WorldWideScience

Sample records for bleeding

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refers to any bleeding that starts in the gastrointestinal tract. Bleeding may come from any site along the GI tract, but is often divided into: Upper GI bleeding: The upper GI tract includes the ...

  2. Bleeding disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can occur when certain factors are low or missing. Bleeding problems can range from mild to severe. Some bleeding disorders are present at birth and are passed through families (inherited). Others develop from: Illnesses such as vitamin ...

  3. Bleeding gums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... periodontal exam. DO NOT use tobacco, since it makes bleeding gums worse. Control gum bleeding by applying pressure directly on the gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water. If you have been diagnosed with a ...

  4. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  5. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Menorrhagia (heavy menstrual bleeding) By Mayo Clinic Staff Menorrhagia is the medical term for menstrual periods with abnormally heavy or prolonged bleeding. Although heavy ...

  6. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J; Adámek, S

    2013-08-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding represents 5% of all cases of bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The cause of this type of bleeding cannot be found by gastroscopy or colonoscopy - the most common cause being bleeding from the source in the small intestine. In other cases it is bleeding from other parts of the digestive tube which has already stopped or was not noticed during admission endoscopy. Imaging methods (X-ray, CT, MRI, scintigraphy) and endoscopic methods (flexible or capsule enteroscopy) are used in the diagnosis and treatment. If, despite having used these methods, the source of bleeding is not found and the bleeding continues, or if the source is known but the bleeding cannot be stopped by radiologic or endoscopic intervention, surgical intervention is usually indicated. The article provides an overview of current diagnostic and treatment options, including instructions on how to proceed in these diagnostically difficult situations.

  7. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding.

  8. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  9. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  10. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  11. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are many causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding. HORMONES Most often, abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. When hormones are the cause, doctors call the problem dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) . DUB is more ...

  12. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Menorrhagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related to pregnancy, such as a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy, can cause abnormal bleeding. A miscarriage is when ... called a fetus) dies in the uterus. An ectopic pregnancy is when a baby starts to grow outside ...

  13. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    This article examines causes of occult, moderate and severe lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The difference in the workup of stable vs unstable patients is stressed. Treatment options ranging from minimally invasive techniques to open surgery are explored.

  14. Avoiding Winter Nose Bleeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    WINTER is the best season for peopleto do cold-endurance exercises. But thedry, windy weather makes the moisturein the nasal mucosa evaporate quickly,reducing the elasticity of capillaries andmaking for frequent nose-bleeds.

  15. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) is defined as abnormal uterine bleeding that results from an ovarian endocrinopathy. It may be associated with ovulatory and anovulatory cycles. The diagnosis of DUB depends on a thorough history and physical examination to exclude organic disorders. In older women, endometrial biopsy should be done before starting therapy. The treatment depends on an understanding of the menstrual cycle. In less urgent cases, anovulatory cycles are managed using progester...

  16. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy.

  17. Bleeding during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ090 “Early Pregnancy Loss”). What is an ectopic pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy occurs when the fertilized egg does not implant ... vaginal bleeding is the only sign of an ectopic pregnancy. Other symptoms may include abdominal, pelvic, or shoulder ...

  18. Approach to the bleeding newborn

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Bleeding in the newborn can lead to serious cardiovascular and neurological effects. Routine administration of vitamin K has reduced the incidence of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, but abnormal bleeding can occur in babies from many causes. A practical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding in the newborn is described in this article.

  19. Platelet function in bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bladel, E.R.

    2013-01-01

    The first bleeding diathesis we studied was hemophilia A. Since FVIII activity level does not always correlate with the bleeding tendency in individual patients, bleeding tendency must also be influenced by other factors. Earlier studies excluded the remaining clotting factors and FVIII genotype as

  20. Story: A Bleeding Watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor bzang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A Bleeding Watermelon was written by Norsang (Nor bzang;b. 1988, a native of Dpa ris (Rab rgyas (Huazangsi 华藏寺 Township, Tianzhu 天祝 Tibetan Autonomous County,Gansu 甘肃 Province. Norsang writes: I heard that a university student opened an elevator door in a campus building still under construction. The elevator shaft was empty and he fell to his death. Many people had questions about his death. This inspired me to write this story.

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding under dabigatran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Stöllberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dabigatran-absorption is dependent on the intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp-system, and P-gp activity is modulated by several drugs. We report an 83-old female with atrial fibrillation who developed gastrointestinal bleeding. She was under a therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID and P-gp-modulating drugs and renal function was impaired. We conclude that NSAID and P-gp-modulating drugs should be avoided in dabigatran-treated patients. If renal function deteriorates the dabigatran-dosage should be reduced or the therapy should be stopped. There is an urgent need to increase knowledge about drug interactions with dabigatran.

  2. Bleeding complications in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding manifestations in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) range from mild skin bruises to life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Severe bleeding is distinctly uncommon when the platelet count is >30 × 10(9)/L and usually only occurs when the platelet count falls administrative databases, the frequency of ICH in patients with ITP is ~0.5% in children and 1.5% in adults. Estimates of severe (non-ICH) bleeding are difficult to obtain because of the lack of standardized case definitions; the lack of a universally accepted, ITP-specific bleeding assessment tool; and the omission of reporting bleeding outcomes in many clinical studies. In practice, the presence of bleeding should dictate whether or not treatment is needed because many patients, especially children, can be safely managed with observation alone. Guiding principles for the management of ITP, based on the bleeding risk are: (1) Decide when treatment is needed and when it can safely be withheld; (2) for patients with chronic ITP, use the least toxic treatment at the lowest dose; (3) emergency treatment of severe thrombocytopenia-associated bleeding requires combination therapy; and (4) early aggressive therapy may result in durable platelet count responses.

  3. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  4. Acute variceal bleeding: general management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Patch; Lucy Dagher

    2001-01-01

    @@ TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR ACUTE VARICEAL BLEEDING Backgound Acute variceal bleeding has a significant mortality which ranges form 5% to 50% in patients with cirrhosis[1].Overall survival is probably improving,because of new therapeutic approaches,and improved medical care.However,mortality is still closely related to failure to control hacmorrhage or carly rebleeding,which is a distinct characteristic of portal hypertensive bleeding and occures in as many as 50% of patients in the first days to 6 weeks after admission et al[2].

  5. Fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens; Johansen, Mathias;

    2013-01-01

    Hypofibrinogenaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but the optimal treatment level, the use of preemptive treatment and the preferred source of fibrinogen remain disputed. Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly used and recommended for bleeding with acquired haemostatic...

  6. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Afshari, Arash; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists throughout Europe to integrate this knowledge into daily patient care wherever possible. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of scientific subcommittees......The aims of severe perioperative bleeding management are three-fold. First, preoperative identification by anamesis and laboratory testing of those patients for whom the perioperative bleeding risk may be increased. Second, implementation of strategies for correcting preoperative anaemia...... and stabilisation of the macro- and microcirculations in order to optimise the patient's tolerance to bleeding. Third, targeted procoagulant interventions to reduce the amount of bleeding, morbidity, mortality and costs. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject...

  7. Bleed Hole Flow Phenomena Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed is an invaluable tool for controlling the airflow in supersonic aircraft engine inlets. Incoming air is decelerated to subsonic speeds prior to entering the compressor via a series of oblique shocks. The low momentum flow in the boundary layer interacts with these shocks, growing in thickness and, under some conditions, leading to flow separation. To remedy this, bleed holes are strategically located to remove mass from the boundary layer, reducing its thickness and helping to maintain uniform flow to the compressor. The bleed requirements for any inlet design are unique and must be validated by extensive wind tunnel testing to optimize performance and efficiency. To accelerate this process and reduce cost, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated an experimental program to study the flow phenomena associated with bleed holes. Knowledge of these flow properties will be incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that will aid engine inlet designers in optimizing bleed configurations before any hardware is fabricated. This ongoing investigation is currently examining two hole geometries, 90 and 20 (both with 5-mm diameters), and various flow features.

  8. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  9. Endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70-80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Diverticular Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Rustagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70–80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  11. [Gastrointestinal bleeding: the role of radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga Gómez, S; Pérez Lafuente, M; Abu-Suboh Abadia, M; Castell Conesa, J

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a diagnostic challenge both in its acute presentation, which requires the point of bleeding to be located quickly, and in its chronic presentation, which requires repeated examinations to determine its etiology. Although the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding is based on endoscopic examinations, radiological studies like computed tomography (CT) angiography for acute bleeding or CT enterography for chronic bleeding are becoming more and more common in clinical practice, even though they have not yet been included in the clinical guidelines for gastrointestinal bleeding. CT can replace angiography as the diagnostic test of choice in acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding, and CT can complement the endoscopic capsule and scintigraphy in chronic or recurrent bleeding suspected to originate in the small bowel. Angiography is currently used to complement endoscopy for the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  12. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander Ahm; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The management of variceal bleeding remains a clinical challenge with a high mortality. Standardisation in supportive and new therapeutic treatments seems to have improved survival within the last 25 years. Although overall survival has improved in recent years, mortality is still closely related...

  13. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    -risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-11-17

    BACKGROUND Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. CASE REPORT A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding.

  15. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GI Bleeding in Children (North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) - PDF Patient Handouts Bleeding esophageal varices (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Bloody or tarry stools (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ...

  16. Abdominal compartment syndrome from bleeding duodenal diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal diverticuli are acquired false diverticuli of unknown etiology. Although mostly asymptomatic, they can occasionally cause upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, rarely with massive bleeding. In this report, we present (to the best of our knowledge the first reported case of duodenal diverticular bleeding, causing abdominal compartment syndrome. Albeit a rare event, duodenal diverticular bleeding should be included in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. As with our case, a multidisciplinary approach to managing such patients is crucial.

  17. An unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C K Adarsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleed often brings the patient to the emergency medical service with great anxiety. Known common causes of GI bleed include ulcers, varices, Mallory-Weiss among others. All causes of GI bleed should be considered however unusual during the evaluation. Aortoenteric fistula (AEF is one of the unusual causes of GI bleed, which has to be considered especially in patients with a history of abdominal surgery in general and aortic surgery in particular.

  18. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preoperative CT-guided percutaneous needle localization of the bleeding small bowel segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Peter; Feuerbach, Stefan; Iesalnieks, Igors; Rockmann, Felix; Wrede, Christian E; Zorger, Niels; Schlitt, Hans J; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Hamer, Okka W

    2009-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Double balloon enteroscopy, angiography, and surgery including intraoperative enteroscopy failed to identify the bleeding site. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) depicted active bleeding of a small bowel segment. The bleeding segment was localized by CT-guided percutaneous needle insertion and subsequently removed surgically.

  19. Role of videocapsule endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Carretero; Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Maite Betes; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as bleeding of an unknown origin that persists or recurs after negative initial upper and lower endoscopies.Several techniques,such as endoscopy,arteriography,scintigraphy and barium radiology are helpful for recognizing the bleeding source;nevertheless,in about 5%-10% of cases the bleeding lesion cannot be determined.The development of videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) has permitted a direct visualization of the small intestine mucosa.We will analyze those techniques in more detail.The diagnostic yield of CE for OGIB varies from 38% to 93%,being in the higher range in those cases with obscure-overt bleeding.

  20. Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency medical services: overview and ground transport. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ... Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ...

  1. The management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Y; Lebreton, G; Le Pennec, V; Hourna, E; Viennot, S; Alves, A

    2014-06-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding is generally less severe than upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding with spontaneous cessation of bleeding in 80% of cases and a mortality of 2-4%. However, unlike UGI bleeding, there is no consensual agreement about management. Once the patient has been stabilized, the main objective and greatest difficulty is to identify the location of bleeding in order to provide specific appropriate treatment. While upper endoscopy and colonoscopy remain the essential first-line examinations, the development and availability of angiography have made this an important imaging modality for cases of active bleeding; they allow diagnostic localization of bleeding and guide subsequent therapy, whether therapeutic embolization, interventional colonoscopy or, if other techniques fail or are unavailable, surgery directed at the precise site of bleeding. Furthermore, newly developed endoscopic techniques, particularly video capsule enteroscopy, now allow minimally invasive exploration of the small intestine; if this is positive, it will guide subsequent assisted enteroscopy or surgery. Other small bowel imaging techniques include enteroclysis by CT or magnetic resonance imaging. At the present time, exploratory surgery is no longer a first-line approach. In view of the lesser gravity of LGI bleeding, it is most reasonable to simply stabilize the patient initially for subsequent transfer to a specialized center, if minimally invasive techniques are not available at the local hospital. In all cases, the complexity and diversity of LGI bleeding require a multidisciplinary collaboration involving the gastroenterologist, radiologist, intensivist and surgeon to optimize diagnosis and treatment of the patient.

  2. AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kishwar; Zarin, Muhammad; Latif, Humera

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (GI) is a serious condition that presents both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. Resuscitation of the patient is the first and most important step in its management followed by measures to localize and treat the exact source and site of bleeding. These modalities are upper and lower GI endoscopies, radionuclide imaging and angiography. Surgery is the last resort to handle the situation, if the patient does not respond to resuscitative measures and the various interventional procedures fail to locate and stop the bleeding. We present a case of upper GI bleeding which presented with massive per rectal bleeding and the patient was not responding to resuscitation with multiple blood transfusions. Ultimately an exploratory laparotomy was done which revealed an extra-intestinal source of bleeding into the lumen of duodenum, presenting as upper GI bleeding.

  3. Factors Associated With Major Bleeding Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Shaun G.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; White, Harvey D.; Paolini, John F.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Breithardt, Gunter; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to report additional safety results from the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation). Background The ROCKET AF trial demonstrated similar risks of stroke/systemic embolism and major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding (principal safety endpoint) with rivaroxaban and warfarin. Methods The risk of the principal safety and component bleeding endpoints with rivaroxaban versus warfarin were compared, and factors associated with major bleeding were examined in a multivariable model. Results The principal safety endpoint was similar in the rivaroxaban and warfarin groups (14.9 vs. 14.5 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.11). Major bleeding risk increased with age, but there were no differences between treatments in each age category (<65, 65 to 74, ≥75 years; pinteraction = 0.59). Compared with those without (n = 13,455), patients with a major bleed (n = 781) were more likely to be older, current/prior smokers, have prior gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, mild anemia, and a lower calculated creatinine clearance and less likely to be female or have a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack. Increasing age, baseline diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were independently associated with major bleeding risk; female sex and DBP <90 mm Hg were associated with a decreased risk. Conclusions Rivaroxaban and warfarin had similar risk for major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding. Age, sex, DBP, prior GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were associated with the risk of major bleeding. (An Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non

  4. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine [Department of Radiology, Hopital Huriez, 1 rue Polonovski, 59037 Lille (France); Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude [Department of Gastroenterology, Hopital Huriez, 1 rue Polonovski, 59037 Lille (France)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  5. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Gachabayov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  6. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  7. Transarterial embolization of acute intercostal artery bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Lee, Seon Joo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chang Jin [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Donga University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Kyimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    To report our experiences of transarterial embolization for acute intercostal artery bleeding. A retrospectively analysis of the causes, clinical manifestations, angiographic findings and transarterial embolization technique in 8 patients with acute intercostal artery bleeding, with a review of the anatomical basis. The causes of intercostal artery bleeding were iatrogenic and traumatic in 88 and 12% of cases, respectively. Active bleeding from the collateral intercostal or posterior intercostal arteries was angiographically demonstrated in 75 and 25% of cases, respectively. Transarterial embolization successfully achieved hemostasis in all cases. However, two patient with hypovolemic shock expired due to a massive hemothorax, despite successful transarterial embolization. Intercostal access should be performed through the middle of the intercostal space to avoid injury to the collateral intercostal artery. Transarterial embolization is an effective method for the control of intercostal artery bleeding.

  8. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding - state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a condition requiring immediate medical intervention, with high associated mortality exceeding 10%. The most common cause of upper GI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, which largely corresponds to the intake of NSAIDs and Helicobacter pylori infection. Endoscopy is the essential tool for the diagnosis and treatment of active upper GI hemorrhage. Endoscopic therapy together with proton pump inhibitors and eradication of Helicobacter pylori significantly reduces rebleeding rates, mortality and number of emergency surgical interventions. This paper presents contemporary data on the diagnosis and treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  9. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  10. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is more common in patients with chronic kidney disease and is associated with higher mortality than in the general population. Blood losses in this patient population can be quite severe at times and it is important to differentiate anemia of chronic diseases from anemia due to GI bleeding. We review the literature on common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGI in chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. We suggest an approach to diagnosis and management of this problem.

  11. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation.

  12. Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Enns

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lower gastrointestinal (LGI bleeding is typically caused by vascular malformations, diverticuli and neoplasia. Although endoscopic evaluation of the colon is relatively standard in stable patients with LGI bleeding, those with significant ongoing hemorrhage are often more difficult to evaluate endoscopically. Other investigative techniques such as nuclear scintigraphy, angiography and surgical exploration have been commonly used in unstable patients with LGI bleeding when the exact site is unknown. These investigative techniques have had variable measures of success. This two-part review evaluates the literature in an attempt to review the optimal investigative approach in patients with LGI hemorrhage, in particular patients who have had significant and ongoing bleeding. Part 1 of this article concentrates on the etiology of LGI hemorrhage, followed in a subsequent article by diagnostic and management strategies. Following the review, a consensus update will be included with guidelines for clinical use.

  13. Fibrinogen concentrate for bleeding - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, J; Stensballe, J; Wikkelsø, A;

    2014-01-01

    Fibrinogen concentrate as part of treatment protocols increasingly draws attention. Fibrinogen substitution in cases of hypofibrinogenaemia has the potential to reduce bleeding, transfusion requirement and subsequently reduce morbidity and mortality. A systematic search for randomised controlled...

  14. Gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillemeier, C.; Gryboski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage in infants and children is a catastrophic event but is not associated with significant mortality except in those with a severe primary illness. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in infants and young children is most often associated with stress ulcers or erosions, but in older children it may also be caused by duodenal ulcer, esophagitis, and esophageal varices. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding may be caused by a variety of lesions among which are infectious colitides...

  15. Angiographic diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Sung, Kyu Bo; Koo, Kyung Hoi; Bae, Tae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    Diagnostic angiographic evaluations were done in 33 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding for recent 5 years at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. On 11 patients of them, therapeutic interventional procedures were made and the results were analysed. 1. In a total of 33 cases, there were 18 cases of upper GI bleeding and 15 cases of lower GI bleeding. The most frequent causes were peptic ulcer in the former and intestinal typhoid fever in the latter. 2. Bleeding sites were localized angiographically in 28 cases, so the detection rate was 85%. Four of the five angiographically negative cases were lower GI bleeding cases. 3. The most frequent bleeding site was left gastric artery (7/33). The next was ileocecal branch of superior mesenteric artery (6/33). 4. Among the 11 interventional procedures, Gelfoam embolization was done in 7 cases and Vasopressin infusion was tried in 4 cases. They were successful in 4 and 3 cases, suggesting 57% and 47% success rates respectively.

  16. ABNORMAL UTERINE BLEEDING IN PERIMENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaji

    2016-06-01

    endometrial carcinoma. Perimenopausal women with heavy or irregular menstrual bleeding should have an endometrial biopsy taken to exclude endometrial disease and early evaluation and diagnosis of the complications of AUB, and thus arrive at timely and effective therapeutic strategies.

  17. Immediate bleeding complications in dental implants: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Balaguer Martí, José Carlos; Peñarrocha Oltra, David; Balaguer Martínez, José; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A review is made of the immediate or immediate postoperative bleeding complications in dental implants, with a view to identifying the areas of greatest bleeding risk, the causes of bleeding, the length of the implants associated with bleeding, the most frequently implicated blood vessels, and the treatments used to resolve these complications. Material and Methods: A Medline (PubMed) and Embase search was made of articles on immediate bleeding complications in dental implants publ...

  18. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  19. Small intestine bleeding due to multifocal angiosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa Zacarias F(o)ohrding; Arne Macher; Stefan Braunstein; Wolfram Trudo Knoefel; Stefan Andreas Topp

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of an 84-year-old male patient with primary small intestinal angiosarcoma.The patient initially presented with anemia and melena.Consecutive endoscopy revealed no signs of upper or lower active gastrointestinal bleeding.The patient had been diagnosed 3 years previously with an aortic dilation,which was treated with a stent.Computed tomography suggested an aorto-intestinal fistula as the cause of the in-testinal bleeding,leading to operative stent explantation and aortic replacement.However,an aorto-intestinal fistula was not found,and the intestinal bleeding did not arrest postoperatively.The constant need for blood transfusions made an exploratory laparotomy imperative,which showed multiple bleeding sites,predominately in the jejunal wall.A distal loop jejunostomy was conducted to contain the small intestinal bleeding and a segmental resection for histological evaluation was performed.The histological analysis revealed a lessdifferentiated tumor with characteristic CD31,cytokeratin,and vimentin expression,which led to the diagnosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma.Consequently,the infiltrated part of the jejunum was successfully resected in a subsequent operation,and adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel was planned.Angiosarcoma of the small intestine is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm that presents with bleeding and high mortality.Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve outcome.A small intestinal angiosarcoma is a challenging diagnosis to make because of its rarity,nonspecific symptoms of altered intestinal function,nonspecific abdominal pain,severe melena,and acute abdominal signs.Therefore,a quick clinical and histological diagnosis and decisive measures including surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy should be the aim.

  20. [Epidemiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Gabon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudong Mbethe, G L; Mounguengui, D; Ondounda, M; Magne, C; Bignoumbra, R; Ntsoumou, S; Moussavou Kombila, J-B; Nzenze, J R

    2014-01-01

    The department of internal medicine of the military hospital of Gabon managed 92 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from April 2009 to November 2011. The frequency of these hemorrhages in the department was 8.2%; they occurred most often in adults aged 30-40 years and 50-60 years, and mainly men (74%). Erosive-ulcerative lesions (65.2%) were the leading causes of hemorrhage, followed by esophageal varices (15.2%). These results underline the importance of preventive measures for the control of this bleeding.

  1. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements.

  2. Acid inhibition and peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štimac, D; Franjić, N; Krznarić, Ž

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common emergency situations in medicine. Combined pharmacological and endoscopic therapy together with emerging interventional radiological procedures are successfully treating peptic ulcer disease, reserving surgical procedures for only a small portion of patients unresponsive to 'conventional' therapy. Technological advancement has seen a great improvement in the field of endoscopic treatment in the form of various methods of hemostasis. However, pharmacological therapy with proton pump inhibitors still plays the central role in the peptic ulcer bleeding treatment algorithm.

  3. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bong; Sik; Matthew; Kim; Bob; T; Li; Alexander; Engel; Jaswinder; S; Samra; Stephen; Clarke; Ian; D; Norton; Angela; E; Li

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is notapparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians.

  4. Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: Variceal and Nonvariceal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is generally defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz, which leads to hematemesis. There are several causes of UGI bleeding necessitating a detailed history to rule out comorbid conditions, medications, and possible exposures. In addition, the severity, timing, duration, and volume of the bleeding are important details to note for management purposes. Despite the source of the bleeding, acid suppression with a proton-pump inhibitor has been shown to be effective in minimizing rebleeding. Endoscopy remains the interventional modality of choice for both nonvariceal and variceal bleeds because it can be diagnostic and therapeutic.

  5. Systemic causes of heavy menstrual bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common problem in fertile women. In addition to local factors, such as a polyp or a uterine fibroid, systemic causes may lead to HMB. These systemic causes are discussed in this thesis. For years, women with HMB were tested underlying thyroid disorder, but our res

  6. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment.

  7. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (pomeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing.

  8. Reoperation for bleeding in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Rauer, Line Juul; Mortensen, Poul Erik;

    2012-01-01

    At Odense University Hospital (OUH), 5-9% of all unselected cardiac surgical patients undergo reoperation due to excessive bleeding. The reoperated patients have an approximately three times greater mortality than non-reoperated. To reduce the rate of reoperations and mortality due to postoperati...

  9. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  10. Correlation of bleeding pattern with endometrial histopathologic results in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Yilmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB is referred as bleeding outside of normal menstruation pattern and it is the most common gynecological problem for women of all ages. This study was evaluated the correlation of menstrual bleeding patterns and endometrial histopathological findings in perimenopausal women. Methods: This study was done on perimenopausal aged women presented with AUB for the last 6 months at a gynecology clinic of a tertiary medical center. Only the patients with isolated endometrial causes of AUB were selected for study. A total of 313 cases were included in the study. Abnormal bleeding patterns of the patients were recorded and endometrial sampling was performed to all women. AUB was classified as menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, polymenorrhea, intermenstrual bleeding, and histopathological findings were classified as Proliferative Endometrium (PE, Secretory Endometrium (SE, Disordered Proliferative Pattern (DPP, Endometrial Polyp (EP, Chronic Endometritis (CE, Endometrial Hyperplasia (EH, and Endometrial Adenocarcinoma (CA. Results: The most common bleeding pattern was menorrhagia (45.0% and the most common histopathological finding was PE+SE (52.0% in our study. PE+SE and endometrial hyperplasia without atypia were found more common in menorrhagia group. The most histopathological findings were found PE+SE in menometrorrhagia and polymenorrhea group (P 0.05. Conclusions: We concluded that although menometrorrhagia and polymenorrhea were significantly more associated with PE+SE, intermenstrual bleeding was significantly more associated with EP and CE. It is noteworthy that endometrial hyperplasia without atypia is significantly higher in patients with menorrhagia which is the most common abnormal bleeding pattern in perimenopausal aged women. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 547-550

  11. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...

  12. Capsule endoscopy: Current status in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Gupta; Nageshwar Duvvuru Reddy

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a safe, non invasive diagnostic modality for the evaluation of small bowel lesions. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is one of the most important indications of capsule endoscopy.Capsule endoscopy has a very high diagnostic yield especially if the bleeding is ongoing. This technique appears to be superior to other techniques for the detection of suspected lesions and the source of bleeding. Capsule endoscopy has been shown to change the outcome in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI)bleed.

  13. Vivax malaria:a rare cause of thalamic bleed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaydeep Sarkar; Biku Naik; Atul Gawande; Atul Goel

    2012-01-01

    Most common cause of thalamic bleed is hypertension; other causes are arteriovenous malformation, aneurysm, bleeding diathesis, drugs, amyloid angiopathy, tumor etc.We present a case ofPlasmodium vivax (P. vivax) malaria with unusual site of bleeding i.e. left thalamus of brain.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of thalamic bleed caused by vivax malaria in absence of severe thrombocytopenia/disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

  14. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women a...

  15. Secondary prophylaxis for esophageal variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albillos, Agustín; Tejedor, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Combination therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the standard prophylaxis of esophageal variceal rebleeding in cirrhosis. Beta-blockers are the backbone of combination therapy, since their benefit extend to other complications of portal hypertension. EBL carries the risk of post-banding ulcer bleeding, which explains why overall rebleeding is reduced when beta-blockers are added to EBL, and not when EBL is added to beta-blockers. TIPS is the rescue treatment, but it could be considered as first choice in patients that first bleed while on beta-blockers, those with contraindications to beta-blockers or with refractory ascites, and those with fundal varices.

  16. The clinicopathological study of postmenopausal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita D.

    2016-11-01

    Results: In patients with post-menopausal bleeding, atrophic endometrium was seen in 31%, proliferative endometrium in 13%, isthmic endometrium in 5%, polyp in 5%, simple hyperplasia without atypia in 35%, simple hyperplasia with atypia in 3%, complex hyperplasia without atypia in 1%, complex hyperplasia with atypia in 1% and endometrial carcinoma in 6% of the patients with PMB. Benign conditions were seen in 94% and malignancy was seen in 6% cases. Conclusions: The most common causes for postmenopausal bleeding were endometrial hyperplasia (40%, atrophic endometrium (31%, isthmic endometrium (5%, polyp (5%, proliferative endometrium (13% and endometrial carcinoma (6%. A definitive diagnosis of PMB can be made by histological evaluation. Obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and age since menopause are the risk factors for PMB. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(11.000: 3671-3674

  17. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...... and feasible, although more time should be allocated for training, and teaching materials should be translated into the local language. Knowledge, skills, and confidence of learners increased significantly immediately after training. However, overall pass rates for skills tests of learners after training were...

  18. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher W; Woods, Amanda G; Cederholm, Carmen K

    2013-12-01

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB), formerly known as hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN), is a bleeding disorder in neonates that is caused by inadequate serum levels of vitamin K. Vitamin K is a nutrient essential for adequate function of the coagulation cascade. Certain internal and external factors place newborn infants at higher risk for VKDB. Therefore, vitamin K prophylaxis has become the standard of care for newborns. Although the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the administration of vitamin K to newborns, some parents are choosing to withhold vitamin K administration at birth. This case study describes an infant who developed VKDB in the absence of vitamin K prophylaxis. Although parents ultimately have the right to choose whether or not to administer vitamin K, as healthcare professionals, it is important to provide education regarding the potential complications of withholding vitamin K and the signs of VKDB if vitamin K prophylaxis at birth is withheld.

  19. Duodenal bleeding from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-04-20

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

  20. Duodenal Bleeding from Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested. PMID:21577373

  1. Duodenal Bleeding from Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Rustagi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

  2. Interventional management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weldon, Derik T.; Burke, Stephen J.; Sun, Shiliang; Mimura, Hidefumi; Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) arises from a number of sources and is a significant cause of hospitalization and mortality in elderly patients. Whereas most episodes of acute LGIB resolve spontaneously with conservative management, an important subset of patients requires further diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention. Endovascular techniques such as microcatheter embolization are now recognized as safe, effective methods for controlling LGIB that is refractory to endoscopic intervention. In addition, multidetector CT has shown the ability to identify areas of active bleeding in a non-invasive fashion, enabling more focused intervention. Given the relative strengths and weaknesses of various diagnostic and treatment modalities, a close working relationship between interventional radiologists, gastroenterologists and diagnostic radiologists is necessary for the optimal management of LGIB patients. (orig.)

  3. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  4. Risk factors for major bleeding in the SEATTLE II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Immad; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Liu, Ping-Yu; Piazza, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis minimizes the risk of intracranial bleeding compared with systemic full-dose fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE). However, major bleeding is nevertheless a potential complication. We analyzed the 150-patient SEATTLE II trial of submassive and massive PE patients to describe those who suffered major bleeding events following ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Major bleeding was defined as GUSTO severe/life-threatening or moderate bleeds within 72 hours of initiation of the procedure. Of the 15 patients with major bleeding, four (26.6%) developed access site-related bleeding. Multiple venous access attempts were more frequent in the major bleeding group (27.6% vs 3.6%; p<0.001). All patients with major bleeding had femoral vein access for device delivery. Patients who developed major bleeding had a longer intensive care stay (6.8 days vs 4.7 days; p=0.004) and longer hospital stay (12.9 days vs 8.4 days; p=0.004). The frequency of inferior vena cava filter placement was 40% in patients with major bleeding compared with 13% in those without major bleeding ( p=0.02). Massive PE (adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.01-12.9; p=0.049) and multiple venous access attempts (adjusted odds ratio 10.09; 95% confidence interval 1.98-51.46; p=0.005) were independently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. In conclusion, strategies for improving venous access should be implemented to reduce the risk of major bleeding associated with ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513759; EKOS Corporation 10.13039/100006522.

  5. Bleeding gums: Duloxetine may be the cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balhara YPS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Duloxetine is a newly introduced drug. It is being prescribed for the management of diabetic neuropathic pain and major depressive disorder. The most frequently observed adverse events with duloxetine are nausea, dry mouth and somnolence, constipation, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, feeling of fatigue, dizziness, somnolence, hypohidrosis, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. One of the patients being prescribed the drug developed bleeding gums on being started with the drug which resolved on stopping it. We hereby report this case.

  6. [Bleeding non-epithelial gastrointestinal neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, V I; Galtsev, A P

    1993-01-01

    Inefficiency of x-ray and endoscopic examinations of a bleeding hollow organ of the gastrointestinal tract may be explained by the effection of its wall with nonepithelial tumor (lipoma, neurinoma, leiomyoma). In some cases only laparotomy and examination of the abdominal cavity succeed in localization of the tumor. Intraoperative cytodiagnosis of nonepithelial benign tumors is a method conducive to sparing surgery (partial resection, dissection).

  7. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Taruna; Parmar, Padam; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst.

  8. Massive rectal bleeding from acquired jejunal diverticula

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Small bowel diverticulosis is an uncommon and often asymptomatic condition that is sporadically observed during radiographic examination or laparotomy. Although it is frequently seen in duodenum, jejunal and ileal locations are very rare. The majority of patients with jejunal diverticula have no symptoms. However, they can present with a number of acute and emergent complications with a high rate of mortality. Bleeding from jejunal diverticula occurs in less than 3% - 8% of patients ...

  9. Bleeding Time, Volume of Shed Blood Collected at the Bleeding Time Site, and the Peripheral Venous Hematocrit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The bleeding time. Prog in Hemostasis and Thrombosis, NY, Grune-Stratton 2:249-271,1974. 2. The bleeding time. The Lancet 1991;337:1447-1448. 3...aggregation. The Lancet 1984;1409-1410. 29. The bleeding-time and the haematocrit. The Lancet May 4; 1984;997-998. 30. Turrito VT,Weiss HJ: Red blood

  10. Endoscopic hemoclip treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung Chih Lai; Sien Sing Yang; Chi Hwa Wu; Tzen Kwan Chen

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic hemoclip in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer.METHODS Totally, 40 patients with F1a and F1b hemorrhagic activity of peptic ulcers were enrolled in this uncontrolled prospective study for endoscopic hemoclip treatment. We used a newly developed rotatable clip-device for the application of hemoclip (MD850) to stop bleeding. Endoscopy was repeated if there was any sign or suspicion of rebleeding, and reclipping was performed if necessary and feasible.RESULTS Initial hemostatic rate by clipping was 95%, and rebleeding rate was only 8%.Ultimate hemostatic rates were 87%, 96%, and 93% in the F1a and F1b subgroups, and total cases, respectively. In patients with shock on admission, hemoclipping achieved ultimate hemostasis of 71% and 83% in F1a and F1b subgroups, respectively. Hemostasis reached 100% in patients without shock regardless of hemorrhagic activity being F1a or F1b. The average number of clips used per case was 3.0 (range 2- 5). Spurting bleeders required more clips on average than did oozing bleeders (3.4 versus 2.8 ). We observed no obvious complications, no tissue injury, or impairment of ulcer healing related to hemoclipping.CONCLUSION Endoscopic hemoclip placement is an effective and safe method. With the improvement of the clip and application device,the procedure has become easier and much more efficient. Endoscopic hemoclipping deserves further study in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers.

  11. The usefulness of MDCT in acute intestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kum Rae; Park, Won Kyu; Kim, Jae Woon; Chang, Jay Chun; Jang, Han Won [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of MDCT for localizing a bleeding site and for helping make a decision on further management for acute intestinal bleeding. We conducted a retrospective review of 17 consecutive patients who presented with acute intestinal bleeding and who also underwent MDCT before angiography or surgery. The sensitivity of MDCT for detecting acute intestinal bleeding was assessed and compared with that of conventional angiography. The sensitivity of MDCT for the detection of acute intestinal bleeding was 77% (13 or 17), whereas that of angiography was 46% (6 or 13). All the bleeding points that were subsequently detected on angiography were visualized on MDCT. In three cases, the bleeding focus was detected on MDCT and not on angiography. In four cases, both MDCT and angiography did not detect the bleeding focus; for one of these cases, CT during SMA angiography was performed and this detected the active bleeding site. In patients with acute intestinal bleeding, MDCT is a useful image modality to detect the bleeding site and to help decide on further management before performing angiography or surgery. When tumorous lesions are detected, invasive angiography can be omitted.

  12. Scintigraphic localisation of colonic bleeding; Scintigrafisk lokalisasjon av colonbloedning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspevik, Ranveig K.; Miskowiak, Jerzy; I Bud, Margreta

    2001-07-01

    Background. Endoscopy and occasionally X-ray studies are used to discover the focus of a gastrointestinal bleeding. Material and methods. We describe a case of severe gastrointestinal bleeding where these methods failed. Scintigraphy after labelling of erythrocytes with 99m technetium was performed in a continuos manner for 60 minutes. Scintigrams were also taken three, ten and 23 hours after the injection. Results. No bleeding was revealed after 60 minutes but two hours later a slight radioactivity was encountered in the right part of the abdomen and the later images localised the bleeding in the right colon. The bleeding ceased after right-sided hemicolectomy. Interpretation. Scintigraphy is of value in localisation of gastrointestinal bleeding and should be performed in a continuos manner until the bleeding focus is localised. Secretion of unbound technetium through the mucosa of the stomach and its presence in the urinary tract should be taken in account.

  13. Endovascular management of acute bleeding arterioenteric fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonhardt, H.; Mellander, S.; Snygg, J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed...... arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered. Patients with cancer may only need treatment for the acute bleeding episode, and an endovascular approach has the advantage...

  14. Somatostatin analogues for acute bleeding oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Hrobjartsson, A.

    2008-01-01

    or recent bleeding from oesophageal varices. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The outcome measures extracted were: mortality, blood transfusions, use of balloon tamponade, initial haemostasis and rebleeding. Intention-to-treat analyses including all randomised patients were conducted if possible; a random...... it was substantially reduced in the other trials, relative risk 0.36 (0.19 to 0.68). Use of balloon tamponade was rarely reported. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The need for blood transfusions corresponded to one half unit of blood saved per patient. It is doubtful whether this effect is worthwhile. The findings do...

  15. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N. Fiorino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA, which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. 123Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine (123MIBG scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and 123MIBG in evaluation and treatment.

  16. [EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF BLEEDING IN PATIENTS TAKING WARFARIN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasolov, N V; Shulutko, E M; Bulanov, A Yu; Yatskov, K V; Shcherbakov, O V

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists (AVK) is an effective treatment and prevention of thrombosis. One of the major disadvantages of the AVK is a risk for serious bleeding. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and vitamin K1 are available for control of these situations. The experience of special team ofthe Scientific Center for Hematology was the basis for presented retrospective study. Three regimens of warfarin-related bleeding were compared: PCC+ VK for several bleeding, FFP+ VK for different clinical situations and VKfor light bleeding. PCC showed himself as effective and safe hemostatic agent. Transfusions of FFP were sometimes not effective, sometimes led to TACO. Supplementation of vitamin K1 for patients of I and II groups provided more stable control of hemostasis. In III group VK vas effective to stop bleeding. Two impotent sings for conclusion: necessary of laboratory monitoring, TEG first of all; individual balance of hemostasis base of bleeding or thrombotic risks.

  17. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: American College of Nurse-Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Variations in uterine bleeding, termed abnormal uterine bleeding, occur commonly among women and often are physiologic in nature with no significant consequences. However, abnormal uterine bleeding can cause significant distress to women or may signify an underlying pathologic condition. Most women experience variations in menstrual and perimenstrual bleeding in their lifetimes; therefore, the ability of the midwife to differentiate between normal and abnormal bleeding is a key diagnostic skill. A comprehensive history and use of the PALM-COEIN classification system will provide clear guidelines for clinical management, evidence-based treatment, and an individualized plan of care. The purpose of this Clinical Bulletin is to define and describe classifications of abnormal uterine bleeding, review updated terminology, and identify methods of assessment and treatment using a woman-centered approach.

  18. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding etiology score for predicting variceal and non-variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supot Pongprasobchai; Sireethorn Nimitvilai; Jaroon Chasawat; Sathaporn Manatsathit

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify clinical parameters, and develop an Upper Gastrointesinal Bleeding (UGIB) Etiology Score for predicting the types of UGIB and validate the score.METHODS: Patients with UGIB who underwent endoscopy within 72 h were enrolled. Clinical and basic laboratory parameters were prospectively collected.Predictive factors for the types of UGIB were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses and were used to generate the UGIB Etiology Score. The best cutoff of the score was defined from the receiver operating curve and prospectively validated in another set of patients with UGIB.RESULTS: Among 261 patients with UGIB, 47 (18%) had variceal and 214 (82%) had non-variceal bleeding.Univariate analysis identified 27 distinct parameters significantly associated with the types of UGIB. Logistic regression analysis identified only 3 independent factors for predicting variceal bleeding;previous diagnosis of cirrhosis or signs of chronic liver disease (OR 22.4, 95% CI 8.3-60.4, P < 0.001), red vomitus (OR4.6, 95% CI 1.8-11.9, P = 0.02), and red nasogastric (NG) aspirate (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.3-8.3, P = 0.011).The UGIB Etiology Score was calculated from (3.1 x previous diagnosis of cirrhosis or signs of chronic liver disease) + (1.5 × red vornitus) + (1.2 × red NG aspirate), when 1 and 0 are used for the presence and absence of each factor, respectively. Using a cutoff ≥ 3.1, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) in predicting variceal bleeding were 85%, 81%,82%, 50%, and 96%, respectively. The score was prospectively validated in another set of 195 UGIB cases (46 variceal and 149 non-variceal bleeding). The PPV and NPV of a score ≥3.1 for variceal bleeding were 79% and 97%, respectively.CONCLUSION: The UGIB Etiology Score, composed of 3 parameters, using a cutoff ≥ 3.1 accurately predicted variceal bleeding and may help to guide the choice of initial therapy for UGIB before endoscopy.

  19. Factors that can minimize bleeding complications after renal biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, M. S.; J. Z. Chen; A.P. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Renal biopsy is a very important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of renal diseases. However, bleeding remains to be one of the most serious complications in this procedure. Many new techniques have been improved to make it safer. The risk factors and predictors of bleeding after percutaneous renal biopsy have been extensively reported in many literatures, and generally speaking, the common risk factors for renal biopsy complications focus on hypertension, high serum creatinine, bleeding dia...

  20. Determination of the Risk of Recurrent Gastroduodenal Ulcer Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in endoscopic haemostasis, the incidence of recurrent ulcer bleeding remains to be high. It necessitates further search for its prognosis and methods of treatment.The objective of the research was to analyse risk factors for recurrent gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding.Materials and methods. The study included 203 patients with gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. There were 135 (66.5%) males and 68 (33.3%) females. All the patients were examined and received conservative treatment ...

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding 30 years after a complicated cholecystectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thorsten; Brechmann; Wolff; Schmiegel; Volkmar; Nicolas; Markus; Reiser

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding from small-bowel varices is a rare and difficult to treat complication of portal hypertension. We describe the case of a 79-year-old female patient with recurrent severe hemorrhage from smallbowel varices 30 years after a complicated cholecystectomy. When double balloon enteroscopy was unsuccessful to reach the site of bleeding, a rendezvous approach was favored with intraoperative endoscopy. Active bleeding from varices within a biliodigestive anastomosis was found and controlled ...

  2. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Scintigraphy in the Early 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Erin

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy performed with (99m)Tc-labeled autologous erythrocytes or historically with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid has been a clinically useful tool since the 1970s. This article reviews the history of the techniques, the different methods of radiolabeling erythrocytes, the procedure, useful indications, diagnostic accuracy, the use of SPECT/CT and CT angiography to evaluate gastrointestinal bleeding, and Meckel diverticulum imaging. The causes of pediatric bleeding are discussed by age.

  3. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding.

  4. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  5. Risk factors for bleeding after endoscopic mucosal resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masatsugu Shiba; Toshio Watanabe; Kazunari Tominaga; Yoshihiro Fujiwara; Tomoshige Hayashi; Kei Tsumura; Tetsuo Arakawa; Kazuhide Higuchi; Kaori Kadouchi; Ai Montani; Kazuki Yamamori; Hirotoshi Okazaki; Makiko Taguchi; Tomoko Wada; Atsushi Itani

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the risk factors for bleeding after endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR).METHODS: A total of 297 consecutive patients who underwent EMR were enrolled. Some of the patients had multiple lesions. Bleeding requiring endoscopic treatment was defined as bleeding after EMR. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), calculated by logistic regression with multivariate adjustments for covariates,were the measures of association.RESULTS: Of the 297 patients, 57 (19.2%) patients with bleeding after EMR were confirmed. With multivariate adjustment, the cutting method of ENR, diameter, and endoscopic pattern of the tumor were associated with the risk of bleeding after ENR. The multivariate-adjusted OR for bleeding after EMR using endoscopic aspiration mucosectomy was 3.07 (95%CI, 1.59-5.92) compared with strip biopsy. The multiple-adjusted OR for bleeding after EMR for the highest quartile (16-50 mm) of tumor diameter was 5.63 (95%CI, 1.84-17.23) compared with that for the lowest (4-7 mm). The multiple-adjusted OR for bleeding after EM R for depressed type of tumor was 4.21 (95%CI, 1.75-10.10) compared with elevated type.CONCLUSION: It is important to take tumor characteristics (tumor size and endoscopic pattern) and cutting method of EMR into consideration in predicting bleeding after ENR.

  6. CERVICAL ECTOPIC PREGNANCY WITH MASSIVE BLEEDING: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavcho Tomov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old patient with cervical ectopic pregnancy (CEP presented as "suspected" cervical mass, and irregular vaginal bleeding was directed to a gynecologic oncologist for consultation. During the examination a massive bleeding occurred. After an unsuccessful attempt to stop the bleeding with a balloon catheter and vaginal tamponade, a total abdominal hysterectomy was performed. The predisposing factors, the differential diagnostic possibilities and the clinical approaches in CEP are discussed. Total abdominal hysterectomy is the procedure of choice for treatment of cervical pregnancy under conditions of urgency and life-threatening bleeding.

  7. Transcatheter arterial embolization in gastric cancer patients with acute bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong-Il; Song, Ho-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-04-15

    The safety and clinical effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization for bleeding associated with unresectable gastric cancer was evaluated. Twenty-three patients with bleeding from unresectable gastric cancer underwent transcatheter arterial embolization. Of the 23 patients, eight showed signs of active bleeding, such as contrast extravasation or pseudoaneurysm, seven showed only tumor staining, and the remaining eight patients showed negative angiographic findings. All embolization procedures were successful without procedure-related complications. In all eight active bleeding patients, immediate hemostasis was achieved. The overall clinical success rate was 52% (12/23). Recurrent bleeding within 1 month occurred in one (8%) in 12 patients with initial clinical success. One patient showed partial splenic infarction after embolization of the splenic artery for active bleeding from the short gastric artery. Overall 30-day mortality rate was 43% (10/23). The median overall survival period was 38 days. In patients with bleeding from unresectable gastric cancer, transcatheter arterial embolization was found to be safe and effective for achieving immediate hemostasis for active bleeding. Although the clinical success rate was not high, the recurrent bleeding rate was low at 1 month post procedure. (orig.)

  8. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  9. Angiography Diagnosis and Treatment of Traumatic Artery Bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; WANG Yan; LIU Jingzhang

    2002-01-01

    Objective After angiography and embolization of three cases suffering from traumatic artery bleeding we summarized the selective embolization of different artery bleeding cases and their treatment analysis. Methods The three cases were all female,among them,one suffering from hepatic artery bleeding by a traffic accident, the other two caused by iatrogenic damage. Of the two, one suffered from bleeding after the gall bladder removal, the other from bleeding after puncture biopsy through the kidney.Seldinger technique was used on the three cases, and puncture intubation was superselected and put through arterial femoralis. Catheters were put separately inside the target blood vessels to have radiography and contrast medium was found to have out flowed out to the bleeding artery. And then the mixed gelatin sponge particles were put into, Ultravist contrast medium to make suspension. Through fluoroscopy the suspension was injected into bleeding artery until no contrast medium out flowed. After that radiography was used to watch the result. Results After the embolization the three cases stopped bleeding at once with remarkable effects. Conclusion Therefore we conclude the embolization is the best method for treating artery bleeding.

  10. Thrombosis and bleeding disorders outside Western countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, P M

    2007-07-01

    The rapidly developing countries of Asia are witnessing substantial progress in the awareness of bleeding and thrombotic disorders as important health care problems. It has been thought for a long time that venous thromboembolism is very rare in Asia. Recent large studies that involved the majority of Asian countries demonstrated that this is not true, so that the practice of not using thromboprophylaxis in high-risk medical and surgical cases should be abandoned. The management of hemophilia and allied coagulation disorders has also dramatically improved in several Asian countries, due to the increased availability of blood products for replacement therapy coupled with the leadership role exerted by a few charismatic physicians, particularly in India and Thailand. As to the future, countries such as China and India have the capacity and expertise in biotechnology to consider the production of recombinant factors and gene transfer as the best strategies to tackle the management of persons with hemophilia in these densely populated and huge countries.

  11. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other...... of statins with UGB were 0.94 (0.78-1.12) for current use, 1.40 (0.89-2.20) for recent use and 1.42 (0.96-2.10) for past use. The lack of effect was consistent across most patient subgroups, different cumulative or current statin doses and different statin substances. In explorative analyses, a borderline...... significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18-1.05)]. CONCLUSION: Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin....

  12. Abnormal uterine bleeding: a clinicohistopathological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupamasuresh Y

    2014-06-01

    Methods: In our prospective study of 359 Patients of the age between 46 and 73 years, clinical characteristics and the pattern of endometrial histopathology and their association in women, who present with abnormal uterine bleeding, are categorised into six groups. Results: In our study, a significant correlation of histopathology and BMI was observed with endometrial hyperplasia and malignancy in obese patient i.e. 37 out 96 and 13 out of 23 respectively. The incidence of malignancy has been increasing with the age being 1.6% in 46-50 years to 60% in 70-75 years. In our study 116 (32.3% had hypertension, 33 patients (9.2% had diabetes mellitus, 40 patients (11.1% had hypothyroidism. Conclusions: We found a maximum incidence of AUB in multiparous women. Clinicohistopathological analysis of AUB revealed endometrial hyperplasia in majority of patients. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(3.000: 656-661

  13. [Clinical pathway for bleeding peptic ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuki, Akira; Tatemichi, Masayuki; Nikaido, Mitsuhiro; Hosoe, Naoki; Funakoshi, Sinsuke; Fukui, Kazuto; Maeda, Norio; Shigematsu, Takeharu; Nishiya, Hiromi; Hayashi, Tatsuhiko; Nagata, Hiroshi; Hibi, Norifumi; Tsukada, Nobuhiro

    2006-03-01

    We devised and evaluated a clinical pathway (CP) protocol for patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (BPU). Patients without severe comorbidities, who had been diagnosed with BPU and who had undergone endoscopic treatment, were enrolled in our study. The CP adaptation rate for BPU patients was 78.8% (89/113). The variance rate was 13.5% (12/89). The median length of admission was 10.0 +/- 4.6 days (n = 78) before and 7.4 +/- 2.9 days (n = 77) after introducing CP. Our CP for BPU was safe and resulted in shorter hospital stays and, therefore, cost reductions. In elder patients, our CP was also successful, but the variance rate was higher than in younger patients.

  14. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  15. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Cathy; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2014-11-21

    Background Tranexamic acid reduces haemorrhage through its antifibrinolytic effects. In a previous version of the present review, we found that tranexamic acid may reduce mortality. This review includes updated searches and new trials.Objectives To assess the effects of tranexamic acid versus no intervention, placebo or other antiulcer drugs for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.Search methods We updated the review by performing electronic database searches (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index) and manual searches in July 2014.Selection criteriaRandomised controlled trials, irrespective of language or publication status.Data collection and analysis We used the standard methodological procedures of the The Cochrane Collaboration. All-cause mortality, bleeding and adverse events were the primary outcome measures. We performed fixed-effect and random-effects model meta-analyses and presented results as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used I² as a measure of between-trial heterogeneity. We analysed tranexamic acid versus placebo or no intervention and tranexamic acid versus antiulcer drugs separately. To analyse sources of heterogeneity and robustness of the overall results, we performed subgroup, sensitivity and sequential analyses.Main results We included eight randomised controlled trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Additionally, we identified one large ongoing pragmatic randomised controlled trial from which data are not yet available. Control groups were randomly assigned to placebo (seven trials) or no intervention (one trial). Two trials also included a control group randomly assigned to antiulcer drugs(lansoprazole or cimetidine). The included studies were published from 1973 to 2011. The number of participants randomly assigned ranged from 47 to 216 (median 204). All trials reported mortality. In total, 42 of 851 participants randomly assigned to

  16. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P. (Saint James' s Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-10-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author).

  17. Role of endoscopy in the management of acute diverticular bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charalampos Pilichos; Emmanouil Bobotis

    2008-01-01

    Colonic diverticulosis is one of the most common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopy is not only a useful diagnostic tool for localizing the bleeding site, but also a therapeutic modality for its management. To date, haemostatic methods have included adrenaline injection, mechanical clipping, thermal and electrical coagulation or combinations of them. The results of all published data are herein reviewed.

  18. Hemospray treatment is effective for lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holster, I.L.; Brullet, E.; Kuipers, E.J.; Campo, R.; Fernandez-Atutxa, A.; Tjwa, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is diverse in origin and can be substantial, requiring urgent hemostasis. Hemospray is a promising novel hemostatic agent for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). It has been claimed in a small series that the use of Hemospray is also feasible in LGIB.

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Arora

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: A woman is considered menopausal after 12 months of amenorrhea. The most feared symptom during menopause is postmenopausal bleeding which unless proved otherwise indicates genital malignancy. Objectives: To study Socio-demographic factors related to postmenopausal bleeding and to find time lapse between bleeding and reporting of these cases. Material and Methods: This cross sectional was done in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Pt. J. N. M. Medical College & DR. B. R. Ambedkar Memorial, Hospital, Raipur (C. G. The participants were 146 women who came with the complaint of postmenopausal bleeding. A detailed, preceded, pre-tested, structured, close ended questionnaire was used to collect the data. By interviewing these women, information was collected about different demographic factors like age, socio-economic status, parity etc. The collected data was put in the master chart and analyzed. Results: The proportion of postmenopausal bleeding cases was 3.5% .Maximum cases(50% with postmenopausal bleeding were found in the age group of 45-54yrs . 60 % of patients were from rural areas and 62% were illiterate. 65% of the patients were grand multipara (Parity4. Most of the patients belonged to lower socioeconomic strata. Almost half (48% of patients presented after, more than 6 months since the first episode of bleeding . Conclusions: The proportion of postmenopausal bleeding is high, requiring immediate investigation. Lack of awareness led to very late presentation of most of the patients, so education at community level is required to reduce this time lapse for earlier diagnosis and management

  20. Recombinant activated factor VII for uncontrolled bleeding postcardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Makram Habib

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: In this analysis, rFVIIa succefully reduced the chest tube bleeding and blood products transfused during severe post cardiac surgical bleeding. However, safety of rFVIIa remains unclear. Prospective controlled trials are still needed to confirm the role of rFVIIa.

  1. Jejunal diverticulosis as the obscure cause of overt gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyin, L Y; Zainun, A R; Tee, H P

    2011-08-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare gastrointestinal condition manifested as benign outpouching from the jejunal wall. It is usually asymptomatic, but may present as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. This condition is often found incidentally in the imaging work-up of patients with other gastrointestinal conditions. We present a case of jejunal diverticulosis in a 65-year-old gentleman with obscure overt gastrointestinal bleed.

  2. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system. The engine must supply bleed air without adverse effect on the engine, excluding reduced thrust or...

  3. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  4. The Mechanisms of Abnormal Bleeding in Patients with Anovulatory Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu LUO; Feng-chuan ZHU; Yao-ying ZENG

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanisms of abnormal bleeding in patients with anovulatory dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) and to analyze the correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and microvessel density in the endometrium Materials & Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to study the expression of VEGF protein in the proliferative and hyperplastic endometrium. CD34 ,a marker of microvessel, was selected to measure microvessel density (MVD) in the endometrium.Fifteen women who were found to have no condition with normal menstrual cycles were set as control group.Results VEGF immunoreactivity in glandular epithelia cells was significantly lower in the hyperplastic endometrium than that of controls(P < 0. 05). There was no significant difference in VEGF protein level between proliferative DUB endometrium and that of controls. A positive correlation was found between glandular VEGF and MVD in the endometrium(r=0. 666, P<0.05). Conclusion The anovulatory DUB is associated with down-regulation of VEGF in the endometrium, and decreased secretion of VEGF will result in the disruption of angiogenesis, as a clinical manifestation of irregular bleeding.

  5. Acoustic resonance phenomena in air bleed channels in aviation engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksentsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The existence of axial-radial acoustic resonance oscillations of the basic air flow in bleed channels of aviation engines is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Numerical and analytical methods are used to determine the frequency of acoustic resonance oscillations for the lowest modes of open and closed bleed channels of the PS-90A engine. Experimental investigations reveal new acoustic resonance phenomena arising in the air flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of this engine owing to instability of the basic air flow. The results of numerical, analytical, and experimental studies of the resonance frequencies reached in the flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of the PS-90A engine are found to be in reasonable agreement. As a result, various types of resonance oscillations in bleed channels can be accurately described.

  6. Diagnosis and management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owensby, Susan; Taylor, Kellee; Wilkins, Thad

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon but potentially serious, life-threatening condition in children. Rapid assessment, stabilization, and resuscitation should precede all diagnostic modalities in unstable children. The diagnostic approach includes history, examination, laboratory evaluation, endoscopic procedures, and imaging studies. The clinician needs to determine carefully whether any blood or possible blood reported by a child or adult represents true upper gastrointestinal bleeding because most children with true upper gastrointestinal bleeding require admission to a pediatric intensive care unit. After the diagnosis is established, the physician should start a proton pump inhibitor or histamine 2 receptor antagonist in children with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Consideration should also be given to the initiation of vasoactive drugs in all children in whom variceal bleeding is suspected. An endoscopy should be performed once the child is hemodynamically stable.

  7. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio; Damián; Sánchez-Capilla; Paloma; De; La; Torre-Rubio; Eduardo; Redondo-Cerezo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem.

  8. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M., E-mail: waly.pr@duke.edu [Duke University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Niemeyer, Matthew M. [Washington University Medical Center, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Dasika, Narasimham L., E-mail: narasimh@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  9. Genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Lin Perng; Hwai-Jeng Lin; Wen-Ching Lo; Guan-Ying Tseng; I-Chen Sun; Yueh-Hsing Ou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pyloricauses chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer,gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma. Different genotypes of Helicobacter pylori are confirmed from diverse geographic areas. Its association with bleeding peptic ulcer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the Helicobacter pylori vac4 alleles, cagA and iceA in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer.METHODS: We enrolled patients with bleeding, nonbleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the antrum of the stomach for rapid urease test, bacterial culture and PCR assay. DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction were used to detect the presence or absence of cagA and to assess the polymorphism of vac4 and iceA.RESULTS: A total of 168 patients (60.4%) (25 patients with chronic gastritis, 26 patients with bleeding gastric ulcer,51 patients with non-bleeding gastric ulcer, 26 patients with bleeding duodenal ulcer, and 40 patients with non-bleeding duodenal ulcer) were found to have positive PCR results between January 2001 and December 2002. Concerning genotypes, we found cagA (139/278, 50%), vacA s1a (127/278, 45.7%), and iceA1 (125/278, 45%) predominated in all studied patients. In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers,vac4 s1a and m1T were fewer than those in patients with non-bleeding peptic ulcers (37/106 vs69/135, P=0.017, and 4/106 vs21/135, P=0.002).CONCLUSION: In patients with peptic ulcers, Hpylori vacA s1a and m1T prevent bleeding complication.

  10. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease: Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Yvonne V.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P.; van der Bom, Johanna G.; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J.; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large co

  11. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease : Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Yvonne V.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P.; van der Bom, Johanna G.; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J.; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large co

  12. The prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in patients with heavy menstrual bleeding with and without gynecologic abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, H. Marieke; Mulder, Andre; Bogchelman, Dick H.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Meijer, Karina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) with and without gynecologic abnormalities. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a single-center prospective cohort study of 112 consecutive patients who were referre

  13. Severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding in extraluminal diverticula in the third part of the duodenum

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The successful management of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding requires identification of the source of bleeding and when this is achieved the bleeding can often be treated endoscopically. However, the identification of the bleeding can be challenging due to the location of the bleeding or technical aspects. Therefore it might be necessary to use other measures than endoscopy such as CT angiography. Duodenal diverticula is a rare cause of upper GI bleeding and can be challenging to diagnos...

  14. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures.

  15. The evaluation and management of obscure and occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common clinical presentation increasing in an aging population, frequently requiring hospitalization and emergent intervention, with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. It may manifest overtly as hematemesis, melena, or hematochezia, or as an asymptomatic occult bleed. Management typically involves an esophagogastroduodenoscopy or a colonoscopy; these in combination sometimes do not identify a source of bleeding, with the source remaining obscure. Further work up to identify an obscure source frequently requires radiologically detecting the leakage of an intravascular tracer (using tagged red blood cells or angiography) with brisk bleeding or in other cases CT enterography (CTE) to detect bowel wall changes consistent with a bleeding source. Recent advances including capsule endoscopy, CTE, and double-balloon endoscopy have helped to identify bleeding sources beyond the reach of conventional endoscopy. Clinical decision-making about their use is complex and evolving. Knowing their relative merits and weaknesses including yield, contraindications, complications, and cost is essential in coming up with an appropriate management plan. This review covers the rationale for clinical management of obscure sources of GI bleeding, mentioning the approach to and the yield of conventional methods, with an emphasis on the recent advances mentioned above.

  16. Intraoperative bleeding control by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Stupnik, Tomaz; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes; Velasco, Carlos; Yang, Yang; Lee, Wentao; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Owing to advances in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), the majority of pulmonary resections can currently be performed by VATS in a safe manner with a low level of morbidity and mortality. The majority of the complications that occur during VATS can be minimized with correct preoperative planning of the case as well as careful pulmonary dissection. Coordination of the whole surgical team is essential when confronting an emergency such as major bleeding. This is particularly important during the VATS learning curve, where the occurrence of intraoperative complications, particularly significant bleeding, usually ends in a conversion to open surgery. However, conversion should not be considered as a failure of the VATS approach, but as a resource to maintain the patient's safety. The correct assessment of any bleeding is of paramount importance during major thoracoscopic procedures. Inadequate management of the source of bleeding may result in major vessel injury and massive bleeding. If bleeding occurs, a sponge stick should be readily available to apply pressure immediately to control the haemorrhage. It is always important to remain calm and not to panic. With the bleeding temporarily controlled, a decision must be made promptly as to whether a thoracotomy is needed or if the bleeding can be solved through the VATS approach. This will depend primarily on the surgeon's experience. The operative vision provided with high-definition cameras, specially designed or adapted instruments and the new sealants are factors that facilitate the surgeon's control. After experience has been acquired with conventional or uniportal VATS, the rate of complications diminishes and the majority of bleeding events are controlled without the need for conversion to thoracotomy.

  17. Transvaginal Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Karen C; Goldstein, Steven R

    2017-03-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound is the first-line imaging test for the evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Transvaginal ultrasound can be used to diagnose structural causes of abnormal bleeding such as polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyomas, hyperplasia, and malignancy, and can also be beneficial in making the diagnosis of ovulatory dysfunction. Traditional 2-dimensional imaging is often enhanced by the addition of 3-dimension imaging with coronal reconstruction and saline infusion sonohysterography. In this article we discuss specific ultrasound findings and technical considerations useful in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding.

  18. Therapeutic Options for Patients Bleeding with Peptic Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available It is likely that the best outcome for the patient with an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (GIB includes early diagnosis: for a bleeding lesion with a high risk of rebleeding, in an older patient with systolic h.ypotension or in a person with multiple medical problems. Early therapeutic endoscopy with meticulous control of intragastric pH will Likely achieve the best outcome. The ideal pH criterion to stop bleeding or to prevent recurrence is unknown. An algorithm is presented to guide the clinical management of patients with GIB, and to focus on important questi.ons for future therapeutic studies.

  19. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF PREGNANCY WITH BLEEDING PER VAGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study of 150 patients presenting with bleeding per vagina in first, second & third trimester was conducted to evaluate the cause of bleeding, access the severity of condition, to predict the later coarse of pregnancy & to evaluate the role of ultrasonography in management. This study was conducted in department of Radiology at Basaweshwar Teaching & General hospital, Government general hospital & Sangameshwer teaching & General hospital. This study concludes that, Ultrasonography should be the first line of investigation in all the cases of bleeding per vagina in pregnancy

  20. Splenic duplication: a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Alkadhi, Hatem; Gubler, Christoph; Bauerfeind, Peter; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency. We report the rare case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by varices in the gastric fundus secondary to splenic duplication. Splenic duplication has been only rarely reported in the literature, and no case so far has described the associated complication of gastrointestinal bleeding, caused by venous drainage of the upper spleen via varices in the gastric fundus. We describe the imaging findings from endoscopy, endosonography, computed tomography (CT), flat-panel CT, and angiography in this rare condition and illustrate the effective role of intra-arterial embolization.

  1. Assessment of bleeding disorders in Sheehan's syndrome: are bleeding disorders the underlying cause of Sheehan's syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Deniz; Tuzcu, Alpaslan; Bahceci, Mithat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Erdemoglu, Mahmut; Alpagat, Gulistan

    2011-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is an adenopituitary insufficiency caused by hypovolemia secondary to excessive blood loss during or after childbirth. However, the mechanism of postpartum hemorrhage and ischemia is not clear. We aimed to evaluate the bleeding disorders among patients with SS, in comparison with healthy controls. In addition, we investigated underlying causes in postpartum hemorrhage that begin the event. The present study was conducted at the Dicle University School of Medicine. Forty-eight patients with SS and 50 age-matched female healthy controls were included. Biochemical and hormonal variables were measured, as was platelet function by means of closure times (PFA-100 testing using collagen plus epinephrine and collagen plus ADP), von Willebrand factor (vWF) level, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), international normalized ratio (INR), and coagulation factors. Although PT and INR were significantly higher in patients with SS (both P<0.01), aPTT and levels of fibrinogen, vWF, and factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII did not differ significantly. Closure times with collagen/epinephrine and collagen/ADP also did not differ significantly between patients with SS and control patients. The nonspecific etiology and presence of excessive postpartum hemorrhage in patients with SS suggest that coagulation disorders may play a role in their predisposition to bleeding. The increased PT and INR noted might implicate bleeding diathesis as the underlying etiology, although no significant decreases were noted in factor levels. Further studies are needed to elucidate this complex mechanism of this disorder.

  2. Endoscopic Management of Nonvariceal, Nonulcer Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjwa, E.T.; Holster, I.L.; Kuipers, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common emergency condition in gastroenterology. Although peptic ulcer and esophagogastric varices are the predominant causes, other conditions account for up to 50% of UGIBs. These conditions, among others, include angiodysplasia, Dieulafoy and Mall

  3. Modern issues on the treatment of peptic ulcer bleedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potakhin S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of therapeutic treatment of peptic ulcer and the introduction of endoscopic technologies, the problem of peptic ulcer hemorrhage remains valid. A large number of publications in foreign literature are dedicated to epidemiology and prevention of bleeding, evaluation of modern tactics and search for new methods of treatment. The works relating to organization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding are of particular interest. According to the recent data not all clinics even in economically developed countries manage to follow the recommendations of an international consensus-2010 for non-variceal bleeding treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract. Among the causes of non-compliance of international recommendations there are subjective and objective factors, the understanding of which can significantly affect the optimization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding.

  4. Pregnancy Complications: Bleeding and Spotting from the Vagina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miscarry have bleeding or spotting before the miscarriage. Ectopic pregnancy. This is when a fertilized egg implants itself ... of the uterus and begins to grow. An ectopic pregnancy cannot result in the birth of a baby. ...

  5. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  6. Factors that can minimize bleeding complications after renal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M S; Chen, J Z; Xu, A P

    2014-10-01

    Renal biopsy is a very important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of renal diseases. However, bleeding remains to be one of the most serious complications in this procedure. Many new techniques have been improved to make it safer. The risk factors and predictors of bleeding after percutaneous renal biopsy have been extensively reported in many literatures, and generally speaking, the common risk factors for renal biopsy complications focus on hypertension, high serum creatinine, bleeding diatheses, amyloidosis, advanced age, gender and so on. Our primary purpose of this review is to summarize current measures in recent years literature aiming at minimizing the bleeding complication after the renal biopsy, including the drug application before and after renal biopsy, operation details in percutaneous renal biopsies, nursing and close monitoring after the biopsy and other kinds of biopsy methods.

  7. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimi, Mircelal; Ulas, Murat; Ibis, Cem; Unver, Mutlu; Ozsan, Nazan; Yilmaz, Funda; Ersoz, Galip; Zeytunlu, Murat; Kilic, Murat; Coker, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19178725

  8. Evaluation and Management of Adolescents with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Tanya L Kowalczyk; Miller, Rachel J; Mullins, Eric S

    2015-09-01

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists support the use of new terminology for abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) to consistently categorize AUB by etiology. The term AUB can be further classified as AUB/heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) (replacing the term "menorrhagia") or AUB/intermenstrual bleeding (replacing the term "metrorrhagia"). Although many cases of AUB in adolescent women are attributable to immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, underlying bleeding disorders should be considered in women with AUB/HMB. This article reviews the new terminology for AUB, discusses important relevant features of history and examination, presents the laboratory evaluation of HMB, and describes hormonal (oral contraceptive pills, progestin-only methods, long-acting reversible contraceptives including intrauterine systems), hematologic (tranexamic acid and desmopressin), and surgical management options for AUB/HMB.

  9. Recent trends of study on esophageal variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Liu-fang; LI Chang-zheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB), a severe complication and main mortality cause of portal hypertension, had reached a relatively mature stage in its research. The mortality rate of EVB within 5 days showed decreased tendency in recent years, which may be due to wide adoption of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS).1 Endoscopic treatment had been widely used because of its simple procedure, high hemostasis rate and low recurrent bleeding rate, and had become a main measure in cease of first episode and prevention of recurrent bleeding. The technique of endoscopic procedures had less progress in the last 5 years. Recent studies on EVB mainly focused on further improvement of clinical outcome, including primary prevention by EVL, selection and combination of different hemostatic measures, minimizing complications, better long-term management and forecast of bleeding risk.

  10. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  11. Challenges in the management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, James Y W; Barkun, Alan; Fan, Dai-ming; Kuipers, Ernst J; Yang, Yun-sheng; Chan, Francis K L

    2013-06-08

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency worldwide, a major cause of which are bleeding peptic ulcers. Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors are cornerstones in the management of the disease, and both treatments have been shown to reduce mortality. The role of emergency surgery continues to diminish. In specialised centres, radiological intervention is increasingly used in patients with severe and recurrent bleeding who do not respond to endoscopic treatment. Despite these advances, mortality from the disorder has remained at around 10%. The disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities who use antiplatelet agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anticoagulants. The management of such patients, especially those at high cardiothrombotic risk who are on anticoagulants, is a challenge for clinicians. We summarise the published scientific literature about the management of patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, identify directions for future clinical research, and suggest how mortality can be reduced.

  12. Clinical approach to the patient with unexpected bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, J M

    2000-10-01

    Bleeding can be considered unexpected if it is disproportionate to the intensity of the haemostatic stress in a patient with no known haemorrhagic disorder or if it occurs in a patient in whom a bleeding disorder has been characterized but is adequately treated. A thorough history usually allows the clinician to predict reasonably accurately whether the patient is likely to have a systemic haemostatic defect (and if so whether it is congenital or acquired), or whether the bleeding likely has a purely anatomical basis. The nature of bleeding is instructive with respect to preliminary categorization. Thus, mucocutaneous bleeding suggests defects of primary haemostasis (disordered platelet-vascular interactions). Bleeding into deeper structures is more suggestive of coagulation defects leading to impaired fibrin clot formation, and delayed bleeding after primary haemostasis is characteristic of hyperfibrinolysis. Localized bleeding suggests an anatomical cause, although an underlying haemostatic defect may coexist. Where bleeding is so acutely threatening as to require urgent intervention, diagnosis and treatment must proceed simultaneously. In the case of minor haemorrhage (not threatening to life or limb) it may be preferable to defer therapy while the nature of the bleeding disorder is methodically investigated. Initial laboratory evaluation is guided by the preliminary clinical impression. The amount of blood loss can be inferred from the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration, and the platelet count will quickly identify cases in which thrombocytopenia is the likely cause of bleeding. In the latter instance, examination of the red cell morphology, leucocyte differential, and mean platelet volume may allow the aetiological mechanism to be presumptively identified as hypoproliferative or consumptive. With regard to coagulation testing, the activated PTT, prothrombin time, and thrombin time usually constitute an adequate battery of screening tests, unless the

  13. Transarterial embolization for management of severe postcoital bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Eskandari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Postcoital bleeding is an uncommon cause of gynecologic hemorrhage; however, it can be severe in a majority of cases necessitating surgical management. Methods: We report a case of severe postcoital bleeding in a young woman requiring blood transfusion. Results: Hemostasis was achieved using subselective embolization of cervical artery by metallic coils. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates a minimally invasive treatment for control of non-obstetric hemorrhage.

  14. Trends in acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju-Yeh; Lee, Tsung-Chun; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Paik, Jane; Chertow, Glenn M; Desai, Manisha; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2012-03-01

    Impaired kidney function is a risk factor for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, an event associated with poor outcomes. The burden of upper GI bleeding and its effect on patients with ESRD are not well described. Using data from the US Renal Data System, we quantified the rates of occurrence of and associated 30-day mortality from acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding in patients undergoing dialysis; we used medical claims and previously validated algorithms where available. Overall, 948,345 patients contributed 2,296,323 patient-years for study. The occurrence rates for upper GI bleeding were 57 and 328 episodes per 1000 person-years according to stringent and lenient definitions of acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding, respectively. Unadjusted occurrence rates remained flat (stringent) or increased (lenient) from 1997 to 2008; after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid conditions, however, we found a significant decline for both definitions (linear approximation, 2.7% and 1.5% per year, respectively; Pupper GI bleeding episodes and were more likely to receive blood transfusions during an episode. Overall 30-day mortality was 11.8%, which declined significantly over time (relative declines of 2.3% or 2.8% per year for the stringent and lenient definitions, respectively). In summary, despite declining trends worldwide, crude rates of acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding among patients undergoing dialysis have not decreased in the past 10 years. Although 30-day mortality related to upper GI bleeding declined, perhaps reflecting improvements in medical care, the burden on the ESRD population remains substantial.

  15. Overlooked problem of laparoscopic surgery: trocar site bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Oguzhan Dincel; Fatih Basak; Erdem Kinaci

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Trocar site bleeding is a complication which can be overlooked and prevented if pay attention. It can lead to unwanted problems during surgery if not noticed. In our study, we aimed to investigate the problem that can be seen in every laparoscopic surgery. Material and Methods: We reviewed the cases who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our clinic between September 2012 - September 2015. Patients with trocar site bleeding after surgery were enrolled into the study. Demogra...

  16. Overlooked problem of laparoscopic surgery: trocar site bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Dincel, Oğuzhan; Başak, Fatih; Kınacı, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Trocar site bleeding is a complication which can be overlooked and prevented if pay attention. It can lead to unwanted problems during surgery if not noticed. In our study, we aimed to investigate the problem that can be seen in every laparoscopic surgery.Material and Methods: We reviewed the cases who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our clinic between September 2012 - September 2015. Patients with trocar site bleeding after surgery were enrolled into the study. Demographic...

  17. Endoscopic Removal of an Unusual Foreign Body Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karaman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body ingestion is a condition more common in the pediatric population than in adults. In adults, although foreign body ingestion can be well tolerated, approximately 10–20% of patients require endoscopic intervention. Delayed diagnosis and unremoved foreign bodies can cause serious and fatal complications including perforation, fistula and gastrointestinal bleeding. Here we report a patient with bleeding duodenal ulcer thought to be initiated by a large foreign body.

  18. Appendicular bleeding: an excepcional cause of lower hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Magaz-Martínez

    Full Text Available Chronic complications of acute appendicitis managed in a conservative manner are not frequent. We present a case of acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a young patient with a previous acute appendicitis without surgical intervention. The colonoscopy detected an appendicular bleeding which was surgically treated. The anatomopathological diagnosis was granulomatous appendicitis. The clinical evolution of the patient was favorable without bleeding recurrence. Appendicular hemorrhage can be an unusual complication -however potentially severe- of acute appendicitis not treated surgically.

  19. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic an...

  20. Fibrinogen concentrates for bleeding trauma patients: what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Martin; Ostrowski, S R; Windeløv, N A;

    2011-01-01

    A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions.......A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions....

  1. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Panikkath, Ragesh; Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up.

  2. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  3. Double-balloon enteroscopy in detecting small intestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Fa-chao; PAN De-shou; ZHOU Dian-yuan; XIAO Bing; JIANG Bo; WAN Tian-mo; GUO Yu; ZHOU Dan; WANG Li-hui; CHEN Jin-feng; XIE Lu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Digestive tract hemorrhage is a common disease of the digestive system, but about 0.4%-5% intestinal bleeding can not be detected with gastroscope or colonscope.1 Since the intestine is long, tortuous, far away from both ends of the digestive tract and unfixed in position, clinical diagnosis of the bleeding is relatively difficult. Yamamoto and Sugano2 reported the clinical application of double-balloon enteroscope at American DDW in 2003.

  4. Fallot′s tetralogy presenting with variceal bleed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejariwal D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The erythrocytosis of Fallot′s tetralogy may lead to spontaneous thrombosis at any site, but splenic vein thrombosis and variceal bleed is rarely a presentation of Fallot′s tetralogy. A case of a 48 years old female with undiagnosed Fallot′s tetralogy, presenting with variceal bleed due to splenic vein thrombosis, is reported. It is also interesting to note that the patient survived till this age without any medical or surgical treatment.

  5. Pharmacologic Agents in the Management of Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    patients with mild congenital and well as vitamin K in patients with cirrn-,sis. The use of acquired bleeding disorders. Despite intensive screen- DDAVP and...induce hemostasis during surgical pro- Moderate doses of aspirin 0 2 or drugs such as diphen- cedures such as renal biopsies. hydramine and diazepam ...Harris AS, Sjorin E, Nilsson IM. Intranasal andmnfor congenital an acquired bleeding disorders. Blood intravenous administration of desmopressin

  6. Therapeutic angiography for giant bleeding gastro-duodenal artery pseudoaneurysm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ram; Elazary; Mahmoud; Abu-Gazala; Avraham; Schlager; Noam; Shussman; Avraham; I; Rivkind; Allan; I; Bloom

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of an 18-year-old female transferred to our center from an outside hospital due to persistent gastrointestinal bleeding. Two weeks prior to her transfer she underwent duodenal omentopexy for a perforated duodenal peptic ulcer. The patient underwent a computed tomography angiogram which identified the source of bleeding as a giant gastroduodenal artery (GDA) pseudoaneurysm. The patient was taken to interventional radiology where successful microcoil embolization was performed. We present ...

  7. Abnormal uterine bleeding in reproductive-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michelle L

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common medical condition with several causes. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics published guidelines in 2011 to develop universally accepted nomenclature and a classification system. In addition, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recently updated recommendations on evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding and indications for endometrial biopsies. This article reviews both medical and surgical treatments, including meta-analysis reviews of the most effective treatment options.

  8. Practical Approach to Endoscopic Management for Bleeding Gastric Varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Young Suk [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Bleeding from gastric varices is generally more severe than bleeding from esophageal varices, although it occurs less frequently. Recently, new endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have broadened the therapeutic armamentarium for gastric varices. This review provides an overview of the classification and pathophysiology of gastric varices, an introduction to current endoscopic and interventional radiological management options for gastric varices, and details of a practical approach to endoscopic variceal obturation using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

  9. Liquefied Bleed for Stability and Efficiency of High Speed Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, J. David; Davis, David; Barsi, Stephen J.; Deans, Matthew C.; Weir, Lois J.; Sanders, Bobby W.

    2014-01-01

    A mission analysis code was developed to perform a trade study on the effectiveness of liquefying bleed for the inlet of the first stage of a TSTO vehicle. By liquefying bleed, the vehicle weight (TOGW) could be reduced by 7 to 23%. Numerous simplifying assumptions were made and lessons were learned. Increased accuracy in future analyses can be achieved by: Including a higher fidelity model to capture the effect of rescaling (variable vehicle TOGW). Refining specific thrust and impulse models ( T m a and Isp) to preserve fuel-to-air ratio. Implementing LH2 for T m a and Isp. Correlating baseline design to other mission analyses and correcting vehicle design elements. Implementing angle-of-attack effects on inlet characteristics. Refining aerodynamic performance (to improve L/D ratio at higher Mach numbers). Examining the benefit with partial cooling or densification of the bleed air stream. Incorporating higher fidelity weight estimates for the liquefied bleed system (heat exchange and liquid storage versus bleed duct weights) could be added when more fully developed. Adding trim drag or 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory analysis for higher fidelity. Investigating vehicle optimization for each of the bleed configurations.

  10. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erwin; Biecker

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding(UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions,erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor(PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application(oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased.

  11. Congenital portosystemic shunts with and without gastrointestinal bleeding - case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ying; Chen, Jun; Chen, Qi; Ji, Min; Pa, Mier; Qiao, Zhongwei [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hui [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Shan [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-15

    The clinical presentation of congenital portosystemic shunt is variable and gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon presentation. To describe the imaging features of congenital portosystemic shunt as it presented in 11 children with (n = 6) and without gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 5). We performed a retrospective study on a clinical and imaging dataset of 11 children diagnosed with congenital portosystemic shunt. A total of 11 children with congenital portosystemic shunt were included in this study, 7 with extrahepatic portosystemic shunts and 4 with intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Six patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and the imaging results showed that the shunts originated from the splenomesenteric junction (n = 5) or splenic vein (n = 1) and connected to the internal iliac vein. Among the five cases of congenital portosystemic shunt without gastrointestinal bleeding, one case was an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt and the other four were intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Most congenital portosystemic shunt patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had a shunt that drained portal blood into the iliac vein via an inferior mesenteric vein. This type of shunt was uncommon, but the concomitant rate of gastrointestinal bleeding with this type of shunt was high. (orig.)

  12. Ultrasound contrast agents for bleeding detection and acoustic hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zderic, Vesna; Luo, Wenbo; Brayman, Andrew; Crum, Lawrence; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) in improving both therapeutic and diagnostic aspects of ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. Methods: Incisions (3 cm long, 0.5 cm deep) were made in rabbit livers (in anterior surface for HIFU treatment, or posterior surface for bleeding detection). UCA Optison (~0.1 ml/kg) was injected into mesenteric vein or ear vein. A HIFU applicator (5.5 MHz, 6400 W/cm2) was scanned manually over the incision until hemostasis was achieved. Occult bleeding was monitored with Doppler ultrasound. Results: The presence of Optison produced 37% reduction in hemostasis times normalized to initial bleeding rates. Gross and histological observations showed similar appearance of HIFU lesions produced in the presence of Optison and control HIFU lesions. The temperature reached 100°C in both HIFU only and HIFU+UCA treatments. Tension strength of hemostatic liver incisions was 0.9+/-0.5 N. Almost no bleeding could be detected before Optison injection. First appearance of contrast enhancement localized at the bleeding site was 15 s after Optison injection, and lasted for ~50 s. Conclusion: The presence of UCA during HIFU treatment of liver incisions resulted in shortening of HIFU application times and better visualization of bleeding sites.

  13. Bleeding disorders in dental practice: A diagnostic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhirup Goswami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental health care workers are increasingly called upon to provide quality dental care to individuals whose bleeding and clotting mechanisms have been altered by inherited or acquired diseases. This provides an opportunity for the dentist who is trained in the recognition of oral and systemic signs of altered hemostasis to assist in the diagnosis of the underlying condition. A number of dental procedures result in the risk of bleeding that can have serious consequences, such as severe hemorrhage or possibly death, for the patient with a bleeding disorder. Oral care providers must be aware of the impact of bleeding disorders on the management of their patients. These disorders must be recognized from history, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations, if indicated, prior to surgical procedures including those in dental surgery to prevent bleeding related complications. Safe dental care may require consultation with the patient′s physician, systemic management, and dental treatment modifications. The purpose of this article is how to identify these patients with bleeding disorders.

  14. Evaluation and management of abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Mary Gayle; Schmidt-Dalton, Tarin A; Weiss, Patrice M; Madsen, Keith P

    2012-01-01

    Up to 14 percent of women experience irregular or excessively heavy menstrual bleeding. This abnormal uterine bleeding generally can be divided into anovulatory and ovulatory patterns. Chronic anovulation can lead to irregular bleeding, prolonged unopposed estrogen stimulation of the endometrium, and increased risk of endometrial cancer. Causes include polycystic ovary syndrome, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction, hyperprolactinemia, and use of antipsychotics or antiepileptics. Women 35 years or older with recurrent anovulation, women younger than 35 years with risk factors for endometrial cancer, and women with excessive bleeding unresponsive to medical therapy should undergo endometrial biopsy. Treatment with combination oral contraceptives or progestins may regulate menstrual cycles. Histologic findings of hyperplasia without atypia may be treated with cyclic or continuous progestin. Women who have hyperplasia with atypia or adenocarcinoma should be referred to a gynecologist or gynecologic oncologist, respectively. Ovulatory abnormal uterine bleeding, or menorrhagia, may be caused by thyroid dysfunction, coagulation defects (most commonly von Willebrand disease), endometrial polyps, and submucosal fibroids. Transvaginal ultrasonography or saline infusion sonohysterography may be used to evaluate menorrhagia. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is an effective treatment for menorrhagia. Oral progesterone for 21 days per month and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are also effective. Tranexamic acid is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovulatory bleeding, but is expensive. When clear structural causes are identified or medical management is ineffective, polypectomy, fibroidectomy, uterine artery embolization, and endometrial ablation may be considered. Hysterectomy is the most definitive treatment.

  15. Multidetector computed tomography in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Palma

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available John Palma, Marius Mihaila, Frank PilleulDépartement de Radiologie Digestive et des Urgences, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, CHU, Lyon, FranceBackground: The aim of this study is to evaluate multidetector computed tomography (MDCT in acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding, with endoscopy and surgery as reference examinations.Methods: A single-center retrospective study involving 34 patients with acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding was carried out. All patients were evaluated by MDCT scan then endoscopic or surgical examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of MDCT scan were calculated using the extravasation of the contrast agent as the main criterion.Results: Extravasation of the contrast agent was found in 30 of 34 patients (88%. The bleeding site seen on CT was always the same as on endoscopic or surgical examinations (100%. Sensitivity of MDCT scan was 94%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 50% (P < 0.001. Twelve diverticulum bleedings were seen on MDCT scan compared with 13 (92% on endoscopic or surgical examinations. Angiodysplasia was overestimated by MDCT scan.Conclusion: MDCT scan appears to be an excellent tool to find and localize the bleeding site in cases of acute massive lower gastrointestinal disease.Keywords: MDCT, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, extravasation, contrast agent

  16. Prognostic variables in patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices without prior bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, E;

    1994-01-01

    As identification of patients at risk of bleeding or death is essential for prophylaxis, we determined the prognostic influence of various patient characteristics on the risk of bleeding and death. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices without previous bleeding were included...... a significant relation with an increased risk of bleeding or death: high plasma volume (p varices (p

  17. [Massive small intestine bleeding: CT-angiography and surgical treatment - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamka, J; Chmátal, P

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is one of acute abdomen conditions that occur relatively frequently. Most cases can nowadays be managed endoscopically, surgery is rarely required. Approximately 5% of gastrointestinal bleeding cases are cases of so-called obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The presented massive gastrointestinal bleed case report provides a current view on diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in the context of everyday clinical practice.

  18. A novel semi-quantitative method for measuring tissue bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukcevic, G; Volarevic, V; Raicevic, S; Tanaskovic, I; Milicic, B; Vulovic, T; Arsenijevic, S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we describe a new semi-quantitative method for measuring the extent of bleeding in pathohistological tissue samples. To test our novel method, we recruited 120 female patients in their first trimester of pregnancy and divided them into three groups of 40. Group I was the control group, in which no dilation was applied. Group II was an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using classical mechanical dilators. Group III was also an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using a hydraulic dilator. Tissue samples were taken from the patients' cervical canals using a Novak's probe via energetic single-step curettage prior to any dilation in Group I and after dilation in Groups II and III. After the tissue samples were prepared, light microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs at 100x magnification. The surfaces affected by bleeding were measured in the microphotographs using the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program and its "polylines" function. The lines were used to mark the area around the entire sample (marked A) and to create "polyline" areas around each bleeding area on the sample (marked B). The percentage of the total area affected by bleeding was calculated using the formula: N = Bt x 100 / At where N is the percentage (%) of the tissue sample surface affected by bleeding, At (A total) is the sum of the surfaces of all of the tissue samples and Bt (B total) is the sum of all the surfaces affected by bleeding in all of the tissue samples. This novel semi-quantitative method utilizes the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program, which is simple to use and widely available, thereby offering a new, objective and precise approach to estimate the extent of bleeding in tissue samples.

  19. Management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, George

    2012-09-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, acute overt, occult or obscure in nature, causes significant morbidity and mortality in older adults. As the elderly population is expected to increase in the future, healthcare costs and the clinical burden of lower gastrointestinal bleeding will rise. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, by definition, originates from a site distal to the ligament of Treitz and is usually suspected when patients present with haematochezia, or maroon stools per rectum. A thorough history is paramount in guiding the diagnostic steps and management but is frequently inadequate in elderly, poorly communicating, nursing home patients. The causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in older adults may be anatomic, vascular, inflammatory, neoplastic or iatrogenic. Comorbidity from cardiopulmonary disease, renal disease, diabetes or underlying cancer, all prevalent in older adults, may affect the incidence, severity, morbidity and mortality of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly. The use of multiple medications, particularly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents, needs to be always considered in elderly patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding and anaemia. CT imaging and early colonoscopy are useful in determining the site of bleeding and allowing haemostasis. If unsuccessful, angiographic intervention and surgery need to be considered. Videocapsule endoscopy is useful in cases where the small bowel is suspected as the source, and its results guide the performance of double- or single-balloon enteroscopy. Optimal care should involve a coordinated effort among the primary physician, endoscopist, interventional radiologist and surgeon in order to improve prognosis and subsequent management and reduce morbidity, mortality, length of stay and overall healthcare costs.

  20. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, M N; Ismail, A R; Barras, C D; Tan, W J

    2000-12-01

    Despite advancements in endoscopy and pharmacology in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease the overall mortality has remained constant at 10% for the past four decades. The aim of this study was to determine the age, gender, racial distribution, incidence and causes of endoscopically diagnosed cases of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding to summarise treatments undertaken and to report their outcome. A prospective study of UGI bleeding in 128 patients was performed in two surgical wards of Kuala Lumpur Hospital, involving both elective and emergency admissions. The study group comprised of 113 (88.2%) males and 15 (11.7%) females. The mean age was 51.9 years (range 14 to 85 years) and 37.5% (48 of 128 patients) were older than 60 years. The Indian race was over-represented in all disease categories. Smoking (50.1%), alcohol consumption (37.5%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (17.2%), traditional remedies (5.5%), anti-coagulants (2.3%) and steroids (0.8%) were among the risk factors reported. Common presenting symptoms and signs included malaena (68.8%), haematemesis (59.4%) and fresh per rectal bleeding (33.6%). The commonest causes of UGI bleeding were duodenal ulcer (32%), gastric ulcer (29.7%), erosions (duodenal and gastric) (21.9%), oesophageal varices (10.9%) and malignancy (3.9%). UGI bleeding was treated non-surgically in 90.6% of cases. Blood transfusions were required in 62.6% (67/107) of peptic ulcer disease patients. Surgical intervention for bleeding peptic ulcer occurred in around 10% of cases and involved under-running of the bleeding vessel in most high risk duodenal and gastric ulcer patients. The overall mortality from bleeding peptic ulcer disease was 4.7%. Six patients died from torrential UGI haemorrhage soon after presentation, without the establishment of a cause. Active resuscitative protocols, early endoscopy, more aggressive interventional therapy, early surgery by more senior surgeons, increasing intensive care unit

  1. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: fatima.rsreis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Cardia, P.P. [Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. (author)

  2. Factors affecting hospital mortality in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

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    Alam Mohammed

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective analysis studied the records of 564 consecutive patients admitted to Gastrointestinal Bleeding Unit of Riyadh Medical Complex with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 2-year period (May 1996-April 1998. The purpose of the study was to analyze the mortality with an aim to identify the risk factors affecting mortality in these patients. Majority of patients were men (82% and Saudis (54%. Their mean age was 52.46 + 17.8 years. Esophageal varices (45% were the main causes of bleeding followed by duodenal ulcers (24%. Overall mortality in this series was 15.8% (89 patients. Comorbid diseases were responsible for death in 68 (76% patients, whereas, bleeding was considered to be directly responsible for death in 21 (24% patients. On analysis of data from this study, old age (>60 years, systolic pressure < 90 mm Hg on admission, comorbid disease, variceal bleeding and Child′s grade C in patients with chronic liver disease were associated with adverse outcome.

  3. Endovascular management for significant iatrogenic portal vein bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Woo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Park, Jonathan K; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite conservative treatment, hemorrhage from an intrahepatic branch of the portal vein can cause hemodynamic instability requiring urgent intervention. Purpose To retrospectively report the outcomes of hemodynamically significant portal vein bleeding after endovascular management. Material and Methods During a period of 15 years, four patients (2 men, 2 women; median age, 70.5 years) underwent angiography and embolization for iatrogenic portal vein bleeding. Causes of hemorrhage, angiographic findings, endovascular treatment, and complications were reported. Results Portal vein bleeding occurred after percutaneous liver biopsy (n = 2), percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (n = 1), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (n = 1). The median time interval between angiography and percutaneous procedure was 5 h (range, 4-240 h). Common hepatic angiograms including indirect mesenteric portograms showed active portal vein bleeding into the peritoneal cavity with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) an arterioportal (AP) fistula, and portal vein pseudoaneurysm alone with an AP fistula (n = 1). Successful transcatheter arterial embolization (n = 2) or percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (n = 2) was performed. Embolic materials were n-butyl cyanoacrylate alone (n = 2) or in combination with gelatin sponge particles and coils (n = 2). There were no major treatment-related complications or patient mortality within 30 days. Conclusion Patients with symptomatic or life-threatening portal vein bleeding following liver-penetrating procedures can successfully be managed with embolization.

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Endoscopic Hemostasis in Marginal Ulcer Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Takenaka, Ryuta; Hori, Keisuke; Takemoto, Koji; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    The usefulness of endoscopy in marginal ulcer bleeding has rarely been studied, and the optimal method for preventing rebleeding is unclear. Here we assessed the efficacy of endoscopy in marginal ulcer bleeding and examined the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the prevention of rebleeding. A total of 28 patients with marginal ulcer bleeding (21 men, 7 women; median age 58.5 years) were treated by endoscopy. We analyzed the clinical characteristics, results of endoscopic therapy, characteristics of rebleeding patients, and relation between the use of PPIs and the duration of rebleeding. Sixteen patients had active bleeding. Initial hemostasis was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related adverse events. Rebleeding occurred in one patient within the first month and in 7 patients thereafter. There was a significant difference in the rebleeding rate between the patients who received a PPI and those who did not. In a multivariate analysis, the non-use of PPIs was a risk factor for rebleeding (hazard ratio, 6.22). Therapeutic endoscopy is effective in achieving hemostasis from marginal ulcer bleeding. PPIs may prevent rebleeding from marginal ulcers.

  5. Portable semiconductor laser system to stop internal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediker, Robert H.; Durville, Frederic M.; Cho, George; Boll, James H.

    1995-03-01

    One significant cause of death during a sever trauma (gun wound or stab wound) is internal bleeding. A semiconductor diode laser system has been used in in vitro studies of cauterizing veins and arteries to stop bleeding. The conditions of laparoscopic surgery, including bleeding conditions (blood flow and pressure), are simulated. Results have been obtained both with and without using a hemostat (e.g., forceps) to temporarily stop the bleeding prior to the cautery. With the hemostat and a fiber-coupled 810-nm laser, blood vessels of up to 5 mm diameter were cauterized with an 8 W output from the fiber. Great cautions must be used in extrapolating from these in vitro results, since the exact conditions of bleeding in a living being are impossible to exactly reproduce in a laboratory in-vitro experiment. In a living being, when blood flow stops the cessation of nourishment to the vessels results in irreversible physiological changes. Also, the blood itself is different from blood in a living being because an anti-clotting agent (heparin) was added in order to inhibit the blood's natural tendency to coagulate.

  6. Efficacy of endoscopic therapy for gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy's lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Cui; Liu-Ye Huang; Yun-Xiang Liu; Bo Song; Long-Zhi Yi; Ning Xu; Bo Zhang; Cheng-Rong Wu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the endoscopic hemostasis for gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion. METHODS: One hundred and seven patients with gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion were treated with three endoscopic hemostasis methods: aethoxysklerol injection (46 cases), endoscopic hemoclip hemostasis (31 cases), and a combination of hemoclip hemostasis with aethoxysklerol injection (30 cases). RESULTS: The rates of successful hemostasis using the three methods were 71.7% (33/46), 77.4% (24/31) and 96.7% (29/30), respectively, with significant differences between the methods (P < 0.05). Among those who had unsuccessful treatment with aethoxysklerol injection, 13 were treated with hemoclip hemostasis and 4 underwent surgical operation; 9 cases were successful in the injection therapy. Among the cases with unsuccessful treatment with hemoclip hemostasis, 7 were treated with injection of aethoxysklerol and 3 cases underwent surgical operation; 4 cases were successful in the treatment with hemoclip hemostasis. Only 1 case had unsuccessful treatment with a combined therapy of hemoclip hemostasis and aethoxysklerol injection, and surgery was then performed. No serious complications of perforation occurred in the patients whose bleeding was treated with the endoscopic hemostasis, and no re-bleeding was found during a 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: The combined therapy of hemoclip hemostasis with aethoxysklerol injection is the most effective method for gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion.

  7. Histopathological pattern of abnormal uterine bleeding in endometrial biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, S; Lakhey, M; Vaidya, S; Sharma, P K; Hirachand, S; Lama, S; KC, S

    2013-03-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common presenting complaint in gyanecology out patient department. Histopathological evaluation of the endometrial samples plays a significant role in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding. This study was carried out to determine the histopathological pattern of the endometrium in women of various age groups presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding. Endometrial biopsies and curettings of patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding was retrospectively studied. A total of 403 endometrial biopsies and curettings were analyzed. The age of the patients ranged from 18 to 70 years. Normal cyclical endometrium was seen in 165 (40.94%) cases, followed by 54 (13.40%) cases of disordered proliferative endometrium and 44 (10.92%) cases of hyperplasia. Malignancy was seen in 10 (2.48%) cases. Hyperplasia and malignancy were more common in the perimenopausal and postmenopausal age groups. Histopathological examination of endometrial biopsies and curettings in patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding showed a wide spectrum of changes ranging from normal endometrium to malignancy. Endometrial evaluation is specially recommended in women of perimenopausal and postmenopausal age groups presenting with AUB, to rule out a possibility of any preneoplastic condition or malignancy.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of CT angiography in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, A E; Ridley, L J

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the study was to carry out a systematic review determining the accuracy of CT angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. A search of published work in Medline and manual searching of reference lists of articles was conducted. Studies were included if they compared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eight published studies evaluating 129 patients were included. Data were used to form 2 x 2 tables. Computed tomography angiography showed pooled sensitivity of 86% (95% confidence interval 78-92%) and specificity of 95% (95% confidence interval 76-100%), without showing significant heterogeneity (chi(2) = 3.5, P = 0.6) and (chi(2) = 5.4, P = 0.6), respectively. Summary receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.93. Computed tomography angiography is accurate in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can show the precise location and aetiology of bleeding, thereby directing further management. Strong recommendations for use of CT cannot be made from this review because of the methodological limitations and further large prospective studies are needed to define the role of CT in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  9. Recurrent Epistaxis and Bleeding as the Initial Manifestation of Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali Aghdam, Mojtaba; Davari, Kambiz; Eftekhari, Kambiz

    2016-03-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia with bleeding is rarely reported in children with brucellosis, and recurrent epistaxis is extremely rare. Brucellosis with hemorrhage should be differentiated from viral hemorrhagic fever, malignancy, and other blood disorders. Bone marrow aspiration (BMA) is mandatory to differentiate from other blood diseases. An 8-year-old boy was admitted with recurrent epistaxis, petechiae and purpura on face and extremities and bleeding from the gums. During the hospitalization, he was febrile and complained of muscle pain. Leukopenias associated with thrombocytopenia were observed. BMA showed to be normal. Among the multiple tests requested, only serum agglutination test (SAT) and 2-MercaptoEthanol test (2-ME) were positive. He was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) associated with co-trimoxazole and rifampin. Finally, fever subsided, and he was discharged with good condition and normal platelet count. Brucellosis should be a differential diagnosis in patients with fever and bleeding disorders and a history of consumption of unpasteurized dairy, in endemic areas.

  10. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-07

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood.

  11. Evaluation and outcomes of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cositha; Santhakumar; Ken; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding(OGIB) is defined as recurrent or persistent bleeding or presence of iron deficiency anaemia after evaluation with a negative bidirectional endoscopy. OGIB accounts for 5% of gastrointestinal bleeding and presents a diagnostic challenge. Current modalities available for the investigation of OGIB include capsule endoscopy, balloon assisted enteroscopy, spiral enteroscopy and computed tomography enterography. These modalities overcome the limitations of previous techniques. Following a negative bidirectional endoscopy, capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy remain the cornerstone of investigation in OGIB given their high diagnostic yield. Longterm outcome data in patients with OGIB is limited, but is most promising for capsule endoscopy. This article reviews the current literature and provides an overview of the clinical evaluation of patients with OGIB, available diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and longterm clinical outcomes.

  12. Bleeding Jejunal Diverticulosis in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zuber-Jerger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A seventy-year-old male presented with severe myasthenia gravis and an episode of obscure bleeding. There was a history of gastric ulcer leading to Billroth II surgery twenty-five years ago. Upper endoscopy revealed no pathology. Colonoscopy showed a few solitary diverticula and traces of old blood in the terminal ileum. Capsule endoscopy pictured red smear in the upper jejunum. Diverticula were seen as well. Suspecting bleeding jejunal diverticulosis double balloon enteroscopy was performed. The complete jejunal ascending loop and about 100 cm of the jejunum through the descending jejunal loop could be inspected. Large diverticula with fecoliths were found in both loops. Bleeding had ceased. The patient was discharged to neurology for optimizing therapy for myasthenia gravis.

  13. Liver transplantation in the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Starzl, Thomas E.; Todo, Satoru; Gordon, Robert D.; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Marsh, J. Wallis; Makowka, Leonard; Koneru, Baburao; Stieber, Andrei; Klintmalm, Goran; Husberg, Bo; van Thiel, David

    2010-01-01

    From March 1980 to July 1987, 1000 patients with various end-stage liver diseases received orthotopic liver transplants. Of the 7000 patients, three hundred two had definite histories of bleeding from esophageal varices before transplantation. There were 287 patients with nonalcoholic liver diseases and 15 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. All patients had very poor liver function, which was the main indication for liver transplantation. One- through 5-year actuarial survival rates of the 302 patients were 79%, 74%, 71%, 71%, and 71%, respectively. These survival rates are far better than those obtained with other available modes of treatment for bleeding varices when liver disease is advanced. Long-term sclerotherapy is the treatment of primary choice for bleeding varices. Patients in whom sclerotherapy fails should be considered for liver transplantation unless clear contraindications exist. PMID:3051474

  14. PALM-COEIN Nomenclature for Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneris, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 30% of women will experience abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) during their life time. Previous terms defining AUB have been confusing and imprecisely applied. As a consequence, both clinical management and research on this common problem have been negatively impacted. In 2011, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Menstrual Disorders Group (FMDG) published PALM-COEIN, a new classification system for abnormal bleeding in the reproductive years. Terms such as menorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, metrorrhagia, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, polymenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and uterine hemorrhage are no longer recommended. The PALM-COEIN system was developed to standardize nomenclature to describe the etiology and severity of AUB. A brief description of the PALM-COEIN nomenclature is presented as well as treatment options for each etiology. Clinicians will frequently encounter women with AUB and should report findings utilizing the PALM-COEIN system.

  15. Therapeutic and Diagnostic Tactics for Bleedings from Esophagogastric Varices

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    F. G. Nazyrov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elaborate therapeutic and diagnostic tactics for bleedings from esophagogastric varices (EGV in an intensive care unit (ICU. Subjects and methods: The experience in treating 102 patients with profuse bleeding from EGV, admitted to the ICU, Acad. V. Vakhidov Republican Specialized Center of Surgery, in 2000—2008, was summarized. Results. The findings show that just less than 40% of the patients with hepatic cirrhosis are admitted for the clinical manifestations of active bleeding from EGV, the latter being profuse in 17.6%. These indicate that the noticeable admission preponderance of patients with first-degree blood loss and the low proportion of those with critical third-degree blood loss are noteworthy. Retrospective analysis demonstrated that hemostasis was achieved in 97 (95.1% patients, by applying solely conservative measures using a Blakemore tube (in both variants of its use. After removal of the Blakemore tube, stable hemostasis retained in 88.9% of the patients with bleedings from the veins of the middle third of the esophagus, in 71.8% of cases of those from its lower third and only in 24.1% of the patients with those from the cardiac stomach. Conclusion. According to the results of the study, we propose the therapeutic and diagnostic tactics for patients with profuse bleedings from EGV, which involve the use of a Blakemore tube and a complex of conservative measures with traditional hemostatic therapy, the administration of portal pressure-reducing agents to prevent or treat hepatic failure. Key words: bleeding, esophagogastric varices, hepatic failure, intensive therapy.

  16. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Normolle, Daniel [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Pan, Charlie C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amarnath, Sudha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ensminger, William D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  17. The timing of neovascularization in fingertip replantation by external bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung-Kyu; Chung, Heung-Soo; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2002-09-15

    To overcome venous congestion in fingertip replantation with no venous anastomosis, the authors have used a salvage procedure that consists of continuous external bleeding through a stab incision on the paraungual area and dripping a heparinized saline solution at the incision site to maintain external bleeding. Because this method requires continuous bleeding for a certain period of time, it may be a great burden on the patient; therefore, it is most important to minimize the duration of bleeding. Many authors have studied the timing of the new venous channel formation of the flap. However, to our knowledge, a study on fingertip replantations has not yet been performed. From June of 1985 to November of 1999, the authors performed fingertip replantations on 144 fingers of 137 patients using our salvage procedure at Korea University Guro Hospital. Among the 144 fingers, 101 fingers of 96 patients were successfully transplanted, including those with partial necrosis. The authors reviewed the medical records of these 101 fingers retrospectively; they compared and analyzed the necessary duration of external bleeding according to sex, age, level of injury, cause of amputation, and the type of injury. The average period of the salvage procedure was 7.6 days. Regarding age, the shortest period (5.5 days) was required for patients younger than 10 years. On the basis of the types of injuries, the duration of bleeding was shortest for the guillotine injury group (5.9 days) compared with crush (8.2 days) or avulsion (8.0 days) injuries. Sex and level of injury did not make much difference in the duration of the procedure.

  18. Prolonged bleeding on the neck in leech therapy: Case report

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    Atakan Savrun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Superficial skin bleeding can usually be stopped by applying short-time compression, unless the patient suffers from coagulation disorders or uses anticoagulant. Because of the anticoagulant component of leech saliva, a leech bite may cause long-time bleeding, which cannot be stopped via compression. In this study, the case of a patient who applied leech therapy on her neck for the treatment of migraine has been presented. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 234-237

  19. Primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst associated with acute bleeding

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    Guohua Zhu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To report a case of unilocular primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst which manifested as acute bleeding. Methods: The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of this rare case are discussed. Published cases of primary extradural hydatid cysts are reviewed. Results: Complete recovery was achieved. Repeated clinical, radiological, and serological examinations did not show any evidence of local recurrence or systemic hydatidosis during the follow-up period of 50 months. Conclusions: Primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst may present as acute bleeding.

  20. Primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst associated with acute bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this article is to report a case of unilocular primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst which manifested as acute bleeding. Methods: The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of this rare case are discussed and published cases of primary extradural hydatid cysts are reviewed. Results: Complete recovery was achieved. Repeated clinical, radiological, and serological examinations did not show any evidence of local recurrence or systemic hydatidosis during the follow-up period of 50 months. Conclusions: Primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst may present as acute bleeding. (Wang Y, Geng D, Zhu G, Du G.

  1. [Gastric lipoma as an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, W; Allemann, J; Simeon, B; Fornaro, M; Rehli, V

    1995-04-18

    This is a case report of a gastric lipoma causing a severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding. About 200 cases of this very rare benign gastric tumor have been reported so far. Symptoms are not characteristic, but may also mimic malignancy when occurring with bleeding, obstruction or weight loss. Malignant transformation is possible, but extremely rare. Because the tumor is situated under the submucosal layer in 90%, preoperative diagnosis by endoscopic biopsy is almost never possible. The tumor has to be treated by resection. A diagnosis by frozen section during the operation is recommended.

  2. [Risk factors influencing the development of gastroduodenal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orobeĭ, Iu A; Lazebnik, L B; Nikolaeva, É I; Selivanova, G B

    2010-01-01

    Bleedings of an ulcerative aetiology are an actual and multiplane problem many years. Obvious communication of the complicated current of a peptic ulcer with various risk factors, such as a tobacco smoking, abusing alcohol, uncontrolled and long reception of ulcerogenic agents (NSAID, anticoagulants etc.), mucosa of stomach H. pylori, is noted by a serious accompanying pathology of other organs and systems. The knowledge of influence of interaction of the facts of risk on development bleedings of an ulcerative aetiology, will allow to develop in due time the complex of medical actions referred on prevention of this terrible complication.

  3. Retained fetal bones: an unusual cause of abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Chawla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB is a common gynaecological problem with most common causes being fibroid, polyp, endometritis, neoplasia and coagulation disorder. Presence of retained intrauterine fetal bones as a cause of AUB, is a rare but well recognized entity. Patient may present with subfertility, secondary infertility, chronic pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, pelvic inflammatory disease, abnormal uterine bleeding. Incidence reported in literature is 0.15% among patients undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy. Calcification appears as hyperechoeic area on ultrasound. Hysteroscopy guided removal of bony fragments is the gold standard and leads to complete resolution of symptoms. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 2032-2033

  4. Risk stratification in upper gastrointestinal bleeding; prediction, prevention and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, N.L.

    2013-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis we developed a novel prediction score for predicting upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in both NSAID and low-dose aspirin users. Both for NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin use risk scores were developed by identifying the five most dominant predictors. The risk of upper

  5. Neonatal bleeding in haemophilia : a European cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, M.; Lissalde, G. Lavigne; Combescure, C.; Batorova, A.; Dolan, G.; Fischer, K.; Klamroth, R.; Lambert, T.; Lopez-Fernandez, M.; Perez, R.; Rocino, A.; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2012-01-01

    Birth is the first haemostatic challenge for a child with haemophilia. Our aim was to examine the association between perinatal risk factors and major neonatal bleeding in infants with haemophilia. This observational cohort study in 12 European haemophilia treatment centres (HTC) incorporated 508 ch

  6. [Summary of the practice guideline 'Heavy menstrual bleeding'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vree, F.E.; Kooij, S.M. van der; Coppus, S.F.P.J.; Janssen, C.A.H.; Reekers, J.A.; Hehenkamp, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    - A new multidisciplinary practice guideline on heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) has recently been published.- HMB may occur with or without structural abnormalities.- The pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBAC) is the best method for estimating the amount of blood loss and for distinguishing bet

  7. Strongyloides hyper-infection causing life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lajos Csermely; Hassan Jaafar; Jorgen Kristensen; Antonio Castella; Waldemar Gorka; Ahmed Ali Chebli; Fawaz Trab; Hussain Alizadeh; Béla Hunyady

    2006-01-01

    A 55-year old male patient was diagnosed with strongyloides hyper-infection with stool analysis and intestinal biopsy shortly after his chemotherapy for myeloma.He was commenced on albendazole anthelmintic therapy. After initiation of the treatment he suffered lifethreatening gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Repeated endoscopies showed diffuse multi-focal intestinal bleeding. The patient required huge amounts of red blood cells and plasma transfusions and correction of haemostasis with recombinant activated factor Ⅶ.Abdominal aorto-angiography showed numerous microinferior mesenteric arteries' territories. While the biopsy taken prior to the treatment with albendazole did not show evidence of vasculitis, the biopsy taken after initiation of therapy revealed leukoclastic aggregations around the vessels. These findings suggest that, in addition to direct destruction of the mucosa, vasculitis could be an important additive factor causing the massive GI bleeding during the anthelmintic treatment.This might result from substances released by the worms that have been killed with anthelmintic therapy.Current guidelines advise steroids to be tapered and stopped in case of systematic parasitic infections as they might reduce immunity and precipitate parasitic hyper-infection. In our opinion, steroid therapy might be of value in the management of strongyloides hyperinfection related vasculitis, in addition to the anthelmintic treatment. Indeed, steroid therapy of vasculitis with other means of supportive care resulted in cessation of the bleeding and recovery of the patient.

  8. Update on the endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractUpper gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common gastrointestinal emergency, with peptic ulcer as the most common cause. Appropriate resuscitation followed by early endoscopy for diagnosis and treatment are of major importance in these patients. Endoscopy is recommended within 24 h of

  9. Histopathological study of endometrium in cases of abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj A. Bolde

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest complaints in women and when it occurs without organic lesions like tumor, inflammation, it is called as dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Aim of current study was to find out the histopathological pattern of endometrium in Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB also to study organic causes of AUB. Methods: Specimens received as endometrial curettage and hysterectomy specimens were studied followed by correlation of histopathology with age and clinical presentation. Results: The patients were mainly from the age group of 30-49 years (74.24%. The most common menstrual disorder was menorrhagia (46.86%. In dysfunctional uterine bleeding the most common histological pattern of endometrium includes proliferative endometrium (22.8% followed by endometrial hyperplasia (19.40%, atrophic endometrium (7.16%, secretory endometrium (5.97%, irregular shedding [1.80%], irregular ripening (1.20% and anovulatory endometrium (0.59%. Organic lesions encountered in AUB cases were leiomyoma (17.92%, endometrial polyp (1.79%, endometrial carcinoma (1.50%, endometriosis (0.59% and choriocarcinoma (0.29%. Conclusion: It is important to know the histological pattern of the endometrium like proliferative endometrium, endometrial hyperplasia, atrophic endometrium, secretory endometrium, irregular ripening and shredding and organic lesions in patients diagnosed as AUB in different age groups since recognition of these conditions will help and will avoid further complications. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1378-1381

  10. Happy ending of life-threatening upper GI bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Quazi Tarikul; Siddiqui, Mahmudur Rahman; Rahman, Md Anisur; Ahmed, Syed Salahuddin

    2011-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode in humans, and estimated about tens of millions of people are infected worldwide. This parasite is endemic in tropical or temperate and subtropical climates like Bangladesh. The authors report a 33-year-old man who presented with recurrent life-threatening upper gastrointestinal bleeding from gastric infection by S stercoralis. PMID:22673715

  11. A Cause of Mortal Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Aortoesophageal Fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Akin, Mete; Yalcinkaya, Tolga; Alkan, Erhan; Arslan, Gokhan; Tuna, Yasar; Yildirim, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aortoesophageal fistula is an uncommon but mortal cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common causes are thoracic aortic aneurisym, foreign body reaction, malignancy and postoperative complication. It can be seen in different pattern on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. There are surgical, endoscopic and interventional radiological treatment options, however, definitive treatment is surgical intervention. Diagnosis and treatment desicion should be made quic...

  12. Embolotherapy using N-butyl cyanoacrylate for abdominal wall bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Cha, Joo Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    We describe our experience with the use of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of abdominal wall bleeding and we evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Embolization was performed in nine patients with abdominal wall bleeding. The sites of embolization were the left first lumbar (n = 1), left second lumbar (n = 1), right inferior epigastric (n 2), left inferior epigastric (n = 3), right circumflex iliac (n = 1), and left circumflex iliac artery (n = 1). A coil was used with NBCA in one patient due to difficulty in selecting only a bleeding focus and anticipated reflux. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:4. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the embolization procedure, and the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Hemostasis was obtained in six out of the nine patients and technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Four out of the nine patients died due to rebleeding of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hepatic failure (n =2) that occurred two to nine days after the embolization procedure. One patient had rebleeding. The five surviving patients had no rebleeding, and the patients continue to visit the clinical on an outpatient basis. NBCA embolization is a clinically safe procedure and is effective for abdominal wall bleeding.

  13. No Slackers in Tourniquet Use to Stop Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    tation injury just proximal to the knee was selected as the testing apparatus .13 The medial hip–pelvic area had an embedded computer interface that...Use to Stop Bleeding 19 COL (Ret) Kragh is currently a hemorrhage control re- searcher at the USAISR. He is an orthopedic surgeon who previously

  14. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, Ferdinand I.; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R. M.

    2014-01-01

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103 wh

  15. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette

    2012-01-01

    a stent dual antiplatelet therapy with a P2Y12 receptor antagonist and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is recommended for 12 months, preferable with prasugrel or ticagrelor unless there is an additional indication of warfarin or increased risk of bleeding. In patients with AF, warfarin is recommended...

  16. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: CT angiography with multi-planar reformatting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Kate; Gollub, Frank; Stuart, Sam; Papadopoulou, Anthie; Woodward, Nick

    2011-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency, which carries a significant mortality. CT Angiography is an important non-invasive diagnostic tool, which can be used to plan subsequent endovascular or surgical management. The cases presented demonstrate that a meticulous and systematic approach to image interpretation is necessary, in particular, to detect focal sites of contrast extravasation and small pseudoaneurysms.

  17. Bleeding Ectopic Varices as the First Manifestation of Portal Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brij Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic varices are defined as dilated portosystemic collateral veins in locations other than the gastroesophageal region. We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding as the first manifestation of portal hypertension. We diagnosed ectopic duodenal varices without gastroesophageal varices on upper GI endoscopy and extrahepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO on CT angiography and managed this case.

  18. A STUDY ON ENDOSCOPIC EVALUATION OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranaya Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB is one of the commonest gastrointestinal emergencies encountered by clinicians. Peptic ulcers are the most common cause of UGIB. Endoscopy has become the preferred method for diagnosis in patients with acute UGIB. This study is done in a diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE setup of a tertiary care hospital to ascertain the causes of UGIB prevalent in this part of our country which might differ from other studies. AIM To ascertain prevalent causes of UGIB in patients of this part of India admitted to a Govt. Tertiary Hospital with a provisional diagnosis of UGIB. METHOD One hundred consecutive patients with UGIB were subjected to UGIE to find out the aetiology. The clinical profile and endoscopic findings were analysed and compared with the data on UGIB from other studies. RESULTS The mean age of patients was 47.03 years with male: female ratio of 2.33:1. 58% of patients were first time bleeders. Majority of patients presented with melaena. Visualisation of active bleeding achieved to 85.7% when endoscopy was done within first 24 hrs. The commonest cause of UGIB was duodenal ulcer (DU which accounted for 41% cases. Gastric ulcer was responsible in 13% of cases. Portal hypertension was responsible for bleed in only 13%. Neoplasms accounted for 25% of cases. Other less common causes were erosive gastritis (3%, gastric polyp (3%, Mallory-Weiss tear (1%, and Dieulafoy’s lesion (1%. Among bleeding peptic ulcers, 27.8% of cases were classified as Forrest IIa and 20.4% in Forrest IIb & IIc each. Acid peptic disease was past history elicited in majority (33% followed by NSAID (26% and alcohol (26%. CONCLUSION The present study has diagnosed various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this part of country. The incidence of gastric carcinoma as a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is significantly high compared to those in other studies. UGI endoscopy should be done in every case

  19. Value of transient elastography for the prediction of variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ioan Sporea; Iulia Ra(t)iu; Roxana (S)irli; Alina Popescu; Simona Bota

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine if liver stiffness (LS) measurements by means of transient elastography (TE) correlate with the presence of significant esophageal varices (EV) and if they can predict the occurrence of variceal bleeding. METHODS: We studied 1000 cases of liver cirrhosis divided into 2 groups: patients without EV or with grade 1 varices (647 cases) and patients with significant varices (grade 2 and 3 EV) (353 cases). We divided the group of 540 cases with EV into another 2 subgroups: without variceal hemorrhage (375 patients) and patients with a history of variceal bleeding (165 cases). We compared the LS values between the groups using the unpaired t-test and we established cut-off LS values for the presence of significant EV and for the risk of bleeding by using the ROC curve. RESULTS: The mean LS values in the 647 patients without or with grade 1 EV was statistically significantly lower than in the 353 patients with significant EV (26.29 ± 0.60 kPa vs 45.21 ± 1.07 kPa,P < 0.0001). Using the ROC curve we established a cut-off value of 31 kPa for the presence of EV,with 83% sensitivity (95% CI: 79.73%-85.93%) and 62% specificity (95% CI: 57.15%-66.81%),with 76.2% positive predictive value (PPV) (95% CI: 72.72%-79.43%) and 71.3% negative predictive value (NPV) (95% CI: 66.37%-76.05%) (AUROC 0.7807,P < 0.0001). The mean LS values in the group with a history of variceal bleeding (165 patients) was statistically significantly higher than in the group with no bleeding history (375 patients): 51.92 ± 1.56 kPa vs 35.20 ± 0.91 kPa,P < 0.0001). For a cut-off value of 50.7 kPa,LS had 53.33% sensitivity (95% CI: 45.42%-61.13%) and 82.67% specificity (95% CI: 78.45%-86.36%),with 82.71% PPV (95% CI: 78.5%-86.4%) and 53.66% NPV (95% CI: 45.72%-61.47%) (AUROC 0.7300,P < 0.0001) for the prediction of esophageal bleeding. CONCLUSION: LS measurement by means of TE is a reliable noninvasive method for the detection of EV and for the prediction of variceal bleeding.

  20. N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolotherapy for acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Seong, Chang Kyu; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Various embolic agents have been used for embolization of acute gastrointestinal (GI) arterial bleeding. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is not easy to handle, but it is a useful embolic agent. In this retrospective study, we describe our experience with NBCA embolization of acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. NBCA embolization was performed in seven patients with acute upper GI arterial bleeding; they had five gastric ulcers and two duodenal ulcers. NBCA embolization was done in the left gastric artery (n = 3), right gastric artery (n = 2), gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) and pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 1). Coil was used along with NBCA in a gastric bleeding patient because of difficulty in selecting a feeding artery. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:2. The blood pressure and heart rate around the time of embolization, the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and the transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Technical success was achieved in all the cases. Two procedure-related complications happened; embolism of the NBCA mixture to the common hepatic artery occurred in a case with embolization of the left gastric artery, and reflux of the NBCA mixture occurred into the adjacent gastric tissue, but these did not cause any clinical problems. Four of seven patients did not present with rebleeding, but two had rebleeding 10 and 16 days, respectively, after embolization and they died of cardiac arrest at 2 months and 37 days, respectively. One other patient died of sepsis and respiratory failure within 24 hours without rebleeding. NBCA embolization with or without other embolic agents could be safe and effective for treating acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding.

  1. Nasal packing in sphenopalatine artery bleeding: therapeutic or harmful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireci, F; Speciale, R; Sorrentino, R; Turri-Zanoni, M; Nicolotti, M; Canevari, F R

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to present our management protocol of sphenopalatine artery bleeding, demonstrating that nasoendoscopic cautery (NC) was a more effective method than the nasal packing, in terms of shorter inpatient stay and reduced complications rate. We present ten posterior epistaxis not resolved by nasal packing. Tabotamp(®) was placed in the area of sphenopalatine foramen and/or in those parts of the posterior nasal cavity, where it was suspected that bleeding origins. In two cases, the bleeding was resolved in this way, instead eight cases needed of subperiosteal cauterization of sphenopalatine artery by Dessi bipolar forceps (MicroFrance(®)). 4 of these 8 patients evidenced a remarkable bleeding removing nasal packing (Hb before-nasal packing = 15 ± 0.69 versus Hb after-nasal packing = 13.3 ± 0.81; t student = 2.94; p value = 0.025). These four patients showed a deviation of the nasal septum ipsilateral to epistaxis, and according our experience, a traumatism of sphenopalatine area can be caused by Merocel(®) nasal packing in this condition. During follow-up, no recurrences of nasal bleeding have been observed in such patients. Nasal packing must be considered if posterior epistaxis is severe, but always taking into account the specific anatomy of patient and in particular septal spurs that can further compromise sphenopalatine artery. In our experience, the endoscopic endonasal cauterization of the sphenopalatine branches represented a safe and effective procedure.

  2. Assessment of multi-modality evaluations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ryan; Varayil, Jithinraj E; WongKeeSong, Louis M; Fidler, Jeff; Fletcher, Joel G; Barlow, John; Alexander, Jeffrey; Rajan, Elizabeth; Hansel, Stephanie; Becker, Brenda; Larson, Joseph J; Enders, Felicity T; Bruining, David H; Coelho-Prabhu, Nayantara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency of bleeding source detection in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) after pre-procedure imaging [multiphase computed tomography enterography (MPCTE), video capsule endoscopy (VCE), or both] and assess the impact of imaging on DBE diagnostic yield. METHODS Retrospective cohort study using a prospectively maintained database of all adult patients presenting with OGIB who underwent DBE from September 1st, 2002 to June 30th, 2013 at a single tertiary center. RESULTS Four hundred and ninety five patients (52% females; median age 68 years) underwent DBE for OGIB. AVCE and/or MPCTE performed within 1 year prior to DBE (in 441 patients) increased the diagnostic yield of DBE (67.1% with preceding imaging vs 59.5% without). Using DBE as the gold standard, VCE and MPCTE had a diagnostic yield of 72.7% and 32.5% respectively. There were no increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to VCE (OR = 1.3, P = 0.150). There were increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to MPCTE (OR = 5.9, P < 0.001). In inpatients with overt OGIB, diagnostic yield of DBE was not affected by preceding imaging. CONCLUSION DBE is a safe and well-tolerated procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of OGIB, with a diagnostic yield that may be increased after obtaining a preceding VCE or MPCTE. However, inpatients with active ongoing bleeding may benefit from proceeding directly to antegrade DBE. PMID:28216967

  3. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takashi; Ikeya; Naoki; Ishii; Yuto; Shimamura; Kaoru; Nakano; Mai; Ego; Kenji; Nakamura; Koichi; Takagi; Katsuyuki; Fukuda; Yoshiyuki; Fujita

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of endo-scopic band ligation(EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel.METHODS: This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients(three males, three fe-males, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, je-junal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy’s lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding(within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess for-mation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients.RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and arepeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case(13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45(range, 2-83) mo.CONCLUSION: EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel.

  4. Prediction of bleeding and prophylactic platelet transfusions in cancer patients with thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille J; Alnor, Anne; Nybo, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    Studies on markers for bleeding risk among thrombocytopenic cancer patients are lacking. This prospective observational cohort study investigated whether platelet parameters and a standardised bleeding questionnaire predicted bleeding or prophylactic platelet transfusions in patients with cancer ...... platelet transfusion but not bleeding. Bleeding risk factors were previous haematuria or gastrointestinal bleeding, infection, antiplatelet or anticoagulant treatment, high urea nitrogen, low haemoglobin or high creatinine........20–7.52 predicted bleeding whereas the standardised bleeding questionnaire did not. Prophylactic platelet transfusions were administered to 97 patients. Predictors of prophylactic platelet transfusions were: platelet count OR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.94–0.97; fibrinogen OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.83–0.95; mean platelet volume...

  5. Protect Your Baby from Bleeds: Talk to Your Healthcare Provider about Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from Bleeds – Talk to Your Healthcare Provider about Vitamin K Without enough vitamin K, your baby has a chance of bleeding ... even death. Infants who do not receive the vitamin K shot at birth can develop VKDB up ...

  6. Clinical profile of patients with abnormal uterine bleeding at a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abnormal uterine bleeding is a very common gynecological condition that affects all age groups. One third of patients attending gynaecology OPD present with complaints of abnormal uterine bleeding. Bleeding is said to be abnormal when the pattern is irregular, abnormal duration (>7 days), or menorrhagia or abnormal amount (>80 ml/menses). Methods: All patients in the perimenopausal age group (45+/- 5 years) with symptoms of abnormal uterine bleeding presenting at department of ...

  7. Recent pharmacological management of oral bleeding in hemophilic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Widyawati Setiawan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemophilia is a hereditary bleeding disorder that can increase the risk of disease in oral cavity. Sometimes hemophilia is not always established already in a patient. The lack of awareness of hemophilia presence can cause serious problem. Purpose: The purpose of this review is to explain about dental bleeding manifestation and management in hemophilic patient. Reviews: Hemophilia can be manifested as dental bleeding that cannot stop spontaneously. It should be treated with factor VIIII either by giving whole blood, fresh plasma, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, and factor VIII concentrate. Factor VIII dose for hemophilia treatment can be calculated based on factor VIII present in hemophilia patient’s body. Factor VIII can also be given as prophylaxis to prevent bleeding. Complications that can be caused by factor VIII replacement therapy are the presence of factor VIII inhibitor and transfusion related diseases. Treatment of dental bleeding due to hemophilia consists of factor replacement therapy and supportive therapy. Conclusion: Treatment of dental bleeding due to hemophilia consists of factor replacement therapy and supportive therapy. There are complications that can happen due to factor VIII replacement therapy that should be considered and anticipated.Latar belakang: Hemofilia adalah kelainan pembekuan darah yang diturunkan. Hemophilia dapat meningkatkan resiko penyakit rongga mulut. Hemofilia tidak selalu sudah terdiagnosa saat penderita melakukan kunjungan ke dokter gigi. Kurangnya kewaspadaan akan adanya hemofilia dapat menyebabkan masalah serius. Tujuan: Tujuan dari kajian pustaka ini adalah memaparkan tentang manifestasi dan penanganan perdarahan gigi pada penderita hemofilia. Tinjauan pustaka: hemofilia dapat bermanifestasi sebagai perdarahan gigi yang tidak dapat berhenti secara spontan. Pada keadaan perdarahan tersebut, pemberian faktor VIII yang diberikan sebagai whole blood, fresh plasma, fresh frozen plasma

  8. OUTCOME OF PREGNANCIES HAVING BLEEDING PERVAGINA IN THE FIRST TRIMESTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhamoy Barik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Vaginal bleeding in early weeks being one of the frequent occurrence, about 20-25% of all pregnancies and have a lot of attention during the last few decades as a predictor of subsequent foetal outcome. In those pregnancies which continue, there is increased incidence of later problems including preterm labour/delivery, Low Birth Weight (LBW, gestational hypertension/Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH, Intrauterine Foetal Death (IUFD, etc. AIMS To evaluate the pregnancy outcome (Both maternal and foetal among groups of patients having bleeding per vagina in the first trimester. SETTING Tertiary level hospital. STUDY DESIGN A hospital-based observational comparative study. METHOD AND MATERIAL In this study, total 200 patients (100 in study group and 100 in control group were taken from September 2009 to August 2010. Out of this 200, 6 patients in study group and 5 patients in control group lost during followup. So, finally 94 patients in study group and 95 patients in control group were critically compared. RESULT In this study mothers who had history of bleeding in 1st trimester, 28.72% had miscarriage, whereas in control group it was 11.57%. 65.95% of women who bleed in 1st trimester continued their pregnancy beyond 28 weeks, which is statistically significant when compared with control group. Incidence of APH (13.82% was also found statistically significant. 15.95% babies were found suffering from IUGR when compared with control group, which was 7.36%. Incidence of vaginal delivery in study group was significantly less when compared with control group. We also found that women who bleed in 1st trimester 3.19% turn out to be ectopic pregnancy, 2.12% were molar pregnancy. No significance was noted in the study group in respect to placenta previa, PROM, PIH, CS delivery. The neonatal morbidity and mortality were also found not significant when compared to control group. CONCLUSION Pregnancies continuing following vaginal bleeding in

  9. Angiographically Negative Acute Arterial Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Incidence, Predictive Factors, and Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chae, Eun Young; Myung, Seung Jae; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of angiographically negative acute arterial upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. From 2001 to 2008, 143 consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for acute arterial upper or lower GI bleeding were examined. The angiographies revealed a negative bleeding focus in 75 of 143 (52%) patients. The incidence of an angiographically negative outcome was significantly higher in patients with a stable hemodynamic status (p < 0.001), or in patients with lower GI bleeding (p = 0.032). A follow-up of the 75 patients (range: 0-72 months, mean: 8 {+-} 14 months) revealed that 60 of the 75 (80%) patients with a negative bleeding focus underwent conservative management only, and acute bleeding was controlled without rebleeding. Three of the 75 (4%) patients underwent exploratory surgery due to prolonged bleeding; however, no bleeding focus was detected. Rebleeding occurred in 12 of 75 (16%) patients. Of these, six patients experienced massive rebleeding and died of disseminated intravascular coagulation within four to nine hours after the rebleeding episode. Four of the 16 patients underwent a repeat angiography and the two remaining patients underwent a surgical intervention to control the bleeding. Angiographically negative results are relatively common in patients with acute GI bleeding, especially in patients with a stable hemodynamic status or lower GI bleeding. Most patients with a negative bleeding focus have experienced spontaneous resolution of their condition.

  10. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from duodenal vascular ectasia in a patient with cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We report a cirrhotic patient with duodenal vascular ectasia and spontaneous bleeding. The bleeding was successfully controlled with argon plasma coagulation.Duodenal vascular ectasia may be a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis, and argon plasma coagulation may be effective and safe to achieve hemostasis of this lesion.

  11. Increased Bleeding Risk With Concurrent Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake inhibitors and Coumarins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalekamp, Tom; Klungel, Olaf H; Souverein, Patrick C; de Boer, Anthonius

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with vitamin K antagonists (coumarins) is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Because use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is also associated with an increased risk of bleeding, we assessed the odds ratio (OR) of abnormal bleeding associated with SS

  12. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) - initial evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaysi, Iyad; Gralnek, Ian M

    2013-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common reason that the 'on-call' gastroenterologist is consulted. Despite the diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities of upper endoscopy, there is still significant associated morbidity and mortality in patients experiencing acute UGIB, thus this is a true GI emergency. Acute UGIB is divided into non-variceal and variceal causes. The most common type of acute UGIB is 'non-variceal' and includes diagnoses such as peptic ulcer (gastric and duodenal), gastroduodenal erosions, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosive oesophagitis, arterio-venous malformations, Dieulafoy's lesion, and upper GI tract tumours and malignancies. This article focuses exclusively on initial management strategies for acute upper GI bleeding. We discuss up to date and evidence-based strategies for patient risk stratification, initial patient management prior to endoscopy, potential causes of UGIB, role of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetic agents, prophylactic antibiotics, vasoactive pharmacotherapies, and timing of endoscopy.

  13. Acute Gastric Bleeding Due to Giant Hyperplastic Polyp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Aksel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperplastic gastric polyps account for the majority of benign gastric polyps. The vast majority of these lesions are small, asymptomatic and found incidentally on radiologic or endoscopic examination. Giant hyperplastic gastric polyps are uncommon and most of them are asymptomatic. We report a case of a 66-year-old woman who admitted because of acute gastric bleeding. The gastrin levels were within normal ranges. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed 12 cm pedunculated and multiple lobulated hyperplastic polyps arising from antrum with signs of diffuse oozing. The patient is treated by subtotal gastrectomy with Roux-Y gastrojejunostomy. Histological examination showed the presence of ulcers and regeneration findings with the contemporary occurrence of hyperplastic polyp. Giant hyperplastic gastric polyp should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Intracochlear Bleeding Enhances Cochlear Fibrosis and Ossification: An Animal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeung A Ryu

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracochlear bleeding during cochleostomy on cochlear inflammatory response and residual hearing in a guinea pig animal model. Auditory brainstem response threshold shifts were greater in blood injected ears (p<0.05. Interleukin-1β, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide synthase 2, cytokines that are related to early stage inflammation, were significantly increased in blood injected ears compared to normal and cochleostomy only ears at 1 day after surgery; with the increased IL-1β being sustained until 3 days after the surgery (p<0.05. Hair cells were more severely damaged in blood injected ears than in cochleostomy only ears. Histopathologic examination revealed more extensive fibrosis and ossification in blood injected ears than cochleostomy only ears. These results show that intracochlear bleeding enhanced cochlear inflammation resulting in increased fibrosis and ossification in an experimental animal model.

  15. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  16. [Guidelines of treatment for non-bleeding peptic ulcer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Dae Young; Jung, Hwoon Yong; Song, Ho June; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2009-11-01

    Over the past century, since the introduction of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), antacid, histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RA), proton pump inhibitors (PPI), and discovery of Helicobacter pylori infection, the paradigm of peptic ulcer disease has changed with marked decrease in morbidity and mortality. However, peptic ulcer disease still occupies a position as a major health problem with increase of aged population and NSAIDs usage. In daily general practice, the management of peptic ulcer disease is directed according to the presence of bleeding or not. For non-bleeding peptic ulcer disease, proper acid suppression and the correction of underlying causes such as Helicobacter pylori infection and NSAID use is the main stay of treatment. Though a complete understanding of pathophysiology and a perfect treatment strategy are still a challenge, this guideline aims to provide practical recommendations based on evidences or consensus of experts through in-depth literature review and expert meeting.

  17. Double blind, placebo-controlled trial of Tranexamic acid on recent internal hemorrhoid bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul A. Rani

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Double blind randomized placebo controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Tranexamic acid in 54 patients with recent hemorrhoid bleeding. Age, gender, body weight, height, grade of hemorrhoid, time of onset of recent bleeding were comparable between two groups. Analysis of haemostatic effect or stop bleeding as an immediate outcome of this study revealed that in the grade 2 patients, 23/23 (100% of tranexamic group and 18/23(78.26% of placebo group the bleeding stop. After 3 days of observation, there was statistically significant different for the rate of stop bleeding as well as at the end of observation. Bleeding stop earlier in the Tranexamic group with median 4 days (3-5 days, compare to placebo, median 11(9.55-12.45. Analysis of recurrent bleeding as an outcome of this study revealed that in the placebo group 9/18(50% of grade 2 patients and all grade 3 (100%patients suffered from recurrent bleeding. Since the days 4, both group have significant different time for recurrent bleeding and at the end of observation, cumulative probability of free of bleeding between two groups significantly different. Median still stop bleeding in the placebo group was 36 days, and the tranexamic group never reaches the median until the end of observation. Conclusion: tranexamic acid was an effective drug to stop recent hemorrhoid bleeding and prevent further recurrent bleeding, significantly better than placebo. (Med J Indones 2002;11: 215-21Keywords: Tranexamic acid, hemorrhoid bleeding, haemostatic effect, recurrent bleeding.

  18. Small bowel stromal tumour revealed by a lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assamoi B. F. Kassi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel stromal tumour must be systematically researched in the presence of obscure and persistent low gastrointestinal bleeding despite a normal endoscopic examination (OGDF and colonoscopy. Video capsule endoscopy is the best diagnosis examination; if it is not available a CT enterography could be useful. Surgical treatment is effective on localized and weak malignancy small bowel stromal tumours. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1248-1250

  19. Overlooked problem of laparoscopic surgery: trocar site bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Dincel

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Trocar site bleeding can be prevented by application of appropriate methods. In particular, special care should be taken when inserting and removing the trocars during the operation. During the entry of secondary trocars it should be accompanied by trans-illumination and at the end of the operation trocars should be removed from their places under direct vision. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 767-770

  20. A rare upper gastrointestinal system bleeding case: Aortoesophageal fistula

    OpenAIRE

    AYYILDIZ, Talat; Nas, Ömer Fatih; YILDIRIM, Çınar; Dolar, Enver; Gurel, Selim

    2014-01-01

    Aortoesophageal fistula is a rare condition with fatal prognosis. It is one of the life-threatining causes of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. With this case report, we will discuss an instance of a fatal aortoesophageal fistula in a patient to whom was implanted a stent due to an aorta aneurysm. In endoscopic examination blood clot on the mouth of the fistula was visualized. J. Exp. Clin. Med., 2014; 31:51-53

  1. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF LIDUI (ST 45) BLEEDING METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春研; 王军

    2004-01-01

    Lidui (厉兑 ST 45) is the Jing (井 Well) point of the Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming. It's effective to reduce the heat from the stomach or the Stomach Meridian. The Stomach Meridian is abundant with qi and blood, and is in charge of hemopathy. So, in clinic, we often apply Lidui (ST 45) point bleeding method to the treatment of many kinds of diseases and get good therapeutic effects. Following are 3 typical cases.

  2. Improved Survival with the Patients with Variceal Bleed

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen Sharma; Sarin, Shiv K.

    2011-01-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is a major cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. Over the past two decades new treatment modalities have been introduced in the management of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) and several recent studies have suggested that the outcome of patients with cirrhosis and AVB has improved. Improved supportive measures, combination therapy which include early use of portal pressure reducing drugs with low rates of adverse effects (somatostatin, octerotide or terlipressin) and end...

  3. Unusual redo mitral valve replacement for bleeding in Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Villarreal, Ovidio A; Fernández-Ceseña, Ernesto; Solano-Ricardi, Mercedes; Aguilar-García, Alma L; Vega-Hernández, Raquel; Del Angel-Soto, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 23-year-old man with mitral valve regurgitation and Glanzmann thrombasthenia, who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement. Warfarin therapy was devastating, causing bilateral hemothorax, pericardial effusion, gastrointestinal bleeding, and hematuria. Redo mitral valve replacement with a biological prosthesis was required to resolve this critical situation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mitral valve replacement in Glanzmann thrombasthenia, highlighting the danger of oral anticoagulation in this pathology.

  4. An Unusual Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Duodenal Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kadaba

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Common causes of chronic upper gastrointestinal bleeding include oesophageal varices, gastroduodenal ulcers and malignancy, and patients mostly present with iron deficiency type anaemia. We present the case of a 60-year-old lady who presented with iron deficiency anaemia and on investigation was found to have a large duodenal polyp requiring surgical excision. On histological examination, the polyp was revealed to be a lipoma. We review the recent literature and formulate a management plan for this rare entity.

  5. Presacral venous bleeding during mobilization in rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal Núñez, Jose Enrique; Vigorita, Vincenzo; Ruano Poblador, Alejandro; Gay Fernández, Ana María; Toscano Novella, Maria Ángeles; Cáceres Alvarado, Nieves; Pérez Dominguez, Lucinda

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze the anatomy of sacral venous plexus flow, the causes of injuries and the methods for controlling presacral hemorrhage during surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS A review of the databases MEDLINE® and Embase™ was conducted, and relevant scientific articles published between January 1960 and June 2016 were examined. The anatomy of the sacrum and its venous plexus, as well as the factors that influence bleeding, the causes of this complication, and its surgical management were defined. RESULTS This is a review of 58 published articles on presacral venous plexus injury during the mobilization of the rectum and on techniques used to treat presacral venous bleeding. Due to the lack of cases published in the literature, there is no consensus on which is the best technique to use if there is presacral bleeding during mobilization in surgery for rectal cancer. This review may provide a tool to help surgeons make decisions regarding how to resolve this serious complication. CONCLUSION A series of alternative treatments are described; however, a conventional systematic review in which optimal treatment is identified could not be performed because few cases were analyzed in most publications.

  6. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  7. Duration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin has a significant effect on hemostasis, so it is often recommended that patients taking aspirin discontinue treatment before elective surgery. While off aspirin, these patients may be at risk of thrombosis. The optimum period of time that aspirin should be withheld is controversial. The aim of this study was to establish the duration of the antihemostatic effect of prolonged aspirin therapy. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study, 51 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into 3 groups, each receiving an identical tablet for 14 days. One group received a placebo tablet; individuals in the other two groups received either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin once a day. Template bleeding times and specific platelet function testing (using the PFA-100; Dade Behring) were carried out on subjects before therapy and again after its completion until they returned to baseline. RESULTS: Thirty-eight volunteers complied sufficiently with the protocol to provide useful results. All bleeding times normalized within 96 hours and all platelet function tests within 144 hours after stopping aspirin. There was no demonstrable hemostatic defect in any volunteer persisting by or beyond the sixth day after treatment cessation. There was no apparent difference in duration of effect between those taking either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: This study uses sensitive measures of platelet function to demonstrate the duration of increased bleeding tendency after withdrawal of aspirin therapy. It supports discontinuation of aspirin therapy 5 days before elective surgery (with the operation being performed on the sixth day).

  8. Infliximab stopped severe gastrointestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satimai Aniwan; Surasak Eakpongpaisit; Boonlert Imraporn; Surachai Amornsawadwatana; Rungsun Rerknimitr

    2012-01-01

    To report the result of rapid ulcer healing by infliximab in Crohn's patients with severe enterocolic bleeding.During 2005 and 2010,inflammatory bowel disease database of King Chulalongkorn Memorial and Samitivej hospitals were reviewed.There were seven Crohn's disease (CD) patients (4 women and 3 men; mean age 52 ± 10.4 years; range:11-86 years).Two of the seven patients developed severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) as a flare up of CD whereas the other five patients presented with GIB as their first symptom for CD.Their mean hemoglobin level dropped from 12 ± 1.3 g/dL to 8.7 ± 1.3 g/dL in a 3-d period.Median packed red blood cells units needed for resuscitation was 4 units.Because of uncontrolled bleeding,surgical resection was considered.However,due to the poor surgical candidacy of these patients (n =3) and/or possible development of short bowel syndrome (n =6),surgery was not pursued.Likewise angiographic embolization was not considered in any due to the risk of large infarction.All severe GIBs successfully stopped by one or two doses of intravenous infliximab.Our data suggests that infliximab is an alternative therapy for CD with severe GIB when surgery has limitation or patient is a high risk.

  9. Meatspace is Cyberspace: The Pynchonian Posthuman in Bleeding Edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Siegel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Thomas Pynchon’s indirect critique of utopian posthumanism in 'Bleeding Edge' by analyzing the deleterious effects that an emerging Internet culture has on the novel’s characters. By seeping into every aspect of their lives, embedding itself in their minds, and becoming a prosthetic consciousness, the Internet has transformed the characters into posthumans and altered their subject positions within a technological global capitalist culture. Contrasting the novel’s take on the posthuman with the posthuman theories of Donna Harraway, N. Katherine Hayles, Robert Pepperell, Rosi Braidotti, David Roden and Seb Franklin, I argue that, while the dominant utopian strain in posthuman theory imagines the advent of posthumanism as an opportunity for liberation from the sexism, racism, and colonial oppression that are enabled by the positing of the classical humanist subject, Pynchon demonstrates that because the Internet technology that brought about the posthuman condition is controlled by governments and corporations, it has become just one more lost chance at freedom that was converted into an instrument of increased control and surveillance. Reading 'Bleeding Edge' against William Gibson’s prototypical posthuman novel Neuromancer, I also contend that while Gibson, despite challenging the ontological primacy of meatspace over cyberspace, keeps the two realms separate, Pynchon, who borrows Gibson’s terms, shows that cyberspace has already merged with meatspace. As a result, Maxine Tarnow, the protagonist of 'Bleeding Edge', has nowhere to run in her attempt to find a provisional refuge for herself and her family.

  10. Intraoperative bleeding control during cesarean delivery of complete placenta previa with transient occlusion of uterine arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Hyun; Joung, Eun-Ju; Lee, Soo-Jung; Kwack, Jae Young; Kwon, Yong Soon

    2015-11-01

    There are few methods to control heavy intra-operative bleeding during cesarean delivery of placenta previa. Transient occlusion of uterine arteries (TOUA) during operation has previously been reported as a quick and safe method to control intra-operative uterine bleeding. We reported 2 cases of cesarean delivery with complete placenta previa in which TOUA was performed to safely reduce intra-operative complication, especially heavy intra-operative bleeding. In the 2 cases, cesarean deliveries were safe and without any complications under the TOUA method. TOUA can be a good method to control heavy intra-operative bleeding during cesarean delivery of complete placenta previa with risk of heavy bleeding.

  11. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wildi, Stefan [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauerfeind, Peter [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Gastroenterology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  12. A new candidate as a hemostatic agent for difficult situations during variceal bleeding: Ankaferd blood stopper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersan Ozaslan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Variceal bleeding is the most challenging emergent situation among the causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Despite substantial improvement, a need remains for therapeutic armamentarium of such cases, which is easy, effective and without side-effect. Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS is a standardized herbal extract acting as a hemostatic agent on the bleeding or injured areas. In this observational study, a total of four patients with variceal bleeding were treated with endoscopic ABS application. The lesions were bleeding gastric varices (n:3 and bleeding duodenal varix (n:1. ABS was selected as a bridge to definitive therapies due to unavailability or inappropriateness of bleeding lesions to conventional measures. ABS was instilled or flushed onto the bleeding areas by sclerotherotherapy needle or heater probe catheter. Periprocedural control of the bleeding was achieved in all instances. Thereafter, on an elective basis, two patients with gastric varices underwent cyanoacrylate injection, while third underwent Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and embolization. The patient with duodenal varix refused further therapy, after a few hours after admission and was discharged. He again presented the same day with rebleeding, but died before any attempt could be made to control his bleeding. ABS seems to be effective in cases of variceal bleeding as a bridge to therapy. Its major advantages are the ease of use and lack of side-effects.

  13. Coagulation is more affected by quick than slow bleeding in patients with massive blood loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Yang, Dejuan; Zheng, Dongyou

    2017-03-01

    Profuse blood loss affects blood coagulation to various degrees. However, whether bleeding speed affects coagulation remains uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bleeding speed on coagulation function. A total of 141 patients in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of our hospital were evaluated between January 2007 and February 2014. There are two groups of patients, those who received decortication for chronic encapsulated empyema were called the slow-bleeding group, and those who received thoracoscopic upper lobectomy were called the fast bleeding group; each group was further subdivided into three: group A, 1000 ml ≤ bleeding amount coagulation function was assessed in all patients before and during surgery and at 1, 2, and 24 h after surgery, measuring prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, blood pressure, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets. Bleeding duration was overtly longer in the slow-bleeding group than that in quick bleeding individuals (2.3 ± 0.25 h vs. 0.41 ± 0.13 h, P coagulation indices at each time point and bleeding amounts had significant differences in the quick bleeding group.Increased consumption of coagulation factors in quick bleeding may have greater impact on coagulation function.

  14. Bleed-through correction for rendering and correlation analysis in multi-colour localization microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dahan; Curthoys, Nikki M; Parent, Matthew T; Hess, Samuel T

    2013-09-01

    Multi-colour localization microscopy has enabled sub-diffraction studies of colocalization between multiple biological species and quantification of their correlation at length scales previously inaccessible with conventional fluorescence microscopy. However, bleed-through, or misidentification of probe species, creates false colocalization and artificially increases certain types of correlation between two imaged species, affecting the reliability of information provided by colocalization and quantified correlation. Despite the potential risk of these artefacts of bleed-through, neither the effect of bleed-through on correlation nor methods of its correction in correlation analyses has been systematically studied at typical rates of bleed-through reported to affect multi-colour imaging. Here, we present a reliable method of bleed-through correction applicable to image rendering and correlation analysis of multi-colour localization microscopy. Application of our bleed-through correction shows our method accurately corrects the artificial increase in both types of correlations studied (Pearson coefficient and pair correlation), at all rates of bleed-through tested, in all types of correlations examined. In particular, anti-correlation could not be quantified without our bleed-through correction, even at rates of bleed-through as low as 2%. Demonstrated with dichroic-based multi-colour FPALM here, our presented method of bleed-through correction can be applied to all types of localization microscopy (PALM, STORM, dSTORM, GSDIM, etc.), including both simultaneous and sequential multi-colour modalities, provided the rate of bleed-through can be reliably determined.

  15. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Wildi, Stefan; Bauerfeind, Peter; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2007-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  16. [Management of abnormal bleeding in an intrauterine device user].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmons, F; Adam-steen, C

    1985-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is the most common complication of IUD use. Minor metrorrhagia during the insertion and the initial 2 or 3 cycles is common and has no pathological significance. The true complications are menorrhagia, or augmentation of the volume of blood, and metrorrhagia, or repeated intermenstrual bleeding. Inert IUDs increase the volume of menstrual blood loss by 100-140% and copper devices by 50-60%. Blood loss is directly related to the size and form of the IUD; copper devices cause less bleeding primarily because of their reduced surface area. Anemia secondary to menstrual problems is a serious problem in developing countries. Metrorrhagia in IUD users is often associated with pain and may lead to removal of the device. It may result from the same array of morphological and functional modifications of the endometrium as menorrhagia, but more often it signals a true complication, either utero-adnexal infection, an intra- or extrauterine pregnancy or spontaneous abortion, or an inadaptation to the uterine cavity or a displacement of the IUD, perhaps with perforation. Metrorrhagia may also result from appearance of a calcium deposit on the surface of an IUD in place for over 2 years, or it may reveal a pathology unrelated to the IUD, such as a myoma, polyp, endometrial hyperplasia, or adenomyosis. Menorrhagia is an almost inevitable consequence of IUD use, but metrorrhagia requires close surveillance. A clinical examination aided by diagnostic tests is needed to distinguish between complications requiring immediate treatment and simple intolerances that may spontaneously resolve. Sonography is indispensable, to confirm good placement of the IUD or to rule out uterine anomalies or pregnancy. Hysteroscopy can be performed with the IUD in place or not, to diagnose localized endometrial hyperplasias, polyps, poorly positioned IUDs, or partial or complete perforations. Hysterography after infection and pregnancy have been ruled out can reveal endocavity

  17. Clinical audit of inherited bleeding disorders in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Raihan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We did a clinical audit to determine the status of coagulation disorders in a hemophilia care center in Pakistan. Setting: Fatimid foundation blood bank and hematological diseases center, Lahore. Study Design: This is a retrospective descriptive study. Materials and Methods: All patients registered at Lahore center were included. Data was collected using a questionnaire including age, gender, diagnosis, hepatitis and human immune deficiency virus (HIV status, number of episodes of bleeding, most common site of bleeding, severity of disorder and number of transfusions required to treat the episode. Results: During the study period, a total of 923 registered patients were reviewed at Lahore center and of these, 408 patients (44.2% were on regular follow-up. Inherited bleeding disorders identified in these patients included hemophilia A, hemophilia B, vWD, factor VII deficiency, factor V deficiency, factor X deficiency, dysfibrinogenemia, afibrinogenemia, factor XIII deficiency; and platelet function defects. Median age was 17 years with a range of three to 57 years. Median age at diagnosis was one year. There were 329 (80.6% males and 79 (19.3% females. The products used in these patients included factor VIII concentrate, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, cryosupernatant and platelets. Testing for transmission of viral infections was also done in these patients and one patient (0.2% was found hepatitis B positive, six patients (1.4% were hepatitis C positive and two patients (0.49% were HIV positive. Conclusion: Hemophilia A, hemophilia B and vWD are the commonly encountered inherited bleeding disorders in our patients followed by other recessively transmitted disorders with a median age of 17 years and male to female ratio of 4: 1. Most of the patients utilized services available at Fatimid foundation with good clinical results. In Pakistan, non-governmental organizations (NGOs are trying their best for providing optimal treatment

  18. Unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in a cirrhotic patient:hepatocellular carcinoma with gastric invasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcos Vinicius Perini; Paulo Herman; Rodrigo Pessoa; Willian Abraao Saad

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common complication of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common tumor in cirrhotic livers. Bleeding from tumor erosion into the GI tract is very rare. A patient with HCC and gastric tumor invasion was described and the previously reported cases were reviewed. METHOD: A patient with upper GI bleeding was treated in a tertiary hospital. RESULTS: A cirrhotic patient with a HCC invading the stomach leading to upper GI bleeding was treated by left lateral segmentectomy and sub-total gastrectomy. The bleeding was controlled and a good surgical outcome was achieved. CONCLUSIONS: HCC with gastric invasion should be differentially diagnosed from upper GI bleeding in cirrhotic patients. Bleeding can be controlled and symptomatic relief marked in selected cases.

  19. ArterioVenous Malformation within Jejunal Diverticulum: An Unusual Cause of Massive Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive gastrointestinal (GI bleeding can occur with multiple jejunal diverticulosis. However, significant bleeding in the setting of few diverticulae is very unusual and rare. We report a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding from an arteriovenous malformation (AVM within a jejunal diverticulum to underscore the significance of such coexisting pathologies. Mesenteric angiogram was chosen to help identify the source of bleeding and to offer an intervention. Despite endovascular coiling, emergent intestinal resection of the bleeding jejunal segment was warranted to ensure definitive treatment. However several reports have shown jejunal diverticulosis as a rare cause of massive GI bleeding. The coexistence of jejunal diverticulum and AVM is rare and massive bleeding from an acquired Dieulafoy-like AVM within a diverticulum has never previously been described. Awareness of Dieulafoy-like AVM within jejunoileal diverticulosis is useful in preventing delay in treatment.

  20. The medical management of abnormal uterine bleeding in reproductive-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Linda D; Gueye, Ndeye-Aicha

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, once a thorough history, physical examination, and indicated imaging studies are performed and all significant structural causes are excluded, medical management is the first-line approach. Determining the acuity of the bleeding, the patient's medical history, assessing risk factors, and establishing a diagnosis will individualize their medical regimen. In acute abnormal uterine bleeding with a normal uterus, parenteral estrogen, a multidose combined oral contraceptive regimen, a multidose progestin-only regimen, and tranexamic acid are all viable options, given the appropriate clinical scenario. Heavy menstrual bleeding can be treated with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, combined oral contraceptives, continuous oral progestins, and tranexamic acid with high efficacy. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be utilized with hormonal methods and tranexamic acid to decrease menstrual bleeding. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are indicated in patients with leiomyoma and abnormal uterine bleeding in preparation for surgical interventions. In women with inherited bleeding disorders all hormonal methods as well as tranexamic acid can be used to treat abnormal uterine bleeding. Women on anticoagulation therapy should consider using progestin-only methods as well as a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to treat their heavy menstrual bleeding. Given these myriad options for medical treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, many patients may avoid surgical intervention.

  1. Efficacy of intra-arterial treatment for massive gastrointestinal bleeding in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banshodani, Masataka; Kawanishi, Hideki; Moriishi, Misaki; Shintaku, Sadanori; Sato, Tomoyasu; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of acute nonvariceal massive gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is higher in hemodialysis (HD) patients than in healthy individuals, and this is often a life-threatening event. We evaluated the efficacy of intra-arterial treatment for GIB in HD patients. Between January 2006 and June 2012, eight HD patients with GIB were treated with superselective transarterial embolization. Of the eight cases, one was duodenal bleeding, two were jejunal bleeding, one was ileocecum bleeding, two were ascending colonic bleeding, and two were sigmoid colonic bleeding. After examining the site of bleeding by endoscopy or contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), embolizations with microcoils, gelatin sponges, or N-butyl cyanoacrylate were performed through interventional radiology (IVR). In all cases, blood transfusions were frequently administered. Six of the eight patients with GIB were successfully salvaged by transarterial embolization. In one case, duodenal bleeding was refractory to endoscopic treatment. Embolization was performed twice in this case; however, the patient died of an aneurysm rupture at the embolization site 24 days after the embolizations. In another case, massive jejunal bleeding and disseminated intravascular coagulation were identified at the time of the first examination, and the patient died of multiorgan failure 26 days after the embolization. On the basis of our experience, we established an effective treatment strategy for HD patients with acute nonvariceal massive GIB, by immediately identifying the exact site and degree of bleeding using contrast-enhanced computed tomography and performing early treatment with transarterial embolization.

  2. Women’s perceptions about reducing the frequency of monthly bleeding: results from a multinational survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szarewski A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anne Szarewski,1 Cecilia Moeller2 1Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom; 2Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Global Market Research General Medicine, Berlin, Germany Background: Monthly bleeding can have a negative impact on daily life and, given the choice, many women would reduce the frequency of bleeding. While some women choose to occasionally postpone or reduce bleeding frequency with an oral contraceptive (OC, most women have no or limited experience of regularly reducing the frequency of scheduled bleeding with OCs, ie, the extended OC regimen. Study design: An online survey of 4039 women aged 15–49 years who were currently using, had used, or would consider using any form of hormonal contraception was conducted in Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, UK, and USA to assess awareness of and the reasons for and against reducing bleeding frequency. Results: Overall, 51.1% and 30.7% of women surveyed were aware that they could occasionally or regularly reduce bleeding frequency with an OC. Moreover, 27.6% and 9.9% of previous/current OC users had occasionally or regularly reduced bleeding frequency with an OC. The main reasons for reducing bleeding frequency were convenience, physician recommendations, special events, and relief of problems associated with bleeding. Many women mistakenly believed that reducing bleeding frequency would have a negative health impact. Conclusion: Additional efforts are needed to educate women about the possibility and potential health benefits of reducing bleeding frequency and to dispel misconceptions about the use of extended OC regimens. Keywords: extended regimen, menstruation, oral contraceptive, withdrawal bleeding, scheduled bleeding

  3. A STUDY ON UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPIC FINDINGS IN PATIENTS WITH UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

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    Salla Surya Prakasa Rao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Vomiting of blood almost always proximal to the ligament of Treitz is the upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage has been estimated to be 50-100 per 1,00,000 person per year, with an annual hospitalization rate of approximately 100 per 1, 00,000 hospital admission. This study is to find out the prevalence of nature of lesion on Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in patients admitted for Gastrointestinal bleeding. (UGI Bleed. MATERIALS AND METHODS Place of Study- Department of General Medicine, Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, India. Type of Study- Prospective study. Period of Study- July 2015 to August 2016. RESULTS The Results Study on Endoscopic Findings in Upper Gastro Intestinal Bleed are 1. The peptic ulcer disease was the most common lesion found on endoscopy with prevalence of 54%. 2. Varices contributes second common lesion, next to peptic ulcer disease in UGI bleed with prevalence of 16%. 3. Minor UGI bleed was the commonest presentation. Majority of lesions (60% presented with minor UGI bleed, 28% lesions presented as moderate UGI bleed. Only 8% presented as major UGI bleed. 4. Varices account for the most common cause for major UGI bleed contributing 50%. 5. Gastric ulcer was commonest lesions accounting for 37 cases (37% among 72 cases having single acid peptic lesions on endoscopy. The second most common is duodenal ulcer (31%. 6. Multiple lesions were found in 10% of cases. Peptic ulcer lesions were found in 20% of total number of varices cases. CONCLUSION Peptic ulcer disease was found to be most common lesion causing UGI bleed, with most common presentation as minor UGI bleed and variceal bleed being most common cause of major UGI bleed.

  4. Registry of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, T; Schved, J F

    2012-11-01

    Creating a national registry for bleeding disorders is a major step in establishing a National Hemophilia Care Program in all countries. Creating such a registry which would contain accurate and regularly updated data, including laboratory analysis confirmed by a reference laboratory established at the Syrian Hemophilia Society. Blood samples were drawn and analysed in the Society reference laboratory for the following screening tests: prothrombin time (PT), APTT and coagulation factor assays. Inhibitor detection and VWF RiCof were performed depending on the result of the screening tests. HBs Ag, anti-HCV, anti-HIV 1+2 and syphilis tests were also performed to detect transfusion transmitted agents (TTA). Diagnosis of the bleeding disorder type was confirmed for 760 of these cases. Among the 760 confirmed patients, 82.5% had haemophilia. Among these, 89.6%were haemophilia A; 10.4% were haemophilia B; 8.3% had VWD; 9.2% had other rare bleeding disorders as follows: 1.2% FVII deficiency, 0.7% FV deficiency, 1.8% F1 deficiency, 0.4% FX deficiency, 1.4% platelets dysfunctions (mainly Glanzmann Thrombasthenia) and 3.7% had combined FVIII and FV deficiency. Eighty (21.3%) cases of 375 screened for transfusion transmitted agents were positive for at least one infection: 0.5% were HBsAg positive, 19.7% were anti-HCV positive, 0.8% had combined HBsAg and anti-HCV positivity and 0.3% was anti-Syphilis positive. All patients were negative for HIV1 and HIV2. The preliminary data presented here follow known data on haemophilia A, haemophilia B and VWD disease. This registry will certainly help in improving haemophilia care in Syria.

  5. Ultrasonographic evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding in postmenopausal women

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    Bindushree Kadakola

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Objectives of current study were to diagnose causes of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB in postmenopausal women (PMW and to correlate it with curettage and histopathological findings, hysteroscopy and thereby minimizing unnecessary interventions in the form of operations and hysteroscopy where sonography depicts normal findings. Methods: After obtaining ethical clearance present prospective observational study was conducted from November 2010 to November 2012, to evaluate the endometrium in 50 postmenopausal women (PMW with bleeding per vagina referred to the department of Radio diagnosis by the department of gynaecology in Bangalore medical college and research institute. After applying inclusion and exclusion criterias the cases were evaluated with ultrasonography both transabdominal (TAS and transvaginal scan (TVS where ever necessary. Histopathological and hysteroscopic correlation was done in all cases. Results: 58% of the PMW with bleed were in the age group of 51-60 years. Most common cause of PMB was atrophic endometrium (44%, endometrial polyp (22%, followed by malignancy (14%, and hyperplastic endometrium (6%. At Endometrium thickness less than 4 mm there were nil chances of carcinoma. Conclusions: In women with AUB in postmenopausal age ultrasonography (USG can be considered as an initial imaging modality for diagnosing endometrial diseases. The sensitivity and specificity of USG for Atrophic endometrium is 100% and 84% respectively with accuracy of 100%, endometrial polyp the specificity is 100% with accuracy of 88%. For malignancy USG showed 100% specificity and accuracy of 100%. Hence USG is highly accurate for evaluating endometrial pathologies. Being noninvasive, less costly and good patient compliance USG should be considered as an initial imaging modality over invasive investigations like D and C, hysteroscopy in evaluating endometrial disorders. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 229-234

  6. Thyroid abnormality in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

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    Prasanna Byna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AUB is a common but complicated clinical presentation and occurs in 15-20% of women between menarche to menopause and significantly affects the women's health. Women with thyroid dysfunction often have menstrual irregularities, infertility and increased morbidity during pregnancy. The objective of present study is to find the correlation between thyroid disorders and AUB in perimenopausal women attending gynecology OPD. Methods: In the present study, fifty five patients with AUB were included and were evaluated for the cause including thyroid abnormality. Thyroid function tests were done in all patients. Results: Among 55 patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism and 7 as hyperthyroidism, women with AUB 36 (65.4% were euthyroid. Among 19 women with thyroid abnormality, heavy menstrual bleeding was seen in 8 (42% women, 6 (31.57% had polymenorrhagia, 5 (26.31% had oligomenorrhoea. The frequent menstrual abnormality in women with hypothyroidism (12 women was heavy menstrual bleeding in 5 (41.6% women, 3 (25% had oligomennorhoea, 4 (33.3% had polymenorrhagia. Out of 7 women with hyperthyroidism, 2 (28.57% had oligomenorrhoea, 3 (42.8% had heavy menstrual bleeding, 2 (28.57% had polymenorrhagia. In a total of 55 patients with AUB, 11 (20% had structural abnormalities in uterus and ovaries. 5 (9% had adenomyosis, 3 (5.4% had ovarian cysts, 3 (5.4% had fibroids. Conclusions: It is important to screen all women for thyroid abnormality who are presenting with AUB especially with non-structural causes of AUB. Correction of thyroid abnormalities also relieves AUB. This will avoid unnecessary hormonal treatment and surgery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3250-3253

  7. Endoscopic difficulties in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. Appleyard; C.P. Swain

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal ( GI ) tract remains common ,with a reported annual incidence of up to 172 per 100 000 [1],which has of anything increased from earlier series. Case fatality was recently reported as 14%[2] ,which has probably not changed over several decades .These figures may reflect a rising proportion of elderly patients and increasing non 杝teroidal anti-inflammatory use ,but occur despite apparently better treatments and understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of peptic ulcer disease.

  8. Initial Assessment and Resuscitation in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Tracey G; Travis, Anne C; Saltzman, John R

    2015-07-01

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding remains an important cause of hospital admission with an associated mortality of 2-14%. Initial patient evaluation includes rapid hemodynamic assessment, large-bore intravenous catheter insertion and volume resuscitation. A hemoglobin transfusion threshold of 7 g/dL is recommended, and packed red blood cell transfusion may be necessary to restore intravascular volume and improve tissue perfusion. Patients should be risk stratified into low- and high-risk categories, using validated prognostic scoring systems such as the Glasgow-Blatchford, AIMS65 or Rockall scores. Effective early management of acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is critical for improving patient outcomes.

  9. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena.

  10. Evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding: Update of current radiologic strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parth; J; Parekh; Ross; C; Buerlein; Rouzbeh; Shams; Harlan; Vingan; David; A; Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding(GIB) is a common presenta-tion with significant associated morbidity and mortality, the prevalence of which continues to rise with the ever-increasing aging population. Initial evaluation includes an esophagoduodeonscopy and/or colonoscopy, which may fail to reveal a source. Such cases prove to be a dilemma and require collaboration between gastroen-terology and radiology in deciding the most appropriate approach. Recently, there have been a number of ra-diologic advances in the approach to GIB. The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based update on the most current radiologic modalities available and an algorithmic approach to GIB.

  11. A Note on Bleeding Edge’s “Unsheltered”

    OpenAIRE

    Albert Rolls

    2014-01-01

    The 'Bleeding Edge 'excerpt provided in the Fall 2013 Penguin Press catalogue notes that “[u]nhoused people sleep in doorways,”but by the time the Advanced Reading Copy had reached reviewers, “unhoused” had been changed to “unsheltered” (2), an edit that remained in place, even after other changes to the text, a couple of months later when the book became available for general readers. . . . We might ask: what significance is there to the edit? And from whose perspective are we seeing Maxine’...

  12. Aero-Effected Flight Control Using Distributed Active Bleed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    x/c ≤ 0.28. A better scheme is to use the actual net pressure distribution near the leading edge of a Clark-Y airfoil with no bleed as a measure...due to continuous, high-frequency actuation, 10° <  < 22°. work (e.g. Carta , 1967, Carta and Carlson, 1973) quantifies the extent of these enclosures...Layer Instability,” AIAA J, 39, 597-604, 2001. Carta , F. O., “An Analysis of the Stall Flutter Instability of Helicopter Rotor Blades,” Journal of the

  13. Microcirculatory remodeling in marginal zone of duodenal ulcer after bleeding

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    Sulayeva О.N.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate objectively vessels network remodeling in duodenal mucosa after ulcer bleeding the morphometric analysis of marginal ulcer zone biopsies was performed in 32 patients. It was shown that reparation is accompanied with chronic inflammation and acute alteration of microcirculation. Injection hemostasis led to enhancement of microcirculation, development of edema and ischemic alteration of mucosal tissues. Acute neutrophilic infiltration during 1 day was changed on 3 day with granular tissue development and angiogenesis stimulation. Intensification and prolongation of angiogenesis paral-leled with lymphocytes infiltration after 7 days resulted to villi dysmorphogenesis and changes in cellular content of intestinal epithelium.

  14. Rescue endoscopic bleeding control for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage using clipping and detachable snaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Kim, B K; Seol, D C; Byun, S J; Park, K H; Sung, I K; Park, H S; Shim, C S

    2013-06-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding recurs after appropriate endoscopic therapy in 10 % - 15 % of cases. The mortality rate can be as high as 25 % when bleeding recurs, but there is no consensus about the best modality for endoscopic re-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate clipping and detachable snaring (CDS) for rescue endoscopic control of nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage. We report a case series of seven patients from a Korean tertiary center who underwent endoscopic hemostasis using the combined method of detachable snares with hemoclips. The success rate of endoscopic hemostasis with CDS was 86 %: six of the seven patients who had experienced primary endoscopic treatment failure or recurrent bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis were treated successfully. In conclusion, rescue endoscopic bleeding control by means of CDS is an option for controlling nonvariceal UGI bleeding when no other method of endoscopic treatment for recurrent bleeding and primary hemostatic failure is possible.

  15. Preventive Strategies against Bleeding due to Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants

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    Lessire Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dabigatran etexilate (DE, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs that have been compared in clinical trials with existing anticoagulants (warfarin and enoxaparin in several indications for the prevention and treatment of thrombotic events. All NOACs presented bleeding events despite a careful selection and control of patients. Compared with warfarin, NOACs had a decreased risk of intracranial hemorrhage, and apixaban and DE (110 mg BID had a decreased risk of major bleeding from any site. Rivaroxaban and DE showed an increased risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin. Developing strategies to minimize the risk of bleeding is essential, as major bleedings are reported in clinical practice and specific antidotes are currently not available. In this paper, the following preventive approaches are reviewed: improvement of appropriate prescription, identification of modifiable bleeding risk factors, tailoring NOAC’s dose, dealing with a missed dose as well as adhesion to switching, bridging and anesthetic procedures.

  16. Severe gastric variceal bleeding successfully treated by emergency splenic artery embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Velayuthan, Sujithra; Vea, Romulo; Herbst, John

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices due to splenic vein obstruction is extremely rare in children, but it can be catastrophic. Reported herein is the case of a teenager with splenic vein thrombosis and chronic decompensated liver disease from autoimmune hepatitis who presented with massive gastric variceal bleeding. Standard medical management did not control the bleeding. Due to decompensated liver disease and continuous active bleeding, emergency partial splenic artery embolization was preferred over splenectomy or a shunt procedure. Bleeding was successfully controlled by partial splenic artery embolization by decreasing the inflow of blood into the portal system. It is concluded that emergency partial splenic artery embolization is a safer alternative life-saving procedure to manage severe gastric variceal bleeding due to splenic vein obstruction in a patient with high surgical risk. To our knowledge, only one other patient with similar management has been reported in the pediatric age group.

  17. Severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding in extraluminal diverticula in the third part of the duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Andersen, Johnny Fredsbo; Lauritsen, Morten Laksafoss

    2014-05-13

    The successful management of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding requires identification of the source of bleeding and when this is achieved the bleeding can often be treated endoscopically. However, the identification of the bleeding can be challenging due to the location of the bleeding or technical aspects. Therefore it might be necessary to use other measures than endoscopy such as CT angiography. Duodenal diverticula is a rare cause of upper GI bleeding and can be challenging to diagnose as they often require specialised endoscopy procedures such as endoscopy with a side-viewing scope. This case describes the first successful management of this rare condition with an upper GI endoscopy with a colonoscope and afterwards intravascular coiling.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Bleeding from Ruptured Vessels in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Darren L.

    2000-11-01

    With the projected increase of manned space activity in the forthcoming years, there will be a heightened risk of serious injury and/or need for surgical procedures resulting in significant blood loss. The bleeding process may be quite different in a microgravity environment compared with the terrestrial setting. Owing to the removal of normally dominant body forces, the mechanism by which the blood exits a ruptured vessel may be greatly influenced by surface tension. Consequently, blood may be ejected from a blood vessel in the form of droplets rather than a continuous leakage; stable domes of blood surrounding a wound may also be possible. The present study represents the first step towards a theoretical and computational model of the bleeding process in microgravity. A finite element-based numerical model (FIDAP 8.5) is developed for the problem of blood loss from a single ruptured vessel into a quiescent, miscible medium. Computations are carried out in two-dimensions and three-dimensions to investigate the rate of blood loss as a function of flow pulsatility, red blood cell concentration, rupture geometry, and vessel wall elasticity. Blood will be modeled as a Newtonian fluid with a concentration-dependent viscosity (Casson's model).

  19. Postoperative bleeding in a patient with normal screening coagulation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Eva; Anvari, Reza; D'cunha, Nicholas; Thaxton, Lauren; Malik, Asim; Nugent, Kenneth

    2011-09-01

    A 54-year-old man was brought to the emergency room after a head-on collision. He had multiple fractures in his lower extremities and required immediate surgery. After surgery, the patient had a persistent drop in hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets despite red blood cell transfusions. Laboratory studies included normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, normal plasminogen functional activity, negative antiplatelet antibodies, normal platelet functional analysis and negative disseminated intravascular coagulation screen. Factor XIII antigen levels were 25% of predicted, and the diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency was made. The patient was treated with cryoprecipitate, and the bleeding stopped. Patients with factor XIII deficiency have either a rare congenital or acquired coagulation disorder. Both presentations have normal standard laboratory clotting tests, and the diagnosis requires an assay measuring factor XIII activity or antigen levels. The usual treatment includes cryoprecipitate, fresh-frozen plasma or recombinant factor XIII. This deficiency should be considered in patients with unexplained spontaneous, traumatic or postoperative bleeding.

  20. Gastric Glomus Tumor: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Handa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old woman was referred to our department because of melena. These symptoms combined with severe anemia prompted us to perform an emergency upper endoscopy, which showed bleeding from an ulcerated 30 mm submucosal tumor in the gastric antrum. A computed tomography scan revealed a homogeneously enhanced mass, and endoscopic ultrasonography identified a well-demarcated mass in the third and fourth layers of the gastric wall. Because analysis of the possible medical causes remained inconclusive and the risk of rebleeding, laparoscopy-assisted gastric wedge resection was performed after administration of 10 units of red cell concentrate. Histological and immunohistological analysis revealed the tumor to be a gastric glomus tumor. Gastric submucosal tumors remain challenging to diagnose preoperatively as they show a variety of radiologic and clinicopathologic features and are associated with the risk of bleeding upon biopsy, as is indicated in the guidelines for gastric submucosal tumors. Gastric glomus tumors characteristically present with exsanguinating gastrointestinal hemorrhaging that often requires blood transfusion. Additionally, gastric submucosal tumors typically occur in elderly patients; however, this case involved a young patient who was 24 years old. Here, we describe this case in order to identify features that may aid in early differentiation of gastric submucosal tumors.

  1. Flight vibrations and bleeding in helicoptered patients with pelvic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carchietti, Elio; Cecchi, Adriana; Valent, Francesca; Rammer, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Depending on their amplitude and frequency, vibrations may facilitate bleeding and worsen the prognosis of patients with pelvic fractures transported by helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS). We measured the range of frequencies and amplitudes of forced vibrations produced by the helicopter used by the HEMS of the Italian Friuli Venezia Giulia region on the pelvis of transported persons. We performed 3 flight tests with 3 different volunteers (mass 70, 80, and 90 kg, respectively) loaded on the helicopter's stretcher and recorded the amplitudes and frequencies of vibrations through a triaxis sensor placed on the HEMS stretcher in the pelvis area. The flight profile planned was identical for each of the 3 iterations. Over the whole flight, the frequencies of vibration were between 26.4 and 53.5 Hz, and the greastest amplitude was 0.035 mm. The vibrations recorded in the helicopter may facilitate bleeding in unstable fractures. In the management of patients with pelvic fractures, HEMS crews should provide prehospital care that includes the use of specific splinting devices in addition to the spinal board, which allows an early immobilization of fractures and the limitation of pelvic motion.

  2. The Application of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeding during Emergency Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Hagel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastrointestinal bleeding represents the main indication for emergency endoscopy (EE. Lately, several hemostatic powders have been released to facilitate EE. Methods. We evaluated all EE in which Hemospray was used as primary or salvage therapy, with regard to short- and long-term hemostasis and complications. Results. We conducted 677 EE in 474 patients (488 examinations in 344 patients were upper GI endoscopies. Hemospray was applied during 35 examinations in 27 patients (19 males, 33 during upper and 2 during lower endoscopy. It was used after previous treatment in 21 examinations (60% and in 14 (40% as salvage therapy. Short-term success was reached in 34 of 35 applications (97.1%, while long-term success occurred in 23 applications (65.7%. Similar long-term results were found after primary application (64,3% or salvage therapy (66,7%. Rebleeding was found in malignant and extended ulcers. One major adverse event (2.8% occurred with gastric perforation after Hemospray application. Discussion. Hemospray achieved short-term hemostasis in virtually all cases. The long-term effect is mainly determined by the type of bleeding source, but not whether it was applied as first line or salvage therapy. But, even in the failures, patients had benefit from hemodynamic stabilization and consecutive interventions in optimized conditions.

  3. The Application of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeding during Emergency Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Heinz; Nägel, Andreas; Vitali, Francesco; Vetter, Marcel; Dauth, Christine; Neurath, Markus F.; Raithel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal bleeding represents the main indication for emergency endoscopy (EE). Lately, several hemostatic powders have been released to facilitate EE. Methods. We evaluated all EE in which Hemospray was used as primary or salvage therapy, with regard to short- and long-term hemostasis and complications. Results. We conducted 677 EE in 474 patients (488 examinations in 344 patients were upper GI endoscopies). Hemospray was applied during 35 examinations in 27 patients (19 males), 33 during upper and 2 during lower endoscopy. It was used after previous treatment in 21 examinations (60%) and in 14 (40%) as salvage therapy. Short-term success was reached in 34 of 35 applications (97.1%), while long-term success occurred in 23 applications (65.7%). Similar long-term results were found after primary application (64,3%) or salvage therapy (66,7%). Rebleeding was found in malignant and extended ulcers. One major adverse event (2.8%) occurred with gastric perforation after Hemospray application. Discussion. Hemospray achieved short-term hemostasis in virtually all cases. The long-term effect is mainly determined by the type of bleeding source, but not whether it was applied as first line or salvage therapy. But, even in the failures, patients had benefit from hemodynamic stabilization and consecutive interventions in optimized conditions. PMID:28232848

  4. [Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding - endoscopy sheds light in the darkness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, A

    2014-08-01

    Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as a bleeding of the small bowel and is the most common indication for small bowel endoscopy. Intraoperative enteroscopy has been regarded as gold standard for a long time. With the introduction of different endoscopy techniques, they play now the central role, whereas intraoperative enteroscopy has become a reserve method for selected patients. Actually, there are, beside capsule endoscopy, five non-surgical, flexible enteroscopy techniques available. In Germany and Europe balloon-assisted enteroscopy (double balloon and single balloon enteroscopy) is mainly used. Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is the "oldest" flexible enteroscopy technique and has become established throughout the world for diagnostic and therapeutic examinations of the small bowel. The majority of the studies have been performed with DBE and it provides the highest rate of complete enteroscopy. Nevertheless, technical improvements to make enteroscopy easier and faster are still required. In patients with chronic MGI or problematic situations capsule endoscopy is an ideal screening option. In case of acute MGI the flexible enteroscopy techniques should be preferred because of the high diagnostic yield combined with the possibility of endoscopic therapeutic interventions. In difficult cases with unsuccessful enteroscopy, CT angiography and conventional angiography with the option of embolisation had proved their value.

  5. New advances in lower gastrointestinal bleeding management with embolotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Urbano, Josè; De Marchi, Giuseppe; Micieli, Camilla; Duka, Ejona; Iacobellis, Francesca; Fontana, Federico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Embolization is currently proposed as the first step in the treatment of acute, life-threatening LGIB, when endoscopic approach is not possible or is unsuccessful. Like most procedures performed in emergency setting, time represents a significant factor influencing outcome. Modern tools permit identifying and reaching the bleeding site faster than two-dimensional angiography. Non-selective cone-beam CT arteriography can identify a damaged vessel. Moreover, sophisticated software able to detect the vessel may facilitate direct placement of a microcatheter into the culprit vessel without the need for sequential angiography. A further important aspect is the use of an appropriate technique of embolization and a safe and effective embolic agent. Current evidence shows the use of detachable coils (with or without a triaxial system) and liquid embolics has proven advantages compared with other embolic agents. The present article analyses these modern tools, making embolization of acute LGIB safer and more effective.

  6. Capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戈之铮; 胡运彪; 萧树东

    2004-01-01

    Background In obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, it is often difficult to detect the bleeding sites located in the small bowel with conventional radiological, scintigraphic or angiographic techniques. Push enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy are currently considered to be the most effective diagnostic procedures. The aim of this study was to compare the detection rates between capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy. Methods From May 2002 through January 2003, we prospectively examined by capsule endoscopy 39 patients with suspected small bowel diseases, in particular GI bleeding of unknown origin in Renji Hospital. Among them, 32 complained of obscure recurrent GI bleeding. Between January 1993 and October 1996, we used push enteroscopy on 36 patients who suffered from unexplained GI bleeding. All patients had prior normal results on gastroscopy, colonoscopy, small bowel barium radiography, scintigraphy and/or angiography. Results M2A capsule endoscopy disclosed abnormal small bowel findings in 26 (82%) out of 32 patients. Twenty-one of them had significant pathological findings explaining their clinical disorders. Diagnostic yield was therefore 66% (21 of 32 patients). Definite bleeding sites diagnosed by capsule endoscopy in 21 patients included angiodysplasia (8), inflammatory small-bowel (5), small-bowel polyps (4), gastrointestinal stromal tumour (2), carcinoid tumour and lipoma (1), and hemorrhagic gastritis (1). Push enteroscopy detected the definite sources of bleeding in 9 (25%) of the 36 patients. Patients with definite bleeding sources included angiodysplasias (2), leiomyosarcoma (2), leiomyoma (1), lymphoma (1), Crohn's disease (1), small-bowel polyps (1) and adenocarcinoma of ampulla (1). Suspected bleeding sources were shown by push enteroscopy in two additional patients (6%), and in other five patients (16%) by capsule endoscopy.Conclusions The present study of patients with obscure GI bleeding showed that capsule endoscopy significantly superior

  7. A method for management of extraperitoneal pelvic bleeding secondary to penetrating trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, R P; Holevar, M R; Falimirski, M E; Merlotti, G J

    1997-08-01

    Several techniques for the management of bleeding from extraperitoneal pelvic bullet tracks have been described in the literature. Some methods described include packing followed by direct control of the bleeding and use of thumbtacks. These methods often incur significant blood loss and prolonged operative times. We present our experience with an alternative method, which involves tamponade of the bleeding using a Foley catheter. This method has been used on 11 consecutive patients with successful control of life-threatening hemorrhage.

  8. Variceal bleeding from ileum identified and treated by single balloon enteroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Traina; Ilaria Tarantino; Luca Barresi; Filippo Mocciaro

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute uncontrolled gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with liver cirrhosis. The upper and lower endoscopy were negative for bleeding lesions. We decided to perform the examination of the small bowel using single-balloon enteroscopy. The lower enteroscopy revealed signs of bleeding from varices of the ileum. In this report, we showed that the injection of a sclerosant solution can be accomplished using a freehand technique via the single balloon enteroscopy.

  9. Selective Embolization for Post-Endoscopic Sphincterotomy Bleeding: Technical Aspects and Clinical Efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young Ho; Choi, Young Ho [Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Soon Young [Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the technical aspects and clinical efficacy of selective embolization for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. We reviewed the records of 10 patients (3%; M:F 6:4; mean age, 63.3 years) that underwent selective embolization for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding among 344 patients who received arteriography for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from 2000 to 2009. We analyzed the endoscopic procedure, onset of bleeding, underlying clinical condition, angiographic findings, interventional procedure, and outcomes in these patients. Among the 12 bleeding branches, primary success of hemostasis was achieved in 10 bleeding branches (83%). Secondary success occurred in two additional bleeding branches (100%) after repeated embolization. In 10 patients, post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleedings were detected during the endoscopic procedure (n = 2, 20%) or later (n = 8, 80%), and the delay was from one to eight days (mean, 2.9 days; {+-} 2.3). Coagulopathy was observed in three patients. Eight patients had a single bleeding branch, whereas two patients had two branches. On the selective arteriography, bleeding branches originated from the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 8, 67%) and anterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 4, 33%), respectively. Superselection was achieved in four branches and the embolization was performed with n-butyl cyanoacrylate. The eight branches were embolized by combined use of coil, n-butyl cyanoacrylate, or Gelfoam. After the last embolization, there was no rebleeding or complication related to embolization. Selective embolization is technically feasible and an effective procedure for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. In addition, the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery is the main origin of the causative vessels of post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding.

  10. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, T.P. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Gulati, M.S. [Department of Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Makharia, G.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)]. E-mail: govindmakharia@aiims.ac.in; Bandhu, S. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Garg, P.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding.

  11. Successful endoscopic sclerotherapy for cholecystojejunostomy variceal bleeding in a patient with pancreatic head cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Chun; Hsu; Hsu-Heng; Yen; Maw-Soan; Soon

    2010-01-01

    Variceal bleeding outside the esophagus and stomach is rare but important because of its difficult diagnosis and treatment.Bleeding from cholecystojejunostomy varices has been reported to be a late complication of palliative biliary surgery for chronic pancreatitis.Such ectopic variceal bleeding has never been reported after palliative surgery for pancreatic cancer,probably because of the limited lifespan of these patients. Herein,we report our successful experience using endoscopic cyanoacrylate sclerother...

  12. The Volume of Blood Shed During the Bleeding Time Correlates with the Peripheral Venous Hematocrit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Thtombosis. NY, Gnme-Stration 1974,2:249. 2. The bleeding time. The Lancet 1991,337:1447. 3. Rodgers RPC, Levin J. A critical reappraisal of the bleeding...The bleeding-time and the baematocrit. The Lancet May 4; 1984,997. * ^SSSfSSf ^ ’*" bl00d "* ""’* ’*■» ">te ta ««»bus fixation. Science

  13. An Unusual Case of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with Coeliac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the journey of a patient with coeliac disease who presented with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy did not reveal a source of bleeding, but an abdominal CT scan detected abnormal lymphadenopathy and a wireless capsule endoscopy diagnosed a jejunal tumour, which was surgically removed. Gastrointestinal bleeding is rare in celiac disease. Malignant tumours of the small intestine are generally uncommon, but celiac disease rep...

  14. Comparative efficiency of endoscopic hemostasis methods in bleeding undercomplicated peptic ulcer in children

    OpenAIRE

    Сокольник, Сергій Олександрович

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To compare the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis in complex treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding in children of Chernovtsy region with peptic ulcer disease.Methods. 43 cases of bleeding in peptic ulcer disease in children are analyzed. Argon plasma coagulation is undergone in order to stop the bleeding for 11 patients, for others – aminocaproic acid irrigation.Results. Using argon plasma coagulation, in contrast to the aminocaproic acid irrigation reduces the risk of rebleeding 0....

  15. Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn: an unusual etiology of neonatal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, L

    1986-08-01

    Emergency physicians may encounter presentations of bleeding in the neonate that have multifactorial etiologies. A case of a 15-day-old male infant with umbilical bleeding that exhibited many of the characteristic features of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (nonmedically attended birth, breastfeeding, no definite history of Vitamin K administration, bleeding from iatrogenic puncture sites, and isolated prolongation of the prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time) is presented. A differential diagnosis and laboratory evaluation of bleeding in the newborn are summarized, and treatment recommendations for hemorrhagic disease of the newborn are discussed.

  16. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1 1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy.

  17. PROPOSAL OF A CLINICAL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Cavalcante FRANCO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Upper gastrointestinal bleeding implies significant clinical and economic repercussions. The correct establishment of the latest therapies for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. The use of clinical pathways for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with shorter hospital stay and lower hospital costs. Objective - The primary objective is the development of a clinical care pathway for the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to be used in tertiary hospital. Methods - It was conducted an extensive literature review on the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, contained in the primary and secondary information sources. Results - The result is a clinical care pathway for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with evidence of recent bleeding, diagnosed by melena or hematemesis in the last 12 hours, who are admitted in the emergency rooms and intensive care units of tertiary hospitals. In this compact and understandable pathway, it is well demonstrated the management since the admission, with definition of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, passing through the initial clinical treatment, posterior guidance for endoscopic therapy, and referral to rescue therapies in cases of persistent or rebleeding. It was also included the care that must be taken before hospital discharge for all patients who recover from an episode of bleeding. Conclusion - The introduction of a clinical care pathway for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding may contribute to standardization of medical practices, decrease in waiting time for medications and services, length of hospital stay and costs.

  18. Numerical simulation of base flow with hot base bleed for two jet models

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-jie Yu; Yong-gang Yu; Bin Ni

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the benefits of base bleed in base flow field, the base flow with hot base bleed for two jet models is studied. Two-dimensional axisymmetric Navier–Stokes equations are computed by using a finite volume scheme. The base flow of a cylinder afterbody with base bleed is simulated. The simulation results are validated with the experimental data, and the experimental results are well reproduced. On this basis, the base flow fields with base bleed for a circular jet model and an...

  19. MEXICANA DE CANANEA TO START UP BREAKTHROUGH PROCESS TO ELIMINATE ELECTROLYTE BLEEDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FaniaLisa

    1997-01-01

    Copper processors using solvent extraction/electrowinning(SX/EW) have known for years that eliminating the electrolyte bleed could benefit process economics dramatically Until now.there was no practical solution to eliminate the bleed.Available processes either could nor reduce iron contaminants sufficiently,or pulled out too much valuable copper and cobalt along with the iron.Based on pilot tests of a new breed of ion exchange separatioin system at three different mine sites on representative electrolytes,an alternmative to bleeding electrolytes now exists.On this basis,processors can shelve the wasteful electrolyte bleeding practice.Already,one major copper producer is installing a fullscale system.

  20. Presacral retroperitoneal hematoma after blunt trauma presents with rectal bleeding — A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Jensen Dich

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Rectal bleed after trauma, in a patient receiving anticoagulant treatment, should raise suspicion of a penetrating hematoma, and such patients should be managed at highly specialized facilities.

  1. Colonic diverticular bleeding: urgent colonoscopy without purging and endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and hemoclips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Couto-Worner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diverticular disease is the most frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Most of the times, bleeding stops without any intervention but in 10-20 % of the cases it is necessary to treat the hemorrhage. Several modalities of endoscopic treatment have been described after purging the colon. We present five cases of severe diverticular bleeding treated with injection of epinephrine and hemoclips. All the colonoscopies were performed without purging of the colon in an emergency setting, with correct visualization of the point of bleeding. Patients recovered well avoiding other aggressive procedures such as angiography or surgery.

  2. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding following aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde's sindrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, G D; Salvatori, F; Masone, S; Simeoli, I; Rega, M; Celiento, M; Persico, G

    2007-09-01

    A 58-year old man was admitted to the hospital because of melena. He had a 1-year history of mechanical aortic valve replacement and coronary stent placement because of myocardial infarction and he was taking warfarin and clopidogrel. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were negative for bleeding. Capsule endoscopy showed bleeding diffuse angiodysplasia of the small bowel. The patient was treated with octreotide 20 mg, at monthly interval. After 25 months there had been no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. The case suggests that mechanical valve replacement may not prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in Heyde syndrome and that octreotide treatment should be considered in these cases.

  3. Severe Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient With Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis Treated With Thalidomide and Octreotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S; Poulsen, Steen H; Agnholt, Jørgen S

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) due to angiodysplasias can cause severe, recurrent bleeding, especially in elderly patients. Angiodysplastic bleedings in the gastrointestinal tract have been associated with aortic stenosis and, more recently, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, caused...... to resolve bleeding, especially in patients with large numbers of angiodysplasias. In patients with aortic stenosis and GB, the main treatment is aortic valve replacement but the patients may be unfit to undergo surgery due to the complicating anemia. In this case story, we present a patient with severe, GB...

  4. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: aspirin increases the incidence of minor bleeding complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliwell, O.T. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hallo99@doctors.org.uk; Yadegafar, G. [Public Health Sciences and Medical Statistics Division, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton University, Southampton (United Kingdom); Lane, C.; Dewbury, K.C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Aim: To assess whether patients taking aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding complications after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods: Three hundred and eighty-seven patients taking aspirin who underwent prostate biopsy over a 3.5 year period and 731 patients not taking aspirin over a 2 year period returned a questionnaire assessing the incidence and severity of bleeding complications. Results: Patients taking aspirin had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of haematuria and rectal bleeding, but not of haemospermia. They also had a longer mean duration of bleeding, but no increase in bleeding severity. Severe bleeding was very uncommon in both groups and no patients required intervention for bleeding complications. Conclusion: Aspirin exacerbates minor bleeding complications in patients undergoing TRUS guided biopsy of the prostate, but in this large group of aspirin-taking patients no dangerous bleeding complications were encountered. It may be that the risks associated with aspirin cessation outweigh the risks of haemorrhagic complications.

  5. COMPARISON OF TRANSVAGINAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND HYSTEROSCOPY IN THE EVALUATION OF PERI AND POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anything that can significantly improve the accuracy of diagnosis, the cause of abnormal uterine bleeding in peri-menopausal and postmenopausal women can reduce the frequency of hysterectomy as a cure. Abnormal uterine bleeding has become more important on 2nd half of twentieth century, because women are experiencing more menstrual cycles during their reproductive life. AIM To evaluate intrauterine abnormalities in symptomatic peri and postmenopausal bleeding by transvaginal ultrasonography and hysteroscopy. METHOD This prospective study was carried out on 60 patients with peri and postmenopausal bleeding attending Gynaecology OPD at Batra Hospital. RESULT Hysteroscopy has higher sensitivity for diagnosing endometrial abnormalities compared to TVS.

  6. An Unusual Case of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with Coeliac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gwiggner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the journey of a patient with coeliac disease who presented with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy did not reveal a source of bleeding, but an abdominal CT scan detected abnormal lymphadenopathy and a wireless capsule endoscopy diagnosed a jejunal tumour, which was surgically removed. Gastrointestinal bleeding is rare in celiac disease. Malignant tumours of the small intestine are generally uncommon, but celiac disease represents a significant risk factor. Wireless capsule endoscopy has been a useful tool to investigate patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

  7. A longitudinal prospective study of bleeding diathesis in Egyptian pediatric patients: single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Telbany, Manal A S; El Arab, Sahar Ezz; Ismail, Mona

    2012-07-01

    Keeping an updated registry of bleeding disorders is crucial for planning care and documenting prevalence. We aimed to assess the prevalence of various bleeding disorders including rare inherited coagulation and platelet disorders concerning their clinico-epidemiological, diagnostic data and bleeding manifestations severity. Patients suffering from manifestations of bleeding or coagulation disorders presented to Hematology Clinic during 16 years were included and prospectively followed up. Demographics, clinical characteristics, complete blood count, bleeding, prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, platelet aggregation tests and bone marrow aspiration were recorded. Overall 687 patients with bleeding disorders from total 2949 patients were identified. Inherited coagulation defects were found in 27.2%; hemophilia A (70.6%), hemophilia B (13.9%), factor I deficiency (2.3%), factor V deficiency (1.6%), factor X deficiency (4.2%), factor VII deficiency (2.6%), factor XIII deficiency (1.1%), combined factor deficiency (2.1%) and unclassified coagulation disorders in 1.6% of studied patients. Overall 72.7% had diagnosed with platelet disorders; immune thrombocytopenia was the commonest (74.8%), and inherited conditions represent (25.2%) in the following order: Glanzman's thrombasthenia (11.2%), von Willebrand disease (6.6%), Bernard-Soulier syndrome (1%) and Chediak Higashi in 0.4% and unclassified in 6%. Median age of diagnosis of coagulation and platelet disorders were 33 and 72 months. Presenting symptoms of coagulation disorders were: 25.1% post circumcision bleeding, 22.5% ecchymosis, 20.9% hemoarthrosis and 15% epistaxis. Symptoms of rare coagulation disorders were postcircumcision bleeding (20%), bleeding umbilical stump (20%), epistaxis (12%), hemoarthrosis (8%) and hematomas (4%). Presenting symptoms in rare inherited platelet disorders were purpura, ecchymosis, epistaxis and bleeding gums, respectively. Analysis of the clinico

  8. Bleeding events with dabigatran or warfarin in patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Ammar; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay; Kearon, Clive; Eriksson, Henry; Kreuzer, Jörg; Feuring, Martin; Hantel, Stephan; Friedman, Jeffrey; Schellong, Sebastian; Schulman, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran was as effective as warfarin for the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism in the RE-COVER and RE-COVER II trials. We compared the incidence of bleeding with dabigatran versus warfarin in pooled data from these studies. The localisation, bleeding severity, and the impact of key factors on the incidence of bleeding, were compared between the dabigatran and warfarin treatment group. Altogether, 2553 patients received dabigatran and 2554 warfarin, each for a mean of 164 days. The incidence of any bleeding event was significantly lower with dabigatran (hazard ratio [HR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.79), as was the incidence of the composite of MBEs and clinically relevant non-major bleeding events (HR 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50-0.76). The incidence of major bleeding events (MBEs) was also significantly lower with dabigatran in the double-dummy phase (HR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.36-0.99) but not statistically different between the two treatment arms when the entire treatment period is considered (HR 0.73 95% CI, 0.48-1.11). Increasing age, reduced renal function, Asian ethnicity, and concomitant antiplatelet therapy were associated with higher bleeding rates in both treatment groups. The reduction in bleeding with dabigatran compared to warfarin was consistent among the subgroups and with a similar pattern for intracranial, and urogenital major bleeding. In conclusion, treatment of venous thromboembolism with dabigatran is associated with a lower risk of bleeding compared to warfarin. This reduction did not differ with respect to the location of bleeding or among predefined subgroups.

  9. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors for peptic ulcer bleeding: Clinical benefits and limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2011-03-16

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common disease and recurrent bleeding is an independent risk factor of mortality. Infusion with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) prevents recurrent bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy. A gastric acidic environment of less than pH 5.4 alters coagulation function and activates pepsin to disaggregate platelet plugs. Gastric acid is secreted by H(+), K(+)-ATPase, naming the proton pump. This update review focuses on the mechanism and the role of PPIs in the clinical management of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. An intravenous omeprazole bolus followed by high-dose continuous infusion for 72 h after successful endoscopic therapy can prevent the recurrent bleeding. In the Asian, however, the infusion dosage can possibly be diminished whilst preserving favorable control of the intragastric pH and thereby still decreasing rates of recurrent bleeding. Irrespective of the infusion dosage of PPIs, rates of recurrent bleeding remain high in patients with co-morbidities. Because recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding may be prolonged in those with co-morbidities, a low-dose infusion of IV PPIs for up to 7-day may result in better control of recurrent bleeding of peptic ulcers. Due to the inter-patient variability in CYP2C19 genotypes, the infusion form of new generation PPIs, such as esomeprazole, should be promising for the prevention of recurrent bleeding. This article offers a comprehensive review of clinical practice, highlighting the indication, the optimal dosage, the duration, and the potential limitation of PPIs infusion for peptic ulcer bleeding.

  10. Improving Quality of Care in Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Steffen Jais; Møller, Morten H; Larsson, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:The treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is complex, and mortality remains high. We present results from a nationwide initiative to monitor and improve the quality of care (QOC) in PUB.METHODS:All Danish hospitals treating PUB patients between 2004 and 2011 prospectively registered...... demographic, clinical, and prognostic data. QOC was evaluated using eight process and outcome indicators, including time to initial endoscopy, hemostasis obtainment, proportion undergoing surgery, rebleeding risks, and 30-day mortality.RESULTS:A total of 13,498 PUB patients (median age 74 years) were included.......10-1.61)), and fewer patients underwent open surgery (4% vs. 6%, RR 0.72 (0.59-0.87)). After controlling for time changes in prognostic factors, rebleeding rates improved (13% vs. 18%, adjusted RR 0.77 (0.66-0.91)). Crude 30-day mortality was unchanged (11% vs. 11%), whereas adjusted mortality decreased...

  11. Clinical use of Plasma and Plasma Fractions in Bleeding Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆钺

    2008-01-01

    Internal and/or external bleeding is a common and sometimes very severe clinical manifestations of disorders of hemostasis. It may follow minor trauma or may arise apparently spontaneously. Disorders of hemostasis are generally divided into those caused by abnormalities of platelets, abnormalities of blood vessels, abnormalities of plasma coagulation factors, and hyperfibrinolysis, or com-binations of these. The use of plasma and plasma fractions dependents on the causing diseases and their severity. Several plasma products and plasma fractions are availa-ble in China and other plasma components and deriva-tives are commercially obtained. There have been the guidelines for their clinical use, and the revised ones will soon be published by Chinese Medical Association.

  12. A Note on Bleeding Edge’s “Unsheltered”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Rolls

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The 'Bleeding Edge 'excerpt provided in the Fall 2013 Penguin Press catalogue notes that “[u]nhoused people sleep in doorways,”but by the time the Advanced Reading Copy had reached reviewers, “unhoused” had been changed to “unsheltered” (2, an edit that remained in place, even after other changes to the text, a couple of months later when the book became available for general readers. . . . We might ask: what significance is there to the edit? And from whose perspective are we seeing Maxine’s neighborhood in the opening of the novel? . . .  The edit actually distances the text from the only characters in the scene to whom we might attribute the perception of unsheltered people, Maxine and her children.

  13. Vascular gastric anomalies as a cause of relapsing bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Gradimir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although relatively rare, gastric vascular anomalies can be recognized as a source of both chronic and acute blood loss, most often presenting as long term iron deficiency anemia, rarely as severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Case report. We present five patients with various gastric vascular anomalies, diagnosed during the year of 2003. in the Clinical Hospital Center Zemun. The diagnosis was based on endoscopic appearances, clinical history and characteristic histological findings. Gastric vascular anomalies presented in our review were: portal hypertensive gastropathy, gastric antral vascular ectasia, angiodysplasia, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and Dieulafoy lesion. The used treatment modalities included surgery and various endoscopic techniques (schlerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation. Conclusion. Patients presented with chronic iron deficiency anemia or acute and recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage should be considered as having one of gastric vascular anomalies.

  14. Invasive mole: a rare cause of postmenopausal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamour Guèye

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD describes a number of gynaecological tumours that originate in the trophoblast layer, including hydatidiform mole (complete or partial, placental site trophoblastic tumour, choriocarcinoma and invasive mole. Invasive moles are responsible of most cases of localized gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN. Invasive mole is a condition where a molar pregnancy, such as a partial hydatidiform mole or complete hydatidiform mole, invades the wall of the uterus. It is an extremely rare condition. As GTN is not considered in the differential diagnosis of postmenopausal uterine malignancies, its preoperative diagnosis is challenging. We report a case of invasive hydatidiform mole in a postmenopausal woman discovered in a context of postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent hysterectomy and followed up till her beta hCG levels were within normal limits. The patient is in complete remission in the first postoperative year. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(3.000: 451-453

  15. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history.

  16. Surgical management of abnormal uterine bleeding in fertile age women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, Andrea; Centini, Gabriele; Lazzeri, Lucia; Zupi, Errico

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common gynecological disease and represents one of the most frequent reasons for hospital admission to a specialist unit, often requiring further surgical treatment. Following the so-called PALM-COEIN system we will attempt to further clarify the surgical treatments available today. The first group (PALM) is characterized by structural lesions, which may be more appropriately treated by means of surgical management. Although hysterectomy remains the definitive and decisive choice, there are many alternative techniques available. These minimally invasive procedures offer the opportunity for a more conservative approach. Precise and accurate counseling facilitates better patient selection, based on the patient's desires, age and disease type, allowing treatment to be individually tailored to each woman.

  17. Prevention of Vitamin K deficiency bleeding in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihatsch, W. A.; Braegger, C P; Bronsky, J

    2016-01-01

    prophylaxis after adequate information is provided should be recorded especially because of the risk of late VKDB. Healthy newborn infants should either receive 1 mg of vitamin K 1 by intramuscular injection at birth; or 3×2 mg vitamin K 1 orally at birth, at 4 to 6 days and at 4 to 6 weeks; or 2 mg vitamin K......Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) due to physiologically low vitamin K plasma concentrations is a serious risk for newborn and young infants and can be largely prevented by adequate vitamin K supplementation. The aim of this position paper is to define the condition, describe the prevalence...... 1 orally at birth, and a weekly dose of 1 mg orally for 3 months. Intramuscular application is the preferred route for efficiency and reliability of administration. The success of an oral policy depends on compliance with the protocol and this may vary between populations and healthcare settings...

  18. Voluminous bleeding stomach GIST: reflections on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracino, Valerio; Maggi, Gustavo; Altobelli, Simone; Lambiase, Carlo; Danza, Costantina; D'Amico, Giampiero

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms which, although rare (around 1% of the total number of malignant tumours), are the most common mesenchymal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. In the past they were not very well known, whereas today, thanks to the remarkable progress made in the immunohistochemical and molecular fields, considerable knowledge has been acquired, offering new opportunities for classification and, above all, for a more adequate multidisciplinary treatment of this pathology. In this study, the authors report a case of a bleeding GIST of the stomach which they recently observed and discuss it in the light of recent reflections on the aetiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of these tumours in the literature.

  19. Splenic artery embolization in a woman with bleeding gastric varices and splenic vein thrombosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Gastric variceal bleeding due to splenic vein thrombosis is a life-threatening situation and is often difficult to manage by endoscopy. In the worst cases, an emergency splenectomy may be required to stop variceal bleeding. Case presentation We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian woman with bleeding gastric varices secondary to splenic vein thrombosis treated by splenic artery embolization. Successful embolization was performed by depositing coils into the splenic artery resulting in cessation of variceal bleeding. After embolization there was no recurrence of bleeding. Conclusion Splenic artery embolization can be an effective and definite treatment for variceal bleeding secondary to splenic vein thrombosis.

  20. Wireless Capsule Endoscopy for Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Single Center, One Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-jiang Tang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE is increasingly being used in the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal (GI bleeding, but some studies have found that many of the bleeding lesions recognized by this technique are within the reach of conventional endoscopy.

  1. An upper gastrointestinal ulcer still bleeding after endoscopy : what comes next?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craenen, E. M. E.; Hofker, Hendrik; Peters, Frans; Kater, G. M.; Glatman, K. R.; Zijlstra, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Recurrent bleeding from an upper gastrointestinal ulcer when endoscopy fails is a reason for radiological or surgical treatment, both of which have their advantages and disadvantages. Case: Based on a patient with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, we reviewed the available evidence

  2. Management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Current policies and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAcute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a gastroenterological emergency with a mortality of 6%-13%. The vast majority of these bleeds are due to peptic ulcers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and Helicobacter pylori are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endosco

  3. Application of endoscopic hemoclips for nonvariceal bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Bin Guo; Ai-Xia Gong; Jing Leng; Jing Ma; Lin-Mei Ge

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and evaluate the effects of endoscopic hemoclipping. METHODS: Sixty-eight cases of acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper GI tract were given endoscopic treatment with hemoclip application. Clinical data, endoscopic findings, and the effects of the therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The 68 cases (male:female = 42:26, age from 9 to 70 years, average 54.4) presented with hematemesis in 26 cases (38.2%), melena in nine cases (13.3%), and both in 33 cases (48.5%). The causes of the bleeding included gastric ulcer (29 cases), duodenal ulcer (11 cases), Dieulafoy's lesion (11 cases), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (six cases), postoperative (three cases), post-polypectomy bleeding (five cases), and post-sphincterotomy bleeding (three cases); 42 cases had active bleeding. The mean number of hemoclips applied was four. Permanent hemostasis was obtained by hemoclip application in 59 cases; 6 cases required emergent surgery (three cases had peptic ulcers, one had Dieulafoy's lesion, and two were caused by sphincterotomy); three patients died (two had Dieulafoy's lesion and one was caused by sphincterotomy); and one had recurrent bleeding with Dieulafoy's lesion 10 mo later, but in a different location. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic hemoclip application was an effective and safe method for acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper GI tract with satisfactory outcomes.

  4. [Bleeding, the Achilles' heel in patients treated with anticoagulants. Approach in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, João

    2012-04-01

    Bleeding is always the Achilles' heel of all antithrombotic therapy, being unthinkable to use this type of therapy ignoring the complications that it may arise. The bleeding risk raises very particular problems, namely how to predict it and how to manage it. The withdrawal of antithrombotic drugs and transfusion are two important practical problems, involving clinical decisions that are generally very difficult. The new oral anticoagulants pose new problems. If on the one hand its bleeding risk appears to be less, specially in what concerns intracranial bleeding and potentially life-threatening bleeding, on the other hand the lack of an antidote or the lack of a quick and effective laboratory test to evaluate its efficacy, are arguments used by the critics. The risk of bleeding is conditioned by several factors, among them old age. The elderly patient is, by definition, the patient that can bleed more but also the one that, due to its ischemic risk, can reap more benefit. In this paper some of the tools used to predict the risk of bleeding and its clinical impact are also presented.

  5. Bleeding in patients using new anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents: Risk factors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M.M.; Eerenberg, E.; Löwenberg, E.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    The most important adverse effect of antithrombotic treatment is the occurrence of bleeding. in case of serious or even life-threatening bleeding in a patient who uses anticoagulant agents or when patient on anticoagulants needs to undergo an urgent invasive procedure, anticoagulant treatment can be

  6. Review article: prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding with proton-pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, P N

    2005-12-01

    Stress-related gastric mucosal bleeding occurs in a substantial number of critically ill patients, with clinically important gastrointestinal bleeding prolonging intensive care stay and increasing mortality. This paper reviews the role of proton-pump inhibitors in the prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding. Bleeding prophylaxis appears to be warranted in patients in intensive care units on mechanical ventilation or those who have coagulopathy. Intravenous histamine H2 receptor antagonists, particularly cimetidine, have demonstrated efficacy for the prevention of bleeding in critically ill patients. Standard delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors have not been extensively studied in this patient group, but there are some data to support their efficacy in increasing intragastric pH, and in the case of intravenous pantoprazole in preventing gastrointestinal bleeding. In a large, randomized controlled trial, immediate-release omeprazole [(IR-OME) Zegerid powder for oral suspension; Santarus Inc., San Diego, CA, USA] administered via gastric tube, was as effective as intravenous cimetidine in the prevention of clinically significant bleeding, and more effective in increasing gastric pH. Effective antisecretory therapy does not appear to increase the risk of nosocomial pneumonia. In conclusion, immediate-release omeprazole provides a safe and effective alternative to intravenous cimetidine for the prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding in critically ill patients.

  7. Incidental detection of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor on Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Vikas; Singh, Rajinder; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-10-01

    The role of 99m-technetium labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy in acute gastro-intestinal bleed is well-established. The authors report a case of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) incidentally discovered on Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy.

  8. Effect of feed and bleed rate on hybridoma cells in an acoustic perfusion bioreactor: Metabolic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalm, M.C.F.; Lamers, P.P.; Cuijten, S.M.R.; Tjeerdsma, A.M.; Grunsven, van W.M.J.; Tramper, J.; Martens, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    For the development of optimal perfusion processes, insight into the effect of feed and bleed rate on cell growth, productivity, and metabolism is essential. In the here presented study the effect of the feed and bleed rate on cell metabolism was investigated using metabolic flux analysis. Under all

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chookhuan Nithiwathanapong; Sanit Reungrongrat; Nuthapong Ukarapol

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency and the risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).METHODS: The medical records of children aged between 1 month and 15 years admitted to the PICU between January 2002 and December 2002 were reviewed.Demographic data, indications for PICU admission, principle diagnosis, and basic laboratory investigations were recorded. Previously described factors for stress ulcer bleeding (mechanical ventilation, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal insufficiency, coagulopathy,thrombocytopenia, and intracranial pathology) were used as independent variables in a multivariate analysis.RESULTS: One hundred and seventy of two hundred and five medical records were eligible for review. The most common indication for PICU admission was respiratory failure (48.8%). Twenty-five children received stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis with ranitidine. The incidence of stress ulcer bleeding was 43.5%, in which 5.3% were clinically significant bleeding. Only mechanical ventilation and thrombocytopenia were significantly associated with stress ulcer bleeding using the univariate analysis.The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were 5.13(1.86-14.12) and 2.26 (1.07-4.74), respectively. However, the logistic regression analysis showed that mechanicai ventilation was the only significant risk factor with the odds ratio of 14.1.CONCLUSION: The incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding was high in critically ill children. Mechanical ventilation was an important risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding.

  10. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH2 registry, a multicenter, pan-European, Web-based database, reports current patient management. The aim was to assess the control of first bleeding episodes treated with a bypassing agent (rFVIIa or aPCC), FVIII, or DDAVP among 501 registered patients. Of 482 patients with one or more bleeding episodes, 144 (30%) received no treatment for bleeding; 31 were treated with symptomatic therapy only. Among 307 patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent, 174 (56.7%) received rFVIIa, 63 (20.5%) aPCC, 56 (18.2%) FVIII, and 14 (4.6%) DDAVP. Bleeding was controlled in 269 of 338 (79.6%) patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent or ancillary therapy alone. Propensity score matching was applied to allow unbiased comparison between treatment groups. Bleeding control was significantly higher in patients treated with bypassing agents versus FVIII/DDAVP (93.3% vs 68.3%; P = .003). Bleeding control was similar between rFVIIa and aPCC (93.0%; P = 1). Thrombotic events were reported in 3.6% of treated patients with a similar incidence between rFVIIa (2.9%) and aPCC (4.8%).

  11. Intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in the victims of house fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Moriya, Fumio; Nakanishi, Akinori

    2003-03-01

    Intramuscular bleeding of the tongue is frequently observed in autopsy cases of house fire victims. The meaning of this finding has not yet been fully discussed. We examined 69 autopsy cases of house fire victims and investigated several factors contributing to intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Victims comprised 45 males and 24 females, ranging in age from 1 to 95 years old. Sixty-four cases (93%) involved severely charred bodies, while the remaining five bodies displayed slight burns. Factors studied were age, sex, posture of the body at the scene of the fire, degree of burn injury and carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) levels in blood. CO-Hb level proved to be the only factor relevant to intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Of 69 autopsy cases, 23 (33%) demonstrated intramuscular bleeding of the tongue (13 cases of slight bleeding, ten cases of severe bleeding). Low concentrations of CO-Hb (fire victims. The burned regions of the body in the early stage of the fire process were unclear due to severe charring in most victims. However, asphyxiation due to neck compression is known to often induce intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Lack of skin elasticity following burns, particularly in the neck, might act in a similar manner to asphyxial neck compression. In conclusion, intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in fire victims may occur as a vital reaction to burns.

  12. Minimizing bleeding risk in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habert JS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Steven Habert Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Many primary care physicians are wary about using direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF. Factors such as comorbidities, concomitant medications, and alcohol misuse increase concerns over bleeding risk, especially in elderly and frail patients with AF. This article discusses strategies to minimize the risk of major bleeding events in patients with AF who may benefit from oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention. The potential benefits of the DOACs compared with vitamin K antagonists, in terms of a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage, are discussed, together with the identification of reversible risk factors for bleeding and correct dose selection of the DOACs based on a patient’s characteristics and concomitant medications. Current bleeding management strategies, including the new reversal agents for the DOACs and the prevention of bleeding during preoperative anticoagulation treatment, in addition to health care resource use associated with anticoagulation treatment and bleeding, are also discussed. Implementing a structured approach at an individual patient level will minimize the overall risk of bleeding and should increase physician confidence in using the DOACs for stroke prevention in their patients with nonvalvular AF. Keywords: anticoagulants, atrial fibrillation, bleeding, primary care

  13. Techno-economic comparison of technologies for the concentration of a mixed leachant bleed stream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.P.; Alkemade, M.M.C.; Bierman, G.

    1995-01-01

    In a new hydrometallurgical process for recovery of lead from lead oxide secondaries, liquid effluence is minimized by jointly treating contaminated washing water and leachant bleed. To enable internal recycling of the leachant bleed and recover pure water, it is necessary to incorporate a concentra

  14. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Levesque, Herve; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul; Aspoeck, G.; Heistinger, M.; Knobl, P.; Makipernaa, A.; Andre, H; Aouba, A.; Bellucci, S.; Beurrier, P.; Borg, J.Y.; Darnige, L.; Devignes, J.; d'Oiron, R.; Gautier, P.; Gay, V.; Girault, S.; Gruel, Y.; Guerin, V.; Hezard, N.; Khellaf, M.; Koenig, M.; Levesque, H.; Lifermann, F; Marlu, R; Ninet, J.; Peynet, J.; Quemeneur, T.; Rothschild, C.; Schleinitz, N.; Sigaud, M.; Trouillier, S; Voisin, S.; Giebl, A.; Holstein, K.; Huth-Kuhne, A; Loreth, R.M.; Steigerwald, U.; Tiede, A.; Theodossiades, G.; Nemes, L.; Radvanyi, G.; Schlammadinger, A.; Barillari, G.; Pasca, S.; Baudo, F; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo Armando, C.L.; Fattorini, A.; Di Minno, G.; Cerbone, A.M.; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, M.; Falanga, A.; Maggioni, A.; Lerede, T.; Franchini, M.; Gaidano, G.; De Paoli, L.; Gamba, G.; Ghirardi, R; Girotto, M.; Tasca, D.; Grandone, E.; Tiscia, G.; Imberti, D.; Iorio, A.; Landolfi, R; Di Gennaro, L.; Novarese, L.; Mariani, G.; Lapecorella, M.; Marietta, M.; Pedrazzi, P.; Mazzucconi, M.G.; Santoro, C.; Morfini, M.; Linari, S.; Moratelli, S.; Paolini, R.; Piseddu, G.; Poggio, R.; Pogliani, E.; Carpenedo, M.; Remiddi, C.; Santagostino, E.; Mancuso, M.E.; Santoro, R.; Papaleo, G.; Schinco, P.; Borchiellini, A.; Valeri, F.; Scortechini, A.R.; Siragusa, S.; Sottilotta, G.; Squizzato, A.; Tagariello, G.; Sartori, R; Tagliaferri, A.R.; Di Perna, C.; Rivolta, G.F.; Testa, S.; Paoletti, O.; Toschi, V.; Zanon, E.; Brandolin, B.; Hamulyak, K.; Kamphuisen, P.; Laros-van Gorkom, B.; Leebeek, F.W.; Marten, N.; Novakova, I.; Schutgens, R.; van der Linden, P.W.; van Esser, J.; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, P.; Campos, M.; Aguilar, C.; Altisent, C.; Bermejo, N.; Del Campo, R.; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Bolos', R.; Gutierrez Pimentel, M.J.; Jimenez-Yuste, V.; Jose-Felix, L.; Marco, P.; Mingot, M.E.; Perez Garrido, R.; Perez Gonzale, N.Z.; Prieto Garcia, M.; Rodriguez-Huerta, A.M.; Sedano, C.; Tolosa Munoz, A.; Baghaei, F.; Tengborn, L.; Boehlen, F.; Korte, W.; Chowdary, P.; Collins, P.; Evans, G.; Pavord, S.; Rangarajan, S.; Wilde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH

  15. Definition of major bleeding in clinical investigations of antihemostatic medicinal products in surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, S; Angerås, U; Bergqvist, D

    2010-01-01

    The definition of major bleeding varies between studies on surgical patients, particularly regarding the criteria for surgical wound-related bleeding. This diversity contributes to the difficulties in comparing data between trials. The Scientific and Standardization Committee (SSC), through its s...... of this definition from the regulatory authorities to enhance its incorporation into future clinical trial protocols....

  16. Efficacy and toxicity of Samen-ista emulsion on treatment of cutaneous and mucosal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mousalreza; Pourakbar, Ali; Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Arian, Amirali; Ghaffarzadegan, Kamran; Salehi, Maryam; Esfandiari, Samaneh; Rakhshandeh, Hassan

    2016-10-01

    Despite new treatment methods, upper gastrointestinal bleeding remains challenging. Samen-ista emulsion is a new agent based on traditional medicine with coagulant properties. The efficacy and safety of Samen-ista were assessed in cutaneous and mucosal bleeding animal models. Coagulant properties of Samen-ista were evaluated using mice tail bleeding assay, marginal ear vein and upper gastrointestinal mucosal bleeding times in rabbits. After 7 days, clinical signs, mortality and end-organ (kidney, liver, lung, brain and gastric mucosa) histopathological changes were also examined. Samen-ista dose-dependently decreased mean cutaneous tail (128 vs. 14 s) and marginal ear vein (396 vs. 84 s) bleeding times. Rabbit's upper gastrointestinal bleeding time was also significantly decreased (214 vs. 15.8 s) upon Samen-ista local endoscopic application. Treatment with Samen-ista for 7 days did not cause any mortality, abnormal signs of bleeding, changes in appetite or significant histopathologicl changes. Samen-ista emulsion is well tolerated and highly effective in achieving hemostasis in cutaneous and mucosal bleeding animal models.

  17. Consensus statement by hospital based dentists providing dental treatment for patients with inherited bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hewson, I. D.; Daly, J.; Hallett, K. B.; Liberali, S. A.; Scott, C. L. M.; Spaile, G.; Widmer, R.; Winters, J.

    2011-01-01

    Avoidance of dental care and neglect of oral health may occur in patients with inherited bleeding disorders because of concerns about perioperative and postoperative bleeding, but this is likely to result in the need for crisis care, and more complex and high-risk procedures. Most routine dental car

  18. Determinants of Bleeding Risk in Patients on Antithrombotic and Antifibrinolytic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Karina; Schulman, Sam

    2008-01-01

    The risk of bleeding associated with antithrombotic and fibrinolytic therapy depends on factors that are specific for the drugs and the patients. In this narrative review, we describe the most important risk factors for bleeding for each class of drugs. Pertinent examples are recent initiation of th

  19. An unusual case of postmenopausal vaginal bleeding: retention of fetal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinoglu, Zeki; Kuyumcuoglu, Umur

    2003-01-01

    Retention of intrauterine fetal bones is a rare finding in patient suffering from abnormal uterine bleeding or secondary infertility. Detailed patient history, pelvic ultrasonography and hysteroscopy are diagnostic tools. Here, we describe a case of postmenopausal persistent uterine bleeding and pelvic pain caused by prolonged retention of fetal bones after a midtrimester abortion 17 years ago.

  20. Intractable Hematuria After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Can Lessons Learned from Gastrointestinal Bleeding Be Applied?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Andre Y; Zhao, Lee; Reyentovich, Alex; Deanda, Abe; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-01-01

    Patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) are at increased risk of bleeding. We reviewed our institutional experience with bleeding in the urinary tract after CF-LVAD implantation and quantified the impact on hospital resource utilization in comparison with bleeding in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the most commonly reported mucosal site of bleeding after LVAD implantation. Records were retrospectively reviewed for patients undergoing CF-LVAD implantation at our institution between October 2011 and April 2015. Major adverse events of gross hematuria and GI bleeding were identified, and patient demographics and hospital course were reviewed. Gross hematuria occurred in 3 of the 35 patients (8.6%) and in 5.1% of all hospitalizations for CF-LVAD patients. Severe hematuria occurred after traumatic urethral catheterization, urinary retention, or urologic surgery. Hospitalization for hematuria was six times less likely than hospitalization for GI bleeding; however, hematuria hospitalizations lasted 3.2 times longer than GI bleeding hospitalizations (17.0 vs. 5.3 days). Late recurrent gross hematuria occurred in all cases, with rehospitalization occurring after 109 ± 53 days. In conclusion, gross hematuria is an infrequent but morbid bleeding complication in CF-LVAD patients. Strategies to avoid this complication include strict avoidance of traumatic urethral catheterization and urinary retention in high-risk patients.

  1. Hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with inherited bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, M; Cochrane, A; Wakefield, C; Stain, A-M; Ling, S; Blanchette, V; Gold, R; Ford-Jones, L

    2009-03-01

    Hepatitis A and B vaccines are highly effective tools that can greatly reduce infection risk in the bleeding disorder population. Although hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with bleeding disorders is universally recommended, various advisory bodies often differ with respect to many practical aspects of vaccination. To review the published literature and guidelines and form a practical, comprehensive and consistent approach to hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with bleeding disorders. We reviewed published immunization guidelines from North American immunization advisory bodies and published statements from North American and international haemophilia advisory bodies. A search of the MEDLINE database was performed to find original published literature pertaining to hepatitis A or B immunization of patients with haemophilia or bleeding disorder patients that provided supporting or refuting evidence for advisory body guidelines. Various advisory bodies' immunization guidelines regarding individuals with bleeding disorders have contradictory statements and often did not clarify issues (e.g. post vaccination surveillance). Published literature addressing immunization in bleeding disorder patients is sparse and mostly examines route of vaccine administration, complications and corresponding antibody response. Although the risk of hepatitis A and B infection is low, the use of simple measures such as vaccination is reasonable and advocated by haemophilia advisory bodies. Following our review of the available literature and North American guidelines, we have developed comprehensive and practical recommendations addressing hepatitis A and B immunization for the bleeding disorder population that may be applicable in Bleeding Disorder clinics.

  2. Multidetector CT angiography in acute gastrointestinal bleeding: why, when, and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffroy, Yann; Rodallec, Mathieu H; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Jullès, Marie-Christine; Fullès, Marie-Christine; Ridereau-Zins, Catherine; Zins, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains an important cause of emergency hospital admissions, with substantial related morbidity and mortality. Bleeding may relate to the upper or lower GI tract, with the dividing anatomic landmark between these two regions being the ligament of Treitz. The widespread availability of endoscopic equipment has had an important effect on the rapid identification and treatment of the bleeding source. However, the choice of upper or lower GI endoscopy is largely dictated by the clinical presentation, which in many cases proves misleading. Furthermore, there remains a large group of patients with negative endoscopic results or failed endoscopy, in whom additional techniques are required to identify the source of GI bleeding. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) with its speed, resolution, multiplanar techniques, and angiographic capabilities allows excellent visualization of both the small and large bowel. Multiphasic multidetector CT allows direct demonstration of bleeding into the bowel and is helpful in the acute setting for visualization of the bleeding source and its characterization. Thus, multidetector CT angiography provides a time-efficient method for directing and planning therapy for patients with acute GI bleeding. The additional information provided by multidetector CT angiography before attempts at therapeutic angiographic procedures leads to faster selective catheterization of bleeding vessels, thereby facilitating embolization. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.313105206/-/DC1.

  3. GIANT SPLENIC ARTERY PSEUDO ANEURYSM MASQUERADING AS BLEEDING PER RECTUM - A RARE CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Splenic artery aneurysm are rare entity, we report a c ase of 40 year old male presenting with hypovolemic shock and massive bleeding per rectum secondary to spleenic artery aneurysm rupture into the colon. Patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and definitive procedure was done KEY WORDS: Splenic artery an eurysm 1: shock 2 : bleeding per rectum 3: chronic pancreatitis;

  4. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raymond V Mirasol; Jason J Tholany; Hasini Reddy; Billie S Fyfe-Kirschner; Christina L Cheng; Issam F Moubarak; John L Nosher

    2016-01-01

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices(CF-LVADs)and gastrointestinal(GI)bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized.However,the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices(CF-BIVADs)and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood.We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD.The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan.The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology.The intensity of bleeding,reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin,as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation,are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs.While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein,pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa,vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation.

  5. Mucosal polymerase chain reaction for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hwai-Jeng Lin; Wen-Ching Lo; Chin-Lin Perng; Guan-Ying Tseng; Anna Fen-Yau Li; Yueh-Hsing Ou

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori(Hpylori) has been linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma.Conventional invasive tests are less sensitive than noninvasive tests in diagnosing H pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers. Polymerase chain reaction is a sensitive and accurate method for diagnosing H pylori infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic role of mucosal polymerase chain reaction for H pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers.METHODS: In patients with bleeding, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, we checked rapid urease test,histology, bacterial culture and mucosal polymerase chain reaction for detecting H pylori infection. Positive H pylori infection was defined as positive culture or both a positive histology and a positive rapid urease test. For mucosal polymerase chain reaction of Hpylori, we checked vacA (s1a, s1b, s1c, s2, m1, m1T, m2),iceA1,iceA2 and cag A.RESULTS: Between October 2000 and April 2002, 88 patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (males/females: 60/28, gastric ulcers/duodenal ulcers: 55/33), 81 patients with non-bleeding peptic ulcers (males/females: 54/27, gastric ulcers/duodenal ulcers: 45/36) and 37 patients with chronic gastritis (males/females: 24/13) were enrolled in this study. In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, 45 patients (51%), 71 patients (88%)and 20 patients (54%) respectively were found to have positive H pylori infection (P<0.001). In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, polymerase chain reaction for H pylori infection was positive in 54 patients (61%), 70 patients (86%) and 20 patients (54%) respectively (P<0.001). The sensitivity,positive predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of mucosal polymerase reaction for Hpylori infection were significantly lower in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (84%, 79%and 81%) than in

  6. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding-review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miros?aw; Szura; Artur; Pasternak

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a conditionthat requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate(exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the firstline treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy(within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature.

  7. Excessive bleeding from genital ulcers of Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostankolu, A; Aksungur, V L; Aksungur, E H; Ozpoyraz, M; Yücel, A; Memisoglu, H R

    1997-09-01

    Although genital ulcers are a common manifestation of Behçet's disease, bleeding from these lesions is unusual. In this report, a patient with excessive bleeding from genital ulcers is presented. A 22-year-old man with recurrent oral and genital ulcers, erythema nodosum, folliculitis, positive pathergic reaction, uveitis, superior vena cava syndrome, and generalized lymphadenopathy fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Behçet's disease. Three years after presenting he was admitted to our clinic with excessive bleeding from large ulcers on the scrotum and upper thighs and with a leg ulcer. Bleeding was controlled with compresses. Examination of a biopsy specimen obtained from the leg ulcer showed findings consistent with Kaposi-like acroangiodermatitis. Results of various radiologic investigations showed thrombosis of the inferior vena cava, peritesticular varicosities, and venous insufficiency of the lower extremities. We suggest that the bleeding was secondary to the extension of genital ulcers to the varicose veins.

  8. Prolonged venous bleeding due to traditional treatment with leech bite: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altun Hasan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, has been used in the treatment of many diseases for thousands of years. In Turkey, it is used most commonly in the management of venous diseases of lower extremities. Case presentation A 25-year-old Turkish woman presented to our emergency room with bleeding from her left leg. She had been treated for varicose veins in her lower extremities with leeches about 24 hours before admission to the emergency room. The bleeding was controlled by applying pressure with sterile gauze upon the wound, and she was discharged. She returned after four hours having started bleeding again. Hemostasis was achieved by vein ligation under local anesthesia. Conclusions Leech bite should be evaluated as a special injury. Prolonged bleeding can be seen after leech bites. In such cases, hemostasis either with local pressure or ligation of the bleeding vessel is mandatory.

  9. Comparing efficacy and safety of fibrinogen concentrate to cryoprecipitate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, N H L; Stensballe, J; Afshari, A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding is associated with the depletion of fibrinogen, thus increasing the risk of coagulopathy, further bleeding and transfusion requirements. Both fibrinogen concentrate and cryoprecipitate replenish low plasma fibrinogen levels. This systematic review aims to identify and evaluate...... evidence of efficacy and safety of fibrinogen concentrate and cryoprecipitate in bleeding patients. METHOD: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, EMBASE up to 2nd of March 2015 were among the electronic search strategies of randomized controlled trials and non......-randomized studies with meta-analysis employed. Studies for inclusion required bleeding patients being treated with either fibrinogen concentrate or cryoprecipitate. Mortality was the primary endpoint. Secondary outcomes included bleeding, coagulopathy, transfusion requirements and clinical complications related...

  10. Novel, high incidence exercise-induced muscle bleeding model in hemophilia B mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranholm, M.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Broberg, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Muscle hematomas are the second most common complication of hemophilia and insufficient treatment may result in serious and even life-threatening complications. Hemophilic dogs and rats do experience spontaneous muscle bleeding, but currently, no experimental animal model is available...... specifically investigating spontaneous muscle bleeds in a hemophilic setting. AIM: The objective of this study was to develop a model of spontaneous muscle bleeds in hemophilia B mice. We hypothesized that treadmill exercise would induce muscle bleeds in hemophilia B mice but not in normal non-hemophilic mice...... and that treatment with recombinant factor IX (rFIX) before treadmill exercise could prevent the occurrence of pathology. METHODS: A total of 203 mice (123 F9-KO and 80 C57BL/6NTac) were included in three separate studies: (i) the model implementation study investigating the bleeding pattern in hemophilia B mice...

  11. The value of RI scintigraphy and angiography in small intestinal bleeding; Report of eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, Susumu; Kuwata, Hajime; Kushibiki, Kyoko; Akimoto, Kimihiko; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Toshiya (Showa General Hospital, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed eight cases of small intestinal bleeding and assessed the value of RI scintigraphy and angiography in diagnosing the bleeding site. The patients' average age was 56.2 years. Chief complaint was melena of variable degree. In most cases neither upper endoscopy nor colonoscopy was diagnostic. RI scientigraphy (Tc-99 labeled human serum albumin) showed 75% of positive rate whereas angiography showed 66.7% (4/6) of positive rate. All four cases of leiomyosarcoma and leiomyoma demonstrated hypervascular stain and/or extra-vasation in angiography whereas RI scintigraphy failed to detect active gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 of the 4 cases. Therefore angiography was considered useful for the detection of bleeding from leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma which are often hypervascular. Scintigraphy is thought of most value in the demonstration of small amount of bleeding with minimum vascular abnormality. (author).

  12. Endoclipping treatment of life-threatening rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panagiotis Katsinelos,; Jannis Kountouras,; Georgios Dimitriadis,; Grigoris Chatzimavroudis,; Christos Zavos,; Ioannis Pilpilidis,; George Paroutoglou,; George Germanidis,; Kostas Mimidis

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bleeding is frequently seen in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate, but is usually mild and stops spontaneously. We report what is believed to be the first case of life-threatening rectal bleeding following this procedure, which was successfully treated by endoscopic intervention through placement of three clips on the sites of bleeding. This case emphasizes endoscopic intervention associated with endoclipping as a safe and effective method to achieve hemostasis in massive rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy. Additionally, current data on the complications of the TRUS-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate and the options for treating fulminant rectal bleeding, a consequence of this procedure, are described.

  13. The predictability of bleeding by prothrombin times sensitive or insensitive to PIVKA during intensive oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnesen, H; Smith, P

    1991-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of PIVKA (Proteins Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonism) on the bleeding tendency during oral anticoagulation, we studied consecutive patients intensively treated with warfarin (INR greater than 4.8). The level of anticoagulation was measured with the PIVKA-insensitive Normotest (NT) as well as with the PIVKA-sensitive Thrombotest (TT), and the results are expressed as per cent coagulant activity. The NT/TT ratio was determined. Twenty patients with bleeding episodes had a mean NT/TT ratio of 2.06 as compared to 2.20 in 143 patients without bleeding episodes (p = 0.08). As the NT/TT ratio was not higher in patients with bleedings, we conclude that PIVKA are of no importance for bleeding during anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists.

  14. Recurrent Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Dilemmas and Success with Pharmacological Therapies. Case Series and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Almadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes three difficult cases of recurrent bleeding from obscure causes, followed by a review of the pitfalls and pharmacological management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. All three patients underwent multiple investigations. An intervening complicating diagnosis or antiplatelet drugs may have compounded long-term bleeding in two of the cases. A bleeding angiodysplasia was confirmed in one case but was aggravated by the need for anticoagulation. After multiple transfusions and several attempts at endoscopic management in some cases, long-acting octreotide was associated with decreased transfusion requirements and increased hemoglobin levels in all three cases, although other factors may have contributed in some. In the third case, however, the addition of low-dose thalidomide stopped bleeding for a period of at least 23 months.

  15. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of abnormal vaginal bleeding secondary to uterine myoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung Hyun; Chung, Dong Jin; Lim, Young Tec; Cho, Sae Hyun; Lee, Jae Mun; Hahn, Seong-Tae

    2011-03-01

    We describe the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound for acute vaginal bleeding secondary to uterine myoma in 2 young female patients. Both patients had episodes of abnormal vaginal bleeding with severe dysmenorrhea that was not efficiently controlled by medical treatment. After high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, both vaginal bleeding control and symptom relief were achieved without postinterventional complications. The patients remained free of symptoms during 2 months of follow-up and regained normal menstruation after high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment is one of the least invasive options for dysfunctional vaginal bleeding and may be an effective and safe alternative to other procedures in women of reproductive age with abnormal vaginal bleeding secondary to uterine myoma.

  16. The use of hemospray in portal hypertensive bleeding; a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L A; Morris, A J; Stanley, A J

    2014-02-01

    Hemospray is a haemostatic agent licensed for endoscopic haemostasis of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe and Canada. Hemospray has been shown to be safe and effective in achieving haemostasis in bleeding peptic ulcers in a prospective clinical study and several further case series have described the use of hemospray in other non-variceal causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertensive gastropathy and colopathy are common in patients with portal hypertension. As hemospray is an easy to apply, non-contact method, which can cover large areas of mucosa, it may be of benefit in acute non-variceal portal hypertensive bleeding. We present data from the first four consecutive patients presenting to our institution with acute haemorrhage secondary to non-variceal diffuse portal hypertensive bleeding treated with hemospray.

  17. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: emerging role of multidetector CT angiography and review of current imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Christopher J; Tobias, Terrence; Rosenblum, David I; Banker, Wade L; Tseng, Lee; Tamarkin, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common cause of hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality in the United States. The evaluation and treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding are complex and often require a multispecialty approach involving gastroenterologists, surgeons, internists, emergency physicians, and radiologists. The multitude of pathologic processes that can result in gastrointestinal bleeding, the length of the gastrointestinal tract, and the often intermittent nature of gastrointestinal bleeding further complicate patient evaluation. In addition, there are multiple imaging modalities and therapeutic interventions that are currently being used in the evaluation and treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. Initial experience indicates that multidetector computed tomographic angiography is a promising first-line modality for the time-efficient, sensitive, and accurate diagnosis or exclusion of active gastrointestinal hemorrhage and may have a profound impact on the evaluation and subsequent treatment of patients who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  18. Global and Local Features Based Classification for Bleed-Through Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangyu; Lin, Hui; Li, Shutao; Sun, Bin

    2016-12-01

    The text on one side of historical documents often seeps through and appears on the other side, so the bleed-through is a common problem in historical document images. It makes the document images hard to read and the text difficult to recognize. To improve the image quality and readability, the bleed-through has to be removed. This paper proposes a global and local features extraction based bleed-through removal method. The Gaussian mixture model is used to get the global features of the images. Local features are extracted by the patch around each pixel. Then, the extreme learning machine classifier is utilized to classify the scanned images into the foreground text and the bleed-through component. Experimental results on real document image datasets show that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-art bleed-through removal methods and preserves the text strokes well.

  19. Near fatal spontaneous intraperitoneal bleeding: A rare manifestation in a congenital factor X deficiency carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K V Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital factor X (FX deficiency is a rare coagulation disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance, characterized by bleeding of variable severity. Bleeding severity generally correlates with the level of FX functional activity and severe bleeding usually occurs in moderate and severe deficiency, when FX coagulant activity is <5%. FX activity above 10% is infrequently associated with severe bleeding. Here we report the rare occurrence of life-threatening massive spontaneous intraperitoneal bleeding with hypovolemic shock, resulting from spontaneous rupture of an ovarian luteal cyst in a 25-year-old FX deficiency carrier woman, with a FX activity of 26%. She was managed successfully conservatively, with fresh frozen plasma and packed red blood cell transfusions and she showed gradual improvement. The case is being reported to discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare inherited coagulation disorder.

  20. Platelet aggregation measurement for assessment of hemostasis failure mechanisms in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinov, Edward; Sulaieva, Oksana; Lyakch, Yuriy; Guryanov, Vitaliy; Kondratenko, Petr; Radenko, Yevgeniy

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the risk of unsustainable hemostasis in patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer bleeding by in vitro assessment of platelet reactivity using artificial neural networks. Methods Patients with gastroduodenal ulcers complicated by bleeding were studied. Platelet aggregation was measured using aggregometry with adenosine diphosphate 5 μM, epinephrine 2.5 μM, 5-hydroxytryptophan 10 μM, collagen 1 μM, and thrombin 0.06 NIH Unit/mL as agonists. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the independent relationship between demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and laboratory data and in vitro assessment of platelet reactivity and local parameters of hemostasis in patients with ulcer bleeding. Results Analysis of platelet aggregation in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding allowed the variability of platelet response to different agonists used in effective concentration which induces 50% platelet aggregation (EC50) to be established. The relationship between platelet aggregation and the spatial-temporal characteristics of ulcers complicated by bleeding was demonstrated. Adrenoreactivity of platelets was associated with time elapsed since the start of ulcer bleeding and degree of hemorrhage. The lowest platelet response to collagen and thrombin was detected in patients with active bleeding (P < 0.001) and unsustainable recent bleeding (P < 0.01). Decreased adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation in patients with ulcer bleeding was correlated with the platelet response to thrombin (r = 0.714, P < 0.001) and collagen (r = 0.584, P < 0.01). Conclusion Estimation of platelet reactivity in vitro indicates the key mechanisms of failure of hemostasis in patients with ulcer bleeding. In addition to gender, an important determinant of unsustainable hemostasis was a decreased platelet response to thrombin and adenosine diphosphate. PMID:23950655

  1. Diagnostic performance of CT angiography in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hang; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of computed tomography angiography (CTA) in identifying the cause of bleeding and to determine the clinical features associated with a positive test result of CTA in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We included 111 consecutive patients (61 men and 50 women; mean age: 63.4 years; range: 28-89 years) who visited emergency department with overt GI bleeding. They underwent CTA as a first-line diagnostic modality from July through December 2010. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the CTA images and determined the presence of any definite or potential bleeding focus by consensus. An independent assessor determined the cause of bleeding based on other diagnostic studies and/or clinical follow-up. The diagnostic performance of CTA and clinical characteristics associated with positive CTA results were analyzed. To identify a definite or potential bleeding focus, the diagnostic yield of CTA was 61.3% (68 of 111). The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were 84.8% (67 of 79), 96.9% (31 of 32), 98.5% (67 of 68), and 72.1% (31 of 43), respectively. Positive CTA results were associated with the presence of massive bleeding (p = 0.001, odds ratio: 11.506). Computed tomography angiography as a first-line diagnostic modality in patients presenting with overt GI bleeding showed a fairly high accuracy. It could identify definite or potential bleeding focus with a moderate diagnostic yield and a high PPV. CTA is particularly useful in patients with massive bleeding.

  2. Transarterial embolization of massive gastric ulcer bleeding in gastrostomy patients caused by a balloon replacement tube: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Byong Jong; Hur, Jin; Lee, Kwang Hun; Won, Jong Yun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    We present the case of a 77-year-old woman with massive gastric ulcer bleeding caused by a balloon replacement tube that required emergent transcatheter left gastric arterial embolization in stop the ulcer bleeding.

  3. Distribution of bleeding gastrointestinal angioectasias in a Western population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth Bollinger; Daniel Raines; Patrick Saitta

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO define which segments of the gastrointestinal tract are most likely to yield angioectasias for ablative therapy.METHODS:A retrospective chart review was performed for patients treated in the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Gastroenterology clinics between the dates of July 1,2007 and October 1,2010.The selection of cases for review was initiated by use of our electronic medical record to identify all patients with a diagnosis of angioectasia,angiodysplasia,or arteriovenous malformation.Of these cases,chart reviews identified patients who had a complete evaluation of their gastrointestinal tract as defined by at least one upper endoscopy,colonoscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy within the past three years.Patients without evidence of overt gastrointestinal bleeding or iron deficiency anemia associated with intestinal angioectasias were classified as asymptomatic and excluded from this analysis.Thirty-five patients with confirmed,bleeding intestinal angioectasias who had undergone complete endoscopic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract were included in the final analysis.RESULTS:A total of 127 cases were reviewed.Sixtysix were excluded during subsequent screening due to lack of complete small bowel evaluation and/or lack of documentation of overt bleeding or iron deficiency anemia.The 61 remaining cases were carefully examined with independent review of endoscopic images as well as complete capsule endoscopy videos.This analysis excluded 26 additional cases due to insufficient records/images for review,incomplete capsule examination,poor capsule visualization or lack of confirmation of typical angioectasias by the principal investigator on independent review.Thirty-five cases met criteria for final analysis.All study patients were age 50 years or older and 13 patients (37.1%) had chronic kidney disease stage 3 or higher.Twenty of 35 patients were taking aspirin (81 mg or 325 mg),clopidogrel,and/or warfarin,with 8/20 on combination

  4. Bleeding tendency in dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin/clopidogrel: rescue of the template bleeding time in a single-center prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Raul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with heightened platelet reactivity in response to antiplatelet agents are at an increased risk of recurrent ischemic events. However, there is a lack of diagnostic criteria for increased response to combined aspirin/clopidogrel therapy. The challenge is to identify patients at risk of bleeding. This study sought to characterize bleeding tendency in patients treated with aspirin and clopidogrel. Patients/methods In a single-center prospective study, 100 patients under long-term aspirin/clopidogrel treatment, the effect of therapy was assayed by template bleeding time (BT and the inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA by light transmission aggregometry (LTA. Arachidonic acid (0.625 mmol/L and adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 2, 4, and 8 μmol/L were used as platelet agonists. Results Bleeding episodes (28 nuisance, 2 hematuria [1 severe], 1 severe proctorrhagia, 1 severe epistaxis were significantly more frequent in patients with longer BT. Template BT ≥ 24 min was associated with bleeding episodes (28 of 32. Risk of bleeding increased 17.4% for each 1 min increase in BT. Correlation was found between BT and IPAmax in response to ADP 2 μmol/L but not to ADP 4 or 8 μmol/L. Conclusion In patients treated with dual aspirin/clopidogrel therapy, nuisance and internal bleeding were significantly associated with template BT and with IPAmax in response to ADP 2 μmol/L but not in response to ADP 4 μmol/L or 8 μmol/L.

  5. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: which factors are associated with positive capsule endoscopy findings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Background: Capsule endoscopy is a first line examination to evaluate obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The identification of factors associated with the detection of lesions by capsule endoscopy could improve resource utilization and patient selection. Objectives: To identify factors associated with positive capsule endoscopy findings in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Methods: Retrospective, single-center study, including 203 patients (214 capsule endoscopy procedures submitted to capsule endoscopy in the setting of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Type of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, number of units of packed red blood cells transfused, type of positive finding, number of endoscopy studies performed prior to capsule endoscopy, comorbidities, medication and Charlson index were evaluated. Overt bleeding was subdivided into ongoing and previous gastrointestinal bleeding. Only lesions with high hemorrhagic potential (P2 were classified as positive findings. Results: The mean age was 62.2 years and 59.7% of patients were female. Most patients were referred for occult gastrointestinal bleeding (64.5%, while 35.5% were referred for overt gastrointestinal bleeding (63.2% previous-overt gastrointestinal bleeding. The most frequent positive findings included ulcers/erosions (34% and angioectasias (32%. In univariate analysis, the identification of positive findings was significantly higher in those with ongoing-overt bleeding (p < 0.001, advanced age (p = 0.003, increasing number of pre-capsule endoscopies (p < 0.001, increasing transfusion requirements (p < 0.001, moderate/severe renal disease (p = 0.009 and antiplatelet drugs (p = 0.021 and NSAID intake (p = 0.005. In multivariate analysis, positive findings were significantly higher only in those with ongoing-overt bleeding (odds ratio [OR] 18.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.98-85.6, p < 0.001, higher transfusion requirements (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.1-1.4, p < 0.001 and NSAID

  6. 75 FR 64314 - Product Development Program for Interventions in Patients With Severe Bleeding Due to Trauma or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... With Severe Bleeding Due to Trauma or Other Causes; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Bleeding Due to Trauma or Other Causes.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to discuss possible... resulting from trauma, has been complicated by the lack of a consensus definition of severe bleeding as...

  7. Experimental and clinical application of laser doppler flowmetry in gastric and duodenal ulcerative bleedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afanasieva G.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to develop a new objective diagnostic method of prerecurrence syndrome that will prognose bleeding recurrence from gastroduodenal ulcers. Materials and methods. Method of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF of the regional perfusion of tissue has been used. The experimental part has been done on 30 white laboratory rats. Characteristics of regional tissue perfusion in the simulation and laser hemostasis of bleeding have been studied. Gastroduodenal endoscopy has been performed with laser Doppler flowmetry (ELDF in clinical conditions to predict the recurrence of ulcerative bleeding. The prognostic method of gastroduodenal ulcerative bleeding was used in 58 patients hospitalized with such pathology and activity of bleeding Forrest II. Results. The study of microcirculation parameters and experimental hemostasis has showed the possibility of using LDF to measure its performance. Effective hemostasis has been accompanied by a significant decrease in perfusion. On the basis of microcirculation parameters in ulcerative bleeding, medical adrenaline test has been proposed for an objective verification pre-recurrence syndrome. To evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis perfusion has been measured before and after its implementation. Conclusion. ELDF has objectified the prognosis of ulcerative bleeding recurrence, verified pre-recurrence syndrome and evaluated the efficacy of endoscopic hemostasis

  8. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding.

  9. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopic Approaches to Upper Gastrointestinal System Bleeding in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Aygün

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ti­on: Upper gastrointestinal system bleeding in children is always very important problems requiring further investigation. The aim of the study was to investigate retrospectively the etiologies of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the therapeutic endoscopic approach to the bleeding, and the efficacy of the endoscopy in the treatment of pediatric age group. Materials and Methods: In this study, 139 (F/M: 63/76 cases diagnosed as upper gastrointestinal bleeding and followed up by the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology were classified into groups according to the age, etiology, the presence of varicose veins, and history of drug ingestion. In addition bleedings caused by peptic ulcer disease were classified according to Forrest classification. Values of p0.68. Discussion: Endoscopic procedure is very useful in both the determination of etiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in childhood. (Jo­ur­nal of Cur­rent Pe­di­at­rics 2012; 10: 1-7

  10. The results of Helicobacter pylori eradication on repeated bleeding in patients with stomach ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Darko; Vcev, Aleksandar; Soldo, Ivan; Timarac, Jasna; Dmitrović, Branko; Misević, Tonci; Ivezić, Zdravko; Kraljik, Nikola

    2005-06-01

    The triple therapy of Helicobacter pylori eradication prevents repeated bleeding from stomach ulcer. The aim of this one-way blind prospective study was to evaluate the efficiency of the two-week triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication in preventing renewed bleeding in patients with stomach ulcer within one year. This research included 60 hospitalized patients with bleeding stomach ulcer and positive Helicobacter pylori infection, 34 men and 26 women (average age 59.7 years). The patients were given therapeutic scheme of omeprazol--amoxicilin--metrodinazol (OAM) eradication for 14 days. Eradication of H. pylori infection was defined as lack of proof of the infection one month or several months after therapy suspension. By applying triple OAM therapy within two weeks the eradication was successful in 72%. In the group of 17 H. pylori positive patients there were 8 patients (47.6%) with repeated stomach ulcer and 3 patients (18%) with bleeding. Within the group of 43 H. pylori negative patients there were only 2 patients (4.65%) with repeated stomach ulcer and 1 patient (2%) with bleeding, during the observed period of 12 months. This research confirms the hypothesis about the necessity of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding stomach ulcer as prevention of repeated bleeding.

  11. Risk factors for postoperative bleeding after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection in patients under antithrombotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuji Shindo; Satohiro Matsumoto; Hiroyuki Miyatani; Yukio Yoshida; Hirosato Mashima

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the risk factors for postoperative bleeding after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection(ESD) based on the latest guidelines.METHODS: A total of 262 gastric neoplasms were treated by ESD at our center during a 2-year period from October 2012. We analyzed the data of these cases retrospectively to identify the risk factors for postESD bleeding.RESULTS: Of the 48(18.3%) cases on antithrombotic treatment, 10 were still receiving antiplatelet drugs perioperatively, 13 were on heparin replacement after oral anticoagulant withdrawal, and the antithrombotic therapy was discontinued perioperatively in 25 cases. Postoperative bleeding occurred in 23 cases(8.8%). The postoperative bleeding rate in the heparin replacement group was 61.5%, significantly higher than that in the non-antithrombotic therapy group(6.1%). Univariate analysis identified history of antithrombotic drug use, heparin replacement, hemodialysis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, elevated prothrombin timeinternational normalized ratio, and low hemoglobin level on admission as risk factors for post ESD bleeding. Multivariate analysis identified only heparin replacement(OR = 13.7, 95%CI: 1.2-151.3, P = 0.0329) as a significant risk factor for post-ESD bleeding.CONCLUSION: Continued administration of antiplatelet agents, based on the guidelines, was not a risk factor for postoperative bleeding after gastric ESD; however, heparin replacement, which is recommended after withdrawal of oral anticoagulants, was identified as a significant risk factor.

  12. Ileal polypoid lymphangiectasia bleeding diagnosed and treated by double balloon enteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Seon; Lee, Beom Jae; Gu, Dae Hoe; Pyo, Jeung-Hui; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yun Ho; Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae

    2013-12-07

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease characterized by focal or diffuse dilated enteric lymphatics with impaired lymph drainage. It causes protein-losing enteropathy and may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding. Commonly, lymphangiectasia presents as whitish spots or specks. To our knowledge, small bowel bleeding resulting from polypoid intestinal lymphangiectasia has not been reported. Here, we report a rare case of active bleeding from the small bowel caused by polypoid lymphangiectasia with a review of the relevant literature. An 80-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy could not identify the source of bleeding. Subsequent colonoscopy showed fresh bloody material gushing from the small bowel. An abdominal-pelvic contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan did not reveal any abnormal findings. Video capsule endoscopy showed evidence of active and recent bleeding in the ileum. To localize the bleeding site, we performed double balloon enteroscopy by the anal approach. A small, bleeding, polypoid lesion was found in the distal ileum and was successfully removed using endoscopic snare electrocautery.

  13. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with AIDS: a relatively uncommon condition associated with reduced survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, F; Cernuschi, M; Valsecchi, L; Rizzardini, G; Musicco, M; Lazzarin, A; Bianchi Porro, G

    1991-01-01

    To determine the cumulative incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding and its effect upon survival in patients with AIDS, 453 consecutive AIDS patients diagnosed in our hospital between June 1985 and March 1989 were followed for a median period of six months (maximum 42 months). The cumulative probability of acute gastrointestinal bleeding was 3% at six months and 6% at 14 months. This event was associated with significantly reduced survival. Independent risk factors for bleeding were: severe thrombocytopenia at the time of diagnosis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as the first clinical manifestation of AIDS. The potential causes of bleeding were investigated in all cases by emergency endoscopy or by necropsy examination in those patients whose clinical condition precluded the procedure. In nine of 15 patients, bleeding was due to lesions specifically associated with AIDS, but in the remainder the source of bleeding was not a direct consequence of HIV infection. We conclude that acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding rarely complicates the course of AIDS, but its occurrence is associated with decreased survival. As many of the causes are potentially treatable, a complete diagnostic approach is indicated in these patients, except those who are terminally ill. PMID:1916503

  14. Minimizing bleeding risk in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habert, Jeffrey Steven

    2016-01-01

    Many primary care physicians are wary about using direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Factors such as comorbidities, concomitant medications, and alcohol misuse increase concerns over bleeding risk, especially in elderly and frail patients with AF. This article discusses strategies to minimize the risk of major bleeding events in patients with AF who may benefit from oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention. The potential benefits of the DOACs compared with vitamin K antagonists, in terms of a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage, are discussed, together with the identification of reversible risk factors for bleeding and correct dose selection of the DOACs based on a patient’s characteristics and concomitant medications. Current bleeding management strategies, including the new reversal agents for the DOACs and the prevention of bleeding during preoperative anticoagulation treatment, in addition to health care resource use associated with anticoagulation treatment and bleeding, are also discussed. Implementing a structured approach at an individual patient level will minimize the overall risk of bleeding and should increase physician confidence in using the DOACs for stroke prevention in their patients with nonvalvular AF.

  15. The practical management of bleedings during treatment with direct oral anticoagulants: the emergency reversal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding represents the most feared complication of the new oral anticoagulants, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, as well as all the antithrombotic therapies. During the acute phase of bleeding in patients taking anticoagulants, restoration of an effective hemostasis represents the cornerstone of practical management. While vitamin K antagonists are effectively and promptly reversed by specific antidotes such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs, fresh frozen plasma or vitamin K, it is still not clear how to manage the urgent reversal of DOACs during life-threatening or major bleedings due to the lack of specific antidotes. However, in vitro and ex vivo studies have suggested some potential strategies to reverse DOACs in clinical practice, other than general support measures that are always recommended. Activated charcoal could be used in subjects with DOAC-related bleedings presenting to the emergency department within two hours of the last oral intake. Non-activated or activated PCCs (FEIBA and recombinant activated Factor VII (raFVII seem to be the optimal strategy for urgent reversal of dabigatran, while non-activated PCCs seem to have efficacy in reversing rivaroxaban. Due to its low plasma protein binding, dabigatran could be also dialyzed in urgent cases. Clinically relevant non-major bleedings and minor bleedings should be treated with general and local measures, respectively, and, when necessary, with dose delay or drug withdrawal. In this article, the Authors describe the practical approach to bleedings occurring during DOACs treatment.

  16. Numerical and experimental investigation of a centrifugal compressor with an inducer casing bleed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunziker, R.; Dickmann, H.P. [ABB Turbo Systems, Baden (Switzerland); Emmrich, R. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2001-12-02

    State-of-the-art centrifugal compressors for turbocharger applications are required to provide broad compressor maps, high pressure ratios and high efficiency levels. Usually these requirements are perceived as contradictory and represent challenging design targets. Various techniques for map width enhancements have been reported since the early 1980s. ABB Turbo Systems Limited has adopted a simple bleed system for internal flow recirculation to a high flowrate, high efficiency, pressure ratio 4.2 centrifugal compressor stage. After initial test runs had proved the effectiveness of the bleed system, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations were performed in order to gain insight into the flow pattern in both the compressor stage and the bleed system. The simulations explain the effectiveness by comparing them with simulations without the bleed channel. Selected streamline and iso-surface plots show the effect of the bleed channel flow on the main flow through the impeller. Four more variants of bleed channels have been modelled and investigated by CFD In order to optimize the bleed slot location and dimension. The most promising configuration, which showed a significant improvement in map width without a loss in efficiency, was subsequently built and tested. This test confirmed the validity of the CFD simulation results. (author)

  17. Presacral retroperitoneal hematoma after blunt trauma presents with rectal bleeding - A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Sanne Jensen; El-Hussuna, Alaa Abdul-Hussein Hmood

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We present a case of a presacral hematoma, which penetrated into the rectum resulting in rectal bleeding. This is an unusual presentation of a presacral hematoma. PRESENTATION OF THE CASE: A 76-year-old woman, using warfarin anticoagulant prophylaxis, presented with a rectal bleed t......: Rectal bleed after trauma, in a patient receiving anticoagulant treatment, should raise suspicion of a penetrating hematoma, and such patients should be managed at highly specialized facilities....... in the gastrointestinal tract. In this report the patient's anticoagulant treatment has likely contributed to bleeding and the formation of the hematoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a presacral hematoma acutely penetrating into the rectum and causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding. CONCLUSION......INTRODUCTION: We present a case of a presacral hematoma, which penetrated into the rectum resulting in rectal bleeding. This is an unusual presentation of a presacral hematoma. PRESENTATION OF THE CASE: A 76-year-old woman, using warfarin anticoagulant prophylaxis, presented with a rectal bleed two...

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal bleeding: Retrospective analysis of 76 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Chen Ba; San-Hua Qing; Xiang-Cheng Huang; Ying Wen; Guo-Xin Li; Jiang Yu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causes of small intestinal bleeding as well as its diagnosis and therapeutic approaches.METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted according to the clinical records of 76 patients with small intestinal bleeding admitted to our hospital in the past 5 years.RESULTS: In these patients, tumor was the most frequent cause of small intestinal bleeding (37/76), followed by Meckel's diverticulum (21/76), angiopathy (15/76) and ectopic pancreas (3/76). Of the 76 patients,21 were diagnosed by digital subtraction angiography,13 by barium and air double contrast X-ray examination of the small intestine, 11 by 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy of the abdominal cavity, 6 by enteroscopy of the small intestine, 21 by laparoscopic laparotomy, and 4 by exploratory laparotomy. Although all the patients received surgical treatment, most of them (68/76) received part enterectomy covering the diseased segment and enteroanastomosis. The follow-up time ranged from 1 year to 5 years. No case had recurrent alimentary tract bleeding or other complications.CONCLUSION: Tumor is the major cause of small intestinal bleeding followed by Meckel's diverticulum and angiopathy. The main approaches to definite diagnosis of small intestinal bleeding include digital subtraction angiography, 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy of the abdominal cavity, barium and air double contrast X-ray examination of the small intestine, laparoscopic laparotomy or exploratory laparotomy. Part enterectomy covering the diseased segment and enteroanastomosis are the most effective treatment modalities for small intestinal bleeding.

  19. Clinical, histopathological and therapeutic considerations in non-neoplastic abnormal uterine bleeding in menopause transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corniţescu, F I; Tănase, Florentina; Simionescu, Cristiana; Iliescu, D

    2011-01-01

    With the decline of ovarian hormonal function, from the fifth decade of life, women enter the menopause transition, during which bleeding becomes irregular in duration and time of occurrence. Secondary to ovarian dysfunction, developmental and maturation endometrial anomalies occur, which are clinically translated by abnormal uterine bleeding, which in many cases at this age can be caused by organic lesions (fibroma, polyps, endometritis, endometrial hyperplasia, adenomyosis, etc.). The retrospective study included a total of 256 patients with abnormal uterine bleeding in menopause transition. Statistics showed that the incidence of these types of bleeding increases with age (64.5%) and parity (30.5%), with symptoms consisting mostly in different clinical forms of abnormal uterine bleeding (62.1%), and leiomyomas prevailing at histopathological examination (49.6%). Progesterone replacement therapy was the first therapeutic choice for correcting these types of bleeding. Progesterone therapy is useful not only for therapeutic purposes to amend the bleeding, but also as a precaution against the development of endometrial carcinoma. Progestogens cancel the proliferative and mitogenic effect of estrogens, even when administered in sequential regimen 10-12 days per month.

  20. Continuous infusion of factor VIII for surgery and major bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, C R; Doughty, H I; Savidge, G F

    1996-03-01

    In a clinical trial, 24 patients with haemophilia A who needed surgery or had suffered severe bleeding were treated by continuous infusion of Monoclate P, a factor VIII concentrate that is immunopurified by monoclonal antibodies. Continuous infusion of Monoclate P began with a dose of 2 U/kg per h that was adjusted according to the results of factor VIII assays to achieve a factor VIII target level of 100 IU/dl for 2 days and then 80 IU/dl for 5 days. The safety, efficacy, and economics of this approach were assessed. No haemorrhagic episodes were observed. The continuous infusion was convenient and had the advantage of producing steady-state levels of factor VIII. With a single-compartment model, we found median factor VIII clearance values of 3.11 (range 1.79-7.78) x 10(3) litres/kg per h, elimination rates of 5.0-19.4 x 10(-2)/h and a median half-life of 9.9 h (range 4.8-20.0 h). Clearance and the elimination rate appeared to decline over the infusion period, as judged by the decreasing infusion rate required to maintain the target concentration of factor VIII. An economic comparison with bolus therapy, using theoretically derived bolus dosages, indicated that the potential saving was related inversely to the factor VIII half-life. Potential savings of 75% were predicted on the first postoperative day, averaging 35% over the full course of therapy.

  1. Spontaneous intra-abdominal bleeding in twin pregnancy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berisavac Milica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Spontaneous rupture of utero-ovarian vessels is a rare cause of haemoperitoneum in pregnancy, leading to significant maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Aetiopathogenesis of this condition is still unclear. Establishing clinical diagnosis of this condition is difficult, but very important. Clinical symptoms are nonspecific, and the diagnosis is usually made at laparotomy. CASE OUTLINE We report a case of spontaneous haematoperitoneum in the third trimester of twin pregnancy. Differential diagnosis included uterine rupture and placental abruption. Due to the deteriorated condition of the patient, it was decided to perform laparotomy which established the diagnosis of ruptured venous varices on the posterior uterine wall. Delivery was performed by caesarean section. The postoperative period was uneventful. CONCLUSION The clinical presentation of spontaneous rupture of utero-ovarian blood vessels is not specific and clinical examination and ultrasonographic scanning may be insufficient for diagnosis. Once the diagnosis of spontaneous haematoperitoneum in pregnancy is established, emergency laparotomy is indicated. Following caesarean delivery, it is necessary to establish surgical haemostasis. There are some authors who suggest leaving the pregnancy intact in cases when the fetus is not viable, although one must have in mind the possibility of recurrent bleeding. The safety of this procedure requires further investigation. It is necessary to have in mind the possibility of blood vessel rupture in all cases of abdominal pain and hypotension of unknown origin during pregnancy.

  2. Does oral clonidine premedication decrease bleeding during open rhinoplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Reza; Eftekharian, Hamidreza; Pourdanesh, Freydoun; Khaghaninejad, Mohammad Saleh

    2014-05-01

    This uni-blind randomized clinical trial study investigated the effect of clonidine premedication on preoperative blood loss during open rhinoplasty. The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups. The members of the first group received oral clonidine as a single dose (0.2 mg) 2 hours before the induction of general anesthesia, whereas the members of the second group received a placebo. All subjects underwent open rhinoplasty without septoplasty. One anesthetic protocol was followed for all subjects. Variable factors include the subjects' weight, age, sex, and blood pressure during the surgery as well as blood loss during rhinoplasty. Group 1 consisted of 22 women and 11 men, whereas group 2 was composed of 16 women and 17 men. The mean for blood loss amounted to 68.03 ± 22.49 mL for group 1 and 132.12 ± 78.53 mL for group 2. An assessment demonstrated a significant difference in blood loss between the 2 groups (P clonidine premedication thus may decrease preoperative bleeding during open rhinoplasty.

  3. Insights into cryotherapy and joint bleeding: cryotherapy and hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanbod, Roya; Torkaman, Giti; Hedayati, Mehdi; Nezhad, Mohammad Esmaeil Zandi

    2017-02-21

    There is some controversy over the use of cryotherapy. Low temperatures (Temp) could interfere with coagulation and increase the risk of bleeding. We sought to examine the effect of cryotherapy on joint swelling, temperature, friction, and inflammatory condition after experimental hemarthrosis. The left knee of 23 albino rabbits, 10 in heparin Ice, five in citrate Ice, four in heparin control, and four in citrate control were injected intraarticularly with 1 ml of blood. In total, four animals were considered to be in normal control group. Joint diameter, Temp, and ultrasonography were assessed before the blood injection. One day after the intraarticular blood injection, cryotherapy was applied 4 times per day for 4 consecutive days. Joint diameter and Temp were measured twice a day. After cessation of the protocol, joint diameter and Temp were assessed and sonography performed, animals euthanized, the friction test was performed and the synovial membrane collected, respectively. Joint diameter and Temp were increased after the intraarticular blood injection. Cryotherapy was capable of reducing the swelling and Temp. Ultrasonography findings approved the positive effect of cryotherapy on joint swelling. The proinflammatory TNF-α reduced by cryotherapy in both cryotherapy groups but Interleukin 1β was only reduced in heparin group. Interleukin-4 increased in heparin Ice group that was in comparison with TNF-α reduction. Cryotherapy reduced joint swelling and has a positive effect on controlling joint inflammation and Temp.

  4. Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and hepatic infarction after liver biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Ting, Peng-Sheng; Green, Richard M

    2014-02-21

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms (HAP) are rare events, particularly after liver biopsy, but can be associated with serious complications. Therefore a high suspicion is necessary for timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. We report on a case of HAP that potentially formed after a liver biopsy in a patient with sarcoidosis. The HAP in our case was virtually undetectable initially by angiography but resulted in several complications including recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic cholecystitis and finally hepatic infarction with abscess formation until it became detectable at a size of 5-mm. The patient remains asymptomatic over a year after endovascular embolization of the HAP. In this report, we demonstrate that a small HAP can avoid detection by angiography at an early stage while being symptomatic for a prolonged course. A high clinical suspicion with a close clinical/radiological follow-up is needed in symptomatic patients with history of liver biopsy despite initial negative work up. Once diagnosed, HAP can be safely and effectively treated by endovascular embolization.

  5. Acoustic hemostasis device for automated treatment of bleeding in limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekins, K. Michael; Zeng, Xiaozheng; Barnes, Stephen; Hopple, Jerry; Kook, John; Moreau-Gobard, Romain; Hsu, Stephen; Ahiekpor-Dravi, Alexis; Lee, Chi-Yin; Ramachandran, Suresh; Maleke, Caroline; Eaton, John; Wong, Keith; Keneman, Scott

    2012-10-01

    A research prototype automated image-guided acoustic hemostasis system for treatment of deep bleeding was developed and tested in limb phantoms. The system incorporated a flexible, conformal acoustic applicator cuff. Electronically steered and focused therapeutic arrays (Tx) populated the cuff to enable dosing from multiple Tx's simultaneously. Similarly, multiple imaging arrays (Ix) were deployed on the cuff to enable 3D compounded images for targeting and treatment monitoring. To affect a lightweight cuff, highly integrated Tx electrical circuitry was implemented, fabric and lightweight structural materials were used, and components were minimized. Novel cuff and Ix and Tx mechanical registration approaches were used to insure targeting accuracy. Two-step automation was implemented: 1) targeting (3D image volume acquisition and stitching, Power and Pulsed Wave Doppler automated bleeder detection, identification of bone, followed by closed-loop iterative Tx beam targeting), and 2) automated dosing (auto-selection of arrays and Tx dosing parameters, power initiation and then monitoring by acoustic thermometry for power shut-off). In final testing the device automatically detected 65% of all bleeders (with various bleeder flow rates). Accurate targeting was achieved in HIFU phantoms with end-dose (30 sec) temperature rise reaching the desired 33-58°C. Automated closed-loop targeting and treatment was demonstrated in separate phantoms.

  6. Medical image of the week: diffuse gastric bleeding and ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okolo O

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 26-year-old man with a medical history significant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL presented with hypovolemic shock secondary to large volume hematemesis. The patient was diagnosed with ALL and treated with high dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant from a matched unrelated donor one year prior to presentation. His treatment course was complicated by grade 4 acute graft versus host disease (GVHD and CMV colitis. Blood work on admission showed hemoglobin of 6.4 g/dL and a leukocytosis. Patient was intubated for airway protection, transferred to ICU, and EGD was performed, which revealed diffusely friable mucosa, inflammation, and ulcerations throughout the gastric mucosa with only a few areas of normal appearing mucosa. Additionally, areas of spontaneous bleeding were seen. Selective arteriography within the right gastric and gastroduodenal arteries showed no active extravasation from the stomach or duodenum. However the gastroepiploic and right gastric arteries were prophylactically embolized. Subsequently ...

  7. Improved survival with the patients with variceal bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Praveen; Sarin, Shiv K

    2011-01-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is a major cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. Over the past two decades new treatment modalities have been introduced in the management of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) and several recent studies have suggested that the outcome of patients with cirrhosis and AVB has improved. Improved supportive measures, combination therapy which include early use of portal pressure reducing drugs with low rates of adverse effects (somatostatin, octerotide or terlipressin) and endoscopic variceal ligation has become the first line treatment in the management of AVB. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis, early use of lactulose for prevention of hepatic encephalopathy, application of early transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunts (TIPS), fully covered self-expandable metallic stent in patients for AVB may be useful in those cases where balloon tamponade is considered. Early and wide availability of liver transplantation has changed the armamentarium of the clinician for patients with AVB. High hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) >20 mmHg in AVB has become a useful predictor of outcomes and more aggressive therapies with early TIPS based on HVPG measurement may be the treatment of choice to reduce mortality further.

  8. Improved Survival with the Patients with Variceal Bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Variceal hemorrhage is a major cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. Over the past two decades new treatment modalities have been introduced in the management of acute variceal bleeding (AVB and several recent studies have suggested that the outcome of patients with cirrhosis and AVB has improved. Improved supportive measures, combination therapy which include early use of portal pressure reducing drugs with low rates of adverse effects (somatostatin, octerotide or terlipressin and endoscopic variceal ligation has become the first line treatment in the management of AVB. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis, early use of lactulose for prevention of hepatic encephalopathy, application of early transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunts (TIPS, fully covered self-expandable metallic stent in patients for AVB may be useful in those cases where balloon tamponade is considered. Early and wide availability of liver transplantation has changed the armamentarium of the clinician for patients with AVB. High hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG >20 mmHg in AVB has become a useful predictor of outcomes and more aggressive therapies with early TIPS based on HVPG measurement may be the treatment of choice to reduce mortality further.

  9. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk scores: Who, when andwhy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a significant cause of hospital admission. In order tostratify patients according to the risk of the complications,such as rebleeding or death, and to predict theneed of clinical intervention, several risk scores havebeen proposed and their use consistently recommendedby international guidelines. The use of risk scoringsystems in early assessment of patients suffering fromUGIB may be useful to distinguish high-risks patients,who may need clinical intervention and hospitalization,from low risk patients with a lower chance of developingcomplications, in which management as outpatientscan be considered. Although several scores havebeen published and validated for predicting differentoutcomes, the most frequently cited ones are the Rockallscore and the Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS). WhileRockall score, which incorporates clinical and endoscopicvariables, has been validated to predict mortality,the GBS, which is based on clinical and laboratorialparameters, has been studied to predict the need ofclinical intervention. Despite the advantages previouslyreported, their use in clinical decisions is still limited. Thisreview describes the different risk scores used in theUGIB setting, highlights the most important research,explains why and when their use may be helpful, reflectson the problems that remain unresolved and guidesfuture research with practical impact.

  10. Pancreatic Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Tumour Presenting with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Petrides

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PEComa is a family of rare mesenchymal tumours which can occur in any part of the human body. Primary PEComas of the pancreas are extremely rare tumours with uncertain malignant potential. A 17-year-old female was admitted to the hospital due to melena. She required several transfusions. CT scan demonstrated a mass at the head of the pancreas measuring 4.2 cm in maximum diameter. An endoscopic ultrasound showed an ulcerating malignant looking mass infiltrating 50% of the wall of the second part of the duodenum in the region of the ampulla. Multiple biopsies taken showed extensive ulceration with granulation tissue formation and underlying large macrophages without being able to establish a definite diagnosis. We proceeded with pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The postoperative course of the patient was unremarkable, and she was discharged on the 8th postoperative day. Histology examination of the specimen showed a PEComa of pancreas. Eighteen months after resection the patient is disease free. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time we describe a case of a pancreatic PEComa presenting with massive gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Spontaneous bleeding or thrombosis in cirrhosis: What should be feared the most?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castro, Kryssia Isabel; Antonello, Alessandro; Ferrarese, Alberto

    2015-07-18

    The more modern and accurate concept of a rebalanced hemostatic status in cirrhosis is slowly replacing the traditional belief of patients with cirrhosis being "auto-anticoagulated", prone only to bleeding complications, and protected from thrombotic events. With greater attention to clinical thrombotic events, their impact on the natural history of cirrhosis, and with the emergence and increased use of point-of-care and global assays, it is now understood that cirrhosis results in profound hemostatic alterations that can lead to thrombosis as well as to bleeding complications. Although many clinical decisions are still based on traditional coagulation parameters such as prothrombin (PT), PT, and international normalized ratio, it is increasingly recognized that these tests do not adequately predict the risk of bleeding, nor they should guide pre-emptive interventions. Moreover, altered coagulation tests should not be considered as a contraindication to the use of anticoagulation, although this therapeutic or prophylactic approach is not at present routinely undertaken. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding continues to be one of the most feared and deadly complications of cirrhosis and portal hypertension, but great progresses have been made in prevention and treatment strategies. Other bleeding sites that are frequently part of end-stage liver disease are similar to clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia, with gum bleeding and epistaxis being very common but fortunately only rarely a cause of life-threatening bleeding. On the contrary, manifestations of coagulation factor deficiencies like soft tissue bleeding and hemartrosis are rare in patients with cirrhosis. As far as thrombotic complications are concerned, portal vein thrombosis is the most common event in patients with cirrhosis, but venous thromboembolism is not infrequent, and results in important morbidity and mortality in patients with cirrhosis, especially those with decompensated disease. Future

  12. Effect of Gastric Acid Suppressant Prophylaxis on Incidence of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahoora Abdollahi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Critically ill children admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU are at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding due to stress related mucosal injury. Reducing gastric acid by acid suppressant medication is the accepted prophylaxis treatment, but there is not any definitive guideline for using prophylaxis in PICU patients. The present study aimed to assess the effect of Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI and H2 Blocker (H2B prophylaxis on gastrointestinal bleeding in admitted patients of PICU, Mashhad- Iran.Materials and Methods: In this study, 100 patients admitted in PICU divided into two equal groups on the first day of admission. They received ranitidine or pantoprazole as prophylaxis of stress ulcer. Those patients who had history of gastrointestinal bleeding or coagulation disorder were excluded. 100 PICU patients who had not received prophylaxis during last 6 months retrospectively evaluated as control of the study. Data were collected as demographic characteristics, admission reason, definitive diagnosis, receiving corticosteroid and mechanical ventilation in each patient. Gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, coffee ground aspirate, and melena and clinically significant gastrointestinal bleeding were daily monitored. Data analyzed through descriptive statistical tests, Chi-square, logistic regression, t-test and using SPSS-16 software.Results: Among 204 patients (control group=105 and case group=99, incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding (GB was 13.2% in which 6.9% of cases presented with clinically significant gastrointestinal bleeding (CSGB. Loss of consciousness and respiratory distress were the main reason of admission. There was no significant differences between the incidence of (GB and (CSGB in experimental and control groups (P>0.05 as well as ranitidine and pantoprazole prophylaxis (P>0.05. Significant risk factors of (GB were mechanical ventilation and loss of consciousness and corticosteroid therapy

  13. Is there still a role for intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Monsanto

    Full Text Available Background: in 21st century, endoscopic study of the small intestine has undergone a revolution with capsule endoscopy and balloon-assisted enteroscopy. The difficulties and morbidity associated with intraoperative enteroscopy, the gold-standard in the 20th century, made this technique to be relegated to a second level. Aims: evaluate the actual role and assess the diagnostic and therapeutic value of intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and methods: we conducted a retrospective study of 19 patients (11 males; mean age: 66.5 ± 15.3 years submitted to 21 IOE procedures for obscure GI bleeding. Capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy had been performed in 10 and 5 patients, respectively. Results: with intraoperative enteroscopy a small bowel bleeding lesion was identified in 79% of patients and a gastrointestinal bleed-ing lesion in 94%. Small bowel findings included: angiodysplasia (n = 6, ulcers (n = 4, small bowel Dieulafoy's lesion (n = 2, bleed-ing from anastomotic vessels (n = 1, multiple cavernous hemangiomas (n = 1 and bleeding ectopic jejunal varices (n = 1. Agreement between capsule endoscopy and intraoperative enteroscopy was 70%. Endoscopic and/or surgical treatment was used in 77.8% of the patients with a positive finding on intraoperative enteroscopy, with a rebleeding rate of 21.4% in a mean 21-month follow-up period. Procedure-related mortality and postoperative complications have been 5 and 21%, respectively. Conclusions: intraoperative enteroscopy remains a valuable tool in selected patients with obscure GI bleeding, achieving a high diagnostic yield and allowing an endoscopic and/or surgical treatment in most of them. However, as an invasive procedure with relevant mortality and morbidity, a precise indication for its use is indispensable.

  14. Successful endoscopic hemostasis for gastric arterial bleeding due to invasion of malignant lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenichi Nomura; Shigeo Horiike; Takeshi Okanoue; Masafumi Taniwaki; Shinya Yamada; Daisuke Shimizu; Takashi Okuda; Yuri Kamitsuji; Naohisa Yoshida; Yosuke Matsumoto; Naoki Wakabayashi; Kazuya Mikami

    2005-01-01

    A 75-year-old male with malignant lymphoma (ML)accompanied with gastric lesion was treated with combination chemotherapy. The patient produced tarry stool on the 4th d, and emergency gastroscopy showed arterial bleeding from the lesion. Hemostasis was achieved by injecting pure ethanol and using hemostatic clips. There is only one previous report on endoscopic hemostasis being effective for bleeding due to lymphoma. Since gastric bleeding causes significant mortality, endoscopic hemostasis should be considered as first-line treatment for ML patients who were treated with chemotherapy.

  15. Hepatobiliary fascioliasis with multiple aneurysms and active bleeding: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Young; Kim Jae Woon; Jang, Jae Cheon [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A 52-year-old woman visited our institution with upper abdominal pain which had lasted for the past two days. Laboratory tests revealed mild leukocytosis, decreased serum hemoglobin, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. CT scans showed multiple ill-defined, hypodense lesions in the peripheral areas of both hepatic lobes and active bleeding with a subcapsular hematoma in the right hepatic lobe. Angiography also showed active bleeding in the right hepatic lobe with multiple aneurysms, so a transarterial coil embolization was performed to stop the bleeding. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed several moving flat flukes in the common bile duct, which were pathologically confirmed as Fasciola hepatica.

  16. [Surgical Removal of Migrated Coil after Embolization of Jejunal Variceal Bleeding: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Lee, Danbi; Oh, Kyunghwan; Lee, Mingee; So, Seol; Yang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Chan Wook; Gwon, Dong Il; Chung, Young Hwa

    2017-01-25

    Jejunal variceal bleeding is less common compared with esophagogastric varices in patients with portal hypertension. However, jejunal variceal bleeding can be fatal without treatment. Treatments include surgery, transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS), endoscopic sclerotherapy, percutaneous coil embolization, and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO). Percutaneous coil embolization can be considered as an alternative treatment option for those where endoscopic sclerotherapy, surgery, TIPS or BRTO are not possible. Complications of percutaneous coil embolization have been reported, including coil migration. Herein, we report a case of migration of the coil into the jejunal lumen after percutaneous coil embolization for jejunal variceal bleeding. The migrated coil was successfully removed using surgery.

  17. Tranexamic Acid in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: an Evidence-based Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Atikah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to review the effectiveness of tranexamic acid therapy which has been proposed to reduce bleeding and in turn lower mortality rate. Methods: following literature searching based on our clinical question on Cochrane Library, PubMed, Clinical Key, EBSCO, Science Direct and Proquest, one systematic review that includes seven randomized controlled trials is obtained. The article meets validity and relevance criteria. Results: the systematic review found that there is no any clear evidence between intervention and control groups in term of mortality. Conclusion: the use of tranexamic acid to reduce mortality in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding is not recommended. Key words: tranexamic acid, mortality, upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  18. Pitfalls in detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding with multi-detector row helical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, T; Hoffmann, M H K; Stuber, G; Klass, O; Feuerlein, S; Aschoff, A J

    2009-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced multi-detector row helical CT angiography is establishing itself as an accurate, rapid, and non-invasive diagnostic modality in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. On arterial phase MDCT images ongoing hemorrhage can be revealed as an area of active extravasation of contrast material within the bowel lumen. This pictorial essay gives a short overview of current diagnostic modalities in assessing acute GI tract bleeding, typical MDCT findings, and depicts potential pitfalls in the detection of acute GI bleeding with MDCT.

  19. Diagnosis of a Bleeding Dieulafoy Lesion on Computed Tomography and Its Subsequent Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Penner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dieulafoy lesions are a potentially serious cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Because they may bleed intermittently, and only be endoscopically evident during hemorrhage, their diagnosis can be challenging. This is the first case to be reported in the English literature of a patient with a Dieulafoy lesion diagnosed during computed tomography (CT examination. Reduced acquisition times required for multislice helical CT allow the application of CT angiography in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding. CT scans are now widely used in the diagnostic algorithm for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and the present case illustrates that with fortuitous timing, they can provide critical information and an opportunity for selected angiography and coil embolization.

  20. Prevalence of gastric varices and results of sclerotherapy with N-butyl 2 cyanoacrylate for controlling acute gastric variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalid Mumtaz; Shahid Majid; Hasnain A Shah; Kashif Hameed; Ashfaq Ahmed; Saeed Hamid; Wasim Jafri

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the prevalence, predictors and control of bleeding following N-butyl 2 cyanoacrylate (NBC)sclerotherapy of gastric varix (GV).METHODS: We analyzed case records of 1436 patients with portal hypertension, who underwent endoscopy during the past five years for variceal screening or upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Fifty patients with bleeding GV underwent sclerotherapy with a mean of 2 mL NBC for control of bleeding. Outcome parameters were primary hemostasis (bleeding control within the first 48 h), recurrent bleeding (after 48 h of esophagogastro-duodenoscopy) and in-hospital mortality were analyzed.RESULTS: The prevalence of GV in patients with portal hypertension was 15% (220/1436) and the incidence of bleeding was 22.7% (50/220). Out of the 50 bleeding GV patients, isolated gastric varices (IGV-Ⅰ) were seen in 22 (44%), gastro-oesophageal varices (GOV) on lesser curvature (GOV-Ⅰ ) in 16 (32%), and GOV on greater curvature (GOV-Ⅱ) in 15 (30%). IGV- Ⅰ was seen in 44% (22/50) patients who had bleeding as compared to 23% (39/170) who did not have bleeding (P <0.003). Primary hemostasis was achieved with NBC in all patients. Re-bleeding occurred in 7 (14%) patients after 48 h of initial sclerotherapy. Secondary hemostasis was achieved with repeat NBC sclerotherapy in 4/7(57%). Three patients died after repeat sclerotherapy,one during transjugular intrahepatic portosysternic stem shunt (TIPSS), one during surgery and one due to uncontrolled bleeding. Treatment failure-related mortality rate was 6% (3/50).CONCLUSION: GV can be seen in 15% of patients with portal hypertension and the incidence of bleeding is 22.7%. NBC is highly effective in controlling GV bleeding.In hospital mortality of patients with bleeding GV is 6%.

  1. The Clinical Outcomes of Transcatheter Microcoil Embolization in Patients with Active Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Small Bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Soo Teik [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To assess the clinical outcomes of the transcatheter microcoil embolization in patients with active lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding in the small bowel, as well as to compare the mortality rates between the two groups based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus determined by an angiography. We retrospectively evaluated all of the consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for treatment of acute LGI bleeding between January 2003 and October 2007. In total, the study included 36 patients who underwent a colonoscopy and were diagnosed to have an active bleeding in the LGI tracts. Based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus, determined by an angiography, the patients were classified into two groups. The clinical outcomes included technical success, clinical success (no rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (> 30 days), as well as the major and minor complication rates. Of the 36 patients, 17 had angiography-proven bleeding that was distal to the marginal artery. The remaining 19 patients did not have a bleeding focus based on the angiography results. The technical and clinical success rates of performing transcatheter microcoil embolizations in patients with active bleeding were 100% and 88%, respectively (15 of 17). One patient died from continued LGI bleeding and one patient received surgery to treat the continued bleeding. There was no note made on the delayed bleeding or on the major or minor complications. Of the 19 patients without active bleeding, 16 (84%) did not have recurrent bleeding. One patient died due to continuous bleeding and multi-organ failure. The superselective microcoil embolization can help successfully treat patients with active LGI bleeding in the small bowel, identified by the results of an angiography. The mortality rate is not significantly different between the patients of the visualization and non-visualization groups on angiography.

  2. Life-threatening gastrointestinal system bleeding in Hodgkin disease: multidetector CT findings and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Erhan; Türkbey, Bariş; Cil, Barbaros Erhan; Canyiğit, Murat; Dündar, Ziya; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2007-06-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding is a life-threatening condition. Immediate determination of the origin of the bleeding is crucial, since hemostatic management must be initiated as rapidly as possible. Colonoscopy, radionuclide studies, and conventional angiography are considered the most important methods for assessing the origin of the bleeding. There are few published reports about the feasibility of computed tomography (CT) in acute GIS bleeding. We present multidetector CT (MDCT) findings in a case of Hodgkin disease status one month post-chemotherapy (CHOP protocol; cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) that presented with acute lower GIS bleeding.

  3. Electrodermal screening of biologically active points for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ying-Jung; Hu, Wen-Long; Hung, I-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between the electrical resistance of the skin at biologically active points (BAPs) on the main meridians and upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Electrical resistance to direct current at 20 BAPs on the fingers and toes of 100 patients with (38 men, 12 women; mean age [range], 58.20 ± 19.62 [18-83] years) and without (27 men, 23 women; 49.54 ± 12.12 [22-74] years) UGIB was measured through electrodermal screening (EDS), based on the theory of electroacupuncture according to Voll (EAV). Data were compared through analysis of variance (ANOVA), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and logistic regression. The initial readings were lower in the UGIB group, indicating blood and energy deficiency due to UGIB. Significant differences in indicator drop values were observed at nine BAPs (p < 0.05) on the bilateral small intestine, bilateral stomach, bilateral circulation, bilateral fibroid degeneration, and right lymph meridians. The area under the ROC curve values of the BAPs on the bilateral small intestine and stomach meridians were larger than 0.5, suggesting the diagnostic accuracy of EDS for UGIB on the basis of the indicator drop of these BAPs. Logistic regression revealed that when the indicator drop of the BAP on the left stomach meridian increased by one score, the risk of UGIB increased by about 1.545-3.523 times. In conclusion, the change in the electrical resistance of the skin measured by EDS at the BAPs on the bilateral small intestine and stomach meridians provides specific information on UGIB.

  4. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding due to a Dieulafoy lesion in the terminal ileum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegdam, J.A.; Hofker, H.S.; Dijkstra, G; Stolk, M.F.; Jacobs, M.A.; Suurmeijer, A.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    A 50-year-old man awaiting liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis developed iron-deficiency anaemia. Repeated occult gastrointestinal bleeding led to an increasing need for blood transfusions. After multiple oesophagogastroduodenoscopies and colonoscopies, videocapsule endoscopy fi

  5. Reproducibility of Wireless Capsule Endoscopy in the Investigation of Chronic Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Christodoulou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Capsule endoscopy (CE is a valuable tool in the diagnostic evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, but limited information is available on the reproducibility of CE findings.

  6. Transcatheter arterial embolization for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Cercueil, J P; Krausé, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, transcatheter arterial embolization has become the first-line therapy for the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic hemostasis. Advances in catheter-based techniques and newer embolic agents, as well as recognition of the effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment options, have expanded the role of interventional radiology in the treatment of bleeding for a variety of indications. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a fast, safe, and effective minimally invasive alternative to surgery, when endoscopic treatment fails to control acute bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the role of arterial embolization in the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and summarizes the literature evidence on the outcomes of endovascular therapy in such a setting.

  7. Epinephrine plus argon plasma or heater probe coagulation in ulcer bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmet Karaman; Mevlut Baskol; Sebnem Gursoy; Edip Torun; Alper Yurci; Banu Demet Ozel; Kadri Guven; Omer Ozbakir; Mehmet Yucesoy

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effectiveness of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and heater probe coagulation (HPC) in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Eighty-five (18 female, 67 male) patients admitted for acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric or duodenal ulcer were included in the study. Upper endoscopy was performed and HPC or APC were chosen randomly to stop the bleeding. Initial hemostasis and rebleeding rates were primary and secondary end-points of the study. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was achieved in 97.7% (42/43) and 81% (36/42) of the APC and HPC groups, respectively (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: APC is an effective hemostatic method in bleeding peptic ulcers. Larger multicenter trials are necessary to confirm these results.

  8. Comparison of 3 dimensional sonohysterography and hysteroscopy in Premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser I. Abd Elkhalek

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: 3-D sonohysterography is a very safe, well tolerated and effective modality for evaluation of intracavitary uterine abnormalities and is an accurate alternative technique for hysteroscopy among the premenopausal women that suffers from abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB.

  9. Meta-analysis: antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding - an updated Cochrane review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavez-Tapia, N C; Barrientos-Gutierrez, T; Tellez-Avila, F;

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention....

  10. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Yamamoto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth.

  11. Clonidine Reduce Bleeding Of Endoscopic Sinus Surgery Amir Alam Hospital (1398-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajy Mohammadi F

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate effect of clonidine as a premedication on endoscopic sinus surgery bleeding."nMethods and Materials: during a randomized double blind clinical trial we compared two groups of patients who scheduled for endoscopic sinus surgery for polypectomy and etmoidectomy. 216 patients randomly assigned in two groups.In first group 2 hours befor surgery a 0.2mg tablet of clonidine orally adminestered to patients and in second group a 100 mg tablet of vit Bj(with same size and color- as"nplacebowas adminestered to patients. The amount of bleeding measured in two groups."nResults: mean bleeding volume in clonidine group was 113+76 ml and in control group was 211 + 113 ml. There was a significant statistical difference between two groups (pO.0001."nConclusion: Clonidine as premedication can reduce bleeding of endoscopic sinus surgery significantly.

  12. Exercise and Dehydration Minimized Bleeding Time in Camels (Camelus dromedarius: A Clinical Standpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Samara*, K. A. Abdoun, A. B. Okab and A. A. Al-Haidary

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The physiological response of hemostatic system, assessed by measuring camel's bleeding time, was determined immediately before, after and during the recovery (post 3, 6, 24 and 48 hours from 2 hours exercise and 72 hours of dehydration in 5 clinically healthy Arabian dromedary camels. It was observed that both conditions resulted in an activation of blood coagulation cascades as demonstrated by a drastic reductions (P<0.05 in the overall means of their bleeding times. Nevertheless, 3 hours post each condition were found sufficient (in exercise: P=0.22, in dehydration: P=0.38 for retrieval of bleeding time to its normal level. Based upon findings, it may be recommended that short periods of exercise and/or dehydration prior to surgical operations can be practiced to minimize bleeding during surgery. However, further investigations are required to clarify the possible role of different intensity and/or duration of these conditions on other hemostatic measurements.

  13. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-03-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent.

  14. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome in Patients with Bleeding Peptic Ulcers and Helicobacter pylori Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Chun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal (UGI bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT, with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed 13C-urea breath test (UBT or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity.

  15. Bleeding risk stratification in an era of aggressive management of acute coronary syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emad; Abu-Assi; Sergio; Raposeiras-Roubín; José; María; García-Acu?a; José; Ramón; González-Juanatey

    2014-01-01

    Major bleeding is currently one of the most common non-cardiac complications observed in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS). Hemorrhagic complications occur with a frequency of 1% to 10% during treatment for ACS. In fact, bleeding events are the most common extrinsic complication associated with ACS therapy. The identification of clinical characteristics and particularities of the antithrombin therapy associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic complications would make it possible to adopt prevention strategies, especially among those exposed to greater risk. The international societies of cardiology renewed emphasis on bleeding risk stratification in order to decide strategy and therapy for patients with ACS. With this review, we performed an update about the ACS bleeding risk scores most frequently used in daily clinical practice.

  16. Microwave technology for localization of traumatic intracranial bleedings-a numerical simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candefjord, Stefan; Winges, Johan; Yu, Yinan; Rylander, Thomas; McKelvey, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem worldwide. Intracranial bleedings represents the most serious complication of TBI and need to be surgically evacuated promptly to save lives and mitigate injury. Microwave technology (MWT) is promising as a complement to computed tomography (CT) to be used in road and air ambulances for early detection of intracranial bleedings. In this study, we perform numerical simulations to investigate if a classification algorithm based on singular value decomposition can distinguish between bleedings at different positions adjacent to the skull bone for a similar but simplified problem. The classification accuracy is 94-100% for all classes, a result that encourages us to pursue our efforts with MWT for more realistic scenarios. This indicates that MWT has potential for localizing a detected bleeding, which would increase the diagnostic value of this technique.

  17. Preoperative hemostatic testing and the risk of postoperative bleeding in coronary artery bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Johansson, Pär I; Kofoed, Klaus F;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We sought to assess predictability of excessive bleeding using thrombelastography (TEG), multiplate impedance aggregometry, and conventional coagulation tests including fibrinogen in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. METHODS: A total of 170 patients were...

  18. Periesophageal Pseudoaneurysms: Rare Cause of Refractory Bleeding Treated with Transarterial Embolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rachit D.; Komorowski, Daniel J.; Smallfield, George B.

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female with history of systemic lupus erythematosus, prior cytomegalovirus esophagitis treated with ganciclovir, and long segment Barrett's esophagus (Prague class C8 M9) with high grade dysplasia treated with radiofrequency ablation presented to the hospital with hematemesis. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed multiple esophageal ulcers with active arterial spurting which could not be controlled with endoscopic interventions including placement of hemostatic clips. An emergent angiogram demonstrated actively bleeding saccular dilations (pseudoaneurysms) in the esophageal branches of the lower thoracic aorta as well as left gastric artery for which gelfoam and coil embolization was initially successful. Due to recurrence of massive bleeding, she subsequently underwent emergent esophagectomy and bipolar exclusion. Pathology demonstrated submucosal hemorrhage, esophagitis with dysplastic Barrett's mucosa, and an ulcer containing cytomegaloviral inclusions. We report the first case of arterial bleeding from periesophageal pseudoaneurysms as well as use of angiographic embolization for arterial bleeding in the esophagus.

  19. Effect of recombinant Factor VIIa on outcome of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; D'Amico, Gennaro; Rusch, Ea;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Two randomized controlled studies have evaluated the effect of recombinant Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) on variceal bleeding in cirrhosis without showing significant benefit. The aim of the present study was to perform a meta-analysis of the two trials on individual patient data...... vasoactive drug infusion and Child-Pugh score >8. RESULTS: 497 patients were eligible for the meta-analysis; 308 (62%) had active variceal bleeding at endoscopy (oozing or spurting) and 283 of these had a Child-Pugh score >8. Analysis on the composite endpoint in all patients with bleeding from oesophageal...... varices did not show any beneficial treatment effect. However, failure rate for the primary composite end-point was significantly lower in treated patients with active bleeding at endoscopy (17%) compared to placebo (26%, p=0.049). This difference was highly significant in patients with Child-Pugh score...

  20. A rare cause for severe recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding in a 12 year old patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belsha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cause for severe, recurrent lower gastrointestinal (LGI bleeding in children can usually be diagnosed readily by means of the commonly used investigative/diagnostic techniques such as colonoscopy, laparoscopy ± laparotomy. Occasionally less commonly used investigations may be necessary to look for more elusive causes of LGI bleeding such as capsule endoscopy, angiography, technetium-99m (99m Tc-labeled red blood cell (RBC scintigraphy, cross-sectional imaging such as CT/MRI (including angiography and laparotomy combined with on-table small bowel enteroscopy. We report a case of severe, recurrent LGI bleeding that had occurred over several years, where the cause remained elusive despite numerous investigations and interventions. The etiology of this was eventually found to be a gastric duplication cyst infiltrating into adjacent transverse colon and causing bleeding from peptic ulceration in the colon. The process by which this diagnosis was made and the lessons learned are discussed.

  1. Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers and Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Chun; Lee, Chia-Long

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT), with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed (13)C-urea breath test (UBT) or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity.

  2. Endoscopic Injection Therapy in Bleeding Peptic Ulcers. Low Mortality in a High Risk Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaqulm Balanzó

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscoric injection therapy was performed in 341 patients consecutively admitted with a bleeding peptic ulcer at high risk of further hemorrhage, assessed by the presence of active arterial bleeding or a nonbleeding visible vessel at emergency endoscopy. Initial hemostasis was achieved in 111 of 119 actively bleeding patients (93%. Rebleeding ocurred in 75 cases (23%, at a mean interval of 53±52 h. A second emergency injection was a ttempted in 36 therapeutic failures, and was successful in 20 (55%. Emergency surgery was finally required in 52 patients (15%. Overall mortality was 4.9%. Major complications occurred in four patients (1.2% (two perforations and two aspiration pneumonia; therefore, injection therapy is an effective and simple method for treating bleeding ulcers, achieving the initial control of hemorrhage in a majority of cases although the rate of further hemorrhage is not negligible and complications are not irrelevant.

  3. Optimization of Mass Bleed Control for Base Drag Reduction of Supersonic Flight Bodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.-K.Lee; H.-D.Kim

    2006-01-01

    The minimization of base drag using mass bleed control is examined in consideration of various base to orifice exit area ratios for a body of revolution in the Mach 2.47 freestream. Axisymmtric, compressible, mass-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the standard k-ω turbulence model, a fully implicit finite volume scheme, and a second order upwind scheme. Base flow characteristics are explained regarding the base configuration as well as the injection parameter which is defined as the mass flow rate of bleed jet non-dimensionalized by the product of the base area and freestream mass flux. The results obtained through the present study show that for a smaller base area, the optimum mass bleed condition leading to minimum base drag occurs at relatively larger mass bleed, and a larger orifice exit can offer better drag control.

  4. Comparative efficiency of endoscopic hemostasis methods in bleeding undercomplicated peptic ulcer in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Олександрович Сокольник

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis in complex treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding in children of Chernovtsy region with peptic ulcer disease.Methods. 43 cases of bleeding in peptic ulcer disease in children are analyzed. Argon plasma coagulation is undergone in order to stop the bleeding for 11 patients, for others – aminocaproic acid irrigation.Results. Using argon plasma coagulation, in contrast to the aminocaproic acid irrigation reduces the risk of rebleeding 0.59 times when the number of patients who must be treated – 2.99.Conclusions. The most effective method of endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding in peptic ulcer disease in children is argon plasma coagulation, which allows you to achieve a stable hemostasis and reduce the risk of rebleeding

  5. Re-bleeding events in patients with obscure gastrointestinalbleeding after negative capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro Magalh?es-Costa; Miguel Bispo; Sofia Santos; Gilberto Couto; Leopoldo Matos; Cristina Chagas

    2015-01-01

    a negative capsule endoscopy in patients with obscuregastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and the risk factorsassociated with the procedure.METHODS: Patients referred to Hospital Egas Moniz(Lisboa, Portugal) between January 2006 and October2012 with OGIB and a negative capsule endoscopy wereretrospectively analyzed. The following study variableswere included: demographic data, comorbidities,bleeding-related drug use, hemoglobin level, indicationfor capsule endoscopy, post procedure details, work-upand follow-up. Re-bleeding rates and associated factorswere assessed using a Cox proportional hazard analysis.The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate thecumulative incidence of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years,and the differences between factors were evaluated.RESULTS: The study population consisted of 640patients referred for OGIB investigation. Wirelesscapsule endoscopy was deemed negative in 113patients (17.7%). A total of 64.6% of the populationwas female, and the median age was 69 years. Themedian follow-up was forty-eight months (interquartilerange 24-60). Re-bleeding occurred in 27.4% of thecases. The median time to re-bleeding was fifteenmonths (interquartile range 2-33). In 22.6% (n = 7)of the population, small-bowel angiodysplasia wasidentified as the culprit lesion. A univariate analysisshowed that age 〉 65 years old, chronic kidney disease,aortic stenosis, anticoagulant use and overt OGIB wererisk factors for re-bleeding; however, on a multivariateanalysis, there were no risk factors for re-bleeding. Thecumulative risk of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years offollow-up was 12.9%, 25.6% and 31.5%, respectively. Magalh‘s-Costa P et al . A long-term follow-up study for re-bleeding events Patients who presented with overt OGIB tended to rebleed sooner (median time for re-bleeding: 8.5 mo vs 22 mo). CONCLUSION: Patients with OGIB despite a negative capsule endoscopy have a significant re-bleeding risk; therefore, these patients

  6. Solute clearance effect of citrate anticoagulation hemodialysate for hemodialysis in patients with high risk of bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the solute clearance effect of the new concentrated anticoagulation hemodialysate of citrate for hemodialysis in patients with high risk of bleeding. Methods Forty-two kidney failure patients with high risk of bleeding were divided into two groups (Group A and Group B) according to their hemodialysis manners. Patients in Group A were hemodialyzed with bicarbonate hemodialysate with low-molecular-weight heparin (dalteparin) anticoagulation and those in Group B with the new citrate anticoag...

  7. Endoscopic treatment of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding: hemoclips and other hemostatic techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rossana M. Moura; Jamie S. Barkin

    2000-01-01

    @@ Although the number of hospitalizations for nonvariccal gastrointestinal bleeding has decreased in recent years, acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage continues to be a common reason for hospital admission, and peptic ulcers account for at least fifty percent of all cases. Despite the fact that bleeding from ulcers ceases spontaneously in approximately 80% of patients, it is still a diagnosis associated with substantial medical costs and significant morbidity and mortality, the latter ranging between 8 and 14%[1], especially in the elderly.

  8. Ovesco system for treatment of postpolypectomy bleeding after failure of conventional treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Alcaide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The clip Ovesco (Ovesco, Tübingen, Germany is a novel endoscopic method for mechanical compression of tissue in the gastrointestinal tract. The indications for treatment are closure of perforations and fistulas and control of bleeding in which the conventional endoscopic treatment has failed. We report two cases about the use of an Ovesco (over-the-scope clip, OTSC system to control persistent bleeding postpolypectomy after failure of usual treatment.

  9. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: the Usefulness of Rotational Angiography after Endoscopic Marking with a Metallic Clip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Soo; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    We wanted to assess the usefulness of rotational angiography after endoscopic marking with a metallic clip in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients with no extravasation of contrast medium on conventional angiography. In 16 patients (mean age, 59.4 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (13 gastric ulcers, 2 duodenal ulcers, 1 malignant ulcer), a metallic clip was placed via gastroscopy and this had been preceded by routine endoscopic treatment. The metallic clip was placed in the fibrous edge of the ulcer adjacent to the bleeding point. All patients had negative results from their angiographic studies. To localize the bleeding focus, rotational angiography and high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip were used. Of the 16 patients, seven (44%) had positive results after high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip and they underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with microcoils. Nine patients without extravasation of contrast medium underwent TAE with microcoils as close as possible to the clip. The bleeding was stopped initially in all patients after treatment of the feeding artery. Two patients experienced a repeat episode of bleeding two days later. Of the two patients, one had subtle oozing from the ulcer margin and that patient underwent endoscopic treatment. One patient with malignant ulcer died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation one month after embolization. Complete clinical success was achieved in 14 of 16 (88%) patients. Delayed bleeding or major/minor complications were not noted. Rotational angiography after marking with a metallic clip helps to localize accurately the bleeding focus and thus to embolize the vessel correctly.

  10. ACD-A solution as anticoagulant during continuous renal replacement therapy in high risk bleeding patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨松涛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of ACDA solution as anticoagulant during continuous renal replacement therapy(CRRT)in high risk of bleeding patients.Methods Forty high risk bleeding patients on continuous veno-venous hemofiltration(CVVH)were randomly divided into two groups:ACD-A group(22 patients,61 cases)and heparin-free group(18 patients,47cases).Serum creatinine,function of the coagulation

  11. Recurrent massive bleeding due to dissecting intramural hematoma of the esophagus: Treatment with therapeutic angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaejun Shim; Jae Young Jang; Young Hwangbo; Seok Ho Dong; Joo Hyeong Oh; Hyo Jong Kim; Byung-Ho Kim; Young Woon Chang; Rin Chang

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous or traumatic intramural bleeding of the esophagus, which is often associated with overlying mucosal dissection, constitutes a rare spectrum of esophageal injury called dissecting intramural hematoma of the esophagus (DIHE). Chest pain, swallowing difficulty, and minor hematemesis are common, which resolve spontaneously in most cases. This case report describes a patient with spontaneous DIHE with recurrent massive bleeding which required critical management and highlights a potential role for therapeutic angiography as an alternative to surgery.

  12. [Historical schedule of management of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Jacek; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract were changed many times. First there were waiting (Hipocrates, Sydenham, Stahl), next transfusion of the blood were initiated (Denis, Blundell, Dieffenbach, Bierkowski, Dungren, Hirszfeld). Big (Rydygier) and small (Dragstedt) operations procedures were attempted. Discovery of endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract (Mikulicz) and initiation of elastic scopes (Hirschowitz) and exploration inhibitor of histamine receptors (H2) and proton pump inhibitors with recognition of role Helicobacter pylori in bleeding were permitted elaborate actual schemas of proceedings.

  13. Role of platelet transfusion in children with bleeding in dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Pothapregada

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: Platelet transfusion was required in children with severe dengue infection in the form of significant spontaneous bleed, shock and severe thrombocytopenia. Bleeding should not be considered only indicator to transfuse platelets as it occurred in children even with normal platelet counts. The community and treating physicians should be educated regarding the judicious transfusion of platelets. Unnecessary and empirical use of platelets should be completely avoided especially during an epidemic when there is scarcity in its availability.

  14. Management of Antiplatelet Agents and Anticoagulants in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Neena S

    2015-07-01

    Antithrombotic drugs (anticoagulants, aspirin, and other antiplatelet agents) are used to treat cardiovascular disease and to prevent secondary thromboembolic events. These drugs are independently associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and, when prescribed in combination, further increase the risk of adverse bleeding events. Clinical evidence to inform the choice of endoscopic hemostatic procedure, safe temporary drug cessation, and use of reversal agents is reviewed to optimize management following clinically significant GIB.

  15. Comparison of ACUITY and CRUSADE Scores in Predicting Major Bleeding during Acute Coronary Syndrome

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    Luis C. L. Correia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:The ACUITY and CRUSADE scores are validated models for prediction of major bleeding events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, the comparative performances of these scores are not known.Objective:To compare the accuracy of ACUITY and CRUSADE in predicting major bleeding events during ACS.Methods:This study included 519 patients consecutively admitted for unstable angina, non-ST-elevation or ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The scores were calculated based on admission data. We considered major bleeding events during hospitalization and not related to cardiac surgery, according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC criteria (type 3 or 5: hemodynamic instability, need for transfusion, drop in hemoglobin ≥ 3 g, and intracranial, intraocular or fatal bleeding.Results:Major bleeding was observed in 31 patients (23 caused by femoral puncture, 5 digestive, 3 in other sites, an incidence of 6%. While both scores were associated with bleeding, ACUITY demonstrated better C-statistics (0.73, 95% CI = 0.63 - 0.82 as compared with CRUSADE (0.62, 95% CI = 0.53 - 0.71; p = 0.04. The best performance of ACUITY was also reflected by a net reclassification improvement of + 0.19 (p = 0.02 over CRUSADE’s definition of low or high risk. Exploratory analysis suggested that the presence of the variables ‘age’ and ‘type of ACS’ in ACUITY was the main reason for its superiority.Conclusion:The ACUITY Score is a better predictor of major bleeding when compared with the CRUSADE Score in patients hospitalized for ACS.

  16. Nd: YAG laser therapy of rectosigmoid bleeding due to radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuchter, R.S.; Petrilli, E.S.; Dwyer, R.M.; Hacker, N.F.; Castaldo, T.W.; Lagasse, L.D.

    1982-06-01

    The Nd:YAG laser was used to treat a patient bleeding from the rectosigmoid as a result of radiation injury related to therapy for cervical carcinoma. Successful laser therapy was performed after a diverting colostomy failed to control persistent bleeding. Further surgical procedures were not required. Characteristics of Nd:YAG laser as compared with those of the carbon dioxide and argon lasers are considered.

  17. Is Previous Tubal Ligation a Risk Factor for Hysterectomy because of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding?

    OpenAIRE

    Sanam Moradan; Raheb Gorbani

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Post tubal ligation syndrome (PTLS) is a term used to describe a variety of post tubal ligation side effects or symptoms. These include increased menstrual bleeding and hysterectomy. Whether or not post tubal syndrome is a real entity, it has been a subject of controversy in the medical literature for decades. Numerous studies have reported conflicting conclusions about these symptoms. In this study the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among sterilized women was co...

  18. Usefulness of CT angiography in diagnosing acute gastrointestinal bleeding:A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. METHODS: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, Cochrane Library database, Sciencedirect, Springerlink and Scopus, from January 1995 to December 2009, were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of CT angiography in diagnosing acute GI bleeding. Studies were included if the ycompared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in ...

  19. Aminaphtone in the control of gingival bleeding in children

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    Pereira de Godoy JM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available José Maria Pereira de Godoy,1,2 Mara Lucia Macedo Paizan3 1Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP, São José do Rio Preto, 2Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq, Brasília, 3FAMERP, São José do Rio Preto, Brazil Aim: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of aminaphtone to control gum bleeding.Patients and methods: Fifteen male and 15 female children, aged between 10 and 18 years with a mean age of 13.4 years and with gingival bleeding, were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase IV clinical trial. The inclusion criterion was gingivitis with gingival bleeding. Participants were prescribed either aminaphtone or placebo. Thirty identical boxes containing blister packs of identical pills of either aminaphtone or placebo were produced and coded with unique numbers by the manufacturer (Baldacci Laboratory, Brazil and donated for this trial. A research assistant administered aminaphtone (Capilarema 75 mg to fifteen patients or placebo to fifteen patients twice daily for 5 days. Intraoral clinical evaluations of bleeding were made before starting medication/placebo and then at 3 and 5 days after administration.Results: On comparing the number of bleeding points before and after treatment between the aminaphtone and placebo groups, we found significantly higher reductions with the medication (P<0.0001.Conclusion: Aminaphtone reduces gum bleeding in gingivitis, and may have a supportive role in the control of bleeding. Keywords: periodontitis, bleeding, treatment

  20. Splenic artery embolization for the treatment of bleeding gastric varices secondary to splenic vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patrick A; Phang, David; Richmond, Bryan; Gill, Gurpreet; Campbell, John E

    2014-04-01

    Splenic vein thrombosis can lead to gastric varices. Subsequent upper gastrointestinal bleeding may ensue related to the change in venous outflow to the portal system. Vascular surgeons are infrequently asked to assist in the management of this entity. However, with many vascular surgeons providing diverse endovascular-based interventions, understanding catheter-based solutions is imperative. This report presents a case in which arterial embolization was used to treat gastric variceal bleeding.

  1. Causes of abortion in pregnant women applying with vaginal bleeding and pain: fetal- maternal causes

    OpenAIRE

    Çevik, Semra Akköz; Başer, Mürüvvet

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Aim of this study was to investigate causes of abortion in pregnant woman applying with vaginal bleeding and pain and diagnosed abortion to Gaziantep 75. year maternatiy hospital.Material and method: This study was conducted on pregnant woman applying with vaginal bleeding and pain and diagnosed abortion to Gaziantep 75. Year maternatiy hospital between 13 September- 29 December 2009 and total 53 pregnant woman were used as a materials( in the first and second trimester). ...

  2. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastroduodenal Bleeding: Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely prescribed medications in the World. A frequent complication of NSAID use is gastroduodenal bleeding. Risk factors for gastroduodenal bleeding while on NSAID therapy are age, prior peptic ulcer and co-medication with anti-platelet agents, anticoagulants, glucocorticosteroids and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Prevention strategies for at-risk patients include the use of the lowest effective dose of NSAIDs, co-t...

  3. Non-small-bowel lesions encountered during double-balloon enteroscopy performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoi-Poh; Tee; Arthur; J; Kaffes

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To report the incidence of non-small-bowel bleeding pathologies encountered during double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) procedures and to analyse their significance.METHODS: A retrospective study of a prospective DBE database conducted in a tertiary-referral center was conducted. A total of 179 patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) referred for DBE from June 2004 to November 2008 were analysed looking for the incidence of non-small-bowel lesions (NSBLs; all and newly diagnosed) encountered ...

  4. The role of capsule endoscopy after negative CT enterography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyun Mi; Park, Chan Hyuk; Lee, Jin Ha; Kim, Bo Kyung; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Hong, Sung Pil [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Institute of Gastroenterology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Joon Seok [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) after negative computed tomographic (CT) enterography. We retrospectively included 30 patients with OGIB who received capsule endoscopy after negative CT enterography. The median age of the patients was 60 years, and 60% of patients were male. The median follow-up duration was 8 months. Overt bleeding was 60%, and occult bleeding was 40%. Based on capsule endoscopy results, a definitive diagnosis was made for 17 patients (57%): ulcer in nine patients (30%), active bleeding with no identifiable cause in five (17%), angiodysplasia in two (7%) and Dieulafoy's lesion in one (3%). Two patients with jejunal ulcers were diagnosed with Crohn's disease. Seven patients (41%) with positive capsule endoscopy received double balloon enteroscopy and two patients (12%) received steroid treatment for Crohn's disease. Patients with overt bleeding, a previous history of bleeding, or who received large amounts of blood transfusions were more likely to show positive capsule endoscopy. Capsule endoscopy showed high diagnostic yields in patients with OGIB after negative CT enterography and may help to provide further therapeutic plans for patients with OGIB and negative CT enterography. circle CT enterography has been widely used in evaluating obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). circle Capsule endoscopy showed high diagnostic yield for OGIB after negative CT enterography. circle Negative CT enterography does not exclude important causes of small bowel bleeding. circle Most lesions missed at CT-enterography are flat and can be detected by capsule endoscopy. (orig.)

  5. Multidetector computed tomography mesentericography for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, P.; Hamer, O.W.; Mueller-Wille, R.; Rennert, J.; Feuerbach, S.; Zorger, N. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Wrede, C.E. [Helios-Klinikum Berlin-Buch (Germany). Interdisziplinaeres Notfallzentrum mit Rettungsstelle; Siebig, S.; Schoelmerich, J. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic yield of 16-row multidetector computed tomography (CT) mesentericography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods: The radiological information system database was used to retrospectively identify all patients in whom CT mesentericography (CTM) was performed for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding between July 2002 and September 2006. A subsequent prospective study was conducted between October 2006 and September 2009 to evaluate CTM in patients with major obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The retrospectively identified patients (six patients) as well as the prospectively evaluated patients (seven patients) constitute the study population. Following mesenteric DSA the catheter was left in the superior mesenteric artery, the patient was transferred to the CT suite and CTM was carried out by scanning the abdomen after contrast material injection via the catheter. Active bleeding was suspected if a focal area of high attenuation consistent with contrast material extravasation was found within the bowel lumen. Results: CTM detected the site of active bleeding in three of 13 patients (23 %). In the subpopulation of patients who were prospectively evaluated, CT mesentericography identified the site of active bleeding in one of seven patients (14 %). Depiction of active bleeding by CTM prompted surgical intervention in each case and surgery confirmed the findings of CT mesentericography. Conclusion: Due to the relatively low rate of positive findings and inherent drawbacks, we feel that CTM cannot be recommended in general. However, in selected patients who are continuously bleeding at a low rate and in whom iv-CT was negative, CT mesentericography might be helpful. (orig.)

  6. Gastrointestinal bleeding and iron absorption in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannella, R A; Toskes, P P

    1976-07-01

    Rats with surgically created self-filling jejunal blind loops and the blind loop syndrome manifested gastrointestinal bleeding and hyperabsorption of iron. Although the mean hematocrit and serum iron levels of rats with self-filling blind loops became overtly anemic and manifested low-serum iron levels. It is suggested that the documented gastrointestinal bleeding in these rats with the experimental blind loop syndrome is another manifestation of damage to the intestinal epithelium in conditions of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

  7. Double-balloon enteroscopy reliably directs surgical intervention for patients with small intestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mou-Bin Lin; Lu Yin; Jian-Wen Li; Wei-Guo Hu; Qian-Jian Qian

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate preoperative double-balloon enteroscopy for determining bleeding lesions of small intestine, thus directing selective surgical intervention.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients who underwent double-balloon enteroscopy to localize intestinal bleeding prior to surgical intervention, and compared enteroscopic findings with those of intraoperation to determine the accuracy of enteroscopy in identifying and localizing the sites of small intestinal bleeding.RESULTS: Double-balloon enteroscopy was performed in all 56 patients in a 30-mo period. A possible site of blood loss was identified in 54 (96%) patients. Enteroscopy provided accurate localization of the bleeding in 53 (95%) of 56 patients, but failed to disclose the cause of bleeding in 4 (7%). There was one case with negative intraoperative finding (2%). Resection of the affected bowel was carried out except one patient who experienced rebleeding after operation. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was most frequently diagnosed (55%).CONCLUSION: Double-balloon enteroscopy is a safe, reliable modality for determining bleeding lesion of small intestine. This technique can be used to direct selective surgical intervention.

  8. Dramatic regression and bleeding of a duodenal GIST during preoperative imatinib therapy: case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwandner Thilo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. The majority of GISTs is located in the stomach. Only 3-5% of GISTs are located in the duodenum associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding as primary manifestation. With response rates of up to 90%, but complications like bleeding due to tumor necrosis in 3%, imatinib mesylate dramatically altered the pre- and postoperative therapy for GIST patients. Case presentation A 58-year-old female patient presented with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding 2 weeks after a giant GIST of the duodenum had been diagnosed. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy had been initiated to achieve a tumor downsizing prior to surgery. During emergency laparotomy a partial duodenopancreatectomy was performed to achieve a complete resection of the mass. Histology revealed a high-malignancy GIST infiltrating the duodenal wall. Adjuvant imatinib therapy was initiated. At follow-up (19 months the patient is still alive and healthy. Conclusion Giant GISTs of the duodenum are rare and - in contrast to other localizations - harbour a higher risk of serious bleeding as primary manifestation. Tumor necrosis and tumor bleeding are rare but typical adverse effects of imatinib therapy especially during treatment of high-malignancy GIST. In GIST patients with increased risk of tumor bleeding neoadjuvant imatinib therapy should thoroughly be performed during hospitalization. In cases of duodenal GIST primary surgery should be considered as treatment alternative.

  9. Rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding owing to hepatic cancer invasion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Ding; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hong-Guo; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Zhao, Da-Jian; Hu, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-21

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding refers to bleeding that arises from the gastrointestinal tract proximal to the ligament of Treitz. The primary reason for gastrointestinal bleeding associated with hepatocellular carcinoma is rupture of a varicose vein owing to pericardial hypotension. We report a rare case of gastrointestinal bleeding with hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient who presented with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. The initial diagnosis was gastric cancer with metastasis to the multiple lymph nodes of the lesser curvature. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, which identified two lesions in the gastric wall. Total gastrectomy and hepatic local excision was then performed. Pathological results indicated that the hepatocellular carcinoma had invaded the stomach directly, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. The patient is alive with a disease-free survival of 1 year since the surgery. Hepatocellular carcinoma with gastric invasion should be considered as a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in hepatocellular carcinoma patients, especially with lesions located in the left lateral hepatic lobe. Surgery is the best solution.

  10. Use of tranexamic acid for controlling bleeding in thoracolumbar scoliosis surgery with posterior instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Magno da Rocha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Scoliosis surgery involves major blood loss and frequently requires blood transfusion. The cost and risks involved in using allogeneic blood have motivated investigation of methods capable of reducing patients' bleeding during operations. One of these methods is to use antifibrinolytic drugs, and tranexamic acid is among these. The aim of this study was to assess the use of this drug for controlling bleeding in surgery to treat idiopathic scoliosis.METHODS: This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of 40 patients who underwent thoracolumbar arthrodesis by means of a posterior route were analyzed. Of these cases, 21 used tranexamic acid and were placed in the test group. The others were placed in the control group. The mean volumes of bleeding during and after the operation and the need for blood transfusion were compared between the two groups.RESULTS: The group that used tranexamic acid had significantly less bleeding during the operation than the control group. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding postoperative bleeding and the need for blood transfusion.CONCLUSIONS: Tranexamic acid was effective in reducing bleeding during the operation, as demonstrated in other studies. The correlation between its use and the reduction in the need for blood transfusion is multifactorial and could not be established in this study. We believe that tranexamic acid may be a useful resource and that it deserves greater attention in randomized double-blind prospective series, with proper control over variables that directly influence blood loss.

  11. The Impact of Reverse Trendelenburg Versus Head-up Position on Intraoperative Bleeding of Elective Rhinoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooraei, Navid; Dabbagh, Ali; Niazi, Feizolah; Mohammadi, Siamak; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Radmand, Golnar; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: In spite of several efforts for decreasing blood loss, our experience sometimes shows that some patients bleed more profusely during rhinoplasty. Patient position could have deep impact on bleeding amount during surgical procedures. Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare reverse trendelenburg position and head-up position on intra-operative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. This was to check the effects of reverse trendelenburg position and head up position on the intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. Methods: In this study, 30 ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiology physical condition classification) patients between 18 and 40 years of age who were candidate to rhinoplasty operations for first time were included. Patients were randomly assigned to reverse trendelenburg or head-up position. Exclusion criteria was any history or lab indicating coagulation problems or using any drug. All gauzes used and the blood that accumulated in the aspirator throughout the operation were calculated. Results: Our results showed that the mean amount of blood loss in reverse trendelenburg was lower (77.00 ± 13.20 ml) than head-up position (83.33 ± 21.18 ml), although, there was no statistical difference between two groups. However, there was no significant differences among two groups in different aspects of hemodynamic determinants and bleeding amount during and after rhinoplasty. Conclusions: Our results showed that patient bleeding is not increased because of positioning per se. In conclusion, perhaps in the future reverse trendelenburg will be given more often during rhinoplasry. PMID:24498500

  12. The impact of reverse trendelenburg versus head-up position on intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nooraei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of several efforts for decreasing blood loss, our experience sometimes shows that some patients bleed more profusely during rhinoplasty. Patient position could have deep impact on bleeding amount during surgical procedures. Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare reverse trendelenburg position and head-up position on intra-operative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. This was to check the effects of reverse trendelenburg position and head up position on the intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. Methods: In this study, 30 ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiology physical condition classification patients between 18 and 40 years of age who were candidate to rhinoplasty operations for first time were included. Patients were randomly assigned to reverse trendelenburg or head-up position. Exclusion criteria was any history or lab indicating coagulation problems or using any drug. All gauzes used and the blood that accumulated in the aspirator throughout the operation were calculated. Results: Our results showed that the mean amount of blood loss in reverse trendelenburg was lower (77.00 ΁ 13.20 ml than head-up position (83.33 ΁ 21.18 ml, although, there was no statistical difference between two groups. However, there was no significant differences among two groups in different aspects of hemodynamic determinants and bleeding amount during and after rhinoplasty. Conclusions: Our results showed that patient bleeding is not increased because of positioning per se. In conclusion, perhaps in the future reverse trendelenburg will be given more often during rhinoplasry.

  13. Omeprazole maintenance therapy prevents recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Demertzis; Dimitrios Polymeros; Theodoros Emmanuel; Konstantinos Triantafyllou; Pericles Tassios; Spiros D Ladas

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the omeprazole maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer.METHODS: We studied 15 consecutive patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer.Omeprazole (20 mg/d) maintenance therapy was given after ulcer healing. In addition to clinical follow-up, ambulatory 24-h gastric pH assay was performed before and during omeprazole therapy in those patients and controls with previous duodenal ulcer surgery but no ulcer recurrence.RESULTS: All the 15 ulcers were healed after being treated with omeprazole (40 mg/d) for 2 mo. Eleven patients with two (1-9) episodes of recurrent ulcer bleeding completed the follow-up (43, 12-72 mo). None of them had a bleeding episode while on omeprazole. One patient discontinued the therapy and had recurrent bleeding. The median 24-h fraction time of gastric pH <4 in patients was 80, 46-95% , and was reduced to 32, 13-70% by omeprazole (P = 0.002).CONCLUSION: Long-term maintenance therapy with omeprazole (20 mg/day) is effective in preventing recurrent ulcer bleeding.

  14. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco; Bustamante-Balén; Gema; Plumé

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding(AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal(GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325(Hemospray), EndoClotTM polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a secondline treatment, and they seem to be especially indi-cated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area.

  15. Endoscopic Evaluation and Management of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients with Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty M. Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal diagnostic approach and yield for gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB in patients with ventricular assist devices (VAD are unknown. We explored the etiology of bleeding and yield of upper and lower endoscopy, balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and video capsule endoscopy in the evaluation of GIB in patients with VADs. Methods. All VAD patients with overt gastrointestinal bleeding and drop in hematocrit from April 1, 2000 to July 31, 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The endoscopic evaluation of each episode was recorded. Overall yield of EGD, colonoscopy, balloon-assisted, and video capsule endoscopy were evaluated. Results. Thirty-six bleeding episodes occurred involving 20 patients. The site of GIB was identified in 32/36 episodes (88.9%, and the etiology of bleeding was determined in 30/36 cases (83.3%. Five VAD patients underwent VCE. The VCE exams demonstrated a high yield with 80% of exams identifying the etiology of GIB. Endoscopic intervention was successful in 8/9 attempts. No adverse events were recorded. Two patients required surgical intervention for GIB. Conclusion. Upper, lower, video capsule, and balloon-assisted enteroscopies are safe and demonstrate a high yield in the investigation of gastrointestinal bleeding in VAD patients. Medical centers caring for VAD patients should employ a standardized protocol to optimize endoscopic evaluation and intervention.

  16. Ultrasound imaging in the management of bleeding and pain in early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knez, Jure; Day, Andrea; Jurkovic, Davor

    2014-07-01

    Bleeding and pain are experienced by 20% of women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Although most pregnancies complicated by pain and bleeding tend to progress normally, these symptoms are distressing for woman, and they are also associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy. Ultrasound is the first and often the only diagnostic modality that is used to determine location of early pregnancy and to assess its health. Ultrasound is an accurate, safe, painless and relatively inexpensive diagnostic tool, which all contributed to its widespread use in early pregnancy. Pain and bleeding in early pregnancy are sometimes caused by concomitant gynaecological, gastrointestinal, and urological problems, which could also be detected on ultrasound scan. In women with suspected intra-abdominal bleeding, ultrasound scan can be used to detect the presence of blood and provide information about the extent of bleeding. In this chapter, we comprehensively review the use of ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of early pregnancy complications. We include information about the diagnosis of gynaecological and other pelvic abnormalities, which could cause pain or bleeding in pregnancy. We also provide a summary of the current views on the safety of ultrasound in early pregnancy.

  17. Comparison of local infiltration of adrenalized lidocaine with adrenaline alone in operative field bleeding in Rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Yari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many head and neck surgeries, operative field bleeding plays an important role in the success of surgery and reducing the time of operation. The current study was conducted to compare local infiltration of adrenalized lidocaine with adrenaline alone in operative field bleeding in Rhinoplasty. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 56 candidate patients aged15-45 years for Rhinoplasty with ASA class I and II were randomly divided into two groups of lidocaine and control. Group 1 was administered lidocaine 2% with adrenaline and group 2 was administered normal saline with adrenaline , Operative field bleeding was then recorded and compared between groups. Results: There was not a significant difference between groups in preoperative systolic BP and diastolic BP, postoperative (15 min systolic BP and diastolic BP , preoperative heart rate and postoperative (15 minheart rate , operative field bleeding and bleeding scale. Conclusion: the effect of lidocaine 2% in operative field bleeding is the same as that of normal saline. Hence, adrenaline along with normal saline can be used in Rhinoplasty.

  18. Periampullary Dieulafoy’s Lesion: An Unusual Cause of Ga strointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder S Rana

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Dieulafoy’s lesion is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding with the most common location being the stomach. A periampullary location is rare for a bleeding Dieulafoy’s lesion. Case report We present the case of a 52-year-old female who presented with intermittent painless melena. Her upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were normal. She was a diagnostic challenge as no definite lesion could be identified on capsule endoscopy. However, as there was presence of fresh blood in the proximal jejunum, a push enteroscopy was performed which revealed the presence of fresh blood in the duodenum and proximal jejunum. But no bleeding lesion could be identified. A side view endoscopy was performed which revealed a bleeding periampullary Dieulafoy’s lesion. Immediate hemostasis was achieved with an injection of adrenalin. Other episodes of bleeding occurred and the patient was finally treated surgically. Conclusion A periampullary Dieulafoy’s lesion presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleed is a diagnostic challenge and can be missed on capsule endoscopy.

  19. Bleeding gastric varices: Results of endoscopic injection with cyanoacrylate at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phadet Noophun; Pradermchai Kongkam; Sutep Gonlachanvit; Rungsun Rerknimitr

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of gastric varices injection with cyanoacrylate in patients with gastric variceal bleeding.METHODS: Twenty-four patients (15 males, 9 females) with gastric variceal bleeding underwent endoscopic treatment with cyanoacrylate injection. Successful hemostasis, rebleeding rate, and complications were retrospectively reviewed. Followed up endoscopy was performed and repeat cyanoacrylate injection was given until gastric varices were obliterated. RESULTS: Seventeen patients achieved definite hemostasis. Of these, 14 patients had primary success after initial endoscopic therapy. Ten patients developed recurrent bleeding. Repeated cyanoacrylate injection stopped rebleeding in three patients. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed to control rebleeding in one patient which occured after repeat endoscopic therapy. Six patients died (three from uncontrolled bleeding, two from sepsis, and one from mesenteric vein thrombosis). Minor complications occurred in 11 patients (six epigastric discomfort and five post injection ulcers). Cyanoacrylate embolism developed in two patients. One of these patients died from mesenteric vein thrombosis. The other had pulmonary embolism which resolved spontaneously. Advanced cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were major risk factors for uncontrolled bleeding.CONCLUSION: Endoscopic treatment for bleeding gastric varices with cyanoacrylate injection is effective for immediate hemostasis. Repeat cyanoacrylate injection has a lower success rate than the initial injection.Cyanoacrylate embolism is not a common serious complication.

  20. Per rectal portal scintigraphy as a useful tool for predicting esophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taned Chitapanarux; Ong-ard Praisontarangkul; Satawat Thongsawat; Pises Pisespongsa; Apinya Leerapun

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate potential roles of per rectal portal scintigraphy in diagnosis of esophageal varices and predicting the risk of bleeding.METHODS: Fifteen normal subjects and fifty cirrhotic patients with endoscopically confirmed esophageal varices were included. Patients were categorized into bleeder and non-bleeder groups according to history of variceal bleeding. All had completed per rectal portal scintigraphy using 99mTechnetium pertechnetate.The shunt index was calculated from the ratio of 99mTechnetium pertechnetate in the heart and the liver.Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and receiver operating characteristics.RESULTS: Cirrhotic patients showed a higher shunt index than normal subjects (63.80 ± 25.21 vs 13.54 ± 6.46, P < 0.01). Patients with variceal bleeding showed a higher shunt index than those without bleeding (78.45 ± 9.40 vs 49.35 ± 27.72, P < 0.01). A shunt index of over 20% indicated the presence of varices and that of over 60% indicated the risk of variceal bleeding.CONCLUSION: In cirrhotic patients, per rectal portal scintigraphy is a clinically useful test for identifying esophageal varices and risk of variceal bleeding.

  1. What is happening? The evolving role of the blood bank in the management of the bleeding patient: The impact of TEG as an early diagnostic predictor for bleeding.

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    Espinosa, Aurora; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding and treatment of coagulopathy, the management of the bleeding patient remains as a major challenge. Traditionally, the main task of the blood bank has been to guarantee the supply of high quality blood and blood components/products to the hospital. Decisions regarding the use of blood components have always been the clinicians' responsibility, with little active involvement of the transfusion service. In the last years, many hospitals have implemented the use of "acute transfusion packages" for massively bleeding patients and point-of-care (POC) instruments such as TEG and RoTEM for monitoring coagulation status in this patient group. This, in addition to the implementation of patient blood management programs in the hospitals, has led to an increasing involvement of transfusion medicine specialists in transfusion decision making, especially regarding strategies for monitoring and treatment of the massively bleeding patient. This new trend may contribute to a more optimal management and monitoring of the bleeding patient, as POC testing may be used as an early predictor for blood usage. The blood bank should optimise the use of POC testing to provide accurate information in a cost-effective way.

  2. Evaluation of stress hormones in traumatic brain injury patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biteghe-Bi-Nzeng Alain-Pascal; WEI Hui-jie; CHEN Xin; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the local risk factors of traumatic brain injury(TBI)patients developing gastrointestinal(GI)bleeding during the early hospitalization in neurosurgery intensive care unit(NICU).Method:From September 2005 to February 2006,41 patients admitted to NICU and 13 healthy volunteers were involved in our study.Blood samples at 24 hours,2-3 days and 5-7 days were obtained from each patient via arterial line at 8 a.m.to measure the concentrations of serum adrenocorticotropic hormone(ACTH),total cortisol and gastrin.The collected serum was immersed in an ice bath and tested by the Immulite 1000 systems.Data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5.Results:Within 24 hours following TBI,the concentrations of total cortisol,ACTH and gastrin increased proportionally to the severity of injury,especially significant in the experimental group(P<0.05).The concentrations of ACTH and gastrin were higher in the GI bleeding positive group than in the GI bleeding negative group,(F=1.413,P=0.253)for ACTH and(F=9.371,P=0.006)for gastrin.GI bleeding had a positive correlation with gastrin concentration(r=0.312,P<0.05)and a negative correlation with serum hemoglobin(Hb)(r=-0.420,P<0.01).The clinical incidence of GI bleeding was 24.39%(10/41)in the experimental group.Within 24 hours,GI bleeding had a strong correlation with gastrin concentration(OR=26.643,P<0.05)and hematocrit(Hct)(OR=5.385,P<0.05).High ACTH concentration(>100 pg/ml)increased the frequency of GI bleeding.For patients with severe TBI and treated with routine antacids,the incidence of GI bleeding was 40.91%(9/22)and the mortality rate was 20%(2/10).Conclusions:Low Glasgow coma scale scores,low Hb,high concentrations of gastrin and ACTH(>100 pg/ml)are risk factors and can be predictive values for post-traumatic GI bleeding.Severe TBI patients have high risks of GI bleeding with high mortality.

  3. The vital threat of an upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Risk factor analysis of 121 consecutive patients

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    Peter Schemmer; Frank Decker; Genevieve Dei-Anane; Volkmar Henschel; Klaus Buhl; Christian Herfarth; Stefan Riedl

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the importance in predicting patients risk of mortality due to upper gastrointestinal (UGI)bleeding under today's therapeutic regimen.METHODS: From 1998 to 2001, 121 patients with the diagnosis of UGI bleeding were treated in our hospital.Based on the patients' data, a retrospective multivariate data analysis with initially more than 270 single factors was performed. Subsequently, the following potential risk factors underwent a logistic regression analysis:age, gender, initial hemoglobin, coumarines, liver cirrhosis, prothrombin time (PT), gastric ulcer (small curvature), duodenal ulcer (bulbus back wall), Forrest classification, vascular stump, variceal bleeding, MalloryWeiss syndrome, RBC substitution, recurrent bleeding,conservative and surgical therapy.RESULTS: Seventy male (58%) and 51 female (42%)patients with a median age of 70 (range: 21-96) years were treated. Their in-hospital mortality was 14%. While 12% (11/91) of the patients died after conservative therapy, 20% (6/30) died after undergoing surgical therapy. UGI bleeding occurred due to duodenal ulcer (n = 36; 30%), gastric ulcer (n = 35; 29%), esophageal varicosis (n = 12; 10%), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (n = 8; 7%), erosive lesions of the mucosa (n = 20;17%), cancer (n = 5; 4%), coagulopathy (n = 4; 3%),lymphoma (n = 2; 2%), benign tumor (n = 2; 2%)and unknown reason (n = 1; 1%). A logistic regression analysis of all aforementioned factors revealed that liver cirrhosis and duodenal ulcer (bulbus back wall)were associated risk factors for a fatal course after UGI bleeding. Prior to endoscopy, only liver cirrhosis was an assessable risk factor. Thereafter, liver cirrhosis,the location of a bleeding ulcer (bulbus back wall) and patients' gender (male) were of prognostic importance for the clinical outcome (mortality) of patients with a bleeding ulcer.CONCLUSION: Most prognostic parameters used in clinical routine today are not reliable enough in predicting a patient's vital threat posed by

  4. Platelet aggregation measurement for assessment of hemostasis failure mechanisms in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

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    Barinov E

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Edward Barinov,1 Oksana Sulaieva,1 Yuriy Lyakch,2 Vitaliy Guryanov,2 Petr Kondratenko,3 Yevgeniy Radenko3 1Department of Histology, Cytology, and Embryology, 2Department of Medical, Biological Physics, Medical Informatics, and Biostatistics, 3Department of Surgery and Endoscopy, M Gorky Donetsk National Medical University, Donetsk, Ukraine Background: The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the risk of unsustainable hemostasis in patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer bleeding by in vitro assessment of platelet reactivity using artificial neural networks. Methods: Patients with gastroduodenal ulcers complicated by bleeding were studied. Platelet aggregation was measured using aggregometry with adenosine diphosphate 5 µM, epinephrine 2.5 µM, 5-hydroxytryptophan 10 µM, collagen 1 µM, and thrombin 0.06 NIH Unit/mL as agonists. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the independent relationship between demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and laboratory data and in vitro assessment of platelet reactivity and local parameters of hemostasis in patients with ulcer bleeding. Results: Analysis of platelet aggregation in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding allowed the variability of platelet response to different agonists used in effective concentration which induces 50% platelet aggregation (EC50 to be established. The relationship between platelet aggregation and the spatial-temporal characteristics of ulcers complicated by bleeding was demonstrated. Adrenoreactivity of platelets was associated with time elapsed since the start of ulcer bleeding and degree of hemorrhage. The lowest platelet response to collagen and thrombin was detected in patients with active bleeding (P< 0.001 and unsustainable recent bleeding (P < 0.01. Decreased adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation in patients with ulcer bleeding was correlated with the platelet response to thrombin (r = 0.714, P < 0.001 and collagen (r

  5. Assessment of bleeding risk in patients with coronary artery disease on dual antiplatelet therapy. A systematic review.

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    Vries, Minka J A; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Henskens, Yvonne M C; ten Cate-Hoek, Arina J; ten Cate, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease are usually treated with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients on DAPT are at risk of both ischaemic and bleeding events. Although side-lined for a long time, real-life studies have shown that both the incidence and the associated morbidity and mortality of out-of-hospital bleeding are high. This indicates that prevention of (post-interventional) bleeding is as important as prevention of ischaemia. For this purpose it is crucial to reliably identify patients with a high bleeding risk. In order to postulate an algorithm, which could help identifying these patients, we performed a systematic review to determine the value of previously proposed prognostic modalities for bleeding. We searched and appraised the following tools: platelet function tests, genetic tests, bleeding scores and questionnaires and haemostatic tests. Most studies indicated that low on-treatment platelet reactivity (LTPR), as measured by several platelet function tests, and the carriage of CYP2C19*17 allele were independent risk factors for bleeding. A bleeding score also proved to be helpful in identifying patients at risk. No studies on haemostatic tests were retrieved. Several patient characteristics were also identified as independent predictors of bleeding, such as older age, female sex and renal failure. Combining these risk factors we propose an algorithm that would hypothetically facilitate identification of those patients at highest risk, warranting prevention measures for bleeding. This could be a starting point for further research concerning the topic.

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and gastrointestinal bleeding: a case-control study.

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    Alfonso Carvajal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day. RESULTS: 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.96 or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2.

  7. Predictors of In-hospital Mortality Among Patients Presenting with Variceal Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    Amith S Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The recent years have witnessed an increase in number of people harboring chronic liver diseases. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding occurs in 30% of patients with cirrhosis, and accounts for 80%-90% of bleeding episodes. We aimed to assess the in-hospital mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding and (2 to investigate the predictors of mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from treatment records of 317 subjects who presented with variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding to Government Medical College, Patiala, between June 1, 2010, and May 30, 2014. The data thus obtained was compiled using a preset proforma, and the details analyzed using SPSSv20. Results: Cirrhosis accounted for 308 (97.16% subjects with bleeding varices, with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction 9 (2.84% completing the tally. Sixty-three (19.87% subjects succumbed to death during hospital stay. Linear logistic regression revealed independent predictors for in-hospital mortality, including higher age (P = 0.000, Child-Pugh Class (P = 0.002, altered sensorium (P = 0.037, rebleeding within 24 h of admission (P = 0.000, low hemoglobin level (P = 0.023, and serum bilirubin (P = 0.002. Conclusion: Higher age, low hemoglobin, higher Child-Pugh Class, rebleeding within 24 h of admission, higher serum bilirubin, and lower systolic blood pressure are the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding.

  8. Emergency single-balloon enteroscopy in overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: Efficacy and safety

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    Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Fernandes, Carlos; Ribeiro, Iolanda; Fraga, José; Carvalho, João

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of emergency single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) on the diagnosis and treatment for active overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods SBE procedures for OGIB were retrospectively reviewed and sub-divided according to the bleeding types: active-overt and inactive-overt bleeding. The patient’s history, laboratory results, endoscopic findings and therapeutic interventions were registered. Emergency SBE was defined as an endoscopy that was performed for active-overt OGIB, within 24 hours of clinical presentation. Results Between January 2010 and February 2013, 53 SBEs were performed in 43 patients with overt OGIB. Seventeen emergency SBEs were performed in 15 patients with active overt-OGIB procedures (group A), which diagnosed the bleeding source in 14: angiodysplasia (n = 5), ulcers/erosions (n = 3), bleeding tumors (gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), n = 3; neuroendocrine tumor, n = 1), and erosioned polyps (n = 2). Endoscopic treatment was performed in nine patients, with one or multiple hemostatic therapies: argon plasma coagulation (n = 5), epinephrine submucosal injection (n = 5), hemostatic clips (n = 3), and polypectomy (n = 2). Twenty-eight patients with inactive bleeding (group B) were submitted to 36 elective SBEs, which successfully diagnosed 18 cases. The diagnostic yield in group A (93.3%) was significantly higher than in group B (64.3%)—Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.038. Conclusion This study revealed an important role of emergency SBE in the diagnosis of bleeding etiology in active overt OGIB. PMID:25452844

  9. Comparing the Effect of Mefenamic Acid and Vitex Agnus on Intrauterine Device Induced Bleeding

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    Parisa Yavarikia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increased bleeding is the most common cause of intrauterine device (IUD removal. The use of alternative therapies to treat bleeding has increased due to the complications of medications. But most alternative therapies are not accepted by women. Therefore, conducting studies to find the right treatment with fewer complications and being acceptable is necessary. This study aimed to compare the effect of mefenamic acid and vitex agnus castus on IUD induced bleeding.Methods: This was a double blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. It was conducted on 84 women with random allocation in to two groups of 42 treated with mefenamic acid and vitex agnus capsules taking three times a day during menstruation for four months. Data were collected by demographic questionnaire and Higham 5 stage chart (1 month before the treatment and 4 months during the treatment., Paired t-test, independent t-test, chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA with repeated measurements, and SPSS software were used to determine the results.Results: Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus significantly decreased bleeding. This decrease in month 4 was 52% in the mefenamic acid group and 47.6% in the vitex agnus group. The mean bleeding score changes was statistically significant between the two groups in the first three months and before the intervention. In the mefenamic acid group, the decreased bleeding was significantly more than the vitex agnus group. However, during the 4th month, the mean change was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus were both effective on IUD induced bleeding; however, mefenamic acid was more effective.

  10. POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING: HISTOPATHOLOGICAL SPECTRUM AND ASSOCIATION WITH AGE AND CLEAR SPAN: CASE SERIES OF 328 CASES

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    Ruchita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Postmenopausal bleeding is defined as vaginal bleeding occurring after twelve months of amenorrhea in a woman of the age where the menopause can be expected. With increase in life expectancy, a larger proportion of female population will be in postmenopausal age group; hence, the incidence of postmenopausal bleeding is expected to increase. AIM: We studied the prevalence of malignancy as well as the histopathological spectrum of genital tract lesions in cases of postmenopausal bleeding. The association between age, period between cessation of menses and onset of bleeding per vaginum (clear span was also studied. RESULTS: Malignant causes were more common (58.5% than benign causes and included cervical carcinoma, malignant uterine tumors (13.1%, carcinoma vagina (4.3%, malignant ovarian tumors (5.5%, carcinoma vulva (0.9% and carcinoma fallopian tube (0.3%. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest among cervical malignancies. The benign causes included polyps (16.5%, endometrial hyperplasia (4.9%, adenomyosis (2.7%, atrophic endometrium (2.4%, cervicitis (2.1%, leiomyoma (1.8%, proliferative endometrium (1.5%, endometritis (1.5%, secretory endometrium (1.2%, retained IUCD (0.9% and uterovaginal prolapse (0.6%. The likelihood of malignancy increased significantly with advancing age (p-value 0.042. The clear span of cases with malignant tumors was significantly longer than the clear span of cases with benign lesions. Hence, the likelihood of malignancy increased with length of clear span (p-value 0.00809. CONCLUSION: Any postmenopausal patient with vaginal bleeding needs to be investigated thoroughly to determine the cause of the bleeding and should be considered to have abnormal histopathology until proved otherwise

  11. Octreotide in the Control of Post-Sclerotherapy Bleeding from Oesophageal Varices, Ulcers and Oesophagitis

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    Spencer A. Jenkins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding from oesophageal varices, oesophageal ulcers or oesophagitis is occasionally massive and difficult to control. Octreotide, a synthetic analogue of somatostin lowers portal pressure and collateral blood flow including that through varices, increases lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, and inhibits the gastric secretion of acid as well as pepsin. Our current experience suggests it is effective in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage. Therefore we have examined the efficacy of octreotide in the control of postsclerotherapy bleeding from oesophageal varices, oesophageal ulcers and oesophagitis. During the study period 77 patients experienced a significant gastrointestinal bleed (blood pressure 100 beats per min or the need to transfuse 2 or more units of blood to restore the haemoglobin level following injection sclerotherapy of oesophageal varices. The source of bleeding was varices in 42 patients, oesophageal ulcers in 31 and oesophagitis in 4. All patients received a continuous intravenous infusion of octreotide (50 μg/h for between 40–140h. If bleeding was not controlled in the first 12h after commencing octreotide hourly bolus doses (50 μg for 24h were superimposed on the continuous infusion. Haemorrhage was successfully controlled by an infusion of octreotide in 38 of the 42 patients with bleeding from varices, in 30 of 31 patients with oesophageal ulceration, and all patients with oesophagitis. In the 1 patient with persistent bleeding from oesophageal ulceration and in 2 of the 4 with continued haemorrhage from varices, haemostasis was achieved by hourly boluses of 50 μg octreotide for 24h in addition to the continuous infusion. No major complications were associated with octreotide administration. The results of this study clearly indicate that octreotide is a safe and effective treatment for the control of severe haemorrhage after technically successful injection sclerotherapy.

  12. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

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    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  13. A prospective study of aspirin use and the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in men.

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    Edward S Huang

    Full Text Available Data regarding the influence of dose and duration of aspirin use on risk of gastrointestinal bleeding are conflicting.We conducted a prospective cohort study of 32,989 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS in 1994 who provided biennial aspirin data. We estimated relative risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding requiring hospitalization or a blood transfusion.During 14 years of follow-up, 707 men reported an episode of major gastrointestinal bleeding over 377,231 person-years. After adjusting for risk factors, regular aspirin use (≥2 times/week had a multivariate relative risk (RR of gastrointestinal bleeding of 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.55 compared to non-regular use. The association was particularly evident for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (multivariate RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.16-1.92. Compared to men who denied any aspirin use, multivariate RRs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 1.05 (95% CI 0.71-1.52 for men who used 0.5-1.5 standard tablets/week, 1.31 (95% CI 0.88-1.95 for 2-5 aspirin/week, 1.63 (95% CI, 1.15-2.32 for 6-14 aspirin/week and 2.40 (95% CI, 1.10-5.22 for >14 aspirin/week (P(trend<0.001. The relative risk also appeared to be dose-dependent among short-term users <5 years; P(trend<.001 and long-term users (≥5 years; P(trend = 0.015. In contrast, after controlling for dose, increasing duration of use did not appear to be associated with risk (P(trend = 0.749.Regular aspirin use increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, especially from the upper tract. However, risk of bleeding appears to be more strongly related to dose than to duration of use. Risk of bleeding should be minimized by using the lowest effective dose among short-term and long-term aspirin users.

  14. Experience in Diagnosis and Treatment of Bleeding Complications in Severe Acute Pancreatitis by TAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The experience in diagnosis and treatment of bleeding complications in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) by transcatheter arterial embolization was summarized. The clinical data of 19 SAP patients complicated with intra-abdominal bleeding in our hospital from Jan. 2000 to Jan. 2003 were analyzed retrospectively and the therapeutic outcome of TAE was evaluated statistically. The results showed that the short-term successful rate of hemostasis by TAE was 89.5 % (17/19), the incidence of re-bleeding after TAE was 36.8 % (7/19) and the successful rate of hemostatis by second TAE was 71.4 % (5/7). It was concluded that the intra-abdominal bleeding in SAP was mainly caused by the rupture of erosive/infected pseudoaneurysm. Mostly, the broken vessels were splenic artery and gastroduodenal artery. In terms of emergence hemostatis, TAE is the most effective method. Surgical hemostasis is necessary if hemostasis by TAE is failed or re-bleeding occurs after TAE.

  15. Therapeutic and prophylactic ethanol lock therapy in patients with bleeding disorders.

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    Rajpurkar, M; McGrath, E; Joyce, J; Boldt-MacDonald, K; Chitlur, M; Lusher, J

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining a reliable venous access is a limiting factor for early initiation of clotting factor prophylaxis and immune tolerance induction. To circumvent this issue, central venous access devices (CVADs) are increasingly being used. Catheter-related infections (CRIs) remain the primary complication of insertion of CVAD. Thus, newer strategies for treatment and prevention of CRI are needed. Ethanol lock therapy (ELT) has been used to treat and prevent CRI in non-bleeding disorder patients. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ELT in treating and preventing CRI in bleeding disorder patients. The medical charts of patients with bleeding disorders who underwent ELT for antimicrobial resistant CRIs were reviewed and data were analysed. ELT was effective in catheter salvage in 87% of patients with antimicrobial resistant CRI by a wide variety of pathogens. Prophylactic therapy with ethanol lock was associated with catheter dysfunction especially in mediports. ELT should be considered prior to removal of catheters in bleeding disorder patients with resistant CRIs. Further studies are needed for using prophylactic ethanol lock in prevention of CRIs in bleeding disorder patients.

  16. Efficacy of Prophylactic Uterine Artery Embolization before Obstetrical Procedures with High Risk for Massive Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Heung Kyu; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyung; Han, Kichang; Lee, Shin-Wha

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of prophylactic uterine artery embolization (UAE) before obstetrical procedures with high risk for massive bleeding. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of 29 female patients who underwent prophylactic UAE from June 2009 to February 2014 was performed. Indications for prophylactic UAE were as follows: dilatation and curettage (D&C) associated with ectopic pregnancy (cesarean scar pregnancy, n = 9; cervical pregnancy, n = 6), termination of pregnancy with abnormal placentation (placenta previa, n = 8), D&C for retained placenta with vascularity (n = 5), and D&C for suspected gestational trophoblastic disease (n = 1). Their medical records were reviewed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of UAE. Results All women received successful bilateral prophylactic UAE followed by D&C with preservation of the uterus. In all patients, UAE followed by obstetrical procedure prevented significant vaginal bleeding on gynecologic examination. There was no major complication related to UAE. Vaginal spotting continued for 3 months in three cases. Although oligomenorrhea continued for six months in one patient, normal menstruation resumed in all patients afterwards. During follow-up, four had subsequent successful natural pregnancies. Spontaneous abortion occurred in one of them during the first trimester. Conclusion Prophylactic UAE before an obstetrical procedure in patients with high risk of bleeding or symptomatic bleeding may be a safe and effective way to manage or prevent serious bleeding, especially for women who wish to preserve their fertility. PMID:28246515

  17. Role of Oxidative Stress on Vaginal Bleeding during The First Trimester of Pregnant Women

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    Rüya Deveer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced in many metabolic and physiologic processes. Antioxidative mechanisms remove these harmful species. Our aim was to assess whether serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status altered during first trimester pregnancies with vaginal bleeding. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, A group of pregnant women at less than 10 weeks of gestation with vaginal bleeding (n=25 and a control group of healthy pregnancies with similar characteristics (n=25 were included. All of the patients in the two groups were matched for age, gestational age and body mass index. Serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status levels were determined using a Hitachi 912 analyzer and compared between the two groups. Results: Characteristics, including maternal age, parity, and gestational age were similar between the two groups. Serum total antioxidant capacity levels were significantly lower in the women with vaginal bleeding than in control women (1.16 ± 0.20 vs. 1.77 ± 0.08 mmol Trolox Equiv./L; p=0.001, whereas higher total oxidant status measurements were found in women with vaginal bleeding compared to the control group (4.01 ± 0.20 vs. 2.57 ± 0.65 μmol H2O2 Equiv./L; p=0.001. Conclusion: Increased total oxidant status might be involved in the pathophysiology of vaginal bleeding during early first trimester pregnancies.

  18. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

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    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  19. Platelet dysfunction in thrombosis patients treated with vitamin K antagonists and recurrent bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola E J van der Meijden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recurrent bleeding can complicate the treatment of thrombosis patients with vitamin K antagonists (VKA, even at a well-regulated level of anticoagulation. In this proof-of-principle study, we investigated whether alterations in platelet function or von Willebrand factor (vWf contribute to a bleeding phenotype in these patients. METHODS: In this case-control study 33 well-regulated patients without bleeding events (controls and 33 patients with recurrent bleeding (cases were retrospectively included. Thrombin generation and vWf were determined in plasma. Platelet function was assessed by light transmission aggregometry and flow cytometry using a validated panel of agonists. RESULTS: Thrombin generation was similarly reduced in controls and cases, in comparison to normal plasma. Plasma vWf level was above the normal range in 85% of controls and 67% of the cases. vWf activity was similarly increased in all patients in comparison to healthy volunteers. Platelet aggregation was in the normal range for almost all patients irrespective of the type of agonist. However, in response to a low collagen dose, platelets from 21% of controls and 27% of cases showed diminished responses. Agonist-induced secretion of alpha- and dense-granules or integrin αIIbβ3 activation were affected in platelets from neither controls nor cases. CONCLUSION: Recurrent bleeding in well-controlled patients on VKA therapy is not explained by anti-hemostatic changes in platelet or vWf function.

  20. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Arterial Esophageal Bleeding with the Use of N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospita, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of arterial esophageal bleeding. Between August 2000 and April 2008, five patients diagnosed with arterial esophageal bleeding by conventional angiography, CT angiography or endoscopy, underwent a TAE with NBCA. We mixed NBCA with iodized oil at ratios of 1:1 to 1:4 to supply radiopacity and achieve a proper polymerization time. After embolization, we evaluated the angiographic and clinical success, recurrent bleeding, and procedure-related complications. The bleeding esophageal artery directly originated from the aorta in four patients and from the left inferior phrenic artery in one patient. Although four patients had an underlying coagulopathy at the time of the TAE, angiographic and clinical success was achieved in all five patients. In addition, no procedurerelated complications such as esophageal infarction were observed during this study. NBCA can be an effective and feasible embolic agent in patients with active arterial esophageal bleeding, even with pre-existing coagulopathy.

  1. Numerical simulation of base flow with hot base bleed for two jet models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jie YU; Yong-gang YU; Bin NI

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the benefits of base bleed in base flow field, the base flow with hot base bleed for two jet models is studied. Two-dimensional axisymmetric NaviereStokes equations are computed by using a finite volume scheme. The base flow of a cylinder afterbody with base bleed is simulated. The simulation results are validated with the experimental data, and the experimental results are well reproduced. On this basis, the base flow fields with base bleed for a circular jet model and an annulus jet model are investigated by selecting the injection temperature from 830 K to 2200 K. The results show that the base pressure of the annular jet model is higher than that of the circular jet model with the changes of the injection parameter and the injection temperature. For the circular jet model, the hot gases are concentrated in the vicinity of the base. For the annular jet model, the bleed gases flow into the shear layer directly so that the hot gases are concentrated in the shear layer. The latter temperature distribution is better for the increase of base pressure.

  2. Tactile Electrosurgical Ablation: A Technique for the Treatment of Intractable Heavy and Prolonged Menstrual Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. El Saman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the efficacy and safety of tactile electrosurgical ablation (TEA in stopping a persistent attack of abnormal uterine bleeding not responding to medical and hormonal therapy. Methods. This is a case series of 19 cases with intractable abnormal uterine bleeding, who underwent TEA at the Women’s Health Center of Assiut University. The outcomes measured were; patient’s acceptability, operative time, complications, menstrual outcomes, and reintervention. Results. None of the 19 counseled cases refused the TEA procedure which took 6–10 minutes without intraoperative complications. The procedure was successful in the immediate cessation of bleeding in 18 out of 19 cases. During the 24-month follow-up period, 9 cases developed amenorrhea, 5 had scanty menstrual bleeding, 3 were regularly menstruating, 1 case underwent repeat TEA ablation, and one underwent a hysterectomy. Conclusions. TEA represents a safe, inexpensive, and successful method for management of uterine bleeding emergencies with additional long-term beneficial effects. However, more studies with more cases and longer follow-up periods are warranted.

  3. Arterial embolization for iatrogenic life-threatening bleeding from subcutaneous hypervascular tumor in prone position

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seiji Morita; Tomoatsu Tsuji; Toru Sawamoto; Hiromichi Aoki; Naoya Miura; Hiroyuki Otsuka; Sadaki Inokuchi

    2010-01-01

    Performing angiography in the prone position is a difficult technique; however it is useful in some emergency situation. We experienced a 60 years old male who was performed lipoma excision on his back in his family doctor's clinic. Since massive arterial bleeding could not be controlled with manual astriction, he transferred to our hospital in prone position with hemodynamic instability. Operating field was not kept because of massive bleeding; there-fore surgical treatment was impossible. We planed emer-gency arterial embolization (AE) in prone position. Hence we chose the left radial artery for vascular access. The left subclavicle arteriography showed many major and minor feeding arteries from left subclavicular and axillary arteries and a massive extravasation of the contrast medium. Three major feeding arteries were performed AE with gelatin sponge and steel coils. After AE, massive bleeding was controlled.He could discharge from our hospital on the 5th hospital day without any complication. Arterial embolization for lifethreatening bleeding from subcutaneous hypervascular tumor in the prone position is first report to our knowledge,and it is extremely rare. However we thought that this tech-nique is useful for patients who could not turn in the supine position, e.g. massive bleeding during renal biopsy and penetrating trauma from back.

  4. Application of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of massive small intestinal bleeding: Report of 22 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Chen Ba; San-Hua Qing; Xiang-Cheng Huang; Ying Wen; Guo-Xin Li; Jiang Yu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic and therapeutic value of laparoscopy in patients with massive small intestinal bleeding.METHODS: Twenty-two patients with massive small intestinal bleeding and hemodynamic alteration underwent laparoscopic laparotomy in our unit from December 2002 to April 2005. Post pathologic sites were found, laparoscopy- or laparoscopy-assisted part small intestinal resection including pathologic intestinal site and enteroanastomosis was performed in all these patients.RESULTS: The bleeding sites were successfully detected by laparoscopy in all these 22 patients. Massive small intestinal bleeding was caused by jejunum benign stromal tumor in 8 cases, by jejunum potential malignant stromal tumor in 5 cases, by jejunum malignant stromal tumor in 1 case, by Mechel's diverticulum in 5 cases,by small intestinal vascular deformity in 2 cases, and by ectopic pancreas in 1 case. A total of 16 patients underwent laparoscopy-assisted enterectomy and enteroanastomosis of small intestine covering the of the diseased segment under laparoscope. No surgical complications occurred and the outcome was satisfactory.CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of massive small intestinal bleeding is noninvasive with less pain, short recovery time and definite therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S; Prins, Martin H

    2016-03-17

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an "unacceptable health risk" during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration.

  6. Living-related liver transplantation in patients with variceal bleeding:outcome and prognostic factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed Saied Hedaya; Walid Mohamed El Moghazy; Shinji Uemoto

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Liver transplantation currently represents the ultimate therapy for bleeding esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis. It is the only therapy that cures both portal hypertension and the underlying liver disease. The outcome of liver transplantation is thought to be correlated with several factors. In this study, the clinical outcome of living-related liver transplantation (LRLT) was evaluated in patients with variceal bleeding, and the prognostic indicators of short-term survival in these patients were identiifed. METHODS:We reviewed retrospectively 121 patients with a history of variceal bleeding who had received LRLT from 1998 to 2006. The clinical outcomes were analyzed, and the risk factors for short-term survival were deifned. RESULTS:The 3-month survival rate of patients with variceal bleeding was 83.4%, while that of non-bleeders was 87%. Sepsis was the commonest cause of death in both groups. Portal vein diameter and blood transfusion were the only independent prognostic factors for short-term survival among variceal bleeders. CONCLUSION:The outcome of LRLT in recipients with variceal bleeding is based on the improvement of portal hemodynamics, by minimizing intraoperative blood loss and subsequent blood transfusion.

  7. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  8. Treating delayed endoscopic sphincterotomy-induced bleeding: Epinephrine injection with or without thermotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung-Kuan Tsou; Cheng-Hui Lin; Nai-Jen Liu; Jui-Hsiang Tang; Kai-Feng Sung; Chi-Liang Cheng

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To compare the hemostatic efficacy between epinephrine injection alone and epinephrine injection combined with thermotherapy for delayed postendoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Cases with delayed post-ES bleeding undergoing epinephrine injection alone (epinephrine injection group, n = 26) or epinephrine combined with thermotherapy (combination therapy group, n = 33) in our institution between 1999 and 2007 were retrospectively investigated. The main outcome measurements were: initial endoscopic hemostasis, rebleeding, complications, requirement of angiographic embolization or surgery, requirement for blood transfusion, and mortality. RESULTS: The initial hemostatic efficacy was 96.2% for epinephrine injection alone and 100% for combination therapy ( P = 0.44). There were four patients with re-bleeding in each group (16.0% vs 12.1%, P = 0.72). There was only one complication of pancreatitis from the combination therapy group. Three patients (11.5%) in the epinephrine injection group and one patient (3%) in the combination therapy group required angiographic embolization or surgery ( P = 0.31). The total number of blood transfusions was not significantly different between the two groups (3.5 ± 4.6 U vs 3.5 ± 4.5 U, P = 0.94). There was no bleeding-related death in either group. CONCLUSION: Epinephrine injection alone is as effective as epinephrine injection combined with thermotherapy for the management of delayed post- ES bleeding.

  9. Upper Gastrointestinal System Bleeding Associated with Mallory-Weiss Syndrome in a Patient with Prosthetic Mitral Valve Using Warfarin Sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Şahin Yıldız

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mallory-Weiss syndrome refers to bleeding from tears in the mucosa at the junction of the stomach and esophagus. Bleeding has been recognised as the major treatment-limiting complication in patients with prosthetic mitral valve using anticoagulant treatment. We report that upper gastrointestinal system bleeding associated with Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patient with prosthetic mitral valve using warfarin sodium.

  10. Is there an alternative therapy to cyanoacrylate injection for safe and effective obliteration of bleeding gastric varices?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroo Imazu; Kuniyuki Kojima; Masahiko Katsumura; Salem Omar

    2006-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR We read with interest the article entitled "Bleeding gastric varices: Results of endoscopic injection with cyanoacrylate at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital" by Noophun et al[1]. They performed n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (CA) injection therapy for bleeding gastric varices in twentyfour patients, and hemostasis was achieved in seventeen (71%) patients. They concluded that CA injection therapy was effective and safe for bleeding gastric varices. However, we disagreed with the author's conclusion.

  11. The critical role of CT angiography in the detection and management of lower gastro-intestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastro-intestinal bleeding (LGIB) is defined as a bleeding site localised in the colon or anorectum. (1) In the past, the diagnosis of LGIB has been a serious challenge for the radiology department because of its possible intermittent character, making it difficult to pinpoint the bleeding site. Patients with a LGIB will typically have undergone a long diagnostic work-up before they end up on the interventional radiology department.The development of multi-detector computed tomography (...

  12. A novel approach to assess the spontaneous gastrointestinal bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents using Apc(min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huijun; Shang, Jin; Keohane, CarolAnn; Wang, Min; Li, Qiu; Ni, Weihua; O'Neill, Kim; Chintala, Madhu

    2014-06-01

    Assessment of the bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents is usually performed in healthy animals with some form of vascular injury to peripheral organs to induce bleeding. However, bleeding observed in patients with currently marketed antithrombotic drugs is typically spontaneous in nature such as intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which happens most frequently on top of preexisting pathologies such as GI ulcerations and polyps. Apc(min/+) mice are reported to develop multiple adenomas through the entire intestinal tract and display progressive anaemia.In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Apc(min/+) mice as a model for assessing spontaneous GI bleeding with antithrombotic agents. Apc(min/+) mice exhibited progressive blood loss starting at the age of nine weeks. Despite the increase in bleeding, Apc(min/+) mice were in a hypercoagulable state and displayed an age-dependent increase in thrombin generation and circulating fibrinogen as well as a significant decrease in clotting times. We evaluated the effect of warfarin, dabigatran etexilate, apixaban and clopidogrel in this model by administering them in diet or in the drinking water to mice for 1-4 weeks. All of these marketed drugs significantly increased GI bleeding in Apc(min/+) mice, but not in wild-type mice. Although different exposure profiles of these antithrombotic agents make it challenging to compare the bleeding risk of compounds, our results indicate that the Apc(min/+) mouse may be a sensitive preclinical model for assessing the spontaneous GI bleeding risk of novel antithrombotic agents.

  13. Prevalence and outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of, risk factors for, and prognostic importance of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients. METHODS: We included adults without GI bleeding who were acutely admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU...... bleeding occurred in 2.6 % (95 % confidence interval 1.6-3.6 %) of patients. The following variables at ICU admission were independently associated with clinically important GI bleeding: three or more co-existing diseases (odds ratio 8.9, 2.7-28.8), co-existing liver disease (7.6, 3.3-17.6), use of renal...

  14. A predominant pelvic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) mass observed on Tc-99m red blood cell gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ravi; Tee, Shang Ian

    2011-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman presented with recurrent bleeding per rectum. Her earlier endoscopies were negative. Tc-99m RBC GI bleeding scintigraphy was performed. It demonstrated an apparent hypervascular pelvic mass, and active small bowel bleeding. Based on scintigraphic finding of a predominant pelvic mass indicating tumor, CT of the abdomen and pelvis was performed for further gastrointestinal bleeding localization work up instead of an invasive angiography or endoscopy, which detected a small bowel tumor in the pelvis. A small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumor was resected subsequently.

  15. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: difficulties in comparing CT enterography and video capsule endoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP 2, Department of Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965-Paris 7 ' ' Angiogenese et recherche translationnelle' ' , Paris (France); Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Paris (France)

    2012-06-15

    A paper reports the results of a retrospective study that was designed to evaluate the potential role of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) in elucidating the cause of bleeding in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) for whom CT enterography was negative. The authors highlight the limitations of dual-phase CT enterography for the detection of flat lesions of the small bowel such as ulcers, angiodysplasias or arteriovenous malformations, and confirm the superiority of VCE for the detection of this category of lesions. This commentary discusses some of the issues raised. Key Points circle Video capsule endoscopy surpasses CT enterography in detecting flat small bowel lesions. circle Retrospective VCE and CT enterography findings in obscure bleeding need further evaluation. circle A fair and unbiased comparison of the two investigations is still needed. (orig.)

  16. Management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Current policies and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingrid Lisanne Holster; Ernst Johan Kuipers

    2012-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a gastroenterological emergency with a mortality of 6%-13%.The vast majority of these bleeds are due to peptic ulcers.Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and Helicobacter pylori are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.Endoscopy has become the mainstay for diagnosis and treatment of acute UGIB,and is recommended within 24 h of presentation.Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration before endoscopy can downstage the bleeding lesion and reduce the need for endoscopic therapy,but has no effect on rebleeding,mortality and need for surgery.Endoscopic therapy should be undertaken for ulcers with high-risk stigmata,to reduce the risk of rebleeding.This can be done with a variety of modalities.High-dose PPI administration after endoscopy can prevent rebleeding and reduce the need for further intervention and mortality,particularly in patients with high-risk stigmata.

  17. Hemosuccus pancreaticus as a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: a report of two cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodratollah Maddah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic diseases are known to be associated with complications such as pseudocyst and abscess. A pseudoaneurysm associated with pancreatitis may develop as well. The pseudoaneurysm may rupture into various parts of the gastrointestinal tract; the peritoneal cavity, or the retroperitoneum. We report two cases of Hemosuccus pancreaticus admitted to our center in the past five years. One case was associated with acute pancreatitis, and another case was associated with chronic pancreatitis. A pseudocyst was found in two cases. Both were successfully managed by emergency surgery. So, Hemosuccus pancreaticus is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding with difficult diagnosis, and surgery is the effective treatment for the patient with severe bleeding. However in cases with no life-threatening bleeding angiography and embolization can be performed.

  18. Role of Self-Expandable Metal Stents in Acute Variceal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Maufa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute variceal bleeding continues to be associated with significant mortality. Current standard of care combines hemodynamic stabilization, antibiotic prophylaxis, pharmacological agents, and endoscopic treatment. Rescue therapies using balloon tamponade or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt are implemented when first-line therapy fails. Rescue therapies have many limitations and are contraindicated in some cases. Placement of fully covered self-expandable metallic stent is a promising therapeutic technique that can be used to control bleeding in cases of refractory esophageal bleeding as an alternative to balloon tamponade. These stents can be left in place for as long as two weeks, allowing for improvement in liver function and institution of a more definitive treatment.

  19. Traumatic intercostal arterial bleeding controlled with a novel surgical technique: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miettinen Simo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A blunt thoracic trauma may cause arterial bleeding requiring operative treatment or endovascular embolization or endovascular aortic stenting. A novel damage control technique to stop such bleeding is presented. Case presentation We present the case of an 82-year-old Caucasian man who experienced rib fractures I-VII on the left side and bleeding from damaged intercostal arteries after a blunt thoracic trauma. Emergency thoracotomy was performed. Conclusions Effective hemostasis was achieved by using a rolled surgical swab and inserting it against the chest wall next to the aorta with sutures pulled through the intercostal muscles and then sutured to the back side of the patient. The patient died four days after the surgery due to a head injury sustained in the car crash.

  20. Real-Time Bleeding Detection in Gastrointestinal Tract Endoscopic Examinations Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Blokus

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a novel approach to medical video data analysis and recognition of bleedings.Emphasis has been put on adapting pre-existing algorithms dedicated to the detection of bleedings for realtimeusage in a medical doctor’s office during an endoscopic examination. A real-time system for analyzingendoscopic videos has been designed according to the most significant requirements of medical doctors.The main goal of the performed research was to establish the possibility of ensuring the necessaryperformance of a given class of algorithms to introduce the solution into real life diagnostics.The structures of two exemplary algorithms for bleeding detection have been analyzed to distinguish anddiscuss parallelization options. After applying them to the algorithms, the usage of a supercomputermultimedia processing platform allowed to acquire the throughput and latency values required for realtimeusage. Different configurations of the algorithms have been tested and their measured parametershave been provided and discussed.