WorldWideScience

Sample records for bleeding

  1. Bleeding time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleeding time is a medical test that measures how fast small blood vessels in the skin stop bleeding. ... until the bleeding stops. The provider records the time it takes for the cuts to stop bleeding.

  2. Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or ... don't work the way they should. Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such ...

  3. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. PMID:26520197

  4. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... pelvis, that are broken. Initially, internal bleeding may cause no symptoms, although an injured organ that is ...

  5. Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... times I'd miss work and skip the gym because I felt so lousy. So I decided ... cell called platelets. Your body also needs blood proteins called clotting factors. In people with bleeding disorders, ...

  6. BLEED & BLEND

    OpenAIRE

    Goodfellow, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BLEED & BLEND is an ambient artwork that was commissioned by Digital Media in Newcastle University's Culture Lab, as part of their data visualisation screening project: Data Elements. The aim of the project was to take an unconventional approach to interpreting and displaying scientific data through visual artworks. The work was projected onto Newcastle University's Kings Gate building in Newcastle city centre in October 2012. A useful and succinct description of Ambient Art is found in B...

  7. Bleeding Disorders Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pictures Young Voices Compendium of Assessment Tools Educational Games Video Library Find a Treatment Centre Haemophilia Journal About Bleeding Disorders Bleeding Disorders The Clotting Process Drugs That Can Cause Bleeding Hemophilia How Do You ...

  8. [Acute gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Robert; Faiss, Siegbert; Cordruwisch, Wolfgang; Schrader, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common major emergency (Internal medical or gastroenterological or medical), approximately 85 % of which occur in the upper GI tract. It is estimated that about a half of upper GI bleeds are caused by peptic ulcers. Upper GI bleeds are associated with more severe bleeding and poorer outcomes when compared to middle or lower GI bleeds. Prognostic determinants include bleeding intensity, patient age, comorbid conditions and the concomitant use of anticoagulants. A focused medical history can offer insight into the bleeding intensity, location and potential cause (along with early risk stratification). Initial measures should focus on rapid assessment and resuscitation of unstable patients. The oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) is the gold standard method for localizing the source of bleeding and for interventional therapy. Bleeding as a result of peptic ulcers is treated endoscopically with mechanical and / or thermal techniques in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. When variceal bleeding is suspected, pre-interventional use of vasopressin analogues and antibiotic therapies are recommended. Endoscopically, the first line treatment of esophageal varices is endoscopic ligature therapy, whereas that for gastric varices is the use of Histoacryl injection sclerotherapy. When persistent and continued massive hemorrhage occurs in a patient with known or suspected aortic disease the possibility of an aorto-enteric fistula must be considered. PMID:27078246

  9. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  10. Approach to bleeding patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Gopinath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing a bleeding patient is very challenging for the perioperative physician. Bleeding in a patient would be due to inherited or acquired disorders of haemostasis. Identifying the patients at risk of bleeding and utilising prophylactic treatment protocols has good outcomes. Along with clinical signs, trends in monitoring coagulation parameters and analysing blood picture are necessary. Management of patients in the postoperative period and in intensive care unit should be focused on normalization of coagulation profile as early as possible with available blood and its products. Available recombinant factors should be given priority as per the approved indications. Exploring the surgical site should be considered for persistent bleeding because haemodynamic compromise, excessive transfusion of fluids, blood and its products and more inotropic support may have a negative impact on the patient outcome.

  11. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the possible causes of minor rectal bleeding? Hemorrhoids Anal fissures Proctitis (inflammation of the rectum) Polyps ... can be cured if detected early. What are hemorrhoids? Hemorrhoids (also called piles) are swollen blood vessels ...

  12. Bleeding during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have placenta accreta, you are at risk of life-threatening blood loss during delivery. Your ob-gyn will plan your ... to be done right after delivery to prevent life-threatening blood loss. Can bleeding be a sign of preterm labor? ...

  13. First trimester bleeding evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Vikram; Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Bhatt, Shweta

    2005-06-01

    First trimester bleeding is a common presentation in the emergency room. Ultrasound evaluation of patients with first trimester bleeding is the mainstay of the examination. The important causes of first trimester bleeding include spontaneous abortion, ectopic pregnancy, and gestational trophoblastic disease; 50% to 70% of spontaneous abortions are due to genetic abnormalities. In normal pregnancy, the serum beta hCG doubles or increases by at least 66% in 48 hours. The intrauterine GS should be visualized by TVUS with beta hCG levels between 1000 to 2000 mIU/mL IRP. Visualization of the yolk sac within the gestational sac is definitive evidence of intrauterine pregnancy. Embryonic cardiac activity can be identified with CRL of >5 mm. A GS with a mean sac diameter (MSD) of 8 mm or more without a yolk sac and a GS with an MSD of 16 mm or more without an embryo, are important predictors of a nonviable gestation. A GS with a mean sac diameter of 16 mm or more (TVUS) without an embryo is a sonographic sign of anembryonic gestation. A difference of subchorionic hematoma. The presence of an extra ovarian adnexal mass is the most common sonographic finding in ectopic pregnancy. Other findings include the tubal ring sign and hemorrhage. About 26% of ectopic pregnancies have normal pelvic sonograms on TVUS. Complete hydatidiform mole presents with a complex intrauterine mass with multiple anechoic areas of varying sizes (Snowstorm appearance). Twenty-five percent to 65% of molar pregnancies have associated theca-leutin cysts. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus is a rare but life-threatening cause of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester. The sonographic findings in a patient with first trimester bleeding should be correlated with serum beta hCG levels to arrive at an appropriate clinical diagnosis. PMID:15905817

  14. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... needed to determine the source of bleeding. The cause of bleeding is corrected, and transfusions and iron ...

  15. Diagnosis of the Bleeding Child

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, İnci

    1995-01-01

    Hemostasis is the body response to bleeding with the interaction of the blood vessel the platelets and the coagulation factors This article reviews the normal physiologic mechanism of hemostasis together with the diagnostic approach to the bleeding child The commonly used tests of hemostasis are described Key words: Bleeding Diagnosis Tests

  16. Story: A Bleeding Watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor bzang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A Bleeding Watermelon was written by Norsang (Nor bzang;b. 1988, a native of Dpa ris (Rab rgyas (Huazangsi 华藏寺 Township, Tianzhu 天祝 Tibetan Autonomous County,Gansu 甘肃 Province. Norsang writes: I heard that a university student opened an elevator door in a campus building still under construction. The elevator shaft was empty and he fell to his death. Many people had questions about his death. This inspired me to write this story.

  17. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulletti, C; Flamigni, C; Prefetto, R A; Polli, V; Giacomucci, E

    1994-09-30

    Cyclic or irregular uterine bleeding is common in perimenarchal and perimenopausal women with or without endometrial hyperplasia. The disturbance often requires surgical treatment because of its negative effects on both blood loss and abnormal endometrial growth including the development of endometrial cancer. The endometrium is often overstimulated during the perimenopausal period when estrogen/progesterone production is unbalanced. A therapeutical approach with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) was proposed in a depot formulation (Zoladex) that induces a sustained and reversible ovarian suppression. To avoid the risk of osteoporosis and to obtain adequate endometrial proliferation and differentiation during ovarian suppression, transdermal 17-beta-estradiol and oral progestin were administered. Results of 20 cases versus 20 controls showed a reduction of metrorrhagia, a normalization of hemoglobin plasma concentration, and an adequate proliferation and secretory differentiation of the endometrium of patients with abnormal endometrial growth. Abnormal uterine bleeding is mainly due to uterine fibrosis and an inadequate estrogen and/or progesterone production or to a disordered estrogen transport from blood into the endometrium. In premenopausal women, endometrial hyperplasia may be part of a continuum that is ultimately manifested in the histological and biological pattern of endometrial carcinoma. The regression of endometrial hyperplasia obtained by using the therapeutic regimen mentioned above represents a preventive measure for endometrial cancer. Finally the normalization of blood loss offers a good medical alternative to surgery for patients with DUB. PMID:7978956

  18. Coronary interventions in patients with bleeding and bleeding tendency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thach Nguyen; Lan Nguyen

    2007-01-01

    @@ In general, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)is contra-indicated in patients with bleeding and those that are easy to bleed because during PCI the patients need full anticoagulation to counter any thrombotic formation caused by introduction and manipulation of devices in the vascular system.

  19. Fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens; Johansen, Mathias;

    2013-01-01

    Hypofibrinogenaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but the optimal treatment level, the use of preemptive treatment and the preferred source of fibrinogen remain disputed. Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly used and recommended for bleeding with acquired haemostatic...

  20. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander Ahm; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The management of variceal bleeding remains a clinical challenge with a high mortality. Standardisation in supportive and new therapeutic treatments seems to have improved survival within the last 25 years. Although overall survival has improved in recent years, mortality is still closely related...... to failure to control initial bleeding or early re-bleeding occurring in up to 30-40% of patients. Initial procedures are to secure and protect the airway, and administer volume replacement to stabilize the patient. Treatment with vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as possible, since a...... adhesives should be used. In conclusion: Improvements in resuscitation and prevention of complications have together with introduction of vasoactive drugs and refinement of endoscopic therapy majorily changed the prognosis of the patient presenting with variceal bleeding....

  1. Bleeding in the Digestive Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lining of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum. The bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and use of nonsteroidal ... paleness shortness of breath vomit that looks like coffee grounds weakness A person with acute bleeding may ...

  2. Endoscopic Management of Diverticular Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Rustagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70–80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  3. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  4. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. CASE REPORT A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  5. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved by the...

  6. An unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C K Adarsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleed often brings the patient to the emergency medical service with great anxiety. Known common causes of GI bleed include ulcers, varices, Mallory-Weiss among others. All causes of GI bleed should be considered however unusual during the evaluation. Aortoenteric fistula (AEF is one of the unusual causes of GI bleed, which has to be considered especially in patients with a history of abdominal surgery in general and aortic surgery in particular.

  7. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often develops shortly ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often have a ...

  8. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preoperative CT-guided percutaneous needle localization of the bleeding small bowel segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Peter; Feuerbach, Stefan; Iesalnieks, Igors; Rockmann, Felix; Wrede, Christian E; Zorger, Niels; Schlitt, Hans J; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Hamer, Okka W

    2009-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Double balloon enteroscopy, angiography, and surgery including intraoperative enteroscopy failed to identify the bleeding site. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) depicted active bleeding of a small bowel segment. The bleeding segment was localized by CT-guided percutaneous needle insertion and subsequently removed surgically. PMID:19328430

  9. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Afshari, Arash; Albaladejo, Pierre;

    2013-01-01

    The aims of severe perioperative bleeding management are three-fold. First, preoperative identification by anamesis and laboratory testing of those patients for whom the perioperative bleeding risk may be increased. Second, implementation of strategies for correcting preoperative anaemia and...... with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists throughout Europe to integrate this knowledge into daily patient care wherever possible. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of scientific...... cross-sectional surveys were selected. At the suggestion of the ESA Guideline Committee, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) grading system was initially used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. During the process of guideline development, the official...

  10. Role of videocapsule endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Carretero; Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Maite Betes; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as bleeding of an unknown origin that persists or recurs after negative initial upper and lower endoscopies.Several techniques,such as endoscopy,arteriography,scintigraphy and barium radiology are helpful for recognizing the bleeding source;nevertheless,in about 5%-10% of cases the bleeding lesion cannot be determined.The development of videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) has permitted a direct visualization of the small intestine mucosa.We will analyze those techniques in more detail.The diagnostic yield of CE for OGIB varies from 38% to 93%,being in the higher range in those cases with obscure-overt bleeding.

  11. Scintigraphic diagnosis of lower GI bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal scintigraphy with 99mTc HSA, 99mTc Sn colloid, or 99mTc RBC was performed in 28 patients with melena to detect bleeding and determine the bleeding site in the lower gastrointestinal tract. Active bleedings and/or vascular lesions were identified in 16 patients. They were proved by antiography, endoscopy or barium enema in 14. We concluded that scintigraphy was an accurate and effective method to detect the bleeding and determine the bleeding site in the lower gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  12. Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latex gloves should be in every first aid kit. People allergic to latex can use a nonlatex glove. You can catch viral hepatitis if you touch infected blood. HIV can be spread if infected blood gets into ...

  13. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective in...... achieving endoscopic hemostasis. Use of endoscopic monotherapy with epinephrine injection is not recommended. Intravenous high-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy for 72 hours after successful endoscopic hemostasis is recommended as it decreases both rebleeding rate and mortality in patients with high...

  14. Bleeding complications of femoral catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT has been used to evaluate hematomas resulting from femoral catheterization (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, cardiac catheterization, angioplasty, valvuloplasty, and venous access) in 21 patients. Four distinct types of hematoma have been identified: retroperitoneal (N = 12); intraperitoneal (N = 3); groin/thigh (N = 9); and abdominal wall (N = 5). Seven patients had hematomas in two locations. CT contributed by estimating transfusion requirement, indicating the need for more intensive monitoring, and predicting the potential need for surgery. Type 1 and 2 bleeds were the most serious and had the most sequelae. Sequelae included transfusion in 17 patients (mean, 5 units/patient) and surgery in two patients

  15. Sandostatin therapy of acute oesophageal variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, R F

    1993-01-01

    This communication deals with the emergency control of variceal bleeding rather than the prevention of rebleeding. The current main options of oesophageal tamponade, emergency sclerotherapy and drug therapy are discussed, with particular reference to the use of somatostatin. Sandostatin (Sandoz, Basel), a synthetic long-acting somatostatin analogue, was found to reduce transhepatic venous gradient by 30% with no effect on systemic haemodynamics in a study of 16 stable cirrhotic patients. In a trial comparing intravenous infusion of Sandostatin (SMS) to oesophageal tamponade (OT) in active variceal bleeding, 18 of 20 bleeds in the SMS group and 19 of 20 bleeds in the OT group were controlled at 4 h. Ten in the SMS group and 14 in the OT group had no further bleeding during the 48-hour study period. Thus SMS may be useful in the temporary control of active variceal bleeding. PMID:8359565

  16. [Diagnosis and therapy of bleeding in ENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2013-12-01

    Bleeding in the oral cavity, nose or ear are common events in the daily routine of ENT specialists. Apart from trivial cases that often get outpatient treatment, there are numerous cases of serious bleeding that require stationary treatment and if necessary, an operative or interventional therapy. In the following section the most frequent types of bleeding, their diagnosis and therapy will be explained. PMID:24285208

  17. Cyclical rectal bleeding in colorectal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, M D; Hodby, K J; van Merwyk, A J; Glancy, R J

    1989-12-01

    Three case reports of cyclical rectal bleeding in endometriosis affecting rectum and sigmoid colon emphasize the close relationship between such cyclical bleeding and intestinal endometriosis. The cause of bleeding, however, is still unclear. The predilection of endometriotic deposits for the outer layers of the bowel wall suggests that mucosal involvement is not a prerequisite for rectal bleeding. The frequent absence of identifiable intramural haemorrhage casts doubt on the premise that intestinal endometriotic deposits 'menstruate'. The cause may simply be a transient tear in normal mucosa due to swelling of an underlying endometriotic deposit at the time of menstruation. PMID:2597100

  18. Bleed condenser tube failure in KAPP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleed condenser, a vertical, tube and shell type heat exchanger employed in bleed circuit of primary heat transport system of PHWR is used for condensing the flashing bleed (heavy water) on shell side and cold heavy water on the tubes side. Examinations conducted at various places indicate failure due to inadequate tube expansion (hydraulic expansion) followed by crevice corrosion. Mechanical rolling of tubes to larger extent (3 to 6% wall thinning) have been specified for this particular type of service in all bleed condensers for subsequent projects. 1 tab., 4 figs

  19. Diagnostic Strategies for Postmenopausal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Breijer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB is a common clinical problem. Patients with PMB have 10%–15% chance of having endometrial carcinoma and therefore the diagnostic workup is aimed at excluding malignancy. Patient characteristics can alter the probability of having endometrial carcinoma in patients with PMB; in certain groups of patients the incidence has been reported to be as high as 29%. Transvaginal sonography (TVS is used as a first step in the diagnostic workup, but different authors have come to different conclusions assessing the accuracy of TVS for excluding endometrial carcinoma. Diagnostic procedures obtaining material for histological assessment (e.g., dilatation and curettage, hysteroscopy, and endometrial biopsy can be more accurate but are also more invasive. The best diagnostic strategy for diagnosing endometrial carcinoma in patients with PMB still remains controversial. Future research should be focussed on achieving a higher accuracy of different diagnostic strategies.

  20. First trimester bleeding and maternal cardiovascular morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob A; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2012-01-01

    First trimester bleeding without miscarriage is a risk factor for complications later in the pregnancy, such as preterm delivery. Also, first trimester miscarriage has been linked to subsequent maternal ischemic heart disease. We investigated the link between maternal cardiovascular disease prior...... to and subsequent to first trimester bleeding without miscarriage....

  1. Obstetric management of adolescents with bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andra H

    2010-12-01

    Adolescents with bleeding disorders who become pregnant must contend with the dual challenges of their bleeding disorder and their pregnancy. Adolescents are more likely to terminate a pregnancy than adult women, and when they do carry a pregnancy, they are more likely to deliver prematurely. Otherwise, they are at risk for the same complications that adult women with bleeding disorders experience, particularly bleeding complications postpartum. Since one half to two thirds of adolescent pregnancies are unplanned, issues related to reproduction should be addressed during routine visits with the pediatrician, hematologist or gynecologist. Girls who are at risk of being carriers for hemophilia A and B, severe von Willebrand disease, and other severe bleeding disorders should have their bleeding disorder status determined before they become pregnant. During pregnancy, a plan should be established to ensure that both mother and fetus deliver safely. Young women at risk for severe bleeding or at risk of having a severely affected infant should be referred for prenatal care and delivery to a center where, in addition to specialists in high-risk obstetrics, there is a hemophilia treatment center or a hematologist with expertise in hemostasis. Prior to delivery or any invasive procedures, young women at risk for severe bleeding should receive prophylaxis. Since administration of desmopressin may result in hyponatremia, whenever available, virally inactivated or recombinant clotting factor concentrates should be used for replacement as opposed to fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate. PMID:20934895

  2. Hemospray Application in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Lyn A; Stanley, Adrian J; Bergman, Jacques J; Kiesslich, Ralf; Hoffman, Arthur; Tjwa, Eric T; Kuipers, Ernst J; von Holstein, Christer Stael; Oberg, Stefan; Brullet, Enric; Schmidt, Palle N; Iqbal, Tariq; Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Masci, Enzo; Prat, Frederic; Morris, Allan J

    2014-01-01

    Hemospray TM (TC-325) is a novel hemostatic agent licensed for use in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe.......Hemospray TM (TC-325) is a novel hemostatic agent licensed for use in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe....

  3. Endoscopic management of bleeding peptic ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptic ulcers account for more than half of the cases of non variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and therefore, are the focus of most of the methods of endoscopic hemostasis. Surgical intervention is now largely reserved for patients in whom endoscopic hemostasis has failed. A variety of endoscopic techniques have been employed to stop bleeding and reduce the risk of rebleeding, with no major differences in outcome between these methods. These include injection therapy, fibrin injection, heater probe, mono polar electrocautery, bipolar electrocautery, lasers and mechanical hemo clipping. The most important factor in determining outcome after gastrointestinal bleeding is rebleeding or persistent bleeding. The endoscopic appearance of an ulcer, however, provides the most useful prognostic information for bleeding. Recurrent bleeding after initial endoscopic hemostasis occurs in 15-20% of patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer. The best approach to these patients remains controversial; the current options are repeat endoscopic therapy with the same or a different technique, emergency surgery or semi elective surgery after repeat endoscopic hemostasis. The combination of epinephrine injection with thermal coagulation may be more effective than epinephrine injection alone. Newer modalities such as fibrin injection or the application of hemo clips appear promising and comparative studies are awaited. (author)

  4. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  5. CLSM bleed water reduction test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report

  6. Management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laterza, Liboria; Cecinato, Paolo; Guido, Alessandra; Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic radiation disease is one of the major complication after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. The most commonly reported symptom is rectal bleeding which affects patients' quality of life. Therapeutic strategies for rectal bleeding are generally ignored and include medical, endoscopic, and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Most cases of radiation-induced bleeding are mild and self-limiting, and treatment is normally not indicated. In cases of clinically significant bleeding (i.e. anaemia), medical therapies, including stool softeners, sucralfate enemas, and metronidazole, should be considered as first-line treatment options. In cases of failure, endoscopic therapy, mainly represented by argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen treatments, are valid and complementary second-line treatment strategies. Although current treatment options are not always supported by high-quality studies, patients should be reassured that treatment options exist and success is achieved in most cases if the patient is referred to a dedicated centre. PMID:24101202

  7. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body's hormones. Problems like compulsive exercise , not eating healthy foods, or too much stress can cause hormone changes. Some severe cases of AUB are caused by bleeding disorders such as von Willebrand disease . What Are the ...

  8. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. PMID:27405681

  9. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  10. Abnormal uterine bleeding: a clinicohistopathological analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Anupamasuresh Y; Suresh YV; Prachi Jain*,

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is one of the most common problem for the patients and the gynecologists. It adversely effects on the quality of life and psychology of women. It is of special concern in developing country as it adds to the causes of anemia. Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) is not complete without tissue diagnosis especially in perimenopausal and post-menopausal women. Histological characteristics of endometrial biopsy material as assessed by light mic...

  11. Management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is unique from variceal bleeding in terms of patient characteristics, management, rebleeding rates, and prognosis, and should be managed differently. The majority of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds will not rebleed once treated successfully. The incidence is 80 to 90% of all upper gastrointestinal bleeds and the mortality is between 5 to 10%. The causes include nonacid-related ulceration from tumors, infections, inflammatory disease, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosions, esophagitis, dieulafoy lesions, angiodysplasias, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and portal hypertensive gastropathy. Rarer causes include hemobilia, hemosuccus pancreaticus, and aortoenteric fistulas. Hematemesis and melena are the key features of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, but fresh per rectal bleeding may be present in a rapidly bleeding lesion. Resuscitation and stabilization before endoscopy leads to improved outcomes. Fluid resuscitation is essential to avoid hypotension. Though widely practiced, there is currently insufficient evidence to show that routine red cell transfusion is beneficial. Coagulopathy requires correction, but the optimal international normalized ratio has not been determined yet. Risk stratification scores such as the Rockall and Glasgow-Blatchford scores are useful to predict rebleeding, mortality, and to determine the urgency of endoscopy. Evidence suggests that high-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPI should be given as an infusion before endoscopy. If patients are intolerant of PPIs, histamine-2 receptor antagonists can be given, although their acid suppression is inferior. Endoscopic therapy includes thermal methods such as coaptive coagulation, argon plasma coagulation, and hemostatic clips. Four quadrant epinephrine injections combined with either thermal therapy or clipping reduces mortality. In hypoxic patients, endoscopy masks allow high-flow oxygen during upper

  12. CIRCUMCISION IN MALES WITH BLEEDING DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mansouritorghabeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Male circumcision practice is an invasive procedure that is using worldwide. It makes challenges to haemostatic system and its possible haemorrhagic side effects are more serious in bleeding individuals than normal subjects. In most cases, it can be complete controlled using infusion of appropriate amount of coagulation factors before and post circumcision.Aim: We aim to documentation type of coagulation therapy and post circumcision practice haemorrhagic presentation among 463 bleeder males of both common and rare bleeding disorders in north eastern part of country.Methods: We retrospectively gathered information using evaluation medical records in 3 major hospitals during last 15 years and list of patients with bleeding disorders that obtained from haemophilia center. Also a call phone established for each bleeder person to complete data and updating of them. The survey took time from Sep 2009- Mar 2011. The designed question form included data on doing circumcision or not? types of treatment before and post the procedure and occurrence of bleeding episodes after the surgery.Results: Overall among 424 cases with various common and rare bleeding disorders who had circumcised, 239 cases (56.3% had passed the procedure with bleeding experience, while 185 cases (43.7% had passed it successfully and without noticeable bleeding experience. The types of coagulation therapy in each group have been cited.Conclusion: The circumcision practice in unequipped medical center for bleeder ones may make challenges for them and medical services. Also it needed supervision of expert haematologist for adjusting treatment to ensure control of unwanted bleeding

  13. Transcatheter arterial embolization for traumatic bleeding control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Choon Wook; Lee, Sang Kwon; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duck Sik [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-04-15

    Angiography is essential for the detection of bleeding vessels in traumatic vascular injury. Immediately after the diagnosis, transcatheter embolization can be performed for the control of bleeding effectively and easily with proper use of embolic materials. Transcatheter embolization is believed to be the treatment of choice when emergency control is needed, where surgical approach is difficult and in those who are poor candidate for surgery. We have tried bleeding control in 18 cases of trauma over recent 4 years. The results were as follows; 1. Causes of bleeding(cases): Blunt or penetrating trauma (10), latrogenic trauma (8), (Postoperative (5), Needle biopsy (2), Percutaneous hepatic procedure (1)) 2. Embolized vessels: Renal artery branches (8), Hepatic artery branches (2), Arteries supplying chest wall (2), External carotid artery branches (3), Internal carotid artery (1), Circumflex humeral artery (1), Internal iliac artery branches (1). 3. Embolic agents: Gelfoam cubes (16), Stainless steel coils (3), Detachable latex balloon (1). 4. Successful bleeding control was achieved in 17 cases and reduction of the amount of bleeding in one case without significant complications.

  14. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... using maximum bleed air must be established. (c) Hazardous contamination of cabin air systems may not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  15. Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagge, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed is discussed. Present and future jet engine systems are compared. The role of auxiliary power units is evaluated. Details of secondary electric power generation systems with and without auxiliary power units are given. Advanced bleed systems are compared with minimum bleed systems. A cost model of ownership is given. The difference in the cost of ownership between a minimum bleed system and an advanced bleed system is given.

  16. Immediate bleeding complications in dental implants: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Balaguer Martí, José Carlos; Peñarrocha Oltra, David; Balaguer Martínez, José; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A review is made of the immediate or immediate postoperative bleeding complications in dental implants, with a view to identifying the areas of greatest bleeding risk, the causes of bleeding, the length of the implants associated with bleeding, the most frequently implicated blood vessels, and the treatments used to resolve these complications. Material and Methods: A Medline (PubMed) and Embase search was made of articles on immediate bleeding complications in dental implants publ...

  17. BLEEDING DUODENAL ULCER-TREATMENT OPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Poroch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Actual treatment of bleeding duodenal ulcer is most frequently medical but also surgical. The aim of this study is to assess the factors that influence the outcomes for a group of 67 patients suffering of bleeding duodenal ulcer. Out of 67 patients considered in this study, 53 were men (79.1% and 14 were women (20.9%. The average age was 52 years for men and 53 years for women (range 19-86 years. 59 (88% were patients with known medical history of peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopy has been performed for 64 patients (95.6%. Specific medical treatment was started immediately for all patients. For 47 patients (70.1% the hemorrhage stopped with conservative treatment, 8 patients (12% benefit by endoscopic treatment and 12 patients (17.9% underwent surgery. The postoperative morbidity rate was 16.7%. Comorbidities were present in 43 patients (64.2%. Failure of medical conservative treatment has been observed in 7 cases (13%, and failure of endoscopic procedures in 2 cases (20%. The risk factors involved in therapy outcomes of bleeding duodenal ulcer are: age, the severity of hemorrhage confirmed by endoscopy, the hemorrhagic episodes in medical history and the time of surgery. Conclusion: The prognosis of bleeding duodenal ulcer after bleeding is highly correlated with the time that the treatment starts, the severity of hemorrhage, comorbid conditions and age.

  18. Accuracy of rockall score for in hospital re bleeding among cirrhotic patients with variceal bleed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of Roc kall scoring system for predicting in-hospital re-ble- eding in cirrhotic patients presenting with variceal bleed. Material and Methods: This descriptive case series study was conducted at Department of Medicine Combined Military Hospital Lahore from December 2013 to May 2014. We included patients with liver cirrhosis who presented with upper GI bleeding and showed varices as the cause of bleeding on endoscopy. Clinical and endoscopic features were noted to calculate Rockall score. Patients with score < 2 and > 8 were included. After treating with appropriate pharmacological and endoscopic therapy, patients were followed for re-bleeding for 10 days. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values using 2 x 2 tables. Results: In the study, 175 patients were included. Mean age was 51.5 ± 1.22 years. Male to female ratio was 1.5 to 1.0 out of 175 patients, 157 patients (89.7%) were of low risk group (score = 2) while 18 patients (10.3%) were in high risk group (score > 8). In low risk group, re-bleeding occurred only in 2 patients (1.2%) while in high risk group, re-bleeding occurred in 14 patients (78%). Rockall score was found to have good diagnostic accuracy with sensitivity of 87.5%, specificity of 97.48%, positive predictive value of 77.8% and negative predictive value of 98.7%. Conclusion: In cases of variceal bleed, frequency of re-bleed is less in patients who are in low risk category with lower Rockall score and high in high risk patients with higher rockall score. The Rockall score has a good diagnostic accuracy in prediction of re-bleed in variceal bleeding. (author)

  19. How I manage heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Menaka; Chan, Anthony; Barr, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common clinical problem; population-based studies estimate that approximately 10-35% of women report this symptom during their lifetime, while about 5% of women consult a physician for evaluation of HMB. Patients with HMB account for 15% of all referrals to gynaecologists and are frequently seen by haematologists in bleeding disorder clinics as well. Heavy menstrual bleeding can be caused by a wide variety of local and systemic factors, so a careful clinical and laboratory evaluation is often necessary to determine the aetiology and guide appropriate management. This review discusses the definition, causes and clinical outcomes of HMB. It outlines a diagnostic approach and focuses on medical (as opposed to surgical) treatments. Throughout, areas of controversy and opportunities for further research are highlighted. PMID:23829452

  20. Fibrinogen concentrate for bleeding - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, J; Stensballe, J; Wikkelsø, A;

    2014-01-01

    Fibrinogen concentrate as part of treatment protocols increasingly draws attention. Fibrinogen substitution in cases of hypofibrinogenaemia has the potential to reduce bleeding, transfusion requirement and subsequently reduce morbidity and mortality. A systematic search for randomised controlled...... trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies investigating fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients was conducted up to November 2013. We included 30 studies of 3480 identified (7 RCTs and 23 non-randomised). Seven RCTs included a total of 268 patients (165 adults and 103 paediatric), and all were...... mortality were lacking. Weak evidence from RCTs supports the use of fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients, primarily in elective cardiac surgery, but a general use of fibrinogen across all settings is only supported by non-randomised studies with serious methodological shortcomings. It seems pre...

  1. Radionuclide detection of lower gastrointestinal bleeding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective review of two years' experience with radionuclide screening to detect lower gastrointestinal bleeding sites was conducted at New York's Montefiore Medical Center. Of 82 studies performed in 63 patients, 13 identified active bleeding sites. Only three of eight angiograms obtained in these 13 patients were positive. Thirteen contrast angiograms were performed in the group of 50 patients with negative radionuclide studies of which ten were negative and one was equivocal. The results of this study suggest that the Tc-99m sulfur colloid study for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is an effective screening procedure. Positive studies help determine which vessel to catheterize selectively if an angiogram is to be performed. If vascular ectasis is still suspected following a negative radionuclide study, contrast angiography can be more efficaciously performed on a nonemergent basis

  2. Radiotherapy in benign uterine bleeding disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy was earlier a method of choice for treatment of benign bleeding disorders (metropathia), especially in woman of high surgical risk. During the period 1912 to 1977 933 women with benign bleeding disorders were treated at Radiumhemmet with intracavitary brachytherapy or external irradiation or a combination of both. The result with regard to cure of the uterine bleedings was good (48%). Hormonal withdrawal symptoms after treatment were noted in 45% of the patients. In the long term follow up an increased risk of cardiovascular death was found in women treated before menopause. Malignant tumours occurred in 107 cases versus 90.2 expected. The estimated ovarian dose of ionizing radiation varied from 3.5 Gy to 6.0 Gy for the three standard techniques. Two women gave birth to a healthy child 4 and 5 years after intracavitary radium treatment. The estimated absorbed dose to the ovaries in these two women were 1 Gy and 4 Gy, respectively

  3. [Jejunal GIST with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelly Manrique, María; Frisancho, Oscar; Rivas Wong, Luz; Palomino, Américo

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a woman of 84 years with a history of cardiac arrhythmia and hemorrhoids. She had multiple hospitalizations and transfusions for symptomatic iron deficiency anemia, endoscopic studies showed only small diverticula and colon polyps. He was later hospitalized with bloody stools red wines, upper endoscopy and colonoscopy showed gastritis, small colonic ulcers, colonic polyp and multiple diverticula. Readmitted with bleeding of obscure origin, on that occasion showed gastritis, antral erosions, small ulcers, colon polyps and colon ulcers in the process of healing, capsule endoscopy showed angiodysplasia in jejunum, anterograde enteroscopy detected some erythematous lesions in proximal jejunum without evidence of bleeding. Again hospitalized for melena and abdominal. PMID:22086325

  4. Somatostatin analogues for acute bleeding oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Hrobjartsson, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatostatin and its derivatives are sometimes used for emergency treatment of bleeding oesophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. OBJECTIVES: To study whether somatostatin or its analogues improve survival or reduce the need for blood transfusions in patients with...... bleeding oesophageal varices. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library were searched (November 2007). Reference lists of publications, contacts with authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised trials comparing somatostatin or analogues with placebo or no treatment in patients suspected of acute or...

  5. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bong; Sik; Matthew; Kim; Bob; T; Li; Alexander; Engel; Jaswinder; S; Samra; Stephen; Clarke; Ian; D; Norton; Angela; E; Li

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is notapparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians.

  6. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (pomeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing. PMID:12181579

  7. Endometrial biopsy findings in postmenopausal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study endometrial histopathology in women presenting with postmenopausal bleeding. A two-year study from January 2003 to December 2004 of 100 cases of postmenopausal bleeding was conducted at Combined Military Hospital, Sialkot. The histopathology of endometrial biopsy specimens was done to find out the causes of postmenopausal bleeding in these ladies. All these 100 patients had confirmed menopause and the average age was 55 years and above. The most common histopathological diagnosis was senile endometrial atrophy (27%), followed by simple cystic hyperplasia in (17%). Three cases of simple cystic hyperplasia had coexistent ovarian tumors. Glandular hyperplasia without atypia was seen in 6% and with atypia in 4%. Other causes were endometritis (13%), endometrial polyps (8%), proliferative phase endometrium (6%) and secretary phase endometrium (5%). Endometrial carcinoma was seen in (6%) cases, (8%) biopsy specimens were non-representative. Although senile endometrial atrophy was most commonly found in these ladies but a significant percentage of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer implies the need for investigating all cases of postmenopausal bleeding. Bimanual examination and pelvic ultrasonography should be combined with endometrial sampling so that rare pelvic pathologies may not be missed. (author)

  8. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus; Dall, Michael; Andries, Alin; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard; Hansen, Jane Møller; Andersen, Morten; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other...

  9. Dysfunctional uterine bleedings of a climacteric period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climacteric period of some women is complicated by dysfunctional uterine bleedings (DUB). Bearing in mind the fact that DUBS are caused by disorder of estrin rhysmic secretion, the paper presents the methods of differential diagnostics for investigations into functional disorders in the hypothalamus -hypophysis - ovaries - uterus system. The preference is given to roentgenologic and radioimmunologic diagnostic methods

  10. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  11. Correlation of bleeding pattern with endometrial histopathologic results in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Yilmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB is referred as bleeding outside of normal menstruation pattern and it is the most common gynecological problem for women of all ages. This study was evaluated the correlation of menstrual bleeding patterns and endometrial histopathological findings in perimenopausal women. Methods: This study was done on perimenopausal aged women presented with AUB for the last 6 months at a gynecology clinic of a tertiary medical center. Only the patients with isolated endometrial causes of AUB were selected for study. A total of 313 cases were included in the study. Abnormal bleeding patterns of the patients were recorded and endometrial sampling was performed to all women. AUB was classified as menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, polymenorrhea, intermenstrual bleeding, and histopathological findings were classified as Proliferative Endometrium (PE, Secretory Endometrium (SE, Disordered Proliferative Pattern (DPP, Endometrial Polyp (EP, Chronic Endometritis (CE, Endometrial Hyperplasia (EH, and Endometrial Adenocarcinoma (CA. Results: The most common bleeding pattern was menorrhagia (45.0% and the most common histopathological finding was PE+SE (52.0% in our study. PE+SE and endometrial hyperplasia without atypia were found more common in menorrhagia group. The most histopathological findings were found PE+SE in menometrorrhagia and polymenorrhea group (P 0.05. Conclusions: We concluded that although menometrorrhagia and polymenorrhea were significantly more associated with PE+SE, intermenstrual bleeding was significantly more associated with EP and CE. It is noteworthy that endometrial hyperplasia without atypia is significantly higher in patients with menorrhagia which is the most common abnormal bleeding pattern in perimenopausal aged women. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 547-550

  12. Bleeding from gums: Can it be a dengue

    OpenAIRE

    Rajat Bansal; Purnita Goyel; Dinesh. C. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Bleeding from gums is a common feature in periodontitis patient. But abnormal bleeding from the gingiva or other areas of the oral mucosa that is difficult to control is an important clinical sign suggesting a hematological disorder. Case Report: A-40-year old male patient reported to our clinic with the chief complaint of acute gingival bleeding. There was continuous bleeding, fever since 3-4 days with weakness, retro orbital pain, and severe backache. Patient gave a history of...

  13. Bleeding from the pancreas - a comparison of imaging methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedl, W.; Nebel, G.; Englehard, K.

    1984-05-01

    Four patients with spontaneous bleeding from the pancreas are described. Transpapillary bleeding is diagnosed endoscopically. Angiography can demonstrate the eroded vessel directly. Ultrasound, CT and ERCP demonstrate the underlying abnormality in the pancreas. Bleeding into a cyst produces characteristic echoes, or an increase in density. NMR is able to demonstrate pancreatitis and pancreatic pseudo-cysts. Early diagnosis is extremely important, since without appropriate surgery, pancreatic bleeding is frequently fatal. 7 figs.

  14. Scintigraphic detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successful management of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding usually depends on accurate localization of the bleeding site. History and clinical findings are often misleading in determination of the site of hemorrhage. The widespread application of flexible endoscopy and selective arteriography now provide accurate diagnoses for the majority of patients bleeding from the upper GI tract, but lower GI bleeding still poses a serious diagnostic challenge. Endoscopy and barium studies are of limited value in examining the small bowel and colon in the face of active hemorrhage. Arteriography, although successful in many cases (3-5), has limitations. The angiographic demonstration of bleeding is possible only when the injection of contrast material coincides with active bleeding at a rate greater than 0.5 ml/min, and since lower GI bleeding is commonly intermittent rather than continuous, a high rate of negative angiographic examinations has been reported. The diagnosis of lower GI bleeding is usually easy to make. In contrast, localizing the site of bleeding may be extremely difficult. Using the techniques described the nuclear physician may be able to detect the bleeding site precisely. However, if the cautions detailed are not observed, the tracer studies will show GI bleeding, but not at the true bleeding site. This must be carefully understood and avoided. Done correctly, these tests can have a major impact on patient care

  15. Evaluation and outcomes of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Santhakumar, Cositha; Liu, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as recurrent or persistent bleeding or presence of iron deficiency anaemia after evaluation with a negative bidirectional endoscopy. OGIB accounts for 5% of gastrointestinal bleeding and presents a diagnostic challenge. Current modalities available for the investigation of OGIB include capsule endoscopy, balloon assisted enteroscopy, spiral enteroscopy and computed tomography enterography. These modalities overcome the limitations of previou...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to hazardous... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system....

  17. Methods of Nuclear Medicine in gastrointestinal bleeding detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods used in the diagnostic of gastrointestinal bleeding are presented. Two radioisotopic methods are considered the main ones: coloidal sulphur labeled with technetium-99m, more useful for low and acute bleeding and red blood cells labeled with technetium-99m, adequate for high and intermitent bleeding. (Author)

  18. Obesity and risk of bleeding : The SMART study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braekkan, S. K.; van der Graaf, Y.; Visseren, F. L J; Algra, A.

    2016-01-01

    Essentials: Whether obesity protects against clinically relevant bleeding is unclear. We investigated the risk of bleeding according to various measures of obesity in a cohort of 9736 patients. Obesity was not associated with a lower risk of bleeding. The procoagulant profile in obese subjects may n

  19. Endoscopic Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices With Histoacryl

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Bleeding from antral and duodenal varices is an uncommon feature in patients with portal hypertension. We report a patient with cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis, who had a massive bleed from antral and duodenal varices. Bleeding was controlled with endoscopic injection of varices using histoacryl. Endoscopic treatment and the relatively uncommon occurrence of antral and duodenal varices are highlighted.

  20. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Cathy; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe;

    2014-01-01

    2011. The number of participants randomly assigned ranged from 47 to 216 (median 204). All trials reported mortality. In total, 42 of 851 participants randomly assigned to tranexamic acid and 71 of 850 in the control group died (RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.87; P value 0.007; I² = 0%). The analysis was...... review will be much more informative in a few years. Further examination of tranexamic acid would require inclusion of high-quality randomised controlled trials. Timing of randomisation is essential to avoid attrition bias and to limit the number of withdrawals. Future trials may use a pragmatic design...... and should include all participants with suspected bleeding or with endoscopically verified bleeding, as well as a tranexamic placebo arm and co-administration of pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy. Assessment of outcome measures in such studies should be clearly defined. Endoscopic examination...

  1. Reoperation for bleeding in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Rauer, Line Juul; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Bo Juel

    2012-01-01

    At Odense University Hospital (OUH), 5-9% of all unselected cardiac surgical patients undergo reoperation due to excessive bleeding. The reoperated patients have an approximately three times greater mortality than non-reoperated. To reduce the rate of reoperations and mortality due to postoperative...... bleeding, we aim to identify risk factors that predict reoperation. A total of 1452 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery using extracorporeal circulation (ECC) between November 2005 and December 2008 at OUH were analysed. Statistical tests were used to identify risk factors for reoperation. We...... after cardiac surgery was low ejection fraction, high EuroSCORE, procedures other than isolated CABG, elongated time on ECC, low body mass index, diabetes mellitus and preoperatively elevated s-creatinine. Reoperated patients significantly had a greater increase in postoperative s-creatinine and higher...

  2. Bleeding risk in 'real world' patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison of two established bleeding prediction schemes in a nationwide cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J B; Lip, G Y H; Hansen, P R;

    2011-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is a double-edged sword, because it decreases the risk of stroke at the cost of an increased risk of bleeding. We compared the performance of a new bleeding prediction scheme, HAS-BLED, with an older bleeding prediction scheme, ......, HEMORR(2)HAGES, in a cohort of 'real-world' AF patients....

  3. The selective bleed variable cycle engine

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, M. A. R.

    1992-01-01

    A new concept in aircraft propulsion is described in this work. In particular, variable jet engine is investigated for supersonic ASTOVL aircraft. This engine is a Selective Bleed Variable Cycle, twin shaft turbofan. At low flight speeds the engine operates as a medium bypass turbofan. At supersonic cruise it operates as low bypass turbofan without reheat. The performance of the engine and its components is analyzed using a novel matching procedure. Off-design engine performance characterist...

  4. Sedimentation and Bleeding of Cement Paste

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Ya

    2014-01-01

    The lower viscosity and high matrix volume of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) compared to ordinary concrete can lead to instability in the form of particle segregation, sedimentation and bleeding. This is a problem for the exploitation of all the benefits from the use of SCC for the ready mix industry and contractors. This research started from the investigation on the main factors influencing the stability of the paste as well as the applicability of generally used theories on particle sedime...

  5. Otorrhagia bleeding due to leech bite

    OpenAIRE

    Narges Askari; Afrooz Eshaghian

    2012-01-01

    Leeches are blood-sucking hermaphroditic parasites that attach to vertebrate hosts, bite through the skin, and suck out blood. When leeches feed, they secrete an anticoagulant (hirudin), which helps them get a full meal of blood. This is the first report of leech removal from external auditory canal. Previous leech involvement cases were explained in nasopharynx, larynx, pharynx, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. Prominent sign of all cases was active bleeding from the leech attachment site; t...

  6. Single session treatment for bleeding hemorrhoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, S.J.; Rypins, E.B.; Houck, J.; Thrower, S.

    1987-12-01

    Fifty consecutive outpatients with bleeding internal hemorrhoids were prospectively treated with a single application of rubber band ligation or infrared coagulation. Complete follow-up observation was obtained in 48 patients (23 underwent rubber band ligation and 25 underwent infrared coagulation). At one month after treatment, 22 patients who underwent rubber band ligation and 16 who underwent infrared coagulation, were symptomatically improved (p less than 0.05). At six months, 15 patients who had undergone rubber band ligation and ten who had infrared coagulation treatment, remained improved (p less than 0.05). There was no statistical difference in the discomfort experienced by either group during or after the procedure as determined by a self-assessment scale. Two patients who underwent rubber band ligation experienced complications--a thrombosed external hemorrhoid developed in one patient and another had delayed rectal bleeding. Although associated with occasional complications after treatment, rubber band ligation is more effective than in infrared coagulation for single session treatment of bleeding internal hemorrhoids.

  7. Endoscopic hemoclip treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung Chih Lai; Sien Sing Yang; Chi Hwa Wu; Tzen Kwan Chen

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic hemoclip in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer.METHODS Totally, 40 patients with F1a and F1b hemorrhagic activity of peptic ulcers were enrolled in this uncontrolled prospective study for endoscopic hemoclip treatment. We used a newly developed rotatable clip-device for the application of hemoclip (MD850) to stop bleeding. Endoscopy was repeated if there was any sign or suspicion of rebleeding, and reclipping was performed if necessary and feasible.RESULTS Initial hemostatic rate by clipping was 95%, and rebleeding rate was only 8%.Ultimate hemostatic rates were 87%, 96%, and 93% in the F1a and F1b subgroups, and total cases, respectively. In patients with shock on admission, hemoclipping achieved ultimate hemostasis of 71% and 83% in F1a and F1b subgroups, respectively. Hemostasis reached 100% in patients without shock regardless of hemorrhagic activity being F1a or F1b. The average number of clips used per case was 3.0 (range 2- 5). Spurting bleeders required more clips on average than did oozing bleeders (3.4 versus 2.8 ). We observed no obvious complications, no tissue injury, or impairment of ulcer healing related to hemoclipping.CONCLUSION Endoscopic hemoclip placement is an effective and safe method. With the improvement of the clip and application device,the procedure has become easier and much more efficient. Endoscopic hemoclipping deserves further study in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers.

  8. [Obscure digestive bleeding by ileal carcinoid tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelly Manrique, María; Frisancho, Oscar; Zumaeta, Eduardo; Palomino, Américo; Rodriguez, César

    2011-01-01

    The patient is an 82 year-old female with a history of osteoarthritis, hypothyroidism and anemia for 14 years (receiving blood transfusions). She was admited to our hospital with a nine months history of malaise, anorexia, fatigue and weakness, associated with intermitten episodes of abdominal pain. She was diagnosed anemia and occult blood positive stools. Physical examination revealed a patient in generally fair condition, obese, with mild edema of lower limbs, no changes in the evaluation of chest, cardiovascular, abdomen, etc. Laboratory data was unremarkable, except for iron deficiency anemia. The upper endoscopy showed duodenal ulcer scar, fundic polyposis and chronic gastritis. Colonoscopy revealed some diverticula, a small sessile polyp and internal hemorrhoids. The diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding was made. The CT scan of the abdomen showed gallstones and fatty liver; a radiograph of intestinal transit detected a lesion apparently protruded intestinal loop for distal jejunum; enteroscopy was performed (with one team ball) anterograde and retrograde achieving assess distal jejunum and distal ileum without observing any injuries. The study of capsule endoscopy showed a polypoid tumor intestinal with evidence of having bleeding. Surgery detected the tumor in proximal ileum. The surgical specimen findings showed three tumors 0.7 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm on the proximal ileum. The microscopic examination revealed that these lesions were neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoid). The Ileal carcinoid tumor may rarely presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:21544161

  9. [Bleeding gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp (Vanek's tumor)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guţu, E; Ghidirim, Gh; Mişin, I; Iakovleva, Iraida; Vozian, M

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp's (IFP) or Vanek tumor of the gastrointestinal tract represents a relatively unusual entity. IFP is an extremely rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report herein a case of a 30-year-old woman who had a gastric IFP complicated by gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive symptoms. The lesion was mistaken on endoscopic, radiologic examination and in the operating room for a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Preoperative endoscopic examination revealed a protruding oval-shaped submucosal lesion (approximately 7 cm in size) of the gastric antrum, with ulceration of the mucosal surface. Multiple endoscopic biopsies were negative for neoplastic changes. Barium meal study disclosed a large tumor in the prepyloric area of the stomach. Presumptive preoperative diagnosis was GIST. Subtotal Bilroth II gastrectomy en bloc with the mass and lymphadenectomy was performed. Surprisingly, the final histological diagnosis was IFP. Postoperative course was uneventful and no recurrences were observed during 4 years follow-up. With reference to case report, the etiology, diagnosis and treatment strategy of IFP will be discussed. This case highlights an unusual presentation of IFP. Although bleeding may represent a rare complication due IFP, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage of uncertain etiology. PMID:20405696

  10. Comparison of detectable bleeding rates of radiopharmaceuticals for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in sheep using a closed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owunwanne, A.; Sadek, S.; Yacoub, T.; Awdeh, M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M. (Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S. (Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait). Dept. of Surgery)

    1989-06-01

    The closed experimental animal model system was used to compare the detectable gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding rates of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA, {sup 99m}Tc-RBCs and {sup 99m}Tc tin colloid in sheep. The three radiopharmaceuticals were used to detect the upper GI bleeding sites at rates of 0.57 and 0.25 ml/min. At the lower bleeding rate of 0.1 ml/min, both {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA and {sup 99m}Tc-RBCs were successful in detecting the bleeding site. At the lowest rate of 0.07 ml/min only {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA was successful in detecting the bleeding site. The results indicate that {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA is the most useful {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceutical for detecting the upper GI bleeding site at the slowest bleeding rate studied. (orig.).

  11. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-02-25

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  12. Spectrum of histopathological findings in postmenopausal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequencies of histopathological findings in endometrial and endocervical biopsy samples with clinical history of Postmenopausal Bleeding (PMB). Study Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Section of Histopathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from February 2012 to January 2013. Methodology: A total of 157 consecutive endometrial and endocervical biopsy specimens with history of postmenopausal bleeding were included. After microscopic examination, frequencies of histological findings in different age groups were generated. Chi-square and independent sample t-tests were applied to see whether the difference was significant which was set at p < 0.05. Results: One hundred and twenty-one (77.1%) specimens showed benign pathologies while 36 (22.9%) were malignant. Endometrial polyp was seen in 67 (42.7%) cases followed by endometrial carcinomas in 25 (15.9%), endometrial hyperplasia in 21 (13.4%), cervical carcinoma in 12 (7.6%) and cervical polyps in 9 (5.7%) cases. Ahighly significant increase in the percentage of malignant and pre-malignant lesions was seen with increasing age group (p < 0.001). Mean age of patients with type-2 endometrial carcinoma was higher than type-1 endometrial carcinoma but statistical significance was not observed (70.2 ± 6.5 vs. 61.8 ± 9.1 years respectively, p=0.069). Conclusion: Although benign pathologies were more common in postmenopausal bleeding but the collective proportion of endometrial and cervical malignancies and pre-malignant conditions was quite high. Therefore, PMB should be urgently evaluated for cause and early commencement of treatment. (author)

  13. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use. PMID:26306615

  14. Emergent Bleeding in Patients Receiving Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard L; Sterling, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer clinical advantages over warfarin, such as minimal medication and food interactions and fixed dosing without the need for routine monitoring of coagulation status. As with all anticoagulants, bleeding, either spontaneous or provoked, is the most common complication. The long-term use of these drugs is increasing, and there is a crucial need for emergency medicine service professionals to understand the optimal management of associated bleeding. This review aims to describe the indications and pharmacokinetics of available DOACs; to discuss the risk of bleeding; to provide a treatment algorithm to manage DOAC-associated emergency bleeding; and to discuss future directions in bleeding management, including the role of specific reversal agents, such as the recently approved idarucizumab for reversal of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Because air medical personnel are increasingly likely to encounter patients receiving DOACs, it is important that they have an understanding of how to manage patients with emergent bleeding. PMID:27255877

  15. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding etiology score for predicting variceal and non-variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supot Pongprasobchai; Sireethorn Nimitvilai; Jaroon Chasawat; Sathaporn Manatsathit

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify clinical parameters, and develop an Upper Gastrointesinal Bleeding (UGIB) Etiology Score for predicting the types of UGIB and validate the score.METHODS: Patients with UGIB who underwent endoscopy within 72 h were enrolled. Clinical and basic laboratory parameters were prospectively collected.Predictive factors for the types of UGIB were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses and were used to generate the UGIB Etiology Score. The best cutoff of the score was defined from the receiver operating curve and prospectively validated in another set of patients with UGIB.RESULTS: Among 261 patients with UGIB, 47 (18%) had variceal and 214 (82%) had non-variceal bleeding.Univariate analysis identified 27 distinct parameters significantly associated with the types of UGIB. Logistic regression analysis identified only 3 independent factors for predicting variceal bleeding;previous diagnosis of cirrhosis or signs of chronic liver disease (OR 22.4, 95% CI 8.3-60.4, P < 0.001), red vomitus (OR4.6, 95% CI 1.8-11.9, P = 0.02), and red nasogastric (NG) aspirate (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.3-8.3, P = 0.011).The UGIB Etiology Score was calculated from (3.1 x previous diagnosis of cirrhosis or signs of chronic liver disease) + (1.5 × red vornitus) + (1.2 × red NG aspirate), when 1 and 0 are used for the presence and absence of each factor, respectively. Using a cutoff ≥ 3.1, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) in predicting variceal bleeding were 85%, 81%,82%, 50%, and 96%, respectively. The score was prospectively validated in another set of 195 UGIB cases (46 variceal and 149 non-variceal bleeding). The PPV and NPV of a score ≥3.1 for variceal bleeding were 79% and 97%, respectively.CONCLUSION: The UGIB Etiology Score, composed of 3 parameters, using a cutoff ≥ 3.1 accurately predicted variceal bleeding and may help to guide the choice of initial therapy for UGIB before endoscopy.

  16. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two othe...

  17. Bleeding and Filtration of Cement-Based Grout

    OpenAIRE

    Draganovic, Almir

    2009-01-01

    Grouting is a common method of sealing rock around tunnels to reduce or stop water inflow. Successful grouting significantly minimizes the maintenance cost and safety of the tunnel. Some questions about bleeding and penetrability of the grouts have to be examined more closely to carry out a successful grouting. Bleeding of cement-based grout is a complex problem. Measuring methods used today originate from the measuring of the bleeding of cement pastes used in ordinary building industry. Whet...

  18. Performance analysis of bleed condenser used in Indian PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation of hot two phase bleed from the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system is carried out by two different cooling modes in the bleed condenser of Indian PHWRs. These are the reflux and spray cooling modes. A computer code has been developed to predict the performance of bleed condensers used in Indian PHWRs for the above two cooling modes. Using the computer code the performance analysis was carried out for the reflux cooling and spray cooling modes separately. (author). 19 refs., 8 figs

  19. Otorrhagia bleeding due to leech bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Askari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leeches are blood-sucking hermaphroditic parasites that attach to vertebrate hosts, bite through the skin, and suck out blood. When leeches feed, they secrete an anticoagulant (hirudin, which helps them get a full meal of blood. This is the first report of leech removal from external auditory canal. Previous leech involvement cases were explained in nasopharynx, larynx, pharynx, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. Prominent sign of all cases was active bleeding from the leech attachment site; that stopped with leech removal. A 24-year-old man was presented to Al-Zahra hospital with left otorrhagia and otalgia from 2 days ago. After suction of ear a small soft foreign body was seen in the external ear near the tympanic membrane, then the ear filled with glycerine phenice, the patient explained decreased movement of foreign body. Four hours later the bloody discharge stopped and otalgia decreased. After suction of clots, a leech was extruded from external auditory canal by alligator. Leech infestation is a rare cause of otorrhagia and should be suspected in the endemic region in all of unusual bleeding; it can be diagnosed and treated by exact inspection and removal.

  20. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding.

  1. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  2. Abnormal uterine bleeding: a clinicohistopathological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupamasuresh Y

    2014-06-01

    Methods: In our prospective study of 359 Patients of the age between 46 and 73 years, clinical characteristics and the pattern of endometrial histopathology and their association in women, who present with abnormal uterine bleeding, are categorised into six groups. Results: In our study, a significant correlation of histopathology and BMI was observed with endometrial hyperplasia and malignancy in obese patient i.e. 37 out 96 and 13 out of 23 respectively. The incidence of malignancy has been increasing with the age being 1.6% in 46-50 years to 60% in 70-75 years. In our study 116 (32.3% had hypertension, 33 patients (9.2% had diabetes mellitus, 40 patients (11.1% had hypothyroidism. Conclusions: We found a maximum incidence of AUB in multiparous women. Clinicohistopathological analysis of AUB revealed endometrial hyperplasia in majority of patients. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(3.000: 656-661

  3. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and...... ambulance drivers involved in maternity care. METHODS: In March 2012, health care workers were trained in HMS BAB, a half-day simulation-based training, using a train-the-trainer model. The training focused on basic delivery care, active management of third stage of labor, and treatment of postpartum...... hemorrhage, including bimanual uterine compression. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Evaluation questionnaires provided information on course perception. Knowledge, skills, and confidence of facilitators and learners were tested before and after training. RESULTS: Four master trainers trained eight local facilitators...

  4. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  5. Genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Perng, Chin-Lin; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lo, Wen-Ching; Tseng, Guan-Ying; Sun, I-Chen; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma. Different genotypes of Helicobacter pylori are confirmed from diverse geographic areas. Its association with bleeding peptic ulcer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the Helicobacter pylori vacA alleles, cagA and iceA in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer.

  6. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P. (Saint James' s Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-10-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author).

  7. Management of bleeding complications in patients with cancer on DOACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Sam; Shrum, Jeffrey; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-04-01

    There has been a concern that major bleeding events (MBE) on direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will be more difficult to manage than on vitamin K antagonists. Patients with cancer and DOAC-associated bleeding may be even more of a challenge to manage. We therefore reviewed the literature on bleeding in patients with cancer on DOACs. In addition, we performed an analysis of individual patient data from 5 phase III trials on treatment with dabigatran with focus on those with cancer. In 6 randomized trials the risk of MBE in patients with cancer was similar on treatment with DOACs compared to vitamin K antagonists. Bleeding was in the majority of patients managed with supportive therapy alone. In the individual patient data analysis there were no significant differences in use of hemostatic products, transfusion of red cells, effectiveness of management, bleeding-related mortality or 30-day all-cause mortality between patients with cancer treated with dabigatran or with warfarin. Local hemostatic therapy, including resection of the cancer site was more common in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding with cancer than among those without cancer. We conclude that management of bleeding in patients with cancer and on a DOAC does not pose a greater challenge than management of bleeding in patients without cancer. PMID:27067968

  8. NCIDENCE OF BLEEDING MANIFESTATIONS IN FEVER WITH THROMBOCYTOPENIA CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Fever is the cardinal manifestation of infection. Platelets are necessary to prevent bleeding manifestations. Certain infections cause thrombocytopenia and bleeding manifestations. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the incidence of bleeding manifestations in i nfections which cause fever and thrombocytopenia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: INCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients who were admitted with fever and thrombocytopenia, aged above 12 years, in S.V.R.R.G.G.H, Tirupati were taken for the study. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients who are admitted with thrombocytopenia and without fever were excluded. Patients who are admitted with fever and normal platelet count were excluded. RESULTS AND CONCLUSI ON: Fever with thrombocytopenia is the commonest presenting problem in the medical war ds. In the present study the commonest infectious etiology of fever with thrombocytopenia was malaria fever (36%, followed by undiagnosed fevers (28%, dengue fever (26%, typhoid fever (6% and scrub typhus (4%. In the present study bleeding manifestati ons were seen in 16 cases (32% and bleeding manifestations were not seen in 34 cases (68%. The commonest bleeding manifestation was cutaneous, followed by hematemesis, malena, bleeding gums, hematuria and epistaxis. Bleeding manifestation was commonly se en in thrombocytopenia with dengue fever (14%, followed by malaria (8%, undiagnosed cases (8% and typhoid (2%.

  9. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  10. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio; Damián; Sánchez-Capilla; Paloma; De; La; Torre-Rubio; Eduardo; Redondo-Cerezo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem.

  11. Scintigraphic detection of gastrointestinal bleeding: a review of current methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experience with radionuclide imaging has provided the clinician with several techniques to noninvasively detect and locate sources of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. These tests can be rapidly performed and often in an ICU setting. One method used Tc-99m sulfur colloid which, in an animal model, has been shown to detect acute bleeding at rates as low as 0.1 ml/min. However, because the tracer remains in the blood for a short period of time, it may be suboptimal for identifying patients with intermittent bleeding. Tc-99m red cells is a tracer that remains within the blood and permits detection of both acute and intermittent bleeding. With tagged red cells, sites of bleeding from both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract can be found. Both of these techniques can provide important information in the patient with suspected active gastrointestinal bleeding and aid the clinician in more effective management including the use of invasive diagnostic and therapeutic techniques

  12. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding And Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg, Søren; Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Nørrelund, Helene; Pedersen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a well-known symptom of colorectal cancer (CRC). Whether incident GI bleeding is also a marker of other GI cancers remains unclear. METHODS: This nationwide cohort study examined the risk of various GI cancer types in patients with lower GI...... bleeding. We used Danish medical registries to identify all patients with a first-time hospital diagnosis of lower GI bleeding during 1995-2011 and followed them for 10 years to identify subsequent GI cancer diagnoses. We computed absolute risks of cancer, treating death as a competing risk, and calculated...... standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) by comparing observed cancer cases with expected cancer incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: Among 58,593 patients with lower GI bleeding, we observed 2,806 GI cancers during complete 10-year follow-up. During the first year of follow-up, the absolute GI...

  13. Bleeding from gums: Can it be a dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleeding from gums is a common feature in periodontitis patient. But abnormal bleeding from the gingiva or other areas of the oral mucosa that is difficult to control is an important clinical sign suggesting a hematological disorder. Case Report: A-40-year old male patient reported to our clinic with the chief complaint of acute gingival bleeding. There was continuous bleeding, fever since 3-4 days with weakness, retro orbital pain, and severe backache. Patient gave a history of bleeding from gums for last 24 hrs. His blood profile revealed; platelet count of 36,000, total wite blood cell (WBC count of 6000/cumm, differential leukocyte count (DLC (P45, L53, E2, and hemoglobin 12 g/dL. Patient sera was positive for dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen, anti-dengue immunoglobulin M (IgM, and anti-dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies. Discussion: Here is a case report capable of changing our vision that acute gingival bleeding can also occur in dengue fever. Dengue fever can also be considered as one of the differential diagnosis for the acute gingival bleeding.

  14. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation. PMID:24124344

  15. PRE-AETHIOLOGICAL TREATMENT IN UPPER GASTRO-INTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dimofte

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastro-intestinal bleeding remains a cornerstone in surgical practice and unfortunately its’ management is profoundly variable according to hospital protocols and local standards of care. Medical interventions are acting at different levels of medical care and a range of specialist are involved in the process, starting from family practitioners to surgeons, as well as highly trained specialist in interventional endoscopy or radiology. This review is trying to establish the landmarks in the early assessment and care of patients with upper gastro-intestinal bleeding, irrespective of the morphological cause of the bleeding. We propose a protocol for the management both of portal and non-portal upper-gastrointestinal bleedings, prior to endoscopic diagnosis. It is fundamental to establish a standard of care which is feasible in Romania and can work both in university and district hospitals. The protocol is marking the essential gestures with their relevance for the bleeding patient but also reminds the significance of clinical evaluation and safety in transportation of the patient to the nearest emergency room. A battery of simple test should be performed in every patient and data interpreted with care, as results vary according to the level of haemodynamic compensation. Standard empiric therapy for upper gastro-intestinal bleeding is not yet been established but a couple of alternatives emerge as possible solutions. We discuss the benefits of a standard therapy based on H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors, octreoctide and somatostatin regarding both portal and non-portal bleedings.

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the risk of bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are commonly prescribed agents for various conditions in general psychiatry. There is a strong consensus that blockade of serotonin reuptake affects primary hemostasis, namely platelet activity, thus resulting in a bleeding tendency. Considering that SSRIs are commonly prescribed, this study was conducted to assess if they were associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Methods: This was a prospective, open-label study of 30 patients attending the Psychiatry out-patient department, Dr. B. R. Ambedkar Medical College, Bangalore who satisfied DSM-IV criteria for a primary diagnosis of depression, treated with SSRIs. Bleeding time, clotting time, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time and platelet count were assessed at baseline and at the end of 6 weeks of treatment or occurrence of bleeding symptom. Results: The patients aged between 18-55 years of whom 21 were females, were treated with an SSRI (fluoxetine 12, escitalopram 12 and sertraline 6 patients. Six patients had overt symptoms of bleeding (upper gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis 4; epistaxis 2 and petechiae 2 of whom one patient gave a history of both hematemesis and petechiae and another of hematemesis and epistaxis. The average day after treatment beginning, on which patients reported with bleeding was 30.33 (26-40 days. There was a significant increase in the bleeding time (p=0.028 and clotting time (p=0.042, implying derangement in platelet aggregation. There was no significant change in the other parameters. Conclusion: Treatment with SSRIs increases the risk of bleeding. However, large, randomized controlled trials are required to re-affirm these findings. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(3.000: 272-274

  17. Intraoperative bleeding control by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Stupnik, Tomaz; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes; Velasco, Carlos; Yang, Yang; Lee, Wentao; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Owing to advances in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), the majority of pulmonary resections can currently be performed by VATS in a safe manner with a low level of morbidity and mortality. The majority of the complications that occur during VATS can be minimized with correct preoperative planning of the case as well as careful pulmonary dissection. Coordination of the whole surgical team is essential when confronting an emergency such as major bleeding. This is particularly important during the VATS learning curve, where the occurrence of intraoperative complications, particularly significant bleeding, usually ends in a conversion to open surgery. However, conversion should not be considered as a failure of the VATS approach, but as a resource to maintain the patient's safety. The correct assessment of any bleeding is of paramount importance during major thoracoscopic procedures. Inadequate management of the source of bleeding may result in major vessel injury and massive bleeding. If bleeding occurs, a sponge stick should be readily available to apply pressure immediately to control the haemorrhage. It is always important to remain calm and not to panic. With the bleeding temporarily controlled, a decision must be made promptly as to whether a thoracotomy is needed or if the bleeding can be solved through the VATS approach. This will depend primarily on the surgeon's experience. The operative vision provided with high-definition cameras, specially designed or adapted instruments and the new sealants are factors that facilitate the surgeon's control. After experience has been acquired with conventional or uniportal VATS, the rate of complications diminishes and the majority of bleeding events are controlled without the need for conversion to thoracotomy. PMID:26424873

  18. Quality laboratory issues in bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, D M; Mammen, J; Nair, S C; de Lima Montalvão, S A

    2016-07-01

    Selected quality issues pertinent to the determination of accurate results in the haemostasis laboratory are discussed. Specifically, the implementation of a successful external quality-assessment scheme is described, including its impact on result accuracy as well as the programme's unique challenges and opportunities. Errors in the preanalytical phase of laboratory testing represent the greatest source for reporting incorrect test results. Some of the most common preanalytical errors are described including those that necessitate sample rejection. Analytical means to identify potential sources of error and analytical means to overcome particular interferences are described. Representing the most important clinical complication in the treatment of patients with haemophilia, quality issues related to determination of the presence of inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII) are reviewed. Heat treatment of patient plasma prior to testing, particularly in patients receiving replacement FVIII concentrate or during induction of immune tolerance to achieve more accurate results is recommended, while screening activated partial thromboplastin time-based mixing tests to rule out inhibitor presence is discouraged. The initiatives presented in this review can be implemented in robust and resource restricted settings to improve the quality of laboratory testing in patients with bleeding disorders. PMID:27405682

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to ulcer in duodenal diverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons more frequent of high gastrointestinal bleeding are the peptic gastric and duodenal, followed by acute erosions and the varicose veins in oesophagus and stomach. The diverticulosis of the small bowel is a very rare reason of gastrointestinal bleeding, must considerate in patients with bleeding without evident reason in oesophagus and stomach, the habitual is to diagnose this entity of accidental form in the course of endoscopic procedures, radiological or surgical. The complications associated with the diverticulosis duodenal are rare; it justifies supporting a not surgical attitude at first

  20. Gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to ulcer in duodenal diverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons more frequent of high gastrointestinal bleeding are the peptic gastric and duodenal, followed by acute erosion and the varicose veins in oesophagus and stomachs. The diverticulosis of the small bowel is a very rare reason of gastrointestinal bleeding, must considerate in patients with bleeding without evident reason in oesophagus and stomach the habitual is to diagnose this entity of occidental form in the course of endoscopic procedures, radiological of surgical. The complications associated with the diverticulosis duodenal are rare; it justifies supporting a not surgical attitude at first

  1. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without...

  2. Splenic angiosarcoma metastasis to small bowel presented with gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Te Hsu; Chin-Yew Lin; Ting-Jun Wu; Han-Ming Chen; Tsann-Long Hwang; Yi-Yin Jan

    2005-01-01

    Primary splenic angiosarcoma is a very rare,aggressive neoplasm with a high metastatic rate and dismal prognosis. This neoplasm usually presents with abdominal pain, splenomegaly, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Splenic angiosarcoma with bleeding gastrointestinal metastases is extremely rare. The literature contains only two case reports. This study reported a 44-year-old male patient with splenic angiosarcoma with sustained repeated gastrointestinal bleeding due to small bowel metastases. Salvage surgery was performed by splenectomy and resection of the metastatic small bowel tumors. The post-operative course was uneventful; the patient survived with the disease and had no GI bleeding, 7 mo after surgery.

  3. Interventional angiography in the diagnosis of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional angiography with the use of indwelling arterial catheters, anticoagulants, vasodilators and fibrinolytic agents, complements conventional angiography in the diagnosis of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. These interventional techniques prolong, augment or reactive bleeding and, by enabling better timing of examinations, they increase the diagnostic efficacy of angiography. In the reported series of 63 patients with acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage, interventions increased the diagnostic yield of angiography for demonstration of extravasation from 32% to 65% and decreased the percentage of negative angiograms from 27% to 16%. Indications, techniques and risks of interventional angiography in the diagnosis of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  5. Bleed condenser pressure relief valves for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four test programs of Bleed Condenser pressure relief valves (RVs) have been completed. This work was initiated following two events in which Bleed Condenser REs were damaged. During one event, the piping connecting one of the RV's to the Bleed Condenser also failed. The author describes the investigations of these events and subsequent testing of several different RV designs. Based on the test results, pressure relief valve designs suitable for this service have been determined. Lessons learned are applicable to pressure relief valves in liquid services

  6. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children. PMID:17484172

  7. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  8. Radionuclide-monitoring of gastro-intestinal bleeding-activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide-monitoring was done in 50 patients to assess gastro-intestinal bleeding, activity and location. Monitoring with 99mTc-in vivo-labelled erythrocytes was performed as sequential scintigraphy in increments of 1-2 hours up to 62 hours. 23 patients without active GI-bleeding were correctly identified. 27 patients showed pathologic activities in abdominal bloodpool-scintigraphy. In 25 patients peristaltic movement of these activities were seen - in each case we correctly diagnosed active GI-bleeding. In 2 patients the activity stayed for a longer period in the same location - one patient had a liverhemangioma, the other patient had an aneurysma of the arteria mesenterica superior. The great impact of radionuclide-monitoring on diagnostic and therapeutic management of gastrointestinal bleeding is emphasized. (orig.)

  9. Pregnancy Complications: Bleeding and Spotting from the Vagina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem, but they can be a sign of miscarriage or other serious complications. Miscarriage is when a baby dies in the womb ... is a sign of a serious problem, like: Miscarriage . Almost all women who miscarry have bleeding or ...

  10. Fibrinogen concentrates for bleeding trauma patients: what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Martin; Ostrowski, S R; Windeløv, N A;

    2011-01-01

    A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions....

  11. Modern issues on the treatment of peptic ulcer bleedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potakhin S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of therapeutic treatment of peptic ulcer and the introduction of endoscopic technologies, the problem of peptic ulcer hemorrhage remains valid. A large number of publications in foreign literature are dedicated to epidemiology and prevention of bleeding, evaluation of modern tactics and search for new methods of treatment. The works relating to organization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding are of particular interest. According to the recent data not all clinics even in economically developed countries manage to follow the recommendations of an international consensus-2010 for non-variceal bleeding treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract. Among the causes of non-compliance of international recommendations there are subjective and objective factors, the understanding of which can significantly affect the optimization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding.

  12. Improving the management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael J; Hayes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major cause of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. The most common source of bleeding is from gastroesophageal varices but non-variceal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease also carries a significant risk in patients with liver disease. The prognosis is related to the severity of the underlying liver disease, and deaths often occur due to liver failure, infection or renal failure. Optimal management should therefore not only achieve haemostasis but address these complications as well. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis includes a range of medical, endoscopic and radiological interventions. This article updates the recent developments in this area and highlights topics where further research is still required. PMID:26581713

  13. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  14. Spinal Hemangiopericytoma Which Needed Intraoperative Embolization due to Unexpected Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2013-01-01

    Spinal intradural hemangiopericytoma is a very rare tumor and can be characterized by massive bleeding during surgeries, frequent recurrence, and metastasis. However, definite radiologic differential points of hemangiopericytoma are not known. We describe an unexpected hemangiopericytoma case with large bleeding and management of the tumor. A 21-year-old man visited complaining of progressive neck pain and tingling sensation in both hands. Magnetic resonance imaging of his spine revealed C1-2...

  15. Systematic review: tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, S.L.; Langholz, S.E.; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid may reduce upper gastrointestinal bleeding and stabilize patients before endoscopic treatments. AIM: To review randomized trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Manual and electronic searches of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and...... were unclearly reported. Data from three of the included trials suggested that tranexamic acid did not significantly increase the risk of thromboembolic disease. CONCLUSIONS: The present review suggests that tranexamic acid may reduce all-cause mortality. However, because of limitations in the internal...

  16. Fibrinogen concentrates for bleeding trauma patients: what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Martin; Ostrowski, S R; Windeløv, N A;

    2011-01-01

    A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions.......A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions....

  17. Therapeutic angiography for giant bleeding gastro-duodenal artery pseudoaneurysm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ram; Elazary; Mahmoud; Abu-Gazala; Avraham; Schlager; Noam; Shussman; Avraham; I; Rivkind; Allan; I; Bloom

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of an 18-year-old female transferred to our center from an outside hospital due to persistent gastrointestinal bleeding. Two weeks prior to her transfer she underwent duodenal omentopexy for a perforated duodenal peptic ulcer. The patient underwent a computed tomography angiogram which identified the source of bleeding as a giant gastroduodenal artery (GDA) pseudoaneurysm. The patient was taken to interventional radiology where successful microcoil embolization was performed. We present ...

  18. Prolonged bleeding on the neck in leech therapy: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Atakan Savrun; Selim Bozkurt; Mehmet Okumus; Emre Gokcen; Murat Turkaslan

    2015-01-01

    Superficial skin bleeding can usually be stopped by applying short-time compression, unless the patient suffers from coagulation disorders or uses anticoagulant. Because of the anticoagulant component of leech saliva, a leech bite may cause long-time bleeding, which cannot be stopped via compression. In this study, the case of a patient who applied leech therapy on her neck for the treatment of migraine has been presented. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000): 234-237

  19. Evaluation of endometrium in peri-menopausal abnormal uterine bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Kotdawala, Parul; Kotdawala, Sonal; Nagar, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) is one of the most common health problems encountered by women. It affects about 20% women of reproductive age, and accounts for almost two thirds of all hysterectomies. Gynaecologists are often unable to identify the cause of abnormal bleeding even after a thorough history and physical examination. Diagnostic evaluations and treatment modalities have been evolving over time. The onus in AUB management is to exclude complex endometrial hyperplasia and endometri...

  20. Lessons Learned from Animal Models of Inherited Bleeding Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in treatment of hemophilia and von Willebrand disease (VWD) depend heavily on the availability of well-characterized animal models. These animals faithfully recapitulate the severe bleeding phenotype that occurs in humans with these inherited bleeding disorders. Research in these animal models represents important early and intermediate steps of translational research aimed at addressing current limitations in treatment such as the development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation ...

  1. The Significance of Small Cerebral Bleeds in Neurodegenerative Dementia Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    De Reuck, Jacques L.

    2012-01-01

    Small cerebral bleeds are frequently observed in brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, they are also observed in patients with other neurodegenerative dementias and in persons without cognitive impairment. The aim of this survey is to compare the bleeding load in brains with different dementia syndromes and in age-matched controls. Hundred sixty-five brains were examined. The prevalence and the severity of the different cerebrovascular ...

  2. Endovascular treatment of nonvariceal acute arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization as treatment of upper nonvariceal gastrointestinal bleeding is increasingly being used after failed primary endoscopic treatment. The results after embolization have become better and surgery still has a high mortality. Embolization is a safe and effective...... procedure, but its use is has been limited because of relatively high rates of rebleeding and high mortality, both of which are associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and non-gastrointestinal related mortality causes. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a valuable minimal invasive method in the...

  3. Endoscopic Removal of an Unusual Foreign Body Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karaman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body ingestion is a condition more common in the pediatric population than in adults. In adults, although foreign body ingestion can be well tolerated, approximately 10–20% of patients require endoscopic intervention. Delayed diagnosis and unremoved foreign bodies can cause serious and fatal complications including perforation, fistula and gastrointestinal bleeding. Here we report a patient with bleeding duodenal ulcer thought to be initiated by a large foreign body.

  4. Double-balloon enteroscopy in detecting small intestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Fa-chao; PAN De-shou; ZHOU Dian-yuan; XIAO Bing; JIANG Bo; WAN Tian-mo; GUO Yu; ZHOU Dan; WANG Li-hui; CHEN Jin-feng; XIE Lu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Digestive tract hemorrhage is a common disease of the digestive system, but about 0.4%-5% intestinal bleeding can not be detected with gastroscope or colonscope.1 Since the intestine is long, tortuous, far away from both ends of the digestive tract and unfixed in position, clinical diagnosis of the bleeding is relatively difficult. Yamamoto and Sugano2 reported the clinical application of double-balloon enteroscope at American DDW in 2003.

  5. An unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal system bleeding: Duodenal varices

    OpenAIRE

    Yılmaz, Ömer; Ataseven, Hilmi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Duodenal varices are an uncommon site of hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension, but their rupture is a serious and often fatal event. We report the case of a 27- year- old man with liver cirrhosis who presented with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed nodular varices in the second portion of the duodenum which were considered to be the source of bleeding. We decided to inject N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Histoacryl), an adhesive agent, and...

  6. Multidetector computed tomography in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Palma

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available John Palma, Marius Mihaila, Frank PilleulDépartement de Radiologie Digestive et des Urgences, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, CHU, Lyon, FranceBackground: The aim of this study is to evaluate multidetector computed tomography (MDCT in acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding, with endoscopy and surgery as reference examinations.Methods: A single-center retrospective study involving 34 patients with acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding was carried out. All patients were evaluated by MDCT scan then endoscopic or surgical examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of MDCT scan were calculated using the extravasation of the contrast agent as the main criterion.Results: Extravasation of the contrast agent was found in 30 of 34 patients (88%. The bleeding site seen on CT was always the same as on endoscopic or surgical examinations (100%. Sensitivity of MDCT scan was 94%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 50% (P < 0.001. Twelve diverticulum bleedings were seen on MDCT scan compared with 13 (92% on endoscopic or surgical examinations. Angiodysplasia was overestimated by MDCT scan.Conclusion: MDCT scan appears to be an excellent tool to find and localize the bleeding site in cases of acute massive lower gastrointestinal disease.Keywords: MDCT, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, extravasation, contrast agent

  7. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD.

  8. Transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of lower gastrointestinal bleeding was attempted in 13 patients by selective embolization of branches of the mesenteric arteries with Gelfoam. Bleeding was adequately controlled in 11 patients with active bleeding during the examination. One patient improved after embolization but bleeding recurred within 24 hours and in another patient the catheterization was unsuccessful. Five patients with diverticular hemorrhage were embolized in the right colic artery four times, and once in the middle colic artery. Three patients had embolization of the ileocolic artery because of hemorrhage from cecal angiodysplasia, post appendectomy, and leukemia infiltration. Three patients had the superior hemorrhoidal artery embolized because of bleeding from unspecific proctitis, infiltration of the rectum from a carcinoma of the bladder, and transendoscopic polypectomy. One patient was septic and bled from jejunal ulcers. Ischemic changes with infarction of the large bowel developed in two patients and were treated by partial semi-elective colectomy, three and four days after embolization. Four other patients developed pain and fever after embolization. Transcatheter embolization of branches of mesenteric arteries in an effective way to control acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, but still has a significant rate of complications that must be seriously weighed against the advantages of operation. (orig.)

  9. Congenital portosystemic shunts with and without gastrointestinal bleeding - case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ying; Chen, Jun; Chen, Qi; Ji, Min; Pa, Mier; Qiao, Zhongwei [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hui [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Shan [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-15

    The clinical presentation of congenital portosystemic shunt is variable and gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon presentation. To describe the imaging features of congenital portosystemic shunt as it presented in 11 children with (n = 6) and without gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 5). We performed a retrospective study on a clinical and imaging dataset of 11 children diagnosed with congenital portosystemic shunt. A total of 11 children with congenital portosystemic shunt were included in this study, 7 with extrahepatic portosystemic shunts and 4 with intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Six patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and the imaging results showed that the shunts originated from the splenomesenteric junction (n = 5) or splenic vein (n = 1) and connected to the internal iliac vein. Among the five cases of congenital portosystemic shunt without gastrointestinal bleeding, one case was an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt and the other four were intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Most congenital portosystemic shunt patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had a shunt that drained portal blood into the iliac vein via an inferior mesenteric vein. This type of shunt was uncommon, but the concomitant rate of gastrointestinal bleeding with this type of shunt was high. (orig.)

  10. Prothrombin complex concentrate for reversal of vitamin K antagonist treatment in bleeding and non-bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mathias; Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    well as patients at high risk of bleeding. Evidence is lacking regarding indication, dosing, efficacy and safety. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the benefits and harms of PCC compared with fresh frozen plasma in the acute medical and surgical setting involving vitamin K antagonist-treated bleeding and non......BACKGROUND: Treatment with vitamin K antagonists is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Reversal therapy with prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) is used increasingly and is recommended in the treatment of patients with bleeding complications undertaking surgical interventions, as......-bleeding patients. We investigated various outcomes and predefined subgroups and performed sensitivity analysis. We examined risks of bias and applied trial sequential analyses (TSA) to examine the level of evidence, and we prepared a 'Risk of bias' table to test the quality of the evidence. SEARCH METHODS: We...

  11. A novel semi-quantitative method for measuring tissue bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukcevic, G; Volarevic, V; Raicevic, S; Tanaskovic, I; Milicic, B; Vulovic, T; Arsenijevic, S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we describe a new semi-quantitative method for measuring the extent of bleeding in pathohistological tissue samples. To test our novel method, we recruited 120 female patients in their first trimester of pregnancy and divided them into three groups of 40. Group I was the control group, in which no dilation was applied. Group II was an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using classical mechanical dilators. Group III was also an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using a hydraulic dilator. Tissue samples were taken from the patients' cervical canals using a Novak's probe via energetic single-step curettage prior to any dilation in Group I and after dilation in Groups II and III. After the tissue samples were prepared, light microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs at 100x magnification. The surfaces affected by bleeding were measured in the microphotographs using the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program and its "polylines" function. The lines were used to mark the area around the entire sample (marked A) and to create "polyline" areas around each bleeding area on the sample (marked B). The percentage of the total area affected by bleeding was calculated using the formula: N = Bt x 100 / At where N is the percentage (%) of the tissue sample surface affected by bleeding, At (A total) is the sum of the surfaces of all of the tissue samples and Bt (B total) is the sum of all the surfaces affected by bleeding in all of the tissue samples. This novel semi-quantitative method utilizes the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program, which is simple to use and widely available, thereby offering a new, objective and precise approach to estimate the extent of bleeding in tissue samples. PMID:24190861

  12. Application of cyanoacrylate in difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Kurek, Krzysztof; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency. Although endoscopic treatment is effective in controlling non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, in cases of persistent bleeding radiological or surgical interventions are required. Application of cyanoacrylate for treatment of difficult-to-arrest non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is poorly investigated. We describe patients in whom cyanoacrylate for acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding was used to stop the ble...

  13. Protein C deficiency related obscure gastrointestinal bleeding treated by enteroscopy and anticoagulant therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Wei-Fan; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Teng, Chung-Jen; Chung, Chen-Shuan

    2015-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommonly encountered and difficult-to-treat clinical problem in gastroenterology, but advancements in endoscopic and radiologic imaging modalities allow for greater accuracy in diagnosing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Ectopic varices account for less than 5% of all variceal bleeding cases, and jejunal variceal bleeding due to extrahepatic portal hypertension is rare. We present a 47-year-old man suffering from obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. C...

  14. Management and outcome of bleeding pseudoaneurysm associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Yi-Yin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A bleeding pseudoaneurysm in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a rare and potentially lethal complication. Optimal treatment of bleeding peripancreatic pseudoaneurysm remains controversial. This study reports on experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH in managing of bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis. Methods The medical records of 9 patients (8 males and 1 female; age range, 28 – 71 years; median, 36 years with bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis treated at CGMH between Aug. 1992 and Sep. 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Alcohol abuse (n = 7;78% was the predominant predisposing factor. Diagnoses of bleeding pseudoaneurysms were based on angiographic (7/7, computed tomographic (4/7, ultrasound (2/5, and surgical (2/2 findings. Whether surgery or angiographic embolization was performed was primarily based on patient clinical condition. Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 4 – 87 months. Results Abdominal computed tomography revealed bleeding pseudoaneurysms in 4 of 7 patients (57%. Angiography determined correct diagnosis in 7 patients (7/7, 100%. The splenic artery was involved in 5 cases, the pancreaticoduodenal artery in 2, the gastroduodenal artery in 1, and the middle colic artery in 1. Initial treatment was emergency (n = 4 or elective (n = 3 surgery in 7 patients and arterial embolization in 2. Rebleeding was detected after initial treatment in 3 patients. Overall, 5 arterial embolizations and 9 surgical interventions were performed; the respective rates of success of these treatments were 20% (1/5 and 89% (8/9. Five patients developed pseudocysts before treatment (n = 3 or following intervention (n = 2. Pseudocyst formation was identified in 2 of the 3 rebleeding patients. Five patients underwent surgical treatment for associated pseudocysts and bleeding did not recur. One patient died from angiography-related complications. Overall mortality

  15. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. (author)

  16. Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water

  17. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: fatima.rsreis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Cardia, P.P. [Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. (author)

  18. Factors affecting hospital mortality in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Mohammed

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective analysis studied the records of 564 consecutive patients admitted to Gastrointestinal Bleeding Unit of Riyadh Medical Complex with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 2-year period (May 1996-April 1998. The purpose of the study was to analyze the mortality with an aim to identify the risk factors affecting mortality in these patients. Majority of patients were men (82% and Saudis (54%. Their mean age was 52.46 + 17.8 years. Esophageal varices (45% were the main causes of bleeding followed by duodenal ulcers (24%. Overall mortality in this series was 15.8% (89 patients. Comorbid diseases were responsible for death in 68 (76% patients, whereas, bleeding was considered to be directly responsible for death in 21 (24% patients. On analysis of data from this study, old age (>60 years, systolic pressure < 90 mm Hg on admission, comorbid disease, variceal bleeding and Child′s grade C in patients with chronic liver disease were associated with adverse outcome.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of CT angiography in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of the study was to carry out a systematic review determining the accuracy of CT angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. A search of published work in Medline and manual searching of reference lists of articles was conducted. Studies were included if they compared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eight published studies evaluating 129 patients were included. Data were used to form 2x2 tables. Computed tomography angiography showed pooled sensitivity of 86% (95% confidence interval 78-92%) and specificity of 95% (95% confidence interval 76-100%), without showing significant heterogeneity (x2 = 3.5, P=0.6) and (x2 - 5.4, P = 0.6), respectively. Summary receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.93. Computed tomography angiography is accurate in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can show the precise location and aetiology of bleeding, thereby directing further management. Strong recommendations for use of CT cannot be made from this review because of the methodological limitations and further large prospective studies are needed to define the role of CT in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  20. Bleeding as a consequence of chorion villus sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D T; Jeavons, B; Preston, C; Slater, E; Symonds, E M

    1989-03-01

    A series of 4 separate studies were conducted to assess the incidence and short term consequence of bleeding associated with chorion villus sampling. Results support previous reports that risk of foetal-maternal transfusion as suggested by a rise in maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) can occur. This occurrence is not consistent and need not be obvious even after therapeutic abortion. It is also transient and did not complicate mid-trimester neural tube screening or subsequent course of pregnancy. Eighty-seven percent of blood contaminating villus samples are of maternal origin. Following diagnosis 37% of patients reported some vaginal bleeding. This is mainly in the form of spotting which did not preclude normal pregnancy. Foetal loss occurred in 4 of the patients when bleeding considered heavier than spotting continued. In rhesus negative patients prophylactic anti-D gamma-globulin is advised, since neither Kleihauer counts nor MSAFP estimation reliably detect all foetal-maternal transfusions. PMID:2472129

  1. PALM-COEIN Nomenclature for Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneris, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 30% of women will experience abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) during their life time. Previous terms defining AUB have been confusing and imprecisely applied. As a consequence, both clinical management and research on this common problem have been negatively impacted. In 2011, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Menstrual Disorders Group (FMDG) published PALM-COEIN, a new classification system for abnormal bleeding in the reproductive years. Terms such as menorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, metrorrhagia, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, polymenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and uterine hemorrhage are no longer recommended. The PALM-COEIN system was developed to standardize nomenclature to describe the etiology and severity of AUB. A brief description of the PALM-COEIN nomenclature is presented as well as treatment options for each etiology. Clinicians will frequently encounter women with AUB and should report findings utilizing the PALM-COEIN system. PMID:26969858

  2. Detection of abdominal bleeding in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arterial hemorrhage is the most serious immediate complication of blunt abdominal trauma. This paper discusses the detection and localization of active hemorrhage in nonpenetrating injury, as a modification of the technique using technetium-99m sulfur colloid to localize the site of active bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Any imaging protocol for suspected hepatosplenic injury can be easily modified to search for active intra-abdominal hemorrhage. The timely detection of unsuspected bleeding improves patient management by allowing the surgeon to reorder his or her treatment priorities. The early detection of clinically unsuspected intra-abdominal, retroperitoneal, or pelvic hemorrhage will identify those patients who may need more definitive diagnostic procedures, interventional angiography for control of bleeding, or surgical intervention. The 500,000-count view of the abdomen and pelvis can be easily incorporated into any existing trauma protocol using technetium-99m sulfur colloid, is of proven value, and adds little additional time to the study

  3. Predictors of recurrent venous thromboembolism and bleeding on anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menapace, Laurel A; McCrae, Keith R; Khorana, Alok A

    2016-04-01

    The impact of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the cancer population remains substantial despite significant advances in detecting and treating thrombotic events. While there is extensive literature regarding predictors of first VTE event in cancer patients as well as a validated predictive score, less data exist regarding recurrent VTE in cancer cohorts and associated predictive variables. A similar paucity of data in regard to bleeding events in cancer patients receiving anticoagulation has been observed. This review article will highlight clinical risk factors as well as predictive biomarkers associated with recurrent VTE and bleeding in cancer patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. Predictive risk assessment models for cancer-associated recurrent VTE and bleeding are also discussed. PMID:27067987

  4. Reduced bleed air extraction for DC-10 cabin air conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a significant fuel savings can be achieved by reducing bleed air used for cabin air conditioning. Air in the cabin can be recirculated to maintain comfortable ventilation rates but the quality of the air tends to decrease due to entrainment of smoke and odors. Attention is given to a development system designed and fabricated under the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program to define the recirculation limit for the DC-10. It is shown that with the system, a wide range of bleed air reductions and recirculation rates is possible. A goal of 0.8% fuel savings has been achieved which results from a 50% reduction in bleed extraction from the engine.

  5. Bleeding Jejunal Diverticulosis in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kullmann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A seventy-year-old male presented with severe myasthenia gravis and an episode of obscure bleeding. There was a history of gastric ulcer leading to Billroth II surgery twenty-five years ago. Upper endoscopy revealed no pathology. Colonoscopy showed a few solitary diverticula and traces of old blood in the terminal ileum. Capsule endoscopy pictured red smear in the upper jejunum. Diverticula were seen as well. Suspecting bleeding jejunal diverticulosis double balloon enteroscopy was performed. The complete jejunal ascending loop and about 100 cm of the jejunum through the descending jejunal loop could be inspected. Large diverticula with fecoliths were found in both loops. Bleeding had ceased. The patient was discharged to neurology for optimizing therapy for myasthenia gravis.

  6. Bleeding rates necessary for detecting acute gastrointestinal bleeding with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells in an experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proponents of [/sup 99m/Tc]sulfur colloid for GI bleeding studies argue that, although labeled red blood cells are useful for intermittent bleeding, they are not capable of detecting low bleeding rates. Studies of dogs with experimental GI bleeding have indicated bleeding rates of 0.05 ml/min can be detected with [/sup 99m/Tc]sulfur colloid. Since similar data in the dog model were unavailable for /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells, we undertook this study. To simulate lower GI bleeding, catheters were inserted into the bowel lumen. Each dog's blood was labeled with /sup 99m/Tc using an in vitro technique. Venous blood was then withdrawn and re-infused into the lumen of the bowel using a Harvard pump. Fourteen dogs were studied, ten receiving a bleeding rate from 4.6-0.02 ml/min in the descending colon and four with proximal jejunal bleeds of 0.20-0.02 ml/min. Bleeding rates of 4.6-0.2 ml/min were detected within 10 min in the colon and bleeding rates as low as 0.04 ml/min were seen by 55 min. Slower bleeding rates were not detected. Similar findings were noted for proximal jejunal bleeds. Based on the time of appearance, a minimum volume of approximately 2-3 ml labeled blood was necessary to detect bleeding. We conclude that /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBCs are sensitive for low bleeding rates in the dog model. The rates are comparable to those described for [/sup 99m/Tc]sulfur colloid in this experimental setting. The time of appearance of activity is related to the bleeding rate

  7. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding And Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viborg, Søren; Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Nørrelund, Helene; Pedersen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a well-known symptom of colorectal cancer (CRC). Whether incident GI bleeding is also a marker of other GI cancers remains unclear. METHODS: This nationwide cohort study examined the risk of various GI cancer types in patients with lower GI bleeding. We used Danish medical registries to identify all patients with a first-time hospital diagnosis of lower GI bleeding during 1995–2011 and followed them for 10 years to identify subsequent GI cancer diagnoses. We computed absolute risks of cancer, treating death as a competing risk, and calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) by comparing observed cancer cases with expected cancer incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: Among 58,593 patients with lower GI bleeding, we observed 2,806 GI cancers during complete 10-year follow-up. During the first year of follow-up, the absolute GI cancer risk was 3.6%, and the SIR of any GI cancer was 16.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 15.6–17.0). Colorectal cancers accounted for the majority of diagnoses, but risks of all GI cancers were increased. During 1–5 years of follow-up, the SIR of any GI cancer declined to 1.36 (95% CI: 1.25–1.49), but risks remained increased for several GI cancers. Beyond 5 years of follow-up, the overall GI cancer risk was close to unity, with reduced risk of rectal cancer and increased risk of liver and pancreatic cancers. CONCLUSIONS: A hospital-based diagnosis of lower GI bleeding is a strong clinical marker of prevalent GI cancer, particularly CRC. It also predicts an increased risk of any GI cancer beyond 1 year of follow-up. PMID:27054580

  8. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of ≥grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD50 (normal) = 56 Gy and TD50 (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  9. Prolonged bleeding on the neck in leech therapy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Savrun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Superficial skin bleeding can usually be stopped by applying short-time compression, unless the patient suffers from coagulation disorders or uses anticoagulant. Because of the anticoagulant component of leech saliva, a leech bite may cause long-time bleeding, which cannot be stopped via compression. In this study, the case of a patient who applied leech therapy on her neck for the treatment of migraine has been presented. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 234-237

  10. Successful excision of a massive bleeding schwannoma by thoracoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hironori; Takasaki, Chihiro; Okubo, Kenichi

    2016-06-01

    Massive intrathoracic bleeding caused by rupture of a benign schwannoma is extremely rare. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our emergency department because of chest pain and dyspnea. Computed tomography revealed massive pleural effusion and a posterior mediastinal tumor. Chest tube thoracostomy was performed, and the initial blood drainage was 1700 mL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the tumor at the 8th costal level measured 46 × 60 mm. The tumor, located beside the 8th vertebra, had ruptured and caused the bleeding. It was successfully excised by thoracoscopic surgery and diagnosed as a benign schwannoma. PMID:27095705

  11. A Cause of Mortal Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Aortoesophageal Fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Mete; Yalcinkaya, Tolga; Alkan, Erhan; Arslan, Gokhan; Tuna, Yasar; Yildirim, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aortoesophageal fistula is an uncommon but mortal cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common causes are thoracic aortic aneurisym, foreign body reaction, malignancy and postoperative complication. It can be seen in different pattern on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. There are surgical, endoscopic and interventional radiological treatment options, however, definitive treatment is surgical intervention. Diagnosis and treatment desicion should be made quickly because of rapid and mortal course. Case report: In this article, a case of aortoesophageal fistula was presented that resulted in mortality as a result of massive bleeding. PMID:26980940

  12. [Emergency embolization in gynaecological bleeding. Two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatremi, Rajhi; Sameh, Amous; Azza, Salem; Najla, Mnif; Rym, Ben Hmid; Sami, Mahjoub; Faouzia, Zouari; Radhi, Hamza

    2005-08-01

    Two patients with gynaecological hemorrhage underwent successfully trans-arterial embolization. The first womanhad an uncontrollable perineal hemorrhage following a delivery with forceps. Angiography showed extravasation of contrast from right and left vaginal artery. Hyperselective embolisation stopped the vaginal bleeding. The second woman had massive hemorrhage following radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Angiography demonstrated extravasation of contrast from both uterine arteries. The bleeding was controlled after hyperselective embolisation. Emergency arterial embolisation is a safe and effective means of control of irrepressible genital hemorrhage. PMID:16238279

  13. Gum and Nose Bleeding as a Presentation of Pediatric Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseininasab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Brucellosis symptoms are nonspecific; the most common complaints include fever, sweats, anorexia, headache, malaise, and arthralgia. Hematological manifestations of active brucellosis vary from mild anemia and leukopenia to thrombocytopenia and rarely pancytopenia. Case Presentation We report on an eight-year-old boy who presented epistaxis and gum bleeding. The physical examination revealed petechiae, purpura, ecchymosis, and cervical while inguinal lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were noted. Brucella agglutinin titer was positive. After five days of specific therapy for brucellosis, fever was controlled, clinical signs and symptoms were improved and platelet count was dramatically increased. Conclusions Sever thrombocytopenia and bleeding may be the presentation of brucellosis.

  14. Increased accuracy in heparin and protamine administration decreases bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Marx; Møller, Christian H; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    Three to 5 percent of the patients undergoing cardiac surgery are reoperated because of bleeding. When a surgical cause can be excluded, heparin/protamine mismatch may be considered. Insufficient reversal of heparin and overdosing of protamine may cause postoperative bleeding. The purpose of the...... ACT values were obtained in both groups. Using the Hemochron RxDx, we observed a significant reduction in postoperative blood loss, as well as the amount of heparin and initial doses of protamine used during CPB. Individual patient managed anticoagulation during cardiac surgery using dose...

  15. Massive extra-enteric gastrointestinal bleeding: angiographic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, P R; Nelson, J A; Berenson, M M

    1976-04-01

    Two patients with massive gastrointestinal bleeding are reported. One bled from an aneurysm of a branch of the left hepatic artery, the blood reaching the bowel through communication with the biliary tree. The second had an aneurysm of a branch of the splenic artery which communicated with the pancreatic duct. This type of bleeding is intermittent and, consequently, actual extravasation of contrast media is not always seen. Therefore, if one sees an aneurysm of a visceral artery, even if it does not directly supply the enteric tract, one should consider the possibility that it is the origin of the hemorrhage. Pathogenesis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:1083037

  16. Retained fetal bones: an unusual cause of abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Chawla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB is a common gynaecological problem with most common causes being fibroid, polyp, endometritis, neoplasia and coagulation disorder. Presence of retained intrauterine fetal bones as a cause of AUB, is a rare but well recognized entity. Patient may present with subfertility, secondary infertility, chronic pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, pelvic inflammatory disease, abnormal uterine bleeding. Incidence reported in literature is 0.15% among patients undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy. Calcification appears as hyperechoeic area on ultrasound. Hysteroscopy guided removal of bony fragments is the gold standard and leads to complete resolution of symptoms. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 2032-2033

  17. Infliximab stopped severe gastrointestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aniwan, Satimai; Eakpongpaisit, Surasak; Imraporn, Boonlert; Amornsawadwatana, Surachai; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2012-01-01

    To report the result of rapid ulcer healing by infliximab in Crohn’s patients with severe enterocolic bleeding. During 2005 and 2010, inflammatory bowel disease database of King Chulalongkorn Memorial and Samitivej hospitals were reviewed. There were seven Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (4 women and 3 men; mean age 52 ± 10.4 years; range: 11-86 years). Two of the seven patients developed severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) as a flare up of CD whereas the other five patients presented with G...

  18. Application of double-balloon enteroscopy in jejunal diverticular bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung-Hsing; Chen; Cheng-Tang; Chiu; Chen-Ming; Hsu

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic diagnosis and therapy for jejunal diverticular bleeding.METHODS:From January 2004 to September 2009,154 patients underwent double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.Ten consecutive patients with jejunal diverticula (5 males and 5 females) at the age of 68.7 ± 2.1 years (range 1995 years) at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital,Academic Tertiary Referral Center,were enrolled in this study.RESULTS:Of the 10 patients,5 had melena,2 had hematochezi...

  19. Haemorrhoids leading to post-mortem bleeding artefact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Manipady, Shahnavaz

    2006-07-01

    We present a case where a 54-year-old man suffering from haemorrhoids, committed suicide by hanging. Gravitational forces due to the upright position of the body facilitated post-mortem per-rectal bleeding from the ulcerated haemorrhoids. The bleeding stained his under garment and wrap around cloth. Frank blood was also seen on the floor beneath the hanging body. The blood at the crime scene was wrongly interpreted by the investigating police as that due to self-inflicted injury or possibly case of homicide followed by post-mortem suspension of the body. Observation of the crime scene by forensic medicine experts and subsequent autopsy findings revealed that the bleeding was from the haemorrhoids. This case is reported for its rarity, for the awareness of the possible post-mortem haemorrhoidal bleeding artefact, to explain the circumstances of such a possibility, and to emphasize the importance of involving forensic medicine experts as a part of the crime scene investigation team. PMID:16442833

  20. Embolotherapy using N-butyl cyanoacrylate for abdominal wall bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Cha, Joo Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    We describe our experience with the use of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of abdominal wall bleeding and we evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Embolization was performed in nine patients with abdominal wall bleeding. The sites of embolization were the left first lumbar (n = 1), left second lumbar (n = 1), right inferior epigastric (n 2), left inferior epigastric (n = 3), right circumflex iliac (n = 1), and left circumflex iliac artery (n = 1). A coil was used with NBCA in one patient due to difficulty in selecting only a bleeding focus and anticipated reflux. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:4. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the embolization procedure, and the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Hemostasis was obtained in six out of the nine patients and technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Four out of the nine patients died due to rebleeding of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hepatic failure (n =2) that occurred two to nine days after the embolization procedure. One patient had rebleeding. The five surviving patients had no rebleeding, and the patients continue to visit the clinical on an outpatient basis. NBCA embolization is a clinically safe procedure and is effective for abdominal wall bleeding.

  1. Embolotherapy using N-butyl cyanoacrylate for abdominal wall bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe our experience with the use of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of abdominal wall bleeding and we evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Embolization was performed in nine patients with abdominal wall bleeding. The sites of embolization were the left first lumbar (n = 1), left second lumbar (n = 1), right inferior epigastric (n 2), left inferior epigastric (n = 3), right circumflex iliac (n = 1), and left circumflex iliac artery (n = 1). A coil was used with NBCA in one patient due to difficulty in selecting only a bleeding focus and anticipated reflux. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:4. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the embolization procedure, and the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Hemostasis was obtained in six out of the nine patients and technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Four out of the nine patients died due to rebleeding of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hepatic failure (n =2) that occurred two to nine days after the embolization procedure. One patient had rebleeding. The five surviving patients had no rebleeding, and the patients continue to visit the clinical on an outpatient basis. NBCA embolization is a clinically safe procedure and is effective for abdominal wall bleeding

  2. Management of Adult Jehovah's Witness Patients with Acute Bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Berend; M. Levi

    2009-01-01

    Because of the firm refusal of transfusion of blood and blood components by Jehovah's Witnesses, the management of Jehovah's Witness patients with severe bleeding is often complicated by medical, ethical, and legal concerns. Because of a rapidly growing and worldwide membership, physicians working i

  3. Histopathological study of endometrium in cases of abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj A. Bolde

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest complaints in women and when it occurs without organic lesions like tumor, inflammation, it is called as dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Aim of current study was to find out the histopathological pattern of endometrium in Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB also to study organic causes of AUB. Methods: Specimens received as endometrial curettage and hysterectomy specimens were studied followed by correlation of histopathology with age and clinical presentation. Results: The patients were mainly from the age group of 30-49 years (74.24%. The most common menstrual disorder was menorrhagia (46.86%. In dysfunctional uterine bleeding the most common histological pattern of endometrium includes proliferative endometrium (22.8% followed by endometrial hyperplasia (19.40%, atrophic endometrium (7.16%, secretory endometrium (5.97%, irregular shedding [1.80%], irregular ripening (1.20% and anovulatory endometrium (0.59%. Organic lesions encountered in AUB cases were leiomyoma (17.92%, endometrial polyp (1.79%, endometrial carcinoma (1.50%, endometriosis (0.59% and choriocarcinoma (0.29%. Conclusion: It is important to know the histological pattern of the endometrium like proliferative endometrium, endometrial hyperplasia, atrophic endometrium, secretory endometrium, irregular ripening and shredding and organic lesions in patients diagnosed as AUB in different age groups since recognition of these conditions will help and will avoid further complications. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1378-1381

  4. [Intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgesner, T; Danse, E; Tombal, B

    2013-09-01

    Hematuria is one of the most frequent minor complications after prostatic biopsy. We would like to report the case of a 68-year-old patient with massive hematuria after prostatic biopsy and intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasonography. PMID:24034804

  5. A sensitive venous bleeding model in haemophilia A mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastoft, Anne Engedahl; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Ezban, M.;

    2012-01-01

    evaluation of pro-coagulant compounds for treatment of haemophilia. Interestingly, the vena saphena model proved to be sensitive towards FVIII in plasma levels that approach the levels preventing bleeding in haemophilia patients, and may, thus, in particular be valuable for testing of new long...

  6. Postmenopausal bleeding: causes and risk of genital tract malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) is bleeding occurring after 6-12 months of amenorrhea in a woman of age where the menopause can be expected. Objectives of this study were to ascertain various causes and prevalence of genital organ malignancy in patients presenting with postmenopausal bleeding. Methods: A prospective observational study carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi comprising of 167 consecutive cases presenting with postmenopausal bleeding one year after menopause. Women having undergone hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy, suffered trauma to the genital tract, having coagulation disorder or on anticoagulant or hormone replacement therapy were excluded. Detailed history was obtained and a thorough clinical examination was conducted. Data were entered into hospital computer database (Medix) system. Mean +- SD were calculated for age, percentage was calculated for types of histopathological findings. Results: The commonest cause of PMB was atrophic endometritis and vaginitis 33 (21.2%). Overall incidence of various genital tract malignancies was 25 (16.0%). Conclusion: The overall incidence of genital tract malignancies in patients presenting with PMB is high (16.0%), therefore, it needs to be taken seriously and requires prompt and thorough investigations. (author)

  7. A STUDY ON ENDOSCOPIC EVALUATION OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranaya Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB is one of the commonest gastrointestinal emergencies encountered by clinicians. Peptic ulcers are the most common cause of UGIB. Endoscopy has become the preferred method for diagnosis in patients with acute UGIB. This study is done in a diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE setup of a tertiary care hospital to ascertain the causes of UGIB prevalent in this part of our country which might differ from other studies. AIM To ascertain prevalent causes of UGIB in patients of this part of India admitted to a Govt. Tertiary Hospital with a provisional diagnosis of UGIB. METHOD One hundred consecutive patients with UGIB were subjected to UGIE to find out the aetiology. The clinical profile and endoscopic findings were analysed and compared with the data on UGIB from other studies. RESULTS The mean age of patients was 47.03 years with male: female ratio of 2.33:1. 58% of patients were first time bleeders. Majority of patients presented with melaena. Visualisation of active bleeding achieved to 85.7% when endoscopy was done within first 24 hrs. The commonest cause of UGIB was duodenal ulcer (DU which accounted for 41% cases. Gastric ulcer was responsible in 13% of cases. Portal hypertension was responsible for bleed in only 13%. Neoplasms accounted for 25% of cases. Other less common causes were erosive gastritis (3%, gastric polyp (3%, Mallory-Weiss tear (1%, and Dieulafoy’s lesion (1%. Among bleeding peptic ulcers, 27.8% of cases were classified as Forrest IIa and 20.4% in Forrest IIb & IIc each. Acid peptic disease was past history elicited in majority (33% followed by NSAID (26% and alcohol (26%. CONCLUSION The present study has diagnosed various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this part of country. The incidence of gastric carcinoma as a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is significantly high compared to those in other studies. UGI endoscopy should be done in every case

  8. Frequency of endometrial carcinoma in patients with postmenopausal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) is defined as bleeding that occurs after 1 year of amenorrhea in a woman who is not receiving hormone replacement therapy (HRT). About 10% of women with postmenopausal bleeding have a primary or secondary malignancy. Common malignancies among them are endometrial cancer (80%), cervical cancer or an ovarian tumour. Endometrial cancer is the second most common cancer associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Ninety percent of patients have benign causes. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of endometrial carcinoma in patients with post-menopausal bleeding. Study Design: Descriptive case series study. Setting: Department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Lady Willingdon, Lahore. Duration of Study: This study was conducted over a period of six months from January, 1 2009 to June 30, 2009. Subjects and Methods: 50 cases with postmenopausal bleeding. Results: During the period of this study a total number of 50 consecutive patients who met inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. Ages of the patients who presented with PMB ranged between 48 years and 80 years with a mean age of 59 years. Malignancy was found in 18 out of 50 cases (36%).Cases with endometrial CA were 14 out of 50 cases (28%) and CA cervix constituted 4 out of 50 cases (8%). Benign pathology was more frequent (64%). 13 of 50 cases (26%) had hyperplasia out of which 1 case (2%) was of atypical hyperplasia. Endometrial polyp was found in 4 of 50 cases (8%). 3 of 50 cases (6%) had chronic endometritis. 5 of 50 cases (10%) had chronic cervicitis. While 7 cases (14%) had postmenopausal bleeding due to decubitus ulcer of uterovaginal prolapse. Among malignancies (36%), endometrial cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women with postmenopausal bleeding with mean age of 65 years. Conclusion: In this study it was concluded that the majority of cases of PMB would be expected to be suffering from benign problems

  9. Screening Bleeding Disorders in Adolescents and Young Women with Menorrhagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suar Çakı Kılıç

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic menorrhagia causes anemia and impairment of life quality. In this study the aim was the screening of bleeding disorders in adolescents and young women with menorrhagia. METHODS: The study was performed prospectively by pediatric hematologists. A form including demographic characteristics of the patients, bleedings other than menorrhagia, familial bleeding history, characteristics of the menorrhagia, and impairment of life quality due to menorrhagia was filled out by the researcher during a face-to-face interview with the patient. A pictorial blood assessment chart was also used for evaluation of blood loss. All patients underwent pelvic ultrasound sonography testing and women also received pelvic examination by gynecologists. Whole blood count, peripheral blood smear, blood group, serum transaminases, urea, creatinine, ferritin, PFA-100, PT, aPTT, INR, TT, fibrinogen, VWF: Ag, VWF: RCo, FVIII, and platelet aggregation assays were performed. Platelet aggregations were studied by lumiaggregometer. RESULTS: Out of 75 patients enrolled, 60 patients completed the study. The mean age was 20.68±10.34 (range: 10-48 years and 65% (n=39 of the patients were younger than 18 years. In 18 (46% of the adolescents, menorrhagia subsided spontaneously. In 20% (n=12 of the patients, a bleeding disorder was detected (1 case of type 3 von Willebrand disease, 2 patients with low VWF: Ag, 1 case of probable von Willebrand disease, 3 cases of Bernard-Soulier syndrome, 2 cases of Glanzmann thrombasthenia, 2 cases of immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 1 case of congenital factor VII deficiency. CONCLUSION: In patients with menorrhagia, at least complete blood count, peripheral smear, aPTT, PT, VWF: Ag, VWF: RCo, FVIII, and fibrinogen assays must be performed. When there is history of nose and gum bleeding, platelet function assay by lumiaggregometer must also be performed. In nearly 50% of adolescents, menorrhagia is dysfunctional and transient

  10. Resuscitation of Polytrauma Patients: The Management of Massive Skeletal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerado, Enrique; Bertrand, Maria Luisa; Valdes, Luis; Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The term 'severely injured patient' is often synonymous of polytrauma patient, multiply-injured patient or, in some settings, polyfractured patient. Together with brain trauma, copious bleeding is the most severe complication of polytrauma. Consequently hypotension develop. Then, the perfusion of organs may be compromised, with the risk of organ failure. Treatment of chest bleeding after trauma is essential and is mainly addressed via surgical manoeuvres. As in the case of lesions to the pelvis, abdomen or extremities, this approach demonstrates the application of damage control (DC). The introduction of sonography has dramatically changed the diagnosis and prognosis of abdominal bleeding. In stable patients, a contrast CT-scan should be performed before any x-ray projection, because, in an emergency situation, spinal or pelvic fractures be missed by conventional radiological studies. Fractures or dislocation of the pelvis causing enlargement of the pelvic cavity, provoked by an anteroposterior trauma, and in particular cases presenting vertical instability, are the most severe types and require fast stabilisation by closing the pelvic ring diameter to normal dimensions and by stabilising the vertical shear. Controversy still exists about whether angiography or packing should be used as the first choice to address active bleeding after pelvic ring closure. Pelvic angiography plays a significant complementary role to pelvic packing for final haemorrhage control. Apart from pelvic trauma, fracture of the femur is the only fracture provoking acute life-threatening bleeding. If possible, femur fractures should be immobilised immediately, either by external fixation or by a sheet wrap around both extremities. PMID:26312112

  11. N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolotherapy for acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various embolic agents have been used for embolization of acute gastrointestinal (GI) arterial bleeding. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is not easy to handle, but it is a useful embolic agent. In this retrospective study, we describe our experience with NBCA embolization of acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. NBCA embolization was performed in seven patients with acute upper GI arterial bleeding; they had five gastric ulcers and two duodenal ulcers. NBCA embolization was done in the left gastric artery (n = 3), right gastric artery (n = 2), gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) and pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 1). Coil was used along with NBCA in a gastric bleeding patient because of difficulty in selecting a feeding artery. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:2. The blood pressure and heart rate around the time of embolization, the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and the transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Technical success was achieved in all the cases. Two procedure-related complications happened; embolism of the NBCA mixture to the common hepatic artery occurred in a case with embolization of the left gastric artery, and reflux of the NBCA mixture occurred into the adjacent gastric tissue, but these did not cause any clinical problems. Four of seven patients did not present with rebleeding, but two had rebleeding 10 and 16 days, respectively, after embolization and they died of cardiac arrest at 2 months and 37 days, respectively. One other patient died of sepsis and respiratory failure within 24 hours without rebleeding. NBCA embolization with or without other embolic agents could be safe and effective for treating acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

  12. N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolotherapy for acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Seong, Chang Kyu; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Various embolic agents have been used for embolization of acute gastrointestinal (GI) arterial bleeding. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is not easy to handle, but it is a useful embolic agent. In this retrospective study, we describe our experience with NBCA embolization of acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. NBCA embolization was performed in seven patients with acute upper GI arterial bleeding; they had five gastric ulcers and two duodenal ulcers. NBCA embolization was done in the left gastric artery (n = 3), right gastric artery (n = 2), gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) and pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 1). Coil was used along with NBCA in a gastric bleeding patient because of difficulty in selecting a feeding artery. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:2. The blood pressure and heart rate around the time of embolization, the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and the transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Technical success was achieved in all the cases. Two procedure-related complications happened; embolism of the NBCA mixture to the common hepatic artery occurred in a case with embolization of the left gastric artery, and reflux of the NBCA mixture occurred into the adjacent gastric tissue, but these did not cause any clinical problems. Four of seven patients did not present with rebleeding, but two had rebleeding 10 and 16 days, respectively, after embolization and they died of cardiac arrest at 2 months and 37 days, respectively. One other patient died of sepsis and respiratory failure within 24 hours without rebleeding. NBCA embolization with or without other embolic agents could be safe and effective for treating acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding.

  13. Could a Clot-Busting Drug Help Treat a 'Bleeding' Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Clot-Busting Drug Help Treat a 'Bleeding' Stroke? Two studies suggest that tPA infusion to brain ... tPA might help patients suffering a hemorrhagic ("bleeding") stroke. According to the American Stroke Association, only about ...

  14. TREATMENT OF 100 CASES OF DYSFUNCTIONAL UTERINE BLEEDING BY SCRATCHING THERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gui-qing

    2006-01-01

    @@ Dysfunctional uterine bleeding, a common gynecological disorder, is generally of two kinds, pubescent and climacteric, characterized by menorrhagia, menostaxis, irregular bleeding, associated with dysmenorrhea, soreness and bearing down sensation in the lumbosacral region.

  15. Protect Your Baby from Bleeds: Talk to Your Healthcare Provider about Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bleeds – Talk to Your Healthcare Provider about Vitamin K Without enough vitamin K, your baby has a chance of bleeding into ... death. Infants who do not receive the vitamin K shot at birth can develop VKDB up to ...

  16. Definition of major bleeding in clinical investigations of antihemostatic medicinal products in surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, S; Angerås, U; Bergqvist, D;

    2010-01-01

    The definition of major bleeding varies between studies on surgical patients, particularly regarding the criteria for surgical wound-related bleeding. This diversity contributes to the difficulties in comparing data between trials. The Scientific and Standardization Committee (SSC), through its...

  17. Risk Factors and Outcome for Massive Intra-Abdominal Bleeding Among Patients With Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xiao; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Jingzhu; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Gang; Jiang, Wei; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of acute bleeding is reported to be 13.5% in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. However, of all the bleeding events, intra-abdominal bleeding was less studied in the literature and its risk factors have not been well defined yet. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the risk factors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding among the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis and assessed the outcome of these patients. Both univariate and multi...

  18. The nursing effect of postoperative adenoid-tonsillectomy bleeding by low-temperature plasma in children

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    To observe the nursing effect of postoperative adenoid tonsil bleeding by low-temperature plasma in children. 12 patients received the operation successfully without bleeding. The nursing methods include psychological nursing, observation, apnea prevention and diet nursing. Low-temperature plasma is an effective and safe way to cure postoperative bleeding without complications.

  19. Angiographically Negative Acute Arterial Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Incidence, Predictive Factors, and Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chae, Eun Young; Myung, Seung Jae; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of angiographically negative acute arterial upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. From 2001 to 2008, 143 consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for acute arterial upper or lower GI bleeding were examined. The angiographies revealed a negative bleeding focus in 75 of 143 (52%) patients. The incidence of an angiographically negative outcome was significantly higher in patients with a stable hemodynamic status (p < 0.001), or in patients with lower GI bleeding (p = 0.032). A follow-up of the 75 patients (range: 0-72 months, mean: 8 {+-} 14 months) revealed that 60 of the 75 (80%) patients with a negative bleeding focus underwent conservative management only, and acute bleeding was controlled without rebleeding. Three of the 75 (4%) patients underwent exploratory surgery due to prolonged bleeding; however, no bleeding focus was detected. Rebleeding occurred in 12 of 75 (16%) patients. Of these, six patients experienced massive rebleeding and died of disseminated intravascular coagulation within four to nine hours after the rebleeding episode. Four of the 16 patients underwent a repeat angiography and the two remaining patients underwent a surgical intervention to control the bleeding. Angiographically negative results are relatively common in patients with acute GI bleeding, especially in patients with a stable hemodynamic status or lower GI bleeding. Most patients with a negative bleeding focus have experienced spontaneous resolution of their condition.

  20. Recent pharmacological management of oral bleeding in hemophilic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Widyawati Setiawan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemophilia is a hereditary bleeding disorder that can increase the risk of disease in oral cavity. Sometimes hemophilia is not always established already in a patient. The lack of awareness of hemophilia presence can cause serious problem. Purpose: The purpose of this review is to explain about dental bleeding manifestation and management in hemophilic patient. Reviews: Hemophilia can be manifested as dental bleeding that cannot stop spontaneously. It should be treated with factor VIIII either by giving whole blood, fresh plasma, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, and factor VIII concentrate. Factor VIII dose for hemophilia treatment can be calculated based on factor VIII present in hemophilia patient’s body. Factor VIII can also be given as prophylaxis to prevent bleeding. Complications that can be caused by factor VIII replacement therapy are the presence of factor VIII inhibitor and transfusion related diseases. Treatment of dental bleeding due to hemophilia consists of factor replacement therapy and supportive therapy. Conclusion: Treatment of dental bleeding due to hemophilia consists of factor replacement therapy and supportive therapy. There are complications that can happen due to factor VIII replacement therapy that should be considered and anticipated.Latar belakang: Hemofilia adalah kelainan pembekuan darah yang diturunkan. Hemophilia dapat meningkatkan resiko penyakit rongga mulut. Hemofilia tidak selalu sudah terdiagnosa saat penderita melakukan kunjungan ke dokter gigi. Kurangnya kewaspadaan akan adanya hemofilia dapat menyebabkan masalah serius. Tujuan: Tujuan dari kajian pustaka ini adalah memaparkan tentang manifestasi dan penanganan perdarahan gigi pada penderita hemofilia. Tinjauan pustaka: hemofilia dapat bermanifestasi sebagai perdarahan gigi yang tidak dapat berhenti secara spontan. Pada keadaan perdarahan tersebut, pemberian faktor VIII yang diberikan sebagai whole blood, fresh plasma, fresh frozen plasma

  1. Rectal bleeding after hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical and dosimetric parameters and the incidence of grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and severity of rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer, and to explore the factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. Methods and materials: The data of 52 patients who had been treated by external beam RT for localized prostate cancer between 1999 and 2002 were analyzed. All the patients had received hypofractionated external beam RT to a total dose of 69 Gy in 3-Gy fractions, three fractions weekly. The clinical and dosimetric factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse late rectal bleeding were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The effect of the percentage of the whole rectal volume receiving 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose (V30, V50, V80, and V90, respectively) on the incidence of rectal bleeding was evaluated. Results: Of the 52 patients, 13 (25%) developed Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. One patient who needed laser coagulation and blood transfusion for the treatment of rectal bleeding was classified as having Grade 3 rectal bleeding. The median time to the development of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding was 11 months. The results of the univariate analysis revealed that the presence of a history of diabetes mellitus (p 30 ≥ 60%, V50 ≥ 40% (p 80 ≥ 25%, and V90 ≥ 15% (p < 0.001) were statistically significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that a history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of rectal bleeding after hypofractionated RT for prostate cancer (p < 0.05). Conclusion: A history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated RT, although dosimetric factors were also closely associated with the risk of rectal bleeding

  2. Double blind, placebo-controlled trial of Tranexamic acid on recent internal hemorrhoid bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul A. Rani

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Double blind randomized placebo controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Tranexamic acid in 54 patients with recent hemorrhoid bleeding. Age, gender, body weight, height, grade of hemorrhoid, time of onset of recent bleeding were comparable between two groups. Analysis of haemostatic effect or stop bleeding as an immediate outcome of this study revealed that in the grade 2 patients, 23/23 (100% of tranexamic group and 18/23(78.26% of placebo group the bleeding stop. After 3 days of observation, there was statistically significant different for the rate of stop bleeding as well as at the end of observation. Bleeding stop earlier in the Tranexamic group with median 4 days (3-5 days, compare to placebo, median 11(9.55-12.45. Analysis of recurrent bleeding as an outcome of this study revealed that in the placebo group 9/18(50% of grade 2 patients and all grade 3 (100%patients suffered from recurrent bleeding. Since the days 4, both group have significant different time for recurrent bleeding and at the end of observation, cumulative probability of free of bleeding between two groups significantly different. Median still stop bleeding in the placebo group was 36 days, and the tranexamic group never reaches the median until the end of observation. Conclusion: tranexamic acid was an effective drug to stop recent hemorrhoid bleeding and prevent further recurrent bleeding, significantly better than placebo. (Med J Indones 2002;11: 215-21Keywords: Tranexamic acid, hemorrhoid bleeding, haemostatic effect, recurrent bleeding.

  3. Acute Gastric Bleeding Due to Giant Hyperplastic Polyp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Aksel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperplastic gastric polyps account for the majority of benign gastric polyps. The vast majority of these lesions are small, asymptomatic and found incidentally on radiologic or endoscopic examination. Giant hyperplastic gastric polyps are uncommon and most of them are asymptomatic. We report a case of a 66-year-old woman who admitted because of acute gastric bleeding. The gastrin levels were within normal ranges. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed 12 cm pedunculated and multiple lobulated hyperplastic polyps arising from antrum with signs of diffuse oozing. The patient is treated by subtotal gastrectomy with Roux-Y gastrojejunostomy. Histological examination showed the presence of ulcers and regeneration findings with the contemporary occurrence of hyperplastic polyp. Giant hyperplastic gastric polyp should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  4. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-06-27

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  5. Endoscopic Evaluation of Upper and Lower Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Emeka Ray-Offor; Elenwo, Solomon N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A myriad of pathologies lead to gastro-intestinal bleeding (GIB). The common clinical presentations are hematemesis, melena, and hematochezia. Endoscopy aids localization and treatment of these lesions. Aims: The aim was to study the differential diagnosis of GIB emphasizing the role of endoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of patients with GIB referred to the Endoscopy unit of two health facilities in Port Harcourt Nigeria from F...

  6. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF LIDUI (ST 45) BLEEDING METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春研; 王军

    2004-01-01

    Lidui (厉兑 ST 45) is the Jing (井 Well) point of the Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming. It's effective to reduce the heat from the stomach or the Stomach Meridian. The Stomach Meridian is abundant with qi and blood, and is in charge of hemopathy. So, in clinic, we often apply Lidui (ST 45) point bleeding method to the treatment of many kinds of diseases and get good therapeutic effects. Following are 3 typical cases.

  7. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    OpenAIRE

    Saif Khan; Gupta, N. D.; Sandhya Maheshwari

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-struct...

  8. Small bowel stromal tumour revealed by a lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assamoi B. F. Kassi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel stromal tumour must be systematically researched in the presence of obscure and persistent low gastrointestinal bleeding despite a normal endoscopic examination (OGDF and colonoscopy. Video capsule endoscopy is the best diagnosis examination; if it is not available a CT enterography could be useful. Surgical treatment is effective on localized and weak malignancy small bowel stromal tumours. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1248-1250

  9. Small bowel stromal tumour revealed by a lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Assamoi B. F. Kassi; Lebeau, R; Y. S. Kacou; K. J. N'dah; Traore, M.

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel stromal tumour must be systematically researched in the presence of obscure and persistent low gastrointestinal bleeding despite a normal endoscopic examination (OGDF and colonoscopy). Video capsule endoscopy is the best diagnosis examination; if it is not available a CT enterography could be useful. Surgical treatment is effective on localized and weak malignancy small bowel stromal tumours. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000): 1248-1250

  10. Trends on gastrointestinal bleeding and mortality: Where are we standing?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Mahmoud EI-Tawil

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract and its management are associated with significant morbidity and mortality.The predisposing factors that led to the occurrence of these hemorrhagic instances are largely linked to the life style of the affected persons.Designing a new strategy aimed at educating the publics and improving their awareness of the problem could effectively help in eradicating this problem with no associated risks and in bringing the mortality rates down to almost zero.

  11. Dynamic of gastroduodenal bleeding distribution after Chernobyl catastrophe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was investigated the evidence of gastroduodenal bleeding between Belarus population from 1989 to 1996 period. 27981 occurrences of this disease were registered. The annual permanent growth of the disease was revealed. Between persons, having worked in the Chernobyl region in the first year after the catastrophe, it was found the ulcer disease distribution in 7 times greater than between the whole population. It was concluded about heavy course of ulcer disease in residents of Belarus in the modern conditions

  12. Risperidone-induced Gingival Bleeding in a Pediatric Case: A Dose-dependent Side Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergüner, Sabri; Özayhan, Hatice Yardım; Erdur, Emire Aybuke

    2016-05-31

    There are several case reports on risperidone-related bleeding; however, to our knowledge, there is no report about gingival bleeding associated with risperidone in the literature. We presented a case who experienced gingival bleeding when risperidone dose was increased to 0.5 mg/day, and subsided after decreasing the dose to 0.25 mg/day, suggesting a dose-dependent side-effect. The bleeding side effect of risperidone might be caused by several mechanisms, including 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor antagonism. Although bleeding associated with risperidone is rarely reported, clinicians should be aware of this side effect. PMID:27121433

  13. Chattering of bleed condenser relief valves in Darlington NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bleed Condenser (BC) is part of the Pressure and Inventory Control System. The Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) will transfer water to the Bleed Condenser via the PHT liquid relief valves (LRV) every time overpressure occurs in the main circuit. The BC is designed to withstand full PHT pressure and is protected against overpressurization by two spring loaded Relief Valves (RV). Chattering of these relief valves was observed during commissioning tests in Darlington, when opening of the LRVs pressurized the bleed condenser above the RVs set point. The chattering caused a drift in the valve setpoint and ruptured a pipe connected to the relief line. Similar undesirable events were observed in Bruce NGS. This paper presents the thermalhydraulic analysis of the system, during the above mentioned event and proposes several possible solutions to the problem. The computer simulation was performed using the SOPHT code, developed by Ontario Hydro. Considering the various limitations imposed by design on the relief valves and on the system, the recommended solution is to prolong the valve closing time by 400-800 milliseconds. (author) 9 refs., 11 figs

  14. Recurrent Epistaxis and Bleeding as the Initial Manifestation of Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali Aghdam, Mojtaba; Davari, Kambiz; Eftekhari, Kambiz

    2016-03-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia with bleeding is rarely reported in children with brucellosis, and recurrent epistaxis is extremely rare. Brucellosis with hemorrhage should be differentiated from viral hemorrhagic fever, malignancy, and other blood disorders. Bone marrow aspiration (BMA) is mandatory to differentiate from other blood diseases. An 8-year-old boy was admitted with recurrent epistaxis, petechiae and purpura on face and extremities and bleeding from the gums. During the hospitalization, he was febrile and complained of muscle pain. Leukopenias associated with thrombocytopenia were observed. BMA showed to be normal. Among the multiple tests requested, only serum agglutination test (SAT) and 2-MercaptoEthanol test (2-ME) were positive. He was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) associated with co-trimoxazole and rifampin. Finally, fever subsided, and he was discharged with good condition and normal platelet count. Brucellosis should be a differential diagnosis in patients with fever and bleeding disorders and a history of consumption of unpasteurized dairy, in endemic areas. PMID:27107528

  15. Endoscopic evaluation of upper and lower gastro-intestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka Ray-Offor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A myriad of pathologies lead to gastro-intestinal bleeding (GIB. The common clinical presentations are hematemesis, melena, and hematochezia. Endoscopy aids localization and treatment of these lesions. Aims: The aim was to study the differential diagnosis of GIB emphasizing the role of endoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of patients with GIB referred to the Endoscopy unit of two health facilities in Port Harcourt Nigeria from February 2012 to August 2014. The variables studied included: Demographics, clinical presentation, risk score, endoscopic findings, therapeutic procedure, and outcome. Data were collated and analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. Results: A total of 159 upper and lower gastro-intestinal (GI endoscopies were performed during the study period with 59 cases of GI bleeding. There were 50 males and 9 females with an age range of 13-86 years (mean age 52.4 ΁ 20.6 years. The primary presentations were hematochezia, hematemesis, and melena in 44 (75%, 9 (15%, and 6 (10% cases, respectively. Hemorrhoids were the leading cause of lower GIB seen in 15 cases (41%. The majority of pathologies in upper GIB were seen in the stomach (39%: Gastritis and benign gastric ulcer. Injection sclerotherapy was successfully performed in the hemorrhoids and a case of gastric varices. The mortality recorded was 0%. Conclusion: Endoscopy is vital in the diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Gastritis and Haemorrhoid are the most common causes of upper and lower GI bleeding respectively, in our environment

  16. Meatspace is Cyberspace: The Pynchonian Posthuman in Bleeding Edge

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    Jason Siegel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Thomas Pynchon’s indirect critique of utopian posthumanism in 'Bleeding Edge' by analyzing the deleterious effects that an emerging Internet culture has on the novel’s characters. By seeping into every aspect of their lives, embedding itself in their minds, and becoming a prosthetic consciousness, the Internet has transformed the characters into posthumans and altered their subject positions within a technological global capitalist culture. Contrasting the novel’s take on the posthuman with the posthuman theories of Donna Harraway, N. Katherine Hayles, Robert Pepperell, Rosi Braidotti, David Roden and Seb Franklin, I argue that, while the dominant utopian strain in posthuman theory imagines the advent of posthumanism as an opportunity for liberation from the sexism, racism, and colonial oppression that are enabled by the positing of the classical humanist subject, Pynchon demonstrates that because the Internet technology that brought about the posthuman condition is controlled by governments and corporations, it has become just one more lost chance at freedom that was converted into an instrument of increased control and surveillance. Reading 'Bleeding Edge' against William Gibson’s prototypical posthuman novel Neuromancer, I also contend that while Gibson, despite challenging the ontological primacy of meatspace over cyberspace, keeps the two realms separate, Pynchon, who borrows Gibson’s terms, shows that cyberspace has already merged with meatspace. As a result, Maxine Tarnow, the protagonist of 'Bleeding Edge', has nowhere to run in her attempt to find a provisional refuge for herself and her family.

  17. Sex hormones alter the effect of aspirin on bleeding

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    Muhammad Tariq Aftab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interaction of aspirin and sex hormones was investigated through bleeding time. Methods: Bleeding time in 32 males and 105 unmarried females with previous 6 normal menstrual cycles and all aged between 18 to 21 years was found by Duke’s method before and after 2 hours of aspirin administration. Phase of menstrual cycle of each female was determined by present menstrual history. Results: Bleeding time in 32 male was 69.33± 4.94 seconds and in 105 female was 73.03±1.89 seconds which were not statistically different (P>0.05.This time was increased to 107.66±4.76 seconds in males and 113.65±3.73 seconds in females after aspirin administration which were statistically different (P0.05 difference after aspirin administration with a greater effect in Follicular phase probably due to estradiol. Conclusion: Males respond to aspirin more as compared to females which is likely the effect of the drug and testosterone interaction. Similarly females in the follicular phase respond to aspirin more as compared to females in the luteal phase which may be a result of interaction of estrogen and aspirin. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(5.000: 537-540

  18. Duration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin has a significant effect on hemostasis, so it is often recommended that patients taking aspirin discontinue treatment before elective surgery. While off aspirin, these patients may be at risk of thrombosis. The optimum period of time that aspirin should be withheld is controversial. The aim of this study was to establish the duration of the antihemostatic effect of prolonged aspirin therapy. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study, 51 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into 3 groups, each receiving an identical tablet for 14 days. One group received a placebo tablet; individuals in the other two groups received either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin once a day. Template bleeding times and specific platelet function testing (using the PFA-100; Dade Behring) were carried out on subjects before therapy and again after its completion until they returned to baseline. RESULTS: Thirty-eight volunteers complied sufficiently with the protocol to provide useful results. All bleeding times normalized within 96 hours and all platelet function tests within 144 hours after stopping aspirin. There was no demonstrable hemostatic defect in any volunteer persisting by or beyond the sixth day after treatment cessation. There was no apparent difference in duration of effect between those taking either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: This study uses sensitive measures of platelet function to demonstrate the duration of increased bleeding tendency after withdrawal of aspirin therapy. It supports discontinuation of aspirin therapy 5 days before elective surgery (with the operation being performed on the sixth day).

  19. Critical gastrointestinal bleed due to secondary aortoenteric fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mohammad U; Ucbilek, Enver; Sherwal, Amanpreet S

    2015-01-01

    Secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF) is a rare yet lethal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and occurs as a complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Clinical presentation may vary from herald bleeding to overt sepsis and requires high index of suspicion and clinical judgment to establish diagnosis. Initial diagnostic tests may include computerized tomography scan and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Each test has variable sensitivity and specificity. Maintaining the hemodynamic status, control of bleeding, removal of the infected graft, and infection control may improve clinical outcomes. This review entails the updated literature on diagnosis and management of SAEF. A literature search was conducted for articles published in English, on PubMed and Scopus using the following search terms: secondary, aortoenteric, aorto-enteric, aortoduodenal, aorto-duodenal, aortoesophageal, and aorto-esophageal. A combination of MeSH terms and Boolean operators were used to device search strategy. In addition, a bibliography of clinically relevant articles was searched to find additional articles (Appendix A). The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SAEF. PMID:26653698

  20. Critical gastrointestinal bleed due to secondary aortoenteric fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad U. Malik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF is a rare yet lethal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and occurs as a complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Clinical presentation may vary from herald bleeding to overt sepsis and requires high index of suspicion and clinical judgment to establish diagnosis. Initial diagnostic tests may include computerized tomography scan and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Each test has variable sensitivity and specificity. Maintaining the hemodynamic status, control of bleeding, removal of the infected graft, and infection control may improve clinical outcomes. This review entails the updated literature on diagnosis and management of SAEF. A literature search was conducted for articles published in English, on PubMed and Scopus using the following search terms: secondary, aortoenteric, aorto-enteric, aortoduodenal, aorto-duodenal, aortoesophageal, and aorto-esophageal. A combination of MeSH terms and Boolean operators were used to device search strategy. In addition, a bibliography of clinically relevant articles was searched to find additional articles (Appendix A. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SAEF.

  1. Heavy menstrual bleeding in adolescents: hormonal or hematologic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, H; Acharya, S S

    2011-12-01

    Adolescence in girls is marked by a host of physical and psychological changes including those associated with menstruation. Heavy menstrual bleeding is one of the most commonly encountered medical problems during transition from childhood to adulthood. Although common, it is likely underreported given that the definition is dependent upon personal experience and influenced by their perception of "normal". Anovulatory cycles related to an immaturity of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis seems to be common, however bleeding disorders such as coagulation factor deficiencies including von Willebrand disease, and quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of platelets must be ruled out. Other medical conditions such as endocrinopathies including diabetes mellitus, Cushing syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome, hypothyroidism, chronic hepatic and renal disease, anatomical uterine anomalies, pregnancy, obesity, medications causing hyperprolactinemia must also be considered. Management is based on the presence of hemodynamic instability and acuity of presentation. Treatment options include the use of combined oral contraceptive pills and antifibrinolytic agents; levonorgesterel impregnated intrauterine devices and or treatment of the specific underling bleeding disorder or endocrinopathy. Ongoing management needs to be accomplished through a multi disciplinary team approach in a comprehensive care setting with an adolescent gynecologist, hematologist, pediatrician, and nutritionist involved in the program for a better outcome of this problem. PMID:22036758

  2. Stroke and bleeding risk assessment: where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail S Dzeshka; Gregory Y.H. Lip

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is one of major problems of the contemporary cardiology. Ischaemic stroke is a common complication of the AF, and effective prophylaxis requires treatment with oral anticoagulants. The purpose of this current review article is to provide an overview of the various stroke and bleeding risk assessment scores that help decision making with respect to thromboprophylaxis. Particular focus is made on the currently guideline-recommended stroke and bleeding risk scores, such as CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction, hypertension, age ≥75, diabetes, stroke, vascular disease, age 65–74 and sex category [female] and HAS-BLED (uncontrolled hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly [e.g. age >65, frail condition], drugs [e.g. aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs]/excessive alcohol is made. Future directions for improvement of predictive ability of risk assessment with clinical factors and biomarkers are also discussed.

  3. Infliximab stopped severe gastrointestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satimai Aniwan; Surasak Eakpongpaisit; Boonlert Imraporn; Surachai Amornsawadwatana; Rungsun Rerknimitr

    2012-01-01

    To report the result of rapid ulcer healing by infliximab in Crohn's patients with severe enterocolic bleeding.During 2005 and 2010,inflammatory bowel disease database of King Chulalongkorn Memorial and Samitivej hospitals were reviewed.There were seven Crohn's disease (CD) patients (4 women and 3 men; mean age 52 ± 10.4 years; range:11-86 years).Two of the seven patients developed severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) as a flare up of CD whereas the other five patients presented with GIB as their first symptom for CD.Their mean hemoglobin level dropped from 12 ± 1.3 g/dL to 8.7 ± 1.3 g/dL in a 3-d period.Median packed red blood cells units needed for resuscitation was 4 units.Because of uncontrolled bleeding,surgical resection was considered.However,due to the poor surgical candidacy of these patients (n =3) and/or possible development of short bowel syndrome (n =6),surgery was not pursued.Likewise angiographic embolization was not considered in any due to the risk of large infarction.All severe GIBs successfully stopped by one or two doses of intravenous infliximab.Our data suggests that infliximab is an alternative therapy for CD with severe GIB when surgery has limitation or patient is a high risk.

  4. A new candidate as a hemostatic agent for difficult situations during variceal bleeding: Ankaferd blood stopper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersan Ozaslan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Variceal bleeding is the most challenging emergent situation among the causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Despite substantial improvement, a need remains for therapeutic armamentarium of such cases, which is easy, effective and without side-effect. Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS is a standardized herbal extract acting as a hemostatic agent on the bleeding or injured areas. In this observational study, a total of four patients with variceal bleeding were treated with endoscopic ABS application. The lesions were bleeding gastric varices (n:3 and bleeding duodenal varix (n:1. ABS was selected as a bridge to definitive therapies due to unavailability or inappropriateness of bleeding lesions to conventional measures. ABS was instilled or flushed onto the bleeding areas by sclerotherotherapy needle or heater probe catheter. Periprocedural control of the bleeding was achieved in all instances. Thereafter, on an elective basis, two patients with gastric varices underwent cyanoacrylate injection, while third underwent Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and embolization. The patient with duodenal varix refused further therapy, after a few hours after admission and was discharged. He again presented the same day with rebleeding, but died before any attempt could be made to control his bleeding. ABS seems to be effective in cases of variceal bleeding as a bridge to therapy. Its major advantages are the ease of use and lack of side-effects.

  5. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wildi, Stefan [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauerfeind, Peter [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Gastroenterology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  6. Successful treatment of Depot Medroxyprogesterone acetate-related vaginal bleeding improves continuation rates in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M. Rager

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available High discontinuation rates for depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA in adolescents may contribute to the number of unintended pregnancies. Many cite vaginal bleeding as a reason for discontinuing DMPA use. In this study, we attempted to determine if treating DMPA-associated vaginal bleeding with monophasic oral contraceptive pills (OCP raised continuation rates. A total of 131 patients who reported vaginal bleeding while on DMPA were included in this study and 83 were treated with monophasic OCP. Of those who received OCP, 38.7% reported that vaginal bleeding stopped completely, 51.8% reported that vaginal bleeding stopped temporarily, and 6.0% reported no change. Overall, 94% of enrolled patients who received OCP as a treatment for DMPA-associated vaginal bleeding continued DMPA use. Our findings indicate that vaginal bleeding due to DMPA can be successfully treated, leading to improvement in continuation rates.

  7. Clinical audit of inherited bleeding disorders in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Raihan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We did a clinical audit to determine the status of coagulation disorders in a hemophilia care center in Pakistan. Setting: Fatimid foundation blood bank and hematological diseases center, Lahore. Study Design: This is a retrospective descriptive study. Materials and Methods: All patients registered at Lahore center were included. Data was collected using a questionnaire including age, gender, diagnosis, hepatitis and human immune deficiency virus (HIV status, number of episodes of bleeding, most common site of bleeding, severity of disorder and number of transfusions required to treat the episode. Results: During the study period, a total of 923 registered patients were reviewed at Lahore center and of these, 408 patients (44.2% were on regular follow-up. Inherited bleeding disorders identified in these patients included hemophilia A, hemophilia B, vWD, factor VII deficiency, factor V deficiency, factor X deficiency, dysfibrinogenemia, afibrinogenemia, factor XIII deficiency; and platelet function defects. Median age was 17 years with a range of three to 57 years. Median age at diagnosis was one year. There were 329 (80.6% males and 79 (19.3% females. The products used in these patients included factor VIII concentrate, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, cryosupernatant and platelets. Testing for transmission of viral infections was also done in these patients and one patient (0.2% was found hepatitis B positive, six patients (1.4% were hepatitis C positive and two patients (0.49% were HIV positive. Conclusion: Hemophilia A, hemophilia B and vWD are the commonly encountered inherited bleeding disorders in our patients followed by other recessively transmitted disorders with a median age of 17 years and male to female ratio of 4: 1. Most of the patients utilized services available at Fatimid foundation with good clinical results. In Pakistan, non-governmental organizations (NGOs are trying their best for providing optimal treatment

  8. Relationship of pelvic bone fracture pattern and bleeding foci on angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the patterns of pelvic bone fracture and location of hemorrhage on angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients with pelvic bone fracture and active bleeding. Fractures were classified according to Tile classification. Locations of bleedings were divided into four groups; main trunk/anterior/posterior divisions of internal iliac artery, and other locations. The relationship between the fracture pattern and bleedings were analyzed statistically. Forty one bleedings were in 22 patients with type A fracture. Twenty (49%) were at the anterior division, 12 (29%) were at the posterior division, and 9 (22%) were found in other location. Thirty three bleedings were in 23 patients with type B fracture. Fifteen (45%) were at the posterior division, 10 (30%) were at the anterior division, 3 (9%) were at the main trunk of the internal iliac artery, and 5 (16%) were at other location. Eighteen bleedings were in 11 patients with type C fracture. Thirteen (72%) were at the posterior division, 4 (22%) were at the anterior division, and 1 (6%) was at main trunk of internal iliac artery. Anterior divisional bleedings were more common in type A, posterior divisional bleedings were more common in type B and C fractures (p = 0.014). The distribution of bleeding is significantly related to the fracture patterns. Fracture pattern may help in predicting the location of bleeding foci on embolization

  9. Women’s perceptions about reducing the frequency of monthly bleeding: results from a multinational survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szarewski A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anne Szarewski,1 Cecilia Moeller2 1Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom; 2Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Global Market Research General Medicine, Berlin, Germany Background: Monthly bleeding can have a negative impact on daily life and, given the choice, many women would reduce the frequency of bleeding. While some women choose to occasionally postpone or reduce bleeding frequency with an oral contraceptive (OC, most women have no or limited experience of regularly reducing the frequency of scheduled bleeding with OCs, ie, the extended OC regimen. Study design: An online survey of 4039 women aged 15–49 years who were currently using, had used, or would consider using any form of hormonal contraception was conducted in Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, UK, and USA to assess awareness of and the reasons for and against reducing bleeding frequency. Results: Overall, 51.1% and 30.7% of women surveyed were aware that they could occasionally or regularly reduce bleeding frequency with an OC. Moreover, 27.6% and 9.9% of previous/current OC users had occasionally or regularly reduced bleeding frequency with an OC. The main reasons for reducing bleeding frequency were convenience, physician recommendations, special events, and relief of problems associated with bleeding. Many women mistakenly believed that reducing bleeding frequency would have a negative health impact. Conclusion: Additional efforts are needed to educate women about the possibility and potential health benefits of reducing bleeding frequency and to dispel misconceptions about the use of extended OC regimens. Keywords: extended regimen, menstruation, oral contraceptive, withdrawal bleeding, scheduled bleeding

  10. Whole blood for hemostatic resuscitation of major bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Philip C; Pidcoke, Heather F; Strandenes, Geir; Hervig, Tor; Fisher, Andrew; Jenkins, Donald; Yazer, Mark; Stubbs, James; Murdock, Alan; Sailliol, Anne; Ness, Paul M; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Recent combat experience reignited interest in transfusing whole blood (WB) for patients with life-threatening bleeding. US Army data indicate that WB transfusion is associated with improved or comparable survival compared to resuscitation with blood components. These data complement randomized controlled trials that indicate that platelet (PLT)-containing blood products stored at 4°C have superior hemostatic function, based on reduced bleeding and improved functional measures of hemostasis, compared to PLT-containing blood products at 22°C. WB is rarely available in civilian hospitals and as a result is rarely transfused for patients with hemorrhagic shock. Recent developments suggest that impediments to WB availability can be overcome, specifically the misconceptions that WB must be ABO specific, that WB cannot be leukoreduced and maintain PLTs, and finally that cold storage causes loss of PLT function. Data indicate that the use of low anti-A and anti-B titer group O WB is safe as a universal donor, WB can be leukoreduced with PLT-sparing filters, and WB stored at 4°C retains PLT function during 15 days of storage. The understanding that these perceived barriers are not insurmountable will improve the availability of WB and facilitate its use. In addition, there are logistic and economic advantages of WB-based resuscitation compared to component therapy for hemorrhagic shock. The use of low-titer group O WB stored for up to 15 days at 4°C merits further study to compare its efficacy and safety with current resuscitation approaches for all patients with life-threatening bleeding. PMID:27100756

  11. Ultrasonographic evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindushree Kadakola

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Objectives of current study were to diagnose causes of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB in postmenopausal women (PMW and to correlate it with curettage and histopathological findings, hysteroscopy and thereby minimizing unnecessary interventions in the form of operations and hysteroscopy where sonography depicts normal findings. Methods: After obtaining ethical clearance present prospective observational study was conducted from November 2010 to November 2012, to evaluate the endometrium in 50 postmenopausal women (PMW with bleeding per vagina referred to the department of Radio diagnosis by the department of gynaecology in Bangalore medical college and research institute. After applying inclusion and exclusion criterias the cases were evaluated with ultrasonography both transabdominal (TAS and transvaginal scan (TVS where ever necessary. Histopathological and hysteroscopic correlation was done in all cases. Results: 58% of the PMW with bleed were in the age group of 51-60 years. Most common cause of PMB was atrophic endometrium (44%, endometrial polyp (22%, followed by malignancy (14%, and hyperplastic endometrium (6%. At Endometrium thickness less than 4 mm there were nil chances of carcinoma. Conclusions: In women with AUB in postmenopausal age ultrasonography (USG can be considered as an initial imaging modality for diagnosing endometrial diseases. The sensitivity and specificity of USG for Atrophic endometrium is 100% and 84% respectively with accuracy of 100%, endometrial polyp the specificity is 100% with accuracy of 88%. For malignancy USG showed 100% specificity and accuracy of 100%. Hence USG is highly accurate for evaluating endometrial pathologies. Being noninvasive, less costly and good patient compliance USG should be considered as an initial imaging modality over invasive investigations like D and C, hysteroscopy in evaluating endometrial disorders. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 229-234

  12. Thyroid abnormality in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Byna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AUB is a common but complicated clinical presentation and occurs in 15-20% of women between menarche to menopause and significantly affects the women's health. Women with thyroid dysfunction often have menstrual irregularities, infertility and increased morbidity during pregnancy. The objective of present study is to find the correlation between thyroid disorders and AUB in perimenopausal women attending gynecology OPD. Methods: In the present study, fifty five patients with AUB were included and were evaluated for the cause including thyroid abnormality. Thyroid function tests were done in all patients. Results: Among 55 patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism and 7 as hyperthyroidism, women with AUB 36 (65.4% were euthyroid. Among 19 women with thyroid abnormality, heavy menstrual bleeding was seen in 8 (42% women, 6 (31.57% had polymenorrhagia, 5 (26.31% had oligomenorrhoea. The frequent menstrual abnormality in women with hypothyroidism (12 women was heavy menstrual bleeding in 5 (41.6% women, 3 (25% had oligomennorhoea, 4 (33.3% had polymenorrhagia. Out of 7 women with hyperthyroidism, 2 (28.57% had oligomenorrhoea, 3 (42.8% had heavy menstrual bleeding, 2 (28.57% had polymenorrhagia. In a total of 55 patients with AUB, 11 (20% had structural abnormalities in uterus and ovaries. 5 (9% had adenomyosis, 3 (5.4% had ovarian cysts, 3 (5.4% had fibroids. Conclusions: It is important to screen all women for thyroid abnormality who are presenting with AUB especially with non-structural causes of AUB. Correction of thyroid abnormalities also relieves AUB. This will avoid unnecessary hormonal treatment and surgery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3250-3253

  13. Sangrado de origen ginecológico Gynaecological bleeding

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    I. Jiménez Ubieto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El sangrado genital es la alteración ginecológica más frecuente en las mujeres en edad reproductiva siendo, en los países occidentales, una de las causas más frecuentes de anemia y que puede ser motivo de absentismo laboral. Ante una paciente con sangrado en el Servicio de Urgencias lo primero habrá que valorar la repercusión hemodinámica, adoptando las medidas necesarias. Se realizará una anamnesis y exploración detalladas para establecer el origen. Cuando aparece sangrado en el área genital generalmente se piensa en un origen uterino, pero no siempre es así y habrá que descartar origen en el tracto genital inferior, en el tracto genital superior u otro origen extraginecológico en el área digestiva y/o urológica. Con el diagnóstico se valorará el tratamiento oportuno y la necesidad o no de ingreso hospitalario.Genital bleeding is the most frequent gynaecological alteration in women of reproductive age. In industrial countries it is one of the most frequent causes of anaemia and can be a cause of labour absenteeism. Facing a patient with bleeding in the Accident and Emergency Service, the first thing is to evaluate the haemodynamic repercussion and take the necessary measures. A detailed case history and exploration are carried out to establish its origin. A uterine origin is usually considered when bleeding appears in the genital area, but this is not always the case, and it is necessary to rule out an origin in the lower genital tract, upper genital tract or an extragynaecological origin in the digestive and/or urological area. With the diagnosis an appropriate treatment will be considered, as well the possible need for hospital admission.

  14. Microcirculatory remodeling in marginal zone of duodenal ulcer after bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulayeva О.N.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate objectively vessels network remodeling in duodenal mucosa after ulcer bleeding the morphometric analysis of marginal ulcer zone biopsies was performed in 32 patients. It was shown that reparation is accompanied with chronic inflammation and acute alteration of microcirculation. Injection hemostasis led to enhancement of microcirculation, development of edema and ischemic alteration of mucosal tissues. Acute neutrophilic infiltration during 1 day was changed on 3 day with granular tissue development and angiogenesis stimulation. Intensification and prolongation of angiogenesis paral-leled with lymphocytes infiltration after 7 days resulted to villi dysmorphogenesis and changes in cellular content of intestinal epithelium.

  15. Improving Quality of Care in Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Steffen J; Møller, Morten H; Larsson, Heidi; Johnsen, Søren P; Madsen, Anders H; Bendix, Jørgen; Adamsen, Sven; Jensen, Anders G; Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik; Nielsen, Ann-Sophie; Kallehave, Finn; Oxholm, Dorthe; Skarbye, Mona; Jølving, Line R; Jørgensen, Henrik S; de Muckadell, Ove B Schaffalitzky; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:The treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is complex, and mortality remains high. We present results from a nationwide initiative to monitor and improve the quality of care (QOC) in PUB.METHODS:All Danish hospitals treating PUB patients between 2004 and 2011 prospectively registered...... demographic, clinical, and prognostic data. QOC was evaluated using eight process and outcome indicators, including time to initial endoscopy, hemostasis obtainment, proportion undergoing surgery, rebleeding risks, and 30-day mortality.RESULTS:A total of 13,498 PUB patients (median age 74 years) were included...

  16. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena. PMID:26100228

  17. A CASE OF FACTITIOUS BLEEDING: MUNCHAUSEN’S SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Munchausen’s syndrome is a psychiatric disorder in which patients inflict on themselves an illness or injury for the primary purpose of assuming the sick role. These patients can present with many different complaints and clinical symptoms including self - inflicted blee ding. This report describes a case of lately diagnosed Munchausen’s syndrome who presented with hemoptysis and developed hematochezia and hematuria during the hospitalization period. Physicians should always consider this rare disorder in cases presented w ith bleeding symptoms of unknown origin.

  18. Placement of Covered Self-Expandable Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Severe Postsphincterotomy Bleeding: Outcomes of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Cintorino; Luca Barresi; Ilaria Tarantino; Marta Di Pisa; Mario Traina

    2010-01-01

    We report two cases of severe postsphincterotomy bleeding in an adult and a pediatric patient treated, as first options, with available techniques to induce hemostasis without success. Because of persisting bleeding, an expandable, partially covered, metallic stent was placed into the choledocho to mechanically compress the bleeding site. The bleeding was stopped. In the following days, both patients remained hemodynamically stable with no further episodes of bleeding. We believe that the app...

  19. Excess long-term mortality following non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Colin John Crooks; Timothy Richard Card; Joe West

    2013-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially life-threatening abdominal emergency that remains a common cause of admission to hospital. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (bleeding derived from a source above the ligament of Treitz, which connects the fourth portion of the duodenum to the diaphragm) is roughly four times as common as bleeding from the lower gastrointestinal tract and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a...

  20. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  1. Role of proton pump inhibitors in the management of peptic ulcer bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hwai-Jeng; Lin

    2010-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a serious medical problem with significant morbidity and mortality.Endoscopic therapy significantly reduces further bleeding,surgery and mortality in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers and is now recommended as the first hemostatic modality for these patients.The efficacy of large-dose proton pump inhibitor(PPI) therapy in reducing re-bleeding after endoscopic therapy has been supported by evidence derived from randomized controlled trials.It may be premature to recommend small-dose intravenous injection PPI after endoscopic hemostasis in patients with bleeding ulcers.An updated systematic review shows that PPI therapy before endoscopy significantly reduces the proportion with major stigmata and requirement for endoscopic therapy at index endoscopy.Some studies show that there is no significant difference between oral and intravenous PPIs in raising intragastric pH.However,clinical data is lacking in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding to date.

  2. Severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding in extraluminal diverticula in the third part of the duodenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Johnny Fredsbo; Wilhelmsen, Michael; Lauritsen, Morten Laksafoss

    2014-01-01

    The successful management of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding requires identification of the source of bleeding and when this is achieved the bleeding can often be treated endoscopically. However, the identification of the bleeding can be challenging due to the location of the bleeding or...... technical aspects. Therefore it might be necessary to use other measures than endoscopy such as CT angiography. Duodenal diverticula is a rare cause of upper GI bleeding and can be challenging to diagnose as they often require specialised endoscopy procedures such as endoscopy with a side-viewing scope....... This case describes the first successful management of this rare condition with an upper GI endoscopy with a colonoscope and afterwards intravascular coiling....

  3. Preterm delivery risk among pregnancies with history of first trimester vaginal bleeding and intrauterin hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    ULUĞ, Ulun; Jozwiak, Esra Aksoy; TOSUN, Süleyman; BAHÇECİ, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Aim:Vaginal bleeding during the first trimester is considered as threatened abortion. Vaginal bleeding can be associated by sonographic demonstration of subchorionic hematoma. This study evaluates the risk of preterm delivery among pregnancies with a history of intrauterin hematoma with vaginal bleeding during the first trimester. Materials and Methods: The files of singleton pregnancies followed up at our center between 2001 and 2003 were retrospectively evaluated. Gestations with vaginal bl...

  4. The Results of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication on Repeated Bleeding in Patients with Stomach Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Horvat, Darko; Včev, Aleksandar; Soldo˛, Ivan; Timarac, Jasna; Dmitrović, Branko; Mišević, Tonči; Ivezić, Zdravko; Kraljika, Nikola

    2005-01-01

    The triple therapy of Helicobacter pylori eradication prevents repeated bleeding from stomach ulcer. The aim of this one-way blind prospective study was to evaluate the efficiency of the two-week triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication in preventing renewed bleeding in patients with stomach ulcer within one year. This research included 60 hospitalized patients with bleeding stomach ulcer and positive Helicobacter pylori infection, 34 men and 26 women (average age 59.7 years). The p...

  5. Cerebral and splenic infarctions after injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in esophageal variceal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Dae-Seong; Chung, Cho-Yun; Park, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sun; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lee, Wan-Sik; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Joo, Young-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is the most serious complication of portal hypertension, and it accounts for approximately one fifth to one third of all deaths in liver cirrhosis patients. Currently, endoscopic treatment remains the predominant method for the prevention and treatment of variceal bleeding. Endoscopic treatments include band ligation and injection sclerotherapy. Injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate has been successfully used to treat variceal bleeding. Although injection scle...

  6. Can Plasma Fibrinogen Levels Predict Bleeding After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Alireza; Ghiasi, Mohammadsaeid; Aghaei, Aghdas; Khaleghparast, Shiva; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Bakhshandeh, Hooman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fibrinogen is the main biomarker for bleeding. To prevent excessive postoperative bleeding, it would be useful to identify high-risk patients before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Objectives: In order to predicating bleeding after CABG, we sought to determine whether preoperative fibrinogen concentration was associated with the amount of bleeding following CABG. Patients and Methods: A total of 144 patients (mean age = 61.50 ± 9.42 years; 65.7% men), undergoing elective and isolated CABG, were included in this case-series study. The same anesthesia technique and medicines were selected for all the patients. In the ICU, the patients were assessed in terms of bleeding at 12 and 24 hours post-operation, amount of contingent blood products received, and relevant tests. Statistical tests were subsequently conducted to analyze the correlation between preoperative fibrinogen concentration and the amount of post-CABG bleeding. Results: The mean ± standard deviation of bleeding at 12 and 24 hours post-operation was 285.37 ± 280.27 and 499.31 ± 355.57 mL, respectively. The results showed that postoperative bleeding was associated with different factors whereas pre-anesthesia fibrinogen was not correlated with bleeding at 12 (P = 0.856) and 24 hours (P = 0.936) post-operation. There were correlations between the extra-corporal circulation time and bleeding at 12 hours post-operation (ρ = 0.231, P = 0.007) and bleeding at 24 hours post-operation (ρ = 0.218, P = 0.013). Conclusions: Preoperative assessment of plasma fibrinogen levels failed to predict post-CABG bleeding. PMID:25478546

  7. Molecular Pathology of Rare Bleeding Disorders (RBDs) in India: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Bipin P.; Nair, Sona B.; Vijapurkar, Manasi; Mota, Leenam; Shanbhag, Sharda; Ali, Shehnaz; Shetty, Shrimati D.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2014-01-01

    Background Though rare in occurrence, patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) are highly heterogeneous and may manifest with severe bleeding diathesis. Due to the high rate of consanguinity in many caste groups, these autosomal recessive bleeding disorders which are of rare occurrence in populations across the world, may not be as rare in India. Objectives To comprehensively analyze the frequency and nature of mutations in Indian patients with RBDs. Methods Pubmed search was used (www.pu...

  8. Stroke and recurrent haemorrhage associated with antithrombotic treatment after gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Lip, Gregory Y H; Olesen, Jonas B;

    2015-01-01

    -2012) included all patients with atrial fibrillation discharged from hospital after gastrointestinal bleeding while receiving antithrombotic treatment. Restarted treatment regimens were single or combined antithrombotic drugs with oral anticoagulation and antiplatelets. Follow-up started 90 days after discharge...... to avoid confounding from use of previously prescribed drugs on discharge. Risks of all cause mortality, thromboembolism, major bleeding, and recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated with competing risks models and time dependent multiple Cox regression models. STUDY ANSWER AND LIMITATIONS...

  9. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, T.P. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Gulati, M.S. [Department of Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Makharia, G.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)]. E-mail: govindmakharia@aiims.ac.in; Bandhu, S. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Garg, P.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding.

  10. Differences in bleeding behavior after endoscopic band ligation: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiefke Ingolf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic band ligation (EBL is generally accepted as the treatment of choice for bleeding from esophageal varices. It is also used for secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal hemorrhage. However, there is no data or guidelines concerning endoscopic control of ligation ulcers. We conducted a retrospective study of EBL procedures analyzing bleeding complications after EBL. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from patients who underwent EBL. We analyzed several data points, including indication for the procedure, bleeding events and the time interval between EBL and bleeding. Results 255 patients and 387 ligation sessions were included in the analysis. We observed an overall bleeding rate after EBL of 7.8%. Bleeding events after elective treatment (3.9% were significantly lower than those after treatment for acute variceal hemorrhage (12.1%. The number of bleeding events from ligation ulcers and variceal rebleeding was 14 and 15, respectively. The bleeding rate from the ligation site in the group who underwent emergency ligation was 7.1% and 0.5% in the group who underwent elective ligation. Incidence of variceal rebleeding did not vary significantly. Seventy-five percent of all bleeding episodes after elective treatment occurred within four days after EBL. 20/22 of bleeding events after emergency ligation occured within 11 days after treatment. Elective EBL has a lower risk of bleeding from treatment-induced ulceration than emergency ligation. Conclusions Patients who underwent EBL for treatment of acute variceal bleeding should be kept under medical surveillance for 11 days. After elective EBL, it may be reasonable to restrict the period of surveillance to four days or even perform the procedure in an out-patient setting.

  11. Successful treatment of Depot Medroxyprogesterone acetate-related vaginal bleeding improves continuation rates in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Kristin M. Rager; Amy Fowler; Hatim A. Omar

    2006-01-01

    High discontinuation rates for depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) in adolescents may contribute to the number of unintended pregnancies. Many cite vaginal bleeding as a reason for discontinuing DMPA use. In this study, we attempted to determine if treating DMPA-associated vaginal bleeding with monophasic oral contraceptive pills (OCP) raised continuation rates. A total of 131 patients who reported vaginal bleeding while on DMPA were included in this study and 83 were treated with monoph...

  12. Women’s perceptions about reducing the frequency of monthly bleeding: results from a multinational survey

    OpenAIRE

    Szarewski A; Moeller C

    2013-01-01

    Anne Szarewski,1 Cecilia Moeller2 1Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom; 2Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Global Market Research General Medicine, Berlin, Germany Background: Monthly bleeding can have a negative impact on daily life and, given the choice, many women would reduce the frequency of bleeding. While some women choose to occasionally postpone or reduce bleeding frequency with an oral contra...

  13. Selective Embolization for Post-Endoscopic Sphincterotomy Bleeding: Technical Aspects and Clinical Efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young Ho; Choi, Young Ho [Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Soon Young [Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the technical aspects and clinical efficacy of selective embolization for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. We reviewed the records of 10 patients (3%; M:F 6:4; mean age, 63.3 years) that underwent selective embolization for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding among 344 patients who received arteriography for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from 2000 to 2009. We analyzed the endoscopic procedure, onset of bleeding, underlying clinical condition, angiographic findings, interventional procedure, and outcomes in these patients. Among the 12 bleeding branches, primary success of hemostasis was achieved in 10 bleeding branches (83%). Secondary success occurred in two additional bleeding branches (100%) after repeated embolization. In 10 patients, post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleedings were detected during the endoscopic procedure (n = 2, 20%) or later (n = 8, 80%), and the delay was from one to eight days (mean, 2.9 days; {+-} 2.3). Coagulopathy was observed in three patients. Eight patients had a single bleeding branch, whereas two patients had two branches. On the selective arteriography, bleeding branches originated from the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 8, 67%) and anterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 4, 33%), respectively. Superselection was achieved in four branches and the embolization was performed with n-butyl cyanoacrylate. The eight branches were embolized by combined use of coil, n-butyl cyanoacrylate, or Gelfoam. After the last embolization, there was no rebleeding or complication related to embolization. Selective embolization is technically feasible and an effective procedure for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. In addition, the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery is the main origin of the causative vessels of post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding.

  14. Traumatic intercostal arterial bleeding controlled with a novel surgical technique: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Miettinen Simo; Hakala Tapio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction A blunt thoracic trauma may cause arterial bleeding requiring operative treatment or endovascular embolization or endovascular aortic stenting. A novel damage control technique to stop such bleeding is presented. Case presentation We present the case of an 82-year-old Caucasian man who experienced rib fractures I-VII on the left side and bleeding from damaged intercostal arteries after a blunt thoracic trauma. Emergency thoracotomy was performed. Conclusions Effective he...

  15. A Method to Control Turbofan Engine Starting by Varying Compressor Surge Valve Bleed

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, Wayne Randolph

    2001-01-01

    A METHOD TO CONTROL TURBOFAN ENGINE STARTING BY VARYING COMPRESSOR SURGE VALVE BLEED Wayne R. Sexton (ABSTRACT) This thesis reports the results of a study of the starting conditions of a turbofan engine. The research focused on ways to minimize turbine inlet temperature while maintaining an adequate compressor stall margin during engine start by varying the surge valve bleed. Varying the surge valve bleed was also shown to reduce compressor and fan required torque. ...

  16. Colonic diverticular bleeding: urgent colonoscopy without purging and endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and hemoclips

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Couto-Worner; Benito González-Conde; Emilio Estévez-Prieto; Pedro Alonso-Aguirre

    2013-01-01

    Diverticular disease is the most frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Most of the times, bleeding stops without any intervention but in 10-20 % of the cases it is necessary to treat the hemorrhage. Several modalities of endoscopic treatment have been described after purging the colon. We present five cases of severe diverticular bleeding treated with injection of epinephrine and hemoclips. All the colonoscopies were performed without purging of the colon in an emergency setting,...

  17. ACR appropriateness Criteria® second and third trimester bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podrasky, Ann E; Javitt, Marcia C; Glanc, Phyllis; Dubinsky, Theodore; Harisinghani, Mukesh G; Harris, Robert D; Khati, Nadia J; Mitchell, Donald G; Pandharipande, Pari V; Pannu, Harpreet K; Shipp, Thomas D; Siegel, Cary Lynn; Simpson, Lynn; Wall, Darci J; Wong-You-Cheong, Jade J; Zelop, Carolyn M

    2013-12-01

    Vaginal bleeding occurring in the second or third trimesters of pregnancy can variably affect perinatal outcome, depending on whether it is minor (i.e. a single, mild episode) or major (heavy bleeding or multiple episodes.) Ultrasound is used to evaluate these patients. Sonographic findings may range from marginal subchorionic hematoma to placental abruption. Abnormal placentations such as placenta previa, placenta accreta and vasa previa require accurate diagnosis for clinical management. In cases of placenta accreta, magnetic resonance imaging is useful as an adjunct to ultrasound and is often appropriate for evaluation of the extent of placental invasiveness and potential involvement of adjacent structures. MRI is useful for preplanning for cases of complex delivery, which may necessitate a multi-disciplinary approach for optimal care.The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every two years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:24263752

  18. Gastric Glomus Tumor: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Handa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old woman was referred to our department because of melena. These symptoms combined with severe anemia prompted us to perform an emergency upper endoscopy, which showed bleeding from an ulcerated 30 mm submucosal tumor in the gastric antrum. A computed tomography scan revealed a homogeneously enhanced mass, and endoscopic ultrasonography identified a well-demarcated mass in the third and fourth layers of the gastric wall. Because analysis of the possible medical causes remained inconclusive and the risk of rebleeding, laparoscopy-assisted gastric wedge resection was performed after administration of 10 units of red cell concentrate. Histological and immunohistological analysis revealed the tumor to be a gastric glomus tumor. Gastric submucosal tumors remain challenging to diagnose preoperatively as they show a variety of radiologic and clinicopathologic features and are associated with the risk of bleeding upon biopsy, as is indicated in the guidelines for gastric submucosal tumors. Gastric glomus tumors characteristically present with exsanguinating gastrointestinal hemorrhaging that often requires blood transfusion. Additionally, gastric submucosal tumors typically occur in elderly patients; however, this case involved a young patient who was 24 years old. Here, we describe this case in order to identify features that may aid in early differentiation of gastric submucosal tumors.

  19. Origins of movements following stunning and during bleeding in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlouw, E M Claudia; Bourguet, Cécile; Deiss, Véronique; Mallet, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    At slaughter, after stunning, the absence of certain physical signs such as eye movements/reflexes or rhythmic breathing helps determine whether the loss of consciousness was actually achieved. Cattle frequently show movements of neck and/or legs during the post-stun period. We evaluated 1) the origins of these movements in stunned unconscious cattle and 2) relationships with presence of ocular signs or breathing and shot characteristics. In stunned unconscious cattle, movements appear to be reflex-like, generated in the brain stem and/or spinal cord. First, in stunned unconscious cattle, movements could continue until 3 min after the start of bleeding. Second, severing the spinal cord in stunned unconscious cattle did not influence amount of movements. Third, in reaction to the skin cut and sticking, some unconscious animals showed a nociceptive withdrawal reflex. In bulls, following longer stun-stick delays, this response was weaker. Shot placement, post-stun movements and initial bleeding efficiency seemed related but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. PMID:26225929

  20. Bleeding complications in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Incidence, mechanisms, prevention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Robin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC has established itself firmly as the ′gold standard′ for the treatment of gallstone disease, but it can, at times, be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Existing literature has focused almost exclusively on the biliary complications of this procedure, but other complications such as significant haemorrhage can also be encountered, with an immediate mortality if not recognized and treated in a timely manner. Materials and Methods: Publications in English language literature that have reported the complication of bleeding during or after the performance of LC were identified and accessed. The results thus obtained were tabulated and analyzed to get a true picture of this complication, its mechanism and preventive measures. Results: Bleeding has been reported to occur with an incidence of up to nearly 10% in various series, and can occur at any time during LC (during trocar insertion, dissection technique or slippage of clips/ ligatures or in the postoperative period. It can range from minor haematomas to life-threatening injuries to major intra-abdominal vessels (such as aorta, vena cava and iliacs. Conclusion: Good surgical technique, awareness and early recognition and management of such cases are keys to success when dealing with this problem.

  1. Bronchoscopic intratumoral injection of tranexamic acid to prevent excessive bleeding during multiple forceps biopsies of lesions with a high risk of bleeding: a prospective case series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant bleeding may occur following endobronchial forceps biopsy or brushing of necrotic or hypervascular tumors in the airways. In some cases, methods such as endobronchial instillation of iced saline lavage and epinephrine may fail to control bleeding. The present study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new bronchoscopic technique using intratumoral injection of tranexamic acid (IIT) for control of bleeding during forceps biopsy in patients with endobronchial tumors with a high risk of bleeding. The study was a prospective case series carried out in a single center. Bronchoscopic IIT was performed in those patients who had endoscopically visible tumoral lesions with persistent active bleeding following the first attempt at bronchoscopic sampling. Tranexamic acid (TEA) was injected through a 22-gauge Wang cytology needle into the lesion in nominal doses of 250–500 mg. After 2–3 minutes, multiple forceps biopsy specimens were obtained from the lesion. Of the 57 consecutive patients included in the study, 20 patients (35.1%) underwent bronchoscopic IIT. The first attempt in 18 patients was endobronchial forceps biopsy (EBB), and because of a high risk of bleeding, the first attempt for the remaining two patients, who were on continuous dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin and clopidogrel), employed endobronchial needle aspiration (EBNA) as a precautionary measure. Following IIT, subsequent specimens were obtained using EBB in all patients. Multiple forceps biopsy specimens (3–10) were obtained from the lesions (8 necrotic and 12 hypervascular) without incurring active bleeding. The following histopathologic diagnoses were made: squamous cell carcinoma (n = 14), adenocarcinoma (n = 2), small-cell lung cancer (n = 3), and malignant mesenchymal tumor (n = 1). No side effects of TEA were observed. Bronchoscopic IIT is a useful and safe technique for controlling significant bleeding from a forceps biopsy procedure and can be considered as a pre

  2. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1 1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy

  3. Surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm with non-bleeding aortocaval fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unosawa, Satoshi; Kimura, Haruka; Niino, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of an aortocaval fistula (ACF) without bleeding because a clot was covering the fistula. A 60-year-old man was diagnosed as having a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and an aortocaval fistula, by enhanced computed tomography (CT). After the aneurysm had been opened, the fistula was detected, but there was no bleeding because it was covered with clot. After graft repair, bleeding from the fistula occurred when the clot was removed by suction. Direct closure of the fistula was achieved after bleeding was controlled by digital compression. PMID:23825505

  4. Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding diagnosed by delayed scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwakanma, Lois; Meyerrose, Gary; Kennedy, Shalyn; Rakvit, Ariwan; Bohannon, Todd; Silva, Micheal

    2003-08-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with bright-red blood from the rectum. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed mild gastritis. Colonoscopy demonstrated diverticulosis without active bleeding, and in vitro tagged red blood cell scintigraphy was unremarkable. There was no further evidence of bleeding and the patient was discharged home. The patient returned with recurrent bright-red blood from the rectum. Although delayed scintigraphic images seldom demonstrate the site of bleeding, delayed images at 12 hours demonstrated active bleeding near the hepatic flexure in this patient. This was confirmed with selective mesenteric angiography, and was treated with coil embolization of the tertiary branches of the right middle colic artery. PMID:12897664

  5. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a single scintigraphic technique to detect and localize the site of bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. This examination requires only intravenous administration of /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid and imaging of the abdomen. Very shortly after the introduction of the radiopharmaceutical, a fraction of the injected activity extravasates at the bleeding site and is eliminated from the circulation. This phenomenon is repeated each time the blood recirculates adding another, but smaller fraction to the extravasated activity at the site of hemorrhage. Because of continued clearance of the radiopharmaceutical from the vascular pool by the reticuloendothelial system, a contrast is eventually reached between the site of bleeding and surrounding background. Based on animal experiments bleeding rates as low as .05-0.1 cc/min can be detected with this technique. The sensitivity of the approach in the detection of the site of hemorrhage is significantly higher than arteriography or other techniques which utilize radioactive blood pool indicators. We have mainly used this technique in the evaluation of patients with GI bleeding. In more than 25 patients with negative scintigrams for hemorrhage, arteriography showed no evidence of bleeding. In 38 patients with scintigraphic evidence of bleeding. In 38 patients with scintigraphic evidence of hemorrhage, arteriograms were positive for bleeding in les than 50% of the cases. No false positive results have been noted in the latter group. This technique appears to offer a simple, practical and reliable approach to the evaluation of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

  6. Multiple smooth muscle tumours in neurofibromatosis presenting with chronic gastrointestinal bleeding.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, J. G.; Royston, C M; Sutton, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Gastrointestinal involvement in neurofibromatosis is well recognised. We present an unusual manifestation of gastro-intestinal neurofibromatosis--chronic gastrointestinal bleeding from extensive smooth muscle tumours.

  7. Active gastrointestinal bleeding:Use of hemostatic forceps beyond endoscopic submucosal dissection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitri; Coumaros; Niki; Tsesmeli

    2010-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge,this is the f irst report of the application of hemostatic forceps in active gastrointestinal(GI) bleeding that is not related to endoscopic submucosal dissection.An 86-year-old woman with chronic intake of low-dose aspirin had a Dieulafoy's lesion of the third duodenal portion.Bleeding control with epinephrine injection was unsuccessful.A 60-year-old man presented with a bleeding ulcer in the duodenal bulb.Ten days after combined endotherapy,he had recurrent bleeding from two m...

  8. Guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Kakushima, Naomi; Kato, Motohiko; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Hoteya, Shu; Kataoka, Mikinori; Shimaoka, Shunji; Yahagi, Naohisa; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2016-05-01

    Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society (JGES) has compiled a set of guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding using evidence-based methods. The major cause of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. As a result, these guidelines mainly focus on peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding, although bleeding from other causes is also overviewed. From the epidemiological aspect, in recent years in Japan, bleeding from drug-related ulcers has become predominant in comparison with bleeding from Helicobacter pylori (HP)-related ulcers, owing to an increase in the aging population and coverage of HP eradication therapy by national health insurance. As for treatment, endoscopic hemostasis, in which there are a variety of methods, is considered to be the first-line treatment for bleeding from almost all causes. It is very important to precisely evaluate the severity of the patient's condition and stabilize the patient's vital signs with intensive care for successful endoscopic hemostasis. Additionally, use of antisecretory agents is recommended to prevent rebleeding after endoscopic hemostasis, especially for gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. Eighteen statements with evidence and recommendation levels have been made by the JGES committee of these guidelines according to evidence obtained from clinical research studies. However, some of the statements that are supported by a low level of evidence must be confirmed by further clinical research. PMID:26900095

  9. MEXICANA DE CANANEA TO START UP BREAKTHROUGH PROCESS TO ELIMINATE ELECTROLYTE BLEEDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FaniaLisa

    1997-01-01

    Copper processors using solvent extraction/electrowinning(SX/EW) have known for years that eliminating the electrolyte bleed could benefit process economics dramatically Until now.there was no practical solution to eliminate the bleed.Available processes either could nor reduce iron contaminants sufficiently,or pulled out too much valuable copper and cobalt along with the iron.Based on pilot tests of a new breed of ion exchange separatioin system at three different mine sites on representative electrolytes,an alternmative to bleeding electrolytes now exists.On this basis,processors can shelve the wasteful electrolyte bleeding practice.Already,one major copper producer is installing a fullscale system.

  10. Risperidone-induced Gingival Bleeding in a Pediatric Case: A Dose-dependent Side Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Hergüner, Sabri; Özayhan, Hatice Yardım; Erdur, Emire Aybuke

    2016-01-01

    There are several case reports on risperidone-related bleeding; however, to our knowledge, there is no report about gingival bleeding associated with risperidone in the literature. We presented a case who experienced gingival bleeding when risperidone dose was increased to 0.5 mg/day, and subsided after decreasing the dose to 0.25 mg/day, suggesting a dose-dependent side-effect. The bleeding side effect of risperidone might be caused by several mechanisms, including 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A rec...

  11. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: aspirin increases the incidence of minor bleeding complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliwell, O.T. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hallo99@doctors.org.uk; Yadegafar, G. [Public Health Sciences and Medical Statistics Division, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton University, Southampton (United Kingdom); Lane, C.; Dewbury, K.C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Aim: To assess whether patients taking aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding complications after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods: Three hundred and eighty-seven patients taking aspirin who underwent prostate biopsy over a 3.5 year period and 731 patients not taking aspirin over a 2 year period returned a questionnaire assessing the incidence and severity of bleeding complications. Results: Patients taking aspirin had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of haematuria and rectal bleeding, but not of haemospermia. They also had a longer mean duration of bleeding, but no increase in bleeding severity. Severe bleeding was very uncommon in both groups and no patients required intervention for bleeding complications. Conclusion: Aspirin exacerbates minor bleeding complications in patients undergoing TRUS guided biopsy of the prostate, but in this large group of aspirin-taking patients no dangerous bleeding complications were encountered. It may be that the risks associated with aspirin cessation outweigh the risks of haemorrhagic complications.

  12. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1 1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy.

  13. PROPOSAL OF A CLINICAL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Cavalcante FRANCO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Upper gastrointestinal bleeding implies significant clinical and economic repercussions. The correct establishment of the latest therapies for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. The use of clinical pathways for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with shorter hospital stay and lower hospital costs. Objective - The primary objective is the development of a clinical care pathway for the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to be used in tertiary hospital. Methods - It was conducted an extensive literature review on the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, contained in the primary and secondary information sources. Results - The result is a clinical care pathway for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with evidence of recent bleeding, diagnosed by melena or hematemesis in the last 12 hours, who are admitted in the emergency rooms and intensive care units of tertiary hospitals. In this compact and understandable pathway, it is well demonstrated the management since the admission, with definition of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, passing through the initial clinical treatment, posterior guidance for endoscopic therapy, and referral to rescue therapies in cases of persistent or rebleeding. It was also included the care that must be taken before hospital discharge for all patients who recover from an episode of bleeding. Conclusion - The introduction of a clinical care pathway for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding may contribute to standardization of medical practices, decrease in waiting time for medications and services, length of hospital stay and costs.

  14. Colonic diverticular bleeding: urgent colonoscopy without purging and endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and hemoclips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Couto-Worner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diverticular disease is the most frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Most of the times, bleeding stops without any intervention but in 10-20 % of the cases it is necessary to treat the hemorrhage. Several modalities of endoscopic treatment have been described after purging the colon. We present five cases of severe diverticular bleeding treated with injection of epinephrine and hemoclips. All the colonoscopies were performed without purging of the colon in an emergency setting, with correct visualization of the point of bleeding. Patients recovered well avoiding other aggressive procedures such as angiography or surgery.

  15. Superselective transarterial embolization for the management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Kyoung; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Jeong; Shin, Sang Soo; Yoon Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chol Kyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    We wanted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of superselective transarterial embolization for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. We evaluated 97 of 115 patients who had undergone diagnostic angiography and transarterial embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding from February 2001 to July 2004, and they subsequently underwent superselective transarterial embolization. Their ages ranged from 17 to 88 years (mean age: 58.5 years), and 73 were men and 24 were women. The etiologies were a postoperative condition (n=31), ulcer (n=23), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (n=3), trauma (n=3), pseudoaneurysm from pancreatitis (n=3), diverticula (n=2), inflammatory bowel disease (n=2), tumor (n=2), Behcet's disease (n=2), hemobilia (n=1), and unknown origin (n=25). The regions of bleeding were the esophagus (n=3), stomach and duodenum (n=41), small bowel (n=38) and colon (n=15). All the patients underwent superselective transarterial embolization using microcoils, gelfoam or a combination of microcoils and gelfoam. Technical success was defined as devascularization of targeted vascular lesion or the disappearance of extravasation of the contrast media, as noted on the angiography after embolization. Clinical success was defined as the disappearance of clinical symptoms and the reestablishment of normal cardiovascular hemodynamics after transarterial embolization without any operation or endoscopic management. The technical success rate was 100%. The primary clinical success rate was 67% (65 of 97 patients). Of the 32 primary failures, fourteen patients underwent repeat embolization; of these, clinical success was achieved in all the patients and so the secondary clinical success rate was 81% (79 of 97 patients). Of the 18 patients with primary failures, five patients underwent operation, one patient underwent endoscopic management and the others died during the observation period due to disseminated coagulopathy or complications of their underlying diseases. During

  16. Causes of arterial bleeding after living donor liver transplantation and the results of transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the causes of arterial bleeding after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to evaluate the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). Forty-two sessions of conventional arteriography were performed in 32 of the 195 patients who underwent LDLT during the past 2 years. This was done in search of bleeding foci of arterial origin. TAE was performed with microcoils or gelatin sponge particles. The causes of arterial bleeding, the technical and clinical success rates of TAE and the complications were retrospectively evaluated. Forty-two bleeding foci of arterial origin were identified on 30 sessions of arteriography in 21 patients. The most common cause of bleeding was percutaneous procedures in 40% of the patients (17 of the 42 bleeding foci) followed by surgical procedures in 36% (15/42). The overall technical and clinical success rates of TAE were 21 (70%) and 20 (67%) of the 30 sessions, respectively. The overall technical success rate of TAE for the treatment of bleeding from the hepatic resection margin, hepatic artery anastomotic site and hepaticojejunostomy was only 18% (2/11), whereas for the treatment of bleeding in the other locations the technical and clinical success rates of TAE were 100% and 95%, respectively. No procedure-related major complications occurred. In the case of arterial bleeding after LDLT, percutaneous procedure-related hemorrhages were as common as surgery-related hemorrhages. There were technical difficulties in using TAE for the treatment of hepatic arterial bleeding. However, in the other locations, TAE seems to be safe and effective for the control of arterial bleeding in LDLT recipients

  17. Bleeding events with dabigatran or warfarin in patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Ammar; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay; Kearon, Clive; Eriksson, Henry; Kreuzer, Jörg; Feuring, Martin; Hantel, Stephan; Friedman, Jeffrey; Schellong, Sebastian; Schulman, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran was as effective as warfarin for the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism in the RE-COVER and RE-COVER II trials. We compared the incidence of bleeding with dabigatran versus warfarin in pooled data from these studies. The localisation, bleeding severity, and the impact of key factors on the incidence of bleeding, were compared between the dabigatran and warfarin treatment group. Altogether, 2553 patients received dabigatran and 2554 warfarin, each for a mean of 164 days. The incidence of any bleeding event was significantly lower with dabigatran (hazard ratio [HR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.79), as was the incidence of the composite of MBEs and clinically relevant non-major bleeding events (HR 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50-0.76). The incidence of major bleeding events (MBEs) was also significantly lower with dabigatran in the double-dummy phase (HR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.36-0.99) but not statistically different between the two treatment arms when the entire treatment period is considered (HR 0.73 95% CI, 0.48-1.11). Increasing age, reduced renal function, Asian ethnicity, and concomitant antiplatelet therapy were associated with higher bleeding rates in both treatment groups. The reduction in bleeding with dabigatran compared to warfarin was consistent among the subgroups and with a similar pattern for intracranial, and urogenital major bleeding. In conclusion, treatment of venous thromboembolism with dabigatran is associated with a lower risk of bleeding compared to warfarin. This reduction did not differ with respect to the location of bleeding or among predefined subgroups. PMID:26403199

  18. The Impact of Vascular Access for In-Hospital Major Bleeding in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome at Moderate- to Very High-Bleeding Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Keun-Ho; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jung, Sang Sik; Kim, Moo Hyun; Yang, Hyoung-Mo; Yoon, Junghan; Rha, Seung Woon; Park, Keum Soo; Han, Kyoo Rok; Cho, Byung Ryul; Cha, Kwang Soo; Kim, Byung Ok; Hyon, Min Soo; Shin, Won-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the impact of vascular access on in-hospital major bleeding (IHMB) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We analyzed 995 patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina at the Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation of the ACC/AHA guidelines (CRUSADE) moderate- to very high-bleeding risk scores in trans-radial intervention (TRI) retrospective registry from 16 center...

  19. Clinical use of Plasma and Plasma Fractions in Bleeding Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆钺

    2008-01-01

    Internal and/or external bleeding is a common and sometimes very severe clinical manifestations of disorders of hemostasis. It may follow minor trauma or may arise apparently spontaneously. Disorders of hemostasis are generally divided into those caused by abnormalities of platelets, abnormalities of blood vessels, abnormalities of plasma coagulation factors, and hyperfibrinolysis, or com-binations of these. The use of plasma and plasma fractions dependents on the causing diseases and their severity. Several plasma products and plasma fractions are availa-ble in China and other plasma components and deriva-tives are commercially obtained. There have been the guidelines for their clinical use, and the revised ones will soon be published by Chinese Medical Association.

  20. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history.

  1. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saif; Gupta, N D; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2013-07-01

    Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history. PMID:24174736

  2. Invasive mole: a rare cause of postmenopausal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamour Guèye

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD describes a number of gynaecological tumours that originate in the trophoblast layer, including hydatidiform mole (complete or partial, placental site trophoblastic tumour, choriocarcinoma and invasive mole. Invasive moles are responsible of most cases of localized gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN. Invasive mole is a condition where a molar pregnancy, such as a partial hydatidiform mole or complete hydatidiform mole, invades the wall of the uterus. It is an extremely rare condition. As GTN is not considered in the differential diagnosis of postmenopausal uterine malignancies, its preoperative diagnosis is challenging. We report a case of invasive hydatidiform mole in a postmenopausal woman discovered in a context of postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent hysterectomy and followed up till her beta hCG levels were within normal limits. The patient is in complete remission in the first postoperative year. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(3.000: 451-453

  3. Spironolactone use and the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem E; Lassen, Annmarie T; Aalykke, Claus;

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT * Recent studies have suggested an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) in spironolactone users. * We conducted this population-based case-control study to confirm the association between spironolactone use and acute nonvaricose UGB alone...... risk factors and quantify the absolute risk. METHODS A population based case-control study was conducted in the County of Funen, Denmark. Cases (n = 3652) were all subjects with a first discharge diagnosis of serious UGB during the period 1995 to 2006. Age- and gender-matched controls (10 for each case......) (n = 36 502) were selected by risk set sampling. Data on all subjects' drug exposure and past medical history were retrieved from a prescription database and from the County's patient register. Confounders were controlled by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The adjusted odds ratio (OR...

  4. Rectal bleeding in a 4-month-old boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of bleeding Meckel's diverticulum is described in an infant. A 4-month-old boy was seen initially with a 24-hour history of painless hematochezia. His parents had noted two episodes of maroon-colored stool that did not appear to be associated with any abdominal distress. His medical history was unremarkable, with normal growth and development. Physical examination revealed a well-nourished, well-hydrated infant in no apparent distress. Vital signs were normal. Rectal examination revealed no masses, but bright-red blood was noted on the examining finger. Findings from the remainder of the examination were normal. An upright roentgenogram of the abdomen was obtained and demonstrated no abnormalities. The abdominal technetium scan was abnormal. An exploratory laparotomy was performed later on the day of admission

  5. Vascular gastric anomalies as a cause of relapsing bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Gradimir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although relatively rare, gastric vascular anomalies can be recognized as a source of both chronic and acute blood loss, most often presenting as long term iron deficiency anemia, rarely as severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Case report. We present five patients with various gastric vascular anomalies, diagnosed during the year of 2003. in the Clinical Hospital Center Zemun. The diagnosis was based on endoscopic appearances, clinical history and characteristic histological findings. Gastric vascular anomalies presented in our review were: portal hypertensive gastropathy, gastric antral vascular ectasia, angiodysplasia, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and Dieulafoy lesion. The used treatment modalities included surgery and various endoscopic techniques (schlerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation. Conclusion. Patients presented with chronic iron deficiency anemia or acute and recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage should be considered as having one of gastric vascular anomalies.

  6. Spectrum of dysfunctional uterine bleeding and its conservative management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find out the proportion of dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) and the response of patients of DUB to medical treatment at Abbasi Shaheed Hospital. Results: Two hundred and ten out of 1300 patients were diagnosed as having DUB with the proportion of 16.1%. Response rate was 20 - 30 % with oral mafenamic acid, 50% with capsule tranexamic acid, 60% and 50% respectively with oral contraceptive pills containing ethinylestradiol and norethisterone, and norethisterone alone. The response rate with capsulated micronised flavonoid and derivative of ethinyltestosterone was 90% and 75% respectively. Conclusion: The patients in adolescent age group are good responders to conservative treatment. Most of the patients preferred micronised flavonoid over derivative of ethinyltestosterone for some misconceptions regarding this medicine. The former was better tolerated with less side effects. (author)

  7. Placement of Covered Self-Expandable Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Severe Postsphincterotomy Bleeding: Outcomes of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Di Pisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of severe postsphincterotomy bleeding in an adult and a pediatric patient treated, as first options, with available techniques to induce hemostasis without success. Because of persisting bleeding, an expandable, partially covered, metallic stent was placed into the choledocho to mechanically compress the bleeding site. The bleeding was stopped. In the following days, both patients remained hemodynamically stable with no further episodes of bleeding. We believe that the application of a covered metallic stent in a severe postendoscopic-sphincterotomy bleeding, refractory to injection therapy, should be considered to avoid additional interventions, which carry a higher risk of complications, even in pediatric patients.

  8. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII. PMID:24608516

  9. Predictors of re-operation due to post-surgical bleeding in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther Lietzen, L; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Garne, Jens Peter;

    2012-01-01

    To assess the risk of re-operation due to post-surgical bleeding after initial breast cancer surgery and to identify predictors of re-operation.......To assess the risk of re-operation due to post-surgical bleeding after initial breast cancer surgery and to identify predictors of re-operation....

  10. Prevalence and risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chookhuan Nithiwathanapong; Sanit Reungrongrat; Nuthapong Ukarapol

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency and the risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).METHODS: The medical records of children aged between 1 month and 15 years admitted to the PICU between January 2002 and December 2002 were reviewed.Demographic data, indications for PICU admission, principle diagnosis, and basic laboratory investigations were recorded. Previously described factors for stress ulcer bleeding (mechanical ventilation, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal insufficiency, coagulopathy,thrombocytopenia, and intracranial pathology) were used as independent variables in a multivariate analysis.RESULTS: One hundred and seventy of two hundred and five medical records were eligible for review. The most common indication for PICU admission was respiratory failure (48.8%). Twenty-five children received stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis with ranitidine. The incidence of stress ulcer bleeding was 43.5%, in which 5.3% were clinically significant bleeding. Only mechanical ventilation and thrombocytopenia were significantly associated with stress ulcer bleeding using the univariate analysis.The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were 5.13(1.86-14.12) and 2.26 (1.07-4.74), respectively. However, the logistic regression analysis showed that mechanicai ventilation was the only significant risk factor with the odds ratio of 14.1.CONCLUSION: The incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding was high in critically ill children. Mechanical ventilation was an important risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Does recombinant human erythropoietin accelerate correction of post-ulcer-bleeding anaemia A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Ladas, Spiros D.; Polymeros, Dimitrios; Pagonis, Thomas; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Paspatis, Gregorios; Hatziargiriou, Maria; Raptis, Sotirios A.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Anaemia caused by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is treated with blood transfusion or iron, but patients usually face a two-month recovery period from post-haemorrhage anaemia. This prospective, randomised, open, pilot study was designed to investigate whether recombinant human erythropoietin (Epoetin) therapy accelerate haematocrit increase in the post-bleeding recovery period.

  12. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirasol, Raymond V; Tholany, Jason J; Reddy, Hasini; Fyfe-Kirschner, Billie S; Cheng, Christina L; Moubarak, Issam F; Nosher, John L

    2016-01-01

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized. However, the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices (CF-BIVADs) and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood. We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD. The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan. The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology. The intensity of bleeding, reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin, as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation, are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs. While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein, pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa, vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27158430

  13. A Source-Term Based Boundary Layer Bleed/Effusion Model for Passive Shock Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, Robert A.; Norris, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    A modeling framework for boundary layer effusion has been developed based on the use of source (or sink) terms instead of the usual practice of specifying bleed directly as a boundary condition. This framework allows the surface boundary condition (i.e. isothermal wall, adiabatic wall, slip wall, etc.) to remain unaltered in the presence of bleed. This approach also lends itself to easily permit the addition of empirical models for second order effects that are not easily accounted for by simply defining effective transpiration values. Two effusion models formulated for supersonic flows have been implemented into this framework; the Doerffer/Bohning law and the Slater formulation. These models were applied to unit problems that contain key aspects of the flow physics applicable to bleed systems designed for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems. The ability of each model to predict bulk bleed properties was assessed, as well as the response of the boundary layer as it passes through and downstream of a porous bleed system. The model assessment was performed with and without the presence of shock waves. Three-dimensional CFD simulations that included the geometric details of the porous plate bleed systems were also carried out to supplement the experimental data, and provide additional insights into the bleed flow physics. Overall, both bleed formulations fared well for the tests performed in this study. However, the sample of test problems considered in this effort was not large enough to permit a comprehensive validation of the models.

  14. Chronic portomesenteic venous thrombosis complicated by a high flow arteriovenous malformation presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, Adam N; Hebroni, Frank; McWilliams, Justin

    2016-02-01

    Portomesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition. The presenting symptoms of chronic portomesenteric venous thrombosis are often non-specific but may present with variceal bleeding. We present the first reported case of chronic portomesenteric venous thrombosis causing a high flow arteriovenous malformation that resulted in extensive gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25871943

  15. Detection and localization of lower gastrointestinal bleeding site with scintigraphic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successful management of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding frequently depends on accurate localization of the bleeding site. History and clinical findings are often misleading in localizing the site of hemorrhage. The widespread application of flexible endoscopy and selective arteriography now provides accurate diagnoses for the majority of patients with upper GI tract hemorrhage, but lower GI bleeding still is a serious diagnostic problem. Endoscopy and barium studies are of limited value in examining the small bowel and colon in the face of active hemorrhage. Arteriography, although successful in many cases, has limitations. The angiographic demonstration of bleeding is possible only when the injection of contrast material coincides with active bleeding. Since lower GI bleeding is commonly intermittent rather than continuous, a high rate of negative angiographic examinations has been reported. Repeated angiography to pursue recurrent episodes of bleeding is impractical. Because of these shortcomings, in the past decade several noninvasive scintigraphic techniques have been developed to detect and localize sites of GI bleeding. In this chapter the authors discuss details related to the technetium 99m sulfur colloid (Tc-SC) and technetium 99m-labeled red blood cell (Tc-RBC) techniques

  16. Localization of gastrointestinal bleeding: superiority of 99mTc sulfur colloid compared with angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary experience with technetium-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy in 43 patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding is described. Within minutes of the intravenous introduction of the radiopharmaceutical, a fraction of the injected activity extravasates at the bleeding site and is eliminated from the circulation. Because of rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical from the vascular pool by the reticuloendothelial system, a contrast develops between the site of bleeding and surrounding background. Based on animal experiments, bleeding rates as low as 0.05-0.1 ml/min can be detected with this technique. The sensitivity of this technique in the detection of the site of hemorrhage is significantly higher than arteriography or other techniques that use radioactive blood pool indicators. In this study all patients underwent both scintigraphy and arteriography within several hours. In 20 patients with negative scintigrams, arteriography showed no evidence of bleeding. In the other 23 patients with scintigraphic evidence of hemorrhage, arteriograms were positive for bleeding only in 10. In 19 of the 23 patients, a cause for bleeding was eventually established by other means. This technique appears to offer a simple, practical, and reliable approach to the evaluation of patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding

  17. Localization of gastrointestinal bleeding: superiority of /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid compared with angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary experience with technetium-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy in 43 patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding is described. Within minutes of the intravenous introduction of the radiopharmaceutical, a fraction of the injected activity extravasates at the bleeding site and is eliminated from the circulation. Because of rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical from the vascular pool by the rediculoendothelial system, a contrast develops between the site of bleeding and surrounding background. Based on animal experiments, bleeding rates as low as 0.05-0.1 ml/min can be detected with this technique. The sensitivity of this technique in the detection of the site of hemorrhage is significantly higher than arteriography or other techniques that use radioactive blood pool indicators. In this study all patients underwent both scintigraphy and arteriography within several hours. In 20 patients with negative scintigrams, arteriography showed no evidence of bleeding. In the other 23 patients with scintigraphic evidence of hemorrhage, arteriograms were positive for bleeding only in 10. In 19 of the 23 patients, a cause for bleeding was eventually established by other means. This technique appears to offer a simple, practical, and reliable approach to the evaluation of patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding

  18. The role of capsule endoscopy after negative CT enterography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) after negative computed tomographic (CT) enterography. We retrospectively included 30 patients with OGIB who received capsule endoscopy after negative CT enterography. The median age of the patients was 60 years, and 60% of patients were male. The median follow-up duration was 8 months. Overt bleeding was 60%, and occult bleeding was 40%. Based on capsule endoscopy results, a definitive diagnosis was made for 17 patients (57%): ulcer in nine patients (30%), active bleeding with no identifiable cause in five (17%), angiodysplasia in two (7%) and Dieulafoy's lesion in one (3%). Two patients with jejunal ulcers were diagnosed with Crohn's disease. Seven patients (41%) with positive capsule endoscopy received double balloon enteroscopy and two patients (12%) received steroid treatment for Crohn's disease. Patients with overt bleeding, a previous history of bleeding, or who received large amounts of blood transfusions were more likely to show positive capsule endoscopy. Capsule endoscopy showed high diagnostic yields in patients with OGIB after negative CT enterography and may help to provide further therapeutic plans for patients with OGIB and negative CT enterography. circle CT enterography has been widely used in evaluating obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). circle Capsule endoscopy showed high diagnostic yield for OGIB after negative CT enterography. circle Negative CT enterography does not exclude important causes of small bowel bleeding. circle Most lesions missed at CT-enterography are flat and can be detected by capsule endoscopy. (orig.)

  19. Determinants of Bleeding Risk in Patients on Antithrombotic and Antifibrinolytic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Karina; Schulman, Sam

    2008-01-01

    The risk of bleeding associated with antithrombotic and fibrinolytic therapy depends on factors that are specific for the drugs and the patients. In this narrative review, we describe the most important risk factors for bleeding for each class of drugs. Pertinent examples are recent initiation of th

  20. 77 FR 41930 - Bleed Air Cleaning and Monitoring Equipment and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... technology for the engine and auxiliary power unit bleed air supplied to the passenger cabin and flight deck... Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478... of removing oil-based contaminants from the bleed air supplied to the passenger cabin and flight...

  1. Techno-economic comparison of technologies for the concentration of a mixed leachant bleed stream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.P.; Alkemade, M.M.C.; Bierman, G.

    1995-01-01

    In a new hydrometallurgical process for recovery of lead from lead oxide secondaries, liquid effluence is minimized by jointly treating contaminated washing water and leachant bleed. To enable internal recycling of the leachant bleed and recover pure water, it is necessary to incorporate a concentra

  2. The effect of transcatheter arterial embolisation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolisation with coils for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy.......The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolisation with coils for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy....

  3. Increased accuracy in heparin and protamine administration decreases bleeding: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Marx; Møller, Christian H; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    Three to 5 percent of the patients undergoing cardiac surgery are reoperated because of bleeding. When a surgical cause can be excluded, heparin/protamine mismatch may be considered. Insufficient reversal of heparin and overdosing of protamine may cause postoperative bleeding. The purpose of the ...

  4. Esophageal Dieulafoy's lesion: an exceedingly rare cause of massive upper GI bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliaras, George P; Carollo, Andrea; Bogen, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion, a dilated aberrant submucosal vessel which erodes the overlying epithelium, is a relatively rare but potentially fatal cause of gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding. The esophagus is a very rare location for the lesion. Here we present a case of massive upper GI bleeding, secondary to this remarkably rare occurrence, which was amendable to endoscopic intervention. PMID:27302497

  5. Cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for the management of abnormal uterine bleeding (heavy menstrual bleeding and post-menopausal bleeding): a decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Natalie A M; Barton, Pelham M; Breijer, Maria; Caffrey, Orla; Opmeer, Brent C; Timmermans, Anne; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S; Clark, T Justin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and post-menopausal bleeding (PMB) together constitute the commonest gynaecological presentation in secondary care and impose substantial demands on health service resources. Accurate diagnosis is of key importance to realising effective treatment, reducing morbidity and, in the case of PMB, reducing mortality. There are many tests available, including transvaginal scan (TVS), endometrial biopsy (EBx), saline infusion sonography and outpatient hysteroscopy (OPH); however, optimal diagnostic work-up is unclear. OBJECTIVES To determine the most cost-effective diagnostic testing strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of (i) HMB and (ii) PMB. DATA SOURCES Parameter inputs were derived from systematic quantitative reviews, individual patient data (IPD) from existing data sets and focused searches for specific data. In the absence of data estimates, the consensus view of an expert clinical panel was obtained. METHODS Two clinically informed decision-analytic models were constructed to reflect current service provision for the diagnostic work-up of women presenting with HMB and PMB. The model-based economic evaluation took the form of a cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the NHS in a contemporary, 'one-stop' secondary care clinical setting, where all indicated testing modalities would be available during a single visit. RESULTS Two potentially cost-effective testing strategies for the initial investigation of women with HMB were identified: OPH alone or in combination with EBx. Although a combination testing strategy of OPH + EBx was marginally more effective, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was approximately £21,000 to gain one more satisfied patient, whereas for OPH it was just £360 when compared with treatment with the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) without investigation. Initial testing with OPH was the most cost-effective testing approach for women wishing to preserve

  6. Mucosal polymerase chain reaction for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hwai-Jeng Lin; Wen-Ching Lo; Chin-Lin Perng; Guan-Ying Tseng; Anna Fen-Yau Li; Yueh-Hsing Ou

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori(Hpylori) has been linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma.Conventional invasive tests are less sensitive than noninvasive tests in diagnosing H pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers. Polymerase chain reaction is a sensitive and accurate method for diagnosing H pylori infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic role of mucosal polymerase chain reaction for H pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers.METHODS: In patients with bleeding, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, we checked rapid urease test,histology, bacterial culture and mucosal polymerase chain reaction for detecting H pylori infection. Positive H pylori infection was defined as positive culture or both a positive histology and a positive rapid urease test. For mucosal polymerase chain reaction of Hpylori, we checked vacA (s1a, s1b, s1c, s2, m1, m1T, m2),iceA1,iceA2 and cag A.RESULTS: Between October 2000 and April 2002, 88 patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (males/females: 60/28, gastric ulcers/duodenal ulcers: 55/33), 81 patients with non-bleeding peptic ulcers (males/females: 54/27, gastric ulcers/duodenal ulcers: 45/36) and 37 patients with chronic gastritis (males/females: 24/13) were enrolled in this study. In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, 45 patients (51%), 71 patients (88%)and 20 patients (54%) respectively were found to have positive H pylori infection (P<0.001). In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, polymerase chain reaction for H pylori infection was positive in 54 patients (61%), 70 patients (86%) and 20 patients (54%) respectively (P<0.001). The sensitivity,positive predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of mucosal polymerase reaction for Hpylori infection were significantly lower in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (84%, 79%and 81%) than in

  7. Prognostic factors for recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuliana Jamanca-Poma; Antonio Velasco-Guardado; Concepción Pi(n)ero-Pérez; Renzo Calderón-Begazo; Josue Uma(n)a-Mejía; Fernando Geijo-Martínez; Antonio Rodríguez-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To analyze the effectiveness of the endoscopic therapy and to identify prognostic factors for recurrent bleeding.METHODS:Retrospective study of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Dieulafoy's lesion (DL) from 2005 to 2011.We analyzed the demographic characteristics of the patients,risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding,endoscopic findings,characteristics of the endoscopic treatment,and the recurrence of bleeding.We included cases in which endoscopy described a lesion compatible with Dieulafoy.We excluded patients who had potentially bleeding lesions such as angiodysplasia in other areas or had undergone other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures.RESULTS:Twenty-nine patients with DL were identified.Most of them were men with an average age of 71.5 years.Fifty-five percent of the patients received antiaggregatory or anticoagulant therapy.The most common location for DL was the stomach (51.7%).The main type of bleeding was oozing in 65.5% of cases.In 27.6% of cases,there was arterial (spurting) bleeding,and 6.9% of the patients presented with an adherent clot.A single endoscopic treatment was applied to nine patients (31%); eight of them with adrenaline and one with argon,while 69% of the patients received combined treatment.Six patients (20.7%)presented with recurrent bleeding at a median of 4 d after endoscopy (interquartile range =97.75).Within these six patients,the new endoscopic treatment obtained a therapeutic success of 100%.The presence of arterial bleeding at endoscopy was associated with a higher recurrence rate for bleeding (50% vs 33.3% for other type of bleeding) [P =0.024,odds ratio (OR) =8.5,95% CI =1.13-63.87].The use of combined endoscopic treatment prevented the recurrence of bleeding (10% vs 44.4% of single treatment) (P =0.034,OR =0.14,95% CI =0.19-0.99).CONCLUSION:Endoscopic treatment of DL is safe and effective.Adrenaline monotherapy and arterial (spurting) bleeding are associated with a

  8. Comparing efficacy and safety of fibrinogen concentrate to cryoprecipitate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, N H L; Stensballe, J; Afshari, A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding is associated with the depletion of fibrinogen, thus increasing the risk of coagulopathy, further bleeding and transfusion requirements. Both fibrinogen concentrate and cryoprecipitate replenish low plasma fibrinogen levels. This systematic review aims to identify and evaluate...... evidence of efficacy and safety of fibrinogen concentrate and cryoprecipitate in bleeding patients. METHOD: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, EMBASE up to 2nd of March 2015 were among the electronic search strategies of randomized controlled trials and non......-randomized studies with meta-analysis employed. Studies for inclusion required bleeding patients being treated with either fibrinogen concentrate or cryoprecipitate. Mortality was the primary endpoint. Secondary outcomes included bleeding, coagulopathy, transfusion requirements and clinical complications related to...

  9. Near fatal spontaneous intraperitoneal bleeding: A rare manifestation in a congenital factor X deficiency carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K V Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital factor X (FX deficiency is a rare coagulation disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance, characterized by bleeding of variable severity. Bleeding severity generally correlates with the level of FX functional activity and severe bleeding usually occurs in moderate and severe deficiency, when FX coagulant activity is <5%. FX activity above 10% is infrequently associated with severe bleeding. Here we report the rare occurrence of life-threatening massive spontaneous intraperitoneal bleeding with hypovolemic shock, resulting from spontaneous rupture of an ovarian luteal cyst in a 25-year-old FX deficiency carrier woman, with a FX activity of 26%. She was managed successfully conservatively, with fresh frozen plasma and packed red blood cell transfusions and she showed gradual improvement. The case is being reported to discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare inherited coagulation disorder.

  10. Endoclipping treatment of life-threatening rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panagiotis Katsinelos,; Jannis Kountouras,; Georgios Dimitriadis,; Grigoris Chatzimavroudis,; Christos Zavos,; Ioannis Pilpilidis,; George Paroutoglou,; George Germanidis,; Kostas Mimidis

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bleeding is frequently seen in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate, but is usually mild and stops spontaneously. We report what is believed to be the first case of life-threatening rectal bleeding following this procedure, which was successfully treated by endoscopic intervention through placement of three clips on the sites of bleeding. This case emphasizes endoscopic intervention associated with endoclipping as a safe and effective method to achieve hemostasis in massive rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy. Additionally, current data on the complications of the TRUS-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate and the options for treating fulminant rectal bleeding, a consequence of this procedure, are described.

  11. Novel, high incidence exercise-induced muscle bleeding model in hemophilia B mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranholm, M.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Broberg, M. L.;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Muscle hematomas are the second most common complication of hemophilia and insufficient treatment may result in serious and even life-threatening complications. Hemophilic dogs and rats do experience spontaneous muscle bleeding, but currently, no experimental animal model is available...... specifically investigating spontaneous muscle bleeds in a hemophilic setting. AIM: The objective of this study was to develop a model of spontaneous muscle bleeds in hemophilia B mice. We hypothesized that treadmill exercise would induce muscle bleeds in hemophilia B mice but not in normal non-hemophilic mice...... and that treatment with recombinant factor IX (rFIX) before treadmill exercise could prevent the occurrence of pathology. METHODS: A total of 203 mice (123 F9-KO and 80 C57BL/6NTac) were included in three separate studies: (i) the model implementation study investigating the bleeding pattern in...

  12. /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBC scan. Diagnostic method for lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience with 62 /sub 99m/Tc-labeled in vivo scans performed for lower gastrointestinal bleeding is discussed. Thirty-seven scans were deemed positive. The tendency of scans to become positive correlated with observations of active bleeding. Five patients had fulminant hemorrhage, necessitating emergency operation. In this group, scanning accurately located the bleeding sources prior to intervention. Seven other patients having later operations bled less rapidly. The bleeding site was localized accurately by scanning in three of these patients. Two studies were falsely positive and two were negative, whereas angiography was positive in two patients studied. Labeled RBC scanning is a useful technique in the early evaluation of patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding, obviating the need of arteriography in some cases

  13. My Patient Taking A Novel Oral Anticoagulant Presents With Major GI Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amartya Kundu; Partha Sardar; Jessica Huston; Parijat Sen; Saurav Chatterjee; Ramez Nairooz; John J. Ryan; Wilbert S. Aronow

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Novel Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs such as Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban and Edoxaban are becoming increasingly popular choices for anticoagulation in place of oral Vitamin K Antagonists in various clinical settings. However, they are thought to be associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Moreover, no specific antidote is available which can rapidly reverse the anti-coagulant action of NOACs raising concern that gastrointestinal bleeding with NOACs could carry a worse prognosis than that associated with conventional agents. In this review, we describe a case of gastrointestinal bleeding in the setting of NOAC use, followed by a brief overview of the pivotal trials involving NOACs. Clinical issues such as pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of NOAC induced GI bleeding have been described. Future trials will help elucidate the true incidence, risk factors and preventive strategies for NOAC associated gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Diagnostic performance of CT angiography in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hang; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of computed tomography angiography (CTA) in identifying the cause of bleeding and to determine the clinical features associated with a positive test result of CTA in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We included 111 consecutive patients (61 men and 50 women; mean age: 63.4 years; range: 28-89 years) who visited emergency department with overt GI bleeding. They underwent CTA as a first-line diagnostic modality from July through December 2010. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the CTA images and determined the presence of any definite or potential bleeding focus by consensus. An independent assessor determined the cause of bleeding based on other diagnostic studies and/or clinical follow-up. The diagnostic performance of CTA and clinical characteristics associated with positive CTA results were analyzed. To identify a definite or potential bleeding focus, the diagnostic yield of CTA was 61.3% (68 of 111). The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were 84.8% (67 of 79), 96.9% (31 of 32), 98.5% (67 of 68), and 72.1% (31 of 43), respectively. Positive CTA results were associated with the presence of massive bleeding (p = 0.001, odds ratio: 11.506). Computed tomography angiography as a first-line diagnostic modality in patients presenting with overt GI bleeding showed a fairly high accuracy. It could identify definite or potential bleeding focus with a moderate diagnostic yield and a high PPV. CTA is particularly useful in patients with massive bleeding.

  15. The international normalized ratio does not reflect bleeding risk in esophageal variceal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy T Hshieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The international normalized ratio (INR has not been validated as a predictor of bleeding risk in cirrhotics. The aim of this study was to determine whether elevation in the INR correlated with risk of esophageal variceal hemorrhage and whether correction of the INR prior to endoscopic therapy affects failure to control bleeding. Patients and Methods: Patient records were retrospectively reviewed from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010. Cases were cirrhotics admitted to the hospital due to bleeding esophageal varices. Controls were cirrhotics with a history of non-bleeding esophageal varices admitted with ascites or encephalopathy. All variceal bleeders were treated with octreotide, antibiotics, and band ligation. Failure to control bleeding was defined according to the Baveno V criteria. Results: We analyzed 74 cases and 74 controls. The mean INR at presentation was lower in those with bleeding varices compared to non-bleeders (1.61 vs 1.74, P = 0.03. Those with bleeding varices had higher serum sodium (136.1 vs 133.8, P = 0.02, lower hemoglobin (9.59 vs 11.0, P < 0.001, and lower total bilirubin (2.47 vs 5.50, P < 0.001. Multivariable logistic regression showed total bilirubin to inversely correlate with bleeding (OR = 0.74. Bleeders received a mean of 1.14 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP prior to endoscopy (range 0-11 units. Of the 14 patients (20% with failure to control bleeding, median INR (1.8 vs 1.5, P = 0.02 and median units of FFP transfused (2 vs 0, P = 0.01 were higher than those with hemostasis after the initial endoscopy. Conclusions: The INR reflects liver dysfunction, not bleeding risk. Correction of INR with FFP has little effect on hemostasis.

  16. Diagnostic performance of CT angiography in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of computed tomography angiography (CTA) in identifying the cause of bleeding and to determine the clinical features associated with a positive test result of CTA in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We included 111 consecutive patients (61 men and 50 women; mean age: 63.4 years; range: 28-89 years) who visited emergency department with overt GI bleeding. They underwent CTA as a first-line diagnostic modality from July through December 2010. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the CTA images and determined the presence of any definite or potential bleeding focus by consensus. An independent assessor determined the cause of bleeding based on other diagnostic studies and/or clinical follow-up. The diagnostic performance of CTA and clinical characteristics associated with positive CTA results were analyzed. To identify a definite or potential bleeding focus, the diagnostic yield of CTA was 61.3% (68 of 111). The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were 84.8% (67 of 79), 96.9% (31 of 32), 98.5% (67 of 68), and 72.1% (31 of 43), respectively. Positive CTA results were associated with the presence of massive bleeding (p = 0.001, odds ratio: 11.506). Computed tomography angiography as a first-line diagnostic modality in patients presenting with overt GI bleeding showed a fairly high accuracy. It could identify definite or potential bleeding focus with a moderate diagnostic yield and a high PPV. CTA is particularly useful in patients with massive bleeding.

  17. Long-term dual antiplatelet treatment and bleeding complications in diabetic patients treated with drug eluting stent implantation

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    Vassilis Voudris

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Long-term DAPLT in diabetic patients after DES implantation is associated with higher risk of overall and minor but not major bleeding; smoking may have a significant role in the occurrence of bleeding complications.

  18. Distribution of bleeding gastrointestinal angioectasias in a Western population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth Bollinger; Daniel Raines; Patrick Saitta

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO define which segments of the gastrointestinal tract are most likely to yield angioectasias for ablative therapy.METHODS:A retrospective chart review was performed for patients treated in the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Gastroenterology clinics between the dates of July 1,2007 and October 1,2010.The selection of cases for review was initiated by use of our electronic medical record to identify all patients with a diagnosis of angioectasia,angiodysplasia,or arteriovenous malformation.Of these cases,chart reviews identified patients who had a complete evaluation of their gastrointestinal tract as defined by at least one upper endoscopy,colonoscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy within the past three years.Patients without evidence of overt gastrointestinal bleeding or iron deficiency anemia associated with intestinal angioectasias were classified as asymptomatic and excluded from this analysis.Thirty-five patients with confirmed,bleeding intestinal angioectasias who had undergone complete endoscopic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract were included in the final analysis.RESULTS:A total of 127 cases were reviewed.Sixtysix were excluded during subsequent screening due to lack of complete small bowel evaluation and/or lack of documentation of overt bleeding or iron deficiency anemia.The 61 remaining cases were carefully examined with independent review of endoscopic images as well as complete capsule endoscopy videos.This analysis excluded 26 additional cases due to insufficient records/images for review,incomplete capsule examination,poor capsule visualization or lack of confirmation of typical angioectasias by the principal investigator on independent review.Thirty-five cases met criteria for final analysis.All study patients were age 50 years or older and 13 patients (37.1%) had chronic kidney disease stage 3 or higher.Twenty of 35 patients were taking aspirin (81 mg or 325 mg),clopidogrel,and/or warfarin,with 8/20 on combination

  19. 75 FR 64314 - Product Development Program for Interventions in Patients With Severe Bleeding Due to Trauma or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... With Severe Bleeding Due to Trauma or Other Causes; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Bleeding Due to Trauma or Other Causes.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to discuss possible... resulting from trauma, has been complicated by the lack of a consensus definition of severe bleeding as...

  20. Treatment of massive gastrointestinal bleeding occurred during autologous stem cell transplantation with recombinant activated factor VII and octreotide

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    Erman Atas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, patients may suffer from bleeding. One of the bleeding type is gastrointestinal (GI which has serious morbidity and mortality in children with limited treatment options. Herein, we presented a child with upper GI bleeding post autologous HSCT controlled successfully by using recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa and octreotide infusion.

  1. Prevention of bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in surgical patients with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewski, Adam; Szczepanik, Andrzej; Misiak, Andrzej; Bykowska, Ksenia; Szopiński, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive hemorrhagic disorder. The major clinical symptoms include: bleeding from the oral cavity, epistaxis, menorrhagia, spontaneous hemarthros, bleeding to the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, and perioperative bleeding. The aim of this study was to present our experience in preventing bleeding and hemorrhagic disorders in surgical patients with inherited FVII deficiency by using recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa), and with prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs). In 2002-2011, 17 patients with inherited FVII deficiency underwent surgery. Thirteen patients had isolated FVII deficiency below 10%, and four patients 10-25. To prevent bleeding and hemorrhagic complications, we administered small single doses of rFVIIa (Novo-Seven) at 12-h intervals to 15 patients on surgery day and on day 1 following surgery, then every 24 h; PCCs were administered (Prothromplex, Beriplex) to two patients. No symptoms of bleeding, hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed in the perioperative and 1-month observation period in surgical patients treated with rFVIIa. One patient treated with PCC (Prothromplex) developed distal deep vein thrombosis on postoperative day 7. The results suggest that small, single, every 12-h doses of rFVIIa (NovoSeven) and in next days after surgery one time every 24 h are well tolerated and effective for prevention of thromboembolic, bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in FVII-deficient patients. Antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin should be applied in patients using PCCs. PMID:25688458

  2. The results of Helicobacter pylori eradication on repeated bleeding in patients with stomach ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Darko; Vcev, Aleksandar; Soldo, Ivan; Timarac, Jasna; Dmitrović, Branko; Misević, Tonci; Ivezić, Zdravko; Kraljik, Nikola

    2005-06-01

    The triple therapy of Helicobacter pylori eradication prevents repeated bleeding from stomach ulcer. The aim of this one-way blind prospective study was to evaluate the efficiency of the two-week triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication in preventing renewed bleeding in patients with stomach ulcer within one year. This research included 60 hospitalized patients with bleeding stomach ulcer and positive Helicobacter pylori infection, 34 men and 26 women (average age 59.7 years). The patients were given therapeutic scheme of omeprazol--amoxicilin--metrodinazol (OAM) eradication for 14 days. Eradication of H. pylori infection was defined as lack of proof of the infection one month or several months after therapy suspension. By applying triple OAM therapy within two weeks the eradication was successful in 72%. In the group of 17 H. pylori positive patients there were 8 patients (47.6%) with repeated stomach ulcer and 3 patients (18%) with bleeding. Within the group of 43 H. pylori negative patients there were only 2 patients (4.65%) with repeated stomach ulcer and 1 patient (2%) with bleeding, during the observed period of 12 months. This research confirms the hypothesis about the necessity of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding stomach ulcer as prevention of repeated bleeding. PMID:16117312

  3. Estimation of transient increases in bleeding risk associated with physical activity in children with haemophilia

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    Latimer Jane

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it is widely appreciated that vigorous physical activity can increase the risk of bleeding episodes in children with haemophilia, the magnitude of the increase in risk is not known. Accurate risk estimates could inform decisions made by children with haemophilia and their parents about participation in physical activity and aid the development of optimal prophylactic schedules. The aim of this study is to provide an accurate estimate of the risks of bleeding associated with vigorous physical activity in children with haemophilia. Methods/Design The study will be a case-crossover study nested within a prospective cohort study. Children with moderate or severe haemophilia A or B, recruited from two paediatric haematology departments in Australia, will participate in the study. The child, or the child's parent or guardian, will report bleeding episodes experienced over a 12-month period. Following a bleeding episode, the participant will be interviewed by telephone about exposures to physical activity in the case period (8 hours before the bleed and 2 control periods (an 8 hour period at the same time on the day preceding the bleed and an 8 hour period two days preceding the bleed. Conditional logistic regression will be used to estimate the risk of participating in vigorous physical activity from measures of exposure to physical activity in the case and control periods. Discussion This case-control study will provide estimates of the risk of participation in vigorous physical activity in children with haemophilia.

  4. Missed bleeding events after ticagrelor in PEGASUS trial: Massive non-compliance, information censoring, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebruany, Victor; Tomek, Ales

    2016-07-15

    PEGASUS trial reported reduction of composite primary endpoint after conventional 180mg/daily ticagrelor (CT), and lower 120mg/daily dose ticagrelor (LT) at expense of extra bleeding. Following approval of CT and LT for long-term secondary prevention indication, recent FDA review verified some bleeding outcomes in PEGASUS. To compare the risks after CT and LT against placebo by seven TIMI scale variables, and 9 bleeding categories considered as serious adverse events (SAE) in light of PEGASUS drug discontinuation rates (DDR). The DDR in all PEGASUS arms was high reaching astronomical 32% for CT. The distribution of some outcomes (TIMI major, trauma, epistaxis, iron deficiency, hemoptysis, and anemia) was reasonable. However, the TIMI minor events were heavily underreported when compared to similar trials. Other bleedings (intracranial, spontaneous, hematuria, and gastrointestinal) appear sporadic, lacking expected dose-dependent impact of CT and LT. Few SAE outcomes (fatal, ecchymosis, hematoma, bruises, bleeding) paradoxically reported more bleeding after LT than after CT. Many bleeding outcomes were probably missed in PEGASUS potentially due to massive non-compliance, information censoring, or both. The FDA must improve reporting of trial outcomes especially in the sponsor-controlled environment when DDR and incomplete follow-up rates are high. PMID:27128533

  5. Hemostatic action of EGF-endospray on mucosectomy-induced ulcer bleeding animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Byoung Wook; Maeng, Jin Hee; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Don Haeng; Yang, Su-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Gastric bleeding is one of the irritant problems in ulcer patients. In this study, we evaluated hemostatic action of ulcer-coating powder (EGF-endospray) on gastric ulcer animal models. EGF-endospray, containing epidermal growth factor, is designed to be applied through an endoscope. Hemostatic action of the EGF-endospray was evaluated on gastric hemorrhage models of rabbits and micro-pigs. The EGF-endospray was directly applied onto a mucosal resection (MR)-induced gastric bleeding focus in a rabbit model. In a porcine model, the EGF-endospray was applied once via an endoscopy to a bleeding lesion created by endoscopic submucosal dissection. The bleeding focus was then observed via an endoscope. In the rabbit model, EGF-endospray treatment significantly shortened mean bleeding time in comparison with other treatments (104.3 vs 548.0 vs 393.2 s for the EGF-endospray, the non-treated control and the epinephrine injection, respectively). In the micro-pig model, EGF-endospray showed immediate hemostatic action and prolonged covering of the bleeding focus for over 72 h. Histology proved mucosal thickness was more efficiently recovered in all EGF-endospray treated animals. The results of the present study suggest that the EGF-endospray is a promising hemostatic agent for GI bleeding. PMID:25585984

  6. Effect of needle tract bleeding on occurrence of pneumothorax after transthoracic needle biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Occasionally bleeding along the needle trajectory is observed at post-biopsy computed tomographic sections. This study was designed to evaluate the possible effect of needle tract bleeding on the occurrence of pneumothorax and on requirement of chest tube insertion. Materials and methods: Two hundred eighty-four needle biopsies performed in 275 patients in whom the needle traversed the aerated lung parenchyma were retrospectively reviewed. Bleeding along the needle tract, occurrence of pneumothorax and need for chest tube insertion, type and size of the needle, size of the lesion, length of the lung traversed by the needle, presence or absence of emphysema were noted. Effect of these factors on the rate of pneumothorax and needle-tract bleeding was evaluated. The data were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Pneumothorax developed in 100 (35%) out of 284 procedures requiring chest tube placement in 16 (16%). Variables that were significantly associated with an increased risk of pneumothorax were depth of the lesion (P 0.05). However, analysis of the relation between length of lung traversed by the needle, tract-bleeding and pneumothorax rate indicated that tract-bleeding had a preventive effect on development of pneumothorax (P 0.05). Conclusion: Bleeding in the needle tract has a preventive effect on the occurrence of the pneumothorax in deep-seated lesions and in the presence of emphysema, although it does not affect the overall rate of pneumothorax

  7. [New methods for endoscopic hemostasis: focus on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, J G; Peiffer, K H

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent emergency in daily clinical practice of a gastroenterologist. While incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal bleeding are decreasing in many countries, numbers of endoscopic procedures are increasing. Endoscopic therapy of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is still mainly based on "classical" procedures like injection of vasoactive drugs (i. e. epinephrine) or blood derivates, application of through-the-scope hemoclips (TTSC), Argon plasma coagulation and bipolar coagulation. However, in the last years new endoscopic techniques especially for non-variceal gastrointestinal bleedings have become available and enriched our endoscopic equipment. For example, over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) surpass the size of TTSCs and have been successfully established for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding and leak closure of fistulas and perforations. In addition, hemostatic powders were shown to achieve primary hemostasis in several cases of gastrointestinal bleeding. Besides a brief overview of "classical" endoscopic procedures for hemostasis of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding, this review focuses on new epidemiological data and uprising methods for endoscopic hemostasis. PMID:26894683

  8. Use of technetium-labeled autologous red blood cells in detection of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty patients with occult gastrointestinal bleeding underwent diagnostic evaluation with autologous TcRBC imaging, which identified a locus of bleeding in 19. Bleeding was demonstrated in the esophagogastroduodenal area in four patients, the cecum in four patients, the ascending colon or hepatic flexure in nine patients and the descending colon in two patients. In the six patients who underwent surgical intervention, the source of bleeding had been correctly located by imaging. The advantages of imaging over those of conventional arteriography included its minimally invasive nature and its ability to detect areas of intermittent minimal bleeding for a period of 30 hours. The major disadvantages of the technique were that localization of the site of bleeding was not as precise as that obtained with arteriography, imaging could not be used as a treatment modality and the nature of the lesion could not be defined. However, we believe that, as an adjunct to conventional angiography and other techniques, autologous TcRBC imaging will improve the localization of obscure foci of gastrointestinal bleeding. Studies are underway to determine the proper place of TcRBC imaging in the gastroenterologic armamentarium. Its noninvasive nature and sensitivity to intermittent hemorrhage suggest that it may become the initial investigative modality of choice in many instances

  9. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopic Approaches to Upper Gastrointestinal System Bleeding in Children

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    Fatih Aygün

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ti­on: Upper gastrointestinal system bleeding in children is always very important problems requiring further investigation. The aim of the study was to investigate retrospectively the etiologies of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the therapeutic endoscopic approach to the bleeding, and the efficacy of the endoscopy in the treatment of pediatric age group. Materials and Methods: In this study, 139 (F/M: 63/76 cases diagnosed as upper gastrointestinal bleeding and followed up by the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology were classified into groups according to the age, etiology, the presence of varicose veins, and history of drug ingestion. In addition bleedings caused by peptic ulcer disease were classified according to Forrest classification. Values of p0.68. Discussion: Endoscopic procedure is very useful in both the determination of etiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in childhood. (Jo­ur­nal of Cur­rent Pe­di­at­rics 2012; 10: 1-7

  10. The practical management of bleedings during treatment with direct oral anticoagulants: the emergency reversal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding represents the most feared complication of the new oral anticoagulants, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, as well as all the antithrombotic therapies. During the acute phase of bleeding in patients taking anticoagulants, restoration of an effective hemostasis represents the cornerstone of practical management. While vitamin K antagonists are effectively and promptly reversed by specific antidotes such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs, fresh frozen plasma or vitamin K, it is still not clear how to manage the urgent reversal of DOACs during life-threatening or major bleedings due to the lack of specific antidotes. However, in vitro and ex vivo studies have suggested some potential strategies to reverse DOACs in clinical practice, other than general support measures that are always recommended. Activated charcoal could be used in subjects with DOAC-related bleedings presenting to the emergency department within two hours of the last oral intake. Non-activated or activated PCCs (FEIBA and recombinant activated Factor VII (raFVII seem to be the optimal strategy for urgent reversal of dabigatran, while non-activated PCCs seem to have efficacy in reversing rivaroxaban. Due to its low plasma protein binding, dabigatran could be also dialyzed in urgent cases. Clinically relevant non-major bleedings and minor bleedings should be treated with general and local measures, respectively, and, when necessary, with dose delay or drug withdrawal. In this article, the Authors describe the practical approach to bleedings occurring during DOACs treatment.

  11. Systematic review of observational studies assessing bleeding risk in patients with atrial fibrillation not using anticoagulants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Cruz Lopes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with atrial fibrillation considering use of anticoagulants must balance stroke reduction against bleeding risk. Knowledge of bleeding risk without the use of anticoagulants may help inform this decision. PURPOSE: To determine the rate of major bleeding reported in observational studies of atrial fibrillation patients not receiving Vitamin K antagonists (VKA. DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL to October 2011 and examined reference lists of eligible studies and related reviews. STUDY SELECTION: All longitudinal cohort studies that included over 100 adult patients with atrial fibrillation not receiving VKA. DATA EXTRACTION: Teams of two reviewers independently and in duplicate adjudicated eligibility, assessed risk of bias and abstracted study characteristics and outcomes. DATA SYNTHESIS: Twenty-one eligible studies included 96,448 patients. Major bleeding rates varied widely, from 0 to 4.69 events per 100 patient-years. The pooled estimate in 13 studies with 78839 patients was 1.59 with a 99% confidence interval of 1.10 to 2.3 and median 1.42 (interquartile range 0.62-2.70. Pooled estimates for fatal bleeding and non-fatal bleeding from 4 studies that reported these outcomes were, respectively, 0.40 (0.34 to 0.46 and 1.18 (0.30 to 4.56 per 100 patient-years. In 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs the median rate of major bleeding in patients not receiving either anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy was 0.6 (interquartile 0.2 to 0.90, and in 12 RCTs the median rate of major bleeding in patients receiving a single antiplatelet agent was 0.75 (interquartile 0.4 to 1.4. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that patients with atrial fibrillation not receiving VKA enrolled in observational studies represent a population on average at higher risk of bleeding.

  12. Outcome of patients who have undergone total enteroscopy for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takayoshi Shishido; Shiro Oka; Shinji Tanaka; Hiroki Imagawa; Yoshito Takemura; Shigeto Yoshida; Kazuaki Chayama

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the diagnostic success and outcome among patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding who underwent total enteroscopy with double-balloon endoscopy.METHODS:Total enteroscopy was attempted in 156 patients between August 2003 and June 2008 at Hiroshima University Hospital and achieved in 75 (48.1%).It is assessed whether sources of bleeding were identified,treatment methods,complications,and 1-year outcomes (including re-bleeding) after treatment,and we compared re-bleeding rates among patients.RESULTS:The source of small bowel bleeding was identified in 36 (48.0%) of the 75 total enteroscopy patients; the source was outside the small bowel in 11 patients (14.7%) and not identified in 28 patients (37.3%).Sixty-one of the 75 patients were followed up for more than 1 year (27.2 ± 13.3 mo).Four (6.6%)of these patients showed signs of re-bleeding during the first year,but bleeding did not recur after treatment.Although statistical significance was not reached,a marked difference was found in the re-bleeding rate between patients in whom total enteroscopy findings were positive (8.6%,3/35) and negative (3.8%,1/26)(3/35 vs 1/26,P =0.63).CONCLUSION:A good outcome can be expected for patients who undergo total enteroscopy and receive proper treatment for the source of bleeding in the small bowel.

  13. Is there still a role for intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Monsanto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: in 21st century, endoscopic study of the small intestine has undergone a revolution with capsule endoscopy and balloon-assisted enteroscopy. The difficulties and morbidity associated with intraoperative enteroscopy, the gold-standard in the 20th century, made this technique to be relegated to a second level. Aims: evaluate the actual role and assess the diagnostic and therapeutic value of intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and methods: we conducted a retrospective study of 19 patients (11 males; mean age: 66.5 ± 15.3 years submitted to 21 IOE procedures for obscure GI bleeding. Capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy had been performed in 10 and 5 patients, respectively. Results: with intraoperative enteroscopy a small bowel bleeding lesion was identified in 79% of patients and a gastrointestinal bleed-ing lesion in 94%. Small bowel findings included: angiodysplasia (n = 6, ulcers (n = 4, small bowel Dieulafoy's lesion (n = 2, bleed-ing from anastomotic vessels (n = 1, multiple cavernous hemangiomas (n = 1 and bleeding ectopic jejunal varices (n = 1. Agreement between capsule endoscopy and intraoperative enteroscopy was 70%. Endoscopic and/or surgical treatment was used in 77.8% of the patients with a positive finding on intraoperative enteroscopy, with a rebleeding rate of 21.4% in a mean 21-month follow-up period. Procedure-related mortality and postoperative complications have been 5 and 21%, respectively. Conclusions: intraoperative enteroscopy remains a valuable tool in selected patients with obscure GI bleeding, achieving a high diagnostic yield and allowing an endoscopic and/or surgical treatment in most of them. However, as an invasive procedure with relevant mortality and morbidity, a precise indication for its use is indispensable.

  14. Acoustic hemostasis device for automated treatment of bleeding in limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekins, K. Michael; Zeng, Xiaozheng; Barnes, Stephen; Hopple, Jerry; Kook, John; Moreau-Gobard, Romain; Hsu, Stephen; Ahiekpor-Dravi, Alexis; Lee, Chi-Yin; Ramachandran, Suresh; Maleke, Caroline; Eaton, John; Wong, Keith; Keneman, Scott

    2012-10-01

    A research prototype automated image-guided acoustic hemostasis system for treatment of deep bleeding was developed and tested in limb phantoms. The system incorporated a flexible, conformal acoustic applicator cuff. Electronically steered and focused therapeutic arrays (Tx) populated the cuff to enable dosing from multiple Tx's simultaneously. Similarly, multiple imaging arrays (Ix) were deployed on the cuff to enable 3D compounded images for targeting and treatment monitoring. To affect a lightweight cuff, highly integrated Tx electrical circuitry was implemented, fabric and lightweight structural materials were used, and components were minimized. Novel cuff and Ix and Tx mechanical registration approaches were used to insure targeting accuracy. Two-step automation was implemented: 1) targeting (3D image volume acquisition and stitching, Power and Pulsed Wave Doppler automated bleeder detection, identification of bone, followed by closed-loop iterative Tx beam targeting), and 2) automated dosing (auto-selection of arrays and Tx dosing parameters, power initiation and then monitoring by acoustic thermometry for power shut-off). In final testing the device automatically detected 65% of all bleeders (with various bleeder flow rates). Accurate targeting was achieved in HIFU phantoms with end-dose (30 sec) temperature rise reaching the desired 33-58°C. Automated closed-loop targeting and treatment was demonstrated in separate phantoms.

  15. Reservations against new oral anticoagulants after stroke and cerebral bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2013-07-15

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are the new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) which have been investigated in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) for primary and secondary prevention of stroke and thromboembolism. In these trials NOAC had a similar efficacy and safety profile compared to traditional vitamin-K-antagonists such as warfarin. We advise caution in the use of NOAC in patients with stroke or cerebral hemorrhage because of the following reasons: 1) Patients with cerebral bleeding were excluded from the trials. 2) Stroke within 14 days and severe stroke within 6 months before screening were exclusion criteria in the trials investigating dabigatran and rivaroxaban. 3) There is no antidote for reversal and no reliable laboratory monitoring of the anticoagulant effect for emergency situations. 4) NOAC are either substrates of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system, or both. Drug-drug interactions between NOAC and P-gp and CYP-affecting drugs are largely unknown. 5) Long-term effects of thrombin generation inhibition on the occurrence of infections, malignancies, dementia, and other diseases are unknown. Based on these considerations it is our opinion that studies of NOAC in patients with stroke compared with other prevention strategies, as well as more post marketing surveillance data, are required. PMID:23628464

  16. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk scores: Who, when andwhy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a significant cause of hospital admission. In order tostratify patients according to the risk of the complications,such as rebleeding or death, and to predict theneed of clinical intervention, several risk scores havebeen proposed and their use consistently recommendedby international guidelines. The use of risk scoringsystems in early assessment of patients suffering fromUGIB may be useful to distinguish high-risks patients,who may need clinical intervention and hospitalization,from low risk patients with a lower chance of developingcomplications, in which management as outpatientscan be considered. Although several scores havebeen published and validated for predicting differentoutcomes, the most frequently cited ones are the Rockallscore and the Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS). WhileRockall score, which incorporates clinical and endoscopicvariables, has been validated to predict mortality,the GBS, which is based on clinical and laboratorialparameters, has been studied to predict the need ofclinical intervention. Despite the advantages previouslyreported, their use in clinical decisions is still limited. Thisreview describes the different risk scores used in theUGIB setting, highlights the most important research,explains why and when their use may be helpful, reflectson the problems that remain unresolved and guidesfuture research with practical impact.

  17. Hypothermia in bleeding trauma: a friend or a foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochanek Ashley R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The induction of hypothermia for cellular protection is well established in several clinical settings. Its role in trauma patients, however, is controversial. This review discusses the benefits and complications of induced hypothermia--emphasizing the current state of knowledge and potential applications in bleeding patients. Extensive pre-clinical data suggest that in advanced stages of shock, rapid cooling can protect cells during ischemia and reperfusion, decrease organ damage, and improve survival. Yet hypothermia is a double edged sword; unless carefully managed, its induction can be associated with a number of complications. Appropriate patient selection requires a thorough understanding of the pre-clinical literature. Clinicians must also appreciate the enormous influence that temperature modulation exerts on various cellular mechanisms. This manuscript aims to provide a balanced view of the published literature on this topic. While many of the advantageous molecular and physiological effects of induced hypothermia have been outlined in animal models, rigorous clinical investigations are needed to translate these promising findings into clinical practice.

  18. Embolization of a Hemorrhoid Following 18 Hours of Life-Threatening Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemorrhoids usually do not pose diagnostic difficulties and they rarely cause massive bleeding. We report a case of massive rectal bleeding over 18 h needing 22 U blood transfusion treated by superselective transcatheter coil embolization 12 h following operative treatment performed in a different hospital. Diagnostic angiography with a view to superselective embolization, following failure of sigmoidoscopy to localize and treat the cause of hemorrhage, might act as a life-saving treatment in massive rectal bleeding, obviating the need for repeated endoscopy or emergency surgery

  19. Primary evaluation of 99mTc-RBC imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-RBC gastrointestinal (GI) scintigraphy was performed in 10 patients with lower GI bleeding which was confirmed by operation later. The results suggested that 99mTc-RBC imaging was an effective method for the diagnosis of intestinal hemorrhage, especially the small intestine. However, there was some difficulty in accurately localizing the bleeding site due to the movement of the blood containing labelled RBC from original bleeding site to lower portion during intestinal peristalsis and also displacement of the moving colon. Therefore it is necessary to completely explore the intestine carefully and awareness of the possibility of biliary hemorrhage

  20. Crohn's disease and massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding: angiographic appearance and two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding is described in two patients with Crohn's disease. In case 1, extravasation of contrast material from the ileal branch of the ileocolic artery was seen during selective angiography. In case 2, results of an in vitro labeled 99Tc pyrophosphate red blood cell scan localized bleeding to the ileum. In both cases, medical management was unsuccessful, and surgical resection of the affected bowel was required to stop the bleeding. Angiographic appearance of Crohn's disease is discussed, and a review of the literature of this unusual feature of Crohn's disease is presented. 16 references

  1. [PHLEBODIA (diosmine): a role in the management of bleeding nonprolapsed hemorrhoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecmanović, D; Pavlov, M; Ceranić, M; Sepetkovski, A; Kovacevi, P; Stamenković, A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a role of diosmine in the management of bleeding nonprolapsed hemorrhoids. From November 2003 to January 2004, 60 patients were treated with Phlebodia (diosmine). Total colonoscopy was performed at the discretion of the authors according to the age, symptoms and genetic factors of the patient. Patients were treated with Phlebodia (diosmine, 3x1, 5 days) and in addition a bulk agent (3,26 g plantago ovata sachet, twice daily, for the period of next three months). Hemorrhoidal bleeding stopped after 3,2 days. Diosmine, used with fiber supplements, rapidly and safely stops bleeding from nonprolapsed hemorrhoids. PMID:16119324

  2. Hepatic Artery-duodenal Fistula with Gastrointestinal Bleeding after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Shyang Soong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer or portal hypertension is a serious complicationin liver transplant recipients. However, Gastrointestinal bleeding from hepaticartery origin after liver transplantation is rare. We report duodenal massive bleeding secondaryto erosion of hepatic artery after liver transplantation in two patients. This was diagnosedby angiography and treated subsequently by surgical intervention with hepatic arteryre-anastomosis. We could not salvage one of these patients who died of complications ofgraft failure. Therefore, early diagnosis and aggressive surgical intervention may be requiredin order to salvage both recipient and graft.

  3. A case with unexplained bleeding from multiple sites: munchausen syndrome by proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Gözmen, Salih; Yılmaz, Şebnem; Hilkay Karapınar, Tuba; Çetin, Benhur; Burak Dursun, Onur; Emiroğlu, Neslihan; Ören, Hale; Irken, Gülersu

    2011-08-01

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MBP) is an extreme form of child abuse where children were unnecessarily treated or investigated for medical conditions that were falsified by their caregivers. Here the authors report a 16-year-old female with the complaints of bleeding from multiple and unusual sites, including hemoptysis, hematuria, bloody tears, and bloody nipple discharge, all of which are only witnessed by her mother. Extensive investigation revealed no organic etiologies for bleeding. The diagnosis of MBP was put by a multidisciplinary team. The diagnosis of MBP must be kept in mind in conditions where there is no underlying organic pathology in a bleeding patient. PMID:21736476

  4. Hepatobiliary fascioliasis with multiple aneurysms and active bleeding: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 52-year-old woman visited our institution with upper abdominal pain which had lasted for the past two days. Laboratory tests revealed mild leukocytosis, decreased serum hemoglobin, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. CT scans showed multiple ill-defined, hypodense lesions in the peripheral areas of both hepatic lobes and active bleeding with a subcapsular hematoma in the right hepatic lobe. Angiography also showed active bleeding in the right hepatic lobe with multiple aneurysms, so a transarterial coil embolization was performed to stop the bleeding. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed several moving flat flukes in the common bile duct, which were pathologically confirmed as Fasciola hepatica.

  5. Hepatobiliary fascioliasis with multiple aneurysms and active bleeding: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Young; Kim Jae Woon; Jang, Jae Cheon [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A 52-year-old woman visited our institution with upper abdominal pain which had lasted for the past two days. Laboratory tests revealed mild leukocytosis, decreased serum hemoglobin, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. CT scans showed multiple ill-defined, hypodense lesions in the peripheral areas of both hepatic lobes and active bleeding with a subcapsular hematoma in the right hepatic lobe. Angiography also showed active bleeding in the right hepatic lobe with multiple aneurysms, so a transarterial coil embolization was performed to stop the bleeding. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed several moving flat flukes in the common bile duct, which were pathologically confirmed as Fasciola hepatica.

  6. The Clinical Outcomes of Transcatheter Microcoil Embolization in Patients with Active Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Small Bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Soo Teik [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To assess the clinical outcomes of the transcatheter microcoil embolization in patients with active lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding in the small bowel, as well as to compare the mortality rates between the two groups based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus determined by an angiography. We retrospectively evaluated all of the consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for treatment of acute LGI bleeding between January 2003 and October 2007. In total, the study included 36 patients who underwent a colonoscopy and were diagnosed to have an active bleeding in the LGI tracts. Based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus, determined by an angiography, the patients were classified into two groups. The clinical outcomes included technical success, clinical success (no rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (> 30 days), as well as the major and minor complication rates. Of the 36 patients, 17 had angiography-proven bleeding that was distal to the marginal artery. The remaining 19 patients did not have a bleeding focus based on the angiography results. The technical and clinical success rates of performing transcatheter microcoil embolizations in patients with active bleeding were 100% and 88%, respectively (15 of 17). One patient died from continued LGI bleeding and one patient received surgery to treat the continued bleeding. There was no note made on the delayed bleeding or on the major or minor complications. Of the 19 patients without active bleeding, 16 (84%) did not have recurrent bleeding. One patient died due to continuous bleeding and multi-organ failure. The superselective microcoil embolization can help successfully treat patients with active LGI bleeding in the small bowel, identified by the results of an angiography. The mortality rate is not significantly different between the patients of the visualization and non-visualization groups on angiography.

  7. The 3-D CFD modeling of gas turbine combustor-integral bleed flow interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. Y.; Reynolds, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was developed to analyze the flow interaction between a gas turbine combustor and an integral bleed plenum. In this model, the elliptic governing equations of continuity, momentum and the k-e turbulence model were solved on a boundary-fitted, curvilinear, orthogonal grid system. The model was first validated against test data from public literature and then applied to a gas turbine combustor with integral bleed. The model predictions agreed well with data from combustor rig testing. The model predictions also indicated strong flow interaction between the combustor and the integral bleed. Integral bleed flow distribution was found to have a great effect on the pressure distribution around the gas turbine combustor.

  8. Weber-Christian disease producing splenic vein occlusion and bleeding gastric varices: successful treatment with sclerotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Heseltine, D.; Bramble, M.; Cole, A.; Clarke, D; Castle, W

    1990-01-01

    A 48 year old woman with intra-abdominal Weber-Christian disease presented with bleeding gastric varices and evidence of splenic vein occlusion. We describe the problems encountered in making this diagnosis and subsequent treatment.

  9. Epinephrine plus argon plasma or heater probe coagulation in ulcer bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmet Karaman; Mevlut Baskol; Sebnem Gursoy; Edip Torun; Alper Yurci; Banu Demet Ozel; Kadri Guven; Omer Ozbakir; Mehmet Yucesoy

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effectiveness of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and heater probe coagulation (HPC) in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Eighty-five (18 female, 67 male) patients admitted for acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric or duodenal ulcer were included in the study. Upper endoscopy was performed and HPC or APC were chosen randomly to stop the bleeding. Initial hemostasis and rebleeding rates were primary and secondary end-points of the study. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was achieved in 97.7% (42/43) and 81% (36/42) of the APC and HPC groups, respectively (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: APC is an effective hemostatic method in bleeding peptic ulcers. Larger multicenter trials are necessary to confirm these results.

  10. Clonidine Reduce Bleeding Of Endoscopic Sinus Surgery Amir Alam Hospital (1398-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajy Mohammadi F

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate effect of clonidine as a premedication on endoscopic sinus surgery bleeding."nMethods and Materials: during a randomized double blind clinical trial we compared two groups of patients who scheduled for endoscopic sinus surgery for polypectomy and etmoidectomy. 216 patients randomly assigned in two groups.In first group 2 hours befor surgery a 0.2mg tablet of clonidine orally adminestered to patients and in second group a 100 mg tablet of vit Bj(with same size and color- as"nplacebowas adminestered to patients. The amount of bleeding measured in two groups."nResults: mean bleeding volume in clonidine group was 113+76 ml and in control group was 211 + 113 ml. There was a significant statistical difference between two groups (pO.0001."nConclusion: Clonidine as premedication can reduce bleeding of endoscopic sinus surgery significantly.

  11. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding due to a Dieulafoy lesion in the terminal ileum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegdam, J.A.; Hofker, H.S.; Dijkstra, G; Stolk, M.F.; Jacobs, M.A.; Suurmeijer, A.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    A 50-year-old man awaiting liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis developed iron-deficiency anaemia. Repeated occult gastrointestinal bleeding led to an increasing need for blood transfusions. After multiple oesophagogastroduodenoscopies and colonoscopies, videocapsule endoscopy fi

  12. Postextraction bleeding in a patient taking antithrombotics: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Schmitt, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombotic medications, including antiplatelets and anticoagulants, are used by millions of patients to prevent stroke or heart attack. When these patients present for dental surgery, a decision must be made whether to continue the antithrombotic medication and risk a bleeding problem or to interrupt the medication and risk an embolic complication such as a stroke or heart attack. In patients taking antithrombotic medications, a small risk of postoperative bleeding after dental extractions must be weighed against a small risk of stroke or heart attack when these medications are interrupted. This case report discusses an episode of minor postextraction bleeding in a patient taking combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy. Antithrombotic therapy generally should not be interrupted for dental procedures, as the prognosis of potential postextraction bleeding that could result from antithrombotic continuation is almost always better than the prognosis of a potential stroke or heart attack that could follow antithrombotic interruption. PMID:27148659

  13. Bleeding Risk, Management and Outcome in Patients Receiving Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Sebastian; Breslin, Tomás; NiAinle, Fionnuala; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Modern direct-acting anticoagulants are rapidly replacing vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the management of millions of patients worldwide who require anticoagulation. These drugs include agents that inhibit activated factor X (FXa) (such as apixaban and rivaroxaban) or thrombin (such as dabigatran), and are collectively known today as non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Since bleeding is the most common and most dangerous side effect of long-term anticoagulation, and because NOACs have very different mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics compared with VKA, physicians are naturally concerned about the lack of experience regarding frequency, management and outcome of NOAC-associated bleeding in daily care. This review appraises trial and registry (or "real-world") data pertaining to bleeding complications in patients taking NOACs and VKA and provides practical recommendations for the management of acute bleeding situations. PMID:25940651

  14. Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding by transvaginal sonography, sonohysterography and correlation with endometrial histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Sinha

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: The findings in present study show a relative supremacy of SIS over TVS in diagnosis of uterine abnormalities in cases of abnormal uterine bleeding. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(5.000: 1374-1379

  15. Oral surgical treatment by erbium laser application in patients with the risk of bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasenko S.V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze the erbium laser effects in oral surgery in patients with the risk of bleeding. There were selected 2 groups of patients for oral surgery treatment. Materials and methods. The first group included 31 patients with bleeding risk. In this group erbium laser radiation was used for the cut and tooth socket conditioning after tooth extraction. The second (control group of 43 patients without concomitant pathology was determined for conventional surgical treatment. Results. In the first group there was no postoperative bleeding, post-surgical pain and infection were prevented with no need for analgesics, and the wounds epithelization took 1-3 days. It takes less time than in control group. Conclusion. Application of erbium laser is a modern method which can be successfully used in surgical treatment of patients with the risk of bleeding.

  16. Inverted meckel's diverticulum as a cause of obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverted Meckel's diverticulum is an infrequent cause of gastrointestinal blood loss, especially in adults. A high index of suspicion is needed for this rare entity when entertaining the possible differentials of gastrointestinal bleeding.(author)

  17. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome in Patients with Bleeding Peptic Ulcers and Helicobacter pylori Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Chun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal (UGI bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT, with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed 13C-urea breath test (UBT or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity.

  18. Does speculum examination have a role in assessing bleeding in early pregnancy?

    OpenAIRE

    Hoey, R; Allan, K

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess to what extent a speculum examination after a bimanual examination influences the accuracy of diagnosis and subsequent management of women with bleeding in early pregnancy in an accident and emergency (A&E) department.

  19. Anaesthesia care with and without tracheal intubation during emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, N; Lundstrøm, L H; Vestergaard, T R; Risom, M; Rosenstock, S J; Foss, N B; Møller, M H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common condition with high mortality. Most patients undergo oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD), but no universally agreed approach exists to the type of airway management required during the procedure. We aimed to compare anaesthesia care...

  20. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to large bowel infiltration by chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, J.; Cachia, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    A 66 year old woman with a 9 year history of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia developed intermittent rectal bleeding for 9 months; sigmoidoscopic biopsy proved that this was due to large bowel infiltration by leukaemia. This is a very rare occurrence.

  1. Optimization of Mass Bleed Control for Base Drag Reduction of Supersonic Flight Bodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.-K.Lee; H.-D.Kim

    2006-01-01

    The minimization of base drag using mass bleed control is examined in consideration of various base to orifice exit area ratios for a body of revolution in the Mach 2.47 freestream. Axisymmtric, compressible, mass-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the standard k-ω turbulence model, a fully implicit finite volume scheme, and a second order upwind scheme. Base flow characteristics are explained regarding the base configuration as well as the injection parameter which is defined as the mass flow rate of bleed jet non-dimensionalized by the product of the base area and freestream mass flux. The results obtained through the present study show that for a smaller base area, the optimum mass bleed condition leading to minimum base drag occurs at relatively larger mass bleed, and a larger orifice exit can offer better drag control.

  2. A case of ascending colon variceal bleeding treated with venous coil embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bong Suk; Kim, Woo Tae; Chang, Su Sun; Kim, Eun Hye; Lee, Seung Woo; Park, Won Seok; Kim, Yeon Soo; Nam, Soon Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Sang Bum

    2013-01-14

    A 38-year-old female with a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis visited our hospital with a massive hematochezia. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy did not demonstrate any bleeding source, and a colonoscopy showed a massive hemorrhage in the ascending colon but without an obvious focus. The source of the bleeding could not be found with a mesenteric artery angiography. We performed an enhanced abdominal computed tomography, which revealed a distal ascending colonic varix, and assumed that the varix was the source of the bleeding. We performed a venous coil embolization and histoacryl injection to obliterate the colon varix. The intervention appeared to be successful because the vital signs and hemoglobin laboratory data remained stable and because the hematochezia was no longer observed. We report here on a rare case of colonic variceal bleeding that was treated with venous coil embolization. PMID:23345957

  3. Bleeding duodenal hemangioma: Morphological changes and endoscopic mucosal resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noriko Nishiyama; Hirohito Mori; Hideki Kobara; Shintarou Fujihara; Takako Nomura; Mitsuyoshi Kobayashi; Tsutomu Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Recently,the development of endoscopic procedures has increased the availability of minimally invasive treatments; however,there have been few case reports of duodenal hemangioma treated by endoscopic mucosal resection.The present report describes a case of duodenal hemangioma that showed various endoscopic changes over time and was treated by endoscopic mucosal resection.An 80-year-old woman presented with tarry stools and a loss of appetite.An examination of her blood revealed severe anemia,and her hemoglobin level was 4.2 g/dL.An emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed.A red,protrusive,semipedunculated tumor (approximately 20 mm in diameter) with spontaneous bleeding on its surface was found in the superior duodenal angle.Given the semipedunculated appearance of the tumor,it was suspected to be an epithelial tumor with a differential diagnosis of hyperplastic polyp.The biopsy results suggested a telangiectatic hemangioma.Because this lesion was considered to be responsible for her anemia,endoscopic mucosal resection was performed for diagnostic and treatment purposes after informed consent was obtained.A histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed dilated and proliferated capillary lumens of various sizes,which confirmed the final diagnosis of duodenal hemangioma.Neither anemia nor tumor recurrence has been observed since the endoscopic mucosal resection (approximately 1 year).Duodenal hemangiomas can be treated endoscopically provided that sufficient consideration is given to all of the possible treatment strategies.Interestingly,duodenal hemangiomas show morphological changes that are influenced by various factors,such as mechanical stimuli.

  4. CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Title: CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY Objectives: Orthognathic surgery involves surgical manipulation of jaw and face skeletal structure. A subgroup of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery suffers from excessive...... according to their bleeding risk. This valuable knowledge will be useful with regard to optimization of patient safety, staff composition and transfusion preparations. This pilot study included only 41 patients, and further studies are needed to consolidate the observations done....

  5. Role of serum copper and ceruloplasmin level in patients with dysfunctional uterine bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Ketki P. Khandhadiya; Yousef Rezaei Chianeh; Pragna Rao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Objective of current study was to study serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels in abnormal endometrial angiogenesis observed in dysfunctional uterine bleeding patients. Methods: Design: The present cross sectional study was undertaken in the departments of biochemistry and department of OBG, Kasturba medical college, Manipal University, Manipal, India. Population: This study was done in 40 females age between 18-45 years with history of, bleeding excessively for more than 3 mont...

  6. Multidetector computed tomography mesentericography for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, P.; Hamer, O.W.; Mueller-Wille, R.; Rennert, J.; Feuerbach, S.; Zorger, N. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Wrede, C.E. [Helios-Klinikum Berlin-Buch (Germany). Interdisziplinaeres Notfallzentrum mit Rettungsstelle; Siebig, S.; Schoelmerich, J. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic yield of 16-row multidetector computed tomography (CT) mesentericography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods: The radiological information system database was used to retrospectively identify all patients in whom CT mesentericography (CTM) was performed for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding between July 2002 and September 2006. A subsequent prospective study was conducted between October 2006 and September 2009 to evaluate CTM in patients with major obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The retrospectively identified patients (six patients) as well as the prospectively evaluated patients (seven patients) constitute the study population. Following mesenteric DSA the catheter was left in the superior mesenteric artery, the patient was transferred to the CT suite and CTM was carried out by scanning the abdomen after contrast material injection via the catheter. Active bleeding was suspected if a focal area of high attenuation consistent with contrast material extravasation was found within the bowel lumen. Results: CTM detected the site of active bleeding in three of 13 patients (23 %). In the subpopulation of patients who were prospectively evaluated, CT mesentericography identified the site of active bleeding in one of seven patients (14 %). Depiction of active bleeding by CTM prompted surgical intervention in each case and surgery confirmed the findings of CT mesentericography. Conclusion: Due to the relatively low rate of positive findings and inherent drawbacks, we feel that CTM cannot be recommended in general. However, in selected patients who are continuously bleeding at a low rate and in whom iv-CT was negative, CT mesentericography might be helpful. (orig.)

  7. Recurrent massive bleeding due to dissecting intramural hematoma of the esophagus: Treatment with therapeutic angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaejun Shim; Jae Young Jang; Young Hwangbo; Seok Ho Dong; Joo Hyeong Oh; Hyo Jong Kim; Byung-Ho Kim; Young Woon Chang; Rin Chang

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous or traumatic intramural bleeding of the esophagus, which is often associated with overlying mucosal dissection, constitutes a rare spectrum of esophageal injury called dissecting intramural hematoma of the esophagus (DIHE). Chest pain, swallowing difficulty, and minor hematemesis are common, which resolve spontaneously in most cases. This case report describes a patient with spontaneous DIHE with recurrent massive bleeding which required critical management and highlights a potential role for therapeutic angiography as an alternative to surgery.

  8. Incidence and costs of bleeding-related complications in French hospitals following surgery for various diagnoses

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Xin; Lafuma, Antoine; Torreton, Elodie; Arnaud, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information is available on the epidemiology and economics of bleeding during surgery in France. Method The objective of this study was to examine the incidence, costs and length of stay (LOS) of bleeding-related complications during various surgical procedures. A retrospective DRG (diagnosis-related group) analysis was conducted using the French National database PMSI (Programme Médicalisé des Systèmes d’Informations). Patients undergoing surgery during 2008 were identifie...

  9. Cyanoacrylate spray as treatment in difficult-to-manage gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Toapanta-Yanchapaxi, Liz; Chavez-Tapia, Norberto; Téllez-Ávila, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can be a life-treating event that is managed with standard endoscopic therapy in the majority of cases. However, up to 5%-10% of patients may have persistent bleeding that does not respond to conventional measures. Several endoscopic treatment techniques have been proposed as strategies to control such cases, such as epinephrine injection, hemoclips or argon plasma coagulation, but there are certain clinical scenarios where it is difficult to achieve hemostasis even ...

  10. Acute Uterine Bleeding Unrelated to Pregnancy: A Southern California Permanente Medical Group Practice Guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Munro, Malcolm G.

    2013-01-01

    Acute uterine bleeding unrelated to pregnancy has been defined as bleeding “sufficient in volume as to, in the opinion of the treating clinician, require urgent or emergent intervention.” The Southern California Permanente Medical Group updated its guidelines for the management of this condition on the basis of the best available evidence, as identified in a systematic review of the available literature. Given the paucity of studies evaluating this condition, the guidelines, by necessity, inc...

  11. Saline infusion sonohysterography for uterine cavity evaluation in women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abd El-Sattar; Ahmed M. Abbas; Mohamed K. Tawfik; Mahmoud A. Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic effectiveness of saline infusion sonohysterography (SIS) with hysteroscopy, as a gold standard diagnostic method, in detecting endometrial pathology in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding. Methods: A prospective study was conducted at Al-Azhar University hospital, Assiut, Egypt. Fifty patients were recruited from the gynecological outpatient clinic complaining of abnormal uterine bleeding. They were evaluated by...

  12. The role of capsule endoscopy after negative CT enterography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyun Mi; Park, Chan Hyuk; Lee, Jin Ha; Kim, Bo Kyung; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Hong, Sung Pil [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Institute of Gastroenterology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Joon Seok [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) after negative computed tomographic (CT) enterography. We retrospectively included 30 patients with OGIB who received capsule endoscopy after negative CT enterography. The median age of the patients was 60 years, and 60% of patients were male. The median follow-up duration was 8 months. Overt bleeding was 60%, and occult bleeding was 40%. Based on capsule endoscopy results, a definitive diagnosis was made for 17 patients (57%): ulcer in nine patients (30%), active bleeding with no identifiable cause in five (17%), angiodysplasia in two (7%) and Dieulafoy's lesion in one (3%). Two patients with jejunal ulcers were diagnosed with Crohn's disease. Seven patients (41%) with positive capsule endoscopy received double balloon enteroscopy and two patients (12%) received steroid treatment for Crohn's disease. Patients with overt bleeding, a previous history of bleeding, or who received large amounts of blood transfusions were more likely to show positive capsule endoscopy. Capsule endoscopy showed high diagnostic yields in patients with OGIB after negative CT enterography and may help to provide further therapeutic plans for patients with OGIB and negative CT enterography. circle CT enterography has been widely used in evaluating obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). circle Capsule endoscopy showed high diagnostic yield for OGIB after negative CT enterography. circle Negative CT enterography does not exclude important causes of small bowel bleeding. circle Most lesions missed at CT-enterography are flat and can be detected by capsule endoscopy. (orig.)

  13. Intractable oesophageal variceal bleeding caused by splenic arteriovenous fistula: treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, C; Tseng, J.; Lui, K; Wan, Y.; Tsai, C.; Shem, C; Wu, C.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a rare case of splenic arteriovenous fistula and venous aneurysm which developed after splenectomy in a 40-year-old woman who presented with epigastralgia, watery diarrhoea, repeated haematemesis and melaena caused by hyperkinetic status of the portal system and bleeding of oesophageal varices. It was diagnosed by computed tomography and angiography, and obliterated with giant Gianturco steel coils.


Keywords: splenic arteriovenous fistula; gastrointestinal bleeding; transcathete...

  14. Estimation of transient increases in bleeding risk associated with physical activity in children with haemophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Latimer Jane; Herbert Robert D; Broderick Carolyn R; Barnes Chris; Curtin Julie A; Monagle Paul

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Although it is widely appreciated that vigorous physical activity can increase the risk of bleeding episodes in children with haemophilia, the magnitude of the increase in risk is not known. Accurate risk estimates could inform decisions made by children with haemophilia and their parents about participation in physical activity and aid the development of optimal prophylactic schedules. The aim of this study is to provide an accurate estimate of the risks of bleeding assoc...

  15. Usefulness of CT angiography in diagnosing acute gastrointestinal bleeding:A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. METHODS: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, Cochrane Library database, Sciencedirect, Springerlink and Scopus, from January 1995 to December 2009, were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of CT angiography in diagnosing acute GI bleeding. Studies were included if the ycompared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in ...

  16. Thromboelastography to Monitor Clotting/Bleeding Complications in Patients Treated with the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System

    OpenAIRE

    Schuepbach, Reto A; Renner, Eberhard L; Beat Müllhaupt; Marco Maggiorini; Markus Béchir; Stover, John F.; Reto Stocker; Jörg Bösiger; Bachli, Esther B.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) has been shown to clear albumin-bound toxins from patients with liver failure but might cause bleeding complications potentially obscuring survival benefits. We hypothesized that monitoring clotting parameters and bed-side thromboelastography allows to reduce bleeding complications. Methods. Retrospective analysis of 25 MARS sessions during which clotting parameters were monitored by a standardized protocol. Results. During MARS ...

  17. The therapeutic effect of high-dose esomeprazole on stress ulcer bleeding in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cui Lihong; Li Chao; Wang Xiaohui; Yan Zhihui; He Xing; Gong Sandong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the therapeutic effects of different doses of intravenous esomeprazole on treating trauma patients with stress ulcer bleeding. Methods: A total of 102 trauma patients with stress ulcer bleeding were randomly divided into 2 groups: 52 patients were assigned to the high-dose group who received 80 mg intravenous esomeprazole, and then 8 mg/h continuous infusion for 3 days; 50 patients were assigned to the conventional dose group who received 40 mg intravenous esomeprazole ...

  18. Comparison of ACUITY and CRUSADE Scores in Predicting Major Bleeding during Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. L. Correia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:The ACUITY and CRUSADE scores are validated models for prediction of major bleeding events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, the comparative performances of these scores are not known.Objective:To compare the accuracy of ACUITY and CRUSADE in predicting major bleeding events during ACS.Methods:This study included 519 patients consecutively admitted for unstable angina, non-ST-elevation or ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The scores were calculated based on admission data. We considered major bleeding events during hospitalization and not related to cardiac surgery, according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC criteria (type 3 or 5: hemodynamic instability, need for transfusion, drop in hemoglobin ≥ 3 g, and intracranial, intraocular or fatal bleeding.Results:Major bleeding was observed in 31 patients (23 caused by femoral puncture, 5 digestive, 3 in other sites, an incidence of 6%. While both scores were associated with bleeding, ACUITY demonstrated better C-statistics (0.73, 95% CI = 0.63 - 0.82 as compared with CRUSADE (0.62, 95% CI = 0.53 - 0.71; p = 0.04. The best performance of ACUITY was also reflected by a net reclassification improvement of + 0.19 (p = 0.02 over CRUSADE’s definition of low or high risk. Exploratory analysis suggested that the presence of the variables ‘age’ and ‘type of ACS’ in ACUITY was the main reason for its superiority.Conclusion:The ACUITY Score is a better predictor of major bleeding when compared with the CRUSADE Score in patients hospitalized for ACS.

  19. Antidepressant-warfarin interaction and associated gastrointestinal bleeding risk in a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Schelleman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bleeding is the most common and worrisome adverse effect of warfarin therapy. One of the factors that might increase bleeding risk is initiation of interacting drugs that potentiate warfarin. We sought to evaluate whether initiation of an antidepressant increases the risk of hospitalization for gastrointestinal bleeding in warfarin users. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Medicaid claims data (1999-2005 were used to perform an observational case-control study nested within person-time exposed to warfarin in those ≥18 years. In total, 430,455 warfarin users contributed 407,370 person-years of warfarin use. The incidence rate of hospitalization for GI bleeding among warfarin users was 4.48 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 4.42-4.55. Each gastrointestinal bleeding cases was matched to 50 controls based on index date and state. Warfarin users had an increased odds ratio of gastrointestinal bleeding upon initiation of citalopram (OR = 1.73 [95% CI, 1.25-2.38], fluoxetine (OR = 1.63 [95% CI, 1.11-2.38], paroxetine (OR = 1.64 [95% CI, 1.27-2.12], amitriptyline (OR = 1.47 [95% CI, 1.02-2.11]. Also mirtazapine, which is not believed to interact with warfarin, increased the risk of GI bleeding (OR = 1.75 [95% CI, 1.30-2.35]. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Warfarin users who initiated citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, amitriptyline, or mirtazapine had an increased risk of hospitalization for gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the elevated risk with mirtazapine suggests that a drug-drug interaction may not have been responsible for all of the observed increased risk.

  20. A RARE CASE OF UTERINE VASCULAR MALFORMATION PRESENTING WITH HEAVY MENSTRUAL BLEEDING AND RECURRENT PREGNANCY LOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM is a rare condition, with fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature. It is a potentially life - threatening condition, as patients may present with profuse bleeding. Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare and the vast majority repo rted in the literature are those of arteriovenous malformations. Uterine AVM can be congenital or acquired. This case reports a woman with Uterine AVM presenting with heavy menstrual bleeding and a history of recurrent pregnancy loss.

  1. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    OpenAIRE

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; W. Essamri; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; M. Benazzouz; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presen...

  2. Diagnostic Evaluation and Management of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Changing Paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Pasha, Shabana F.; Hara, Amy K.; Leighton, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract that persists or recurs after a negative initial evaluation using bidirectional endoscopy and radiologic imaging with small-bowel radiograph. The main challenges related to evaluation of OGIB include the high miss rate for lesions on initial evaluation with standard endoscopy and the limited capacity of older diagnostic modalities to effectively examine the small bowel. The introduction of capsule ...

  3. Meckel’s diverticulum bleeding diagnosed with magnetic resonance enterography: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Fu-Run; Huang, Liu-Ye; Xie, Hai-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Although the introduction of double-balloon enteroscopy has greatly improved the diagnostic rate, definite diagnosis of Meckel’s diverticulum far from the ileocecal valve is still impossible in most cases. We explored the role of magnetic resonance (MR) enterography in detecting bleeding from Meckel’s diverticulum that can not be confirmed via double-balloon enteroscopy. This study describes a case of male patient with bleeding from Meckel’s diverticulum diagnosed with MR enterography of the ...

  4. Effect of Haemostatic Control Resuscitation on mortality in massively bleeding patients: a before and after study

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, P I; Stensballe, J

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives Evidence supporting the use of platelets and plasma in resuscitation of massive bleedings is questionable. Current consensus guidelines recommend restrictive use. Our aim was to determine the effect of changing the transfusion practice on 30-day survival in massively bleeding patients. Materials and Methods Consecutive adult patients receiving more than 10 units of red blood cells (RBC) within 24 h 2 years prior to (2002–2003) and 2 years after (2005–2006) a change i...

  5. The assessment of anticoagulant activity to predict bleeding outcome in atrial fibrillation patients receiving dabigatran etexilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Ting; Hu, Yu-Feng; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Wu, Cheng-Hsueh; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lu, Tse-Min; Chao, Tze-Fan; Lo, Li-Wei; Hsu, Li-Chi; Chung, Chih-Ping; Chang, Peter M-H; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Special circumstances may require the measurement of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran etexilate. No data currently link any given coagulation test to bleeding outcomes in patients receiving dabigatran etexilate for atrial fibrillation. Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients receiving dabigatran etexilate of 110 mg (DE110) or 150 mg (DE150) were consecutively enrolled. The hemoclot thrombin inhibitor (HTI) assay, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) measurements were correlated with bleeding events during a prospective follow-up. There were 17 bleeding events (8.2%) in 208 patients (74.7 ± 10.3 years old, 67.9% male, median follow-up: 364 days), whereas 15 patients with bleeding events used DE110. Compared with DE110, the patients receiving DE150 were younger and more often male and had lower HAS-BLED and CHA2DS2VASc scores and better renal function. Patients' HTI levels were very variable (DE110, 10-90th percentile: 20.5-223.9 ng/ml). A receiver-operator characteristic curve gave a median cutoff HTI level of 117.7 ng/ml to predict bleeding events (C-statistics: 0.65; P = 0.036), but no cutoff could be determined for prothrombin time or APTT. Based on the Kaplan-Meier analysis, a dabigatran etexilate level greater than 117.7 ng/ml was associated with a higher bleeding rate (15.4% vs. 4.9%, P = 0.01). After multivariate Cox regression analysis, HTI levels, history of stroke, and male sex were independent risk factors for bleeding events. Dabigatran etexilate-HTI levels were independently associated with bleeding in patients receiving routine clinical care. Blood sampling at multiple time points might be needed to increase reliability because of high variation of dabigatran etexilate-HTI levels. PMID:26991859

  6. Stoma-Related Variceal Bleeding: An Under-Recognized Complication of Biliary Atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Sam; Wiener, Eugene S.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Rowe, Marc I.

    1988-01-01

    The medical records of 52 children with biliary atresia treated by portoenterostomy and evaluated for liver transplantation were reviewed to determine the frequency of stoma variceal bleeding and the optimal strategies for prevention and treatment. Eighteen patients had had prior stoma closure, four by preperitoneal closure without takedown from the abdominal wall. Three of the four developed occult variceal bleeding from the stoma closure site. Twenty-two patients had a stoma present at eval...

  7. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: the Usefulness of Rotational Angiography after Endoscopic Marking with a Metallic Clip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to assess the usefulness of rotational angiography after endoscopic marking with a metallic clip in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients with no extravasation of contrast medium on conventional angiography. In 16 patients (mean age, 59.4 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (13 gastric ulcers, 2 duodenal ulcers, 1 malignant ulcer), a metallic clip was placed via gastroscopy and this had been preceded by routine endoscopic treatment. The metallic clip was placed in the fibrous edge of the ulcer adjacent to the bleeding point. All patients had negative results from their angiographic studies. To localize the bleeding focus, rotational angiography and high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip were used. Of the 16 patients, seven (44%) had positive results after high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip and they underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with microcoils. Nine patients without extravasation of contrast medium underwent TAE with microcoils as close as possible to the clip. The bleeding was stopped initially in all patients after treatment of the feeding artery. Two patients experienced a repeat episode of bleeding two days later. Of the two patients, one had subtle oozing from the ulcer margin and that patient underwent endoscopic treatment. One patient with malignant ulcer died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation one month after embolization. Complete clinical success was achieved in 14 of 16 (88%) patients. Delayed bleeding or major/minor complications were not noted. Rotational angiography after marking with a metallic clip helps to localize accurately the bleeding focus and thus to embolize the vessel correctly.

  8. Aminaphtone in the control of gingival bleeding in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Godoy JM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available José Maria Pereira de Godoy,1,2 Mara Lucia Macedo Paizan3 1Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP, São José do Rio Preto, 2Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq, Brasília, 3FAMERP, São José do Rio Preto, Brazil Aim: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of aminaphtone to control gum bleeding.Patients and methods: Fifteen male and 15 female children, aged between 10 and 18 years with a mean age of 13.4 years and with gingival bleeding, were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase IV clinical trial. The inclusion criterion was gingivitis with gingival bleeding. Participants were prescribed either aminaphtone or placebo. Thirty identical boxes containing blister packs of identical pills of either aminaphtone or placebo were produced and coded with unique numbers by the manufacturer (Baldacci Laboratory, Brazil and donated for this trial. A research assistant administered aminaphtone (Capilarema 75 mg to fifteen patients or placebo to fifteen patients twice daily for 5 days. Intraoral clinical evaluations of bleeding were made before starting medication/placebo and then at 3 and 5 days after administration.Results: On comparing the number of bleeding points before and after treatment between the aminaphtone and placebo groups, we found significantly higher reductions with the medication (P<0.0001.Conclusion: Aminaphtone reduces gum bleeding in gingivitis, and may have a supportive role in the control of bleeding. Keywords: periodontitis, bleeding, treatment

  9. Prophylactic tracheal intubation for upper GI bleeding: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Rahman, Rubayat; Jersak, Samuel T.; Asombang, Akwi W; Hinds, Alisha M.; Hammad, Hazem T.; Nguyen, Douglas L.; Bechtold, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate usefulness of prophylactically intubating upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) patients. METHODS UGIB results in a significant number of hospital admissions annually with endoscopy being the key intervention. In these patients, risks are associated with the bleeding and the procedure, including pulmonary aspiration. However, very little literature is available assessing the use of prophylactic endotracheal intubation on aspiration in these patients. A comprehensive search wa...

  10. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: the Usefulness of Rotational Angiography after Endoscopic Marking with a Metallic Clip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Soo; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    We wanted to assess the usefulness of rotational angiography after endoscopic marking with a metallic clip in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients with no extravasation of contrast medium on conventional angiography. In 16 patients (mean age, 59.4 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (13 gastric ulcers, 2 duodenal ulcers, 1 malignant ulcer), a metallic clip was placed via gastroscopy and this had been preceded by routine endoscopic treatment. The metallic clip was placed in the fibrous edge of the ulcer adjacent to the bleeding point. All patients had negative results from their angiographic studies. To localize the bleeding focus, rotational angiography and high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip were used. Of the 16 patients, seven (44%) had positive results after high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip and they underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with microcoils. Nine patients without extravasation of contrast medium underwent TAE with microcoils as close as possible to the clip. The bleeding was stopped initially in all patients after treatment of the feeding artery. Two patients experienced a repeat episode of bleeding two days later. Of the two patients, one had subtle oozing from the ulcer margin and that patient underwent endoscopic treatment. One patient with malignant ulcer died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation one month after embolization. Complete clinical success was achieved in 14 of 16 (88%) patients. Delayed bleeding or major/minor complications were not noted. Rotational angiography after marking with a metallic clip helps to localize accurately the bleeding focus and thus to embolize the vessel correctly.

  11. Meta-analysis: antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding - an updated Cochrane review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavez-Tapia, N C; Barrientos-Gutierrez, T; Tellez-Avila, F; Soares-Weiser, K; Mendez-Sanchez, N; Gluud, C; Uribe, M

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention.......Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention....

  12. Multidetector computed tomography mesentericography for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic yield of 16-row multidetector computed tomography (CT) mesentericography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods: The radiological information system database was used to retrospectively identify all patients in whom CT mesentericography (CTM) was performed for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding between July 2002 and September 2006. A subsequent prospective study was conducted between October 2006 and September 2009 to evaluate CTM in patients with major obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The retrospectively identified patients (six patients) as well as the prospectively evaluated patients (seven patients) constitute the study population. Following mesenteric DSA the catheter was left in the superior mesenteric artery, the patient was transferred to the CT suite and CTM was carried out by scanning the abdomen after contrast material injection via the catheter. Active bleeding was suspected if a focal area of high attenuation consistent with contrast material extravasation was found within the bowel lumen. Results: CTM detected the site of active bleeding in three of 13 patients (23 %). In the subpopulation of patients who were prospectively evaluated, CT mesentericography identified the site of active bleeding in one of seven patients (14 %). Depiction of active bleeding by CTM prompted surgical intervention in each case and surgery confirmed the findings of CT mesentericography. Conclusion: Due to the relatively low rate of positive findings and inherent drawbacks, we feel that CTM cannot be recommended in general. However, in selected patients who are continuously bleeding at a low rate and in whom iv-CT was negative, CT mesentericography might be helpful. (orig.)

  13. Relation Between Red Blood Cell Omega-3 Fatty Acid Index and Bleeding During Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Salisbury, Adam C.; Harris, William S.; Amin, Amit P.; Reid, Kimberly J.; O’Keefe, James H; Spertus, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids have multiple cardiovascular benefits, but may also inhibit platelet aggregation and increase bleeding risk. If this platelet inhibition is clinically meaningful, patients with the highest omega-3 indices (red blood cell eicosapentaenoic [EPA] plus docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]), which reflect long-term omega-3 fatty acid intake, should be at the greatest bleeding risk. We studied 1,523 patients from 24 US centers who had their omega-3 index assessed at the time of AMI. The r...

  14. Endoscopic treatment of gastric varices bleeding with the use of n-butyl-2 cyanoacrylate

    OpenAIRE

    Kozieł, Sławomir; Kobryń, Konrad; Paluszkiewicz, Rafał; Krawczyk, Marek; Wróblewski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oesophageal varices and gastric varices are naturally-formed, pathological portosystemic shunts that occur in patients with portal hypertension. Gastric varices are responsible for about 10% of variceal bleeding; however, they are also the cause of massive haemorrhage, often with dramatic progress. Aim To assess the results of endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding from oesophageal and gastric varices using tissue glue Histoacryl. Material and methods From January 2013...

  15. Direct Versus Video Laryngoscopy for Intubating Adult Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Jestin N. Carlson; Jason Crofts; Walls, Ron M.; Brown III, Calvin A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Video laryngoscopy (VL) has been advocated for several aspects of emergency airway management; however, there are still concerns over its use in select patient populations such as those with large volume hematemesis secondary to gastrointestinal (GI) bleeds. Given the relatively infrequent nature of this disease process, we sought to compare intubation outcomes between VL and traditional direct laryngoscopy (DL) in patients intubated with GI bleeding, using the third iteration o...

  16. Pantoprazole for the Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding and Prevention of Rebleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Cheer; Van Rensburg, Christo J

    2012-01-01

    Adding proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to endoscopic therapy has become the mainstay of treatment for peptic ulcer bleeding, with current consensus guidelines recommending high-dose intravenous (IV) PPI therapy (IV bolus followed by continuous therapy). However, whether or not high-dose PPI therapy is more effective than low-dose PPI therapy is still debated. Furthermore, maintaining pH ≥ 4 appears to prevent mucosal bleeding in patients with acute stress ulcers; thus, stress ulcer prophylaxis ...

  17. Detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding by means of technetium-99m in vivo labelled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prognosis of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding depends on the timely and accurate detection of the source of bleeding and sequential surgical or endoscopy therapy. Scintigraphy with red blood cells (RBCs) in vivo labelled by means of technetium-99m hastened detection of source of GI bleeding and improved management of the particular disease. Gastrointestinal endoscopy is the method of choice for the diagnostics of bleeding from upper tract and large bowel. For diagnostics of bleeding from the small bowel we can use scintigraphy with in vivo labelled autological red blood cells if pushenteroscopy, intra-operative enteroscopy or angiography are not available. 31 patients (13 men, 18 women, aged 20-91, mean 56 years) underwent this investigation from 1998 till 2001 at the Department of Nuclear Medicine. All patients had melaena or enterorrhagia associated with acute anaemia. Gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroclysis or X-ray angiography did not detect the source of bleeding. Twenty-one patients had positive scintigraphy with in vivo labelled RBCs - 9 patients were already positive on dynamic scintigraphy, and 12 patients were positive on static images. Scintigraphy with in vivo labelled RBCs was negative in 10 patients. GI bleeding stopped spontaneously in these 10 patients with negative scintigraphy. These patients did not undergo intra-operative enteroscopy or surgery. The final diagnosis of the 21 patients with positive scintigraphy was determined in 16 patients by push-enteroscopy (6 patients), intra-operative enteroscopy (6 patients) or by surgery (4 patients). Of these 16 patients the correct place of bleeding was determined by scintigraphy with labelled RBCs in 11 (69%) patients. Final diagnoses of our 16 patients with positive scintigraphy with autological labelled RBCs were: bleeding small bowel arteriovenous malformation (6 patients), uraemic enteritis with bleeding erosions in ileum and jejunum (2 patients), Osler-Rendu- Weber disease (1 patient), pseudocyst of

  18. Sonographic Diagnosis in Patients with Vaginal Bleeding and Pelvic Pain at the First Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeel Shokrollahi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain are among the most common complications in the first trimester of pregnancy. Most of the pregnant women who were referred with these complications underwent sonography. The common causes were ectopic pregnancy (EP and incomplete abortion. Other causes included were subchorionic hematoma, molar pregnancy, fibroma and corpus luteum cyst."nPatients and Methods: Sonography was accomplished for 61 pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy who were referred with chief complaints of vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain. Severity of vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain correlated with final diagnosis by Chi-square and Fischer exact test."nResults: The most common causes consisted of 26 (42.6% abortions, 7 (11.5% ectopic pregnancies, 7 (11.5% subchorionic hematomas, two (3.3% molar pregnancies, two (3.3% fibromas, one (1.6% corpus luteum cyst and 16 (26.2% normal cases. Severe vaginal bleeding was associated with incomplete abortion and moderate to severe pain associated with EP. "nConclusion: Incomplete abortion and EP are the most common causes of vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain in the first trimester of pregnancy. Incomplete or threatened abortion may appear as moderate to severe vaginal bleeding,whereas severe pelvic pain may be indicative of EP.

  19. Dramatic regression and bleeding of a duodenal GIST during preoperative imatinib therapy: case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwandner Thilo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. The majority of GISTs is located in the stomach. Only 3-5% of GISTs are located in the duodenum associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding as primary manifestation. With response rates of up to 90%, but complications like bleeding due to tumor necrosis in 3%, imatinib mesylate dramatically altered the pre- and postoperative therapy for GIST patients. Case presentation A 58-year-old female patient presented with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding 2 weeks after a giant GIST of the duodenum had been diagnosed. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy had been initiated to achieve a tumor downsizing prior to surgery. During emergency laparotomy a partial duodenopancreatectomy was performed to achieve a complete resection of the mass. Histology revealed a high-malignancy GIST infiltrating the duodenal wall. Adjuvant imatinib therapy was initiated. At follow-up (19 months the patient is still alive and healthy. Conclusion Giant GISTs of the duodenum are rare and - in contrast to other localizations - harbour a higher risk of serious bleeding as primary manifestation. Tumor necrosis and tumor bleeding are rare but typical adverse effects of imatinib therapy especially during treatment of high-malignancy GIST. In GIST patients with increased risk of tumor bleeding neoadjuvant imatinib therapy should thoroughly be performed during hospitalization. In cases of duodenal GIST primary surgery should be considered as treatment alternative.

  20. Per rectal portal scintigraphy as a useful tool for predicting esophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taned Chitapanarux; Ong-ard Praisontarangkul; Satawat Thongsawat; Pises Pisespongsa; Apinya Leerapun

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate potential roles of per rectal portal scintigraphy in diagnosis of esophageal varices and predicting the risk of bleeding.METHODS: Fifteen normal subjects and fifty cirrhotic patients with endoscopically confirmed esophageal varices were included. Patients were categorized into bleeder and non-bleeder groups according to history of variceal bleeding. All had completed per rectal portal scintigraphy using 99mTechnetium pertechnetate.The shunt index was calculated from the ratio of 99mTechnetium pertechnetate in the heart and the liver.Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and receiver operating characteristics.RESULTS: Cirrhotic patients showed a higher shunt index than normal subjects (63.80 ± 25.21 vs 13.54 ± 6.46, P < 0.01). Patients with variceal bleeding showed a higher shunt index than those without bleeding (78.45 ± 9.40 vs 49.35 ± 27.72, P < 0.01). A shunt index of over 20% indicated the presence of varices and that of over 60% indicated the risk of variceal bleeding.CONCLUSION: In cirrhotic patients, per rectal portal scintigraphy is a clinically useful test for identifying esophageal varices and risk of variceal bleeding.

  1. Novel single nucleotide polymorphism markers for low dose aspirin-associated small bowel bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Shiotani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aspirin-induced enteropathy is now increasingly being recognized although the pathogenesis of small intestinal damage induced by aspirin is not well understood and related risk factors have not been established. AIM: To investigate pharmacogenomic profile of low dose aspirin (LDA-induced small bowel bleeding. METHODS: Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was performed using the Affymetrix DMET™ Plus Premier Pack. Genotypes of candidate genes associated with small bowel bleeding were determined using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay kits and direct sequencing. RESULTS: In the validation study in overall 37 patients with small bowel bleeding and 400 controls, 4 of 27 identified SNPs: CYP4F11 (rs1060463 GG (p=0.003, CYP2D6 (rs28360521 GG (p=0.02, CYP24A1 (rs4809957 T allele (p=0.04, and GSTP1 (rs1695 G allele (p=0.04 were significantly more frequent in the small bowel bleeding group compared to the controls. After adjustment for significant factors, CYP2D6 (rs28360521 GG (OR 4.11, 95% CI. 1.62 -10.4 was associated with small bowel bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: CYP4F11 and CYP2D6 SNPs may identify patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced small bowel bleeding.

  2. Performance characteristics and clinical evaluation of an in vitro bleeding time device--Thrombostat 4000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshameeri, R S; Mammen, E F

    1995-08-01

    The performance characteristics of an in vitro bleeding time device--Thrombostat 4000 were evaluated and compared with the Simplate bleeding time in healthy individuals and patients with disorders of primary hemostasis. Reference ranges were established using 30 normal volunteers. Although there were variations between different filter batches, reproducibility was good within a single batch. There were no differences between the two channels of the instrument and between male and female subjects. Hematocrit correlated negatively with the initial flow (IF) and IF correlated positively with closure time (T) and bleeding volume (V). Aspirin could be detected only when the traditional addition of ADP was replaced with CaCl2. Both, closure time (T) or bleeding volume (V) were more sensitive than Simplate bleeding time and T was more sensitive than V in detecting patients with disorders of primary hemostasis. We conclude that the Thrombostat 4000 is a reproducible, reliable, sensitive and easy to use instrument. It is superior to the traditional in vivo bleeding times for investigations of disorders of primary hemostasis (screening, diagnosis, monitoring, etc.). PMID:8533123

  3. Omeprazole maintenance therapy prevents recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Demertzis; Dimitrios Polymeros; Theodoros Emmanuel; Konstantinos Triantafyllou; Pericles Tassios; Spiros D Ladas

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the omeprazole maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer.METHODS: We studied 15 consecutive patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer.Omeprazole (20 mg/d) maintenance therapy was given after ulcer healing. In addition to clinical follow-up, ambulatory 24-h gastric pH assay was performed before and during omeprazole therapy in those patients and controls with previous duodenal ulcer surgery but no ulcer recurrence.RESULTS: All the 15 ulcers were healed after being treated with omeprazole (40 mg/d) for 2 mo. Eleven patients with two (1-9) episodes of recurrent ulcer bleeding completed the follow-up (43, 12-72 mo). None of them had a bleeding episode while on omeprazole. One patient discontinued the therapy and had recurrent bleeding. The median 24-h fraction time of gastric pH <4 in patients was 80, 46-95% , and was reduced to 32, 13-70% by omeprazole (P = 0.002).CONCLUSION: Long-term maintenance therapy with omeprazole (20 mg/day) is effective in preventing recurrent ulcer bleeding.

  4. Reasons of bleeding complications and prevention methods in endovascular stenting for intracranial artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the reasons of bleeding complications and the prevention methods in stenting for intracranial arterial stenosis. Methods: The clinical data of 366 patients underwent stent-assistant angioplasty of intracranial artery stenosis from July 2006 to December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Among them, 14 patients with bleeding complications were found. The initial 100 patients were categorized as early stage group and the rest as mature stage group. The reasons of bleeding and the methods for preventing this complication were summarized. Results: The overall incidence of bleeding complication was 3.8% (14/366). In the early stage group and mature stage group,the rates was 10%(10/100) and 1.5% (4/266). Six cases were related to the operational manipulation and 8 cases secondary to hyperperfusion injury. Death was found in 6 patients,severe disability in 3, mild paralysis in 2, and no neurological deficits in 3. Conclusions: The bleeding complications in stent-assisted angioplasty of intracranial artery stenosis have a high disability and mortality. The improvement of operative techniques and the more strict indications decrease the bleeding complications rate effectively. (authors)

  5. Periampullary Dieulafoy’s Lesion: An Unusual Cause of Ga strointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder S Rana

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Dieulafoy’s lesion is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding with the most common location being the stomach. A periampullary location is rare for a bleeding Dieulafoy’s lesion. Case report We present the case of a 52-year-old female who presented with intermittent painless melena. Her upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were normal. She was a diagnostic challenge as no definite lesion could be identified on capsule endoscopy. However, as there was presence of fresh blood in the proximal jejunum, a push enteroscopy was performed which revealed the presence of fresh blood in the duodenum and proximal jejunum. But no bleeding lesion could be identified. A side view endoscopy was performed which revealed a bleeding periampullary Dieulafoy’s lesion. Immediate hemostasis was achieved with an injection of adrenalin. Other episodes of bleeding occurred and the patient was finally treated surgically. Conclusion A periampullary Dieulafoy’s lesion presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleed is a diagnostic challenge and can be missed on capsule endoscopy.

  6. The impact of reverse trendelenburg versus head-up position on intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nooraei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of several efforts for decreasing blood loss, our experience sometimes shows that some patients bleed more profusely during rhinoplasty. Patient position could have deep impact on bleeding amount during surgical procedures. Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare reverse trendelenburg position and head-up position on intra-operative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. This was to check the effects of reverse trendelenburg position and head up position on the intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. Methods: In this study, 30 ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiology physical condition classification patients between 18 and 40 years of age who were candidate to rhinoplasty operations for first time were included. Patients were randomly assigned to reverse trendelenburg or head-up position. Exclusion criteria was any history or lab indicating coagulation problems or using any drug. All gauzes used and the blood that accumulated in the aspirator throughout the operation were calculated. Results: Our results showed that the mean amount of blood loss in reverse trendelenburg was lower (77.00 ΁ 13.20 ml than head-up position (83.33 ΁ 21.18 ml, although, there was no statistical difference between two groups. However, there was no significant differences among two groups in different aspects of hemodynamic determinants and bleeding amount during and after rhinoplasty. Conclusions: Our results showed that patient bleeding is not increased because of positioning per se. In conclusion, perhaps in the future reverse trendelenburg will be given more often during rhinoplasry.

  7. Bleeding gastric varices: Results of endoscopic injection with cyanoacrylate at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phadet Noophun; Pradermchai Kongkam; Sutep Gonlachanvit; Rungsun Rerknimitr

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of gastric varices injection with cyanoacrylate in patients with gastric variceal bleeding.METHODS: Twenty-four patients (15 males, 9 females) with gastric variceal bleeding underwent endoscopic treatment with cyanoacrylate injection. Successful hemostasis, rebleeding rate, and complications were retrospectively reviewed. Followed up endoscopy was performed and repeat cyanoacrylate injection was given until gastric varices were obliterated. RESULTS: Seventeen patients achieved definite hemostasis. Of these, 14 patients had primary success after initial endoscopic therapy. Ten patients developed recurrent bleeding. Repeated cyanoacrylate injection stopped rebleeding in three patients. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed to control rebleeding in one patient which occured after repeat endoscopic therapy. Six patients died (three from uncontrolled bleeding, two from sepsis, and one from mesenteric vein thrombosis). Minor complications occurred in 11 patients (six epigastric discomfort and five post injection ulcers). Cyanoacrylate embolism developed in two patients. One of these patients died from mesenteric vein thrombosis. The other had pulmonary embolism which resolved spontaneously. Advanced cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were major risk factors for uncontrolled bleeding.CONCLUSION: Endoscopic treatment for bleeding gastric varices with cyanoacrylate injection is effective for immediate hemostasis. Repeat cyanoacrylate injection has a lower success rate than the initial injection.Cyanoacrylate embolism is not a common serious complication.

  8. Severe Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient With Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis Treated With Thalidomide and Octreotide: Bridging to Transcoronary Ablation of Septal Hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S.; Poulsen, Steen H.; Agnholt, Jorgen S.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) due to angiodysplasias can cause severe, recurrent bleeding, especially in elderly patients. Angiodysplastic bleedings in the gastrointestinal tract have been associated with aortic stenosis and, more recently, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, caused by an acquired coagulopathy known as Heyde’s syndrome. Multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis of angiodysplastic bleeding including genetic factors and increased levels of vascular intestinal grow...

  9. Incidence, predictors and prognostic implications of bleeding complicating primary percutaneous coronary intervention

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    Matić Dragan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Data about bleeding complicating primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI are more frequently obtained from randomized clinical trials on patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS, but less frequently from surveys or registries on patients with STelevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence, predictors and prognostic impact of in-hospital major bleeding in the population of unselected real-world patients with acute STEMI undergoing primary PCI. Methods. All consecutive patients presenting with STEMI who underwent primary PCI at a single large tertiary healthcare center between January 2005 and July 2009, were studied. Major bleeding was defined according to the Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO study criteria. We examined the association between in-hospital major bleeding and death or major adverse cardiac events (MACE in patients treated with PCI. The primary outcomes were in-hospital and 6-month mortality and MACE. Results. Of the 770 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI, in-hospital major bleeding occurred in 32 (4.2% patients. Independent predictors of major bleeding were advanced age (≥ 65 years, female gender, baseline anemia and elevated white blood cell (WBC count and signs of congestive heart failure at admission (Killip class II-IV. In-hospital and 6-month mortality and MACE rates were more than 2.5-fold-higher in patients who developed major bleeding compared with those who did not. Major bleeding was a predictor of 6- month MACE, independent of a few risk factors (previous MI, previous PCI, diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (OR = 3.02; 95% CI for OR 1.20-7.61; p = 0.019, but was not a true independent predictor of MACE and mortality in the fully adjusted models. Conclusion: Patients of advanced age, female gender, with baseline anemia and elevated WBC count and those with Killip class II-IV at presentation are at

  10. The vital threat of an upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Risk factor analysis of 121 consecutive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Schemmer; Frank Decker; Genevieve Dei-Anane; Volkmar Henschel; Klaus Buhl; Christian Herfarth; Stefan Riedl

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the importance in predicting patients risk of mortality due to upper gastrointestinal (UGI)bleeding under today's therapeutic regimen.METHODS: From 1998 to 2001, 121 patients with the diagnosis of UGI bleeding were treated in our hospital.Based on the patients' data, a retrospective multivariate data analysis with initially more than 270 single factors was performed. Subsequently, the following potential risk factors underwent a logistic regression analysis:age, gender, initial hemoglobin, coumarines, liver cirrhosis, prothrombin time (PT), gastric ulcer (small curvature), duodenal ulcer (bulbus back wall), Forrest classification, vascular stump, variceal bleeding, MalloryWeiss syndrome, RBC substitution, recurrent bleeding,conservative and surgical therapy.RESULTS: Seventy male (58%) and 51 female (42%)patients with a median age of 70 (range: 21-96) years were treated. Their in-hospital mortality was 14%. While 12% (11/91) of the patients died after conservative therapy, 20% (6/30) died after undergoing surgical therapy. UGI bleeding occurred due to duodenal ulcer (n = 36; 30%), gastric ulcer (n = 35; 29%), esophageal varicosis (n = 12; 10%), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (n = 8; 7%), erosive lesions of the mucosa (n = 20;17%), cancer (n = 5; 4%), coagulopathy (n = 4; 3%),lymphoma (n = 2; 2%), benign tumor (n = 2; 2%)and unknown reason (n = 1; 1%). A logistic regression analysis of all aforementioned factors revealed that liver cirrhosis and duodenal ulcer (bulbus back wall)were associated risk factors for a fatal course after UGI bleeding. Prior to endoscopy, only liver cirrhosis was an assessable risk factor. Thereafter, liver cirrhosis,the location of a bleeding ulcer (bulbus back wall) and patients' gender (male) were of prognostic importance for the clinical outcome (mortality) of patients with a bleeding ulcer.CONCLUSION: Most prognostic parameters used in clinical routine today are not reliable enough in predicting a patient's vital threat posed by

  11. Detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding by intra-arterial scintigraphy: an experimental study and preliminary clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this animal and clinical study was to compare intra-arterial (IA) scintigraphy with angiography in the localization of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. After sedation with intramuscularly administered ketamine, lower GI bleeding was induced in ten rabbits. Using inguinal cut-down, an arterial femoral 3F catheter was placed in the proximal mesenteric artery. Following abdominal incision to expose the bowel, lower GI bleeding was caused by incising the antimesenteric border of the small bowel wall. Initial angiography was performed, and this was followede by Tc-99m pertechnetate IA scintigarphy. Tc-99m RBC IA scintigraphy involved two patients who had undergone selective mesenteric arterial catheterizaion for the evaluation of acute lower GI bleeding. Ten rabbits, bleeding at a mean rate of 0.7g/min, were studied. IA scintigraphy was superior to angiography in four cases and equal in six. The sensitivity of angiography was 40%(4/10), and IA scintigraphy 80%(8/10). In one patient, Tc-99m RBC was administered directly into the superior mesenteric artery and ulcer bleeding in the transverse colon was identified. PRior to conventional angiography, the bleeding had been occult. In a second patient, in whom angiography had revealed a hypervascular mass, selective injection of Tc-99m RBC into the superior mesenteric artery revealed tumor(leiomyoma) bleeding in the jejunum. Selective IA scintigraphy was valuable for detecting intestinal bleeding, occult during conventional studies and may be useful for detecting acute bleeding at the time of negative angiography.=20

  12. Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Is Associated With Reduction of Early Bleeding Risk After Prophylactic Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong Hee; Yim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Seung Young; Suh, Sang Jun; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) is an effective procedure to control and prevent variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis, but it can be complicated by bleeding from post-EVL ulcers. Several studies have reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) decrease the size of post-EVL ulcers. However, evidence are limited as to whether PPIs actually reduce the risk of bleeding after EVL. This study aimed to analyze the factors associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL and to assess the effect of PPI therapy. Five hundred and five cirrhotic patients with high risk esophageal varices who received primary prophylactic EVL were included for this retrospective cohort study. Post-EVL bleeding was defined as bleeding after prophylactic EVL within 8 weeks evidenced by the occurrence of melena or hematemesis, or by a decrease of hemoglobin by >2.0 g/dL. If evidence of bleeding from ulceration of the EVL sites was confirmed by endoscopy, we defined it as post-EVL ulcer bleeding. Fourteen patients developed bleeding after prophylactic EVL. Factors associated with post-EVL bleeding included alcohol as etiology, low albumin, high total bilirubin, high Child-Pugh score, high MELD score, coexistence of gastric varices, and not administrating PPI medication by univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic analysis, Co-existing gastric varix (odds ratio [OR] 5.680, P = 0.005] and not administrating PPIs (OR 8.217, P = 0.002) were associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL. In the subgroup analysis excluding patients whose gastric varices were treated, not administering PPI medication (OR 8.827, P = 0.008) was the sole factor associated with post-EVL bleeding. We suggest that PPI therapy needs to be considered in patients receiving prophylactic EVL to reduce the risk of bleeding after prophylactic EVL. PMID:26937932

  13. Octreotide in the Control of Post-Sclerotherapy Bleeding from Oesophageal Varices, Ulcers and Oesophagitis

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    Spencer A. Jenkins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding from oesophageal varices, oesophageal ulcers or oesophagitis is occasionally massive and difficult to control. Octreotide, a synthetic analogue of somatostin lowers portal pressure and collateral blood flow including that through varices, increases lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, and inhibits the gastric secretion of acid as well as pepsin. Our current experience suggests it is effective in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage. Therefore we have examined the efficacy of octreotide in the control of postsclerotherapy bleeding from oesophageal varices, oesophageal ulcers and oesophagitis. During the study period 77 patients experienced a significant gastrointestinal bleed (blood pressure 100 beats per min or the need to transfuse 2 or more units of blood to restore the haemoglobin level following injection sclerotherapy of oesophageal varices. The source of bleeding was varices in 42 patients, oesophageal ulcers in 31 and oesophagitis in 4. All patients received a continuous intravenous infusion of octreotide (50 μg/h for between 40–140h. If bleeding was not controlled in the first 12h after commencing octreotide hourly bolus doses (50 μg for 24h were superimposed on the continuous infusion. Haemorrhage was successfully controlled by an infusion of octreotide in 38 of the 42 patients with bleeding from varices, in 30 of 31 patients with oesophageal ulceration, and all patients with oesophagitis. In the 1 patient with persistent bleeding from oesophageal ulceration and in 2 of the 4 with continued haemorrhage from varices, haemostasis was achieved by hourly boluses of 50 μg octreotide for 24h in addition to the continuous infusion. No major complications were associated with octreotide administration. The results of this study clearly indicate that octreotide is a safe and effective treatment for the control of severe haemorrhage after technically successful injection sclerotherapy.

  14. POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING: HISTOPATHOLOGICAL SPECTRUM AND ASSOCIATION WITH AGE AND CLEAR SPAN: CASE SERIES OF 328 CASES

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    Ruchita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Postmenopausal bleeding is defined as vaginal bleeding occurring after twelve months of amenorrhea in a woman of the age where the menopause can be expected. With increase in life expectancy, a larger proportion of female population will be in postmenopausal age group; hence, the incidence of postmenopausal bleeding is expected to increase. AIM: We studied the prevalence of malignancy as well as the histopathological spectrum of genital tract lesions in cases of postmenopausal bleeding. The association between age, period between cessation of menses and onset of bleeding per vaginum (clear span was also studied. RESULTS: Malignant causes were more common (58.5% than benign causes and included cervical carcinoma, malignant uterine tumors (13.1%, carcinoma vagina (4.3%, malignant ovarian tumors (5.5%, carcinoma vulva (0.9% and carcinoma fallopian tube (0.3%. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest among cervical malignancies. The benign causes included polyps (16.5%, endometrial hyperplasia (4.9%, adenomyosis (2.7%, atrophic endometrium (2.4%, cervicitis (2.1%, leiomyoma (1.8%, proliferative endometrium (1.5%, endometritis (1.5%, secretory endometrium (1.2%, retained IUCD (0.9% and uterovaginal prolapse (0.6%. The likelihood of malignancy increased significantly with advancing age (p-value 0.042. The clear span of cases with malignant tumors was significantly longer than the clear span of cases with benign lesions. Hence, the likelihood of malignancy increased with length of clear span (p-value 0.00809. CONCLUSION: Any postmenopausal patient with vaginal bleeding needs to be investigated thoroughly to determine the cause of the bleeding and should be considered to have abnormal histopathology until proved otherwise

  15. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and gastrointestinal bleeding: a case-control study.

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    Alfonso Carvajal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day. RESULTS: 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.96 or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2.

  16. Effect of Desmopressin in Reducing Bleeding after Cardiac Surgery in Patients Receiving Anti-Platelet Agents

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    Kamran Shadvar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Severe bleeding is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery using the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB pump. Desmopressin, a synthetic analogue of vasopressin, is used to prevent postoperative bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of desmopressin in reducing blood loss after cardiac surgery in patients receiving antiplatelet drugs. Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, 40 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery with CPB, aged over 18 years, and on antiplatelet therapy for a week before surgery were divided in two groups. Case and control groups received nasal desmopressin spray and nasal normal saline spray, respectively. Patient vital signs, blood loss, administration of blood products, prescription drugs to improve the coagulation status, serum and whole intake and output of patients, need for a second surgery to control the bleeding, remaining sternum open, mortality due to bleeding, duration of intensive care unit (ICU stay and mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: In the case and control groups there were no differences in duration of operation, mechanical ventilation and length of ICU stay. There was no significant difference in terms of postoperative bleeding and intake of blood products between two groups (P>0.05. Reoperation due to bleeding in the case and control groups was observed in 3 (15%, and 1 (5% patient(s, respectively (P=0.3. Conclusion: Desmopressin has no significant effect on reducing the amount of bleeding after cardiac surgery in patients receiving anti-platelet agents. Keywords: CABG; cardio pulmonary bypass pump; hemorrhage; desmopressin 

  17. Comparing the Effect of Mefenamic Acid and Vitex Agnus on Intrauterine Device Induced Bleeding

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    Parisa Yavarikia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increased bleeding is the most common cause of intrauterine device (IUD removal. The use of alternative therapies to treat bleeding has increased due to the complications of medications. But most alternative therapies are not accepted by women. Therefore, conducting studies to find the right treatment with fewer complications and being acceptable is necessary. This study aimed to compare the effect of mefenamic acid and vitex agnus castus on IUD induced bleeding.Methods: This was a double blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. It was conducted on 84 women with random allocation in to two groups of 42 treated with mefenamic acid and vitex agnus capsules taking three times a day during menstruation for four months. Data were collected by demographic questionnaire and Higham 5 stage chart (1 month before the treatment and 4 months during the treatment., Paired t-test, independent t-test, chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA with repeated measurements, and SPSS software were used to determine the results.Results: Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus significantly decreased bleeding. This decrease in month 4 was 52% in the mefenamic acid group and 47.6% in the vitex agnus group. The mean bleeding score changes was statistically significant between the two groups in the first three months and before the intervention. In the mefenamic acid group, the decreased bleeding was significantly more than the vitex agnus group. However, during the 4th month, the mean change was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus were both effective on IUD induced bleeding; however, mefenamic acid was more effective.

  18. Predictors of In-hospital Mortality Among Patients Presenting with Variceal Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    Amith S Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The recent years have witnessed an increase in number of people harboring chronic liver diseases. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding occurs in 30% of patients with cirrhosis, and accounts for 80%-90% of bleeding episodes. We aimed to assess the in-hospital mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding and (2 to investigate the predictors of mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from treatment records of 317 subjects who presented with variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding to Government Medical College, Patiala, between June 1, 2010, and May 30, 2014. The data thus obtained was compiled using a preset proforma, and the details analyzed using SPSSv20. Results: Cirrhosis accounted for 308 (97.16% subjects with bleeding varices, with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction 9 (2.84% completing the tally. Sixty-three (19.87% subjects succumbed to death during hospital stay. Linear logistic regression revealed independent predictors for in-hospital mortality, including higher age (P = 0.000, Child-Pugh Class (P = 0.002, altered sensorium (P = 0.037, rebleeding within 24 h of admission (P = 0.000, low hemoglobin level (P = 0.023, and serum bilirubin (P = 0.002. Conclusion: Higher age, low hemoglobin, higher Child-Pugh Class, rebleeding within 24 h of admission, higher serum bilirubin, and lower systolic blood pressure are the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Bleeding risk during latent period after gamma knife surgery for small cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Comparison with natural history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the bleeding risk during latency period after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for small (3 cm or less) cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We analyzed 720 cases with a natural history and 100 cases with GKS. The incidence of bleeding was calculated from the data of the former cases according to the history of bleeding and their age and was compared with the actual number obtained from the latter. The estimated incidence of bleeding was 1.6 for unruptured AVMs and 5.5 for ruptured AVMs, whereas the actual incidence of bleeding was 2 for unruptured and 0 for ruptured. The difference was statistically significant in the ruptured but was not significant in the unruptured. These results lead us to conclude that the bleeding risk during latency period after GKS for small AVMs is almost the same in the unruptured, but is decreased in the ruptured. (author)

  20. A prospective study of aspirin use and the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in men.

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    Edward S Huang

    Full Text Available Data regarding the influence of dose and duration of aspirin use on risk of gastrointestinal bleeding are conflicting.We conducted a prospective cohort study of 32,989 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS in 1994 who provided biennial aspirin data. We estimated relative risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding requiring hospitalization or a blood transfusion.During 14 years of follow-up, 707 men reported an episode of major gastrointestinal bleeding over 377,231 person-years. After adjusting for risk factors, regular aspirin use (≥2 times/week had a multivariate relative risk (RR of gastrointestinal bleeding of 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.55 compared to non-regular use. The association was particularly evident for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (multivariate RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.16-1.92. Compared to men who denied any aspirin use, multivariate RRs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 1.05 (95% CI 0.71-1.52 for men who used 0.5-1.5 standard tablets/week, 1.31 (95% CI 0.88-1.95 for 2-5 aspirin/week, 1.63 (95% CI, 1.15-2.32 for 6-14 aspirin/week and 2.40 (95% CI, 1.10-5.22 for >14 aspirin/week (P(trend<0.001. The relative risk also appeared to be dose-dependent among short-term users <5 years; P(trend<.001 and long-term users (≥5 years; P(trend = 0.015. In contrast, after controlling for dose, increasing duration of use did not appear to be associated with risk (P(trend = 0.749.Regular aspirin use increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, especially from the upper tract. However, risk of bleeding appears to be more strongly related to dose than to duration of use. Risk of bleeding should be minimized by using the lowest effective dose among short-term and long-term aspirin users.

  1. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  2. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Arterial Esophageal Bleeding with the Use of N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospita, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of arterial esophageal bleeding. Between August 2000 and April 2008, five patients diagnosed with arterial esophageal bleeding by conventional angiography, CT angiography or endoscopy, underwent a TAE with NBCA. We mixed NBCA with iodized oil at ratios of 1:1 to 1:4 to supply radiopacity and achieve a proper polymerization time. After embolization, we evaluated the angiographic and clinical success, recurrent bleeding, and procedure-related complications. The bleeding esophageal artery directly originated from the aorta in four patients and from the left inferior phrenic artery in one patient. Although four patients had an underlying coagulopathy at the time of the TAE, angiographic and clinical success was achieved in all five patients. In addition, no procedurerelated complications such as esophageal infarction were observed during this study. NBCA can be an effective and feasible embolic agent in patients with active arterial esophageal bleeding, even with pre-existing coagulopathy.

  3. Transcatheter embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate for renal arterial bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the effectiveness and safety of transcatheter embolization with N- butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in treating renal artery bleeding. Methods: During the period from Jan. 2006 to June 2013, transcatheter embolization with NBCA was carried out in 12 patients with renal arterial bleeding, who failed to respond to the conventional treatment. Of the 23 patients, only NBCA was used in 20 (80%), and NBCA together with Gelfoam and/or micro-coils was employed in 3 (13%). DSA showed that the lesions included pseudoaneurysm (n=10), arteriovenous fistula (n=8) and active bleeding (n=5). The clinical and imaging materials were retrospectively analyzed. The technical success rate, clinical result and procedure-related complications were recorded. Results: Technical success was obtained in all 23 patients. Angiography performed after the transcatheter embolization showed that the abnormal vascular manifestations disappeared in all cases. The bleeding stopped at 2 or 3 days after the procedure, and no recurrence was observed. No obvious complications occurred during and after the treatment. Conclusion: For renal bleeding due to various reasons, transcatheter embolization with NBCA only or with NBCA plus other embolic materials is safe and effective. Even for patients with poor coagulation function, NBCA can also get satisfactory result. (authors)

  4. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Arterial Esophageal Bleeding with the Use of N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of arterial esophageal bleeding. Between August 2000 and April 2008, five patients diagnosed with arterial esophageal bleeding by conventional angiography, CT angiography or endoscopy, underwent a TAE with NBCA. We mixed NBCA with iodized oil at ratios of 1:1 to 1:4 to supply radiopacity and achieve a proper polymerization time. After embolization, we evaluated the angiographic and clinical success, recurrent bleeding, and procedure-related complications. The bleeding esophageal artery directly originated from the aorta in four patients and from the left inferior phrenic artery in one patient. Although four patients had an underlying coagulopathy at the time of the TAE, angiographic and clinical success was achieved in all five patients. In addition, no procedurerelated complications such as esophageal infarction were observed during this study. NBCA can be an effective and feasible embolic agent in patients with active arterial esophageal bleeding, even with pre-existing coagulopathy

  5. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

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    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  6. Role of Oxidative Stress on Vaginal Bleeding during The First Trimester of Pregnant Women

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    Rüya Deveer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced in many metabolic and physiologic processes. Antioxidative mechanisms remove these harmful species. Our aim was to assess whether serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status altered during first trimester pregnancies with vaginal bleeding. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, A group of pregnant women at less than 10 weeks of gestation with vaginal bleeding (n=25 and a control group of healthy pregnancies with similar characteristics (n=25 were included. All of the patients in the two groups were matched for age, gestational age and body mass index. Serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status levels were determined using a Hitachi 912 analyzer and compared between the two groups. Results: Characteristics, including maternal age, parity, and gestational age were similar between the two groups. Serum total antioxidant capacity levels were significantly lower in the women with vaginal bleeding than in control women (1.16 ± 0.20 vs. 1.77 ± 0.08 mmol Trolox Equiv./L; p=0.001, whereas higher total oxidant status measurements were found in women with vaginal bleeding compared to the control group (4.01 ± 0.20 vs. 2.57 ± 0.65 μmol H2O2 Equiv./L; p=0.001. Conclusion: Increased total oxidant status might be involved in the pathophysiology of vaginal bleeding during early first trimester pregnancies.

  7. Numerical simulation of base flow with hot base bleed for two jet models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jie YU; Yong-gang YU; Bin NI

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the benefits of base bleed in base flow field, the base flow with hot base bleed for two jet models is studied. Two-dimensional axisymmetric NaviereStokes equations are computed by using a finite volume scheme. The base flow of a cylinder afterbody with base bleed is simulated. The simulation results are validated with the experimental data, and the experimental results are well reproduced. On this basis, the base flow fields with base bleed for a circular jet model and an annulus jet model are investigated by selecting the injection temperature from 830 K to 2200 K. The results show that the base pressure of the annular jet model is higher than that of the circular jet model with the changes of the injection parameter and the injection temperature. For the circular jet model, the hot gases are concentrated in the vicinity of the base. For the annular jet model, the bleed gases flow into the shear layer directly so that the hot gases are concentrated in the shear layer. The latter temperature distribution is better for the increase of base pressure.

  8. Experience in Diagnosis and Treatment of Bleeding Complications in Severe Acute Pancreatitis by TAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The experience in diagnosis and treatment of bleeding complications in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) by transcatheter arterial embolization was summarized. The clinical data of 19 SAP patients complicated with intra-abdominal bleeding in our hospital from Jan. 2000 to Jan. 2003 were analyzed retrospectively and the therapeutic outcome of TAE was evaluated statistically. The results showed that the short-term successful rate of hemostasis by TAE was 89.5 % (17/19), the incidence of re-bleeding after TAE was 36.8 % (7/19) and the successful rate of hemostatis by second TAE was 71.4 % (5/7). It was concluded that the intra-abdominal bleeding in SAP was mainly caused by the rupture of erosive/infected pseudoaneurysm. Mostly, the broken vessels were splenic artery and gastroduodenal artery. In terms of emergence hemostatis, TAE is the most effective method. Surgical hemostasis is necessary if hemostasis by TAE is failed or re-bleeding occurs after TAE.

  9. Clinical application of Hawkeye VG SPECT/CT imaging in the bleeding position of lower gastrointestinal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of Hawkeye VG SPECT/CT imaging on diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal bleeding using in vivo labeling 99Tcm-RBC. Methods: Fifty-six patients (42 males, 14 females, age ranging from 10 to 76 years) who had definite lower gastrointestinal bleeding were studied retrospectively. All patients had intravenous injection with 370 MBq 99Tcm-RBC and then underwent planar, SPECT, and CT imaging respectively in the abdomen before exploratory laparotomy. Images from SPECT and CT were fused thereafter to locate the active bleeder, if any. χ2 test was performed to show the differences of diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy between planar and SPECT/CT imaging. Results: In 56 patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding, 50 patients showed abnormally concentrated radionuclide activity with planar images and 52 patients showed the similar imaging pattern with SPECT/CT. Among these patients, concordant bleeding with operation findings was found in 31 patients with planar images and 48 patients with SPECT/CT images. The sensitivity and accuracy were 89.3% (50/56) and 73.8% (31/42) in planar images, and 92.9% (52/56) and 92.3% (48/52) in SPECT/CT images (χ2=0.11, P>0.05; χ2=4.63, P<0.05). Conclusion: Hawkeye VG SPECT/CT imaging shows an effective, simple and accurate method and could be used for diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal bleeding. (authors)

  10. New direct oral anticoagulants--current therapeutic options and treatment recommendations for bleeding complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesbach, Wolfgang; Seifried, Erhard

    2012-10-01

    To date, clinical studies show that the incidence of spontaneous bleeding with new direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) is comparable to that of established anticoagulants. However, unlike vitamin K antagonists, there are currently no clinically available antidotes or approved reversal agents for new DOAs. Restoring normal coagulation is important in many cases, such as emergency surgeries, serious bleedings, or anticoagulant overdosing. Attempts have been made to restore normal coagulation after treatment with new DOAs using compounds such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), or FEIBA (factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity). Limited pre-clinical data and even less clinical evidence are available on the usefulness of these methods in restoring normal coagulation for the emergency management of critical bleeding episodes. Evaluating the utility of DOAs is further complicated by the fact that it is unknown how predictive established test systems are of the bleeding risks. Clinical practice requires further evaluation of the emergency management options for the new DOAs to define the agents and the doses that are most useful. Furthermore, patients receiving long-term treatment with a DOA are likely to undergo elective surgery at some point, and there is lack of evidence regarding perioperative treatment regimens under such conditions. This review summarises potential bleeding management options and available data on the new DOAs. PMID:22782297

  11. Use of Provocative Angiography to Localize Site in Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. While the source of most cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding may be diagnosed with modern radiological and endoscopic techniques, approximately 5% of patients remain who have negative endoscopic and radiological investigations.Clinical Problem. These patients require repeated hospital admissions and blood transfusions, and may proceed to exploratory laparotomy and intraoperative endoscopy. The personal and financial costs are significant. Method of Diagnosis and Decision Making. The technique of adding pharmacologic agents (anticoagulants, vasodilators, fibrinolytics) during standard angiographic protocols to induce a prohemorrhagic state is termed provocative angiography. It is best employed when significant bleeding would otherwise necessitate emergency surgery. Treatment. This practice frequently identifies a bleeding source (reported success rates range from 29 to 80%), which may then be treated at the same session. We report the case of a patient with chronic lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage with consistently negative endoscopic and radiological workup, who had an occult source of bleeding identified only after a provocative angiographic protocol was instituted, and who underwent succeeding therapeutic coil embolization of the bleeding vessel

  12. Predictive Factors Study Of Rectal Bleeding Radical Radiotherapy In Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Objective: To determine clinical, para clinical or to predict dosimetric the occurrence of rectal bleeding after radical radiotherapy as primary treatment prostate cancer in patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (Inca) dimensional external beam radiation. Materials and Methods: From July 2008 to July 2011 132 patients were recruited, 86 of which met followed for 12 months. Side effect was recorded gastrointestinal track at different times of the patient with classifications RTOG / EORTC ( Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) and SOMA / LENT also used a questionnaire specifically built and tested by the Italian cooperative group. results were correlated with clinical parameters (PSA, Gleason score, clinical T, class risk, hypertension, and diabetes) and dosimetric ( treatment volume, volume rectum, total dose, maximum dose to the rectum mean dose to the rectum) to assess the correlation thereof with the occurrence of rectal bleeding. Results: In a cut to 12 months follow-up, there is a relationship between the appearance bleeding with time. The mean dose to the rectum and the initial PSA showed significance in correlation with the occurrence of rectal bleeding, with a p of 0.01 and 0.54 respectively. Conclusions: The rectal side effect is one of the major side effects both acute and chronic prostate radiotherapy in the present study has failed to demonstrate a correlation between two factors predictive identified as potentially priori significant the occurrence of rectal bleeding, as the initial PSA and the mean dose to the rectum

  13. Single center experience of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahesh Kumar Goenka; Shounak Majumder; Sanjeev Kumar; Pradeepta Kumar Sethy; Usha Goenka

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify optimum timing to maximize diagnostic yield by capsule endoscopy (CE) in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB).METHODS: We identified patients who underwent CE at our institution from August 2003 to December 2009.Patient medical records were reviewed to determine type of OGIB (occult, overt), CE results and complications,and timing of CE with respect to onset of bleeding.RESULTS: Out of 385 patients investigated for OGIB,284 (74%) had some lesion detected by CE. In 222 patients (58%), definite lesions were detected that could unequivocally explain OGIB. Small bowel ulcer/erosions secondary to Crohn's disease, tuberculosis or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent use were the commonest lesions detected. Patients with overt GI bleeding for <48 h before CE had the highest diagnostic yield (87%).This was significantly greater (P < 0.05) compared to that in patients with overt bleeding prior to 48 h (68%),as well as those with occult OGIB (59%).CONCLUSION: We established the importance of early CE in management of OGIB. CE within 48 h of overt bleeding has the greatest potential for lesion detection.

  14. Unusual Cause of Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Arora

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most common emergencies in gastroenterology. The common causes of the upper gastrointestinal bleeding include peptic ulcer disease, gastric erosive mucosal disease and portal hypertension. Gastrointestinal arteriovenous malformation is a less common cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and these arteriovenous malformation are most commonly located in the large and small intestine. Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation is a rare condition in which there is tumorlike formation or vascular anomaly built up via an aberrant bypass anastomosis of the arterial and venous systems in the pancreas. Splenic artery is most commonly involved (42%, followed by gastroduodenal artery (22% and small pancreatic arteries (25%. Clinically it may present as gastrointestinal hemorrhage which is occasionally fatal. Other presentations are abdominal pain, pancreatitis, duodenal ulcer, jaundice, and portal hypertension. Case report We present a rare case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation presenting as massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Conclusion Since early surgery is a life saving treatment for such cases, hence, a high index of suspicion should be maintained especially when massive bleeding is detected from the medial wall of second part of duodenum.

  15. Endovascular control of the acute bleeding in patients with advanced neoplasms of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Advanced neoplastic processes in the neck can cause acute life-threatening bleeding. Source of the bleeding can be vessels from a tumor mass or invasion of the main cervical arterial vessels. Poor general condition of the patients and accompanying complications create additional difficulties in getting these situations under control. What you will learn: Endovascular embolization of acute bleeding from advanced cervical neoplasms requires detailed knowledge of anatomical structures in this area and precision equipment with the possibility of super selective catheterization of small caliber vessels. The presentation discusses the various embolization materials and possibilities for their application in the neck. The experience of 5 embolization sessions in 4 patients is presented. An important point is discussion of the possible complications and how to avoid them. Discussion: Acute bleeding from large tumor formation is often a real risk to the life of the patient. Getting these conditions under control usually postpones the poor prognosis of the main disease. Postembolization syndrome and postembolization tissue necrosis define the basic cares in the early and late period after such a procedure. Conclusion: Acute bleeding from advanced neoplastic processes in the neck offers a real challenge. For their successful mastery it is required certain technical skills, unconventional solutions and a wide range of materials for embolization. A multidisciplinary approach is required to view the specific care these patients need and the possible complications

  16. [Actinic enteritis as a cause of digestive bleeding of obscure origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Luis; Guevara, Julissa; Aguilar, Victor; Menéndez, Monica; Bravo, Eduar; Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Pichilingue, Catherina; Zegarra, Arturo; Huerta-Mercado, Jorge; Pinto, José; Prochazka, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Vanessa; Bussalleu, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic actinic enteritis is a malfunction of the small bowel, occurring in the 6 months post-radiotherapy, and it can be manifestated as malabsortion, stenosis, fistula formation, local abscesses, perforation and bleeding, We report a case of an elderly patient who presents an episode of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) secondary to actinic enteritis. She is a 64-year- old female patient with the past medical history of cervical cancer who received radiotherapy and brachytherapy. One year after the treatment, the patient presents a chronic episode of melena and symptomatic anemia and 1 week before the admission she had hematochezia. At admission she has hemodynamic instability with a hemoglobin value of 2.7 gr/dl. We did an upper endoscopy, a colonoscopy and abdomino-pelvic tomography without any findings of the bleeding’s source. Reason why an endoscopic capsule was done, showing bleeding areas in the medial and distal small bowel. The patient had another gastrointestinal bleeding requiring a surgery where they decide to do a resection of the small bowel and a right hemicholectomy. The pathology was compatible with actinic enteritis. The patient after the surgery had a torpid evolution, and finally dies. We describe this case and do a review of all the existent data around the world, because is the first case reported in Peru of an actinic enteritis as a cause of OGIB. PMID:27409093

  17. Update on the transfusion in gastrointestinal bleeding (TRIGGER) trial: statistical analysis plan for a cluster-randomised feasibility trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kahan, B. C.; Jairath, V; Murphy, M F; Doré, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested an association between more liberal red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and greater risk of further bleeding and mortality following acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB). Methods and design The Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding (TRIGGER) trial is a pragmatic cluster-randomised feasibility trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a restrictive vs. liberal RBC transfusion policy for adult patients admitted to hospital w...

  18. Gallbladder ulcer erosion into the cystic artery: a rare cause ofupper gastro-intestinal bleeding Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Person Benjamin; Shmulevsky Pavel; Farraj Mouad; Ben-Ishay Offir; Kluger Yoram

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Intra luminal gallbladder bleeding is a rare cause of hemobilia that results in upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. In this case report we present a patient who presented with melena and eventually was diagnosed as bleeding from an ulcer in the gallbladder which was induced by gallstones and eroded into the cystic artery. Surgery revealed perforation of gallbladder which was the result of a pressure sore induced by a second gallstone.

  19. Octreotide for the Management of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with a HeartWare Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Dang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HeartWare is a third generation left ventricular assist device (LVAD, widely used for the management of advanced heart failure patients. These devices are frequently associated with a significant risk of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. The data for the management of patients with LVAD presenting with GI bleeding is limited. We describe a 56-year-old lady, recipient of a HeartWare device, who experienced recurrent GI bleeding and was successfully managed with subcutaneous (SC formulations of octreotide.

  20. The Correlation Between Age and Bleeding Volume in Haemorrhagic Stroke Using Multi Slice CT at District Hospitals in Jakarta

    OpenAIRE

    Saefudin, Tatan; Apriantoro, Nursama Heru; Hidayat, Ekaputra Syarif; Purnamawati, Schandra

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhagic Stroke is a common disease in Indonesia. The best imaging modality for this disease is Multi Slice Computed Tomography Scanning (MSCT), as it may help strengthening the diagnosis as well as determining the brain bleeding volume. This study aimed to show correlation between bleeding volume of the brain and patient’s age using cross-sectional approach. The 68 samples in this study were taken from secondary data from Head CT Scan of Haemorrhagic Stroke cases. Brain bleeding volume i...

  1. Women’s perceptions about reducing the frequency of monthly bleeding: results from a multinational survey

    OpenAIRE

    Szarewski, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Anne Szarewski,1 Cecilia Moeller2 1Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom; 2Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Global Market Research General Medicine, Berlin, Germany Background: Monthly bleeding can have a negative impact on daily life and, given the choice, many women would reduce the frequency of bleeding. While some women choose to occasionally postpone or reduce bleeding frequency with an oral contr...

  2. Endoscopic treatment of bleeding gastric varices with histoacryl (N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate): a South European single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Monsanto, P.; Almeida, N.; Rosa, A.; Maçôas, F; Lérias, C; Portela, F; Amaro, P.; Ferreira, MC; Gouveia, H.; Sofia, C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopic injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is the current recommended treatment for gastric variceal bleeding. Despite the extensive worldwide use, there are still differences related to the technique, safety, and long term-results. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of cyanoacrylate in patients with gastric variceal bleeding. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between January 1998 and January 2010, 97 patients with gastric variceal bleeding underwent endoscopic...

  3. Transcritical CO2 power cycle – Effects of regenerative heating using turbine bleed gas at intermediate pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For energy utilization from low temperature waste heat, CO2 is a potential working fluid due to its lower critical temperature. In this work, assuming finite quantity of flue gas available at low temperature (200 °C), a thermodynamic model is developed for a transcritical CO2 power cycle utilizing turbine bleed gas for regenerative heating. Analysis show that the cycle performance improves with higher value of bleed ratio. However, for a specified bleed pressure and bleed gas temperature at the regenerator exit, maximum practical value of bleed ratio may be fixed by considering the exponential growth of the regenerator size (specified by NTU (number of transfer unit)). Most significant observation is the existence of optimum bleed pressures corresponding to maximum 1st law efficiency or minimum cycle irreversibility for specified values of remaining cycle parameters. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic model for Transcritical CO2 cycle with bleed gas are developed. • Effects of bleed ratio, pressure, and regenerator exit gas temperature are studied. • 1st and 2nd law efficiencies are estimated. • An optimum bleed pressure for maximum 1st and 2nd efficiencies is obtained. • Maximum value of 1st law efficiency is limited by regenerator size

  4. [Diagnosis of mild hemophilia A made by massive intraabdominal bleeding in a 13-year-old boy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Yoko; Akiyama, Masaharu; Yokoi, Kentaro; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Mika; Kato, Yoko; Tanaka, Keiichiro; Baba, Yuji; Kuwashima, Naruo; Ashizuka, Shuichi; Yoshizawa, Jyoji; Motoki, Takanori; Saito, Yoshihiro; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    We report a 13-year-old boy who had massive intra-abdominal bleeding without a history of bleeding episodes or traumatic cause of bleeding. The patient underwent surgical treatment because bleeding was not controlled after treatment with tranexamic acid and transfusions including fresh-frozen plasma. Bleeding was traced to the lower left lobe of the liver. The mother's side of the family had a history of bleeding episodes in the boy's grandfather, great uncle, and son of a great aunt. A low level of plasma factor VIII coagulant activity (22%) led to a diagnosis of mild hemophilia A. Compared with severe hemophilia, mild hemophilia is more difficult to diagnose because bleeding episodes are less frequent. Most cases are found after incidental trauma or uncontrolled surgery-related bleeding, there is rarely a family history of hemophilia and activated partial thromboplastin time is normal or slightly prolonged. However, bleeding episodes in mild hemophilia may result in excessive, sometimes life-threatening hemorrhage and require early diagnosis and replacement treatment with adequate amounts of factor VIII, as in severe hemophilia. PMID:22975817

  5. A rare cause of anemia due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Cameron lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet Özaydın

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic large hiatal hernias may lead to iron deficiency anemia due to occult and massive bleeding from linear gastric erosions or ulcers on the mucosal folds at the level of the diaphragm called the Cameron lesions. The diagnosis is usually made during upper gastrointestinal system endoscopies. Current therapy includes the medication with proton pump inhibitors in combination with oral iron supplements and in some cases surgical reconstruction of hiatal hernia with fundoplication. We present a case of a 78-year-old woman who was admitted to the outpatient clinic with the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia without signs of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. She was treated with medication and her follow-up gastroscopy showed a total cure. She is asymptomatic for two years after treatment with proton pump inhibitors and iron supplements. Cameron lesions should be kept in mind as an unusual cause of iron deficiency anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding

  6. Severe Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient With Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis Treated With Thalidomide and Octreotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S; Poulsen, Steen H; Agnholt, Jørgen S

    2015-01-01

    resolve bleeding, especially in patients with large numbers of angiodysplasias. In patients with aortic stenosis and GB, the main treatment is aortic valve replacement but the patients may be unfit to undergo surgery due to the complicating anemia. In this case story, we present a patient with severe, GB...... due to hypertrophic subvalvular obstructive cardiomyopathy. Endoscopic procedures with argon beaming were performed without effect on bleeding. The patient was treated with a combination of both thalidomide and octreotide. Within 3 months, the patient recovered from the anemia and was able to undergo...... transcoronary ethanol ablation. No further bleeding episodes occurred, and thalidomide and octreotide were arrested. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe how this new drug combination therapy is an effective treatment of GB from angiodysplasias and can be used to bridge to surgical or...

  7. The Clinical and Experimental Studies of ChanLe Chongji for Reducing Bleeding after Abortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵荣胜; 丁元珍; 胡燕尔

    1999-01-01

    ChanLe Chongji (ChanLe dissolvable granule preparation) is a mixed Chinese traditional medicine composed of Prunus persica Batsch, Carthamus tinctorius, Angelica sinensis Diets, Typha angustifotia Borv. et Chaub. , Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.,etc. which could clear fever and remove blood stasis. The bleeding days in vagina after abortion by drug and the complete abortion rate were observed, 100cases were selected randomly from the treated group and the control group respectively. The results showed that the mean bleeding period in the treated group was 8. 4 days, while 13.3 days in the control. Although the mean complete abortion rate had no distinct difference between these two groups, the absolute level was higher in the treated group. The resuits of animal experiments showed that ChanLe Chongji could increase the contraction of uterus, stop bleeding, resist bacteria and diminish inflammation, thus providing its potentiality for clinical application.

  8. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained. PMID:26358933

  9. Rhizobium Strain Effects on Yield and Bleeding Sap Amino Compounds in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Lis

    1984-01-01

    for a higher percentage of the organic solutes transporting newly assimilated N from the root system than in the association with 1044. The Rhizobium strain effect on amino compound composition of the bleeding sap may indicate an influence of the bacteroids on either the N-assimilatory enzyme system......Bleeding sap composition, dry matter production and N distribution in pea (P. sativum L. cv. Bodil) grown with and without nitrate and nodulated with either R. leguminosarum strain 128c53 or strain 1044 were compared. Nitrate increased the total dry matter production of both symbioses, but...... relative to the total N-accumulation was greater with strain 128c53 due to a higher production of nodule tissue. The root bleeding sap of the symbiosis with the greater yield (strain 1044) contained high levels of asparagine and aspartic acid. In the 128c53 symbiosis, glutamine plus homoserine accounted...

  10. Definition of major bleeding in clinical investigations of antihemostatic medicinal products in surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, S; Angerås, U; Bergqvist, D;

    2010-01-01

    The definition of major bleeding varies between studies on surgical patients, particularly regarding the criteria for surgical wound-related bleeding. This diversity contributes to the difficulties in comparing data between trials. The Scientific and Standardization Committee (SSC), through its...... subcommittee on Control of Anticoagulation, of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis has previously published a recommendation for a harmonized definition of major bleeding in non-surgical studies. That definition has been adopted by the European Medicines Agency and is currently used in...... several non-surgical trials. A preliminary proposal for a parallel definition for surgical studies was presented at the 54(th) Annual Meeting of the SSC in Vienna, July 2008. Based on those discussions and further consultations with European and North American surgeons with experience from clinical trials...

  11. Jejunal angiodysplasia causing recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding presenting as severe anaemia and melena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Satyendra K; Hakim, Md Zeeshan; Kumar, Puneet; Khanna, Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Angiodysplasia of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract consists of ectasia of the submucosal vessels of the bowel. The evaluation of such patients needs proctoscopy, colonoscopy, small bowel enema, enteroscopy, capsule enteroscopy and angiography. Capsule enteroscopy has come up as an alternative to GI enteroscopy and colonoscopy in patients with occult GI bleeding; up to 52% cases of small bowel angiodysplasia in patients with occult GI bleed with negative upper GI and colonoscopy have been reported. The use of capsule enteroscopy potentially limits the hazard of radiation exposure from angiography and is less invasive than double balloon endoscopy. The treatment options for angiodysplasias include intra-arterial vasopressin injection, selective gel foam embolisation, endoscopic electrocoagulation and injection of sclerosants, with each of these being technically demanding, and requiring centres with good access to enteroscopy technology and trained gastroenterologists. Operative intervention has been indicated for refractory bleeding or lesions in sites not accessible to endoscopic interventions. PMID:26567241

  12. Fatal Aeromonas hydrophila Infection of Soft Tissue after Endoscopic Injection Sclerotherapy for Gastric Variceal Bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ber-Ming Liu

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas hydrophila, an anaerobic gram-negative bacillus, can cause severe infectionsin immune-compromised patients. We present a 45-year-old cirrhotic man who sufferedfrom hematemesis and received emergency endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EISfor gastric variceal bleeding. Twenty-one hours after EIS, painful swelling of the bilaterallower extremities and fever occurred. Severe soft-tissue infections with emergence of hemorrhagicbullae over the bilateral lower extremities followed. Even under aggressive treatment,the patient died of overwhelming sepsis 42 hours after EIS. Cultures of the blood andserosanguineous fluid from the hemorrhagic bullae revealed Aeromonas hydrophila. To thebest of our knowledge, this is the first case of fatal Aeromonas hydrophila infection afteremergancy EIS for gastric variceal bleeding reported in the English literature. It is worthemphasizing that physicians should consider Aeromonas hydrophila infection in cirrhoticpatients who develop soft-tissue infections after variceal bleeding whether emergency EIShas been performed or not.

  13. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: difficulties in comparing CT enterography and video capsule endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A paper reports the results of a retrospective study that was designed to evaluate the potential role of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) in elucidating the cause of bleeding in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) for whom CT enterography was negative. The authors highlight the limitations of dual-phase CT enterography for the detection of flat lesions of the small bowel such as ulcers, angiodysplasias or arteriovenous malformations, and confirm the superiority of VCE for the detection of this category of lesions. This commentary discusses some of the issues raised. Key Points circle Video capsule endoscopy surpasses CT enterography in detecting flat small bowel lesions. circle Retrospective VCE and CT enterography findings in obscure bleeding need further evaluation. circle A fair and unbiased comparison of the two investigations is still needed. (orig.)

  14. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: difficulties in comparing CT enterography and video capsule endoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP 2, Department of Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965-Paris 7 ' ' Angiogenese et recherche translationnelle' ' , Paris (France); Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Paris (France)

    2012-06-15

    A paper reports the results of a retrospective study that was designed to evaluate the potential role of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) in elucidating the cause of bleeding in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) for whom CT enterography was negative. The authors highlight the limitations of dual-phase CT enterography for the detection of flat lesions of the small bowel such as ulcers, angiodysplasias or arteriovenous malformations, and confirm the superiority of VCE for the detection of this category of lesions. This commentary discusses some of the issues raised. Key Points circle Video capsule endoscopy surpasses CT enterography in detecting flat small bowel lesions. circle Retrospective VCE and CT enterography findings in obscure bleeding need further evaluation. circle A fair and unbiased comparison of the two investigations is still needed. (orig.)

  15. Real-Time Bleeding Detection in Gastrointestinal Tract Endoscopic Examinations Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Blokus

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a novel approach to medical video data analysis and recognition of bleedings.Emphasis has been put on adapting pre-existing algorithms dedicated to the detection of bleedings for realtimeusage in a medical doctor’s office during an endoscopic examination. A real-time system for analyzingendoscopic videos has been designed according to the most significant requirements of medical doctors.The main goal of the performed research was to establish the possibility of ensuring the necessaryperformance of a given class of algorithms to introduce the solution into real life diagnostics.The structures of two exemplary algorithms for bleeding detection have been analyzed to distinguish anddiscuss parallelization options. After applying them to the algorithms, the usage of a supercomputermultimedia processing platform allowed to acquire the throughput and latency values required for realtimeusage. Different configurations of the algorithms have been tested and their measured parametershave been provided and discussed.

  16. Influence of variceal bleeding on natural history of ACLF and management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Garg, Hitendra

    2016-05-01

    Patients with diagnosed and undiagnosed chronic liver diseases experience one or more acute assaults of a hepatic nature and develop a downhill course of liver diseases, a condition regarded as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). It is a medical emergency, the prognosis of ACLF is extremely bad and considerable numbers of patients with ACLF die even after diagnosis and receiving conservative treatment. ACLF is characterized by jaundice, coagulopathy, ascites and encephalopathy. ACLF patients are very sick and associated with different hemodynamic profiles and have very high 3-month mortality. As these groups of patients have high baseline hepatic venous pressure gradients, the chances of variceal bleed are also high, and the impact is also greater in comparison to stable cirrhosis; however, evidence is lacking to substantiate such effects. The aim of this review is to discuss the natural course of variceal bleeding in ACLF patients and to develop insights into the management of variceal bleeding in ACLF. PMID:26589951

  17. Dysfunction of neutrophils in patients with peptic ulcers, complicated with bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulayeva O.N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyze a role of leukocytes dysfunction in the pathogenesis of ulcer bleeding the oxygen dependent metabolism, phagocytic activity and cytochemical indices of neutrophils were estimated in 100 patients with gatric and duodenal ulcers bleeding with effective hemostasis (group 1, n = 77 and rebleeding (group 2, n = 23. It was shown that peptic ulcer bleeding in patients of group 1 was associated with moderate increase of spontaneous production of active oxygen radicals, restriction of induced NADPH oxidase activity, decrease of acid phosphatase and myeloperoxidase activity but enhancement of phagocytic index. Sharp increase of spontaneous NBT-reaction with lost of oxidize functional reserve in neutrophils with significant inhibition of ability to phagocytosis and decreased of lysosomal enzymes activity were risk factors for rebleeding in patients of group 2.

  18. Treatment of bleeding gastroesophageal varices: a report of forty-four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, S K; Leong, Y P; Meah, F A; Abdullah, T; Zain, A R

    1992-12-01

    Bleeding gastroesophageal varices is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Forty-four cases of bleeding gastroesophageal varices were treated at the Department of Surgery, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur over four and a half years. Thirty-two of them had liver cirrhosis. Hepatitis B infection was noted in 13 and alcoholic abuse was present in 14 patients. Five patients had associated hepatoma. Thirty-four percent had gastric fundal varices and a third of these bled from them. A total of 179 endoscopic injection sclerotherapy sessions were performed averaging 4 per person. Rebleeding rate was 4% and mortality was high (50%) in these cases. It was concluded that injection sclerotherapy is a safe and effective means of controlling bleeding oesophageal varices. Operative surgery was employed in those who rebled after injection and would be considered in those in Child's A. PMID:1303478

  19. Bleeding risks of herbal, homeopathic, and dietary supplements: a hidden nightmare for plastic surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wendy W; Gabriel, Allen; Maxwell, G Patrick; Gupta, Subhas C

    2012-03-01

    The utilization of complementary and alternative medicine has increased tremendously in the last two decades. Herbal products, homeopathic medicines, and dietary supplements are extremely popular and are available without a prescription (which likely contributes to their popularity). Despite their "natural" characteristics, these remedies have the potential to cause bleeding in patients who undergo surgery. The high use of these supplements among cosmetic surgery patients, coupled with increasing reports of hematomas associated with herbal and homeopathic medicines, prompted the authors to conduct a comprehensive review focused on bleeding risks of such products in an effort to raise awareness among plastic surgeons. This review focuses on 19 herbs, three herbal formulas, two herbal teas, and several other supplements that can cause bleeding perioperatively and postoperatively. In addition to being aware of such adverse effects, plastic surgeons must adequately screen all patients and educate them on the possible dangers associated with these treatments. PMID:22395325

  20. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay D Mate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of hepatic artery is a rare but known complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC. Such pseudoaneurysms may bleed in biliary tree, upper gastrointestinal (GI tract or peritoneal cavity leading to life-threatening internal haemorrhage. It is very rare for them to present as lower GI bleeding. We report an unusual case of Right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm developed following LC, which ruptured into hepatic flexure of colon resulting in catastrophic lower GI bleeding. This was associated with partial celiac artery occlusion due to thrombosis. Due to failure of therapeutic embolisation, the patient was subjected to exploratory laparotomy to control haemorrhage. Postoperatively, patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 10. A strong index of suspicion is necessary for early diagnosis of such condition and to limit resultant morbidity. Angioembolisation is the first-line treatment and surgery is indicated in selected cases.

  1. Traumatic intercostal arterial bleeding controlled with a novel surgical technique: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miettinen Simo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A blunt thoracic trauma may cause arterial bleeding requiring operative treatment or endovascular embolization or endovascular aortic stenting. A novel damage control technique to stop such bleeding is presented. Case presentation We present the case of an 82-year-old Caucasian man who experienced rib fractures I-VII on the left side and bleeding from damaged intercostal arteries after a blunt thoracic trauma. Emergency thoracotomy was performed. Conclusions Effective hemostasis was achieved by using a rolled surgical swab and inserting it against the chest wall next to the aorta with sutures pulled through the intercostal muscles and then sutured to the back side of the patient. The patient died four days after the surgery due to a head injury sustained in the car crash.

  2. Recombinant factor VIIa for variceal bleeding in patients with advanced cirrhosis: A randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Jaime; Thabut, Dominique; Albillos, Agustín;

    2008-01-01

    A beneficial effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in Child-Pugh class B and C patients with cirrhosis who have variceal bleeding has been suggested. This randomized controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of rFVIIa in patients with advanced cirrhosis and active variceal...... bleeding. At 31 hospitals in an emergency setting, 256 patients (Child-Pugh > 8; Child-Pugh B = 26%, C = 74%) were randomized equally to: placebo; 600 microg/kg rFVIIa (200 + 4x 100 microg/kg); or 300 microg/kg rFVIIa (200 + 100 microg/kg). Dosing was intravenous at 0, 2, 8, 14, and 20 hours after...... endoscopy, in addition to standard vasoactive, prophylactic antibiotic, and endoscopic treatment. The primary composite endpoint consisted of failure to control 24-hour bleeding, or failure to prevent rebleeding or death at day 5. Secondary endpoints included adverse events and 42-day mortality. Baseline...

  3. Comparison of Bleeding Time and Clotting Time in Different Blood Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mahapatra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Researchers have demonstrated that epistaxis is more often encountered in patients having blood group O probably due to lower expression of von Willebrand factor. We had taken up this study to find out if there is any definite relationship between the blood groups with the bleeding time and clotting time in our population. Approach: This retrospective study was conducted in the department of physiology in our institution. The available detail reports of 740 students passing through 1st year of MBBS over the years from 1999-2007 were analyzed in respect of age, sex, blood groups, bleeding time and clotting time. The blood grouping was done with the standard antisera and bleeding time and clotting time were estimated by Duke method and capillary tube method respectively. Finally bleeding time and clotting time of different blood groups were compared and statistical analysis was done. Results: In present study population O group was found in more number of cases (37.8% than A, B and AB. Clotting time was found to be prolonged more than 6 min in maximum number of cases in B group (12.7 cases followed by A group (8 and O group (5.8 and AB group (4.3%. Similarly bleeding time was more than 4 min in AB group in 21.8 followed by 13.9 in group B, 10.5 in group A and 9.6% in group O. Conclusion: In present study population interestingly clotting time was more in blood group AB and bleeding time in blood group B than other blood groups which was statistically significant. Further study needed to correlate the association of this finding in cases of epistaxis and hemoptysis in our population.

  4. Does recombinant human erythropoietin accelerate correction of post-ulcer-bleeding anaemia? A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Spiros D. Ladas; Dimitrios Polymeros; Thomas Pagonis; Konstantinos Triantafyllou; Gregorios Paspatis; Maria Hatziargiriou; Sotirios A.Raptis

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Anaemia caused by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is treated with blood transfusion or iron, but patients usually face a two-month recovery period from posthaemorrhage anaemia. This prospective, randomised, open,pilot study was designed to investigate whether recombinant human erythropoietin (Epoetin) therapy accelerate haematocrit increase in the post-bleeding recovery period.METHODS: We studied hospitalised patients admitted because of acute ulcer bleeding or haemorrhagic gastritis,who had a haematocrit of 27-33% and did not receive blood transfusions. One day after the endoscopic confirmation of cessation of bleeding, they were randomised either to erythropoietin (20 000 IU Epoetin alfa subcutaneously, on days 0, 4 and 6) plus iron (100 mg im, on days 1- 6, (G1) or iron only (G2). Haematocrit was measured on days 0, 6, 14,30, 45, and 60, respectively.RESULTS: One patient from G1 and two from G2 were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 14 and 13 patients from G1 and G2respectively were analysed. Demographic characteristics, serum iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity, reticulocytes, and haematocrit were not significantly different at entry to the study.Median reticulocyte counts were significantly different between groups on day six (G1: 4.0, 3.0-6.4 vsG2: 3.5, 2.1-4.4%,P=0.03) and median haematocrit on day fourteen [G1: 35.9,30.7-41.0 vsG2: 32.5, 29.5-37.0% (median, range), P=0.04].CONCLUSION: Erythropoietin administration significantly accelerates correction of anemia after acute ulcer bleeding.The haematocrit gain is equivalent to one unit of transfused blood two weeks after the bleeding episode.

  5. Topical Application of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Bleeding in Open-Heart Surgery: Myth or Fact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of topical application of Tranexamic acid in controlling postoperative bleeding in open-heart surgery. Study Design: Double blind randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: Departments of Cardiac Surgery and Intensive Care of Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC-NIHD), Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from May to October 2011. Methodology: A total of 100 consecutive adult patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria undergoing elective on-pump cardiac surgeries were randomly divided in groups A and B. A study solution that contained 2.5 g of Tranexamic acid in 250 ml normal saline in group-A and equal amount of normal saline (placebo) in group-B was poured in the pericardial cavity over the mediastinal tissues before sternal closure. Postoperative bleeding was measured in both groups for 24 hours in the cardiac surgical ICU. Efficacy of Topical Tranexamic Acid / Placebo was measured in terms of mean postoperative bleeding in ml. Kindly again include these lines which seem to have been omitted in the final proof. Results: There was significant difference in the mean postoperative bleeding within 24 hours among the two groups 340.1 ± 112.4 ml in Tranexamic acid group vs. 665 ± 187.28 ml in placebo group (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Patients who did not have topical Tranexamic acid before chest closure had a significantly higher postoperative bleeding. Topical Tranexamic acid application is an effective and economical way for controlling non-surgical bleeding in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. (author)

  6. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings.

  7. Hepatic artery stent-grafts for the emergency treatment of acute bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellemann, Nadine, E-mail: nadine.bellemann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Mokry, Theresa; Kortes, Nikolas; Gnutzmann, Daniel; Gockner, Theresa; Schmitz, Anne [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Weitz, Jürgen [Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department for Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery at the University Hospital, Technical University Dresden (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Radeleff, Boris; Stampfl, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We report our experiences with stent-grafts for the treatment of acute hemorrhage from the hepatic artery or the stump of the gastroduodenal artery. • The technical success of stent-graft implantation was 88%. • The bleeding ceased immediately after stent-graft implantation in 88%. • The complication rate was 21%. - Abstract: Purpose: We evaluated the technical success and clinical efficacy of stent-graft implantation for the emergency management of acute hepatic artery bleeding. Methods: Between January 2010 and July 2013, 24 patients with hemorrhage from the hepatic artery were scheduled for emergency implantation of balloon expandable stent-grafts. The primary study endpoints were technical and clinical success, which were defined as successful stent-graft implantation with sealing of the bleeding site at the end of the procedure, and cessation of clinical signs of hemorrhage. The secondary study endpoints were complications during the procedure or at follow-up and 30-day mortality rate. Results: In 23 patients, hemorrhage occurred after surgery, and in one patient hemorrhage occurred after trauma. Eight patients had sentinel bleeding. In most patients (n = 16), one stent-graft was implanted. In six patients, two overlapping stent-grafts were implanted. The stent-grafts had a target diameter between 4 mm and 7 mm. Overall technical success was 88%. The bleeding ceased after stent-graft implantation in 21 patients (88%). The mean follow-up was 137 ± 383 days. In two patients, re-bleeding from the hepatic artery occurred during follow-up after 4 and 29 days, respectively, which could be successfully treated by endovascular therapy. The complication rate was 21% (minor complication rate 4%, major complication rate 17%). The 30-day mortality rate was 21%. Conclusions: Implantation of stent-grafts in the hepatic artery is an effective emergency therapy and has a good technical success rate for patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  8. Comparative study between ormeloxifene and oral contraceptive pills in the treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimitkumar Jamanadas Chhatrala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is the most common cause of abnormal uterine bleeding. It can cause anemia, reduces the quality of life and increases healthcare costs. The present study was carried out to study the efficacy of ormeloxifene and compare it to combined oral contraceptive pills in the treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Methods: 140 patients with dysfunctional uterine bleeding were selected randomly and divided into 2 groups of 70 each. Group A was given ormeloxifene tablet 60 mg twice a week for 12 weeks followed by 60 mg once a week for next 12 weeks. Group B was given low dose oral contraceptive pills containing 30 and #956;g of ethinyl estradiol and 150 and #956;g levonorgestrel from day 1 of the menstrual cycle to day 21 for 6 consecutive cycles. Follow up for six months on every cycle was done to assess the symptoms in the form of amount of bleeding (which was assessed by pictorial blood loss assessment chart score, recurrence of symptoms and also the side effects of each drug. Patient's improvement was assessed by performing blood hemoglobin level. Patient's level of satisfaction was judged by general health, limitation of social activity, sexual life and patient's wish to continue treatment with the same drug. Results: The reduction in mean pictorial blood loss assessment score with ormeloxifene (174 to 75 was significantly more than with oral contraceptive pills (171 to 106 at 6 months (P 0.05. Recurrence of symptoms was 11% with ormeloxifene and 24% with oral contraceptive pills. The side effects were minimal in both the groups. 68.6% patients with ormeloxifene and 47.2% with oral contraceptive pills were highly satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Ormeloxifene is more effective, with convenient dose schedule, well tolerated, with better compliance and shows less recurrence rate in treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding than oral contraceptive pills. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol

  9. Hepatic artery stent-grafts for the emergency treatment of acute bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We report our experiences with stent-grafts for the treatment of acute hemorrhage from the hepatic artery or the stump of the gastroduodenal artery. • The technical success of stent-graft implantation was 88%. • The bleeding ceased immediately after stent-graft implantation in 88%. • The complication rate was 21%. - Abstract: Purpose: We evaluated the technical success and clinical efficacy of stent-graft implantation for the emergency management of acute hepatic artery bleeding. Methods: Between January 2010 and July 2013, 24 patients with hemorrhage from the hepatic artery were scheduled for emergency implantation of balloon expandable stent-grafts. The primary study endpoints were technical and clinical success, which were defined as successful stent-graft implantation with sealing of the bleeding site at the end of the procedure, and cessation of clinical signs of hemorrhage. The secondary study endpoints were complications during the procedure or at follow-up and 30-day mortality rate. Results: In 23 patients, hemorrhage occurred after surgery, and in one patient hemorrhage occurred after trauma. Eight patients had sentinel bleeding. In most patients (n = 16), one stent-graft was implanted. In six patients, two overlapping stent-grafts were implanted. The stent-grafts had a target diameter between 4 mm and 7 mm. Overall technical success was 88%. The bleeding ceased after stent-graft implantation in 21 patients (88%). The mean follow-up was 137 ± 383 days. In two patients, re-bleeding from the hepatic artery occurred during follow-up after 4 and 29 days, respectively, which could be successfully treated by endovascular therapy. The complication rate was 21% (minor complication rate 4%, major complication rate 17%). The 30-day mortality rate was 21%. Conclusions: Implantation of stent-grafts in the hepatic artery is an effective emergency therapy and has a good technical success rate for patients with acute arterial hemorrhage

  10. Multi-detector CT angiography for lower gastrointestinal bleeding: can it select patients for endovascular intervention?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This is a retrospective review of the results at our institution of using multi-detector CT angiography (CTA) to localise lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We hypothesised that in our patient population: (i) CTA was unlikely to demonstrate bleeding in patients who were haemodynamically stable; (ii) in haemodynamically unstable patients in whom CTA was undertaken, the results could be used to select patients who would benefit from catheter angiography; and (iii) in haemodynamically unstable patients in whom CTA was undertaken, a subgroup of patients could be identified who would benefit from primary surgical treatment, avoiding invasive angiography completely. A retrospective review was conducted of the clinical records of all patients undergoing CTA for lower GI haemorrhage at our institution between 1 January 2005 and 30 June 2007. Out of the 20 patients examined, 10 had positive CTAs demonstrating the bleeding site. Nine were haemodynamically unstable at the time of the study. Four patients with positive CT angiograms were able to be treated directly with surgery and avoided invasive angiography. Ten patients had negative CTAs. Four of these were haemodynamically unstable, six haemodynamically stable. Only one required intervention to secure haemostasis, the rest stopped spontaneously. No haemodynamically stable patient who had a negative CTA required intervention. CTA is a useful non-invasive technique for localising the site of lower GI bleeding. In our patient population, in the absence of haemodynamic instability, the diagnostic yield of CTA was low and bleeding was likely to stop spontaneously. In haemodynamically unstable patients, a positive CTA allowed patients to be triaged to surgery or angiography, whereas there was a strong association between a negative CTA and spontaneous cessation of bleeding.

  11. Risk factors for colonic diverticular bleeding: A Westernized community based hospital study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antje Jansen; Sabine Harenberg; Uwe Grenda; Christoph Elsing

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the r isk factor s -other than nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-for colonic diverticular bleeding in a westernized population.METHODS: One hundred and forty patients, treated for symptomatic diverticular disease in a community based hospital, were included. Thirty (21%) had signs of diverticular bleeding. Age, gender, and the results of colonoscopy were collected and compared to a group of patients with nonbleeding symptomatic diverticulosis. Records were reviewed for comorbidities,such as obesity, alcohol consumption, smoking habits and metabolic diseases. Special emphasis was put on arterial hypertension, cardiovascular events, diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia and hypercholesterinemia.RESULTS: There was no di f ference between patients with diverticular hemorrhage and those with nonbleeding symptomatic diverticulosis regarding gender ratio (male/female 9/21 vs 47/63) and diverticular localisation. Bleeding patients differed in respect to age (73.4±vs67.8±13.0,p<0.013).Significant differences were found between both groups regarding the presence of hyperuricemia and use of steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Patients with three concomitant metabolic diseases were also identified as being at risk of bleeding. A forward stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed steroids, hyperuricemia and the use of calcium-channel blockers as independent risk factors of bleeding.CONCLUSION: Beside nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory steroid drug use, antihypertensive medication and concomitant arteriosclerotic diseases are risk factors for colonic diverticular hemorrhage. Our results support the hypothesis of an altered arteriosclerotic vessel as the source of bleeding.

  12. Bleeding Frame and Region Detection in the Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yixuan; Li, Baopu; Meng, Max Q-H

    2016-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) enables noninvasive and painless direct visual inspection of a patient's whole digestive tract, but at the price of long time reviewing large amount of images by clinicians. Thus, an automatic computer-aided technique to reduce the burden of physicians is highly demanded. In this paper, we propose a novel color feature extraction method to discriminate the bleeding frames from the normal ones, with further localization of the bleeding regions. Our proposal is based on a twofold system. First, we make full use of the color information of WCE images and utilize K-means clustering method on the pixel represented images to obtain the cluster centers, with which we characterize WCE images as words-based color histograms. Then, we judge the status of a WCE frame by applying the support vector machine (SVM) and K-nearest neighbor methods. Comprehensive experimental results reveal that the best classification performance is obtained with YCbCr color space, cluster number 80 and the SVM. The achieved classification performance reaches 95.75% in accuracy, 0.9771 for AUC, validating that the proposed scheme provides an exciting performance for bleeding classification. Second, we propose a two-stage saliency map extraction method to highlight bleeding regions, where the first-stage saliency map is created by means of different color channels mixer and the second-stage saliency map is obtained from the visual contrast. Followed by an appropriate fusion strategy and threshold, we localize the bleeding areas. Quantitative as well as qualitative results show that our methods could differentiate the bleeding areas from neighborhoods correctly. PMID:25675468

  13. Effect of a Low-Dose Contraceptive Patch on Efficacy, Bleeding Pattern, and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegratz, Inka; Bassol, Susana; Weisberg, Edith; Mellinger, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This Phase III, uncontrolled, open-label, multicenter study was conducted to investigate the contraceptive efficacy, bleeding pattern, and cycle control of a novel once-a-week contraceptive patch, delivering low-dose ethinyl estradiol (EE) and gestodene (GSD) at the same systemic exposure seen after oral administration of a combined oral contraceptive containing 0.02 mg EE/0.06 mg GSD. Participants were women aged 18 to 35 years, all of whom received the EE/GSD patch for 13 cycles each of 21 treatment days (one patch per week for 3 weeks) followed by a 7-day, patch-free interval. The primary efficacy variable was the occurrence of unintended pregnancies during the study period as assessed by life table analysis and the Pearl Index. Secondary efficacy variables were days with bleeding during four 90-day reference periods and during 1 treatment year, bleeding pattern, and cycle control. The Kaplan-Meier probability of contraceptive protection after 364 treatment days was 98.8% and the adjusted Pearl Index was 0.81. The percentage of participants with intracyclic bleeding/spotting decreased over time, from 11.4% to 6.8% in cycles 1 and 12, respectively. Almost all participants (range: 90.8%-97.6%) experienced withdrawal bleeding across the study period. Compliance was very high (mean: 97.9%; median: 100%). The most frequent adverse events were headache (9.5%) and application site reaction (8.5%); no clinically significant safety concerns were observed. Results suggest the EE/GSD patch is highly effective in preventing pregnancy. Menstrual bleeding pattern was favorable and within the ranges expected of a healthy female population. The patch was well tolerated and treatment compliance was high. PMID:24784719

  14. Evaluation of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sinan Dal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of gastrointestinal complications especially gastric bleeding increased in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. The aim of this study was to comparatively investigate upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB in patients with non-hemodialysis CRF and the patients without CRF.Materials and Methods: Seventy-six patients (55 men and 21 women with and without CRF and UGB was included. The first group who had CRF consisted of 23 patients and the control group 53. All patients were evaluated in the view point of age, gender, smoking status, other illnesses, medicine usage, laboratory parameters, endoscopic evidence and endoscopic intervention (scleroteraphy.Results: Calcium levels of patients with a history of previous UGB was significantly lower compared with those bleeding for the first time (p<0.05. The mean parathormon level was higher in patients with CRF (171.24 ± 141.96 pg/ml (p<0.05. Serum albumin level was negatively correlated with urea and creatinine (p<0.001, and positively correlated with hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (p=0.003 and p=0.005. The patients undergoing sclerotherapy more frequently needed transfusions (p<0.05. The hospitalization time found to be shortening with increasing hemoglobin, hematocrit, calcium and albumin levels; and lengthens with increased urea and creatinine.Conclusion: The history of previous gastrointestinal bleeding and detection of pathological findings in endoscopy were more frequent in patients with CRF. Gastrointestinal bleeding risk did not reduce using by gastric protection against acetylsalicylic acid and other non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Also, low albumin levels and secondary hiperparathyroidism in these patients may be risky for gastrointestinal bleeding. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:207-13

  15. Diagnostic Features and Therapeutic Consequences of Hysteroscopy in Women with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding and Abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh A. Fard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Hysteroscopy is a procedure in which the endometrial cavity is observable and subject of manipulation via transcervical route. Hysteroscopy is a minimally invasive process in diagnosis and treatment of many intrauterine and endocervical conditions. Polypectomy, myomectomy and endometrial ablation could be easily manageable by this procedure. According to safety and high efficiency of hysteroscopy, this method is changing to a widespread procedure in dealing with many gynecologic and obstetrical conditions. This study aimed at evaluating the diagnostic and therapeutical efficiency of hysteroscopy in managing of common conditions including abnormal uterine bleeding and abortion. Approach: In a descriptive cross-sectional setting, 243 women underwent hysteroscopy were evaluated in two groups: with uterine bleeding 236 cases and with recurrent abortions 7 cases. This study was conducted in Tabriz Alzahra Educational Center during a 15-month period. The main causes of the complaints were determined in each group. Six months after treatment, the overall success rate was recorded. Results: Hysteroscopy was the sole diagnostic procedure in 16.5 and 14.3% of the patients in groups with abnormal uterine bleeding and abortion, respectively. In the group with abnormal uterine bleeding, curettage, myomectomy, polypectomy, hysterectomy, laparoscopy and laparotomy were the main diagnostic-therapeutical approaches along with the hysteroscopy in descending order. In the group with recurrent abortion, laparoscopy, curettage and myomectomy were the main diagnostic-therapeutical approaches along with the hysteroscopy in descending. There was not any major complication. The diagnostic-therapeutical measures accompanying with the laparoscopy were successful in 73.5% of the bleeding group in follow-up period. Conclusion: Based on our results, hysteroscopy is a safe, accurate and highly-efficient procedure in managing women with abnormal uterine

  16. Is Occult Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding a Definite Indication for Capsule Endoscopy? A Retrospective Analysis of Diagnostic Yield in Patients with Occult versus Overt Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Ikue Watari; Shiro Oka; Shinji Tanaka; Makoto Nakano; Taiki Aoyama; Shigeto Yoshida; Kazuaki Chayama

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Usefulness of capsule endoscopy (CE) for diagnosing small-bowel lesions in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) has been reported. Most reports have addressed the clinical features of overt OGIB, with few addressing occult OGIB. We aimed to clarify whether occult OGIB is a definite indication for CE. Methods. We retrospectively compared the cases of 102 patients with occult OGIB and 325 patients with overt OGIB, all having undergone CE. The diagnostic yield o...

  17. Oral versus intravenous proton pump inhibitors in preventing re-bleeding for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy

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    Yen Hsu-Heng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor after endoscopic therapy for peptic ulcer bleeding has been recommended as adjuvant therapy. Whether oral proton pump inhibitor can replace intravenous proton pump inhibitor in this setting is unknown. This study aims to compare the clinical efficacy of oral and intravenous proton pump inhibitor after endoscopic therapy. Methods Patients with high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers after successful endoscopic therapy were randomly assigned as oral lansoprazole or intravenous esomeprazole group. Primary outcome of the study was re-bleeding rate within 14 days. Secondary outcome included hospital stay, volume of blood transfusion, surgical intervention and mortality within 1 month. Results From April 2010 to Feb 2011, 100 patients were enrolled in this study. The re-bleeding rates were 4% (2/50 in the intravenous group and 4% (2/50 in the oral group. There was no difference between the two groups with regards to the hospital stay, volume of blood transfusion, surgery or mortality rate. The mean duration of hospital stay was 1.8 days in the oral lansoprazole group and 3.9 days in the intravenous esomeprazole group (p > 0.01. Conclusion Patients receiving oral proton pump inhibitor have a shorter hospital stay. There is no evidence of a difference in clinical outcomes between oral and intravenous PPI treatment. However, the study was not powered to prove equivalence or non-inferiority. Future studies are still needed. Trial registration NCT01123031

  18. Polyclonal gammopathy related to renal bleeding in a peritoneal dialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Mi Cho

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyclonal gammopathy represents the diffuse activation of B cells and is usually related to inflammation or immune-related diseases. However, the mechanisms leading to polyclonal gammopathy are essentially speculative. Generally, infectious, inflammatory, or various other reactive processes may be indicated by the presence of a broad-based peak or band in the gamma region on serum protein electrophoresis results. A 15-year-old girl, who had been receiving peritoneal dialysis, presented with polyclonal gammopathy and massive gross hematuria. Renal artery embolization was performed, after which the continuous bleeding subsided and albumin-globulin dissociation resolved. This is a rare case of polyclonal gammopathy related to renal bleeding.

  19. Comparative analysis of the effect of two chlorhexidine mouthrinses on plaque accumulation and gingival bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Alfredo Franco Neto; Clarissa Cavalcanti Fatturi Parolo; Cassiano Kuchenbecker Rösing; Marisa Maltz

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of two chlorhexidine rinsing solutions (0.12% and 0.2%) on plaque and gingival bleeding. Ten dental students participated in this double-blind, cross-over study, rinsing twice a day, for one minute, with each one of the tested solutions for fourteen days. A wash-out period of one week between treatments was observed. In order to assess gingival bleeding, the van der Weijden et al.¹ (1994) index was used. The plaque indexes used were thos...

  20. [Antisecretory therapy as a component of hemostasis in acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleedings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostishchev, V K; Evseev, M A

    2005-01-01

    Results of antisecretory therapy (pyrenzepin, H(2)-blockers, inhibitors of proton pump, octreotid) in 962 patients with acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleedings (AGDUB) were analyzed over 14-years period. Antisecretory treatment in AGDUB has principally different goals and potential depending on risk of bleeding's recurrence and morphological changes in tissue of gastroduodenal ulcer. Antisecretory therapy is the main treatment in high risk of AGDUB recurrence or before urgent surgery. Intravenous infusion of omeprazol has demonstrated the highest clinical efficacy due to maximal inhibition of gastric secretion and absence of negative influences on oxygen regimen in tissue of ulcer. PMID:16091681

  1. Emergency total thyroidectomy for bleeding anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: A viable option for palliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is a rare and highly aggressive thyroid neoplasm. Bleeding from tumor is an uncommon, but potentially life-threatening complication requiring sophisticated intervention facilities which are not usually available at odd hours in emergency. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with exsanguinating hemorrhage from ATC and was treated by emergency total thyroidectomy. The patient is well three months postoperatively. Emergency total thyroidectomy is a viable option for palliation in ATC presenting with bleeding.

  2. Tc-99m sulfur colloid scanning in blunt trauma: detection of abdominal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronfman, H.J.; Kunkel, B.K.; Rabin, H.S.

    1981-11-01

    Tc-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy can detect and locate active lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The same principles apply to the detection and location of active intra-abdominal or pelvic hemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma. We report two patients with abdominal bleeding who were correctly diagnosed by this method. As part of the routine examination of all patients having Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans for trauma, 500,000-count images should be made of the rest of the abdomen and pelvis.

  3. Absence of intrafamilial transmission of hepatitis C in patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasani, H; Jackson, H; Jones, J A; Howlett, J

    1997-07-01

    Hepatitis 'C' virus (HCV) infection has caused significant anxiety in patients with inherited bleeding disorders. A significant number of patients with HCV have developed chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The exact risk of heterosexual and contact transmission is unclear at the moment. A test for antibody to hepatitis 'C' was offered, after counselling, to spouses and family members of 118 known hepatitis 'C' antibody positive patients with inherited bleeding disorders. Two hundred and fifteen family members were tested, 73 partners and 142 household contacts; all were found negative for hepatitis 'C'. Our experience confirms the low risk of heterosexual and contact transmission of hepatitis 'C' virus. PMID:27214805

  4. The role of hysteroscopy in diagnosis and treatment of postmenopausal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop-Trajković-Dinić Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Abnormal uterine bleeding is the most common problem which brings woman to the gynecologist during the postmenopausal period. The aim of this study was to define the significance of hysteroscopy as a diagnostic procedure for the evaluation of patients with postmenopausal bleeding, as well as to define it as a surgical procedure by which the cause of bleeding can be treated in most cases in the same sitting. Methods. The study involved 148 female patients referred to the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics in Niš for postmenopausal bleeding in the period of 12 months. Hysteroscopy with endometrial biopsy were performed in all the patients. Biopsy materials were directed to histological examination, and the hysteroscopic and histological findings were compared afterwards. Polyps and submucous miomas were hysteroscopically removed in the same sitting and also directed to histological examination. Results. The success rate of the method was 95.1%, while complications occurred in 1.37% of the cases. The hysteroscopic findings were normal in almost 30% of the cases, and the most common pathological finding was endometrial polyp. The sensitivity of hysteroscopy in the detection of intrauterine pathology was 100%, the specificity 81%, the positive predictive value 92% and the negative predictive value 100%. In 69.7% of the patients the cause of bleeding was hysteroscopically removed. Hysteroscopy was performed in 58.1% of the patients in the same sitting, and in 11.6% of the patients after obtaining histological findings. Conclusion. Hysteroscopy is a safe, highly sensitive diagnostic procedure, thus being an ideal method for evaluation of patients with postmenopausal bleeding. The application of hysteroscopy with endometrial biopsy leads to accurate diagnosis. An adequate diagnosis is crucial for the selection of relevant treatment of postmenopausal bleeding and avoidance of unnecessary major surgical procedures. Except for being a

  5. Regulatory T Cells Vary over Bleeding Segments in Asthmatic and non-Asthmatic Women

    OpenAIRE

    Wegienka, Ganesa; Bobbitt, Kevin R.; Woodcroft, Kimberley J.; Havstad, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Sex hormones may play an important role in observed gender differences in asthma incidence and severity. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are presumed to be involved in asthma and may vary with hormone levels. To investigate the effects of sex hormones on levels of Treg cells (percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ lymphocytes that are CD127), a cohort of 13 women (6 with and 7 without an asthma diagnosis) had blood drawn multiple times over the course of a bleeding segment (bleeding interval plus the ...

  6. Tc-99m sulfur colloid scanning in blunt trauma: detection of abdominal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tc-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy can detect and locate active lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The same principles apply to the detection and location of active intra-abdominal or pelvic hemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma. We report two patients with abdominal bleeding who were correctly diagnosed by this method. As part of the routine examination of all patients having Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans for trauma, 500,000-count images should be made of the rest of the abdomen and pelvis

  7. Is Previous Tubal Ligation a Risk Factor for Hysterectomy because of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanam Moradan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Post tubal ligation syndrome (PTLS is a term used to describe a variety of post tubal ligation side effects or symptoms. These include increased menstrual bleeding and hysterectomy. Whether or not post tubal syndrome is a real entity, it has been a subject of controversy in the medical literature for decades. Numerous studies have reported conflicting conclusions about these symptoms. In this study the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among sterilized women was compared with the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among non-sterilized female population of the same age.Methods: This study was carried out on 160 women, 38-52 years, who underwent hysterectomy in Amir University Hospital, Semnan, Iran, from September 2008 to September 2011. After gathering of data from medical records, in this study, the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among sterilized women was compared with the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among nonsterilized female population for the same age.Results: The mean age of the study group was 44/4±5/7 and the mean age of the control group was 45/2±5/3, (p=0.424.The mean parity of the study group was 3/8±1/8 and the mean parity of the control group was 3/5±1/4, (p=0.220. So, in regard to age and parity, two groups were matched. Hysterectomies were performed for 160 cases and abnormal uterine bleeding was the cause of hysterectomy in 67 cases. Among 67 cases, 19 cases (37.3% had previous tubal sterilization + hysterectomy (study group and 48 cases (44% were not undergoing tubal sterilization but had hysterectomy for abnormal bleeding causes (control group. Statistical analyses showed that there were not significant differences between two groups, (RR=0.85; 95% CI: 0.56-1.28; p=0.418.Conclusion: The result of this study showed that previous tubal sterilization is not a risk factor for undergoing hysterectomy because of abnormal uterine bleeding.

  8. Intracranial bleeding in patients with traumatic brain injury: A prognostic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooney Jane

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracranial bleeding (IB is a common and serious consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI. IB can be classified according to the location into: epidural haemorrhage (EDH subdural haemorrhage (SDH intraparenchymal haemorrhage (IPH and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH. Studies involving repeated CT scanning of TBI patients have found that IB can develop or expand in the 48 hours after injury. If IB enlarges after hospital admission and larger bleeds have a worse prognosis, this would provide a therapeutic rationale for treatments to prevent increase in the extent of bleeding. We analysed data from the Trauma Audit & Research Network (TARN, a large European trauma registry, to evaluate the association between the size of IB and mortality in patients with TBI. Methods We analysed 13,962 patients presenting to TARN participating hospitals between 2001 and 2008 with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS less than 15 at presentation or any head injury with Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS severity code 3 and above. The extent of intracranial bleeding was determined by the AIS code. Potential confounders were age, presenting Glasgow Coma Score, mechanism of injury, presence and nature of other brain injuries, and presence of extra-cranial injuries. The outcomes were in-hospital mortality and haematoma evacuation. We conducted a multivariable logistic regression analysis to evaluate the independent effect of large and small size of IB, in comparison with no bleeding, on patient outcomes. We also conducted a multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess the independent effect on mortality of large IB in comparison with small IB. Results Almost 46% of patients had at some type of IB. Subdural haemorrhages were present in 30% of the patients, with epidural and intraparenchymal present in approximately 22% each. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found that large IB, wherever located, was associated with increased mortality in

  9. Arteriovenous malformation of the mandible presented as massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding: report of one case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuan-Wen; Peng, Yen-Shih; Wu, Yu-Nian; Tsai, Ya-Huei; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2006-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation is an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children. It should be taken into consideration when a child has upper gastrointestinal bleeding because without proper management, it might be fatal. We report a 10-year-old boy whose initial presentation was massive hematemesis and impending shock. After angiography, arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the mandible was found and treated with embolization. This 10-year-old boy also had chicken pox during admission. Case reports regarding AVM of dental arches in literature are reviewed and the proposed managements are summarized. Embolization combined with surgical excision might be the optimal way to manage AVM of dental arches. PMID:17180789

  10. Management of disseminated bleeding in a patient with multiple malignomas using rotation thromboleastometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolbenschlag, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] We report on a case of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome with a histologically diagnosed dedifferentiated angiosarcoma. During operative tumor debulking, a disseminated bleeding developed which required a massive transfusion of red blood cell concentrates and therapeutic plasma. While plasmatic coagulation was within normal range, thromboelastometry showed a distinct hyperfibrinolysis. The bleeding was controlled by prolonged cauterisation and the substitution of tranexam acid as well as fresh frozen plasma. As a result of this treatment, hyperfibrinolysis showed complete restitution within a few hours. Histologically, a malignant peripheral nerve sheat tumor, a dedifferentiated angiosarcoma, a spindle cell sarcoma and an osteosarcoma were diagnosed within the tissue samples.

  11. Value of color Doppler ultrasound in diagnosis of portal hypertension liver cirrhosis merged with esophageal variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Rong Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the value of color Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of portal hypertension liver cirrhosis merged with esophageal variceal bleeding.Methods:The clinical materials of 30 patients with portal hypertension liver cirrhosis merged with esophageal varices who were admitted in our hospital from August, 2014 to August, 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. According to whether there was a history of hematemesis and melena or not before and 3 months after ultrasound examination, and whether was esophageal variceal bleeding or not confirming by the electronic gastroscopy, the patients were divided into the bleeding group (17 cases) and non-bleeding group (13 cases). The color Doppler ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus was used to detect the inner diameter and blood flow rate of splenic vein, portal vein, and left gastric vein. The blood flow volume of splenic vein, portal vein, and left gastric vein was calculated.Results:The inner diameter and blood flow volume of splenic vein in the bleeding group were significantly higher than those in the non-bleeding group, but the blood flow rate was significantly lower than that in the non-bleeding group (P0.05). The inner diameter of left gastric vein in the bleeding group was significantly higher than that in the non-bleeding group, but the blood flow rate was significantly lower that that in the non-bleeding group (P0.05).Conclusions:Color Doppler ultrasound can detect the inner diameter of splenic vein, portal vein, and left gastric vein, and the related hemodynamic indicators, particularly, the inner diameter, blood flow rate, and blood flow volume of splenic vein are effective in predicting the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding.

  12. Evaluative comparison of systemic aspirin therapy effects on gingival bleeding in post non-surgical periodontal therapy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elanchezhiyan Sundram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival bleeding is considered as an important clinical sign for diagnosis of periodontal disease pathogenesis. Immune inflammatory reactions caused by local factors are considered as essential reasons for gingival bleeding, as also for the systemic bleeding disorders. In disease-free conditions of gingiva, the bleeding disorders are considered to be the main contender for bleeding. Other than these variables, many systemic drugs including systemic aspirin could also cause gingival bleeding. The main aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of buffered aspirin therapy on gingival bleeding. Materials and Methods: Totally, 36 systemically healthy individuals were included in the 15-day randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The 15 days were divided as: control period for the first 7 days and study period for the following 7 days. On the 1 st day, all individuals were given oral prophylaxis after recording gingival parameters such as Plaque Index, probing depth, and Bleeding Index, and then blood samples were collected for hematological investigations. Then, all individuals were administered placebo capsules for 1 week as once daily dose. On the 8 th day, all procedures were repeated and the individuals were prescribed with 325 coated aspirin capsules for 1 week. On the 15 th day, all parameters were repeated and the results were statistically analyzed. Results: In the study period, the parameters such as Bleeding Index, bleeding time, and prothrombin time were increased significantly, compared to the control period. Conclusion: The variables such as systemic drug therapy should be considered for the examination of gingiva while the diagnosis is considered mainly based on gingival bleeding.

  13. Three-year Study of Effective Factors in Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Hospitalized Burn Patients in Ahvaz Taleghani Hospital

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    Pipelzadeh MH

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Gastrointestinal bleeding can arise following various stressing conditions such as burns. Gastrointestinal bleeding has serious effect on the treatment process of burn patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding and to identify factors contributing to its occurrence in burn patientsSubjects and Methods: In this descriptive and retrospective research study, the population of the study included all patients admitted in the Ahvaz Taleghani burn center from the year 2008 to 2010 and 3901 medical records were reviewed. Data were collected by a checklist and analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Results: From a total of 3901 patients admitted during the three years period of study, 45 patients had gastrointestinal bleeding (1.15%. The average of burned surface area in these patients was 61%. Seventy seven percent of gastrointestinal bleeding had occurred in patients with burn over 50 percent, and there was direct correlation between the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding and the extent of burn. The age group of 15-30 years comprised 40.1% of our cases. The mortality among patients suffered from gastrointestinal bleeding was 71%. A significant relationship was found between burn in face and incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding (P<0.001. However, the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding among different sexes was not statistically significant.Conclusion: The results of this study show that the importance of timely diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding in burn patients. Therefore, doing preventive procedures such as medication and psychiatric interventions to reduce stress can decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in burn patients.Sci Med J 2011; 9(6:535-542

  14. Pre-test calculations for PMK-2 and PACTEL counterpart test 2.3 with ATHLET code. 7.4 % Cold leg break with secondary bleed and primary bleed and feed. Rev. 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The test is a 7.4 % cold leg break with secondary bleed and primary bleed and feed. As for the ECCS, only the accumulators and the LPIS are available. It is a counterpart test. The calculations were performed with help of the system thermal-hydraulic code ATHLET. (author)

  15. Defective platelet aggregation to the calcium ionophore A23187 in a patient with a lifelong bleeding disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Machin, S J; Keenan, J. P.; McVerry, B A

    1983-01-01

    A patient with a lifelong bleeding disorder is presented with a prolonged bleeding time and abnormal aggregation and secretion responses to arachidonic acid, thromboxane A2, PAF-acether and the divalent calcium ionophore A23187. Platelet alpha and dense granule contents and morphology appear normal. The proposed defect is due to an abnormality of a platelet intracellular calcium dependent process.

  16. Recurrent Bacteremia, a Complication of Cyanoacrylate Injection for Variceal Bleeding: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Pialoux, G; Faure, K; Durand, F.; F. Delisle; Said Ibrahim, T.; Lescure, F. X.; G. Béraud; Venon, M. D.; Flateau, C.; T. Galperine; Guery, B.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first description of recurrent bacteremia in two patients after cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices bleeding treated with antibiotics alone. Adapted and prolonged antibiotic treatment allowed a complete resolution of the infection with no relapse after more than 6 months. According to recent data, prophylactic antibiotics should be further investigated for patients with bleeding varices undergoing cyanoacrylate injection.

  17. Anemia predicts thromboembolic events, bleeding complications and mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation : insights from the RE-LY trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. D.; Alings, M.; Connolly, S. J.; Eikelboom, J.; Ezekowitz, M. D.; Oldgren, J.; Yang, S.; Pongue, J.; Yusuf, S.; Wallentin, L.; van Gilst, W. H.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundAnemia may predispose to thromboembolic events or bleeding in anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). ObjectivesTo investigate whether anemia is associated with thromboembolic events and bleeding in patients with AF. Patients and methodsWe retrospectively analyzed the RE-LY

  18. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckle, T.; Stuber, G.; Hoffmann, M.H.K.; Jeltsch, M.; Schmitz, B.L.; Aschoff, A.J. [University Hospital of Ulm, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT. (orig.)

  19. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT. (orig.)

  20. Re-prescribing of causative drugs in persons discharged after serious drug-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, M; Christensen, René dePont; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B;

    2012-01-01

    Several drug classes are known to be associated with serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), among others NSAID, low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), vitamin K antagonists (VKA), clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). There are few data on how and to what extent...... these drugs are reintroduced in patients who have been discharged after a bleeding episode related to any of them....