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Sample records for bleeding splenic hemangiomas

  1. Difficult preoperative diagnosis of a patient with sclerosing splenic hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edoute, Y.; Ben-Haim, S.A.; Ben-Arie, Y.; Fishman, A.; Barzilai, D.

    1989-01-01

    We present a young asymptomatic woman with splenomegaly and a large isolated splenic mass demonstrated by ultrasonography, 99m Tc sulfur colloid, and gallium scintigraphy studies. Computerized tomography (CT) and three-phase 99mTc-labeled red blood cell imaging suggested a malignant lesion. Repeated sonographically guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) obtained only blood, suggesting the possible vascular nature of the tumor. Splenectomy established the diagnosis of splenic hemangioma (SH) with marked sclerotic changes. We conclude from this case that (1) the sclerotic and cystic changes in the SH and the abdominal lymphadenopathy could explain why the three-phase red blood cell and CT scanning, respectively, suggested that the lesion was malignant rather than benign; (2) guided FNA of a splenic mass suspected to be hemangioma may be an additional safe and useful diagnostic procedure. Multiple aspirations yielding blood alone suggest hemangioma and may prevent an unnecessary operation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature of FNA of splenic hemangioma

  2. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

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    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  3. Splenic avulsion and bleeding shown on radiocolloid images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, H.A.; Sziklas, J.J.; Spencer, R.P.; Rosenberg, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A case is discussed of a man who presented with trauma to the chest and abdomen. A radiocolloid image showed uptake by the liver. However, the spleen was not identified. Areas of activity outside of the spleen were noted. The patient had splenic avulsion; extra sites of activity likely represented bleeding sites in the abdomen. Failure to identify the spleen on a radiocolloid image, after trauma, should be an alerting sign to possible splenic avulsion (especially when there are also ectopic sites of accumulation of the radiocolloid)

  4. Splenic avulsion and bleeding shown on radiocolloid images

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    Levy, H.A.; Sziklas, J.J.; Spencer, R.P.; Rosenberg, R.J.

    1983-06-01

    A case is discussed of a man who presented with trauma to the chest and abdomen. A radiocolloid image showed uptake by the liver. However, the spleen was not identified. Areas of activity outside of the spleen were noted. The patient had splenic avulsion; extra sites of activity likely represented bleeding sites in the abdomen. Failure to identify the spleen on a radiocolloid image, after trauma, should be an alerting sign to possible splenic avulsion (especially when there are also ectopic sites of accumulation of the radiocolloid).

  5. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@126.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology (China)

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  6. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications

  7. A splenic artery aneurysm presenting with multiple episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report.

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    De Silva, W S L; Gamlaksha, D S; Jayasekara, D P; Rajamanthri, S D

    2017-05-03

    Splenic artery aneurysm is rare and its diagnosis is challenging due to the nonspecific nature of the clinical presentation. We report a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in which the patient presented with chronic dyspepsia and multiple episodes of minor intragastric bleeding. A 60-year-old, previously healthy Sri Lankan man presented with four episodes of hematemesis and severe dyspeptic symptoms over a period of 6 months. The results of two initial upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and an abdominal ultrasound scan were unremarkable. A third upper gastrointestinal endoscopy detected a pulsatile bulge at the posterior wall of the gastric antrum. A contrast-enhanced computed tomogram of his abdomen detected a splenic artery aneurysm measuring 3 × 3 × 2.5 cm. While awaiting routine surgery, he developed a torrential upper gastrointestinal bleeding and shock, leading to emergency laparotomy. Splenectomy and en bloc resection of the aneurysm with the posterior stomach wall were performed. Histology revealed evidence for a true aneurysm without overt, acute, or chronic inflammation of the surrounding gastric mucosa. He became completely asymptomatic 2 weeks after the surgery. Splenic artery aneurysms can result in recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The possibility of impending catastrophic bleeding should be remembered when managing patients with splenic artery aneurysms after a minor bleeding. Negative endoscopy and ultrasonography should require contrast-enhanced computed tomography to look for the cause of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  8. Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding

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    MK Roy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available “Haemosuccus pancreaticus” is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Active Splenic Bleeding After Colonoscopy: A Systematic Review of the Literature

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    Corcillo, Antonella; Aellen, Steve; Zingg, Tobias; Bize, Pierre; Demartines, Nicolas; Denys, Alban

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Colonoscopy is reported to be a safe procedure that is routinely performed for the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal diseases. Splenic rupture is considered to be a rare complication with high mortality and morbidity that requires immediate diagnosis and management. Nonoperative management (NOM), surgical treatment (ST), and, more recently, proximal splenic artery embolization (PSAE) have been proposed as treatment options. The goal of this study was to assess whether PSAE is safe even in high-grade ruptures. Methods: We report two rare cases of post colonoscopy splenic rupture. A systematic review of the literature from 2002 to 2010 (first reported case of PSAE) was performed and the three types of treatment compared. Results: All patients reviewed (77 of 77) presented with intraperitoneal hemorrhage due to isolated splenic trauma. Splenic rupture was high-grade in most patients when grading was possible. Six of 77 patients (7.8 %) were treated with PSAE, including the 2 cases reported herein. Fifty-seven patients (74 %) underwent ST. NOM was attempted first in 25 patients with a high failure rate (11 of 25 [44 %]) and requiring a salvage procedure, such as PSAE or ST. Previous surgery (31 of 59 patients), adhesions (10 of 13), diagnostic colonoscopies (49 of 71), previous biopsies or polypectomies (31 of 57) and female sex (56 of 77) were identified as risk factors. In contrast, splenomegaly (0 of 77 patients), medications that increase the risk of bleeding (13 of 30) and difficult colonoscopies (16 of 51) were not identified as risk factors. PSAE was safe and effective even in elderly patients with comorbidities and those taking medications that increase the risk of bleeding, and the length of the hospital stay was similar to that after ST. Conclusion: We propose a treatment algorithm based on clinical and radiological criteria. Because of the high failure rate after NOM, PSAE should be the treatment of choice to manage grade I through IV splenic

  10. Endovascular Treatment of Active Splenic Bleeding After Colonoscopy: A Systematic Review of the Literature

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    Corcillo, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.corcillo@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Departement de Medecine Interne (Switzerland); Aellen, Steve, E-mail: steve.aellen@hopitalvs.ch; Zingg, Tobias [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Service de Chirurgie Viscerale (Switzerland); Bize, Pierre [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Departement de Radiologie Interventionnelle (Switzerland); Demartines, Nicolas [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Service de Chirurgie Viscerale (Switzerland); Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Departement de Radiologie Interventionnelle (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Colonoscopy is reported to be a safe procedure that is routinely performed for the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal diseases. Splenic rupture is considered to be a rare complication with high mortality and morbidity that requires immediate diagnosis and management. Nonoperative management (NOM), surgical treatment (ST), and, more recently, proximal splenic artery embolization (PSAE) have been proposed as treatment options. The goal of this study was to assess whether PSAE is safe even in high-grade ruptures. Methods: We report two rare cases of post colonoscopy splenic rupture. A systematic review of the literature from 2002 to 2010 (first reported case of PSAE) was performed and the three types of treatment compared. Results: All patients reviewed (77 of 77) presented with intraperitoneal hemorrhage due to isolated splenic trauma. Splenic rupture was high-grade in most patients when grading was possible. Six of 77 patients (7.8 %) were treated with PSAE, including the 2 cases reported herein. Fifty-seven patients (74 %) underwent ST. NOM was attempted first in 25 patients with a high failure rate (11 of 25 [44 %]) and requiring a salvage procedure, such as PSAE or ST. Previous surgery (31 of 59 patients), adhesions (10 of 13), diagnostic colonoscopies (49 of 71), previous biopsies or polypectomies (31 of 57) and female sex (56 of 77) were identified as risk factors. In contrast, splenomegaly (0 of 77 patients), medications that increase the risk of bleeding (13 of 30) and difficult colonoscopies (16 of 51) were not identified as risk factors. PSAE was safe and effective even in elderly patients with comorbidities and those taking medications that increase the risk of bleeding, and the length of the hospital stay was similar to that after ST. Conclusion: We propose a treatment algorithm based on clinical and radiological criteria. Because of the high failure rate after NOM, PSAE should be the treatment of choice to manage grade I through IV splenic

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of active bleeding associated with hepatic and splenic trauma.

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    Lv, F; Tang, J; Luo, Y; Li, Z; Meng, X; Zhu, Z; Li, T

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging of active bleeding from hepatic and splenic trauma. Three hundred and ninety-two patients with liver or/and spleen trauma (179 liver and 217 spleen injuries), who underwent CEUS examinations following contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), were enrolled in this retrospective study over a period of >4 years. CEUS detected contrast medium extravasation or pooling in 16% (63/396) of liver or spleen lesions in 61 patients, which was confirmed by contrast-enhanced CT. Special attention was paid to observing the presence, location, and characteristics of the extravasated or pooled contrast medium. The CEUS detection rate for active bleeding was not different from that of contrast-enhanced CT (p=0.333). Information from surgery, minimally invasive treatment and conservative treatment was used as reference standard, and the sensitivities of the two techniques were not different (p=0.122). Of 63 lesions in 61 patients, CEUS showed that 74.6% (47/63) (21 liver lesions and 26 spleen lesions) presented contrast medium extravasation or pooling, both in the organ and out the capsule, in 14.3% (9/63) and only outside the capsule in 11.1% (7/63). CEUS imaging of active bleeding from hepatic and splenic trauma presented various characteristics, and the sizes and shapes of the active bleeding due to contrast medium extravasation or pooling were variable. CEUS can show the active bleeding associated with hepatic and splenic trauma with various imaging characteristics, thus making it possible to diagnose active bleeding using CEUS.

  12. RadioIogic findings of mesenteric hemangioma with gastrointestinal bleeding: case report

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    Kim, Ki Nam

    2004-01-01

    Mesenteric hemangioma is a rare disease entity. To our knowledge, only scattered reports about this condition have appeared in the literature. Herein, the author presents a rare case of mesenteric hemangioma with duodenal ulceration and invasion of the adjacent pancreatic head and transverse mesocolon. The tumor appeared in the form of a mild contrast enhancement of a low attenuation mass on contrast-enhanced CT

  13. A rare case of important and recurrent abnormal uterine bleeding in a post partum woman caused by cavernous hemangioma: a case report and review of literature.

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    Aka, Kacou Edele; Apollinaire Horo, Gninlgninrin; Fomba, Minata; Kouyate, Salif; Koffi, Abdoul Koffi; Konan, Seni; Fanny, Mohamed; Effi, Benjamin; Kone, Mamourou

    2017-01-01

    The cavernous hemangioma is a rare benign vascular tumor. About 50 cases of this disease were found in the literature over the last century and only 9 cases of cavernous hemangioma on the pregnant uterus were published it comes into cavernous or capillary form. The symptomatology is not unequivocal and when it occurs during pregnancy or postpartum, it causes life-threatening cataclysmic hemorrhage. Antenatal diagnosis is difficult and requires a multidisciplinary approach with pathologists, radiologists and gynecologists to avoid these complications or unnecessary hysterectomies. The diagnosis is histological. Hysterectomy is possible after failure of conservative treatment means. We report a rare case, a novel mixed cavernous hemangioma of the body associated with a capillary hemangioma of the cervix in a patient of 28 years 5th visors with recurrent genital bleeding in the postpartum period leading to a hysterectomy.

  14. Liver Hemangioma

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    Liver hemangioma Overview A liver hemangioma (he-man-jee-O-muh) is a noncancerous (benign) mass in the liver. A liver hemangioma is made up of a tangle of blood vessels. Other terms for a liver hemangioma are hepatic hemangioma and cavernous hemangioma. Most ...

  15. Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding from a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Caused by a Penetrating Gastric Ulcer: Case Report and Review of Literature

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    Sawicki, Marcin; Marlicz, Wojciech; Czapla, Norbert; Łokaj, Marek; Skoczylas, Michał M.; Donotek, Maciej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysm and pseudoaneurysm are rare pathologies. True aneurysms are usually asymptomatic. Aneurysm rupture occurring in 2–3% of cases results in bleeding into the lesser sack, peritoneal space or adjacent organs typically presenting as abdominal pain and hemodynamic instability. In contrast, pseudoaneurysms are nearly always symptomatic carrying a high risk of rupture of 37–47% and mortality rate of 90% if untreated. Therefore, prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential in the management of patients with splenic artery pseudoaneurysm. Typical causes include pancreatitis and trauma. Rarely, the rupture of a pseudoaneurysm presents as upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding. Among causes, peptic ulcer is the casuistic one. This report describes a very rare case of recurrent UGI bleeding from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm caused by a penetrating gastric ulcer. After negative results of endoscopy and ultrasound, the diagnosis was established in CT angiography. The successful treatment consisted of surgical ligation of the bleeding vessel and suture of the ulcer with preservation of the spleen and pancreas, which is rarely tried in such situations. The most important factor in identifying a ruptured splenic artery pseudoaneurysm as a source of GI bleeding is considering the diagnosis. UGI hemorrhage from splenic artery pseudoaneurysm can have a relapsing course providing false negative results of endoscopy and ultrasound if performed between episodes of active bleeding. In such cases, immediate CT angiography is useful in establishing diagnosis and in application of proper therapy before possible recurrence

  16. Renal hemangioma

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    Theodorico F. da Costa Neto

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Renal hemangioma is a relatively rare benign tumor, seldom diagnosed as a cause of hematuria. CASE REPORT: A female 40-year old patient presented with continuous gross hematuria, anemia and episodic right lumbar pain, with onset about 3 months previously. The patient underwent multiple blood transfusions during her hospital stay and extensive imaging propedeutics was performed. Semi-rigid ureterorenoscopy evidenced a bleeding focus in the upper calix of the right kidney, with endoscopic treatment being unfeasible. The patient underwent right upper pole nephrectomy and presented a favorable outcome. Histopathological analysis of the surgical specimen showed that it was a renal hemangioma. COMMENTS: Imaging methods usually employed for diagnostic investigation of hematuria do not have good sensitivity for renal hemangioma. However, they are important to exclude the most frequent differential diagnoses. The ureterorenoscopy is the diagnostic method of choice and endoscopic treatment can be feasible when the lesion is accessible and electrocautery or laser are available. We emphasize the open surgical treatment as a therapeutic option upon failure of less invasive methods.

  17. Successful Treatment of Bleeding Gastric Varices with Splenectomy in a Patient with Splenic, Portal, and Mesenteric Thromboses

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    Lior Menasherian-Yaccobe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old female with a history of multiple splanchnic and portal thromboses treated with warfarin underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy for cancer screening, and a polypoid mass was biopsied. One week later, she was admitted with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Her therapeutic coagulopathy was reversed with fresh frozen plasma, and she was transfused with packed red blood cells. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated an erosion of a gastric varix without evidence of recent bleeding. Conservative measures failed, and she continued to bleed during her stay. She was not considered a candidate for a shunt procedure; therefore, a splenectomy was performed. Postoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated near complete resolution of gastric varices. One year after discharge on warfarin, there has been no recurrence of hemorrhage. Gastric varices often arise from either portal hypertension or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage can be challenging. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is often effective for emergency control in varices secondary to portal hypertension. Splenectomy is the treatment for varices that arise from splenic vein thrombosis. However, treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage in the context of multiple splanchnic and portal vein thromboses is more complicated. We report splenectomy as a successful treatment of gastric varices in a patient with multiple extrahepatic thromboses.

  18. Novel Application of Percutaneous Cryotherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Oral Bleeding From a Noninvoluting Congenital Hemangioma Involving the Right Buccal Space and Maxillary Tuberosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehian, Sepand; Gemmete, Joseph J.; Kasten, Steven; Edwards, Sean P.

    2011-01-01

    Cryotherapy is the application of varying extremes of cold temperatures to destroy abnormal tissue. The intent of this article is to describe a novel technique using percutaneous cryotherapy for treating a noninvoluting congenital craniofacial hemangioma (NICH). An 18-year-old woman with type 1 von Willebrand’s disease, as well as a qualitative platelet aggregation disorder, presented with multiple recurrent episodes of oral bleeding from a NICH involving the right buccal space and maxillary tuberosity. The patient was initially treated with a combination of endovascular particulate embolization, percutaneous sclerotherapy, tissue cauterization, and laser therapy between the ages of 4 and 8 years of age. At 18 years of age, the patient presented with recurrent episodes of oral bleeding related to the NICH. Endovascular embolization was performed using particulate and a liquid embolic agent with limited success. Due to the refractory nature of this bleeding, the patient underwent successful lesion ablation using percutaneous cryotherapy. At 9-month follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic with no episodes of recurrent bleeding.

  19. Blood flow parameters in the short gastric vein and splenic vein on Doppler ultrasound reflect gastric variceal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hitoshi; Ishihara, Takeshi; Ishii, Hiroshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Matsutani, Shoichi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Hemodynamic features associated with the bleeding from gastric fundal varices (FV) have not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to elucidate hemodynamics in the short gastric vein (SGV) which is a major inflow route for FV and flow direction of the splenic vein (SV) in relation to bleeding FV. Materials and Methods: The subject of this retrospective study was 54 cirrhotic patients who had medium- or large-sized FV (20 bleeders, 34 non-bleeders) on endoscopy with SGV on both angiogram and sonogram. Diameter, flow velocity, flow volume of SGV and flow direction in the SV were evaluated by Doppler ultrasound. Results: Diameter, flow velocity and flow volume of SGV were significantly greater in bleeders (9.6 ± 3.1 mm, 11.4 ± 5.2 cm/s, 499 ± 250.1 ml/min) than non-bleeders (6.5 ± 2.2 mm, p = 0.0141; 7.9 ± 3.3 cm/s, p = 0.022; 205 ± 129.1 ml/min, p = 0.0031). SV showed forward flow in 37 (68.5%), to and fro in 3 (5.6%) and reversed flow in 14 patients (25.9%). The frequency of FV bleeding was significantly higher in case with reversed or 'to and fro' SV flow (11/17) than forward SV flow (9/37, p = 0.0043). The cumulative bleeding rate at 3 and 5 years was significantly higher in patients without forward SV flow (38.8% at 3 years, 59.2% at 5 years) than in patients with forward SV flow (18.7% at 3 years, 32.2% at 5 years, p = 0.0199). Conclusion: Advanced SGV blood flow and reversed SV flow direction may be a hemodynamic features closely related to the FV bleeding.

  20. Hemangioma colorretal Colon rectal hemangioma

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    João Batista Pinheiro Barreto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O hemangioma colorretal (HCR é uma lesão vascular benigna rara, com manifestação clínica geralmente entre 5 e 25 anos de idade. Faz parte do diagnóstico diferencial das causas de hemorragia digestiva baixa, sendo confundido, na maioria das vezes, com entidades mais comuns, como hemorróidas e doenças inflamatórias intestinais. O retardo do diagnóstico ocorre freqüentemente devido ao desconhecimento da doença, com taxas de mortalidade alcançando 40 a 50% na presença de sangramento importante. O caso relatado é de uma paciente de 17 anos de idade, admitida no Serviço de Colo-proctologia do Hospital Universitário - HUUFMA, em setembro de 2005, com anemia e sangramento retal, desde a infância, de forma intermitente e não dolorosa. Apresentado sua história clínica e propedêutica diagnóstica, realizada por meio de exames laboratoriais, endoscopia digestiva alta, colonoscopia e arteriografia de mesentéricas e ilíacas internas. O tratamento cirúrgico realizado foi retossigmoidectomia convencional com anastomose colorretal baixa, com boa evolução pós-operatória, tendo o exame histopatológico da peça cirúrgica ressecada, confirmado o diagnostico.The colon and rectum hemangioma is a rare benign vascular lesion, with clinical features usually between 5 and 25 years of age. It is included in the differential diagnose of the lower digestive bleeding causes, and has been frequently misdiagnosed with other more common entities, like hemorrhoids and bowel inflammatory disease. The late diagnose occurs usually because of the rarity of the disease, with mortality rates reaching 40 to 50% in presence of severe bleeding. We report a case of a 17 years old girl who was admitted at the Coloproctology Service of the Academic Hospital - HUUFMA, in September 2005, with anemia and intermittent rectal bleeding since childhood. Laboratorial findings included laboratorial exams, GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and arteriography of mesenteric and

  1. Epitheloid hemangioma: A report of two cases

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    Basanti Devi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of epitheloid hemangioma presented with multiple nodular lesions over head and neck region. One of them gave history of bleeding on minor trauma. Pyogenic granuloma was considered as a differential diagnosis from the morphological appearance and history of bleeding. Nodular leprosy, sarcoidosis, and secondary syphilis were also considered. Histopathological examination of both was typical of epitheloid hemangioma, an entity commonly overlooked clinically due to its rarity.

  2. Embolisation of the splenic artery

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    Essler, G; Duex, A

    1982-09-01

    In bleeding of oesophageal varices with resistance to common treatment embolisation of the splenic artery causes depression of the portal hypertension by forty per cent. Thrombosis of the splenic or portal vein as in splenectomies are not to be expected. The splenic vein remains open for later spleno-renal anastomosis. By occlusion of the splenic artery we were successful in stopping oesophageal bleeding. In a patient with dominant hypersplenism in portal hypertension the severity of the syndrome decreased after embolisation of the splenic artery. Thrombocytes, leukocytes and gammaglobulin increased.

  3. Angiographic features of rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH)

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    Konez, Orhan; Burrows, Patricia E. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Mulliken, John B. [Division of Plastic Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fishman, Steven J. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kozakewich, Harry P.W. [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH) is a recently recognized entity in which the vascular tumor is fully developed at birth and undergoes rapid involution. Angiographic findings in two infants with congenital hemangioma are reported and compared with a more common postnatal infantile hemangioma and a congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. Congenital hemangiomas differed from infantile hemangiomas angiographically by inhomogeneous parenchymal staining, large and irregular feeding arteries in disorganized patterns, arterial aneurysms, direct arteriovenous shunts, and intravascular thrombi. Both infants had clinical evidence of a high-output cardiac failure and intralesional bleeding. This congenital high-flow vascular tumor is difficult to distinguish angiographically from arteriovenous malformation and congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. (orig.)

  4. Penile cavernous hemangioma

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    Abdelmoughit ECHCHAOUI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are benign lesions that occur in any part of the body in newborns or in young patients, they are typically capillary or cavernous. Cavernous hemangioma of the penis is extremely rare; and its etiology is not completely understood. Treatment options (surgical excision, laser therapy or sclerotherapy… are controversial and are required if pain, cosmetic defect and/or bleeding during intercourse.                                                  We report a case of a 26 years old man presented with a five years history of a painless lesion on his penis. Physical examination showed an ovoid, solid, 1 x 2 mm in size on the dorsum of penis (Panel A and two elevated irregular lesions on the ventral side (Panel B. The lesions were compressive, nonpulsatile and bluish-red in color with strawberry like appearance. Biopsy and histopathological examination of the lesion revealed a gaping and communicating vessels proliferated in the superficial and medium dermis which is pathognomonic for cavernous hemangioma (Panel C and D. Given the small size, the large number of the lesions, the young age, and the ulceration risk during intercourse if skin graft after excision, Neodymium: YAG laser coagulation was recommended to get a good cosmetic results and sexual function satisfaction.

  5. Verrucous hemangioma

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    M J Cyriac

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45 years old male had a warty growth on the thigh diagnosed as verrucous hemangioma histopathologically. Earlier he had received treatment under the clinical diagnoses of verruca vulgaris and tuberculosis verrucosa cutis. The lesion was treated with surgical excision and grafting.

  6. Case report and systematic literature review of a novel etiology of sinistral portal hypertension presenting with UGI bleeding: Left gastric artery pseudoaneurysm compressing the splenic vein treated by embolization of the pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Seifeldin; Bortman, Jared; Orosey, Molly; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2017-03-01

    A novel case is reported of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension, caused by a left gastric artery (LGA) pseudoaneurysm (PA) compressing the splenic vein (SV) that was successfully treated with PA embolization. A 41-year-old man with previous medical history of recurrent, alcoholic pancreatitis presented with several episodes of hematemesis and abdominal pain for 48 hours. Physical examination revealed a soft abdomen, with no abdominal bruit, no pulsatile abdominal mass, and no stigmata of chronic liver disease. The hemoglobin declined acutely from 12.3 to 9.3 g/dL. Biochemical parameters of liver function and routine coagulation profile were entirely within normal limits. Abdominal CT revealed a 5-cm-wide peripancreatic mass compressing the stomach and constricting the SV. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed blood oozing from portal hypertensive gastropathy, small nonbleeding gastric cardial and fundal varices, gastric compression from the extrinsic mass, and no esophageal varices. MRCP and angiography showed that the mass was vascular, arose from the LGA, compressed the mid SV without SV thrombosis, and caused sinistral portal hypertension. At angiography, the PA was angioembolized and occluded. The patient has been asymptomatic with no further bleeding and a stable hemoglobin level during 8 weeks of follow-up. Literature review of the 14 reported cases of LGA PA revealed that this report of acute UGI bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA constricting the SV is novel; one previously reported patient had severe anemia without acute UGI bleeding associated with sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA. A patient presented with UGI bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA compressing the SV that was treated by angiographic obliteration of the PA which relieved the SV compression and arrested the UGI bleeding. Primary therapy for this syndrome should be addressed to obliterate the PA and not

  7. Posttraumatic Progressive Vertebral Hemangioma Induced by a Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Emre; Toktas, Zafer Orkun; Aker, Fugen Vardar; Akakın, Akın; Kilic, Türker

    2017-01-01

    The authors present an extremely rare case of an aggressive and progressive vertebral capillary hemangioma of the lumbar spine secondary to a trauma. A 40-year-old man who complained of back and leg pain due to a hemangioma of L1 that had begun a year after the fracture of the same vertebra was subsequently operated on. Due to the profuse bleeding, only a subtotal removal was possible. Histopathological diagnosis of the lesion revealed a capillary hemangioma. Postoperative control MRI taken at eight months showed that the lesion and destruction of the L1 vertebra were progressive. A second embolization procedure was performed and this time the hemangioma was totally removed via an anterior approach and corpectomy. Fusion was achieved by Th12-L2 graft and plaque. In the fourteenth year of follow-up, he was symptom-free and radiologically clear of this lesion. We propose that progressive hemangioma is extremely rare and that its cure is possible by total surgical removal of the lesion. This case is the second extradural capillary hemangioma secondary to spinal trauma ever to have been documented in English literature. The emergence of a hemangioma in a fractured vertebra suggests that its pathogenesis can be related to the deviation of the angiogenetic pathways from the normal healing process. PMID:28713608

  8. Symptomatic splenic hamartoma with renal, cutaneous, and hematological abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassarjian, A.; Patenaude, Y.G.; Bernard, C.; Bell, L.

    2001-01-01

    Background. There is a rare association between splenic hamartomas and hematological abnormalities with, to our knowledge, only 24 reported cases in the English literature. Patients and methods. We report a case of a splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old boy associated with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, multiple lobular capillary hemangiomas of the skin, hypertension, and anemia. Following imaging with ultrasonography, MRI, and nuclear scans, a hamartoma was suspected, but malignancy could not be excluded. The lesion was removed by partial splenectomy, and pathological examination confirmed the presence of a red pulp splenic hamartoma. Results. The renal, hematological, and dermatological abnormalities resolved following removal of the splenic hamartoma. This is the first reported case of a splenic hamartoma associated with renal, cutaneous, and hematological abnormalities and only the second reported case of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma treated by partial splenectomy. (orig.)

  9. Symptomatic splenic hamartoma with renal, cutaneous, and hematological abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassarjian, A.; Patenaude, Y.G. [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada); Bernard, C. [Dept. of Pathology, Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada); Bell, L. [Dept. of Nephrology, Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada)

    2001-02-01

    Background. There is a rare association between splenic hamartomas and hematological abnormalities with, to our knowledge, only 24 reported cases in the English literature. Patients and methods. We report a case of a splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old boy associated with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, multiple lobular capillary hemangiomas of the skin, hypertension, and anemia. Following imaging with ultrasonography, MRI, and nuclear scans, a hamartoma was suspected, but malignancy could not be excluded. The lesion was removed by partial splenectomy, and pathological examination confirmed the presence of a red pulp splenic hamartoma. Results. The renal, hematological, and dermatological abnormalities resolved following removal of the splenic hamartoma. This is the first reported case of a splenic hamartoma associated with renal, cutaneous, and hematological abnormalities and only the second reported case of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma treated by partial splenectomy. (orig.)

  10. Fulminant Epstein-Barr virus - infectious mononucleosis in an adult with liver failure, splenic rupture, and spontaneous esophageal bleeding with ensuing esophageal necrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Daniel; Hilswicht, Sarah; Schöb, Dominik S; von Trotha, Klaus T; Junge, Karsten; Gassler, Nikolaus; Truong, Son; Neumann, Ulf P; Binnebösel, Marcel

    2014-02-05

    Infectious mononucleosis is a clinical syndrome most commonly associated with primary Epstein-Barr virus infection. The majority of patients with infectious mononucleosis recovers without apparent sequelae. However, infectious mononucleosis may be associated with several acute complications. In this report we present a rare case of esophageal rupture that has never been described in the literature before. We present the case of an 18-year-old Caucasian man affected by severe infectious mononucleosis complicated by fulminant hepatic failure, splenic rupture and esophageal necrosis. Although primary Epstein-Barr virus infection is rarely fatal, fulminant infection may occur - in this case leading to hepatic failure, splenic rupture and esophageal necrosis, subsequently making several surgical interventions necessary. We show here that infectious mononucleosis is not only a strictly medical condition, but can also lead to severe surgical complications.

  11. Nasal Lobular Capillary Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasal lobular capillary hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of the paranasal sinuses. This lesion is believed to grow rapidly in size over time. The exact etiopathogenesis is still a dilemma. We discuss a case of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma presenting with a history of epistaxis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of paranasal sinuses revealed an intensely enhancing soft-tissue mass in the left nasal cavity and left middle and inferior meati with no obvious bony remodeling or destruction. We present imaging and pathologic features of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma and differentiate it from other entities like nasal angiofibroma.

  12. Guide to Understanding Hemangiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chemical oxyhemoglobin in the red blood cells. The blood heats up, causing the vessels to either burst or ... into a thick hemangioma to damage the abnormal blood vessels with heat, with variable results. Otolaryngologists (ear, nose and throat ...

  13. [Splenic infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuquerella, J; Ferrer, L; Rivera, P; Tuset, J A; Medina, E; Pamós, S; Ariete, V; Tomé, A; García, V

    1996-06-01

    A 53-year-old male suffered splenic infarction etiologically related to atrial fibrillation and non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The main clinical manifestations were a one-month history of epigastric and left upper quadrant pain, with tenderness to palpation in the later zone. Laboratory tests revealed a slight leucocytosis (14.700) with left shift and a marked increase in LDH concentration (945 IU). Abdominal CAT and arteriography established the diagnosis, Echography proved normal. Patient evolution was satisfactory with conservative medical treatment. We conclude that splenic infarction should be considered in all cases of acute or chronic pain in the left hypochondrium. The diagnosis is established by CAT, arteriography and hepatosplenic gammagraphy. Medical management is initially advocated, surgery being reserved for those cases involving complications or in which diagnosis is not clear. Emphasis is placed on the main etiological, clinical, diagnostic and management characteristics of splenic infarction.

  14. Splenic arteriovenous fistula treated with percutaneous transarterial embolization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M.A.; Frevert, S.; Madsen, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    Splenic arteriovenous fistula is a rare complication following splenectomy. We report a case of a large splenic arteriovenous fistula 23 years after splenectomy in a 50-year old male with abdominal pain, gastro-intestinal bleeding, ascites, diarrhoea, dyspnoea, portal hypertension and heart failure...

  15. Splenic littoral cell angioma. Radio pathological correlation in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asensio, J.; Montero, N.; Perez-Cidoncha, P.

    2000-01-01

    We present two cases of Littoral Cell Angiomas (LCA), a recently described variant of splenic angioma which originates in the cells that line the sinusoids from the red pulp (littoral cell). The histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of this neoplasm verifies its origin in the littoral cell with an intermediate origin between the endothelial and histiocyte cell and makes it possible to consider it as a pathological entity which is differentiated from the hemangiomas. The imaging findings are indistinguishable from the other splenic vascular neoplasms and the role of the Magnetic Resonance (MRI) stands out. (Author) 21 refs

  16. Splenic Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Diaz, Fabio F; Buitrago Mejia, Francisco; Ulloa Guerrero, Luis Heber

    2001-01-01

    The spleen is the organ that is injured during the closed trauma with more frequency and it is the cause more common of foregone death in the patients with wounded abdominal. At the present time the complications of the splenic trauma are related with their severity, associate wounds, diagnostic fail or inadequate treatments. The lesions that are diagnosed in early form are managed quick and satisfactorily, but the forgotten wounds or the diagnoses and late treatments take for themselves high rates of morbid-mortality. The paper includes their phyto pathology, diagnoses, classification and treatment

  17. Higher incidence of major complications after splenic embolization for blunt splenic injuries in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Chi; Fu, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Chen, Yung-Fang; Wang, Yu-Chun; Chung, Ping-Kuei; Yu, Shu-Fen; Tung, Cheng-Cheng; Lee, Kun-Hua

    2011-02-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injuries has been widely accepted, and the application of splenic artery embolization (SAE) has become an effective adjunct to NOM. However, complications do occur after SAE. In this study, we assess the factors leading to the major complications associated with SAE. Focusing on the major complications after SAE, we retrospectively studied patients who received SAE and were admitted to 2 major referral trauma centers under the same established algorithm for management of blunt splenic injuries. The demographics, angiographic findings, and factors for major complications after SAE were examined. Major complications were considered to be direct adverse effects arising from SAE that were potentially fatal or were capable of causing disability. There were a total of 261 patients with blunt splenic injuries in this study. Of the 261 patients, 53 underwent SAE, 11 (21%) of whom were noted to have 12 major complications: 8 cases of postprocedural bleeding, 2 cases of total infarction, 1 case of splenic abscess, and 1 case of splenic atrophy. Patients older than 65 years were more susceptible to major complications after SAE. Splenic artery embolization is considered an effective adjunct to NOM in patients with blunt splenic injuries. However, risks of major complications do exist, and being elderly is, in part, associated with a higher major complication incidence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  19. Splenic abscess after splenic blunt injury angioembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Dario; Galatioto, Christian; Lippolis, Piero Vincenzo; Modesti, Matteo; Gianardi, Desirée; Bertolucci, Andrea; Cucinotta, Monica; Zocco, Giuseppe; Seccia, Massimo

    2014-11-03

    Splenic Angioembolization (SAE), during Nonoperative Management (NOM) of Blunt Splenic Injury (BSI), is an effective therapy for hemodynamically stable patients with grade III, IV, and V OIS splenic injuries. We report a case of a patient with a blunt abdominal trauma due to an accidental fall, who presented splenic abscess a week after SAE and a review of the literature. A 38-year-old male arrived at Emergency after an accidental fall with contusion of the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. Abdominal CT scan revealed the fracture of the lower splenic pole with intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysms (OIS spleen injury scale IV). Considering the hemodynamic stability, NOM was undertaken and SAE was performed. After a week, the patient developed a splenic abscess confirmed by Abdominal CT; therefore, splenectomy was performed. There was no evidence of bacterial growing in the perisplenic hematoma cultures but the histological examination showed multiple abscess and hemorrhagic areas in the spleen. Splenic abscess after SAE during NOM of BSI is a rare major complication. The most frequently cultured organisms include Clostridium perfringens, Alpha-Hemoliticus Streptococcus, gram-positive Staphylococcus, gram-negative Salmonella, Candida, and Aspergillus. This case represents our first reported splenic abscess after SAE. SAE is a very useful tool for BSI managing; splenic abscess can occur in a short time, even if it is a rare major complication, so it may be useful to monitor patients undergoing SAE, focusing not only on the hemodynamic parameters but also on the inflammatory and infectious aspects.

  20. Common and uncommon features of focal splenic lesions on contrast-enhanced ultrasound: a pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavariz, Julia D., E-mail: julia.zavariz@hc.fm.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (HC/FMUSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clínicas; Konstantatou, Eleni; Deganello Annamaria; Bosanac, Diana; Huang, Dean Y.; Sellars, Maria E.; Sidhu, Paul S. [Department of Radiology, King’s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    The characterization of focal splenic lesions by ultrasound can be quite challenging. The recent introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has come to play a valuable role in the field of imaging splenic pathologies, offering the possibility of an ionizing radiation-free investigation. Because CEUS has been incorporated into everyday clinical practice, malignant diseases such as focal lymphomatous infiltration, metastatic deposits, benign cysts, traumatic fractures, and hemangiomas can now be accurately depicted and characterized without the need for further imaging. More specifically, splenic traumatic fractures do not require additional imaging by computed tomography (with ionizing radiation exposure) for follow-up, because splenic fractures and their complications are safely imaged with CEUS. In the new era of CEUS, more patients benefit from radiation-free investigation of splenic pathologies with high diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  1. Hemangioma of the prostate - an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography. Case presentation We present a case of prostatic hemangioma in an 84-year old male presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms. Bleeding has not been a feature in our case and diagnosis was not made until after operation. The patient was treated as a case of bladder neck outflow obstruction with transurethral resection of prostate gland and simultaneous bladder neck incisions. A period of self-catheterization was instituted due to postoperative urinary retention as the result of detrusor insufficiency. Conclusion Hemangioma of prostate gland is extremely rare and symptomatic prostatic hemangioma should be treated either by transurethral resection of prostate or laser evaporation.

  2. Tratamento de hemangioma gigante com interferon alfa: relato de dois casos Treatment of giant hemangioma with interferon-alpha: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Julia Balau

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho é descrever o uso de interferon alfa no tratamento de pacientes com hemangioma gigante. Os autores relatam e analisam dois casos de hemangioma gigante em tratamento com interferon alfa. IBS, 3 anos, em acompanhamento no Ambulatório de Hematologia desde um ano de idade com quadro de lesão angiomatosa em praticamente toda hemiface direita, acompanhada de sangramentos gengivais importantes. Após a realização de exames complementares (Angiorressonância magnética e feito o diagnóstico de hemangioma gigante em face, foi iniciado tratamento com prednisona e, posteriormente, associação com interferon alfa e observada importante melhora do quadro, resultando na diminuição dos episódios de sangramento e no tamanho do tumor. C.N.P., 12 anos, apresentando nódulo em região lateral de joelho esquerdo há 2 anos, com aumento progressivo do tamanho e dor local. Fez uso de prednisona e, sem melhora do quadro, introduzido interferon alfa com regressão importante do tamanho do tumor. O tratamento com interferon alfa deve ser considerado no tratamento de hemangiomas, pois apresenta bons resultados em relação à diminuição do tamanho do tumor e, conseqüentemente, reduz as intercorrências clínicas associadas à sua presença, principalmente os sangramentos.The aim of this study is to describe the treatment using interferon-alpha of giant hemangiomas in children. The authors report two cases of children presenting with giant hemangiomas treated using interferon-alpha and analyze the results. IBS, 3 years-old, has been followed up in Famema Hemathology Service since she was 1 year-old with a tumor on the face and persistent bleeding. After clinical and radiologic evaluations and suggested the diagnosis of giant hemangioma, she started treatment with interferon-alpha. A great clinical improvement was observed a reducing of the number of episodes of bleedings and a decrease in of the tumor size. CNP, 12 years-old, came to

  3. CT of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, B.G.; Federle, M.P.; Minagi, H.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-five consecutive cases of surgically proved splenic injuries were evaluated by CT. CT correctly identified 54 splenic injuries, with one false-negative and three false-positive studies. In the single false-negative study and in two of the three false-positive studies, CT correctly indicated the presence of a large hemoperitoneum and other abdominal visceral lacerations and so correctly indicated the need for surgery. Of the 55 proved cases of splenic injury, CT revealed hemoperitoneum in 54 (99%), perisplenic clot in 47 (85%), splenic laceration in 39 (71%), and subcapsular hematoma in 13 (24%). Perisplenic clot can be distinguished from lysed blood in the peritoneal cavity and is a sensitive and specific sign of splenic trauma, even in the absence of visible splenic laceration. The authors conclude that CT is highly reliable means of evaluating splenic trauma

  4. Benign mass in tonsil- cavernous hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sumitha; Prakash, M; Mohammed, Hafida K; Govar, Aberna

    2013-10-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is also called as 'ANGIOMA CAVERNOSUM' or 'CAVERNOMA' as benign lesion of blood vessels. They are similar to strawberry hemangioma but deeply situated. Although most often associated with skin it is also sometimes found in mucous membrane, brain and the viscera. The diagnosis of hemangiomas is mainly based on clinical evaluation . Isolated hemangiomas in the tonsillar tissue is a rare occurance. In this we report had a case of adult tonsillar hemangioma of left side associated with recurrent tonsillitis . He was effectively managed surgically without any complications.

  5. Mixed Capillary Venous Retroperitoneal Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Godar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of mixed capillary venous hemangioma of the retroperitoneum in a 61-year-old man. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a mass to be hypoechoic with increased flow in color Doppler imaging. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a centripetal filling-in of the mass, located anterior to the left psoas muscle at the level of sacroiliac joint. On the basis of imaging features, preoperative diagnosis of hemangioma was considered and the mass was excised by laparoscopic method. Immunohistochemical studies were strongly positive for CD31 and CD34, and negative for calretinin, EMA, WT1, HMB45, Ki67, synaptophysin, and lymphatic endothelial cell marker D2–40. Histologically, the neoplasm was diagnosed as mixed capillary venous hemangioma.

  6. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  7. Treatment of extensive urethral hemangioma with KTP/532 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvetz, R W; Malek, R S; Husmann, D A

    1996-01-01

    Urethral hemangiomas are rare. They vary in size from pinpoint masses to extensive honeycomb-shape deformities leading to significant hematuria. For extensive lesions, therapeutic options have included extensive surgical resection and reconstruction or multistaged neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser photocoagulation. We report our experience with the use of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP/532) laser for treatment of the extensive form. A 7-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of urethral bleeding. He had extensive hemangiomas of the genital and perineal regions. Cystourethroscopy disclosed diffusely scattered honeycomb-shape hemangiomatous malformation of the anterior urethra. KTP/532 laser energy was delivered transurethrally to the hemangiomatous areas until they blanched. The Foley catheter was removed 24 hours postoperatively, and the patient voided clear urine without difficulty. He has remained trouble-free for more than 2 years. Judicious endoscopic single-stage therapy with KTP/532 laser may obviate open surgical intervention in most cases of extensive and symptomatic urethral hemangiomas. In view of our observation and the literature, KTP/532 laser therapy should be considered the first line of treatment.

  8. Co-occurrence of intraoral hemangioma and port wine stain: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are neoplastic proliferations of endothelial cells, characterized by a period of growth after birth, and eventual spontaneous involution. The course can be uneventful with spontaneous resolution; or it may be marked by complications such as infection, bleeding, ulceration, visual defects and feeding difficulties. Apart from these, rare life-threatening complications such as congestive heart failure and consumption coagulopathy may also be seen. Although hemangiomas commonly occur in the head and neck region, intraoral occurrence is relatively rare. A port wine stain is defined as a macular telangiectatic patch which is present at birth and remains throughout life. They may be localized or extensive, affecting a whole limb. This article reports a rare case of co-occurrence of port wine stain with intraoral hemangioma.

  9. Multiple splenic abscesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity with poor prognosis. But owing to imaging technique, diagnosis and prognosis have improved nowadays. Most patients who are presented with splenic abscess are immunocompromised due to predisposing risk factors like diabetes mellitus, intravenous drug abuse, trauma, bacterial endocarditis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, chemotherapy, or steroids. Here, we are presenting a rarer case of multiple splenic abscesses with its complication in an immunocompetent healthy adult male without any risk factor.

  10. Splenic trauma: three pronged diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, M.L.; Brantigan, J.; Chang, F.

    1975-01-01

    Peritoneal lavage, splenic scan, and splenic arteriography can vastly increase the speed and accuracy of patient evaluation when splenic injury is suspected. Although certain pitfalls exist, their wider use is advocated

  11. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  12. Nasopharyngeal Hemangioma in Adult: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khil, Eun Kyung; Hong, Hyun Sook; Park, Ji Sang; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Hee Kyung; Byun, Jang Yul [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Nasopharyngeal masses are usually malignant, and benign nasopharyngeal tumors such as hemangioma are unusual. In adults, hemangiomas do not involute spontaneously, but progress. Imaging modalities are useful to rule out other malignancies and vascular lesions and to evaluate the lesion. Most hemangiomas require no therapy, but certain factors such as age of the patient and location and size of the lesion may make treatment necessary. We report a case of an unusual nasopharyngeal hemangioma treated with endoscopic excision in an adult who complained of hearing loss.

  13. Successful management of airway hemangioma with propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiratta, Vibhu; Varghese, Bincy; Chander, Ram; Parakh, Ankit; Solanki, Ravi S

    2013-06-01

    Airway hemangiomas can be difficult to manage and cause anxiety in both the parents and the treating physician. Propranolol, a nonselective beta-blocker, has recently been used for treating proliferating infantile hemangiomas. We report successful management of a proliferating, large, mixed infantile hemangioma with subglottic extension in an Indian infant using oral propranolol in a dose of 2mg/kg/day without any side effects. Induction of early involution and freedom from the side effects of steroid therapy seem encouraging for using propranolol as a first line treatment modality in the management of troublesome hemangiomas. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or period, is a woman's monthly bleeding.Abnormal vaginal bleeding is different from normal menstrual periods. It ... therapy) Cancer of the cervix, ovaries, uterus or vagina Thyroid problems Bleeding during pregnancy can have several ...

  15. Verrucous Hemangioma Treated with Electrocautery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fatani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Verrucous hemangioma is a rare vascular malformation consisting of a proliferation of dilated blood vessels of different sizes that occupy the dermis and hypodermis. The epidermis of the affected area shows a strong proliferative reaction that presents as a warty appearance. Here, we report the case of a 17-year-old male who presented with an asymptomatic warty growth above the lateral malleolus on the right leg, which healed after electrocautery.

  16. Recent progress in the clinical application of partial splenic embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yaojun; Liu Changjiang; Wang Yaojun

    2012-01-01

    Partial splenic embolization (PSE) is a non-surgical procedure used to treat hypersplenism in various clinical settings and thus to avoid the disadvantages of splenectomy. PSE can be employed for the treatment of a variety of diseases including hypersplenism, thrombocytopenia, portal hypertension, splenic arterial aneurysms, etc. PSE can effectively relieve the splenic artery steal syndrome which occurred after liver transplantation, and therefore significantly improve the blood perfusion of the recipient liver. Besides, PSE can also be adopted to reduce the bleeding risk in patients with esophageal and gastric varices caused by portal hypertension. PSE is beneficial to the improvement of peripheral hematologic parameters, which helps the patients successfully undergo the high-dose chemotherapy or interferon therapy. In addition, PSE possesses potential curative effect for thrombocytopenia related diseases such as chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the recent progress in the clinical application of partial splenic embolization. (authors)

  17. Syncope as the Presenting Feature of Splenic Rupture after Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jamorabo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic rupture is a rare, catastrophic complication of colonoscopy and an exceptional cause of syncope. This injury is believed to be from direct trauma or tension on the splenocolic ligament with subsequent capsule avulsion or else from direct instrument-induced splenic injury. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion that may be absent because presentation can be subtle, nonspecific, and delayed anywhere from hours to days and therefore not easily attributed to a recent endoscopy. We describe a case of syncope as the initial manifestation of splenic rupture after colonoscopy. Our patient’s pain was delayed; his discomfort was mild and not localized to the left upper quadrant. Clinicians should consider syncope, lightheadedness, and drop in hemoglobin in absence of rectal bleeding following a colonoscopy as possible warning signs of imminent or emergent splenic injury.

  18. Intraosseous hemangioma of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, June Seok; Bae, Yong Chan; Kang, Gyu Bin; Choi, Kyung-Un

    2018-03-01

    Intraosseous hemangioma is an extremely rare tumor that accounts for 1% or fewer of all osseous tumors. The most common sites of its occurrence are the vertebral column and calvaria. Occurrence in a facial bone is very rare. The authors aim to report a case of the surgical treatment of intraosseous hemangioma occurring in the periorbital region, which is a very rare site of occurrence and to introduce our own experiences with the diagnosis and treatment of this condition along with a literature review. A 73-year-old male patient visited our hospital with the chief complaint of a mass touching the left orbital rim. A biopsy was performed by applying a direct incision after local anesthesia. Eventually, intraosseous hemangioma was diagnosed histologically. To fully resect the mass, the orbital floor and zygoma were exposed through a subciliary incision under general anesthesia, and then the tumor was completely eliminated. Bony defect was reconstructed by performing a seventh rib bone graft. Follow-up observation has so far been conducted for 10 months after surgery without recurrence or symptoms.

  19. Splenic injury diagnosis & splenic salvage after trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Non-operative management (NOM) has replaced surgery as the treatment of choice for hemodynamically stable patients with splenic injury after trauma. The growing use of NOM for blunt abdominal organ injury has been made possible by the progress in the quality and availability of the multidetector CT

  20. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON SPLENIC INJURY

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    Palanivel Rajagopal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND An injured spleen is a well-known entity to those involved in trauma care. The majority of individual with a splenic injury now receive nonoperative intervention and therapy. This shift from operative to nonoperative treatment over the past several decades is a tremendous success story in which clinical judgment and reason triumphed over standard surgical dogma. In emergency room, restoration of airway, breathing and circulation should be focussed on. A careful history is the most important one. Nevertheless, the severity of the splenic injury plays a dominant part in determining whether nonoperative management is appropriate or-if-not-whether splenorrhaphy or splenectomy will be the more appropriate surgical option. As a general rule, younger, healthier patients with lower grade splenic injuries and fewer associated injuries and comorbidities are usually managed nonoperatively or with splenic repair, whether unstable, actively bleeding patients with more severe splenic trauma and/or multiple associated injuries require splenectomy. The aim of the study is to evaluate- 1. The impact of blunt or penetrating abdominal trauma on spleen. 2. Various modes of injury. 3. Various modes of clinical presentation of cases. 4. The value of various available investigations employed. 5. The various methods of treatment. 6. The morbidity and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was a prospective study of 20 cases of splenic injury admitted in the triage ward of Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Government Medical College Hospital, Trichy, over a period of 2 years from December 2014 to December 2016. Once the patient is admitted, the name, age, sex and mode of injury are noted. The time interval between splenic injury and admission and time interval between admission to hospital and surgery are recorded. After resuscitating the patient, all patients were subjected to careful clinical examination. RESULTS The total number of patients who had sustained

  1. Pure laparoscopic right hepatectomy for giant hemangioma using anterior approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Hun; Kirchner, Varvara A; Lee, Sang-Kyung

    2017-05-01

    Laparoscopic major hepatectomy remains a challenging procedure [1, 2]. In the case of giant tumors in the right liver, conventional approach (complete mobilization of the right liver before parenchymal transection) could be dangerous during mobilization because of large volume and weight [3, 4]. We present the case of a pure laparoscopic right hepatectomy for a giant hemangioma using an anterior approach. We achieved the informed consent with this patient and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Asan Medical Center. Giant hemangioma (13 × 11 × 14 cm) was located in right liver. After glissonean approach [5], Pringle maneuver was performed during the hepatic parenchymal transection. For the transection, the Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator was used. Small hepatic vein branches along the middle hepatic vein and small glissonean pedicles were sealed and divided with a THUNDERBEATTM (Olympus), which is the device with integration of both bipolar and ultrasonic energies delivered simultaneously. iDriveTM Ultra Powered Stapling device (Medtronic) was used for division of right glissonean pedicle and large hepatic veins. Hemangioma was removed through the lower abdominal transverse incision using the endo-bag. This technique has the advantage of avoiding excessive bleeding caused by avulsion of the hepatic vein and caval branches, iatrogenic tumor rupture [3]. By means of the anterior approach, pure laparoscopic right hepatectomy was performed successfully without intraoperative complications and transfusions. The operation time was 202 min, and the estimated blood loss was less than 150 ml. On postoperative day 3, computed tomographic scan showed no pathological findings. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 without complications. Laparoscopic approach has good results because of the view with magnification enabling meticulous hemostasis and the small wounds that give patients less pain [6, 7]. The authors recommend that the laparoscopic

  2. Radionuclide scanning in the diagnosis of splenic injury: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naga, A.H.; Boyette, E.L.; Broadrick, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma may lead to rupture of the spleen with major bleeding, minor laceration or intracapsular damage with delayed bleeding. At times diagnosis may be difficult delaying treatment. The safety, simplicity, rapidity and accuracy of radionuclide scanning when splenic injury is suspected are demonstrated in the case of a 7-year-old boy

  3. Cavernous hemangioma presenting marked hyperostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobata, Hitoshi; Miyake, Hiroji; Kitamura, Junji; Kajikawa, Hiroshi; Ohta, Tomio

    1988-01-01

    The authors report here a case of hemangioma of the left parietal bone which presented headache and papilledema. This patient is a 37-year-old female who had, prior to admission, complained of increasing headache for one year and blurred vision for three months. She had no history of head injury. Local physical examinations revealed a slight bulging in her left parietal region which was insensitive to palpation and not adherent to the overlying scalp. Neurological examinations revealed bilateral papilledema and an incongruous bitemporal upper quadrant defect in the visual field. All the other neurological and laboratory data were normal. A plain skull roentogenogram showed a 9 x 9 cm osteolytic and characteristic honeycomb lesion in the parietal region. Systemic bone survey revealed a similar lesion in the right tibia which was not histologically examined. A marked accumulation of isotopes was detected on the bone scintigrams at both lesions. Selective external carotid angiograms demonstrated a tumor stain fed by the superficial temporal, occipital, and middle meningial arteries. CT scans of the brain and skull clearly showed a local thickening of and structural changes in the skull bone and also a mass effect on the brain and lateral ventricle. The lesioned bone was removed en bloc and replaced by an artificial bone. It was highly vascular, but not adherent to the overlying dura. The post-operative course was uneventful, and the headache and papilledema disappeared. Hemangioma of the skull presenting marked hyperostosis, as reported above, seems to be rare. In addition, in this case, skeletal angioma without any clinical manifestation was detected. Clinical and radiological pictures of the hemangioma of the skull and other bones were briefly discussed. (author)

  4. Diffuse hemangioma of the colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, J.; Caseiro-Alves, F.; Cruz, L.; Moreira, A.; Rebelo, O.

    1995-01-01

    We report two cases of diffuse hemangioma of the colon in adolescent patients. One patient had multiple phleboliths at the lower pelvis identified with plain radiographs of the abdomen. Several aspects were seen on double-contrast enema: luminal narrowing, colonic-wall thickening and submucosal colonic masses that changed in appearance with the degree of colonic distension. Angiography was inconclusive in one case. Use of CT and MR provided relevant information regarding the true extent of the disease, but MR was superior in demonstrating unequivocally the vascular nature of the lesions. (orig.)

  5. MR of head and neck hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilaniuk, L.T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Gusnard, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the MR characteristics of head and neck hemangiomas and to evaluate the role of MR in their diagnosis and management. Eighteen pediatric and young adult patients with head and neck hemangiomas (six neck, six face, three eyelid, two scalp, and one parotid) underwent high-field-strength 1.5-T MR imaging. Conventional spin-echo sequences with T1 and T2 weighting were performed. In addition, one-third of patients underwent MR angiography and gadolinium enhancement. The hemangiomas were isointense to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images

  6. Gamma graphic findings in giant hepatic hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, R.; Morales, R.; Mendoza, P.; Ramirez, E.; Aguilar, C.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to describe gamma graphic findings in patients with giant hepatic hemangiomas, when evaluated with 99m Tc red blood cell (RBC) imaging. Three patients with clinical suspicion of giant hepatic hemangiomas, who had had, ultrasound and computed tomography were studied with RBC using in vivo labelling with pyrophosphate. All cases had dynamic and static views. All cases showed hypoperfusion in dynamics views and over perfusion in delayed studies. Surgery confirmed diagnosis in two cases. 99m Tc RBC is a good method for diagnosis of giant hepatic hemangioma, which generally needs surgical treatment. (Authors). 24 refs., 2 figs

  7. Scanning in the diagnosis of hepatic and splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzer, P.M.

    1976-01-01

    The diagnosis of hepatic and splenic injuries in the trauma patient with classic physical and plain film findings usually presents little problem. If bleeding is severe there is no time for extensive roentgenographic or laboratory studies. Often, however, the trauma is mild, and the physical findings quite minimal at best. Other injuries may divert attention. The patient may be unconscious. In such circumstances, clinical evaluation of possible hepatic or splenic injuries is difficult. Scanning of the liver and spleen is a safe, accurate, noninvasive, readily available technique for the detection of traumatic rupture, laceration, or hematoma. This report describes two cases in which scanning proved helpful in the management of blunt abdominal trauma

  8. Atraumatic splenic rupture and ileal volvulus following cocaine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, David H; Smith, J Patrick; Samra, Navdeep S

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 38-year-old male with an atraumatic splenic rupture, hemoperitoneum, and ileal volvulus following acute cocaine intoxication. Computed tomography showed a "whirl sign", a subcapsular splenic hematoma with suspected peripheral laceration, and diffuse hemoperitoneum. At laparotomy, the spleen was confirmed to be the source of bleeding and was removed. A nonreducible volvulus was found at the distal ileum, and this segment of small bowel was removed. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fractures (Part II) Additional Content Medical News Internal Bleeding By Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, ... Emergency First Aid Priorities Cardiac Arrest Choking Internal Bleeding Severed or Constricted Limbs or Digits Soft-Tissue ...

  10. Splenic trauma: Is splenectomy redundant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 41 year old male, serving air warrior sustained blunt abdominal trauma, CECT revealed grade III splenic injury. He was managed conservatively with good clinical outcome. Conservatism is the new approach to splenic trauma.

  11. Capillary hemangioma of adult nasal cavity: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Wan Seop; Cho, Sung Bum; Choi, Yun Sun; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Seog Joon; Yoon, Sook Ja; Yoon, Yong Kyu

    2002-01-01

    Capillary hemangioma of the adult nasal cavity is rare. We report a case which occurred in the right nasal cavity of a 25-year-old woman, together with the multiphase enhanced CT findings. The patients who had a history of recurrent nasal bleeding, had experienced nasal obstruction and swelling during the two-month period prior to presentation, and one month before presentation, spontaneous vaginal delivery occurred. Physical examination revealed the presence of a well-defined round mass, with redness in the right nasal vertibule. The mass showed rim enhancement at early arterial-phase CT scanning, increased enhancement at the late arterial phase, and moderately homogeneous enhancement at the delayed phase

  12. Splenic epithelial cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousuf, M.; Jalali, U.

    2011-01-01

    Cysts of spleen are rare entities. Congenital splenic cysts are even more uncommon comprising of only 10% of benign non-parasitic cysts. We report a case of 22 years old female who presented with history of 2 years abdominal pain and gradual distension. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) both were suggestive of splenic cyst. Laboratory tests show thrombocytopenia with platelets count of 97000 per cubic millimeter and anemia with hemoglobin 8.7 gram per deciliter. Serological tests were negative for parasitic infection. Splenectomy was done and the weight of the spleen was found to be 1.5 kilogram. Histopathological findings are consistent with splenic epithelial cyst. The aetiology, diagnostic modalities and treatment options are discussed in the case report. (author)

  13. Splenic Arterial Embolization in the Treatment of Severe Portal Hypertension Due to Pancreatic Diseases: The Primary Experience in 14 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi, E-mail: wqtjmu@gmail.com; Xiong, Bin, E-mail: herrxiong@126.com; Zheng, ChuanSheng, E-mail: hqzcsxh@sina.com; Liang, Ming, E-mail: whliangming@163.com; Han, Ping, E-mail: cjr.hanping@vip.163.com [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College (China)

    2016-03-15

    ObjectiveThis retrospective study reports our experience using splenic arterial particle embolization and coil embolization for the treatment of sinistral portal hypertension (SPH) in patients with and without gastric bleeding.MethodsFrom August 2009 to May 2012, 14 patients with SPH due to pancreatic disease were diagnosed and treated with splenic arterial embolization. Two different embolization strategies were applied; either combined distal splenic bed particle embolization and proximal splenic artery coil embolization in the same procedure for acute hemorrhage (1-step) or interval staged distal embolization and proximal embolization in the stable patient (2-step). The patients were clinically followed.ResultsIn 14 patients, splenic arterial embolization was successful. The one-step method was performed in three patients suffering from massive gastric bleeding, and the bleeding was relieved after embolization. The two-step method was used in 11 patients, who had chronic gastric variceal bleeding or gastric varices only. The gastric varices disappeared in the enhanced CT scan and the patients had no gastric bleeding during follow-up.ConclusionsSplenic arterial embolization, particularly the two-step method, proved feasible and effective for the treatment of SPH patients with gastric varices or gastric variceal bleeding.

  14. Radiation therapy of hemangiomas, 1909-1959

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, C.J.; Lundell, M.; Holm, L.E.; Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm

    1987-01-01

    Radium and roentgen therapies for hemangiomas of the skin (mainly strawberry hemangiomas) were used between 1909 and 1959 at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. The total number of admitted patients with hemangioma of the skin during this period was 20012. About 90% were treated with irradiation and radium therapy was the most commonly used modality. Needles, tubes and flat applicators containing radium were used. Roentgen therapy was given by using standard machines available at the time. A small number of patients were treated with 32 P plaques. Most hemangiomas were located in the head-neck region (47%) and 30% were located on the thorax and upper part of the abdomen. The median age at the first treatment was 6 months and 90% of all patients were younger than 2 years of age at the time of treatment. The purpose of the investigation was to define a cohort, useful for studies on possible late effects following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood. (orig.)

  15. Splenic artery embolisation for portal hypertention in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisheri Ila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleeding from esophageal varices is one of the most common causes of serious gastrointestinal haemorrhage in children. We analysed our experience with the use of splenic artery embolisation and variceal sclerotherapy for bleeding oesophageal varices. Patients and Methods: Records of all patients treated for bleeding oesophageal varices caused by portal hypertension from 1998 to 2004 were retrospectively analysed. Patients were followed up for five years. Results: Out of 25 patients treated, ten belonged to sclerotherapy (group A, eight to combined sclerotherapy and embolisation (group B, and seven to only embolisation (group C. The patients were selected randomly, only two patients who had active bleed recently were directly sclerosed. The splenic artery was embolised at the hilum using steel coils in 15 patients with portal hypertension and hypersplenism. Follow-up findings showed decrease in splenic mass, varices, and hyperdynamic flow. Conclusion: In spite of few patients and a short period of follow-up, our results pointed out that a serious consideration should be given to this procedure, as it slowed the sequel of portal hypertension and the complications associated with it. Patients who were embolised and followed up for five years had lesser rebleeds and complications than sclerotherapy patients.

  16. Vulvar Lobular Capillary Hemangioma (Pyogenic Granuloma

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    Kian-Mei Chong

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: Pyogenic granuloma is considered a reactive hyperproliferative vascular response to trauma or other stimuli. The name “pyogenic granuloma” is a misnomer since the condition is not associated with pus and does not represent a granuloma histologically. There are a few cases of lobular capillary hemangioma of the glans penis but it is rare on the female genitalia. We present this case to help physicians become aware that lobular capillary hemangiomas may occur at this site.

  17. Intra-muscular hemangioma: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Nayak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-muscular hemangiomas (IMH are relatively uncommon benign vascular tumors, which account for less than 1% of all hemangiomas. IMH may be presented as a perceived sporting injury. Diagnosis of this lesion is important not only because of its rarity, but also due to dangers posed by misdiagnosis and mismanagement. They must be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain and swelling in muscles. IMH occurring in the oral cavity is reviewed below.

  18. Laser treatment of infantile hemangiomas

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    Michelle Si Ying Ng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantile hemangiomas (IHs are the most common benign soft tissue tumor of infancy and childhood. Many patients seek early treatment to halt progression of tumor growth and accelerate regression to achieve quick resolution with good cosmetic outcomes. We reviewed literature through PubMed search on the treatment strategies for IH and share our experience in the field of laser treatment of IH. Treatment strategies for IH include both pharmacological, laser, and surgical interventions depending on the stage and severity of the lesion. Various laser beams have been attempted with varying effects and effectiveness. The 595-nm pulsed dye laser therapy has been most widely utilized owing to its great efficacy but minimal adverse effects. It works by targeting oxyhemoglobin chromophore in blood vessels located within the dermis, causing photothermal damage of these target vessels stimulating quick involution without damaging surrounding healthy skin. It is especially useful in treating ulcerated superficial facial hemangiomas that necessitate rapid healing to avoid unsightly scarring. It has a good safety profile but small risk of epidermal burn, blistering, postinflammatory pigment changes, and scarring remains in those with darker skin types treated with higher fluences and short-pulsed duration. Combination treatment with 1064 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, oral propranolol, and even corticosteroids remains an option, especially in treatment of deep, large, and functionally threatening IH. Careful consideration in consultation with the child's parents given the complexities and potential complications surrounding treatment should always be considered. Laser treatment remains an appropriate treatment for rapidly growing IH in exposed locations at early presentation.

  19. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture in Melanoma

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    Hadi Mirfazaelian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous rupture of spleen due to malignant melanoma is a rare situation, with only a few case reports in the literature. This study reports a previously healthy, 30-year-old man who came with chief complaint of acute abdominal pain to emergency room. On physical examination, abdominal tenderness and guarding were detected to be coincident with hypotension. Ultrasonography revealed mild splenomegaly with moderate free fluid in abdominopelvic cavity. Considering acute abdominal pain and hemodynamic instability, he underwent splenectomy with splenic rupture as the source of bleeding. Histologic examination showed diffuse infiltration by tumor. Immunohistochemical study (positive for S100, HMB45, and vimentin and negative for CK, CD10, CK20, CK7, CD30, LCA, EMA, and chromogranin confirmed metastatic malignant melanoma. On further questioning, there was a past history of a nasal dark skin lesion which was removed two years ago with no pathologic examination. Spontaneous (nontraumatic rupture of spleen is an uncommon situation and it happens very rarely due to neoplastic metastasis. Metastasis of malignant melanoma is one of the rare causes of the spontaneous rupture of spleen.

  20. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  1. Hemangiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 18 months, and then slowly shrink. Port wine stains and other true birthmarks are fully formed ... left alone, but as medicine has progressed the benefits to early treatment are outweighing the risks more ...

  2. Hemangioma rubi no couro cabeludo Cherry hemangioma in the scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Pereira

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available O hemangioma rubi (HR é dermatose de origem vascular extremamente freqüente, acometendo mais de 75% da população acima de 70 anos de idade. Em geral compõe-se de lesões múltiplas,localizadas predominantemente no alto do tronco e braços. Clinicamente é caracterizado por lesões que variam desde máculas puntiformes até lesões papulosas com cinco milímetros de diâmetro. As mais novas são vermelhas, em tons vivos, e as mais antigas podem ser azuladas. O HR é de etiologia desconhecida. Histologicamente chama atenção uma neoformação de vasos capilares, que se tornam dilatados e com fenestrações em suas paredes. A membrana basal está muito espessada e existe abundante estroma de colágeno entre os vasos. O presente trabalho demonstra a alta incidência do HR no couro cabeludo Em amostra de 171 pacientes, sendo 85 homens e 86 mulheres, o autor observou que 123 deles (72% tinham HR no couro cabeludo, localização em que o HR nunca foi descrito na literatura.Cherry hemangioma (CH is an extremely frequent dermatosis with vascular origin involving more than 75% of the population over 70 years of age. Normally they are multiplex spots and focus predominantly on the upper trunk and arms. Clinically they are characterized by pinpoint maculae and papules with up to 5 millimeters in diameter. The most recent lesions can be a strong red color while the older ones are bluish. The etiology of CH is still unknown. From the histologic standpoint, the neoformation of the capillary tube draws attention: they are very dilated and with fenestration along the wall. The basement membranes are thickened and there is abundant collagen stroma between the veins. This work demonstrates the high frequency of CH in the scalp. In a sample of 171 patients (85 men and 86 women the author noted that 123 (72% had CH in the scalp. However, according to the literature, CH in the scalp has never been described.

  3. FEASIBILITY OF THE CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT OF SPLENIC INJURIES IN BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Abakumov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. In blunt trauma, the structural features of the splenic parenchyma usually predispose to a significant intra-abdominal bleeding, so the excision of the damaged spleen is considered a main treatment technique in a majority of cases. However, a number of recent clinical studies have proved the necessity of a differentiated approach to making the treatment decisions and demonstrated the possibility of spleen salvage in certain cases.The most debatable issue is the management tactics in splenic injury associated with the formation of subcapsular hematoma. It is necessary to emphasize that the conservative treatment of such splenic injury implies a persisting risk of double-stage splenic rupture with following intra-abdominal bleeding.The Sklifosovsky Research Institute traditionally deals with injury management in all aspects and has gained a wide experience in splenic injury treatment that makes possible to demonstrate the choice of treatment tactics with regard to the splenic injury severity, and patient’s condition. A conservative management of spleen injury is reasonable only in stable patients and requires an additional use of instrumental diagnostic techniques. Morphological studies suggest that reparation processes around the splenic hematoma arise early enough and proceed, as a rule, with no signs of a purulent inflammation. 

  4. Dynamic enhanced computed tomographic findings of a perirenal capillary hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Ryu, Jung Kyu; Lim, Sung Jig [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Hemangiomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms that rarely occur in the kidney and perirenal space. Perirenal hemangiomas can mimic the appearance of exophytic renal cell carcinoma or various retroperitoneal tumors. We report a case of perirenal hemangioma detected by dynamic enhanced computed tomography in a 43-year-old female.

  5. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  6. MANAGEMENT OF SPLENIC INJURY AFTER BLUNT INJURY TO ABDOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bharath Prakash Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The spleen is an important organ in the body’s immune system. It is the most frequently injured organ in blunt abdominal trauma. 1 Over the past several decades, diagnosis and management of splenic trauma has been evolved. The conservative, operative approach has been challenged by several reports of successful non-operative management aided by the power of modern diagnostic imaging. The aim of our prospective study was to compare non-operative management with surgery for cases of splenic injury. METHODS We conducted a prospective study of patients admitted with blunt splenic injury to our regional hospital over a three-year period (2012-2015. Haemodynamic status upon admission, FAST examination, computed tomography 2 grade of splenic tear, presence and severity of associated injuries have been taken into account to determine the treatment of choice. Therapeutic options were classified into non-operative and splenectomy. RESULTS Over a 3-year period, 24 patients were admitted with blunt splenic injury. Sixteen patients were managed operatively and eight patients non-operatively. 3,4 Non-operative management failed in one patient due to continued bleeding. The majority of grades I, II, and III splenic injuries were managed non-operatively and grades IV and V were managed operatively. Blood transfusion requirement was significantly higher among the operative group, but the operative group had a significantly longer hospital stay. Among those managed non-operatively (median age 24.5 years, a number of patients were followed up with CT scans with significant radiation exposure and unknown longterm consequences. CONCLUSION In our experience, NOM is the treatment of choice for grade I, II and III blunt splenic injuries. Splenectomy was the chosen technique in patients who met exclusion criteria for NOM, as well as for patients with grade IV and V injury.

  7. Splenic injury after colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, C.R.; Adamsen, S.; Gocht-Jensen, P.

    2008-01-01

    the colonoscopy, ranging from 4 hours to 7 days, before presenting with signs of splenic injury. In all cases the spleen was torn, and the amount of blood in the peritoneal cavity ranged from 1500 mL to 5000 mL. Two patients died postoperatively. The number of cases reported after 2000 indicates......Splenic injury is a rare and serious complication of colonoscopy. The most likely mechanism is tension on the splenocolic ligament and adhesions. Eight cases were identified among claims for compensation submitted to the Danish Patient Insurance Association during the period 1992-2006, seven...... that this potentially lethal complication might be more common than was previously assumed, and it is possibly under-reported. Preventive measures include good colonoscopic technique to avoid loop formation and the use of excessive force; and it is possible that emerging endoscopic technologies will lead to a reduced...

  8. Different Clinical Features of Acral Abortive Hemangiomas

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    N. Vega Mata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Some infantile hemangiomas called in literature “minimal or arrested growth hemangiomas” or “abortive hemangiomas” are present at birth and have a proliferative component equaling less than 25% of its total surface area. Often, they are mistaken for vascular malformation. We present five patients (three girls and two boys with abortive hemangiomas diagnosed between January 2010 and December 2015 localized in acral part of the extremities. They were congenital lesions resembling precursor of hemangiomas but did not show proliferation phase. Immunohistochemical Glut-1 was performed in all of them as a way to confirm the abortive hemangioma diagnosis. The most common appearance was a reticulated erythematous patch with multiple fine telangiectasias on the surface. We remark that one of them presented a segmental patch with two different morphologies and evolutions. The proximal part showed pebbled patches of bright-red hemangioma and presented proliferation and the distal part with a reticulated network-like telangiectasia morphology remained unchanged. We detected lower half of the body preference and dorsal region involvement preference without ventral involvement. The ulceration occurred in three patients with two different degrees of severity.

  9. Small hepatocellular carcinoma versus small cavernous hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, B.I.; Park, H.W.; Kim, S.H.; Han, M.C.; Kim, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    To determine the optimal pulse sequence for detection and differential diagnosis of small hepatocellular carcinomas and cavernous hemangiomas less than 5 cm in diameter, the authors have analyzed spin-echo (SE) images of 15 small hepatocellular carcinomas and 31 small cavernous hemangiomas obtained at 2.0 T. Pulse sequences used included repetition times (TRs) of 500 and 2,000 msec and echo times (TEs) of 30,60,90,120,150, and 180 msec. Mean tumor-liver contrast-to-noise ratios on the SE 2,000/60 (TR msec/TE msec) sequence were 23.90 ± 16.33 and 62.10 ± 25.94 for small hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, respectively, and were significantly greater than for all other pulse sequences. Mean tumor-liver signal intensity ratios on the SE 2,000/150 sequence were 2.34 ± 1.72 and 6.04 ± 2.72 for small hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, respectively, and were significantly greater than for all other pulse sequences in hemangiomas

  10. Vocal cord hemangioma in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Kanlıkama

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioma is one of the most common benign tumorsin the head and neck region. Laryngeal hemangiomasare benign vascular tumors of unknown etiology thatarise from subglottic region with stridor in infants. Thistype also known as congenital laryngeal hemangioma, isthe more common. Congenital hemangiomas occur usuallyin subglottic region and more frequent in girls. Laryngealhemangioma in adults is a very rare conditionand main symptom is hoarseness and breathing difficulties.Adult hemangiomas can be seen in different locationssuch as the epiglottis, aryepiglottic folds, arytenoidsand false and true vocal cords. They are more oftenof cavernous form and cause hoarseness. In this reportwe present an adult patient with hemangioma ofthe left vocal fold and review the literature. Diagnosticinvestigation revealed a pink-purple mass which was extendedfrom the anterior comissure to the posterior partof true vocal cord and false vocal cord, filling the ventriculeand extending to supraglottic region. Directlaryngoscopy was performed, but the lesion was not excisedbecause of its widespread extension in the larynx. JClin Exp Invest 2010; 2(1: 91-94

  11. Surgical excision of Infantile Haemangiomas: a technical refinement to prevent bleeding complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Leone

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study is to improve operative speed and precision of haemangiomas excision. Methods: Case-report: haemangioma is a common affection of the 8% of the population during the neonatal period. In complicated cases and involution sequelae surgical treatment is the first choice. The Authors propose a surgical refinement to prevent intraoperative bleeding. Methods: several suture stitches were placed around the hemangioma. The edges of the lesion became more defined, thus allowing accurate excision. Results and Conclusions: Haemangiomas are characterized by rich blood supply. Surgery is often hindered by massive bleeding and Temporary placement of full-thickness sutures, surrounding the hemangioma, allowed a noticeable improvement in hemostasis precision and greater definition of the margins of the hemangioma.

  12. MR imaging of hemangiomas in oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masao; Tada, Shimpei.

    1995-01-01

    Eleven patients with hemangioma in the oral cavity were studied by MR imaging using spin-echo T 1 - and fast SE T 2 -weighted sequences. The hemangioma was iso-intense to muscles on T 1 -weighted images, and markedly hyperintense on T 2 -weighted images. The lesions were lobulated in margin. Four lesions showed internal spotty and/or curvilinear structures of low signal intensity. After administration of Gd-DTPA, three of seven lesions showed uniform contrast enhancement, three lesions showed partial or marginal enhancement, and remaining one lesion did not show enhancement effect. We conclude that MR imaging of oral hemangiomas is useful in delineating extent of the lesion. (author)

  13. Ultrasonographic classification of Atypical hepatic hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang Jin; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho; Yoon, Kwon Ha

    2000-01-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is the most common benign hepatic tumor. Typically, the most common features revealed by ultrasound (US) include its small size (4 cm or less in diameter), uniform hyperechogenicity, well defined margins, position in the subcapsular region of the right lobe of the liver, and some posterior echo enhancement. In addition, follow-up scanning may reveal changes in size, though this is rare. The US findings of hepatic hemangiomas may vary, however, especially when lesions are large and/or multiple. For that reason, differential diagnosis between this condition and hepatocellular carcinomas, metastatic lesions, lymphomas and other tumors is difficult. An understanding of the various sonographic findings of hepatic hemangioma can facilitate the early detection of the condition. (author)

  14. Spinal epidural hemangioma related to pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, G.S.; Millett, P.J. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); DiCarlo, E.F. [Dept. of Pathology, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Mintz, D.N. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Dept. of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY (United States); Gamache, F.W. [Department of Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Dept. of Surgery, New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY (United States); Rawlins, B.A. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Weill Medical College of Cornell Univ., New York (United States)

    2001-05-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis presenting with myelopathy secondary to a spinal epidural hemangioma. MRI showed an epidural soft tissue mass within the spinal canal between T5 and T9 with severe spinal cord compression. Symptoms had a temporal relationship to her pregnancy. Surgical removal of the epidural hemangioma rapidly relieved her symptoms and neurologic deficits. Follow-up examination 2 years later demonstrated normal motor and sensory function, without any neurologic sequelae or progression of deformity. (orig.)

  15. Hemangioma de úvula: relato de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sobrinho Fernando P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O hemangioma é o mais comum tumor de origem vascular, benigno, freqüentemente diagnosticado em crianças, e com predileção pela cabeça e pescoço, mas que raramente tem origem na úvula. Neste órgão, apresenta risco de traumatismo local e sangramento. Este artigo relato um caso de hemangioma de úvula num adulto jovem com disfagia orofaríngea progressiva e sensação de corpo estranho na garganta, tratado com sucesso por ressecção cirúrgica do tumor com bisturi de radiofreqüência.

  16. Intracerebral Capillary Hemangioma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Young; Kim, Jae Kyun; Byun, Jun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Chung Ang University Medical Center, Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eon Sub [Dept. of Radiology, Chung Ang University Medical Center, Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Intracerebral capillary hemangiomas are very rare benign vascular tumors that mostly occur during infancy. We described a 69-year-old man with generalized tonic-clonic seizures who was diagnosed with an intracranial mass. Multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography studies were performed for evaluation of brain, and there was a well-enhancing mass found in the right temporal lobe without a definite feeding vessel. The patient underwent surgery and the pathologic examination demonstrated marked proliferation of small vessels with a lobular pattern in the brain parenchyma, which was confirmed to be capillary hemangioma.

  17. TESTICULAR CAPILLARY HEMANGIOMA: DESCRIPTION OF A CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Markova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of testicular capillary hemangioma in a 24-year-old man undergone a partial resection of the testis with the intraoperative morphological examination. Testicular capillary hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of a vascular origin, which can be similar to malignant testicular tumors on the clinical presentation, as well as on the imaging methods, in particular to seminoma. The intraoperative histological study can assist in avoiding organ-removing surgical interventions in diagnostically ambiguous cases if a benign testicular tumor is diagnosed.

  18. Splenic abscess: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bhatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity with an incidence of 0.2-0.7% in autopsy-based studies. When untreated, splenic abscess is associated with nearly 100% mortality; in treated patients, the mortality rate is 16.6% during the first 90 days. It mostly occurs in patients with neoplasia, immunodeficiency, trauma, diabetes or splenic infarct. The incidence of splenic abscess is thought to be growing because of the increase in the number of immunocompromised patients who are particularly at risk for this disease and also because of the widespread use of diagnostic modalities. However, the optimal treatment for this remains unclear. We present a case of a 42-year-old man diagnosed with multiloculated splenic abscess and was subjected to splenectomy.

  19. Microwave coagulation therapy and drug injection to treat splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoming; Sun, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jie; Dong, Lei; Mu, Nannan; Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Lanfen; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiaofei; Liang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The present study compares the efficacy of 915- and 2450-MHz contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)-guided percutaneous microwave coagulation with that of CEUS-guided thrombin injection for the treatment of trauma-induced spleen hemorrhage. In a canine splenic artery hemorrhage model with two levels of arterial diameter (A, microwaves and drug injection. Therapy efficacy was measured by comparing bleeding rate, hemostatic time, bleeding index, bleeding volume, and pathology. The most efficient technique was CEUS-guided 915-MHz percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy in terms of action time and total blood loss. The success rate of the 915-MHz microwave group was higher than that of the 2450-MHz microwave and the drug injection groups (except A level, P microwave group than those in the 2450-MHz microwave and drug injection groups (P microwave group, but pathologic changes of light injury could be seen in the other groups. The present study provides evidence that microwave coagulation therapy is more efficient than thrombin injection for the treatment of splenic hemorrhage. Furthermore, treatment with 915-MHz microwaves stops bleeding more rapidly and generates a wider cauterization zone than does treatment with 2450-MHz microwaves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Partial splenic embolization in patients with idiopathic portal hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Maurizio E-mail: maurizio.romano@ibb.cnr.it; Giojelli, Angela; Capuano, Gaetano; Pomponi, Domenico; Salvatore, Marco

    2004-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of partial splenic embolization (PSE) in patients with idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH) in reducing variceal bleeding episodes, splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia. Materials and methods: Six patients (2M, 4F, mean age 30.3 years) with IPH presenting with splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia and recurrent variceal bleeding were treated with PSE using gelatin sponge (four patients) or Contour particles (two patients) as embolization material. Results: PSE was performed successfully in all cases; 3F coaxial microcatheters were necessary in two patients due to extreme splenic artery tortuosity. The average amount of devascularized parenchyma at CT 1 week after PSE was 71%. Splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia improved in all cases, with a mean platelet count increase of 120000/mm{sup 3} and an average 68% reduction of spleen volume at follow up. Variceal bleeding did not recur after PSE. Esophageal or gastroesophageal varices disappeared (one patient) or significantly reduced (five patients) at endoscopic controls. No significant complications were noted. The follow up was of at least 18 months in all patients; mean follow up was 28.2 months. Conclusion: In patients with IPH PSE can be effective in preventing variceal bleedings, in reducing spleen volume and in significantly increasing platelet count; therapeutic results were durable in our population.

  1. A rapidly enlarging cutaneous hemangioma in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ma'ayeh, Marwan

    2014-06-18

    This is a case of a rapidly enlarging cutaneous pedunculated tumor on a patient\\'s thumb during her pregnancy. This was excised and identified as a hemangioma. A literature search identified a possible hormonal factor in causing an accelerated growth of this tumor.

  2. Vertebral Hemangiomas - Aggressive Forms | Allali | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical imaging allows both diagnosis and evaluation of their aggressivity. Objective To assess the role of radiology, embolisation, percutaneous vertebroplasty, radiotherapy and surgery in the diagnosis and treatment of vertebral hemangiomas. Methods We report our experience of five patients who had an average age of ...

  3. Life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: successful seletive splenic artery embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    matteo molica

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy.

  4. The impact of coagulopathy on traumatic splenic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalls, Norma; Obirieze, Augustine; Ehanire, Imudia

    2015-10-01

    Patients with pre-injury coagulopathy have worse outcomes than those without coagulopathy. This article investigated the risk-adjusted effect of pre-injury coagulopathy on outcomes after splenic injuries. Review of the National Trauma Data Bank from 2007 to 2010 comparing mortality and complications between splenic injury patients with and without a pre-injury bleeding disorder. Of 58,896 patients, 2% had a bleeding disorder. Coagulopathic patients had higher odds of mortality (odds ratio, 1.3), sepsis (odds ratio, 2.0), acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio, 2.6), acute renal failure (odds ratio, 1.5), cardiac arrest (odds ratio, 1.5), and overall complications (odds ratio, 2.4). The higher odds of myocardial infarction did not achieve statistical significance (odds ratio, 1.6). Pre-injury coagulopathy in patients with splenic injury has a negative impact on cardiac arrest, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute renal failure, and mortality. The higher likelihood of myocardial infarction did not reach statistical significance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Laparoscopic Splenectomy for Traumatic Splenic Injury after Screening Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Abunnaja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopy is a widespread diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The most common complications include bleeding and perforation. Splenic rupture following colonoscopy is rarely encountered and is most likely secondary to traction on the splenocolic ligament. Exploratory laparotomy and splenectomy is the most commonly employed therapeutic intervention for this injury reported in the literature. We present the case of a patient with this potentially fatal complication who was treated successfully at our institution. To our knowledge it is the first report in the literature of laparoscopic splenectomy as a successful minimally invasive treatment of splenic rupture following colonoscopy. The patient was a 62-year-old female who underwent screening colonoscopy with polypectomies at the cecum, descending colon and rectum. Immediately following the procedure she developed abdominal pain and had a syncopal episode. Clinical, laboratory and imaging findings were suggestive of hemoperitoneum and a ruptured spleen. A diagnostic laparoscopy was emergently performed and revealed a grade IV splenic laceration and hemoperitoneum. Laparoscopic splenectomy was completed safely and effectively. The patient’s postoperative recovery was uneventful. We conclude that splenic rupture after colonoscopy is a rare but dangerous complication. A high index of suspicion is required to recognize it early. Awareness of this potential complication can lead to optimal patient outcome. Laparoscopic splenectomy may be a feasible treatment option.

  6. Image guided percutaneous splenic interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mandeep; Kalra, Naveen; Gulati, Madhu; Lal, Anupam; Kochhar, Rohit; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions as diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective review of our interventional records from July 2001 to June 2006. Ninety-five image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions were performed after informed consent in 89 patients: 64 men and 25 women who ranged in age from 5 months to 71 years (mean, 38.4 years) under ultrasound (n = 93) or CT (n = 2) guidance. The procedures performed were fine needle aspiration biopsy of focal splenic lesions (n = 78) and aspiration (n = 10) or percutaneous catheter drainage of a splenic abscess (n = 7). Results: Splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy was successful in 62 (83.78%) of 74 patients with benign lesions diagnosed in 43 (58.1%) and malignancy in 19 (25.67%) patients. The most common pathologies included tuberculosis (26 patients, 35.13%) and lymphoma (14 patients, 18.91%). Therapeutic aspiration or pigtail catheter drainage was successful in all (100%) patients. There were no major complications. Conclusions: Image-guided splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy is a safe and accurate technique that can provide a definitive diagnosis in most patients with focal lesions in the spleen. This study also suggests that image-guided percutaneous aspiration or catheter drainage of splenic abscesses is a safe and effective alternative to surgery

  7. Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH): a brief case report

    OpenAIRE

    Scalise, Robert; Bolton, Joanna; Gibbs, Neil F

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hemangiomas (CH) are benign vascular neoplasms that proliferate in utero and have completed development by birth. Two subtypes of CH are recognized: rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICH) and non-involuting congenital hemangiomas (NICH). Involution of the RICH subtype often begins in the first weeks of life. NICH does not involute, allowing the distinction between RICH and NICH. We report a case of an infant with RICH occurring on the scalp, examined at birth and followed...

  8. Enucleation of a Giant Hemangioma of Liver: Old School Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpagavel ChandraBose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are the most frequent benign hepatic tumours and are usually found in patients aged between 40 and 60 years, more frequently in women. In 30–35% of patients, the lesions are multiple. If the lesions are larger than 4–10 cm, they are coined as “giant” hemangioma. Here, we present a case of giant hemangioma treated with enucleation of the lesion and the advantages of the procedure.

  9. Management of splenic and pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, E; Abba, J; Cristiano, N; Siebert, M; Barbois, S; Létoublon, C; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    The spleen and pancreas are at risk for injury during abdominal trauma. The spleen is more commonly injured because of its fragile structure and its position immediately beneath the ribs. Injury to the more deeply placed pancreas is classically characterized by discordance between the severity of pancreatic injury and its initial clinical expression. For the patient who presents with hemorrhagic shock and ultrasound evidence of major hemoperitoneum, urgent "damage control" laparotomy is essential; if splenic injury is the cause, prompt "hemostatic" splenectomy should be performed. Direct pancreatic injury is rarely the cause of major hemorrhage unless a major neighboring vessel is injured, but if there is destruction of the pancreatic head, a two-stage pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) may be indicated. At open laparotomy when the patient's hemodynamic status can be stabilized, it may be possible to control splenic bleeding without splenectomy; it is always essential to search for injury to the pancreatic duct and/or the adjacent duodenum. Pancreatic contusion without ductal rupture is usually treated by drain placement adjacent to the injury; ductal injuries of the pancreatic body or tail are treated by resection (distal pancreatectomy with or without splenectomy), with generally benign consequences. For injuries of the pancreatic head with pancreatic duct disruption, wide drainage is usually performed because emergency PD is a complex gesture prone to poor results. Postoperatively, the placement of a ductal stent by endoscopic retrograde catheterization may be decided, while management of an isolated pancreatic fistula is often straightforward. Non-operative management is the rule for the trauma victim who is hemodynamically stable. In addition to the clinical examination and conventional laboratory tests, investigations should include an abdominothoracic CT scan with contrast injection, allowing identification of all traumatized organs and assessment of the severity of

  10. Cavernous sinus hemangioma: a fourteen year single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sumit; Suri, Ashish; Singh, Manmohan; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Agarwal, Deepak; Sharma, Manish Singh; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2014-06-01

    Cavernous sinus hemangioma (CSH) is a rare extra-axial vascular neoplasm that accounts for 2% to 3% of all cavernous sinus tumors. Their location, propensity for profuse bleeding during surgery, and relationship to complex neurovascular structures are factors which present difficulty in excising these lesions. The authors describe their experience of 22 patients with CSH over 14 years at a tertiary care center. Patients were managed with microsurgical resection using a purely extradural transcavernous approach (13 patients) and with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS; Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) (nine patients). Retrospective data analysis found headache and visual impairment were the most common presenting complaints, followed by facial hypesthesia and diplopia. All but one patient had complete tumor excision in the surgical series. Transient ophthalmoparesis (complete resolution in 6-8 weeks) was the most common surgical complication. In the GKRS group, marked tumor shrinkage (>50% tumor volume reduction) was achieved in two patients, slight shrinkage in five and no change in two patients, with symptom improvement in the majority of patients. To our knowledge, we describe one of the largest series of CSH managed at a single center. Although microsurgical resection using an extradural transcavernous approach is considered the treatment of choice in CSH and allows complete excision with minimal mortality and long-term morbidity, GKRS is an additional tool for treating residual symptomatic lesions or in patients with associated comorbidities making surgical resection unsuitable. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-12-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children.

  12. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children

  13. Symptomatic heterotopic suprarenal splenic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heider, J.; Kreft, B.; Winter, P.

    1998-01-01

    We report on a 33-year-old man with symptomatic heterotopic suprarenal splenic tissue. Heterotopic splenic tissue can often be found after posttraumatic splenectomy. It is a result of autotransplantation induced by trauma (splenosis). Additionally it can grow during embryogenic development. Such an accessory spleen is found in 10-44% of all autopsies. In this case report the patient was treated by resection due to increasing flank pain and suspected neoplasm. (orig.) [de

  14. Nonsurgical drainage of splenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkman, W.A.; Harris, S.A. Jr.; Bernardino, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The mortality associated with intraabdominal abscess remains high despite modern surgical methods and antibiotics. Draingae of abscesses of the abdomen, retroperitoneum, pelvis, pancreatic pseudocyst, mediastinum, and lung may be treated effectively by percutaneous catheter placement. In several reports of percutaneous abdominal abscess drainage, only three cases of splenic abscess drainage have been reported. The authors have recently drained two splenic abscesses with the aid of computed tomography (CT) and emphasize several advantages of the percutaneous guided approach

  15. Myometrial cavernous hemangioma with pulmonary thromboembolism in a post-partum woman: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavsar Tapan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cavernous hemangiomas of the uterus are rare benign vascular lesions. Nine cases of diffuse cavernous hemangioma of the gravid uterus have been reported, most of which diffusely involved the myometrium. These vascular malformations are clinically significant, and may cause pronounced bleeding resulting in maternal or fetal demise. Thrombosis of cavernous hemangiomas of the uterus has been previously reported. We here report the first case in which a thrombosed cavernous hemangioma of the myometrium resulted in a fatal pulmonary embolism in a post-partum woman. Case presentation A 25-year-old obese African-American woman who had one pregnancy and was delivered of twins by cesarean section was admitted 1 week after the successful delivery. The 12-day clinical course included ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, systemic hypertension, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the sputum, leukocytosis and asystole. A transabdominal ultrasound examination showed heterogeneous thickened and irregular products in the endometrial canal. The laboratory values were relevant for an increased prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, ferritin and a decrease in hemoglobin. The clinical cause of death was cited as acute respiratory distress syndrome. At autopsy, a 400g spongy, hemorrhagic uterus with multiple cystic spaces measuring approximately 0.5 × 0.4cm filled with thrombi within the myometrium was identified. Immunohistological examination with a CD31 stain for vascular endothelium associated antigen confirmed several endothelium-lined vessels, some of which contained thrombi. These histological features were consistent with cavernous hemangioma of the myometrium. A histological examination of the lungs revealed multiple fresh thromboemboli in small- and medium-sized pulmonary arteries in the right upper and lower lobes without organization, but with adjacent areas of fresh hemorrhagic infarction

  16. Myometrial cavernous hemangioma with pulmonary thromboembolism in a post-partum woman: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Tapan; Wurzel, John; Duker, Nahum

    2012-11-23

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the uterus are rare benign vascular lesions. Nine cases of diffuse cavernous hemangioma of the gravid uterus have been reported, most of which diffusely involved the myometrium. These vascular malformations are clinically significant, and may cause pronounced bleeding resulting in maternal or fetal demise. Thrombosis of cavernous hemangiomas of the uterus has been previously reported. We here report the first case in which a thrombosed cavernous hemangioma of the myometrium resulted in a fatal pulmonary embolism in a post-partum woman. A 25-year-old obese African-American woman who had one pregnancy and was delivered of twins by cesarean section was admitted 1 week after the successful delivery. The 12-day clinical course included ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, systemic hypertension, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the sputum, leukocytosis and asystole. A transabdominal ultrasound examination showed heterogeneous thickened and irregular products in the endometrial canal. The laboratory values were relevant for an increased prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, ferritin and a decrease in hemoglobin. The clinical cause of death was cited as acute respiratory distress syndrome. At autopsy, a 400g spongy, hemorrhagic uterus with multiple cystic spaces measuring approximately 0.5 × 0.4cm filled with thrombi within the myometrium was identified. Immunohistological examination with a CD31 stain for vascular endothelium associated antigen confirmed several endothelium-lined vessels, some of which contained thrombi. These histological features were consistent with cavernous hemangioma of the myometrium. A histological examination of the lungs revealed multiple fresh thromboemboli in small- and medium-sized pulmonary arteries in the right upper and lower lobes without organization, but with adjacent areas of fresh hemorrhagic infarction. This case underscores the importance of a high index of suspicion in

  17. Mimicry of lyme arthritis by synovial hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospach, Toni; Langendörfer, M; Kalle, T V; Tewald, F; Wirth, T; Dannecker, G E

    2011-12-01

    To report on the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma due to similar clinical and radiological signs and symptoms. A 15-year-old boy presented at the age of 9 with recurrent rather painless swelling of the right knee. Altogether four episodes lasting for 1-2 weeks each occurred over a period of 18 months before medical advice was sought. Physical examination revealed only a slightly limited range of motion. Living in an endemic area of borreliosis, he reported a tick bite 6 months prior to onset of his symptoms with erythema migrans and was treated for 10 days with amoxicillin. Serology revealed two positive unspecific bands in IgG immunoblot (p41 and 66) with slight positivity for ELISA. Ultrasound revealed synovial thickening and increased fluid. Despite the weak positive serology a diagnosis of lyme arthritis could not be excluded and intravenous antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone was started. After two further relapses antiinflammatory therapy including intraarticular steroids were introduced with no long lasting effect. A chronical disease developed with alternate periods of swelling and almost complete remission. Ultrasound as well as MRI demonstrated ongoing signs of synovitis, therefore after further progression, a diagnostic arthroscopy was performed showing an inconspicuous knee joint. A second MRI showed focal suprapatellar enhancement and was followed by open arthrotomy revealing a histopathological proven synovial cavernous juxtaarticular hemangioma. To our knowledge, the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma has not yet been reported despite obvious clinical similarities. In conclusion, in children and adolescents synovial hemangioma has to be considered in differential diagnosis of recurrent knee swelling. Early diagnosis is important to prevent prolonged suffering from chronic joint swelling with probable joint damages, unnecessary treatment procedures and as well school and sports

  18. Adrenal Hemangioma: A Case of Retroperitoneal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genta Iwamoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adrenal hemangioma is a rare disease, with only some 60 cases reported previously. Due to the difficulty of the preoperative diagnosis of adrenal hemangioma, almost all of the cases were diagnosed by a histopathological analysis of surgical specimens. Case Presentation. A 52-year-old man was referred to our department for further examination of his left retroperitoneal tumor. He had received hemodialysis due to chronic renal failure resulting from membranous nephropathy. Computed tomography revealed a mass around his left hilum. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron-emission tomography (PET-CT were unable to confirm or deny malignancy, and tumor markers, including CEA and CA19-9, showed slight elevation. His tumor grew from 38 mm to 54 mm in diameter in 7 months of follow-up. We therefore planned retroperitoneal tumor resection with left nephrectomy. Histopathologically, hyperplastic small vessels with hemorrhaging and denaturation were seen. The endothelial cells showed no variants or division of the nucleus. Based on this diagnosis, no further therapy was performed. He has had no recurrence in the eight months since the surgery. Conclusion. We herein report a rare case of adrenal hemangioma.

  19. Cytogenetic study of a pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, María J; Vargas, María T; Sánchez, Ana; Ibáñez, José; González-Cámpora, Ricardo

    2009-11-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) is an uncommon benign tumor that presents as a solitary asymptomatic and slow-growing nodule. It occurs in both young and old persons; peak incidence is in the fifth decade. Both sexes are affected by this tumor, but women more frequently than men. On histological examination, PSH shows prominent sclerotization and vascularization of the tissue. Recent studies conclude that PSH derives from type II pneumocytes, but the potential for progression and histogenesis remains controversial. We report a case of pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma in a 61-year-old woman with a neoplastic node 1 cm in diameter. The karyotype was 46,XX,t(8;18),der(14;15),+14 in all the cells analyzed. PTEN (10q23) and IgH (14q32) probes were analyzed in interphase nuclei and paraffin-embedded tissues of tumor cells. These chromosome abnormalities could provide information about the relationship of genetic changes to the biological properties of sclerosing hemangioma tumors.

  20. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. www. ...

  1. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging characteristics of two subtypes of congenital hemangiomas: rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas and non-involuting congenital hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorincour, Guillaume; Rypens, Francoise; Garel, Laurent; Dubois, Josee; Kokta, Victor; Powell, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Common infantile hemangiomas (COMMON) occur in approximately 10% of infants by the age of 1 year, with a female predominance. Some hemangiomas can be fully developed at birth and are thus called congenital hemangiomas (CH). Within this population, two courses have been identified: rapidly involuting CH (RICH) and non-involuting CH (NICH). Little has been reported on the clinical prognosis and imaging features of these entities. To describe the imaging characteristics of two subtypes of CH, i.e. RICH and NICH, and to compare them with COMMON. We retrospectively gathered data on 26 children presenting with CH, i.e. lesions fully developed at birth. These lesions were divided into two groups according to the clinical course: suspected RICH (n=8) and suspected NICH (n=18). We used US, CT or MRI and angiography to identify the gross anatomy and structure and the vascularization. Imaging findings were compared with the clinical course and pathology results, when available. The imaging findings in these patients were compared retrospectively with those in 26 patients with COMMON randomly chosen from the database of our multidisciplinary clinic. When compared with COMMON imaging characteristics, NICH and RICH had distinctive features on US such as being heterogeneous (72% of NICH and 62.5% of RICH vs 42.3% of COMMON), visible vessels (72% of NICH and 62.5% of RICH vs 15.4% of COMMON), calcifications (17% of NICH and 37.5% of RICH vs no case of COMMON). On CT and/or MRI, we compared imaging features such as well-defined limits (67% of NICH and 60% of RICH vs 100% of COMMON), and fat stranding (29.4% of NICH and RICH vs 7.7% of COMMON). Distinctive imaging characteristics are observed in cases of CH with US findings of visible vessels and calcifications statistically significant. (orig.)

  3. Splenic abscess in cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Essadi; El Barni, Rachid; Lahkim, Mohamed; Rokhsi, Redouane; Atmane, Elmehdi; El Fikri, Abdelghani; Bouchama, Rachid; Achour, Abdessamad; Zyani, Mohamed

    2015-11-11

    Splenic abcess is an uncommon complication for cancer treatment. It occurs more frequently in immunocompromised patients. They are characterized by high mortality. The classic triad (fever, pain of the left hypochondrium, and sensitive mass left) is only present in one-third of cases the clinical spectrum ranging from no symptoms to events such as fever, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, abdominal pain left, splenomegaly. Treatment options are limited, but must be discussed and adapted to the patient profile. We report the case of a 62-year-old Arabic male, diagnosed with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma, who, after several cycles of chemotherapy, presented symptoms and signs of splenic abcess. Splenic abcess is rare situation, which must be actively researched, to have access to an optimal therapeutic approach.

  4. Rebleeding of a Splenic Artery Aneurysm after Coil Embolisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra D. Kingma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Splenic artery aneurysm (SAA is an uncommon and difficult diagnosis. SAA is more common in females. Only 20% of SAA is symptomatic and may present as a rupture. A ruptured SAA is associated with a 25% mortality rate. Case Presentation. We present a case of a male patient with a bleeding SAA that rapidly increased in size. Distal coiling was technically impossible and despite proximal coil embolisation the SAA continued to bleed. A laparotomy including splenectomy and partial pancreatectomy was performed with an uneventful patient recovery. Discussion. Endovascular management is currently considered the optimal treatment of SAA. However, careful monitoring and follow-up is needed after embolisation as rapid recanalization of the SAA may possibly occur, especially when distal coiling of the aneurysm is unsuccessful. Conclusion. Endovascular treatment of an SAA is not necessarily effective. Surgeons must be prepared to perform open procedures to further reduce mortality rates.

  5. Large primary splenic cyst: A laparoscopic technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Geraghty, M

    2009-01-01

    Splenic cysts are rare lesions with around 800 cases reported in the world literature. Traditionally splenectomy was the treatment of choice. However, with the recognition of the important immunological function of the spleen, new techniques to preserve splenic function have been developed. This case emphasizes that in selected cases splenic preservation is appropriate.

  6. Splenic irradiation for hairy cell leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Moundhri, A.; Graham, P.H. [St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW, (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology

    1997-11-01

    Splenic irradiation in the management of hairy cell leukaemia is previously unreported. A case is presented here to illustrate that splenic irradiation may be a useful addition to systemic therapies. It achieved local splenic and blood picture response and remission similar to splenectomy without any significant toxicity. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery mimicking a solid lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old man presented to the hospital because of hematemesis; on admission, he had weakness and pale skin, tachycardia and hypotension. Laboratory tests revealed severe anemia (hemoglobin 7.8 g/dL; liver, renal and pancreatic function tests were normal. An upper digestive endoscopy revealed a gastric ulcer of the cardia, treated with metallic clips and adrenalin injection. The patient was treated with fluids and was transfused with three units of red blood cells. In the previous two months, due to the presence of bloating and diarrhea, associated with abdominal distension, a colon-computed tomography (CT revealed a large retroperitoneal hypodense mass, 53x37 mm in size, without contrast enhancement localized between the body and the tail of the pancreas and the stomach, near the splenic artery and without signs of infiltration. To better define the mass, endoscopic ultrasound and biopsy were performed; however histopathology of multiple biopsies was not diagnostic, because of the presence of necrotic tissue and inflammatory cells. Since hematemesis recurred, the patient underwent a second upper digestive endoscopic examination, but no source of bleeding was found. Then a new contrast enhanced CT was performed that showed a size reduction of the mass, the presence of blood in the stomach and a small pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery. Because of these findings an angiograpghic study was carried out; angiography confirmed a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm that was successfully embolized with metal microcoils.

  8. Infraglottic lobular capillary hemangioma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinh Ly Pham Hoang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH is a benign proliferation of capillary blood vessels adopting a lobular configuration. A laryngeal origin of LCH is exceedingly rare. Here, we describe a case of an 11-year-old boy presenting with a subglottic lesion, leading to a subglottic stenosis. Histopathologic findings of the lesion implicated an LCH, which was removed successfully by a coblator. This is the first report of a subglottic LCH. Physicians should be aware of this unique lesion and laryngeal LCH should be considered in diagnosing the cause of a subglottic stenosis. Additionally, coblation should be an effective treatment for laryngeal LCH.

  9. Cavernous hemangioma of the knee - case report

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Marcin; Dolata, Tomasz; Weiss, Waldemar; Maksymiak, Martyna; Kałużny, Krystian; Kałużna, Anna; Zukow, Walery; Hagner Derengowska, Magdalena

    2018-01-01

    Weiss Marcin, Dolata Tomasz, Weiss Waldemar, Maksymiak Martyna, Kałużny Krystian, Kałużna Anna, Zukow Walery, Hagner‑Derengowska Magdalena. Cavernous hemangioma of the knee - case report. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2018;8(4):318-325. eISNN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1226645 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/5438 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evalu...

  10. Chylous Ascites Secondary to Giant Liver Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius L. Lazarus

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chylous ascites is rare in clinical practice. It is characterized by milky-appearing peritoneal fluid with a triglycerides concentration of >1.25 mmol/l (110 mg/dl. Its pathophysiology is related to a disruption in the normal lymphatic flow. It is more common after trauma (including post surgery, neoplasia or atypical infections such as tuberculosis or filariasis. Other rare medical causes have been reported. The treatment is supportive and focused on correction of the underlying pathology. We report here the first case of chylous ascites caused by giant liver hemangioma and discuss the management of this condition.

  11. Splenic conservation in children with splenic injury at Nnewi - South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hitherto, the mode of treatment has been towards resuscitation and splenectomy but over the past one and half decades, the trend moved to conserve. Objective: We therefore review the management of splenic injuries in children over the past ten years as well as highlight management problems. Patients and Methods: ...

  12. Severe gastric variceal haemorrhage due to splenic artery thrombosis and consecutive arterial bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasmuth Hermann E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage is mainly caused by ulcers. Gastric varicosis due to portal hypertension can also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertension causes the development of a collateral circulation from the portal to the caval venous system resulting in development of oesophageal and gastric fundus varices. Those may also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Case presentation In this study, we describe the case of a 69-year-old male with recurrent severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by arterial submucosal collaterals due to idiopathic splenic artery thrombosis. The diagnosis was secured using endoscopic duplex ultrasound and angiography. The patient was successfully treated with a laparoscopic splenectomy and complete dissection of the short gastric arteries, resulting in the collapse of the submucosal arteries in the gastric wall. Follow-up gastroscopy was performed on the 12th postoperative week and showed no signs of bleeding and a significant reduction in the arterial blood flow within the gastric wall. Subsequent follow-up after 6 months also showed no further gastrointestinal bleeding as well as subjective good quality of life for the patient. Conclusion Submucosal arterial collaterals must be excluded by endosonography via endoscopy in case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Laparoscopic splenectomy provides adequate treatment in preventing any recurrent bleeding, if gastric arterial collaterals are caused by splenic artery thrombosis.

  13. Sonographic Findings of Cavernous Hemangioma in Fatty Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Jin Kyeung; Kim, Ki Whang; Yoon, Sang Wook; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Myung Jin; Ji, Hoon

    1995-01-01

    Typical cavernous hemangioma presents no diagnostic difficulty at sonography. However, in cases of atypical hemangioma, further evaluation is needed to differentiate it from malignancy. On the other hand, thcechogenicity of the lesion may be iso echo or hypoecho when it occurs in association with fatty liver. We analyzed the sonographic features of hemangioma in fatty liver. We reviewed the sonograms of 22 lesions from 19 patients. We divided the lesions into two groups; the lesion measuring less than 3cm in diameter (group I) and the lesions measuring same or greater than 3cm (group II). The lesions of each group were analyzed in terms of location, shape, distinction of margin, internal echogenicity, posterior enhancement, lateral shadowing, and peritumoral hypoechoic halo. The lesions were located in subcapsular or perivascular areain 86%. They strowed round or lobulated shape with well defined margin in 82%. Internal echo of the lesions was hypoechoic in 82% and homogeneous in 64%. Posterior enhancement was seen in 77%. The posterior wall of the lesion was distinct in 68%. There was no statistical difference in incidence of each finding described above between the two groups except the internal echogenicity(p<0.05). All of the four hyperechoic lesions measured greater than 3cmin diameter, and three of them showed uneven thickness of echogenic rind. Definitive diagnosis of hemangioma could be obtained in 82%. In remaining 18% of hemangioma, the lesions showed peripheral hypoechoic halo and lateral shadowing that made the diagnosis of hemangioma difficult. However, the possibility of hemangioma could be suggested because they showed haemangiomas internal eye-catching and posterior enhancement. Hepatic cavernous hemangioma presents with variable eye-catching as compared to the surrounding tissue when it is associated with fatty liver disease, Thus, in differentiating hemangiomas from other localized hepatic mass, other characteristics such as homogeneity of the

  14. Primary splenic torsion in a Boston terrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHTA, Hiroshi; TAKAGI, Satoshi; MURAKAMI, Masahiro; SASAKI, Noboru; YOSHIKAWA, Muneyoshi; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; HWANG, Shiang-Jyi; YAMASAKI, Masahiro; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2009-11-01

    A 7-year-old female Boston terrier was referred to Hokkaido University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a history of hemoglobinuria and anemia for several days. Abdominal radiographs showed splenomegaly, and ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic splenic parenchyma with interspersed linear echoes consistent with the ultrasonographic appearance of splenic torsion. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) indicated a C-shaped spleen. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of splenic torsion. A splenectomy was performed, and the dog recovered well without complications. This is the first report of splenic torsion in Boston terriers, and the usefulness of ultrasonographic and CT findings of the splenic torsion was also confirmed.

  15. Primary splenic torsion in a Boston terrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, H.; Takagi, S.; Murakami, M.; Sasaki, N.; Yoshikawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Hwang, S.J.; Yamasaki, M.; Takiguchi, M.

    2009-01-01

    A 7-year-old female Boston terrier was referred to Hokkaido University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a history of hemoglobinuria and anemia for several days. Abdominal radiographs showed splenomegaly, and ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic splenic parenchyma with interspersed linear echoes consistent with the ultrasonographic appearance of splenic torsion. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) indicated a C-shaped spleen. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of splenic torsion. A splenectomy was performed, and the dog recovered well without complications. This is the first report of splenic torsion in Boston terriers, and the usefulness of ultrasonographic and CT findings of the splenic torsion was also confirmed

  16. The changing face of complicated infantile hemangioma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menapace, Deanna [Creighton University School of Medicine, Phoenix Regional Campus, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education-MN, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Rochester, MN (United States); Mitkov, Mario [Creighton University School of Medicine, Phoenix Regional Campus, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Towbin, Richard [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Hogeling, Marcia [University of California, Los Angeles, Division of Dermatology, Santa Monica, CA (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Infantile hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. A multidisciplinary approach including dermatologists, otolaryngologists, plastic surgeons, hematologists/oncologists and interventional/diagnostic radiologists is crucial for appropriate management of children with complicated infantile hemangiomas. Since its unforeseen discovery in 2008, propranolol has become the first-line treatment for infantile hemangiomas, eclipsing systemic corticosteroids and radiologic intervention. There are still, however, uncommon indications for more aggressive interventional management. We review the 2014-updated International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) classification for vascular anomalies. Additionally, we suggest management algorithms for complicated lesions, including recommendations for radiologic and surgical intervention. (orig.)

  17. Splenic contraction in patients with various disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iio, Atsushi; Murase, Kenya; Ito, Hisao; Watanabe, Yuji; Kawamura, Masashi; Hamamoto, Ken

    1986-03-01

    To investigate the pathophysiology of human spleen, splenic contraction following subcutaneous injection of epinephrine was measured in 45 patients with various disorders using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The splenic contraction rates and percent decreases in splenic counts (ejection rates) in 5 controls were 34.5 +- 10.0 percent (mean +- SD) and 16.4 +- 6.9 percent respectively. With regard to non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the splenic contraction and ejection rates in 8 patients with no splenic involvement diagnosed by CT and/or /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy were 27.3 +- 7.0 percent and 9.4 +- 7.0 percent respectively, while these values in 6 patients with splenic involvement diagnosed by presence of splenomegaly, CT and/or /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy were 12.8 +- 5.8 percent and 2.5 +- 1.6 percent respectively. Both the values in the patients with splenic involvement were low (p < 0.01, p < 0.1) compared with those in the patients without splenic involvement. The splenic contraction and ejection rates in 7 patients with splenomegaly due to portal hypertension were averaged 33.5 +- 6.7 percent and 13.8 +- 4.5 percent respectively. These values were comparable to those in controls. All 3 patients with leukemia and splenomegaly showed exceedingly low values of the splenic contraction and ejection rates. The values were also remarkably low in a patient with splenic metastasis of unknown origin.

  18. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - vaginal bleeding; Maternal blood loss - vaginal ... Up to 1 in 4 women have vaginal bleeding at some time during their pregnancy. Bleeding is more common in the first 3 months (first trimester), especially with twins.

  19. Bleeding Disorders in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... might be heavy, print and use a menstrual chart to track your bleeding and talk to your ... you’re “low in iron.” Heavy bleeding after dental surgery, other surgery, or childbirth. Prolonged bleeding episodes ...

  20. Estrogen-mediated hemangioma-derived stem cells through estrogen receptor-? for infantile hemangioma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ling; Wu, Hai Wei; Yuan, Weien; Zheng, Jia Wei

    2017-01-01

    Ling Zhang,1 Hai Wei Wu,1 Weien Yuan,2 Jia Wei Zheng1 1Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Center for Specialty Strategy Research of Shanghai Jiao Tong University China Hospital Development Institute, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common benign vascular tumor of infancy. They occur more frequently in female infants....

  1. Intracranial cavernous hemangiomas: a case report and bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiguihara, L.C.M.; Granero, P.C.; Gianotti, I.A.; Lederman, H.M.; Seixas, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    This is a case report of intracranial cavernous hemangioma that presented with macrocrania. A large, spontaneously hyperdense area with mass effect on CT was seen. This is a rare vascular malformation evolving the CNS in pediatrics. (author)

  2. Safety and effectiveness of percutaneous biopsy of focal splenic lesions under ultrasonographic guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hyun Young; Kim, Joo Heon [Eulji University College of Medicine, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Sook [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic yield and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle biopsy for the diagnosis of focal splenic lesions. US guided, automated needle biopsy using an 18-gauge cutting needle was performed in 11 patients, consisted of nine men and two women (mean age=49 years), with focal splenic lesions detected on the CT or US. Six patients (55%) had multiple lesions while five (45%) had a single lesion. Two of eleven patients had splenomegaly. None of 11 patients had the prior diagnosis of extrasplenic or hematopoietic malignancies. The biopsy was considered successful if a specific pathological diagnosis was possible. The diagnostic yield and frequency of complication were retrospectively analyzed. Tissue adequate for histological diagnosis was obtained in nine (82%) of 11 patients, and no complications other than mild, localized discomfort occurred. Multifocal splenic lesions without splenomegaly in five patients were confirmed as Hodgkin's disease (n=2), tuberculosis (n=1), infarction (n=1), and hemangioma (n=1). All single lesion in four patients were proven as benign conditions including hamartoma (n=2), lymphangioma (n=1) and chronic organizing abscess (n=1), and only of them with a large hamartoma received splenectomy while others did not receive further treatment. Although in two (18%) patients with multiple lesions and splenomegaly, no specific diagnosis was established by US-guided biopsy, malignant lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease were confirmed by surgery. US-guided automated needle biopsy is a safe and valuable procedure that can provides a specific diagnosis in patients with splenic lesions.

  3. [Application of Da Vinci surgical robot in the dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes for gastric cancer patients with total gastrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Chen, Xinzu; Zhang, Weihan; Chen, Xiaolong; Hu, Jiankun

    2016-08-25

    To investigate the feasibility and safety of Da Vinci surgical robot in the dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes for gastric cancer patients with total gastrectomy. Clinical data of two cases who underwent total gastrectomy for cardia cancer at our department in January 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. Two male patients were 62 and 55 years old respectively, with preoperative diagnosis as cT2-3N0M0 and cT1-2N0M0 gastric cancer by gastroscope and biopsy, and both received robotic total gastrectomy spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymph node dissection successfully. The operative time for splenic hilar lymph node dissection was 30 min and 25 min respectively. The intraoperative estimated blood loss was both 100 ml, while the number of total harvested lymph node was 38 and 33 respectively. One dissected splenic hilar lymph node and fatty tissues in two patients were proven by pathological examinations. There were no anastomotic leakage, pancreatic fistula, splenic infarction, intraluminal bleeding, digestive tract bleeding, aneurysm of splenic artery, and other operation-associated complications. Both patients suffered from postoperative pneumonia, and were cured by conservative therapy. The robotic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymph node dissection is feasible and safe, but its superiority needs further evaluation.

  4. Ossified skeletal muscle hemangioma: Radiologic and pathologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelstad, B L; Gilula, L A [Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (USA); Kynakos, M [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA). Dept. of Surgical Pathology

    1980-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hemangiomas are relatively uncommon tumors in children and young adults. Although the operative management of these lesions may be affected by their vascularity, the correct preoperative diagnosis is often not made. Ossification of these lesions is rare. Two patients are described whose skeletal muscle hemangiomas contained abundant osseous tissue. This was radiologically reflected by the 'swiss cheese' appearance of the tumors. Such an appearance in an ossified soft tissue mass may allow the correct preoperative diagnosis of this condition.

  5. Breast hemangioma mimicking metastasis at PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Sabas Carlos [Universidade Federal do Piaui (UFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Silva, Jucelia Saraiva e [MedImagem, Teresina, PI (Brazil). Clinica Medica; Madeira, Eveline Brandao; Franca, Julio Cesar Queiroz de; Martins Filho, Sebastiao Nunes [Universidade Federal do Piaui (UFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Breast hemangioma is a rare benign tumor that presents either absent or low {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake at positron emission tomography (PET). The authors report the case of a breast nodule pathologically compatible with hemangioma in a woman whose PET-scan has demonstrated increased FDG uptake (simulating a malignant tumor). A brief review of factors leading to false positive and false negative PET results is also undertaken. (author)

  6. Cavernous hemangioma of the thoracic spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.M.; Lin, J.C.T.; Morris, J.H.; Fischer, E.G.; Petersen, R.

    1988-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with a four-year history of progressive right-lower-extremity weakness and atrophy and a left hemisensory deficit was found. Metrizamide-enhanced spinal CT scan showed an intramedullary lesion at the level of T1-T2; this had expanded the cord in fusiform fashion but showed no evidence of a cystic component. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma. Two and one-half years later, her left hemisensory deficit was worsening and a spinal MRI showed high signal intensity mass in the region of the previous surgery consistent with chronic hematoma which was re-evacuated with some improvement in the patient's neurological condition. (orig.)

  7. Management of infantile hemangiomas: Current trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomathy Sethuraman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantile hemangiomas (IH are common vascular tumours. IH have a characteristic natural course. They proliferate rapidly during the early infantile period followed by a period of gradual regression over several years. Most of the uncomplicated IH undergo spontaneous involution, with a small proportion of cases requiring intervention. These are children with IH in life-threatening locations, local complications like haemorrhage, ulceration and necrosis and functional or cosmetic disfigurements. Systemic corticosteroids have been the first line of treatment for many years. Recently, non-selective beta-blockers, such as oral propranalol and topical timolol, have emerged as promising and safer therapies. Other treatment options include interferon α and vincristine which are reserved for life-threatening haemangiomas that are unresponsive to conventional therapy. This review mainly focuses on the current trends and evidence-based approach in the management of IH.

  8. Radiologic viewpoint of splenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jae Chun; Jung, Kyung Hwa; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Sun Yong; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan

    1988-01-01

    Splenic abscess is not a common disease, and has been infrequently diagnosed during life because of vague symptom and presence of underlying disease. However, advent of newer diagnostic imaging and interventional technology have augmented our ability to diagnose and treat the abscess. Authors experienced eight cases of splenic abscess, which were confirmed by operation or aspiration and, herein, we describe the radiological viewpoint and clinical course. Summary is follows: 1. Radiological finding was well defined, noncontrast enhancing wedge or lentiform lower density lesion, either single or multiple, focal or massive, parenchymal or subcapsular in location. Prognosis was favorable in focal parenchymal lesion after medical treatment. 2. Pancreatitis is the most common combined disease and this made the localization delay. 3. High incidence of sterile culture suggests possibility of anaerobic of fungal infection. 4. Hypoechoic lesion suggesting splenic abscess should be aspirated under the guidance of ultrasound and The aspirate should be cultured including anaerobic and fungus. C.T. scan should be done for better evaluation of the lesion. 5. According to pathology, organism and loculation pattern, various treatment modalities can be considered rather than routine splenectomy.

  9. Echogenic rim of hepatic hemangioma on abdominal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Woo; Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Chul Joong; Cheong, In Joo; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Kyu Byung

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the association between the size of the hepatic hemangioma and the shape and thickness of the echogenic rim of hepatic hemangioma on abdominal ultrasound. We examined 47 cases (M:F=24:23, mean age 47.1) of hepatic hemangiomas with echogenic rim on abdominal ultrasound during the past 2 years. Radiologic findings were retrospectively reviewed in terms of completeness and thickness of echogenic rim. If echogenic rim showed even thickness, it was measured. But if not, the maximum and minimum thickness of the rim was measured. The association between the size of hemangioma and the completeness and thickness of the echogenic rim were analyzed statistically. Of the 47 cases, complete echogenic rim and incomplete echogenic rim were obtained in 29 (62%) and 18 (38%) cases, respectively. Twenty-two cases of hemangioma were less than 2 cm in diameter, and their distribution according to echogenic rim were as follows: complete echogenic rim (17/20, 91% mean thickness 2.2 cm) and uneven thickness with complete echogenic rim (3/20, 15%, range:2.0-6.1 mm). Twenty-five hemangiomas were larger than 2 cm in diameter and their distribution according to echogenic rim were as follows: complete echogenic rim (n=9, 34%), incomplete echogenic rim (n=16, 64%0,even thickness with complete echogenic rim (3/9, 33%, mean thickness 2.2 mm) and uneven thickness with complete echogenic rim (6/9,67%, range: 2.0-7.6 mm). In statistical analysis, hemangiomas more than 2 cm in diameter were more likely to have incomplete echogenic rim (p<0.05) than those of less than 2 cm; hemangiomas more than with more than 2 cm in diameter and complete echogenic rim showed uneven thickness of echogenic rim (p<0.05), more often than those of less than 2 cm diameter. Hemangiomas with more than 2 cm in diameter showed more frequent incomplete echogenic rim than those of less than 2 cm in diameter, which had more frequent complete echogenic rim. Hemangiomas with complete echogenic rim and even rim

  10. Splenic function after angioembolization for splenic trauma in children and adults: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmer, J. A. G.; van der Steeg, A. F. W.; Zuidema, W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Splenic artery embolization (SAE), proximal or distal, is becoming the standard of care for traumatic splenic injury. Theoretically the immunological function of the spleen may be preserved, but this has not yet been proven. A parameter for measuring the remaining splenic function must therefore be

  11. Computed tomographic diagnosis of the splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Funaki, Hiromi; Uogishi, Makoto; Isobe, Tsugimasa; Kanno, Shoichi; Ushitani, Kenji; Fuchuh, Kosei; Sakita, Tsuyoshi.

    1985-01-01

    Three cases (3-year-old, 51-year-old and 17-year-old males) in which splenic trauma was diagnosed by plain computed tomography (CT) are presented. CT images revealed retention of fluid in the abdominal cavity in all cases and clear splenic hematoma and laceration in one case. CT is superior in the visualization of splenic hematoma and hemorrhage in the abdominal cavity accompanied by splenic trauma. It should, however, be noted that the presence of laceration is frequently difficult to detect due to artifacts. Indication for surgery should be decided by evaluating the severity of clinical symptoms. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Computed tomographic diagnosis of the splenic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Funaki, Hiromi; Uogishi, Makoto; Isobe, Tsugimasa; Kanno, Shoichi; Ushitani, Kenji; Fuchuh, Kosei; Sakita, Tsuyoshi

    1985-01-01

    Three cases (3-year-old, 51-year-old and 17-year-old males) in which splenic trauma was diagnosed by plain computed tomography (CT) are presented. CT images revealed retention of fluid in the abdominal cavity in all cases and clear splenic hematoma and laceration in one case. CT is superior in the visualization of splenic hematoma and hemorrhage in the abdominal cavity accompanied by splenic trauma. It should, however, be noted that the presence of laceration is frequently difficult to detect due to artifacts. Indication for surgery should be decided by evaluating the severity of clinical symptoms. (Namekawa, K.).

  13. Escherichia coli clearance after splenic autotransplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, R.G.; Petroianu, A.; Oliveira, M.B.N.; Bernardo-Filho, M.; Portela, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Splenic autotransplantation seems to be the only alternative for preservation of splenic tissue, after total splenectomy. The present study was carried out to analyze Escherichia coli depuration by mononuclear phagocyte system organs after total splenectomy and splenic autotransplantation. Methods: We utilized an experimental model including young and adult Wistar rats, of both sexes, submitted to total splenectomy and splenic autotransplantation. The evaluation method was intravenous inoculation of a suspension of Escherichia coli labeled with technetium-99m. We analyzed bacteria uptake by mononuclear phagocyte system organs and bacteria remnant in the bloodstream. Results: There was no difference between young and adult animals in bacteria uptake by mononuclear phagocyte system organs. In the comparison of groups, it was found out that the mean percent uptake by spleen and liver of animals in the control group was higher than that observed for animals with splenic implants. However, bacteria uptake in the lung was higher in the splenic implant group than in the control group. Although spleen bacteria uptake in the control group animals has been higher than that of animals in the splenic implant group, the remnant bacteria in the bloodstream was similar. Animals submitted to isolated total splenectomy showed higher bacteria remnant in the bloodstream than animals of the control group or the group submitted to total splenectomy combined with splenic autotransplantation. Conclusion: Our results indicate that autogenous splenic implant is efficacious in bacteria depuration in rats, by means of their macrophages phagocytosis. In addition, it does not modify bacteria removal function of liver and lung

  14. MRI findings of cavernous hemangioma of the uterus: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ji Hwa; Kim, Ok Hwa; Park, Young Mi; Jeng, Hae Woong; Lee, Sun Joo; Eun, Choong Gi; Choi, Su Im; Kim, Gi Tae [College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    Hemangioma is the most common soft tissue tumor in the body. Though it may occur anywhere in the body, hemangioma of the uterus is a very rare tumor. Hemangioma is almost asymptomatic, but it is sometimes clinically important because it can cause massive hemorrhage and this is a life-threatening condition. We report here on the magnetic resonance imaging and pathologic findings of cavernous hemangioma of the uterus in a 32-year-woman with menorrhagia.

  15. Emergency CT for assessment and management of blunt traumatic splenic injuries at a Level 1 Trauma Center: 13-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margari, Sergio; Garozzo Velloni, Fernanda; Tonolini, Massimo; Colombo, Ettore; Artioli, Diana; Allievi, Niccolò Ettore; Sammartano, Fabrizio; Chiara, Osvaldo; Vanzulli, Angelo

    2018-05-12

    To determine the relationship between multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings, management strategies, and ultimate clinical outcomes in patients with splenic injuries secondary to blunt trauma. This Institutional Review Board-approved study collected 351 consecutive patients admitted at the Emergency Department (ED) of a Level I Trauma Center with blunt splenic trauma between October 2002 and November 2015. Their MDCT studies were retrospectively and independently reviewed by two radiologists to grade splenic injuries according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) organ injury scale (OIS) and to detect intraparenchymal (type A) or extraparenchymal (type B) active bleeding and/or contained vascular injuries (CVI). Clinical data, information on management, and outcome were retrieved from the hospital database. Statistical analysis relied on Student's t, chi-squared, and Cohen's kappa tests. Emergency multiphase MDCT was obtained in 263 hemodynamically stable patients. Interobserver agreement for both AAST grading of injuries and vascular lesions was excellent (k = 0.77). Operative management (OM) was performed in 160 patients (45.58% of the whole cohort), and high-grade (IV and V) OIS injuries and type B bleeding were statistically significant (p trauma event, without significant increase of mortality. Both intraparenchymal and extraparenchymal active bleeding were predictive of NOM failure (p splenic traumas and contributes to the shift toward NOM in hemodynamically stable patients.

  16. Estrogen-mediated hemangioma-derived stem cells through estrogen receptor-α for infantile hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ling Zhang,1 Hai Wei Wu,1 Weien Yuan,2 Jia Wei Zheng1 1Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Center for Specialty Strategy Research of Shanghai Jiao Tong University China Hospital Development Institute, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Infantile hemangiomas (IHs are the most common benign vascular tumor of infancy. They occur more frequently in female infants. The cause of hemangioma is currently unknown; however, current studies suggested the importance of estrogen (E2 signaling in hemangioma proliferation. Methods: Hemangioma-derived stem cells (HemSCs were cultured with estrogen for 48–72 h; the cell viability and proliferation were evaluated with the messenger RNA (mRNA and protein expression levels of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α, by application of several in vitro assays, such as methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Western blotting. Also, the cell population’s response to external estrogen was investigated by in vivo experiments. HemSCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were mixed and injected subcutaneously into 20 flank of BALB/c-nu mice, which were randomly divided into 5 groups based on different E2 treatment doses (0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 mg, respectively, 0.1 mg dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as control. Each group of mice were treated intramuscularly every week, then 2 and 4 weeks later, the subcutaneous implants were harvested and evaluated the tumor tissues with microvessel density (MVD assay and immunohistochemistry. Results: The study demonstrated that application of E2 increased the expression of FGF2, VEGF-A, and ER-α in HemSCs with the optimal concentration from 10−9 to 10−5 M. Two

  17. Prenatal and postnatal MR findings of a congenital hemangioma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyung Hee; Chang, Yun Woo; Lee, Jung Jai; Lee, Woo Ryung [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Wha [Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Hemangiomas are common benign soft tissue tumors found in pediatrics. Knowledge of prenatal image findings for hemangiomas can be essential for ensuring optimal antepartum and postpartum care. In this study, we provide a report the MR findings of a congenital hemangioma in the posterior neck region, which was different from the pre and postnatal image findings as well as a literature review.

  18. Our Treatment Results of Circumscribed and Diffuse Choroidal Hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Savku

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To discuss our treatment results of choroidal hemangiomas. Material and Method: The records of 39 cases of choroidal hemangioma followed up at our clinic between July 1999–October 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Asymptomatic cases were followed up. Symptomatic cases with subretinal fluid and impaired vision received treatment. Results: Mean age of the 39 patients was 44 (12-80 years. Thirty-five of 39 cases had circumscribed choroidal hemangioma, and 4 cases had diffuse choroidal hemangioma. Sturge-Weber syndrome was present in 3 cases with diffuse choroidal hemangioma. Cases with circumscribed choroidal hemangioma and minimal subretinal fluid were treated with TTT in 11 cases, PDT in 12 cases, and PDT+TTT in 1 case. Cases with circumscribed choroidal hemangioma and excessive subretinal fluid were treated with Ru-106 plaque radiotherapy in 1 case, Ru-106 plaque radiotherapy+TTT in 1 case, EBRT in 3 cases, and TTT+EBRT in 1 case. One painful blind eye with neovascular glaucoma and complicated cataract was enucleated. Cases with diffuse choroidal hemangioma and excessive subretinal fluid were treated with Ru-106 plaque radiotherapy+TTT in 1 case and EBRT in 1 case. Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation and FAKO emulsification were applied to a case with neovascular glaucoma and complicated cataract. Complete resorption of subretinal fluid was achieved in 23 (72% of treated 32 cases. When mean initial tumor thickness was 2.6 mm (0.5-6, mean final tumor thickness was 1.4 mm (0-6. When mean initial visual acuity (LogMAR was 1.5 (0-3, mean final visual acuity was 1.1 (0-3. No recurrence was observed. Discussion: The amount of the subretinal fluid determines the method of treatment in circumscribed choroidal hemangioma. While TTT and PDT are effective treatment modalities for minimal subretinal fluid, plaque radiotherapy and EBRT are applied in cases with excessive subretinal fluid. Combination therapies may be necessary according to the

  19. Diode laser for the treatment of telangiectasias following hemangioma involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrati, Eric W; O, Teresa M; Chung, Hoyun; Waner, Milton

    2015-02-01

    Infantile hemangiomas are well known for their rapid growth during the first 6 to 9 months of life, followed by a spontaneous but slow involution. The standard of care is to treat these lesions at an early age with propranolol to expedite the involution process; however, surgery still remains an active component in the management. Medical treatment with propranolol or natural involution will often result in residual telangiectasias. We evaluated the efficacy of using a diode laser as a treatment for telangiectasias following cervicofacial infantile hemangioma involution. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care hospital and practice specializing in the care of vascular anomalies. Twenty patients, aged 4 months to 11 years (average 2.69 years), underwent treatment with a 532-nm diode laser to treat the residual telangiectasias following hemangioma involution. All procedures were performed in the operating room. To assess the efficacy, we independently evaluated pre- and posttreatment digital photographs and ranked them on a 0- to 4-point scale (0 = no change and 4 = complete response). Adverse reactions were also recorded. The telangiectasias showed considerable improvement following treatment. In more than half of the patients treated, the affected area demonstrated a complete response. No adverse reactions were noted. A 532-nm diode laser effectively treats the remaining telangiectasias following hemangioma involution. Whether used independently or in conjunction with other treatment modalities, the diode laser should be part of the surgical armamentarium when treating infantile hemangiomas. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  20. Preoperative MRI evaluation of vertebral hemangiomas treated with percutaneous vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoping; Wu Chungen; Li Minghua; Li Yuehua; Gu Yifeng; Cheng Yongde

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging examination in guiding the treatment of vertebral hemangiomas with percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP). Methods: A total of 286 patients with vertebral hemangiomas detected on spine MRI in authors' Department were enrolled in this study. The patient's age, the lesion's size and location, the clinical symptoms, MRI findings, etc. were retrospectively analyzed. Results: A total of 336 vertebral bodies were affected in 286 patients. The lesions were mainly located at the lumbar spine (43.15%) and the thoracic spine (37.80%). The highest incidence of disease was seen in 50-59 years old patients (34.62%). The mean diameter of the lesions was 14.56 mm. Solitary lesion was seen in 85.66% of patients, while two vertebral bodies involved were seen in 10.14% of patients. Twelve cases (4.20%) simply presented as back pain at the related vertebral bodies. Two patients showed signs due to spinal cord compression. All aggressive vertebral hemangiomas were manifested as iso-lower signal on T1-weighted images and higher signal on T2-weighted images. Simple PVP was performed in 4 cases, and subtotal tumor excision together with PVP was carried out in two patients with aggressive vertebral hemangiomas. Conclusion: Evaluation of vertebral hemangiomas with MRI performed prior to percutaneous vertebroplasty is very helpful in guiding the selection of therapeutic scheme. (authors)

  1. Radionuclide scan findings in delayed splenic rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, F.W.; Jackson, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    An initial liver/spleen scan performed on a patient with blunt abdominal trauma was negative 3 days following the accident. A follow-up scan 7 days later showed definite evidence of splenic rupture, proved surgically. The authors conclude that, in such cases, spleen scans may be negative initially because of delayed splenic ruptures

  2. Splenic irradiation in HIV-related thrombocytopenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, J.T.; Kuan, R.

    1996-01-01

    Splenic irradiation has been used in patients with HIV-related thrombocytopenia. This retrospective review deals with four patients treated with low dose splenic irradiation. All patients had an increase in platelet count and tolerated the treatment without side effects. However, the treatment response lasted for several months only. 9 refs., 1 tab

  3. Splenic abscesses from Salmonella infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Carmen Cecilia; Zuniga Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Spleen abscesses are uncommon. We describe the case of a 56 year-old man who presented with diarrhea, fever, vomiting and weight loss. On physical examination, the main findings included jaundice, hepatomegaly and ascites. Diagnostic imaging showed the presence of spleen abscesses, due to Salmonella species. Considering the type of abscess, medical treatment was given without the need for interventional treatment, resulting in a satisfactory outcome. No other risk factor was found, other than the gastrointestinal focus as the precursor of the splenic abscess.

  4. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other menstrual conditions; Abnormal menstrual periods; Abnormal vaginal bleeding ... There are many causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding. HORMONES ... Doctors call the problem abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) . AUB ...

  5. Embolization Therapy for Traumatic Splenic Lacerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Niloy; Matsumoto, Alan H., E-mail: ahm4d@virginia.edu; Arslan, Bulent; Turba, Ulku C.; Sabri, Saher; Angle, John F. [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the clinical success, complications, and transfusion requirements based on the location of and agents used for splenic artery embolization in patients with splenic trauma. Methods: A retrospective study was performed of patients with splenic trauma who underwent angiography and embolization from September 2000 to January 2010 at a level I trauma center. Electronic medical records were reviewed for demographics, imaging data, technical aspects of the procedure, and clinical outcomes. Results: Fifty patients were identified (34 men and 16 women), with an average age of 48 (range, 16-80) years. Extravasation was seen on initial angiography in 27 (54%) and was absent in 23 (46%). All 27 patients with extravasation were embolized, and 18 of 23 (78.2%) without extravasation were embolized empirically. Primary clinical success was similar (>75%) across all embolization locations, embolic agents, and grades of laceration treated. Of 45 patients treated, 9 patients (20%) were embolized in the main splenic artery, 34 (75.6%) in the splenic hilum, and 2 (4.4%) were embolized in both locations. Partial splenic infarctions developed in 47.3% treated in the splenic hilum compared with 12.5% treated in the main splenic artery. There were four (8.9%) mortalities: two occurred in patients with multiple critical injuries and two from nonbleeding etiologies. Conclusions: Embolization of traumatic splenic artery injuries is safe and effective, regardless of the location of treatment. Embolization in splenic hilar branches may have a higher incidence of infarction. The grade of laceration and agents used for embolotherapy did not impact the outcomes.

  6. Embolization Therapy for Traumatic Splenic Lacerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Niloy; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Arslan, Bulent; Turba, Ulku C.; Sabri, Saher; Angle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the clinical success, complications, and transfusion requirements based on the location of and agents used for splenic artery embolization in patients with splenic trauma. Methods: A retrospective study was performed of patients with splenic trauma who underwent angiography and embolization from September 2000 to January 2010 at a level I trauma center. Electronic medical records were reviewed for demographics, imaging data, technical aspects of the procedure, and clinical outcomes. Results: Fifty patients were identified (34 men and 16 women), with an average age of 48 (range, 16–80) years. Extravasation was seen on initial angiography in 27 (54%) and was absent in 23 (46%). All 27 patients with extravasation were embolized, and 18 of 23 (78.2%) without extravasation were embolized empirically. Primary clinical success was similar (>75%) across all embolization locations, embolic agents, and grades of laceration treated. Of 45 patients treated, 9 patients (20%) were embolized in the main splenic artery, 34 (75.6%) in the splenic hilum, and 2 (4.4%) were embolized in both locations. Partial splenic infarctions developed in 47.3% treated in the splenic hilum compared with 12.5% treated in the main splenic artery. There were four (8.9%) mortalities: two occurred in patients with multiple critical injuries and two from nonbleeding etiologies. Conclusions: Embolization of traumatic splenic artery injuries is safe and effective, regardless of the location of treatment. Embolization in splenic hilar branches may have a higher incidence of infarction. The grade of laceration and agents used for embolotherapy did not impact the outcomes.

  7. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  8. GI bleeding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Gastrointestinal Bleeding A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  9. Bleeding into the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003235.htm Bleeding into the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bleeding into the skin can occur from broken blood ...

  10. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003156.htm Vaginal bleeding between periods To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses vaginal bleeding that occurs between a woman's monthly menstrual ...

  11. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Menorrhagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Blood Disorders Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... It can also be bleeding that is very heavy. How do you know if you have heavy ...

  12. Synovial hemangioma in an adult horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhausen, Lars; Nowak, Michael; Junginger, Johannes; Puff, Christina

    2012-03-01

    A 15-year-old gelding presented with a progressive lameness of the left forelimb of 2.5 months duration. Clinically, a dilation of the deep flexor tendon sheath with a firm elastic consistency and a pronounced tenderness was noted. Ultrasonically, a marked swelling of the flexor tendon sheath with an irregular density of the mesotendineum was observed. The white, firm material forming a nodular distension of the flexor tendon sheath with a diameter of approximately 1 cm was excised and sent for histopathological examination. Biopsies of the deep flexor tendon and corresponding tendon sheath were sent for histopathological evaluation. Histologically, the mass consisted of clefts and numerous anastomosing vascular channels extending between the collagen fibers of the deep flexor tendon. These capillary-like spaces were lined by neoplastic cells that were flattened to polygonal and contained few erythrocytes. There was 0 to 1 mitotic figure per 10 high power fields (400×). Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells stained positive for vimentin and factor VIII-related antigen. Adjacent to the neoplastic endothelial cells located pericytes expressed α-smooth muscle actin antigen. Based on the histopathological and immunohistochemical features, synovial hemangioma was diagnosed. One year after surgery, the horse has shown no lameness.

  13. Medullar compression caused by vertebral hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo Catling, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    This is case of a 41 years old feminine patient in whom a unique primary bone tumor injury was demonstrated, diagnosed as a bone hemangioma, located at T-7, with grew and compressed the spinal cord. These bone vascular and frequently observed in the radiological studies and autopsies, in a sporadic form are only symptomatic, growing and affecting the nervous roots and the spinal cord. The clinical history of the patient is described with the preoperative studies and magnetic resonance 6 years after the surgery: The medical literature of these primary bony injuries is reviewed and as they are treated. Objectives: to present the clinical history of a patient who consults having medullar compression syndrome caused by an unusual extra-medullar tumor injury, of bony origin, primary and benign, with clinical controls 8 years after the operation and without evidence of tumor recurrences. The medical literature of this bone pathology is reviewed. Methodology: the clinical history of the patient is described, who was treated surgically successfully, because spinal cord was decompressed without neurological sequels. Vertebral instability was not observed and nor diagnosed. The patient was periodically taken care of with last control of magnetic resonance 6 years after the surgery and last medical control 8 years later. Medical publications are extensively reviewed

  14. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Choroidal Hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Taek; Kang, Se Woong; Lee, Jung-Il

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with choroidal hemangioma (CH), a benign ocular hamartoma, frequently presents with visual disturbance as a result of exudative retinal detachment (RD), which originates in subretinal fluid accumulation. We report our experience using the Leksell Gamma Knife in the management of symptomatic CH. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with symptomatic CH (circumscribed form in 3 patients and diffuse form in 4) were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution during a 7-year period. All patients presented with exudative RD involving the macula that resulted in severe visual deterioration. The prescription dose to the target margin was 10 Gy in all cases. The mean tumor volume receiving the prescription dose was 536 mm 3 (range, 151–1,057). The clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 9–76). Results: The resolution of exudative RD was achieved within 6 months, and the visual acuity of the affected eye had improved at the latest follow-up examination (p = .018) in all patients. No recurrence of exudative RD occurred. Thinning of the CHs was observed in most patients; however, symptomatic radiation toxicity had not developed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Symptomatic CHs can be safely and effectively managed with Gamma Knife radiosurgery using a marginal dose of 10 Gy.

  15. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Choroidal Hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yun Taek; Kang, Se Woong [Department of Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Il, E-mail: jilee@skku.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Patients with choroidal hemangioma (CH), a benign ocular hamartoma, frequently presents with visual disturbance as a result of exudative retinal detachment (RD), which originates in subretinal fluid accumulation. We report our experience using the Leksell Gamma Knife in the management of symptomatic CH. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with symptomatic CH (circumscribed form in 3 patients and diffuse form in 4) were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution during a 7-year period. All patients presented with exudative RD involving the macula that resulted in severe visual deterioration. The prescription dose to the target margin was 10 Gy in all cases. The mean tumor volume receiving the prescription dose was 536 mm{sup 3} (range, 151-1,057). The clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 9-76). Results: The resolution of exudative RD was achieved within 6 months, and the visual acuity of the affected eye had improved at the latest follow-up examination (p = .018) in all patients. No recurrence of exudative RD occurred. Thinning of the CHs was observed in most patients; however, symptomatic radiation toxicity had not developed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Symptomatic CHs can be safely and effectively managed with Gamma Knife radiosurgery using a marginal dose of 10 Gy.

  16. Failure to thrive in infants with complicated facial hemangiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Meghan W; Burkhart, Craig N; Vaghani, Sapna P; Morrell, Dean S; Wagner, Annette M

    2012-01-01

    We have observed that some children with facial hemangiomas of infancy have feeding difficulties coincident with periods of failure to thrive. We evaluated the early oral sensory and feeding experiences of four children with facial hemangiomas through medical record review and parental surveys to investigate their contribution to the patients' failure to thrive. All children with feeding irregularities experienced some degree of oral sensory impairment and required early oral sensory intervention, but there were varying reports of difficulty or delay in the development of oral feeding. The nature of these difficulties is discussed. Infants with complicated facial hemangiomas with perioral and airway involvement may be at higher risk for feeding and oral sensory problems. We recommend close monitoring for failure to thrive and early evaluation by speech or occupational therapists. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of Retinal Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Luisa; Marchese, Alessandro; Gagliardi, Marco; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    Retinal cavernous hemangioma is a rare, benign, retinal tumor characterized by angiomatous proliferation of vessels within the inner retina or the optic disc.1 Here we report a case of retinal cavernous hemangioma on the margin of the optic disc in the right eye of a 61-year-old asymptomatic female. The lesion was studied with multimodal imaging which included structural optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, blue fundus auto-fluorescence, optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) (DRI OCT Triton; Topcon, Tokyo, Japan) and visual field examination. Blood circulation inside retinal cavernous hemangioma lesion is typically low-stagnant.2 However, OCTA demonstrated blood flow inside the lesion, illustrating its vascular circulation.3 Visual field was within the normal limits, except from a slight enlargement of the blind spot. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:684-685.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Intraneural hemangioma of the median nerve: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinç Teoman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hemangiomas of the median nerve are very rare and, so far, only ten cases of intraneural hemangioma of this nerve have been reported in the literature. We present a case of 14-year-old girl who had a soft tissue mass in the region of the left wrist with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Total removal of the mass was achieved using microsurgical epineural and interfasicular dissection. The symptoms were relieved completely, after this procedure, without any neurologic deficit. On follow-up two years later, no recurrence was observed. Whenever a child or young adult patient presents with CTS the possibility of a hemangioma involving the median nerve should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  19. Endocrine carcinoma of the pancreatic tail exhibiting gastric variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas is uncommon. Without excess hormone secretion, it is clinically silent until the enlarging or metastatic tumor causes compressive symptoms. Epigastric pain, dyspepsia, jaundice, and abdominal mass are the usual symptoms, whereas upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is rare. Here, we describe the case of a 24-year-old man with the chief complaint of hematemesis. Upper GI panendoscopy revealed isolated gastric varices at the fundus and upper body. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a tumor mass at the pancreatic tail causing a splenic vein obstruction, engorged vessels near the fundus of the stomach, and splenomegaly. After distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, the bleeding did not recur. The final pathologic diagnosis was endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. Gastric variceal bleeding is a possible manifestation of nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas if the splenic vein is affected by a tumor. In non-cirrhotic patients with isolated gastric variceal bleeding, the differential diagnosis should include pancreatic disorders.

  20. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, P. T.; Kavnoudias, H.; Cameron, P. U.; Czarnecki, C.; Paul, E.; Lyon, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function

  1. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, P. T., E-mail: pfoley@doctors.org.uk [The Canberra Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (Australia); Kavnoudias, H., E-mail: h.kavnoudias@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Radiology Department (Australia); Cameron, P. U., E-mail: paul.cameron@unimelb.edu.au [The Alfred Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit (Australia); Czarnecki, C., E-mail: caroline.czarnecki@gmail.com [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Radiology Department (Australia); Paul, E., E-mail: eldho.paul@monash.edu [Monash University, Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Alfred Hospital (Australia); Lyon, S. M., E-mail: lyonsey@optusnet.com.au [Melbourne Endovascular (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function.

  2. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, P T; Kavnoudias, H; Cameron, P U; Czarnecki, C; Paul, E; Lyon, S M

    2015-10-01

    To compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels. Patients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population. Of the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation-a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume. IgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function.

  3. Head-facial hemangiomas studied with scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Cavallotti, Chiara; Giovannetti, Filippo; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2009-11-01

    Hemangiomas of the head or face are a frequent vascular pathology, consisting in an embryonic dysplasia that involves the cranial-facial vascular network. Hemangiomas show clinical, morphological, developmental, and structural changes during their course. Morphological, structural, ultrastructural, and clinical characteristics of head-facial hemangiomas were studied in 28 patients admitted in our hospital. Nineteen of these patients underwent surgery for the removal of the hemangiomas, whereas 9 patients were not operated on. All the removed tissues were transferred in our laboratories for the morphological staining. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for the observation of all microanatomical details. All patients were studied for a clinical diagnosis, and many were subjected to surgical therapy. The morphological results revealed numerous microanatomical characteristics of the hemangiomatous vessels. The observation by light microscopy shows the afferent and the efferent vessels for every microhemangioma. All the layers of the arterial wall are uneven. The lumen of the arteriole is entirely used by a blood clot. The observation by transmission electron microscopy shows that it was impossible to see the limits of the different layers (endothelium, medial layer, and adventitia) in the whole wall of the vessels. Moreover, both the muscular and elastic components are disarranged and replaced with connective tissue. The observation by scanning electron microscopy shows that the corrosion cast of the hemangioma offers 3 periods of filling: initially with partial filling of the arteriolar and of the whole cast, intermediate with the entire filling of the whole cast (including arteriole and venule), and a last period with a partial emptying of the arteriolar and whole cast while the venule remains totally injected with resin. Our morphological results can be useful to clinicians for a precise

  4. Bleeding during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in pregnancy? • What problems with the placenta can cause bleeding during pregnancy? • Can bleeding be a sign of preterm labor? • ... the hospital. What problems with the placenta can cause bleeding during pregnancy? Several problems with the placenta later in pregnancy ...

  5. Esplenectomia parcial para tratar hemangioma esplênico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Petroianu

    Full Text Available Apesar de a esplenectomia ser eficaz na abordagem terapêutica de pacientes com hemangioma esplênico, esse procedimento é acompanhado de elevada morbidade e até mortalidade, principalmente devido à sepse, quando realizado em crianças e adolescentes com sistema imunitário ainda imaturo. Para prevenir os efeitos adversos da asplenia, propõe-se neste artigo a esplenectomia parcial, com a retirada apenas da região do hemangioma, mantendo o restante do baço e preservando suas importantes funções.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral soft tissue hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, M C; Stull, M A; Patt, R H; Freedman, M T [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Radiology; Teitelbaum, G P [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Radiology University of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Radiology; Lack, E E [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Pathology; Bogumill, G P [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    1990-10-01

    Ten patients with soft tissue hemangiomas outside the central nervous system were studied with MR imaging. Eight patients were studied at 1.5 Tesla (T) with T{sub 1}-weighted and triple echo T{sub 2}-weighted sequences. Two additional patients were imaged on a 0.5-T system. The MR images were correlated with images from other modalities. It was found that prolonged T{sub 2}-weighted imaging together with standard spin echo T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} pulse sequences is a good substitute for contrast-enhanced CT and arteriographic evaluation of soft tissue hemangiomas. (orig./DG).

  7. Dynamic MR imaging of cavernous hemangioma with Gd-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luning, M.; Wolf, K.J.; Hamm, B.; Dewey, C.; Koch, M.; Taupitz, M.; Schnackenburg, B.; Schneider, T.; Petersein, J.; Muhler, A.; Haustein, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of gradient-echo, fast-field-echo (FFE), breathhold MR imaging in The characterization of liver tumors. The authors examined 32 hepatic hemangiomas with a 1.5-T imager using T1-weighted (500/15) and T2-weighted (2,480/100) spin-echo sequences, and multi-echo sequences (2,000/30,60,90...240); also, after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg), gradient-echo, FFE, breathhold images (27/13/60 degrees) were obtained. We evaluated the relationship of peripheral and central enhancement to the size of the lesion in 22 hemangiomas

  8. Delayed splenic rupture presenting 70 days following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resteghini, Nancy; Nielsen, Jonpaul; Hoimes, Matthew L; Karam, Adib R

    2014-01-01

    Delayed splenic rupture following conservative management of splenic injury is an extremely rare complication. We report a case of an adult patient who presented with delayed splenic rupture necessitating splenectomy, 2 months following blunt abdominal trauma. Imaging at the initial presentation demonstrated only minimal splenic contusion and the patient was discharge following 24 hours of observation. © 2014.

  9. Determinants of splenectomy in splenic injuries following blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The management of splenic injuries has shifted from splenectomy to splenic preservation owing to the risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI). This study aimed to identify the factors that determine splenectomy in patients with isolated splenic injuries, with a view to increasing the rate of splenic ...

  10. [Spleen-preserving surgery after blunt abdominal trauma with splenic hilum involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Cuéllar, José Aurelio; Cañete-Gómez, Jesús; López-Bernal, Francisco; García-Rivera, Carla; Pareja-Ciuró, Felipe; Padillo-Ruiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Splenic involvement secondary to blunt abdominal trauma is often treated by performing a splenectomy. The severity of the post-splenectomy syndrome is currently well known (blood loss, sepsis), so there is an increasing tendency to preserve the spleen. The case is presented of splenic preservation after blunt abdominal trauma with hilum involvement, emphasising the role of Floseal as a haemostatic agent, as well as the use of resorbable meshes to preserve the spleen. A 22-year-old woman presenting with a grade IV splenic lesion secondary to a blunt abdominal trauma after a traffic accident. Partial splenic resection was performed and bleeding was controlled with Floseal and use of a reinforcing polyglycolic acid mesh. No postoperative complications occurred, being discharged on day 5. The long-term follow-up has been uneventful. The use of haemostatic agents such as thrombin and the gelatine gel (FloSeal) and the use of polyglycolic acid meshes enable spleen-preserving surgery, making it a feasible and reproducible procedure and an alternative to classical splenectomy. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Idiopathic Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Rupture as an Uncommon Cause of Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Schatz MD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Splenic artery pseudoaneurysms are infrequently encountered but critical to recognize. Limited literature to date describes associations with pancreatitis, trauma, and rarely peptic ulcer disease. Hemorrhage and abdominal pain are the most common manifestations. There is typically overt gastrointestinal blood loss but bleeding can also extend into the peritoneum, retroperitoneum, adjacent organs, or even a pseudocyst. Most patients with ruptured splenic artery pseudoaneurysms present with hemodynamic instability. Here, we describe a patient recovering from acute illness in the intensive care unit but with otherwise no obvious risk factors or precipitants for visceral pseudoaneurysm. He presented with acute onset altered mental status, nausea, and worsening back and abdominal pain and was found to be in hypovolemic shock. The patient was urgently stabilized until more detailed imaging could be performed, which ultimately revealed the source of blood loss and explained his rapid decompensation. He was successfully treated with arterial coiling and embolization. Thus, we herein emphasize the importance of prompt recognition of hemorrhagic shock and of aggressive hemodynamic stabilization, as well as a focused diagnostic approach to this problem with specific treatment for splenic artery pseudoaneurysm. Finally, we recommend that multidisciplinary management should be the standard approach in all patients with splenic artery pseudoaneurysm.

  12. Segmental resection with primary anastomosis is not always safe in splenic flexure perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weledji, Elroy P; Mokake, Martin D; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-01-16

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by a rare mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene on Chromosome 5q. The risk of colorectal cancer in patients with FAP is nearly 100% and intensive endoscopic surveillance or prophylactic colectomy are mandatory. If extensive endoscopic surveillance is chosen, there is a cumulative risk of perforation and bleeding especially after polypectomy. We discussed the problems and options in the management of the late diagnosis of an iatrogenic perforation of the splenic flexure complicating endoscopic surveillance in FAP. We present a 35-year-old black African man with FAP who sustained a splenic flexure perforation following a colonoscopic polypectomy of a suspicious lesion. He underwent a splenic flexure resection and primary anastomosis that dehisced and the patient benefited from an emergency definitive colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis. Resection with primary anastomosis following iatrogenic perforation of the splenic flexure is not safe because of a high chance of anastomotic dehiscence. Following a late diagnosis in an unstable patient exteriorization of the perforation as a stoma is a better option prior to a definitive prophylactic colectomy.

  13. Splenic injuries in athletes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Elizabeth H; Howard, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Splenic injuries can be challenging to the sports medicine physician. While these injuries are not common among athletes, they can have serious, potentially fatal consequences if not properly diagnosed and managed in a prompt and timely fashion. Currently, there are no evidence-based guidelines on returning athletes to previous levels of activity after sustaining a splenic injury. In addition, there is no consensus on follow-up imaging after injury. This article discusses the evaluation of athletes with blunt abdominal trauma for splenic injury, including the imaging, management, and current return-to-play guidelines.

  14. Splenic tuberculosis. Report of twelve cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adil, A.; Chikhaoui, N.; Ousehal, A.; Kadiri, R.

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spleen is not exceptional. The authors report ten cases which occurred with a predominance in young male adults. All patients had at least one other site of tuberculosis without any HIV infection. All patients had focal splenic lesions in the form of scattered hypo-echogenic and hypodense nodules. These nodules had a pseudo-tumor appearance in one case. CT-guided puncture was performed in one case. Splenic tuberculosis is not as rare as is sometimes thought. The CT-guided splenic puncture is now performed routinely and remains the ideal diagnostic approach. (authors). 9 refs., 5 figs

  15. Splenic Infarction: An Under-recognized Complication of Infectious Mononucleosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; George, Ann; Arnaout, Sami; Wang, Jennifer P; Abraham, George M

    2018-03-01

    Splenic infarction is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis. We describe 3 cases of splenic infarction attributed to infectious mononucleosis that we encountered within a 2-month period. We underscore the awareness of this potential complication of infectious mononucleosis and discuss the differential diagnosis of splenic infarction, including infectious etiologies. While symptomatic management is usually sufficient for infectious mononucleosis-associated splenic infarction, close monitoring for other complications, including splenic rupture, is mandated.

  16. Splenic vein thrombosis with chronic pancreatitis: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiri SH, Khorgami J, Donboli K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chronic pancreatitis and perivasculitis is the most common etiology of splenic vein thrombosis (SVT. Reported in up to 45% of patients with chronic pancreatitis, SVT may also be seen in patients with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. It causes a localized portal hypertension called sinistral portal hypertension. Unlike those with generalized portal hypertension, patients with sinistral portal hypertension are asymptomatic and have normal liver function. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from gastric varices is a life threatening complication of SVT. In patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to esophageal or gastric varices, late-phase celiac angiography is used to determine the presence SVT. Splenectomy is effective in treating the collateral outflow for patients with massive gastrointestinal bleeding."n"nCase report: a 23-year-old patient with SVT due to chronic pancreatitis with gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient came to the hospital with upper gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown etiology. Diagnostic workups revealed chronic pancreatitis and SVT with bleeding gastric fundal varices, after which the patient underwent splenectomy. A review of current literature on SVT, known etiologies, diagnosis and treatment is discussed

  17. Infantile hemangioma: pulsed dye laser versus surgical therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remlova, E.; Dostalova, T.; Michalusova, I.; Vranova, J.; Jelinkova, H.; Hubacek, M.

    2014-05-01

    Hemangioma is a mesenchymal benign tumor formed by blood vessels. Anomalies affect up to 10% of children and they are more common in females than in males. The aim of our study was to compare the treatment efficacy, namely the curative effect and adverse events, such as loss of pigment and appearance of scarring, between classical surgery techniques and laser techniques. For that reason a group of 223 patients with hemangioma was retrospectively reviewed. For treatment, a pulsed dye laser (PDL) (Rhodamine G, wavelength 595 nm, pulsewidth between 0.45 and 40 ms, spot diameter 7 mm, energy density 9-11 J cm-2) was used and the results were compared with a control group treated with classical surgical therapy under general anesthesia. The curative effects, mainly number of sessions, appearance of scars, loss of pigment, and relapses were evaluated as a marker of successful treatment. From the results it was evident that the therapeutic effects of both systems are similar. The PDL was successful in all cases. The surgery patients had four relapses. Classical surgery is directly connected with the presence of scars, but the system is safe for larger hemangiomas. It was confirmed that the PDL had the optimal curative effect without scars for small lesions (approximately 10 mm). Surgical treatment under general anesthesia is better for large hemangiomas; the disadvantage is the presence of scars.

  18. Hemangioma of the left coronary artery: Diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, A.; Wiesmann, W.; Peters, P.E.; Haesfeld, M.; Sciuk, J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a histologically proven hemangioma in the left coronary artery of the left ventricle of a 24-year-old woman. The results of the different medical imaging methods applied are described and the treatment of cardiac angiomas is discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. [High frequency electrocoagulation for treating noninvoluting congenital hemangioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhongqiang, Wang; Yafei, Wang; Jiashuang, Zhou; Quan, Zhou; Lijuan, Yang; Li, Wang

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the clinical efficiency of electrocoagulation for the treatment of noninvoluting congenital hemangioma. Sixteen infants with noninvoluting congenital hemangioma who were admitted to our hospital from January 2011 to June 2013 were included in this study. Color Doppler ultrasound was used to determine the hemangioma location, as well as its size and depth. High frequency electrocoagulation was adopted for the treatment. The output power was set at 10-20 W. The probes were inserted around the tumor or at the surface of the tumor. After switching on for 1-2 seconds, the direction and position of the probe was modulated until covering the whole tumor. After the treatment, the absorption of tumor was about 3-6 months. The efficiency was evaluated during the follow-up. Tumor atrophy was obvious after treatment in all patients. The temperature around the tumor mass was decreased, and the aberrant blood signals were decreased under the ultrasonic examination. Complete or partial atrophy were observed. The efficiency was graded as level I, II, III, IV in 0, 2, 9 and 5 patients, respectively. One patient showed local infection due to improper nursing, which was completely relieved after corresponding treatment. No severe adverse events were observed. High-frequency electrocoagulation is effective for treating noninvoluting congenital hemangioma through coagulating the aberrant blood vessels in the tumor, interrupting the vascular endothelial cell, blocking the aberrant blood flow, as well as leading to atrophy and absorption of tumor mass. Besides, no obvious scar is observed after the surgery.

  20. The efficacy of radiotherapy for 59 patients with vertebral hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Liting; Liu Xinfan; Li Yexiong; Yu Zihao; Yin Weibo

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indication, total dose and efficacy of radiotherapy for vertebral hemangiomas. Methods: Between 1967 and 2000, 59 patients (36 female, 23 male) with vertebral hemangioma were treated with deep X-ray, electron beam, 60 Co or 6-8MV X-ray with a total dose ranging from 28 to 90 Gy and a median of 40 Gy. Results: Of the 54 evaluable cases, the overall response rate was 87.0%. The response rates were 90.2% and 83.3%, respectively, for patients treated with 34-40 Gy and more than 40 Gy (χ 2 =0.41, P=0.608). Among the 9 patients with paraplegic patients, 4 achieved complete response, 4 partial response, and only one showed no response to the treatment. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is effective and safe for symptomatic vertebral hemangioma, on condition of a suitable total dose range of 30 to 40 Gy. Patients with asymptomatic or minor symptomatic lesion should be watched and followed rather than giving immediate treatment. Radiation therapy shows slow and delayed improvement in vertebral hemangioma and the symptoms are gradually relieved or disappear in three months to seven years with a median interval of 1.5 years, even though diagnostic images show no or only minor changes after treatment

  1. Hepatic hemangiomas as diagnosed by ultrasonography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachse, M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 62 cases where the clinical diagnosis of hepatic hemangioma had been established during the period between 1981 and 1983 on the basis of computed tomography and sonography were subjected to retrospective analysis with the aim of evaluating the diagnostic reliability of these two methods. In 29 patients a typical distribution pattern of the contrast medium gave irrefutable evidence of the disease. Hemangiomas were predicted from the results of computed tomography for a further 5 patients with less revealing distribution patterns, although in 4 among these the preliminary diagnosis of hemangioma was disproved by additional diagnostic procedures (scintigraphy, laparoscopy, surgery and biopsy). Out of 16 patients, in which the hemangiomas were diagnosed from the typical patterns created by the contrast medium on the CT scans, 11 showed sonographic findings to confirm the presence of such tumours. This retrospective analysis showed that a correct and positive diagnosis could be established in no more than 7 patients on the basis of sonography alone, while 6 such diagnoses were definitely proven to be false-positive. As regards diagnostic accuracy, sonography clearly compares unfavourably with computed tomography. It may offer some advantages inasmuch as it requires no radiation exposure, is non-invasive and, last not least, less costly. (ECB) [de

  2. Right atrial hemangioma in the newborn: Utility of fetal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, Christopher; Blalock, Shannon; Bengur, Resai; Ikemba, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare primary right atrial tumor diagnosed in-utero with fetal echocardiography, and further characterized as a congenital hemangioma with magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical resection was done six days after birth. This case illustrates the complementary roles of evolving advanced imaging techniques for fetuses and infants with congenital heart disease that allows for surgery early in the neonatal period

  3. Capillary hemangiomas with hemorrhage in cervicothoracic intramedullary, a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old male patient had presented with worsening pain at extremities and body. The MRI showed an inhomogeneously enhancing lesion at C5-T1. During the surgical evacuation through a midline myelotomy, a frozen section could not find any tumor cells or vascular malformations. Immunohistochemically, the diagnosis of capillary hemangiomas was confirmed.

  4. Synovial hemangioma of the knee: MRI findings in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llauger, J.; Monill, J.M.; Palmer, J.; Clotet, M.

    1995-01-01

    The findings in two patients with histologically proven synovial hemangioma of the knee are described. Both cases emphasize the typical appearance of this unusual tumor on magnetic resonance imaging. Additional radiologic findings, such as adjacent osseous insolvement, are discussed. The MRI findings of this tumor are highly suggestive of the diagnosis and MRI should eliminate the need for invasive angiographic procedures. (orig.)

  5. Ultrasonographic Findings of Hepatic Hemangioma : Analysis of Echo-Patterns According to Tumor Size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Hoon; Lee, Hae Giu; Choi, Byung Gil; Jung, Jung Im; Lee, Sung Yong; Yim, Jung Ik; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1995-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of ultrasonographic features of hepatic hemangiomas according to tumor size. After an initial ultrasonographic examination, 5l hepatic hemangiomas in 4l patients were confirmed by one or combined examinations of 99mTc RBC SPECT, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging. angiography or ultrasonographic follow up. Definition of margin, internal echogenicity,peripheral rim and posterior enhancement were evaluated by two radiologists. Forty seven cases(92%) of 51 hemangiomas appeared to be well defined. Of 29 hemangiomas with less than 3cm in diameter. 25 cases (86%)showed homogeneous internal echogenicity. Of 22 hemangiomas with above 3 cm in diameter, 16 cases (73%) showed inhomogeneous echogenicity. Of 12 hemangiomas (24%) with peripheral rim, nine cases revealed hyperechoic rim and two hypoechoic rim. The remaining one case showed hyperechoic rim and hypoechoic rim alternately. Hemangiomas with greater than 3cm in diameter had higher incidence of inhomogeneous echogenicity, peripheral rim and posterior enhancement than those less than 3 cm(P<0.05). The majority of small hepatic hemangiomas are well defined homogeneous hyperechoic masses. On the other hand, large hemangiomas tended to have higher incidence of inhomogeneous internal echogenicity, posterior enhancement and a peripheral hyperechoic rim. A hyperechoic mass with a hypoechoic rim should also be considered as a candidate for hepatic hemangioma

  6. Post traumatic intra thoracic spleen presenting with upper GI bleed! – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinra Sonali

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolated splenic vein thrombosis with left sided portal hypertension is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed. Diagnosis is difficult and requires a high index of suspicion, especially in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleed in the presence of splenomegaly and normal liver function tests. Case presentation A 64 year old male presented with haematemesis and melaena. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the presence of antral erosions in the stomach and fundal varices. A computerised tomography scan of abdomen confirmed the presence of a diaphragmatic tear and the spleen to be lying in the left hemi thorax. The appearances of the splenic vein on the scan were consistent with thrombosis. Conclusion Left sided portal hypertension as a result of isolated splenic vein thrombosis secondary to trauma is rare. The unusual presentation of our case, splenic herniation into the left hemithorax, causing fundal varices leading to upper gastrointestinal bleed 28 years after the penetrating injury, makes this case most interesting. We believe that this has not been reported in literature before.

  7. Evaluation and management of Periocular Capillary Hemangioma: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Motowa, Saeed A.; Chaudhry, Imtiaz A.

    2006-01-01

    To review the salient features of periocular capillary hemangioma, provide the ophthalmologist with clinical, diagnostic and histological features characteristic of the tumor and discuss various methods of management. Methods were literature review of periocular capillary hemangioma, diagnostic evaluation with emphasis on treatment through the presentation of illustrative clinical cases. Capillary hemangioma is the most common benign vascular tumor found on the head and neck area including eyelids and orbit. The lesion typically manifests within the first few weeks of life, grows rapidly in the first year during the proliferative phase, then invariably and slowly regresses over the next 4 to 5 years during the involutional phase. The lesion may resolve without leaving any significant cosmetic sequelae in vast majority of patients, however, the functional defects in the form of amblyopia, squint, facial disfigurement and rarely optic atrophy may persist long after complete resolution of the tumor. The diagnosis of the capillary hemangioma requires a combination of clinical and imaging studies such as ultrasonography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography in selected cases. With the advent of less invasive diagnostic techniques, the need for biopsy in capillary hemangioma has decreased. Nevertheless, it should be differentiated from other periocular tumors such as rhabdomyosarcoma, lymphangioma, chloroma, neuroblastoma, orbital cyst, and orbital cellulites. Treatment is indicated to prevent amblyopia or cosmetic disfigurement. If indicated, intra-lesional corticosteroids may be used to enhance resolution of the tumor. Other forms of treatment tried with variable success include systematic and topical corticosteroids, radiation, surgical excision and intravenous embolization of the tumor. Indecent years, laser ablation of the tumor has been found effective in some cases. Interferon-u has been utilized effectively in cases of capillary

  8. Congenital portosystemic shunts with and without gastrointestinal bleeding - case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ying; Chen, Jun; Chen, Qi; Ji, Min; Pa, Mier; Qiao, Zhongwei [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hui [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Shan [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-15

    The clinical presentation of congenital portosystemic shunt is variable and gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon presentation. To describe the imaging features of congenital portosystemic shunt as it presented in 11 children with (n = 6) and without gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 5). We performed a retrospective study on a clinical and imaging dataset of 11 children diagnosed with congenital portosystemic shunt. A total of 11 children with congenital portosystemic shunt were included in this study, 7 with extrahepatic portosystemic shunts and 4 with intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Six patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and the imaging results showed that the shunts originated from the splenomesenteric junction (n = 5) or splenic vein (n = 1) and connected to the internal iliac vein. Among the five cases of congenital portosystemic shunt without gastrointestinal bleeding, one case was an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt and the other four were intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Most congenital portosystemic shunt patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had a shunt that drained portal blood into the iliac vein via an inferior mesenteric vein. This type of shunt was uncommon, but the concomitant rate of gastrointestinal bleeding with this type of shunt was high. (orig.)

  9. Management of splenic trauma--changing concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihneŕ, E; Brismar, B

    1995-03-01

    During the last two decades the reported risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection (OPSI) has resulted in a conservative approach to splenic trauma, with the aim of splenic salvage. The appropriateness of this strategy is now questioned. The risk of OPSI varies with age and indication for splenectomy from less than 1% in adults to more than 4% in children. Pneumococcus is the causative agent in about 60% of cases. A prerequisite for splenic preservation procedures should be a haemodynamically stable patient without other intraabdominal injuries. The benefits derived from non-operative treatment of splenic salvage procedures may be overshadowed by the potential risk of transfusion-related bacterial and viral diseases. Polyvalent pneumococcal vaccines given early after splenectomy appear to reduce the incidence of OPSI substantially.

  10. Splenic artery aneurysm rupture in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.R.; Low, S.; Selinger, M.; Nelson, N.

    2004-01-01

    Rupture of a splenic artery aneurysm, commonly associated with pregnancy is a rare and catastrophic event. We report here a case of a patient in her second pregnancy who presented with a short history of left hypochondriac and epigastric pain, followed by collapse at 32 weeks gestation. Sudden fetal distress lead to emergency caesarean delivery when splenic artery aneurysm rupture was diagnosed. With timely involvement of multidisciplinary personnel both mother and baby survived and had an uneventful recovery. (author)

  11. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of splenic lymphoma involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerg, Christian; Faoro, Charis; Bert, Tillmann; Tebbe, Johannes; Neesse, Albrecht; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with standard B-mode ultrasound (US) for diagnosis of splenic lymphoma involvement. Methods: From 04/2005 to 10/2008 n = 250 lymphoma patients were investigated by standard B-mode US. A homogeneous splenic echotexture was found in 199 patients (79%). To clarify the benefit of CEUS in this group a pilot series was performed with 16 of the 199 lymphoma patients. All patients with an abnormal splenic echotexture on standard B-Mode US (n = 51) including focal hypoechoic splenic lesions (n = 41) and an inhomogeneous splenic texture (n = 10) were studied by CEUS. CEUS data were retrospectively evaluated. The diagnoses included indolent lymphoma (n = 27), aggressive lymphoma (n = 14), and Hodgkin's disease (n = 10). Number and size of lesions were determined by B-mode US and CEUS. The visualisation of splenic lymphoma involvement by CEUS in comparison to B-mode US was classified as worse, equal, or better. Results: All patients with a homogeneous spleen on B-mode US (n = 16) had no visible focal lesions on CEUS. Study patients with focal lesions (n = 41) had a hypoechoic (n = 22) or isoechoic (n = 19) enhancement during the arterial phase, and a hypoechoic enhancement during the parenchymal phase (n = 41). The visualisation of focal splenic lymphoma was equal (n = 32), better (n = 6), or worse (n = 3). In all study patients with an inhomogeneous spleen on B-mode US (n = 10) no focal lesions were found by CEUS and the value of CEUS therefore was classified as worse. Conclusion: CEUS has no clear advantage for diagnosis of splenic lymphoma involvement.

  12. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of splenic lymphoma involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerg, Christian, E-mail: goergc@med.uni-marburg.de [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik, Baldingerstrasse, 35033 Marburg/Lahn (Germany); Faoro, Charis [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik, Baldingerstrasse, 35033 Marburg/Lahn (Germany); Bert, Tillmann [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Robert-Koch-Allee 9, 99437 Bad Berka (Germany); Tebbe, Johannes [Klinikum Lippe-Detmold, Roentgenstrasse 18, 32756 Detmold (Germany); Neesse, Albrecht; Wilhelm, Christian [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik, Baldingerstrasse, 35033 Marburg/Lahn (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with standard B-mode ultrasound (US) for diagnosis of splenic lymphoma involvement. Methods: From 04/2005 to 10/2008 n = 250 lymphoma patients were investigated by standard B-mode US. A homogeneous splenic echotexture was found in 199 patients (79%). To clarify the benefit of CEUS in this group a pilot series was performed with 16 of the 199 lymphoma patients. All patients with an abnormal splenic echotexture on standard B-Mode US (n = 51) including focal hypoechoic splenic lesions (n = 41) and an inhomogeneous splenic texture (n = 10) were studied by CEUS. CEUS data were retrospectively evaluated. The diagnoses included indolent lymphoma (n = 27), aggressive lymphoma (n = 14), and Hodgkin's disease (n = 10). Number and size of lesions were determined by B-mode US and CEUS. The visualisation of splenic lymphoma involvement by CEUS in comparison to B-mode US was classified as worse, equal, or better. Results: All patients with a homogeneous spleen on B-mode US (n = 16) had no visible focal lesions on CEUS. Study patients with focal lesions (n = 41) had a hypoechoic (n = 22) or isoechoic (n = 19) enhancement during the arterial phase, and a hypoechoic enhancement during the parenchymal phase (n = 41). The visualisation of focal splenic lymphoma was equal (n = 32), better (n = 6), or worse (n = 3). In all study patients with an inhomogeneous spleen on B-mode US (n = 10) no focal lesions were found by CEUS and the value of CEUS therefore was classified as worse. Conclusion: CEUS has no clear advantage for diagnosis of splenic lymphoma involvement.

  13. Splenic irradiation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hukku, S.; Baboo, H.A.; Venkataratnam, S.; Vidyasagar, M.S.; Patel, N.L. (Department of Radiation Therapy, Gujarat Cancer Research Institute, Ahmedabad, India)

    1983-01-01

    Results of splenic irradiation as the initial and only method of treatment are reported in 25 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Peripheral remission was induced in all the patients. Induction was achieved after a short period of 11 to 30 days in the majority of the patients, the longest period being 40 days. Several patients were in remission 9 months after treatment. The results are compared with those obtained by chemotherapy. Some advantages of splenic irradiation over chemotherapy are emphasized.

  14. Periocular capillary hemangioma: management practices in recent years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez JA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Jo Anne Hernandez,1,3,4 Audrey Chia,2 Boon Long Quah,1,2 Lay Leng Seah1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kandang Kerbau Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore; 2Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; 3National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Cardinal Santos Medical Center, San Juan, Manila, Philippines Purpose: To present a case series on the management options for capillary hemangiomas involving the eyelid and orbit. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of clinically diagnosed capillary hemangioma cases involving the periocular region treated at two local eye institutions. The patients' demographics and clinical presentation – including visual acuity, refractive error, periorbital and orbital examinations, and ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings – were reviewed. The clinical progression, modalities of treatment, and treatment outcomes were studied. Results: Sixteen cases of capillary hemangiomas involving the eyelid and orbit were studied. The mean age at consultation was 9.6 months (range: 1 month–72 months. The majority were females (75%, with 50% presenting as upper-eyelid hemangiomas and the remaining as lower-eyelid (38% and glabellar (12% lesions. Combined superficial and deep involvement was common (64%. Cases whose lesions were located at the upper eyelid or superior orbit led to amblyopia (25%. Fifty-six percent of cases (9/16 were managed conservatively, and 44% (7/16 underwent treatment with either single-agent (n = 4 or combined treatments (n = 3. Conclusion: Close monitoring of visual development and prompt institution of amblyopia therapy for children with periocular capillary hemangiomas generally preserve vision. Extensive lesions that affect the visual axis require local and systemic treatments, alone or in combination, in order to reduce the size and impact of lesions on the eyeball, to reduce induced refractive error and

  15. Natural history of splenic vascular abnormalities after blunt injury: A Western Trauma Association multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzaur, Ben L; Dunn, Julie A; Leininger, Brian; Lauerman, Margaret; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanthan; Kaups, Krista; Zamary, Kirellos; Hartwell, Jennifer L; Bhakta, Ankur; Myers, John; Gordy, Stephanie; Todd, Samuel R; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Teicher, Erik; Sperry, Jason; Privette, Alicia; Allawi, Ahmed; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Maung, Adrian A; Davis, Kimberly A; Cogbill, Thomas; Bonne, Stephanie; Livingston, David H; Coimbra, Raul; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2017-12-01

    Following blunt splenic injury, there is conflicting evidence regarding the natural history and appropriate management of patients with vascular injuries of the spleen such as pseudoaneurysms or blushes. The purpose of this study was to describe the current management and outcomes of patients with pseudoaneurysm or blush. Data were collected on adult (aged ≥18 years) patients with blunt splenic injury and a splenic vascular injury from 17 trauma centers. Demographic, physiologic, radiographic, and injury characteristics were gathered. Management and outcomes were collected. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to determine factors associated with splenectomy. Two hundred patients with a vascular abnormality on computed tomography scan were enrolled. Of those, 14.5% were managed with early splenectomy. Of the remaining patients, 59% underwent angiography and embolization (ANGIO), and 26.5% were observed. Of those who underwent ANGIO, 5.9% had a repeat ANGIO, and 6.8% had splenectomy. Of those observed, 9.4% had a delayed ANGIO, and 7.6% underwent splenectomy. There were no statistically significant differences between those observed and those who underwent ANGIO. There were 111 computed tomography scans with splenic vascular injuries available for review by an expert trauma radiologist. The concordance between the original classification of the type of vascular abnormality and the expert radiologist's interpretation was 56.3%. Based on expert review, the presence of an actively bleeding vascular injury was associated with a 40.9% risk of splenectomy. This was significantly higher than those with a nonbleeding vascular injury. In this series, the vast majority of patients are managed with ANGIO and usually embolization, whereas splenectomy remains a rare event. However, patients with a bleeding vascular injury of the spleen are at high risk of nonoperative failure, no matter the strategy used for management. This group may warrant closer observation or

  16. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang; Golzarian, Jafar

    2007-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  17. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  18. Role of pigment epithelium-derived factor in the involution of hemangioma: Autocrine growth inhibition of hemangioma-derived endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Jin [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Science, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jang-Hyuk; Heo, Jong-Ik [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Hui [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Hye Sook [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Tae Hyun, E-mail: psthchoi@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Children’s Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pediatric Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Children’s Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chung-Hyun, E-mail: iamhyun@snu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Science, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Ischemic/Hypoxic Disease Institute, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • PEDF was expressed and induced during the involuting phase of IH. • PEDF inhibited the cell growth of the involuting HemECs in an autocrine manner. • PEDF suppression restored the impaired cell growth of the involuting HemECs. - Abstract: Hemangioma is a benign tumor derived from abnormal blood vessel growth. Unlike other vascular tumor counterparts, a hemangioma is known to proliferate during its early stage but it is followed by a stage of involution where regression of the tumor occurs. The critical onset leading to the involution of hemangioma is currently not well understood. This study focused on the molecular identities of the involution of hemangioma. We demonstrated that a soluble factor released from the involuting phase of hemangioma-derived endothelial cells (HemECs) and identified pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) as an anti-angiogenic factor that was associated with the growth inhibition of the involuting HemECs. The growth inhibition of the involuting HemECs was reversed by suppression of PEDF in the involuting HemECs. Furthermore, we found that PEDF was more up-regulated in the involuting phase of hemangioma tissues than in the proliferating or the involuted. Taken together, we propose that PEDF accelerates the involution of hemangioma by growth inhibition of HemECs in an autocrine manner. The regulatory mechanism of PEDF expression could be a potential therapeutic target to treat hemangiomas.

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical and Radiological Presentations and Management of Blunt Splenic Trauma: A Single Tertiary Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Gaby; Al-Hassani, Ammar; El-Menyar, Ayman; Abdelrahman, Husham; Peralta, Ruben; Ellabib, Mohammed; Al-Jogol, Hisham; Asim, Mohammed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2017-07-12

    BACKGROUND Splenic injury is the leading cause of major bleeding after blunt abdominal trauma. We examined the clinical and radiological presentations, management, and outcome of blunt splenic injuries (BSI) in our institution. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective study of BSI patients between 2011 and 2014 was conducted. We analyzed and compared management and outcome of different splenic injury grades in trauma patients. RESULTS A total of 191 BSI patients were identified with a mean (SD) age of 26.9 years (13.1); 164 (85.9%) were males. Traffic-related accident was the main mechanism of injury. Splenic contusion and hematoma (77.2%) was the most frequent finding on initial computerized tomography (CT) scans, followed by shattered spleen (11.1%), blush (11.1%), and devascularization (0.6%). Repeated CT scan revealed 3 patients with pseudoaneurysm who underwent angioembolization. Nearly a quarter of patients were managed surgically. Non-operative management failed in 1 patient who underwent splenectomy. Patients with grade V injury presented with higher mean ISS and abdominal AIS, required frequent blood transfusion, and were more likely to be FAST-positive (p=0.001). The majority of low-grade (I-III) splenic injuries were treated conservatively, while patients with high-grade (IV and V) BSI frequently required splenectomy (p=0.001). Adults were more likely to have grade I, II, and V BSI, blood transfusion, and prolonged ICU stay as compared to pediatric BSI patients. The overall mortality rate was 7.9%, which is mainly association with traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock; half of the deaths occurred within the first day after injury. CONCLUSIONS Most BSI patients had grade I-III injuries that were successfully treated non-operatively, with a low failure rate. The severity of injury and presence of associated lesions should be carefully considered in developing the management plan. Thorough clinical assessment and CT scan evaluation are crucial for

  1. An incidental ovarian mass: A case of ovarian hemangioma with prominent stromal luteinization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Shirazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of female genital tract. Stromal luteinization in ovarian hemangioma is an uncommon process and the pathogenesis is controversial. In this regard, two hypotheses have been suggested whether luteinization is a reactive process or it is the stimulator for development of ovarian hemangioma. Here, we report a case of a 55-year-old woman who referred to our center due to incidental finding of left ovarian mass in pelvic sonography. Microscopically, the mass showed a mixed cavernous and capillary hemangioma and the peripheral stroma contained several small and large clusters of stromal cells, which were luteinized. It should be noted that an ovarian hemangioma could be associated with stromal luteinization although its pathogenesis is not clearly known. Yet, we believe the stromal luteinization around ovarian hemangioma could be a reactive phenomenon.

  2. Splenic function after angioembolization for splenic trauma in children and adults: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, J A G; van der Steeg, A F W; Zuidema, W P

    2016-03-01

    Splenic artery embolization (SAE), proximal or distal, is becoming the standard of care for traumatic splenic injury. Theoretically the immunological function of the spleen may be preserved, but this has not yet been proven. A parameter for measuring the remaining splenic function must therefore be determined in order to decide whether or not vaccinations and/or antibiotic prophylaxis are necessary to prevent an overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI). A systematic review of the literature was performed July 2015 by searching the Embase and Medline databases. Articles were eligible if they described at least two trauma patients and the subject was splenic function. Description of procedure and/or success rate of SAE was not necessary for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility and the quality of the articles and performed the data extraction. Twelve studies were included, eleven with adult patients and one focusing on children. All studies used different parameters to assess splenic function. None of them reported a OPSI after splenic embolization. Eleven studies found a preserved splenic function after SAE, in both adults and children. All but one studies on the long term effects of SAE indicate a preserved splenic function. However, there is still no single parameter or test available which can demonstrate that unequivocally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of radionuclide techniques for assessment of splenic function and detection of splenic remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Sinha, S.; Sarkar, B.R.; Basu, S.; Ghosh, S.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The spleen is often involved in hematological malignancies; it is also the site of RBC destruction in thalassemia and ITP. In latter cases, splenectomy is often performed and postoperatively, detection of functioning splenic remnants affect the prognosis adversely. In this study, we assessed the usefulness of radionuclide techniques in : a) assessment of splenic function in primarily non-splenic diseases (benign or malignant), and b) detection of splenic remnant after splenectomy. 12 patients of splenomegaly and 5 patients after splenectomy underwent splenic imaging; imaging was performed using both 99m Tc-sulphur colloid (with first pass) and 99m Tc labelled heat denatured RBCs as tracers. Thus splenic perfusion, morphology and RBC trapping functions were all assessed. The colloid images usually matched the RBC images except in 2 cases where photogenic areas (presumably infarcts) were visualized on RBC scans that were missed on colloid scans. Three of the post splenectomy cases revealed functioning splenic remnants, which was also better visualized on RBC scans. It is concluded that radionuclide imaging could be used regularly for assessing function of spleen, or detecting splenic remnants

  4. Hemangioma of the prostate--an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Nørgaard, Nis; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma...... is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography....

  5. Delayed splenic vascular injury after nonoperative management of blunt splenic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Alessandro; Tublin, Mitchell E; Rees, Mitchell A; Nicholas, Dederia H; Sperry, Jason L; Alarcon, Louis H

    2017-05-01

    Delayed splenic vascular injury (DSVI) is traditionally considered a rare, often clinically occult, harbinger of splenic rupture in patients with splenic trauma that are managed conservatively. The purpose of our study was to assess the incidence of DSVI and associated features in patients admitted with blunt splenic trauma and managed nonoperatively. A retrospective analysis was conducted over a 4-y time. Patients admitted with blunt splenic trauma, managed no-operatively and with a follow-up contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan study during admission were included. The CT scans were reviewed for American Association for the Surgery of Trauma splenic injury score, amount of hemoperitoneum, and presence of DSVI. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the risk factors associated with DSVI. A total of 100 patients (60 men and 40 women) constituted the study group. Follow-up CT scan demonstrated a 23% incidence of DSVI. Splenic artery angiography validated DSVI in 15% of the total patient population. Most DSVIs were detected only on arterial phase CT scan imaging. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma splenic injury score (odds ratio = 1.73; P = 0.045) and the amount of hemoperitoneum (odds ratio = 1.90; P = 0.023) on admission CT scan were associated with the development of DSVI on follow-up CT scan. DSVI on follow-up CT scan imaging of patients managed nonoperatively after splenic injury is common and associated with splenic injury score assessed on admission CT scan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Sabri; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Chaudry, Gulraiz [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kozakewich, Harry P. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Fishman, Steven J. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Mulliken, John B. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Infantile hemangiomas demonstrate a pattern of proliferative growth in infancy followed by a slow phase of involution. In contrast a rare type of vascular tumor, intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma, usually presents beyond the period of infancy with nonspecific symptoms and no evidence of involution. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical, imaging, histopathological characteristics and management of intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma. We performed a retrospective review of a 20-year period to identify children diagnosed with intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma. Patient demographics, imaging and histopathological findings were recorded. We included 18 children (10 boys, 8 girls) with histologically proven intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma - and adequate imaging. The mean age at presentation was 8.1 years (range 1 day to 19 years). Twelve lesions involved muscles of the extremities, 4 were located in the trunk and 2 were in the head and neck. MRI had been performed in all children and demonstrated a soft-tissue mass with flow voids, consistent with fast flow. The lesion was well-circumscribed in 16 children and intralesional fat was seen in 14. Doppler US demonstrated a heterogeneous lesion, predominantly isoechoic to surrounding muscle, with enlarged arterial feeders. Enlarged feeding arteries, inhomogeneous blush and lack of arteriovenous shunting were noted on angiography (n = 5). The most common histopathological findings were lobules of capillaries with plump endothelium and at least some adipose tissue. The lesions were excised in six children. Two children were lost to follow-up. In the remaining 10, follow-up MRI studies ranging from 3 months to 10 years showed that the lesion enlarged in proportion to the child (n = 7), demonstrated slow growth (n = 2) or remained stable (n = 1). There was no change in imaging characteristics on follow-up. Intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma is a rare benign vascular tumor of

  7. Epithelioid hemangioma of brachial artery: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragazzi Moira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelioid hemangioma (EH is an uncommon benign vascular lesion, also known as angioblastic lymphoid (or angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia, characterized by an unclear etiopathogenesis.

  8. Managment of superficial infantile capillary hemangiomas with topical timolol maleate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed Ali Raza; Yusuf, Faraz; Sharma, Rajeev; Rizvi, Syed Wajahat Ali

    2015-01-01

    Capillary hemangioma is the most common benign tumor of eyelids and orbit in children. Recently, a topical beta blocker has been reported as an effective treatment for superficial capillary hemangiomas. We present a case report of two children having large capillary hemangiomas who responded well to topical treatment by 0.5% timolol maleate solution. After 12 months of treatment, the lesion has significantly reduced in size, thickness, and color in both cases. Thus, we conclude that long-term use of topical 0.5% timolol maleate solution is safe and effective in treating superficial capillary hemangiomas.

  9. Incremental benefit of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the assessment of a primary pericardial hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisha, Mohammed J; Hsiung, Ming C; Nanda, Navin C; ElKaryoni, Ahmed; Mohamed, Ahmed H; Wei, Jeng

    2017-08-01

    Hemangiomas are rarely found in the heart and pericardial involvement is even more rare. We report a case of primary pericardial hemangioma, in which three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE) provided incremental benefit over standard two-dimensional images. Our case also highlights the importance of systematic cropping of the 3D datasets in making a diagnosis of pericardial hemangioma with a greater degree of certainty. In addition, we also provide a literature review of the features of cardiac/pericardial hemangiomas in a tabular form. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Severe Bleeding: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12, 2017. Jevon P, et al. Part 5 — First-aid treatment for severe bleeding. Nursing Times. 2008;104:26. Oct. 19, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-severe-bleeding/basics/ART-20056661 . Mayo ...

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid —This medication treats heavy menstrual bleeding. • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs—These drugs, which include ibuprofen, may help control heavy bleeding and relieve menstrual cramps. • Antibiotics—If you have an infection, you may be ...

  12. Determinants of splenectomy in splenic injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinkuolie, A A; Lawal, O O; Arowolo, O A; Agbakwuru, E A; Adesunkanmi, A R K

    2010-02-01

    The management of splenic injuries has shifted from splenectomy to splenic preservation owing to the risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI). This study aimed to identify the factors that determine splenectomy in patients with isolated splenic injuries, with a view to increasing the rate of splenic preservation. Files of 55 patients managed for isolated splenic injuries from blunt abdominal trauma between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively analysed using a pro forma. Management options were classified into nonoperative, operative salvage and splenectomy. The majority of patients suffered splenic injury as a result of motor vehicle accident (MVA) trauma or falls. Splenectomy was undertaken in 33 (60%) patients, 12 (22%) had non-operative management, and operative salvage was achieved in 10 (18%) patients. Significant determinants of splenectomy were grade of splenic injury, hierarchy of the surgeon, and hierarchy of the assistant. MVA injury and falls accounted for the vast majority of blunt abdominal trauma in this study. The rate and magnitude of energy transferred versus splenic protective mechanisms at the time of blunt abdominal trauma seems to determine the grade of splenic injury. Interest in splenic salvage surgery, availability of technology that enables splenic salvage surgery, and the experience of the surgeon and assistant appear to determine the surgical management. Legislation on vehicle safety and good parental control may reduce the severity of splenic injury in blunt abdominal trauma. When surgery is indicated, salvage surgery should be considered in intermediate isolated splenic injury to reduce the incidence of OPSI.

  13. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko; Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm

  14. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit blood ...

  15. Intracranial meningeal masson's hemangioma: CT and angiographic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Chi, Je Gen; Han, Man Chung; Cho, Byung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Jip

    1985-01-01

    Masson's hemangioma is a rare benign vascular condition with a papillary intravascular endothelial proliferation which may appear either as a primary form as a secondary form in a pre-existing vascular process. CT and angiographic features of 2 cases with Masson's hemangioma were presented. Both of them were located extra-axially in the posterior fossa. CT findings were not specific in both cases; One showed homogeneously enhancing mass, simulating meningioma. And the other demonstrated a multiocular rim enhancing mass. However, the angiographic features were rather characteristic; Both cases showed persistent vascular poolings of contrast media which were supplied form the meningeal vessels. Angiographic differential diagnosis of similar lesions in the posterior fossa is discussed

  16. Blood group ascription as a genetic marker of hepatic hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polysalov, V.N.; Tarazov, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    There is no single point of view on pathogenesis of hemangiomas. The authors investigated the ABO blood types in 52 patients with hepatic hemangiomas (Group 1) and 1000 control patients (Group 2). The character of changes in the liver was established by means of reontgenoradionuclide investigation methods. The study demonstrated 61.5 % of the A blood type among the patients of Group 1. This was significantly higher than in the Group 2 and representative groups from literature (P < 0.001). Taking into account that the cells of both blood and blood vessels are formed in embryos through the mesenchyma and the heritability of blood group antigens, it is supposed that the results obtained support the genetic determination theory of pathogenesis of hepatic hemangioamas

  17. Lymph node hemangioma in one-humped camel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Aljameel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioma is a benign tumor of blood and lymphatic vessels. It is common in skin, mucosa and soft tissues, and its occurrence in lymph nodes is extremely rare. A 10 year-old she-camel was slaughtered at Nyala slaughterhouse, South Darfur State, Sudan. Grossly, the carcass was emaciated. The left ventral superficial cervical lymph node was enlarged, hard on palpation and protruded outside the body. Its cut surface was dark red in color and measured (18 cm in diameter. Histopathologically, the sections revealed vascular masses were composed of non-encapsulated clusters of small and medium sized with thick and thin-walled, filled with blood, separated by courageous stroma and surrounded by closely packed proliferating capillaries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first record of the left ventral superficial cervical lymph node hemangioma in a camel in the Sudan.

  18. Cavernous hemangioma of the tongue: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are developmental vascular abnormalities and more than 50% of these lesions occur in the head and neck region, with the lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, and palate most commonly involved. They are considered as hamartomas rather than true neoplasms. Here we report a case of hemangioma of the body of the tongue, discussing the diagnostic aspects and treatment modalities of such lesion and emphasizing the role of the color Doppler ultrasonography, especially in the diagnosis and treatment. Factors such as patient′s age, size and site of lesion and the proximity of lesion to vital structure are paramount in the determination of the therapeutic approach and surgical excision. Even though radiotherapy, cryotherapy, laser therapy, medical treatment, injection of sclerosing substances and the selective embolization of the lingual artery seem to have some efficacy, the author conclude that surgery is the therapy of choice in the isolated vascular lesions of the body of the tongue.

  19. Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neira Escobar, Fabian; Chamorro, Flor Medina; Posada Trujillo, Clara Ines

    2008-01-01

    The objective is to analyze the main epidemiological, pathophysiological, clinical,and imagenological aspects of the vascular hemangiomas and vascular malformations, emphasizing the therapeutic options. The vascular hemangiomas and malformations are the most frequent benign tumors in childhood. Their description and classification remain confusing, which makes it difficult to have an adequate approach to the diagnosis and their treatment. The radiologist has to guide the physician through the selection of the appropriate study for each patient, and characterize in detail all the injuries based on the analysis of the diagnostic modalities performed. The role of the interventionist radiologist is crucial as a part of the interdisciplinary group, which has to be involved in the treatment of these patients. Patients with this pathology, sent from medical assistance centers around the country are consulted at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (Cancer Research National Institute). Based on this experience, it shows clinical and imagenological focus for the diagnosis and handling of these injuries.

  20. Splenic trauma management in relation to mode and grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangat, S.A.; Khaskhali, A.A.; Memon, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    To study the prevalence and management of splenic trauma in relation to its mode and grade. All cases admitted in emergency with abdominal trauma and splenic injury. The data of all the patients who had splenic trauma was entered on a proforma and analyzed. A total of 44 patients with ages between 20-40 years presented with splenic injury; 32(72.7%) were male. The commonest mode of splenic trauma was blunt abdominal injury (50%), and most (47%) patients had Grade- III injury. Splenectomy was carried out in 84% patients, while 9% underwent splenic salvage. Seven (15.9%) patients with splenectomy died in the series. Splenic injury was mostly caused by blunt abdominal trauma. Proper assessment of the grade of injury at the time of laparotomy resulted in more splenic salvage procedures with decreased risk of complications. (author)

  1. Open splenectomy for Varicella zoster induced spontaneous splenic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Christopher Sykes

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Atraumatic splenic rupture should be considered as an important differential in those presenting with abdominal pain and peritonism without a history of preceding trauma. Haematological and infectious diagnoses should be sought to identify causation for the splenic rupture.

  2. Comparative analysis of CT and DSA in traumatic splenic salvage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tie; Mao Xinfeng; Pan Feng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the better diagnostic method for acute splenic artery injury through comparative analysis of CT and DSA. Methods: Fifty-seven patients with acute splenic injury were examined by CT and DSA, treated with splenic arterial embolization and then undertook follow up. Results: CT examination possessed higher sensitivity and accuracy than DSA in demonstrating splenic parenchymal laceration, intrasplenic hematoma, subcapsular hematoma, rupture of splenic capsule and combined injury of intra-abdominal organs, especially in localizing splenic laceration. And there was a high significant difference statistically between the two kinds of examination (χ 2 =10.71, P 2 =12.57, P<0.005). Conclusions: CT and DSA are complementary in the diagnosis of splenic injury. After CT confirmation of splenic injury and the patient vital signs being stable, DSA should be referred to as soon as possible for further detail information as well as for possible interventional embolization and reduction of surgical complications. (authors)

  3. The value of MDCT in diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Cong; Liu Cheng; Wang Ximing; Wang Daoping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis and planning the treatment of splenic aneurysms. Methods: Eight cases with splenic artery aneurysms (SAA) were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty four-slice spiral CT scans were performed. Intravenous contrast material was injected at 4 ml/s, and arterial and venous phase images were obtained. Subsequently, arterial phase images were analyzed and made for CT angiography. The diagnosis was made by using axial and reconstructive images. All of the patients were also performed Doppler color echocardiography. Results: All patients showed splenic artery and splenic artery aneurysms clearly with CT arterial phase images. Among them, six patients had splenic artery aneurysms, one had giant splenic artery aneurysms (GSAA) and one had splenic artery pseudoaneurysms. Ultrasound examination only diagnosed six of them. Conclusion: MDCT is a noninvasive and valuable method in diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysms and has high value in determination of treatment plan

  4. The value of MDCT in diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Cong [Shandong University, Shandong Provincial Medical Imaging Institute, Road jing-wu No. 324, Jinan, Shandong 250021 (China)], E-mail: suncong03@163.com; Liu Cheng; Wang Ximing; Wang Daoping [Shandong University, Shandong Provincial Medical Imaging Institute, Road jing-wu No. 324, Jinan, Shandong 250021 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis and planning the treatment of splenic aneurysms. Methods: Eight cases with splenic artery aneurysms (SAA) were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty four-slice spiral CT scans were performed. Intravenous contrast material was injected at 4 ml/s, and arterial and venous phase images were obtained. Subsequently, arterial phase images were analyzed and made for CT angiography. The diagnosis was made by using axial and reconstructive images. All of the patients were also performed Doppler color echocardiography. Results: All patients showed splenic artery and splenic artery aneurysms clearly with CT arterial phase images. Among them, six patients had splenic artery aneurysms, one had giant splenic artery aneurysms (GSAA) and one had splenic artery pseudoaneurysms. Ultrasound examination only diagnosed six of them. Conclusion: MDCT is a noninvasive and valuable method in diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysms and has high value in determination of treatment plan.

  5. A randomized, controlled trial of oral propranolol in infantile hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léauté-Labrèze, Christine; Hoeger, Peter; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Guibaud, Laurent; Baselga, Eulalia; Posiunas, Gintas; Phillips, Roderic J; Caceres, Hector; Lopez Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Ballona, Rosalia; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Powell, Julie; Perek, Danuta; Metz, Brandie; Barbarot, Sebastien; Maruani, Annabel; Szalai, Zsuzsanna Zsofia; Krol, Alfons; Boccara, Olivia; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Febrer Bosch, Maria Isabel; Su, John; Buckova, Hana; Torrelo, Antonio; Cambazard, Frederic; Grantzow, Rainer; Wargon, Orli; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Roessler, Jochen; Bernabeu-Wittel, Jose; Valencia, Adriana M; Przewratil, Przemyslaw; Glick, Sharon; Pope, Elena; Birchall, Nicholas; Benjamin, Latanya; Mancini, Anthony J; Vabres, Pierre; Souteyrand, Pierre; Frieden, Ilona J; Berul, Charles I; Mehta, Cyrus R; Prey, Sorilla; Boralevi, Franck; Morgan, Caroline C; Heritier, Stephane; Delarue, Alain; Voisard, Jean-Jacques

    2015-02-19

    Oral propranolol has been used to treat complicated infantile hemangiomas, although data from randomized, controlled trials to inform its use are limited. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, adaptive, phase 2-3 trial assessing the efficacy and safety of a pediatric-specific oral propranolol solution in infants 1 to 5 months of age with proliferating infantile hemangioma requiring systemic therapy. Infants were randomly assigned to receive placebo or one of four propranolol regimens (1 or 3 mg of propranolol base per kilogram of body weight per day for 3 or 6 months). A preplanned interim analysis was conducted to identify the regimen to study for the final efficacy analysis. The primary end point was success (complete or nearly complete resolution of the target hemangioma) or failure of trial treatment at week 24, as assessed by independent, centralized, blinded evaluations of standardized photographs. Of 460 infants who underwent randomization, 456 received treatment. On the basis of an interim analysis of the first 188 patients who completed 24 weeks of trial treatment, the regimen of 3 mg of propranolol per kilogram per day for 6 months was selected for the final efficacy analysis. The frequency of successful treatment was higher with this regimen than with placebo (60% vs. 4%, P<0.001). A total of 88% of patients who received the selected propranolol regimen showed improvement by week 5, versus 5% of patients who received placebo. A total of 10% of patients in whom treatment with propranolol was successful required systemic retreatment during follow-up. Known adverse events associated with propranolol (hypoglycemia, hypotension, bradycardia, and bronchospasm) occurred infrequently, with no significant difference in frequency between the placebo group and the groups receiving propranolol. This trial showed that propranolol was effective at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram per day for 6 months in the treatment of infantile hemangioma. (Funded by

  6. Splenic mass with remote trauma history: a management dilemma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, C J

    2011-03-02

    BACKGROUND: Delayed presentation of splenic trauma is a well described entity. METHOD: We report two patients who presented with splenic abnormality found incidentally on imaging for other medical problems. A remote history of splenic trauma was elicited during clinical evaluation; 18 months in one patient and 11 years in the second patient. Both patients underwent surgical exploration. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological investigations could not reassure us that the splenic abnormalities were benign, and their management was the subject of some debate.

  7. Splenic mass with remote trauma history: a management dilemma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, C J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Delayed presentation of splenic trauma is a well described entity. METHOD: We report two patients who presented with splenic abnormality found incidentally on imaging for other medical problems. A remote history of splenic trauma was elicited during clinical evaluation; 18 months in one patient and 11 years in the second patient. Both patients underwent surgical exploration. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological investigations could not reassure us that the splenic abnormalities were benign, and their management was the subject of some debate.

  8. Hemangiomas versus arterio-venous malformations: Role of elastic stains and mast cell density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Pawane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Vascular anomalies present diagnostic challenges to histopathologists. Mulliken and Glowacki′s classification categorizes vascular lesions into hemangiomas and vascular malformations. Aim: This study explored diagnostic clues in the histomorphology of hemangiomas and vascular malformations. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 cases of benign vascular lesions were retrieved from 12 years period. A total of 94 cases, where complete clinical details and representative paraffin sections were available, were included in this study. Hematoxylin and eosin (H and E stain and Verhoeff′s stain for elastic tissue were done on all cases and lesions were classified into hemangiomas or arterio-venous malformations (AVM. Mast cell density in all lesions was calculated from toluidine blue stained sections. Results: Ten cases of hemangiomas were reclassified as AVM on the basis of presence and absence of arteriovenous structures. Intra-lesional nerves were seen in significantly higher number of AVMs compared to hemangiomas. Medium and thick sized nerve bundles were seen in 56% of AVMs, while they were not seen in any of the hemangiomas. Mean mast cell density was significantly higher in proliferating hemangiomas (53.12 ± 27.83 cells/mm 2 compared to involuting hemangiomas (11.43 ± 7.9 cells/mm 2 . Conclusions: Use of elastic tissue stains are useful ancillary tools to distinguish between AVMs and hemangiomas. The presence of arteries and arterioles are an integral part of AVMs. The presence of the intra-lesional nerves can be useful to distinguish between AVMs and hemangiomas even on H and E stained sections. The significantly higher mast cell density seen in proliferating hemangiomas compared with involuting ones, seem to suggest that mast cells play an important role in the natural history of these lesions.

  9. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of nasal cavity hemangiomas according to histological type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Park, Sun Won; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Yeo Ju; Lee, Ha Young [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Tae Young [Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Hye [Dept. of Radiology, nha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To compare computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings between two histological types of nasal hemangiomas (cavernous hemangioma and capillary or lobular capillary hemangioma). CT (n = 20; six pre-contrast; 20 post-enhancement) and MRI (n = 7) images from 23 patients (16 men and seven women; mean age, 43 years; range, 13-73 years) with a pathologically diagnosed nasal cavity hemangioma (17 capillary and lobular capillary hemangiomas and six cavernous hemangiomas) were reviewed, focusing on lesion location, size, origin, contour, enhancement pattern, attenuation or signal intensity (SI), and bony changes. The 17 capillary and lobular hemangiomas averaged 13 mm (range, 4-37 mm) in size, and most (n = 13) were round. Fourteen capillary hemangiomas had marked or moderate early phase enhancement on CT, which dissipated during the delayed phase. Four capillary hemangiomas on MRI showed marked enhancement. Bony changes were usually not seen on CT or MRI (seen on five cases, 29.4%). Half of the lesions (2/4) had low SI on T1-weighted MRI images and heterogeneously high SI with signal voids on T2-weighted images. The six cavernous hemangiomas were larger than the capillary type (mean, 20.5 mm; range, 10-39 mm) and most had lobulating contours (n = 4), with characteristic enhancement patterns (three centripetal and three multifocal nodular), bony remodeling (n = 4, 66.7%), and mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement during the early and delayed phases. CT and MRI findings are different between the two histological types of nasal hemangiomas, particularly in the enhancement pattern and size, which can assist in preoperative diagnosis and planning of surgical tumor excision.

  10. Changing treatment of pediatric splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakkasseril, J.S.; Stewart, D.; Cox, J.A.; Gelfand, M.

    1982-01-01

    A review of splenic injuries at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from July 1978 to June 1980 revealed this form of injury in 29 patients. Treatment without surgery was successful in 21 patients. Seven patients required operation. One patient died shortly after admission of severe associated injuries. All patients admitted with blunt abdominal trauma were initially treated conservatively. If the clinical state improved, after transfusions if necessary, or remained stable and there were no objective signs of further blood loss, conservative therapy was continued. Liver-spleen scans were obtained on an urgent basis to confirm the diagnosis of splenic injury in patients who did not undergo surgery. No complications of treatment without surgery were recognized. The satisfactory outcome in these patients suggests that there is a place for treatment without surgery in some children with splenic injury

  11. Changing treatment of pediatric splenic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakkasseril, J.S.; Stewart, D.; Cox, J.A.; Gelfand, M.

    1982-06-01

    A review of splenic injuries at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from July 1978 to June 1980 revealed this form of injury in 29 patients. Treatment without surgery was successful in 21 patients. Seven patients required operation. One patient died shortly after admission of severe associated injuries. All patients admitted with blunt abdominal trauma were initially treated conservatively. If the clinical state improved, after transfusions if necessary, or remained stable and there were no objective signs of further blood loss, conservative therapy was continued. Liver-spleen scans were obtained on an urgent basis to confirm the diagnosis of splenic injury in patients who did not undergo surgery. No complications of treatment without surgery were recognized. The satisfactory outcome in these patients suggests that there is a place for treatment without surgery in some children with splenic injury.

  12. Complicated congenital splenic cyst: Saved by a splenunculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karia Nina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl presented with a large congenital splenic cyst complicated by Salmonella organisms. After failure of conservative management and percutaneous drainage, a splenectomy was performed. An incidental splenunculus was preserved. On follow up the splenunculus had increased to normal splenic size and there was no evidence of Howell-Jolly bodies, suggesting normal splenic function.

  13. Drainage of Splenic Abscess: A Case Report | Kombo | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and was managed by tube drainage. His post operative recovery was uneventful. Conclusion: Tube drainage of the splenic abscess is encouraged if there is easy access to the abscess and there is evidence of residual splenic tissue in the critically ill patient. Key Word: Tube drainage, splenic abscess, splenectomy.

  14. The contemporary management of penetrating splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Regan J; Inaba, Kenji; Okoye, Obi; Pasley, Jason; Teixeira, Pedro G; Esparza, Michael; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2014-09-01

    Selective non-operative management (NOM) is standard of care for clinically stable patients with blunt splenic trauma and expectant management approaches are increasingly utilised in penetrating abdominal trauma, including in the setting of solid organ injury. Despite this evolution of clinical practice, little is known about the safety and efficacy of NOM in penetrating splenic injury. Trauma registry and medical record review identified all consecutive patients presenting to LAC+USC Medical Center with penetrating splenic injury between January 2001 and December 2011. Associated injuries, incidence and nature of operative intervention, local and systemic complications and mortality were determined. During the study period, 225 patients experienced penetrating splenic trauma. The majority (187/225, 83%) underwent emergent laparotomy. Thirty-eight clinically stable patients underwent a deliberate trial of NOM and 24/38 (63%) were ultimately managed without laparotomy. Amongst patients failing NOM, 3/14 (21%) underwent splenectomy while an additional 6/14 (42%) had splenorrhaphy. Hollow viscus injury (HVI) occurred in 21% of all patients failing NOM. Forty percent of all NOM patients had diaphragmatic injury (DI). All patients undergoing delayed laparotomy for HVI or a splenic procedure presented symptomatically within 24h of the initial injury. No deaths occurred in patients undergoing NOM. Although the vast majority of penetrating splenic trauma requires urgent operative management, a group of patients does present without haemodynamic instability, peritonitis or radiologic evidence of hollow viscus injury. Management of these patients is complicated as over half may remain clinically stable and can avoid laparotomy, making them potential candidates for a trial of NOM. HVI is responsible for NOM failure in up to a fifth of these cases and typically presents within 24h of injury. Delayed laparotomy, within this limited time period, did not appear to increase

  15. Imaging of nontraumatic benign splenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Eun Kyung; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Seong Joon [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Lu Ci A [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    The spleen is one of the largest organ in the reticuloendothelial system and plays an important role in the activation of immune response. It is the organ most commonly injured after blunt abdominal trauma, and malignant lesions such as lymphoma, or these due to metastasis, occur not infrequently. Even so, it is ignored even in abdominal ultrasonography. Some benign splenic lesions, however can cause severe symptoms and result in high mortality, and their accurate diagnosis is therefore essential. This study describes the imaging findings and histopathologic features of various nontraumatic benign splenic lesions.

  16. Imaging of nontraumatic benign splenic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Eun Kyung; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Seong Joon; Kim, Lu Ci A

    1999-01-01

    The spleen is one of the largest organ in the reticuloendothelial system and plays an important role in the activation of immune response. It is the organ most commonly injured after blunt abdominal trauma, and malignant lesions such as lymphoma, or these due to metastasis, occur not infrequently. Even so, it is ignored even in abdominal ultrasonography. Some benign splenic lesions, however can cause severe symptoms and result in high mortality, and their accurate diagnosis is therefore essential. This study describes the imaging findings and histopathologic features of various nontraumatic benign splenic lesions

  17. Huang's three-step maneuver shortens the learning curve of laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chang-Ming; Huang, Ze-Ning; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Jun, Lu; Chen, Qi-Yue; Cao, Long-Long; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong

    2017-12-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the difference between the learning curves of different maneuvers in laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy for advanced upper gastric cancer. From January 2010 to April 2014, 53 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy via the traditional-step maneuver (group A) and 53 consecutive patients via Huang's three-step maneuver (group B) were retrospectively analyzed. No significant difference in patient characteristics were found between the two groups. The learning curves of groups A and B were divided into phase 1 (1-43 cases and 1-30 cases, respectively) and phase 2 (44-53 cases and 31-53 cases, respectively). Compared with group A, the dissection time, bleeding loss and vascular injury were significantly decreased in group B. No significant differences in short-term outcomes were found between the two maneuvers. The multivariate analysis indicated that the body mass index, short gastric vessels, splenic artery type and maneuver were significantly associated with the dissection time in group B. No significant difference in the survival curve was found between the maneuvers. The learning curve of Huang's three-step maneuver was shorter than that of the traditional-step maneuver, and the former represents an ideal maneuver for laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy.To shorten the learning curve at the beginning of laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy, beginners should beneficially use Huang's three-step maneuver and select patients with advanced upper gastric cancer with a body mass index of less than 25 kg/m 2 and the concentrated type of splenic artery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Acquired bleeding disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B one marrow aplasia ... Laboratory approach to a suspected acquired bleeding disorder. (LER = leuko- .... lymphocytic leukaemia, and lymphoma). ... cells), a bone marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy (BMAT) is not ..... transplantation.

  19. Small Bowel Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pouchings in the wall of the colon), or cancer. Upper GI (esophagus, stomach, or duodenum) bleeding is most often due ... begins transmitting images of the inside of the esophagus, stomach, and small bowel to a ... Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome ...

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially the progestin-only pill (also called the “mini-pill”) can actually cause abnormal bleeding for some ... Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality ...

  1. Bleeding aneurysms of the celiac trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziviello, M.; D'Isa, L.; Siani, A.; Maglione, F.; Cataldo, B.; Ziviello, R.; Capalbogiliberti, R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience in the study of bleeding aneurysms of the celiac arteries. Eleven patients were examined with US,CT, and angiography (8 hepatic artery aneurysms and 3 splenic artery aneurysms). Clinical findings included digestive bleeding, upper abdominal pain, palpable pulsating masses, and jaundice. Patient history included blunt abdominal trauma, penetrating trauma due to gunshot, acute pancreatitis, recent hepatic biospy. In all cases US showed an abdominal mass ranging in size from 2 to 10 cm. US findings included cyst-like lesions (8 cases), anobulated solid-like lesion, and complex lesion (2 cases). Continuity of the lesion with adjancent arterial vessels was noted in 5/11 cases, and pulsing activity in 3/11 cases. US patterns, although not specific, play an important role in the diagnosis when associated to other elements such as arterial continuity, mass pulsatility, patient history, and gastrointestinal bleeding. They suggest the need for more specific imaging exams, i.e. CT and angiography, and help avoid dangerous diagnostic biopsies. CT was performed to confirm US findings in 5 cases, and detected either hypodense cystic masses, or inhomogeneous masses with arterial enhancement after bolus injection of cm. CT was used to better demonstrate the lumen, patency of the vessel, the walls of the vessel, and the parietal thrombotic component. The typical arterial enhancement was the decisive finding for the diagnosis, even though a total continuity with arterial vessels was never observed. Angiography was the method of choice for the preoperative demonstration of hepatic artery aneurysms (10 cases) and for occlusive treatment with Gianturco coils (3 cases)

  2. Spinal capillary hemangioma involving the lumbar epidural and paraspinal spaces: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Bong Guk; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Chan Kum; Paik, Seung Sam [Hanyang University Medical Center, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Spinal capillary hemangiomas in the epidural space are extremely rare; however, a preoperative radiological diagnosis is very important because of the risk of massive intraoperative hemorrhage. We report a case of a spinal capillary hemangioma involving the lumbar epidural and paraspinal spaces.

  3. Spinal capillary hemangioma involving the lumbar epidural and paraspinal spaces: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Bong Guk; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Chan Kum; Paik, Seung Sam; Park, Dong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal capillary hemangiomas in the epidural space are extremely rare; however, a preoperative radiological diagnosis is very important because of the risk of massive intraoperative hemorrhage. We report a case of a spinal capillary hemangioma involving the lumbar epidural and paraspinal spaces

  4. The value of color Doppler imaging and intralesional steroid injection in pediatric orbital capillary hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Ke

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: The blood flow characteristics of CDI play a vital role in the differentiation of orbital capillary hemangiomas from other orbital lesions. The availability and lack of adverse effects of CDI enable its utilization in the early clinical diagnosis of pediatric orbital capillary hemangioma.

  5. The Effectiveness of Contact Cryotherapy in Treatment of Infantil Hemangiomas - Original Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Taşlıdere

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hemangiomas of infancy are the most common benign tumours of childhood. Cryotherapy is a widely accepted modality for the treatment of hemangiomas of the newborn. However, no studies clearly supporting its effectivity are available. In contrast to an earlier "wait and see" approach to treating hemangiomas in young children, we sought to determine whether these vascular lesions would respond to contact cryosurgery.Methods: Nineteen patients with 25 infantil hemangiomas were included in the study between 2003-2008 years. Patients were treated with contact cryotherapy. All lesions were treated with the same method (double freeze-thaw cycle of 15 seconds.Results: In 15 lesion; 11 (%73.3 lesions healed with full regression, two (%13.3 lesions healed with partially regression, one lession showed no change and one lesion showed progression. Conclusion: Contact cryotherapy has been evaluated as an effective and safe method in infantil hemangiomas.

  6. Hemangioma of the prostate--an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Nørgaard, Nis; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangio...... is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography.......Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma...

  7. Splenectomy for solitary splenic metastasis of ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Yang Seok; Kim, Jung Chul; Cho, Chol Kyoon

    2004-01-01

    Splenic metastases occur in rare cases with a few case reports of patients in the literature. Generally, splenic metastases mean late dissemination of a disease. Solitary splenic metastases from solid tumors are extremely unusual. We report a case of a patient with ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma who underwent splenectomy for isolated parenchymal metastasis. Ovarian epithelial tumors comprised most of isolated splenic metastases from gynecologic tumor. When isolated splenic recurrence is suspected on image studies and serum tumor markers, intraabdominal gross findings should be examined to exclude peritoneal carcinomatosis. If only spleen was under suspicion of recurrence of ovarian cancer, splenectomy may play a therapeutic role

  8. Development of optimal management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to pancreatic sinistral portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of pancreatic sinistral portal hypertension (PSPH is quite different from that of cirrhotic portal hypertension, and PSPH is the only curable type of portal hypertension. Gastric variceal bleeding is a less common manifestation of PSPH; however, it probably exacerbates the patient’s condition and leads to critical illness, and inappropriate management would result in death. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the optimal management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in PSPH patients. Splenectomy is considered as a definitive procedure, together with surgical procedures to treat underlying pancreatic diseases. For patients in poor conditions or ineligible for surgery, splenic artery coil embolization is a preferable and effective method to stop bleeding before second-stage operation. The therapeutic decision should be made individually, and the further multi-center study to optimize the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from PSPH is warranted.

  9. The International Bleeding Risk Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Laine, L.; Dalton, H.

    2017-01-01

    The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding.......The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding....

  10. Surgical management of splenic echinococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meimarakis G

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection of the spleen with echinococcus is a rare clinical entity. Because the diagnosis of a splenic infestation with echinococcus is sometimes delayed, large hydatid cysts or pseudotumors may develop, demanding a differential surgical approach to cure the disease. Methods In a retrospective study 10 patients out of 250 with abdominal echinococcosis (4% were identified to have splenic infestation, either limited to the spleen (n = 4 or with synchronous involvement of the liver (n = 4, major omentum (n = 1, or the liver and lung (n = 1. Only one patient had alveolar echinococcosis whereas the others showed hydatid cysts of the spleen. Surgical therapy included splenectomy in 7 patients or partial cyst excision combined with omentoplasty in 3 patients. In case of liver involvement, pericystectomy was carried out simultaneously. Results There was no mortality. Postoperative complications were observed in 4 patients. Hospital stay and morbidity were not influenced when splenic procedures were combined with pericystectomies of the liver. Mean follow- up was 8.8 years and all of the patients are free of recurrence at this time. Conclusions Splenectomy should be the preferred treatment of hydatid cysts but partial cystectomy is suitable when the cysts are located at the margins of the spleen. Due to low morbidity rates, simultaneous treatment of splenic and liver hydatid cysts is recom mended.

  11. Radiological features of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.E.; Walsh, E.A.; Cramer, B.C.; Pushpanathan, C.C.; Hollett, P.; Ingram, L.; Price, D.

    1996-01-01

    Symptomatic splenic hamartomas are rare in the pediatric age group, with only four previous reports in the literature. Splenic hamartoma has been reported as a solid homogeneous mass without calcification on CT and ultrasound (US), and only one previous report of the findings on MRI has been published. We report a case of a large symptomatic splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old girl who presented with splenomegaly, pancytopenia and growth retardation. A solid mass with multiple punctate foci resembling calcifications was seen on US. The mass was heterogeneous and better demarcated on enhanced CT. Radiocolloid scintigraphy demonstrated uptake within the lesion, but less than that of normal spleen. The mass was isointense relative to normal splenic tissue on T1-weighted MRI (0.5 T) and of increased intensity with T2 weighting. At splenectomy, a red pulp hamartoma was identified, which contained nodules of hyalinization and necrosis thought to account for the punctate foci seen on US. (orig.). With 4 figs

  12. [Splenic abscesses: From diagnosis to therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davido, B; Dinh, A; Rouveix, E; Crenn, P; Hanslik, T; Salomon, J

    2017-09-01

    Splenic abscess is septic collection which occurs after haematogenous spread or local dissemination. Splenic abscess is an uncommon and rare condition, more frequently affecting male and immunocompromised patients. There are no guidelines regarding its diagnosis and management. Computed tomography (CT) scan is highly sensitive and specific (95% and 92%, respectively) in the diagnosis of splenic abscess. Diagnosis is based on blood cultures which are positive in 24 to 80% of cases. Bacterial growth culture of abscess after drainage is more efficient (50-80%) and can be performed after surgery or percutaneous drainage under imaging, including CT scan. Microorganisms involved are frequently enterobacteriaceae, gram-positive cocci and anaerobes. This particular ecology leads to an empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, with a variable duration, from 10days to more than one month. Management remains very close to the one applied in case of liver abscesses. The role of splenectomy in the prevention of recurrence remains controversial. We reviewed the literature regarding splenic abscesses, from diagnosis to therapy. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of splenic iron overload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrive, L.; Thurnher, S.; Hricak, H.; Price, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    The value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in assessing iron overload in the spleen was retrospectively investigated in 40 consecutive patients. MR appearance, mesaure of signal intensity and T1-and T2-relaxation times were correlated with the histologically determined level of iron in the spleen in each patient. Histologic examination revealed no iron overload in 19 patients, mild iron overload in seven, moderate iron overload in six, and severe iron overload in eight. All 19 patients with no splenic iron overload and 11 of the other 21 patients with splenic iron overload were correctly identified by MR imaging (sensitivity 52%, specificity 100%, accuracy 75%). Splenic iron overload was diagnosed when a decrease of signal intensity of the spleen compared with those of adipose tissue and renal cortex was demonstrated. MR images demonstrated all eight cases of severe, three of the six cases of moderate, and none of the seven cases of mild iron overload. Only spleens with severe iron overload had a significant mean decrease in signal intensity and T1- and T2-relaxation times. Although specific, MR imaging is poorly sensitive to splenic iron overload. (author). 15 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Coeliac disease, splenic function, and malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, D A F; Swinson, C M; Hall, R; Losowsky, M S

    1982-01-01

    Blood films from 41 cases of coeliac disease complicated by malignancy were examined and evidence of hyposplenism found in 12 cases (29%). This is similar to the proportion of adult coeliacs without malignancy who have hypoplenism and it is concluded that impaired splenic function is not associated with the development of malignancy in coeliac disease.

  15. Radiological features of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.E. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Walsh, E.A. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Cramer, B.C. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Pushpanathan, C.C. [Department of Pathology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Hollett, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Health Sciences Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Ingram, L. [Department of Pediatrics, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Price, D. [Department of Surgery, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada)

    1996-09-01

    Symptomatic splenic hamartomas are rare in the pediatric age group, with only four previous reports in the literature. Splenic hamartoma has been reported as a solid homogeneous mass without calcification on CT and ultrasound (US), and only one previous report of the findings on MRI has been published. We report a case of a large symptomatic splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old girl who presented with splenomegaly, pancytopenia and growth retardation. A solid mass with multiple punctate foci resembling calcifications was seen on US. The mass was heterogeneous and better demarcated on enhanced CT. Radiocolloid scintigraphy demonstrated uptake within the lesion, but less than that of normal spleen. The mass was isointense relative to normal splenic tissue on T1-weighted MRI (0.5 T) and of increased intensity with T2 weighting. At splenectomy, a red pulp hamartoma was identified, which contained nodules of hyalinization and necrosis thought to account for the punctate foci seen on US. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  16. The long-term hemodynamic changes of liver and spleen after partial splenic embolization for portal hypertension due to cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinyuan; Geng Huijie; Wang Baocai; Zhang Xinfang; Du Ruiqing; Wang Lijing; Yin Shumei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the long-term hemodynamic changes of liver and spleen after partial splenic embolization (PSE) in patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis. Methods: PSE was performed in 1720 patients with portal hypertension and hypersplenism due to cirrhosis. The survival rate of 1 - 5 years and the cause of death were observed. The preoperative and postoperative hemodynamics of both the liver and spleen, the blood picture, splenic size and the complications in 600 patients who survived over five years and had integrated document were retrospectively analyzed and compared. Results Obvious changes in hemodynamics at different time after PSE were seen. The frequency and the volume of gastrointestinal bleeding were obviously decreased, while the leucocyte and platelet count was markedly increased. The spleen size began to reduce two months after PSE, which became very obvious in three months. The difference in above items between pre-PSE and post-PSE was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: PSE can definitely improve hepatic and splenic hemodynamics, reduce the pressure of portal vein, alleviate hypersplenism and reduce the occurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding, elongate the life span and improve the living quality. With obvious and reliable long-term efficacy and fewer complications, PSE is a minimallyinvasive, safe and effective therapy. (authors)

  17. Splenic artery ligature associated with endoscopic banding for schistosomal portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaneri, Renata Potonyacz; Coelho, Fabrício Ferreira; de Cleva, Roberto; Perini, Marcos Vinícius; Herman, Paulo

    2014-11-28

    To propose a less invasive surgical treatment for schistosomal portal hypertension. Ten consecutive patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis and portal hypertension with a history of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage from esophageal varices rupture were evaluated in this study. Patients were subjected to a small supraumbilical laparotomy with the ligature of the splenic artery and left gastric vein. During the procedure, direct portal vein pressure before and after the ligatures was measured. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed at the 30(th) postoperative day, when esophageal varices diameter were measured and band ligature performed. During follow-up, other endoscopic procedures were performed according to endoscopy findings. There was no intra-operative mortality and all patients had confirmed histologic diagnoses of schistosomal portal hypertension. During the immediate postoperative period, two of the ten patients had complications, one characterized by a splenic infarction, and the other by an incision hematoma. Mean hospitalization time was 4.1 d (range: 2-7 d). Pre- and post-operative liver function tests did not show any significant changes. During endoscopy thirty days after surgery, a decrease in variceal diameters was observed in seven patients. During the follow-up period (57-72 mo), endoscopic therapy was performed and seven patients had their varices eradicated. Considering the late postoperative evaluation, nine patients had a decrease in variceal diameters. A mean of 3.9 endoscopic banding sessions were performed per patient. Two patients presented bleeding recurrence at the late postoperative period, which was controlled with endoscopic banding in one patient due to variceal rupture and presented as secondary to congestive gastropathy in the other patient. Both bleeding episodes were of minor degree with no hemodynamic consequences or need for blood transfusion. Ligature of the splenic artery and left gastric vein with supraumbilical

  18. Overview of Nonoperative Blunt Splenic Injury Management with Associated Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Chet A; Gross, Brian W; Kauffman, Matthew; Rittenhouse, Katelyn J; Rogers, Frederick B

    2017-06-01

    The delayed development of splenic artery pseudoaneurysm (SAP) can complicate the nonoperative management of splenic injuries. We sought to determine the utility of repeat imaging in diagnosing SAP in patients managed nonoperatively without angioembolization. We hypothesized that a significant rate of SAPs would be found in this population on repeat imaging. Patients undergoing nonoperative splenic injury management from January 2011 to June 2015 were queried from the trauma registry. Rates of repeat imaging, angioembolization, readmission, and SAP development were analyzed. Further, subanalyses investigating the incidence of SAP in patients managed nonoperatively without angioembolization were conducted. A total of 133 patients met inclusion criteria. Repeat imaging rate was 40 per cent, angioembolization rate was 26 per cent, and readmission rate was 6 per cent. Within the study population, nine SAPs were found (8/9 in patients with splenic injury grade ≥III). Of these nine SAPs, three (33%) were identified on initial scans and embolized, whereas six (67%) were found on repeat imaging in patients not initially receiving angioembolization. Splenic injuries are typically managed nonoperatively without serious complications. Our results suggest patients with splenic injuries grade ≥III managed nonoperatively without angioembolization should have repeat imaging within 48 hours to rule out the possibility of SAP.

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Features of Iris Racemose Hemangioma in 4 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jason L; Sioufi, Kareem; Ferenczy, Sandor; Say, Emil Anthony T; Shields, Carol L

    2017-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows visualization of iris racemose hemangioma course and its relation to the normal iris microvasculature. To describe OCTA features of iris racemose hemangioma. Descriptive, noncomparative case series at a tertiary referral center (Ocular Oncology Service of Wills Eye Hospital). Patients diagnosed with unilateral iris racemose hemangioma were included in the study. Features of iris racemose hemangioma on OCTA. Four eyes of 4 patients with unilateral iris racemose hemangioma were included in the study. Mean patient age was 50 years, all patients were white, and Snellen visual acuity was 20/20 in each case. All eyes had sectoral iris racemose hemangioma without associated iris or ciliary body solid tumor on clinical examination and ultrasound biomicroscopy. By anterior segment OCT, the racemose hemangioma was partially visualized in all cases. By OCTA, the hemangioma was clearly visualized as a uniform large-caliber vascular tortuous loop with intense flow characteristics superimposed over small-caliber radial iris vessels against a background of low-signal iris stroma. The vascular course on OCTA resembled a light bulb filament (filament sign), arising from the peripheral iris (base of light bulb) and forming a tortuous loop on reaching its peak (midfilament) near the pupil (n = 3) or midzonal iris (n = 1), before returning to the peripheral iris (base of light bulb). Intravenous fluorescein angiography performed in 1 eye depicted the iris hemangioma; however, small-caliber radial iris vessels were more distinct on OCTA than intravenous fluorescein angiography. Optical coherence tomography angiography is a noninvasive vascular imaging modality that clearly depicts the looping course of iris racemose hemangioma. Optical coherence tomography angiography depicted fine details of radial iris vessels, not distinct on intravenous fluorescein angiography.

  20. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohmer, Steven J.; Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-01-01

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  1. CT assessment of normal splenic size in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.; Cavouras, D.

    1994-01-01

    The size of the normal spleen was estimated by CT in 153 children, examined with indication unrelated to splenic disease. In each patient the width, thickness, length and volume of the spleen were calculated. Measurements were also normalized to the transverse diameter of the body of the first lumbar vertebra. The spleen underwent significant growth during the first 4 years of life and reached maximum size at the age of 13. There were no differences in splenic volume between boys and girls. Splenic thickness correlated best with normal splenic volume. The strongest correlation was also found between splenic thickness and volume in a group of 45 children with clinically evident splenomegaly. Splenic thickness, an easy-to-use measurement, may be employed in everyday practice to represent splenic volume on CT. (orig.)

  2. Double splenic artery pseudoaneurysm with pancreatic pseudocyst: A therapeutic stalemate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Satheesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm is a rare but a potentially fatal complication associated with chronic pancreatitis. The presence of concomitant aneurysms has been reported rarely and poses a therapeutic challenge owing to the technical difficulty in accessing the distal aneurysm by endovascular means and increased chances of rupture and bleeding. Here, we report an unusual presentation of simultaneous occurrence of two pseudoaneurysms on the splenic artery (SA. A 50-year-old male, a known case of chronic pancreatitis, presented with acute abdomen and a pulsating epigastric lump. A diagnosis of double pseudoaneurysm of SA with a concomitant pseudocyst was made based on contrast-enhanced computed tomography and was confirmed by angiography. The endovascular coil embolization by the standard sandwich-technique was expected to increase the risk of expansion and rupture of the distal pseudoaneurysm, and hence was managed by adapting a modified endovascular technique, following which patient made uneventful recovery. Double pseudoaneurysm of SA associated with chronic pancreatitis is an unusual presentation. Conventional endovascular treatment used for single aneurysm may not be feasible in the presence of two aneurysms, and it needs to be tailored according to the physical site, size, and the anatomy of the vasculature associated with the aneurysms.

  3. Blunt splenic trauma: Assessment, management and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Matbouly, Moamena; Jabbour, Gaby; El-Menyar, Ayman; Peralta, Ruben; Abdelrahman, Husham; Zarour, Ahmad; Al-Hassani, Ammar; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-02-01

    The approach for diagnosis and management of blunt splenic injury (BSI) has been considerably shifted towards non-operative management (NOM). We aimed to review the current practice for the evaluation, diagnosis and management of BSI. A traditional narrative literature review was carried out using PubMed, MEDLINE and Google scholar search engines. We used the keywords "Traumatic Splenic injury", "Blunt splenic trauma", "management" between December 1954 and November 2014. Most of the current guidelines support the NOM or minimally approaches in hemodynamically stable patients. Improvement in the diagnostic modalities guide the surgeons to decide the timely management pathway Though, there is an increasing shift from operative management (OM) to NOM of BSI; NOM of high grade injury is associated with a greater rate of failure, prolonged hospital stay, risk of delayed hemorrhage and transfusion-associated infections. Some cases with high grade BSI could be successfully treated conservatively, if clinically feasible, while some patients with lower grade injury might end-up with delayed splenic rupture. Therefore, the selection of treatment modalities for BSI should be governed by patient clinical presentation, surgeon's experience in addition to radiographic findings. About one-fourth of the blunt abdominal trauma accounted for BSI. A high index of clinical suspicion along with radiological diagnosis helps to identify and characterize splenic injuries with high accuracy and is useful for timely decision-making to choose between OM or NOM. Careful selection of NOM is associated with high success rate with a lower rate of morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of pediatric splenic injuries in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lindsay A; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2012-03-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injuries has become the standard of care in hemodynamically stable children. This study compares the management of these injuries between pediatric and nonpediatric hospitals in Canada. Data were obtained from the Canadian Institute of Health Information trauma database on all patients aged 2 to 16 years, admitted to a Canadian hospital with a diagnosis of splenic injury between May 2002 and April 2004. Variables included age, sex, associated major injuries, splenic procedures, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, blood transfusions, and length of stay. Hospitals were coded as pediatric or nonpediatric. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to determine associations between hospital type and outcomes. Of 1284 cases, 654 were managed at pediatric hospitals and 630 at nonpediatric centers. Patients at pediatric centers tended to be younger and more likely to have associated major injuries. Controlling for covariates, including associated major injuries, patients managed at pediatric centers were less likely to undergo splenectomy compared with those managed at nonpediatric centers (odds ratio [OR], 0.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.4). The risk of receiving blood products, admission to the ICU, and staying in hospital for more than 5 days was associated only with having associated major injuries. Even in the presence of other major injuries, successful NOM of blunt splenic injuries occurs more frequently in pediatric hospitals in Canada. This has policy relevance regarding education of adult surgeons about the appropriateness of NOM in children and developing guidelines on appropriate regional triaging of pediatric patients with splenic injury in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wedge-shaped parenchymal enhancement peripheral to the hepatic hemangioma : two-phase spiral CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Ah Young; Lee, Hyun Ju; Song, Chi Sung; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2000-01-01

    To determine the incidence of hepatic hemangiomas associated with wedge-shaped parenchymal enhancements adjacent to the tumors as seen on two-phase spiral CT images obtained during the hepatic arterial phase and to characterize the two-phase spiral CT findings of those hemangiomas. One hundred and eight consecutive hepatic hemangiomas in 63 patients who underwent two-phase spiral CT scanning during an 11-month period were included in this study. Two-phase spiral CT scans were obtained during the hepatic arterial phase (30-second delay) and portal venous phase (65-second delay) after injection of 120 mL of contrast material at a rate of 3 mL/sec. We evaluated the frequency with which wedge-shaped parenchymal enhancement was adjacent to the hemangiomas during the hepatic arterial phase and divided hemangiomas into two groups according to whether or not wedge-shaped parenchymal enhancement was noted (Group A and Group B). The presence of such enhancement in hemangiomas was correlated with tumor size and the grade of intratumoral enhancement. In 24 of 108 hemangiomas, wedge-shaped parenchymal enhancement adjacent to hepatic tumors was seen on two-phase CT images obtained during the hepatic arterial phase. Mean hemangioma size was 22mm in group A and 24mm in group B. There was no statistically significant relationship between lesion size and the presence of wedge-shaped parenchymal enhancement adjacent to a hemangioma. In 91.7% and 100% of tumors in Group A, and in 9.6% and 17.8% in Group B, hemangiomas showed more than 50% intratumoral enhancement during the arterial and portal venous phase, respectively. Wedge-shaped parenchymal enhancements peripheral to hepatic hemangiomas was more frequently found in tumors showing more than 50% intratumoral enhancement during these two phases (p less than 0.01). Wedge-shaped parenchymal enhancements is not uncommonly seen adjacent to hepatic hemangiomas on two-phase spiral CT images obtained during the hepatic arterial phase. A

  6. Epithelioid hemangioma of the colon: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Nonose

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Epithelioid hemangioma or angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia is an uncommon benign vascular neoplasm that is usually located on the face or neck. Exceptionally, it has been described affecting the colon, with only two such cases described in the worldwide literature. The aim here was to present a case of primary epithelioid hemangioma of the sigmoid colon with confirmation by immunohistochemical examination. CASE REPORT: A 37-year-old woman had had a complaint of intermittent abdominal pain for six months. Two months after the condition started, she began to present changes in her intestinal habit, with evacuations containing blood and mucus and a weight loss of 4 kg over this period. At physical examination, a palpable mass was noted in the lower left quadrant of the abdomen. Neoplasia of the colon was clinically suspected and she underwent colonoscopy. This demonstrated the presence of a vegetating sessile lesion of approximately 5 cm in diameter, at a distance of 36 cm from the anal margin. It occupied 80% of the intestinal lumen. A biopsy collected during the examination suggested a diagnosis of neoplasia of vascular origin. After surgical resection, histopathological examination of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioid hemangioma of the colon, which was backed up by the immunohistochemical panel (factor VIII, Ki-67, CD-34. At present, three years after the surgery, the patient is asymptomatic, she has recovered her normal weight and she has normal findings from control colonoscopy. Despite the rarity of neoplasia of vascular origin, this possibility should be considered in the differential diagnosis for colorectal tumors.

  7. Impact of Splenic Artery Embolization on the Success Rate of Nonoperative Management for Blunt Splenic Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlies, C. H. van der; Hoekstra, J.; Ponsen, K. J.; Reekers, J. A.; Delden, O. M. van; Goslings, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nonoperative management (NOM) has become the treatment of choice for hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injury. Results of outcome after NOM are predominantly based on large-volume studies from level 1 trauma centers in the United States. This study was designed to assess the results of NOM in a relatively low-volume Dutch level 1 trauma center. Methods: An analysis of a prospective trauma registry was performed for a 6-year period before (period 1) and after the introduction and implementation of splenic artery embolization (SAE) (period 2). Primary outcome was the failure rate of initial treatment. Results: A total of 151 patients were reviewed. An increased use of SAE and a reduction of splenic operations during the second period was observed. Compared with period 1, the failure rate after observation in period 2 decreased from 25% to 10%. The failure rate after SAE in period 2 was 18%. The splenic salvage rate (SSR) after observation increased from 79% in the first period to 100% in the second period. During the second period, all patients with failure after observation were successfully treated with SAE. The SSR after SAE in periods 1 and 2 was respectively 100% and 86%. Conclusions: SAE of patients with blunt splenic injuries is associated with a reduction in splenic operations. The failure and splenic salvage rates in this current study were comparable with the results from large-volume studies of level 1 trauma centers. Nonoperative management also is feasible in a relatively low-volume level 1 trauma center outside the United States.

  8. Adrenal cavernous hemangioma: MRI, CT, and US appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marotti, M.; Sucic, Z.; Krolo, I.; Dimanovski, J.; Klaric, R.; Ferencic, Z.; Karapanda, N.; Babic, N.; Pavlekovic, K.

    1997-01-01

    Two cases of rare adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are reported, one imaged with conventional X-ray techniques, US, CT, and MRI, and the other with US and CT. The CT technique clearly demonstrated calcifications and the internal structure of the lesions in both cases and peripheral rim enhancement on the postcontrast scan in one patient. Although MRI demonstrated accurately the complex nature of the lesion, the inability to visualize the calcified areas do not allow to make a specific histologic diagnosis. (orig.). With 8 figs

  9. Transvenous sclerotherapy of peripheral arteriovenous malformations and hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.W.; Moradian, G.P.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Amplantz, K.

    1989-01-01

    After exsanguination of the lesion and control of arterial inflow and venous outflow, the authors used a transvenous or direct puncture technique for injection of a sclerosing solution (3% sotradecol and ionic contrast material) to treat 18 patients with peripheral arteriovenous malformations or hemangiomas. The results are discussed. Good results were achieved in 12 patients. The other six patients had residual symptoms. Multiple treatment sessions were usually necessary. Short-term management included the use of intravenous heparin, steroids, and antibiotics. No significant long-term complications occurred. Short-term complications, including swelling, local pain, blistering, and localized deep venous thrombosis, occurred in 70% of the patients

  10. Detection of small size hepatic hemangioma with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mana, O.; Zatta, G.; Boccolari, S.; Gallazzi, M.; Tarolo, G.L.; Pisani, A.

    1985-01-01

    A case of a patient with hepatic hemangioma was studied by non-invasive methods. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) studies were able to detect some lesions, but not ascertain the diagnosis. Planar scintigraphy both with 99m Tc-sulfur colloid and with in vivo labelled RBC's did not show the lesions, while single-photon emission tomography (blood pool and sulfur colloid) pointed out their presence and allowed to achieve a correct diagnosis for the biggest lesion (2.5 cm in diameter)

  11. An interesting case of angiogenesis in cavernous hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavernous hemangioma is the most common orbital tumor in adult. There is lot of literatures for clinicopathological features of this tumor. These tumors had been studied for the model of angiogenesis in many of the experimental setups. We present a case of 34-year-old male with this tumor in the left eye with computerized tomography evidence. Postsurgical laboratory findings gave interesting evidence of tumor angiogenesis with tumor endothelial cells and sprouting of the small vessels endothelial cells. Podosome rosette could be conceptualized from the characteristic patterns seen in the tumor.

  12. Large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign: A case report

    KAUST Repository

    YANG, GUANG

    2014-05-13

    The present study reports a rare case of large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign. A 57-year-old female presented with pulsatile tinnitus and episodic vertigo associated with a ten-year history of an intermittent faint headache. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the right petrous bone, which was hypointense on T1-weighted images and heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and showed a dural tail sign following gadolinium administration. Pre-operatively, this tumor was believed to be a meningioma. During surgery, the vascular tumor was removed by a modified pterional approach. A histopathological examination indicated that the tumor was a capillary hemangioma. Although intraosseous capillary hemangiomas are rare, they most frequently affect the temporal bone. Hemangiomas of the temporal bone may mimic other more common basal tumors. The diagnosis is most often made during surgical resection. The dural tail sign is not specific for meningioma, as it also occurs in other intracranial or extracranial tumors. The treatment of intratemporal hemangiomas is complete surgical excision, with radiotherapy used for unresectable lesions. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the fourth case of intraosseous intracranial capillary hemangioma, but the largest intratemporal hemangioma to be reported in the literature to date.

  13. Large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign: A case report

    KAUST Repository

    YANG, GUANG; LI, CHENGUANG; CHEN, XIN; LIU, YAOHUA; HAN, DAYONG; Gao, Xin; KAWAMOTO, KEIJI; ZHAO, SHIGUANG

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports a rare case of large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign. A 57-year-old female presented with pulsatile tinnitus and episodic vertigo associated with a ten-year history of an intermittent faint headache. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the right petrous bone, which was hypointense on T1-weighted images and heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and showed a dural tail sign following gadolinium administration. Pre-operatively, this tumor was believed to be a meningioma. During surgery, the vascular tumor was removed by a modified pterional approach. A histopathological examination indicated that the tumor was a capillary hemangioma. Although intraosseous capillary hemangiomas are rare, they most frequently affect the temporal bone. Hemangiomas of the temporal bone may mimic other more common basal tumors. The diagnosis is most often made during surgical resection. The dural tail sign is not specific for meningioma, as it also occurs in other intracranial or extracranial tumors. The treatment of intratemporal hemangiomas is complete surgical excision, with radiotherapy used for unresectable lesions. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the fourth case of intraosseous intracranial capillary hemangioma, but the largest intratemporal hemangioma to be reported in the literature to date.

  14. Pattern of Venous Collateral Development after Splenic Vein Occlusion in an Extended Whipple Procedure (Whipple at the Splenic Artery) and Long-Term Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Ismael Dominguez; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Sanchez, Luis A; Fields, Ryan C; Hawkins, William G; Strasberg, Steven M

    2017-03-01

    Extended Whipple procedures may require division of the splenic vein (SV). Controversy exists regarding the risk of sequelae of sinistral portal hypertension when the SV is ligated without reimplantation. The aim of this study was to identify postoperative venous collateral patterns and sequelae of SV ligation, as well as long-term results in an extended Whipple procedure. Patients who had an extended Whipple procedure (Whipple at the Splenic Artery or WATSA) were entered in an institutional database. Evaluation of the venous collaterals was performed at least 5 months postoperatively by imaging. Spleen size and platelet counts were measured before and after operation. Fifteen patients were entered from 2009 to 2014. SV was not reconstructed and the IMV-SV junction was always resected. Two collateral routes developed. An inferior route was present 14/15 patients. It connected the residual SV to the SMV via intermediate collateral veins in the omentum and along the colon. A superior route, present in 10/15 patients connected the residual SV to the portal vein via gastric, perigastric, and coronary veins. Gastrointestinal bleeding did not occur. Mean platelet count and spleen size were not affected significantly. Procedures were long, but few severe complications developed. In 12 patients with adenocarcinoma, the median survival has not been reached. Patients who have SV ligation in an extended Whipple are protected against sequelae of sinestral portal hypertension by inferior collateral routes. The omentum and marginal veins of the colon are key links in this pathway.

  15. Transcatheter Splenic Artery Occlusion for Treatment of Splenic Artery Steal Syndrome After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uflacker, Renan; Selby, J. Bayne; Chavin, Kenneth; Rogers, Jeffrey; Baliga, Prabhakar

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To review some aspects of the problem of splenic artery steal syndrome as cause of ischemia in transplanted livers and treatment by selective splenic artery occlusion. Materials and Methods: Eleven liver transplant patients from a group of 350 patients, nine men and two women,ranging in age from 40 years to 61 years (mean 52 years), presented with biochemical evidences of liver ischemia and failure, ranging from one to 60 days following orthotopic liver transplantation. Diagnosis of splenic artery steal syndrome was suspected by elevated enzymes, Doppler ultrasound and confirmed by celiac angiogram. Patients with confirmed hepatic artery thrombosis before angiography were excluded from the study. Embolization with Gianturco coils was performed. Results: All patients were treated by splenic artery embolization with Gianturco coils. The 11 patients improved clinically within 24 hours of the procedure with significant change in the biochemical and clinical parameters. Followup ranged from one month to two years. One of the 11 patient initially improved, but developed hepatic artery thrombosis within 24 hours of the embolic treatment,requiring surgical repair. Conclusion: Splenicartery steal syndrome following liver transplantation surgery can be diagnosed by celiac angiography, and effectively treated by splenic artery embolization with coils. Embolization is one of the treatments available, it is minimally invasive, and leads to immediate clinical improvement. Hepatic artery thrombosis is a possible complication of the procedure

  16. Anastomosing hemangioma involving the para-arotic region: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Min; KIm, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Sang Won; Won, Kyu Yeoun

    2017-01-01

    Anastomosing hemangioma (AH) is a rare and benign vascular neoplasm that is regarded as a morphological variant of capillary hemangioma. AH has been encountered primarily in the kidney. To our knowledge, para-aortic involvement of AH has not been reported previously. Here, we report a case of slowly progressing AH involving the left para-aortic region in a 72-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer surgery. A contrast-enhanced, dynamic abdominal CT scan revealed that the lesion had peripheral enhancement with slow centripetal fashion, which is an enhancement pattern similar to that of hepatic hemangioma

  17. Anastomosing hemangioma involving the para-arotic region: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; KIm, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Sang Won; Won, Kyu Yeoun [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Anastomosing hemangioma (AH) is a rare and benign vascular neoplasm that is regarded as a morphological variant of capillary hemangioma. AH has been encountered primarily in the kidney. To our knowledge, para-aortic involvement of AH has not been reported previously. Here, we report a case of slowly progressing AH involving the left para-aortic region in a 72-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer surgery. A contrast-enhanced, dynamic abdominal CT scan revealed that the lesion had peripheral enhancement with slow centripetal fashion, which is an enhancement pattern similar to that of hepatic hemangioma.

  18. Research progress in hepatic cavernous hemangiomas: a comprehensive review with graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yong; Zhang Xuejun; Ouyang Xuehui; Chao Lumeng

    2012-01-01

    The common benign tumor of the liver, cavernous hemangioma, has already been confirmed, both embryologically and pathologically, to be not a neoplasm, but a congenital vascular malformation of the liver which is resulted from the arrested development of hepatic sinusoids at embryologic stage. This paper aims to make a comprehensive description of the cavernous hemangiomas of the liver, including the lesion's blood supply, the hemodynamics, the imaging features, the classification and its interventional therapy. The relevant example illustrations, figures and graphics are accompanied with the text in order to provide the readers with an complete and up-to-date understanding of the hepatic cavernous hemangiomas. (authors)

  19. Splenic flexure volvulus presenting with gangrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Norman O; Chopra, Pradeep J; Subramanian, Sureshkannan K

    2009-01-01

    Volvulus of the splenic flexure is very rare cause of colonic obstruction constituting 2% of cases of colonic segmental volvulus. Primary splenic flexure volvulus (SFV) is due to congenital absence or laxity of the phrenocolic, gastro colic, and splenocolic ligaments while secondary volvulus is due to other causes including some prior surgery releasing these ligaments. A preoperative diagnosis can be established based on the characteristic radiological findings on plain x-ray abdomen and CT scan. We present a case of SFV in a young man who presented with acute abdominal pain, and distension, and illustrate the usefulness of CT scan, and plain x-ray of the abdomen in making a preoperative diagnosis. Laparotomy revealed a gangrenous SFV, which was resected and primary anastomosis was carried out. Literature is reviewed with regards to predisposing factors, presentation, investigation, and management among the more than 32 cases reported so far. (author)

  20. Endovascular treatment of ruptured splenic artery aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Ole Steen

    2008-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms (SAA) are traditionally treated surgically, but endovascular techniques are becoming increasingly popular. A 64 year-old male with chest pain and low blood pressure was admitted under suspicion of AMI. A CT scan showed a 56 mm SAA with signs of rupture. The patient...... was treated with endovascular embolisation of the SAA with coils. Blood pressure and haemoglobin levels were stabilized and the patient was discharged. In the case of rupture the treatment of choice seems to be endovascular....

  1. Nasal glial heterotopia or congenital hemangioma? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartizien, R; Durand, C; Blaise, S; Morand, B

    2017-10-01

    Nasal glial heterotopia (NGH) is a rare benign tumor of the median line. We describe the case of a child presenting a lateral nasal mass. The characteristics of the prenatal ultrasound and the postnatal clinical examination argued in favor of a congenital hemangioma (CH). The MRI performed at 6 weeks of life suggested glial heterotopia. This diagnosis was confirmed by the pathological analysis. Congenital hemangiomas and nasal glial heterotopies have similar clinical presentations. Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis between NGH and CH is difficult. Fetal MRI is not yet highly specific for these two lesions, but it can eliminate an intracerebral connection in cases of NGH. Postnatal exams are more specific. Flow on the Doppler exam is rapid for CH and slow for NGH. On MRI, these two lesions appear as a hypersignal on T2-weighted sequences, but less intense for NGH than for CH. Distinguishing between NGH and CH can be difficult. This does not have a direct incidence on treatment because it is surgical in both cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Subretinal Hemorrhage after Photodynamic Therapy for Juxtapapillary Retinal Capillary Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Baba

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old Japanese woman presented with a juxtapapillary retinal capillary hemangioma (RCH in her left eye. Twelve months after the initial examination, the size of the hemangioma had increased and the exudation from the RCH involved the macula. Her best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA had decreased from 0.8 to 0.3. A total of five intravitreal injections of bevacizumab (IVB; 1.25 mg was given but the RCH did not respond. A photodynamic therapy (PDT was done using multiple laser spots to avoid damaging the optic nerve head. After the first PDT, the subfoveal fluid was reduced but not completely gone. One week after the second PDT, a massive subretinal hemorrhage developed. The subretinal hemorrhage was successfully displaced by injecting intraocular sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 gas. At the 3-year follow-up examination, no subretinal hemorrhage or fluid was observed at the macula and the BCVA remained at 0.05. Our case was resistant to the combination of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and PDT and had a rare massive subretinal hemorrhage. A further collection of RCH cases treated with anti-VEGF and PDT that would justify this treatment is necessary.

  3. Management and outcome of bleeding pseudoaneurysm associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Yi-Yin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A bleeding pseudoaneurysm in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a rare and potentially lethal complication. Optimal treatment of bleeding peripancreatic pseudoaneurysm remains controversial. This study reports on experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH in managing of bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis. Methods The medical records of 9 patients (8 males and 1 female; age range, 28 – 71 years; median, 36 years with bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis treated at CGMH between Aug. 1992 and Sep. 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Alcohol abuse (n = 7;78% was the predominant predisposing factor. Diagnoses of bleeding pseudoaneurysms were based on angiographic (7/7, computed tomographic (4/7, ultrasound (2/5, and surgical (2/2 findings. Whether surgery or angiographic embolization was performed was primarily based on patient clinical condition. Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 4 – 87 months. Results Abdominal computed tomography revealed bleeding pseudoaneurysms in 4 of 7 patients (57%. Angiography determined correct diagnosis in 7 patients (7/7, 100%. The splenic artery was involved in 5 cases, the pancreaticoduodenal artery in 2, the gastroduodenal artery in 1, and the middle colic artery in 1. Initial treatment was emergency (n = 4 or elective (n = 3 surgery in 7 patients and arterial embolization in 2. Rebleeding was detected after initial treatment in 3 patients. Overall, 5 arterial embolizations and 9 surgical interventions were performed; the respective rates of success of these treatments were 20% (1/5 and 89% (8/9. Five patients developed pseudocysts before treatment (n = 3 or following intervention (n = 2. Pseudocyst formation was identified in 2 of the 3 rebleeding patients. Five patients underwent surgical treatment for associated pseudocysts and bleeding did not recur. One patient died from angiography-related complications. Overall mortality

  4. CT of splenic and perisplenic abnormalities in septic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balthazar, E.J.; Hilton, S.; Naidich, D.; Megibow, A.; Levine, R.

    1985-01-01

    Splenic and perisplenic pathology, demonstrated by CT examination in 14 septic patients, was correlated with the clinical course and with surgical and pathologic findings available. Twelve patients were intravenous drug addicts and two patients developed bacteremia associated with bacterial endocarditis. The CT fingings were divided into three groups: (1) Single wedge-shaped peripherally located defects were seen in five patients; there was good response to medical therapy without other complications. (2) Larger and/or multiple, rounded or oval lesions were present in five patients; two of these patients had splenic abscesses proven on subsequent splenectomy. (3) Multiple splenic lesions and fissures associated with perisplenic and subphrenic fluid collections were seen in four patients; infected splenic infarcts, splenic fractures, and infected perisplenic hemorrhagic fluid collections were found in this group of patients. The CT examination in septic patients can reliably demonstrate splenic and perisplenic pathology, and its appearance contributes greatly to the overall clinical assessment and surgical approach.

  5. CT of splenic and perisplenic abnormalities in septic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balthazar, E.J.; Hilton, S.; Naidich, D.; Megibow, A.; Levine, R.

    1985-01-01

    Splenic and perisplenic pathology, demonstrated by CT examination in 14 septic patients, was correlated with the clinical course and with surgical and pathologic findings available. Twelve patients were intravenous drug addicts and two patients developed bacteremia associated with bacterial endocarditis. The CT fingings were divided into three groups: (1) Single wedge-shaped peripherally located defects were seen in five patients; there was good response to medical therapy without other complications. (2) Larger and/or multiple, rounded or oval lesions were present in five patients; two of these patients had splenic abscesses proven on subsequent splenectomy. (3) Multiple splenic lesions and fissures associated with perisplenic and subphrenic fluid collections were seen in four patients; infected splenic infarcts, splenic fractures, and infected perisplenic hemorrhagic fluid collections were found in this group of patients. The CT examination in septic patients can reliably demonstrate splenic and perisplenic pathology, and its appearance contributes greatly to the overall clinical assessment and surgical approach

  6. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Sullivan, Ashley N. [St. George' s University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies (Grenada); Bloom, David A. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  7. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H.; Sullivan, Ashley N.; Bloom, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  8. Splenic Abscesses: Review of 29 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Shun Chiang

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscess is an unusual and potentially life-threatening disease. Due to the nonspecific clinical picture, it remains a diagnostic challenge. Splenic abscess should be suspected in febrile patients with left upper quadrant tenderness and leukocytosis, and diagnosis confirmed based mostly on imaging studies, microbiologic and/or pathologic evidence, or by response to antibiotic or antifungal treatment. We present 29 cases of splenic abscess treated in our hospital from 1990 to 2001. There were 18 male patients (62% and 11 female patients (38%. Ages ranged from 4 to 85 years, with a median of 44 years. There were five pediatric patients (17% and 24 adults (83%. The most common associated condition was leukemia. Most patients were immunocompromised (72%. The more common signs and symptoms were fever (90%, chills (41%, abdominal pain (31%, and leukocytosis (38%. Ultrasonography of the abdominal cavity was positive in 27 cases (93%; computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was used in 26 patients (90% and was positive in all patients. The abscess was solitary in 21 cases (72% and multiple in eight cases (28%. Positive blood cultures were found in only seven patients (24%. According to the literature, the treatment of choice is still splenectomy, but in our study, the success rate of 75% with antibiotics alone indicates that antibiotic therapy should be considered an important alternative treatment modality in patients not suitable for percutaneous drainage and splenectomy.

  9. Evaluation of splenic autotransplants by radionuclide methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, K.; Nema, T.A.; Al-Mohannadi, S.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    The viability of omental autotransplantation of splenic tissue after splenectomy has been disputed. The authors followed up splenic implants by imaging with either Tc-99m tin colloid or heat-damaged RBCs to determine how early implants can be visualized and whether a difference exists between patients who underwent emergency splenectomy for trauma (nine patients) and those who underwent elective splenectomy (seven patients). In the latter group, splenectomy was performed for portal hypertension in six patients and for hematologic disorder (Wiscott Aldrich syndrome) in one. All patients were imaged 2-4 weeks and 6 months after surgery. In the first group, seven implants were seen at 2-4 weeks and all nine were seen by 6 months. In the second group, only two implants were seen at 2-4 weeks and four were seen at 6 months; two implants were not visualized even at 6 months. The implant of the patient with hematologic disorder was not seen before 6 months. The authors conclude that splenic implants can be visualized bu scintigraphic methods as early as 2-4 weeks after surgery, and that by 6 months all implants from normal spleen are viable. By contrast, spleen implants placed for portal hypertension or hematologic disorders may fail

  10. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing ... JavaScript. One out of 10 women will have vaginal bleeding during their 3rd trimester. At times, it ...

  11. Nonoperative Management of Splenic Injury in Combat: 2002-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    recognized as the defini- tive treatment for splenic injury when Dr. Johnston reported 150 splenectomies for trauma in 1908.4 However, in 1968, Upadhyaya...management safe and effective for all splenic blunt trauma ? A systematic review. Crit Care 2013; 17(5): R185. 6. Joint Theater Trauma System Clinical Practice...2014. 7. Zonies D, Eastridge B: Combat management of splenic injury: trends during a decade of conflict. J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2012; 73(2 Suppl 1

  12. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Ahmed, Aamer B; Afshari, Arash

    2017-01-01

    : The management of perioperative bleeding involves multiple assessments and strategies to ensure appropriate patient care. Initially, it is important to identify those patients with an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. Next, strategies should be employed to correct preoperative anaemia...... and to stabilise macrocirculation and microcirculation to optimise the patient's tolerance to bleeding. Finally, targeted interventions should be used to reduce intraoperative and postoperative bleeding, and so prevent subsequent morbidity and mortality. The objective of these updated guidelines is to provide...

  13. Association of splenic and renal infarctions in acute abdominal emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano; Gatta, Gianluca; Lombardo, Patrizia; Stavolo, Ciro; Romano, Luigia; Grassi, Roberto

    2004-04-01

    Introduction: Splenic and renal infarctions are usually related to vascular disease or haematologic abnormalities. Their association is infrequent and rarely observed in trauma. In this study, we analyze our data to look at the occurrence of renal and splenic infarctions based on CT findings in a period of 4 years. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of 84 patients admitted to our Department of Diagnostic Imaging from June 1998 to December 2002, who underwent emergency abdominal spiral CT examination and in whom there was evidence of splenic and/or renal infarction. Results: We found 40 cases of splenic infarction and 54 cases of renal infarction, associated in 10 patients. In 26 patients, there was also evidence of intestinal infarction. A traumatic origin was found in 19 cases; non-traumatic causes were found in 65 patients. Association between renal and splenic infarction in the same patient was related to trauma in two cases. Conclusions: Although renal and splenic infarctions are a common manifestation of cardiac thromboembolism, other systemic pathologies, infections or trauma may lead to this occurrence. Renal infarction may be clinically and/or surgically managed with success in most cases. There are potential complications in splenic infarction, such as development of pseudocysts, abscesses, hemorrhage, subcapsular haematoma or splenic rupture; splenectomy in these cases may be necessary. Some patients with splenic and/or renal infarction may be clinically asymptomatic. The high accuracy of CT examination is needed to allow a correct evaluation of infarcted organs.

  14. [A case of infectious mononucleosis with splenic infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Daisuke; Nakatani, Toshiya; Fujinaga, Yukihisa; Seki, Kenichiro; Saikawa, Soichiro; Sawada, Yasuhiko; Sato, Yoshiki; Nagamatsu, Shinsaku; Matsuo, Hideki; Kikuchi, Eiryo

    2013-08-01

    A 22-year-old man complaining of persisting high fever and right hypochondralgia was admitted to our hospital for infectious mononucleosis with splenic infarction detected by computed tomography. The splenic infarction deteriorated with a marked elevation of inflammatory parameters. This necessitated the commencement of methylprednisolone pulse therapy, resulting in prompt amelioration of inflammation and a reduction in cytokine levels. Including our case, only 9 cases of mononucleosis with splenic infarction have been reported to date; however, splenic infarction should be considered because it is a significant complication of infectious mononucleosis.

  15. Association of splenic and renal infarctions in acute abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Stefania; Scaglione, Mariano; Gatta, Gianluca; Lombardo, Patrizia; Stavolo, Ciro; Romano, Luigia; Grassi, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Splenic and renal infarctions are usually related to vascular disease or haematologic abnormalities. Their association is infrequent and rarely observed in trauma. In this study, we analyze our data to look at the occurrence of renal and splenic infarctions based on CT findings in a period of 4 years. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of 84 patients admitted to our Department of Diagnostic Imaging from June 1998 to December 2002, who underwent emergency abdominal spiral CT examination and in whom there was evidence of splenic and/or renal infarction. Results: We found 40 cases of splenic infarction and 54 cases of renal infarction, associated in 10 patients. In 26 patients, there was also evidence of intestinal infarction. A traumatic origin was found in 19 cases; non-traumatic causes were found in 65 patients. Association between renal and splenic infarction in the same patient was related to trauma in two cases. Conclusions: Although renal and splenic infarctions are a common manifestation of cardiac thromboembolism, other systemic pathologies, infections or trauma may lead to this occurrence. Renal infarction may be clinically and/or surgically managed with success in most cases. There are potential complications in splenic infarction, such as development of pseudocysts, abscesses, hemorrhage, subcapsular haematoma or splenic rupture; splenectomy in these cases may be necessary. Some patients with splenic and/or renal infarction may be clinically asymptomatic. The high accuracy of CT examination is needed to allow a correct evaluation of infarcted organs

  16. Isolated splenic calcifications in two patients with portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleixandre, A.; Cugat, A.; Ruiz, A.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Tardaguila, F.

    2002-01-01

    Calcification of the walls of the veins of the portal hypertension (PHT) (1-0), is uncommon. Calcification of the intra splenic vessels is exceptional. We report two cases of isolated calcification of intra splenic vessels, without calcification of the splenoportal venous axis, in patients with liver cirrhosis and PHT. The calcification was not clear. Computed tomography identified the calcification as linear tubular, branched structures located in the wall of intra splenic vessels. magnetic resonance imaging disclosed signs of cirrhosis and PHT but did not show the splenic classifications because of technical limitations. The cause of these calcifications was sustained PHT due to chronic liver disease. (Author) 15 refs

  17. Endovascular treatment of splenic artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, Domenico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Dizonno, Massimiliano; Fugazzola, Carlo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular treatment of splenic artery aneurysm (SAAs). Materials and methods. Between May 2000 and June 2003 we treated 11 true SAAs in 9 patients (7 females and 2 males; mean age 58 years), 8 saccular and 3 fusiform, 4 located at the middle tract of the splenic artery, 5 at the distal tract and 2 intra-parenchymal. The diagnosis was performed with colour-Doppler ultrasound and/or CT-angiography; 7 patients were symptomless, 1 had left hypochondriac pain, and 1 had acute abdomen caused by a ruptured SAA. Four SAAs were treated by micro coil embolisation of the aneurysmal sac with preservation of splenic artery patency; in 2 cases this was associated with transcatheter injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. Four cases were treated by endovascular ligature, with sectoral spleen ischaemia. One ruptured SAA received emergency treatment with splenic artery cyanoacrylate embolisation. Two intra-parenchymal SAAs were excluded, one by cyanoacrylate embolisation of the afferent artery and the other by transcatheter thrombin injection in the aneurysmal sac. Results. Technical success was observed in all cases (in 10/11 at the end of the procedure; in 1/11 at CT performed 3 days after the procedure). The follow-up (mean 18 months; range 6-36) was performed by colour-Doppler ultrasound and/or CT-angiography 3, 6 and 12 months after the procedure and subsequently once a year; the complete exclusion of the aneurysms was confirmed in 11/11 cases. The complications were: 4 cases of mild pleuritis; fever and left hypochondriac pain 1 day after the procedure (in the same 4 patients and in one other case); 5 cases of sectorial spleen ischaemia and 1 case of diffuse spleen infarction with partial revascularization by collateral vessels. No alteration of the levels of pancreatic enzymes was found; a transitory increase in platelet count occurred only in the patient with diffuse spleen infarction. Conclusions. Using different

  18. Synovial hemangiomas of the knee: magnetic resonance findings in six cases; Hemangiomas sinoviales de rodilla: hallazgos de la resonancia magnetica en seis casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concepcion, L.; Marti-Bonmati, L. M.; Dosda, R. [Hospital Dr. Peset. Valencia (Spain); Llauger, J.; Palmer, J. [Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau. Barcelona (Spain); Mellado, J. M. [Inscanner, S. L. Alicante (Spain)

    1999-05-01

    The synovial hemangioma is an uncommon benign vascular tumor that is difficult to diagnose on the basis of clinical signs Moreover, it has no characteristic radiographic features. The objective of the present report was to describe the MR findings associated with synovial hemangioma of the knee. We review the clinical and MR findings in six patients, with histologically confirmed synovial hemangioma of the Knee, studied with different MR systems and techniques. Synovial hemangiomas were isointense with respect to muscle in T1-weighted images, strongly hyperintense in T2-weighted sequences and presented wavy hypointense linear images. Gadolinium administration resulted in a marked enhancement, although it was heterogeneous in two of three cases analyzed. Although the findings are not pathognomonic, the presence of an intraarticular tumor of the knee that is isointense with respect to muscle in T1 and hyperintense in T2, and shows wavy hypointense images and a marked contrast uptake, may suggest the presence of synovial hemangioma. (Author) 11 refs.

  19. Hemangioma of the porus acusticus. Impact of imaging studies: case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit-Lacour, M.C.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Hadj-Rabia, M.; Doyon, D.; Lasjaunias, P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Kremlin-Bicetre Hospital (France); Sterkers, O. [Dept. of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy (France); Bobin, S. [Dept. of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Kremlin-Bicetre Hospital (France)

    2001-12-01

    Hemangiomas are tumors. Hemangiomas near the geniculate ganglion or in the internal acoustic meatus are well known but rare. We present two cases of hemangiomas located at the porus acusticus, an even more rare site. MRI showed a millimeter-sized tumor, located in the porus acusticus, developing perpendicular to the axis of the acoustico-facial nerves, surrounding them. They were hyperintense on T1-weighted images, strongly hyperintense on T2-weighted images with a characteristic progressive and marked enhancement after injection of gadolinium DTPA. Similar signal abnormalities were present in the adjacent temporal bone, and CT scan demonstrated a honeycomb appearance with intra-tumoral bony spicules. These imaging criteria allows differentiation between hemangioma and neurinoma. We hypothesize that this location is related to the presence of a rich vascular plexus of the dura mater in this area. (orig.)

  20. Hemangioma of the porus acusticus. Impact of imaging studies: case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit-Lacour, M.C.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Hadj-Rabia, M.; Doyon, D.; Lasjaunias, P.; Sterkers, O.; Bobin, S.

    2001-01-01

    Hemangiomas are tumors. Hemangiomas near the geniculate ganglion or in the internal acoustic meatus are well known but rare. We present two cases of hemangiomas located at the porus acusticus, an even more rare site. MRI showed a millimeter-sized tumor, located in the porus acusticus, developing perpendicular to the axis of the acoustico-facial nerves, surrounding them. They were hyperintense on T1-weighted images, strongly hyperintense on T2-weighted images with a characteristic progressive and marked enhancement after injection of gadolinium DTPA. Similar signal abnormalities were present in the adjacent temporal bone, and CT scan demonstrated a honeycomb appearance with intra-tumoral bony spicules. These imaging criteria allows differentiation between hemangioma and neurinoma. We hypothesize that this location is related to the presence of a rich vascular plexus of the dura mater in this area. (orig.)

  1. Cellular hemangioma and angioblastoma of the spine, originally classified as hemangioendothelioma. A confusing diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, H. D.; Fidler, M. W.; Bras, J.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report two cases of vascular tumors of the spine, classified originally as benign and malignant hemangioendothelioma, and after revision, as cellular hemangioma and angioblastomatosis, respectively. Problems in interpretation of the confusing term hemangioendothelioma and treatment

  2. Radiation therapy for life-threatening huge laryngeal hemangioma involving pharynx and parapharyngeal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Lee, Ka-Wo; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2013-04-01

    Adult hemangiomas are rare, slowly progressing vascular tumors. Potential complications include laryngeal involvement or massive tumor burden. A case of recurrent, bulky laryngeal hemangioma involving the parapharyngeal space is presented herein. The clinical course and treatment are described, and a series of MRI studies are compared to demonstrate the treatment response. A 35-year-old woman presented with progressive hoarseness, neck fullness, and intermittent dyspnea caused by a bulky laryngeal hemangioma. Steroid therapy had a limited response. Radiation therapy with a total dose of 40 Gray (Gy) in 20 fractions successfully relieved her symptoms. Image studies after therapy revealed moderate tumor regression. The patient showed no serious complications during the next 2 years of follow-up. Radiation therapy may be effective in intractable and function-threatening laryngeal hemangiomas. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Role of intralesional bleomycin in the treatment of complicated hemangiomas: prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Shapour; Nezakatgoo, Nosrat; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Mosalaei, Ahmad

    2005-05-01

    Hemangioma is the most common tumor of infancy. Although it has a basically benign nature and usually spontaneously regresses, a small percentage (5%) have complications that need treatment. Many different therapeutic modalities can be used in this tumor. To investigate the effect of a new method of treatment (intralesional bleomycin injection) in complicated hemangiomas. In the Department of Radiation Oncology at Nemazee Hospital in Shiraz, Iran, from April 1992 to October 1998, 32 patients with complicated hemangioma were treated with four to six courses of direct injection of bleomycin into the lesion. After a minimum follow-up of 6 years, there was 70 to 100% regression in 18 patients, 50 to 70% in 7 cases, and less than 50% reduction in 7 patients. Intralesional injection of bleomycin is an easy, safe, and effective therapeutic modality in complicated cutaneous hemangiomas.

  4. Hepatic hemangioma. Comparison between MR and SPECT in its detection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galant Herrero, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Sopena Monforte, R.; Caballero Calabuig, E.; Martinez Rodrigo, J.; Ferrer Puchol, D.; Paniagua Escudero, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Given the high prevalence of hepatic hemangioma, diagnostic techniques that differentiate these benign lesions from metastasis, hepatoma, and other malignant diseases are necessary. Twenty-five consecutive patients in whom ultrasonography led to the suspicion of hemangioma were studied by magnetic resonance (MR) and tomographic scintigraphy using 99m Tc-labeled red blood cells. Twenty patients presented 42 hemangiomas. Of the 5 remaining patients, 2 proved to have hepatoma and 3 had metastases. Both MR and SPECT have been shown to be highly sensitive in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangioma (95% and 74%, respectively). The specificity of both techniques was 100%. A diagnostic algorithm is presented, based on the high sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques for the purpose of avoiding unnecessary diagnostic measures. (Author)

  5. Therapeutic effects of percutaneous transhepatic variceal embolization combined with partial splenic embolization for portal hypertention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Yingxue; Yan Zhiping; Cheng Yongde; Qiao Delin; Zhou Bing; Chen Shiwei; Li Yong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous transhepatic variceal embolization (PTVE) combined with patial splenic embolization (PES)for portal hypertension. Methods: 30 patients with critical portal hypertension were divided randomly into two groups, 15 patients of A group underwent PSE PTVE combined with PSE and 15 of B group underwent PES only. The changes of collateral circulation of the two groups were compared via color Doppler ultrasonography pre-and postoperatively. Results: The hypersplenism was well controlled in both groups after PTVE and PSE. The varices of A group were embolized completely, the flow rate and velocity of portal blood stream were significantly reduced (P<0.05). In addition, the flow rate and velocity together with inner diameter of the azygous vein decreased (P<0.01), but no change shown on portal vein diameter, only with decrease of blood flow and velocity postoperatively were shown in the two groups (P<0.05). During 13-16 months follow-up, gastroesophageal variceal bleeding appeared in 2 patients and formation of portal thrombi in 1 patients of B group. There was no gastroesophageal variceal bleeding in A group but 2 patients appeared portal hypertensive gastroenteropathy (PHG)under endoscopic confirmations. Conclusion: PTVE combined PSE is very efficient for gastroesophageal variceal bleeding and hypersplenism due to portal hypertension, especially for patients with poor hepatic function, possessing simple, economic, less invasive properties and deserving to be recommended. (authors)

  6. Intramedullary capillary hemangioma of the thoracic spine: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Santiago

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas are benign vascular neoplasms. When associated with the spine, these growths frequently involve the vertebral body, but rarely have they been reported to occur as intradural lesions, while even more rarely occurring in a true intramedullary location. We report a rare case of an intrame-dullary capillary hemangioma of the thoracic spinal cord and a review of the literature.

  7. Chronic Expanding Hematoma of the Adrenal Gland Mimicking a Hemangioma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Kim, Min Jeong; Ha, Hong Il; Lee, In Jae; Lee, Kwan Seop; Seo, Jin Won [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Seung Gu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    We report a rare case of unilateral chronic expanding hematoma in the left adrenal gland, mimicking a hemangioma on multiphase computed tomography (CT). On CT, the mass showed several enhancing foci of irregular and frond-like shape in the periphery at the hepatic arterial phase and gradual fill-in pattern at the portal venous phase, which was similar with the enhancement pattern of hemangioma.

  8. PRIMARY HEMANGIOMA OF A SUBMENTAL LYMPH NODE –A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shri LakshmiS, Durga PrasadD, Subba Rao D, PrasanthiC, Vandana Gangadharan, Kishore Kumar C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Primary vascular tumors occurring in lymph nodes are extremely rare. Nodal hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors that can occur at any age and seen mostly in females. It is usually asymptomatic, affects only one node, and does not recur. Four histologic types of hemangioma have been identified: capillary/cavernous, lobular capillary, cellular, and epithelioid. This case has been reported for its rarity

  9. Pinworms and postmenopausal bleeding.

    OpenAIRE

    al-Rufaie, H K; Rix, G H; Pérez Clemente, M P; al-Shawaf, T

    1998-01-01

    The human pinworm Enterobius vermicularis is normally found within the human gastrointestinal tract. Pregnant females migrate out of their host's anus at night to lay their eggs perianally. As a consequence of this nocturnal migration some worms find their way into adjacent orifices, most commonly the female genitourinary tract, producing irritative symptoms such as vulvovaginitis. A case of pinworm infestation of the uterus presented as postmenopausal bleeding.

  10. Paradoxical bleeding and thrombosis in a patient with afibrinogenemia and fibrinogen Mumbai mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaddam, Alfiya; Patil, Rucha; Jadli, Anshul; Chandrakala, S; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2015-05-01

    Thrombosis is rarely reported in cases of afibrinogenemia and is generally associated with thrombophilia or replacement therapy. Often, it is difficult to predict whether the patients will bleed or whether they are exposed to the risk of thrombosis. We report a patient with afibrinogenemia who presented with complete thrombosis of right hepatic, portal, and splenic veins and who described a lifelong history of bleeding. Direct sequencing of the three fibrinogen genes was performed to identify the mutation. DNA sequencing showed the presence of a homozygous for G8017A substitution in exon 8 of the fibrinogen β-chain gene, resulting in a G434D missense mutation (Fibrinogen Mumbai). Presence of both bleeding and thrombotic manifestations in a patient with afibrinogenemia in the presence of other associated risk factors warrants a very careful individualized approach in the management of patients with afibrinogenemia. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  11. Liver hemangioma : comparison of echogenecity and contrast-enhancement on dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Chang Kyu; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Seog Joon; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the differences in sonographic appearance and hemodynamics between hypoechoic and hyperechoic hemangioma Material and Method : We retrospectively reviewed the sonographic appearance and MRI findings of 23 hypoechoic hepatic hemangiomas in 16 consecutive patients. Nine were men and seven were women, witha mean age of 50 years(range, 40-72). We analyzed the sonographic appearance such as size, shape, border,echogenecity, posterior acoustic enhancement and the presence of fatty liver, and MRI findings such as signal intensity, enhancement pattern. For comparison, we also reviewed the sonographic appearance and MRI findings of 23 hyperechoic hemangiomas in 16 randomly selected patients. Results : There were no differences in size, shape,incidence of posterior acoustic enhancement, MR signal intensity or enhancement pattern between hypoechoic and hyperechoic hemangiomas(p>0.05, Chi-square). However, fatty infiltration of the liver and echogenic rim of the masses were more commonly seen in hypoechoic hemangiomas(9:1, 5:0, respectively, p<0.05). Conclusions : There we reno differences in MR enhomcement pattern or incidence of posterior acoustic enhancement between hypoechoic hyperechoic hemangioma. The vascularity of a mass therefore seems to contribute little to its echogenecity

  12. Clinical observation of 5686 cases of infant hemangioma treated by 32P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qinyuan; Lin Shixiu; Liu Jingtao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the therapeutic method of treating infant hemangioma by radioisotopes 32 P. Methods: Simple hemangiomata were treated by 32 P dermal application method. The authors prepared 32 P at the activity of 165.98 kBq/cm 2 /h, diluted it with 2 ml water, and then dropped it on filter paper. The authors applied the paper to the impaired site according to the shape and the size of hemangioma. The impaired site received 32 P radiation at the dosage of 9.41 Gy/cm 2 each time. The treatment was repeated once every month. Cavernous hemangiomata were treated by local injections of colloid 32 P at the dosage of 370 kBq/cm 3 once every 2-3 months. Mixed hemangiomata received combined treatment mentioned above. Results: 3383 cases (99.0%) of simple hemangioma were cured by 32 P dermal application method. 1241 case (98.7%) of cavernous hemangioma were cured. 397 cases (83.0%) of mixed hemangioma were cured. 534 cases (98.1%) of naevus flammeus were improved by 32 P application method. The total effective rate was 99.8%. The cure rate was 88.3%. Conclusion: Treating hemangioma with 32 P is satisfactory for its high efficiency and low toxicity. It may be advisable for infant skin disease

  13. LUMBAR: association between cutaneous infantile hemangiomas of the lower body and regional congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobas, Ionela; Burrows, Patricia E; Frieden, Ilona J; Liang, Marilyn G; Mulliken, John B; Mancini, Anthony J; Kramer, Daniela; Paller, Amy S; Silverman, Robert; Wagner, Annette M; Metry, Denise W

    2010-11-01

    To define the clinical spectrum of regional congenital anomalies associated with large cutaneous hemangiomas of the lower half of the body, clarify risk for underlying anomalies on the basis of hemangioma location, and provide imaging guidelines for evaluation. We conducted a multi-institutional, retrospective case analysis of 24 new patients and review of 29 published cases. Hemangiomas in our series tended to be "segmental" and often "minimal growth" in morphology. Such lesions were often extensive, covering the entire leg. Extensive limb hemangiomas also showed potential for extracutaneous anomalies, including underlying arterial anomalies, limb underdevelopment, and ulceration. The cutaneous hemangioma and underlying anomalies demonstrated regional correlation. Myelopathies were the most common category of associated anomalies. We propose the acronym "LUMBAR" to describe the association of Lower body hemangioma and other cutaneous defects, Urogenital anomalies, Ulceration, Myelopathy, Bony deformities, Anorectal malformations, Arterial anomalies, and Renal anomalies. There are many similarities between LUMBAR and PHACE syndrome, which might be considered regional variations of the same. Although guidelines for imaging are suggested, prospective studies will lead to precise imaging recommendations and help determine true incidence, risk and long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preliminary Report On Combined Surgical- And Laser-Treatment Of Large Hemangiomas And Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsbach, G.

    1981-05-01

    As most hemangiomas and tattoos require many sessions to be cured completely by argon-laser or conventional therapy I developed a new combined surgical and laser-therapy method for large hemangiomas and tattoos. This is a three step method. First: The skin lesion is treated by argon-laser with the point by point method, developed by ourself. Second: Under local or general anaesthesia a) the hemangioma is partially excised and undermined letting only the skin which is already treated by argon-laser-beams. Than the hemangioma is exstirpated in toto, the wound closed by running intradermal sutures and a pressure bandage applied, b) the tattoo is abraded as deep as possible, draped by lyofoam. Then a pressure bandage is applied. Third: The hemangioma as well as the tattoo are treated by argon-laser-beams after the operation. This method is safe and effective, gives good results, minimal scars in the case of hemangiomas and tattoos. In this paper the method is described and some cases are illustrated by pre- and postoperational photographs.

  15. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Tai; Lee, Choon Keun; Lee, Sun Wha; Choi, Woo Suk; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1988-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major diagnostic problem. Although advances have been made in the medical and surgical methods of managing gastrointestinal bleeding, the commonly employed techniques of barium radiography, endoscopy, and angiography may not successfully localize the site and define the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two widely available technetium-99m-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, sulfur colloid and red blood cells are currently used in the evaluation of patients who are bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgically confirmed 19 patients with use of 99m Tc-sulfur colloid (7 cases) and 99m Tc-RBC (12 cases) were retrospectively evaluated. The overall sensitivity of scintigraphy in detection of bleeding and localization of bleeding site was 68% and 84%, respectively. The authors conclude that bleeding scintigraphy is a safe, sensitive, and non-invasive method as an effective screening test before performing angiography or surgery.

  16. Impact of Splenic Artery Embolization on the Success Rate of Nonoperative Management for Blunt Splenic Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vlies, C. H.; Hoekstra, J.; Ponsen, K. J.; Reekers, J. A.; van Delden, O. M.; Goslings, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nonoperative management (NOM) has become the treatment of choice for hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injury. Results of outcome after NOM are predominantly based on large-volume studies from level 1 trauma centers in the United States. This study was designed to

  17. E-learning enables parents to assess an infantile hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Marlies; Knol, Mirjam J; Totté, Joan E E; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Breugem, Corstiaan C; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A

    2014-05-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IH) at risk for complications need to be recognized early. We sought to determine if parents are able to assess, after e-learning, whether their child has an IH, is at risk for complications, and needs to be seen (urgently) by a specialist. This was a prospective study of 158 parents participating in an IH e-learning module. Parents were asked to assess their child's skin abnormality. A dermatologist answered the same questions (by e-consult). The 2 assessments were compared. Parents showed a 96% concordance with the dermatologist for correct diagnosis after e-learning. Concordances were 79%, 75%, and 84% (P e-learning module. E-learning by parents could result in earlier presentation and treatment of high-risk IH. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Breast cancer after radiotherapy for skin hemangioma in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundell, M.; Mattsson, A.; Hakulinen, T.; Holm, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Between 1920 and 1959, 9675 women were irradiated in infancy for skin hemangioma at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. They were exposed to low to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. The mean age at first exposure was 6 months and the mean absorbed dose to the breast anlage was 0.39 Gy (range 50 years after exposure the ERR at 1 Gy was 2.25 (95% CI 0.59-5.62). The fitted excess absolute risk (EAR) was 22.9 per 10 4 breast-year gray. The breast absorbed dose and time after exposure were important risk determinants for breast cancer excess risk. Forty to 50 years of follow-up was necessary for the excess risk to be expressed. The study confirms previous findings that the breast anlage of female infants is sensitive to ionizing radiation. 17 refs., 6 figs

  19. Intramedullary cavernous hemangiomas, magnetic resonance studies in four patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, M.R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Garcia, S.; Bertrol, V.

    1998-01-01

    Intramedullary cavernous hemangiomas are vascular malformations that can be located throughout the entire central nervous system. They are more frequently found in brain than in spinal cord, where it is only possible to diagnose them by magnetic resonance (RM): We present four cases of intramedullary spinal cord cavernoma, three of which were located in the thoracic spine and one in cervical spine. Computed tomography was ineffective in their diagnosis. However, MR disclosed there presence of well-defined tumors producing a thickening of the spinal cord. The signal was heterogeneous in both T1 and T2-weighted images. There were low signal areas due to the presence of calcium and hemosiderin and high intensity signals provoked by methemoglobin within the lesions, which were scarcely enhanced by intravenous gadolinium administration. One of the lesions presented in the form of a large intramedullary hematoma. (Author) 8 refs

  20. Case report 367: Hemangioma of the nasal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, T.L. Jr.; Keats, T.E.; Fechner, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    In summary, an 18-year-old young woman presented with an expanding lesion of the nasal bone(s), with a prior history of gradual swelling of the nose. A past history of trauma sustained when she was struck by a tennis ball dated approximately five years before the current presentation. Plain film roentgenograms and a tomographic study showed an expanding lesion of the nasal bone(s) which had the appearance of benignity; the lesion was well demarcated with a narrow zone of transition. The lesional tissue contained small bony opacities in the form of circles and linear and curvilinear strands. The neoplasm was surgically excised and proved to be a benign hemangioma. (orig./SHA)

  1. Facial nerve hemangioma: a rare case involving the vertical segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Neda; Newkirk, Kenneth; Kim, H Jeffrey

    2013-02-01

    This case report and literature review reports on a rare case of facial nerve hemangioma (FNH) involving the vertical facial nerve (FN) segment, and discusses the clinical presentation, imaging, pathogenesis, and management of these rare lesions. A 53-year-old male presented with a 10-year history of right hemifacial twitching and progressive facial paresis (House-Brackmann grading score V/VI). The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies confirmed an expansile lesion along the vertical FN segment. Excision and histopathologic examination demonstrated FNH. FNHs involving the vertical FN segment are extremely rare. Despite being rare lesions, we believe that familiarity with the presentation and management of FNHs are imperative. Laryngoscope, 2012. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging features of hepatic hemangioma compared with enhanced computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Tateyama, Akihiro; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Takumi, Koji; Shindo, Toshikazu; Kumagae, Yuichi; Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Nakajo, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To clarify features of hepatic hemangiomas on gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with enhanced computed tomography (CT).

  3. Low-dose splenic irradiation in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia in HIV-infected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soum, F.; Trille, J.A.; Auvergnat, J.C.; Giraud, Ph.; Bicart-See, A.; Marchou, B.; Ceccaldi, J.; Mihura, J.; Daly Schveitzer, N.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low-dose splenic irradiation on severe Zidovudine-resistant, HIV-1-associated thrombocytopenia (HAT). Methods and Materials: Between September 1994 and October 1996, 17 patients were included in a prospective study. The patients met the following criteria for inclusion: hemorrhagic symptoms or a platelet count below or equal to 50 x 10 9 /l and normal numbers of megakaryocytes on bone aspiration. The mean baseline platelet count was 20.3 (± 14.4) x 10 9 /l; four patients had a platelet count inferior to 10 x 10 9 /l. Splenic volume was defined by ultrasonography. A total dose of 9 Gy was given using an isocentric parallel pair field technique. Results: One month after the end of treatment six patients had a significant rise in their platelet count. Clinically, hemorrhagic symptoms stopped for all patients that were symptomatic. Unfortunately, duration of response was short because for one patient only the platelet count remains stable with a follow-up of 6 months. All patients are alive and in recent evaluation, with four out of eight patients receiving a combination of antiretroviral therapy had a platelet count above 50 x 10 9 /l. Conclusion: Our results are disappointing concerning the duration of response, especially comparatively to those reported in autoimmune thrombocytopenia. Mechanisms of HAT are more complex, and megakaryocytes' infection may play an important role. Splenic irradiation should be considered as palliative treatment for the minority of patients with severe bleeding that does not respond to standard medical treatment

  4. Nitrotyrosine formation in splenic toxicity of aniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M. Firoze; Wu Xiaohong; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Splenic toxicity of aniline is characterized by vascular congestion, hyperplasia, fibrosis and development of a variety of sarcomas in rats. However, the mechanisms of this selective splenic toxicity are not well understood. Previously we showed that aniline exposure causes oxidative damage to spleen. To further explore the oxidative mechanisms of aniline toxicity, we evaluated the contributions of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide reacts with superoxide anion to form peroxynitrite, a powerful oxidant that converts the tyrosine residues of proteins to nitrotyrosine (NT). Therefore, aim of this study was to establish the role of nitric oxide through the formation and localization of NT in the spleen of rats exposed to aniline. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were given 1 mmol/kg per day aniline hydrochloride in water by gavage for 7 days, while the controls received water only. Immunohistochemical analysis for NT showed an intense staining in the red pulp areas of spleen from aniline-treated rats, localized in macrophages and sinusoidal cells. Occasionally mild NT immunostaining was also evident in the white pulp. Western blot analyses of the post-nuclear fraction of the spleens showed major nitrated proteins with molecular weights of 49, 30 and 18 kDa. Immunohistochemical analysis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) also showed increased expression in the red pulp of the spleens from aniline-treated rats; the cellular localization was similar to nitrated proteins. These studies suggest that oxidative stress in aniline toxicity also includes aberration in nitric oxide production leading to nitration of proteins. Functional consequences of such nitration will further elucidate the contribution of nitric oxide to the splenic toxicity of aniline

  5. Splenic rupture in a neonate – a rare complication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    differential diagnosis of a hypovolaemic shocked infant with an abdominal mass. The symptoms of splenic rupture are ... A diagnosis of splenic rupture due to possible birth trauma was made. The mother admitted a month later ... parenchyma, e.g. erythroblastosis fetalis and congenital syphilis, as an enlarged spleen is more ...

  6. Blunt Splenic Trauma in Children : Are We Too Careful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, W. J. J.; Nellensteijn, D. R.; ten Duis, H. J.; Albers, M. J. I. J.; El Moumni, M.; Hulscher, J. B. F.

    Introduction: There has been a shift from operative treatment (OT) to non-operative treatment (NOT) of splenic injury. We evaluated the outcomes of treatment of pediatric patients with blunt splenic trauma in our hospital, with special focus on the outcomes after NOT. Patients and Methods: The data

  7. Radionuclide diagnosis of splenic rupture in infectious mononucleosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezina, W.C.; Nicholson, R.L.; Cohen, P.; Chamberlain, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture is a rare but serious complication of infectious mononucleosis. Although radionuclide spleen imaging is a well accepted method for diagnosis of traumatic rupture, interpretation can be difficult in the setting of mononucleosis, as tears may be ill-defined and diagnosis hampered by inhomogeneous splenic uptake. Four proven cases of spontaneous rupture are presented, three of which illustrate these diagnostic problems

  8. The pattern and management outcomes of splenic injuries in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In the last decade or so, the management of splenic injuries has undergone a lot of debate and changes including refinement of the indications for non-operative management (NOM). The aims of this retrospective study are: to characterize the pattern of splenic injuries in the Abha region of Saudi Arabia; ...

  9. Splenic abscess in children: A report of three patients | Rattan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Splenic abscess is uncommon in paediatric age group. It usually occurs in conditions of disseminated infective focus. Conventional treatment of abscess is incision and drainage, although splenectomy or splenic conservation is alternative. In this report, we are presenting case summaries of three patients suffering from ...

  10. Complicated congenital splenic cyst: Saved by a splenunculus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 12-year-old girl presented with a large congenital splenic cyst complicated by Salmonella organisms. After failure of conservative management and percutaneous drainage, a splenectomy was performed. An incidental splenunculus was preserved. On follow up the splenunculus had increased to normal splenic size and ...

  11. Spontaneous resolution of splenic infarcts after distal splenorenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In cases of portal hypertension with splenic infarcts, splenectomy with proximal splenorenal shunt has been recommended. We are sharing our experience with distal splenorenal shunt in these cases contrary to the popular belief. Materials and Methods: Splenic infarcts were graded as mild, moderate and ...

  12. Combined lymphangioma and hemangioma of the spleen in a patient with Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Marko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome (KTS is a very rare congenital anomaly of blood vessels, characterized by the following clinical triad: varicose superficial veins, port-wine stain and usually bony and soft tissue hypertophy of extremities, most often located in the lower extremities. It is often accompanied by visceral manifestations, and rarely combined with splenomegaly. Case Outline. A 30-year-old female patient came to the Surgery Clinic because of occasional left hypochondrial pain. After she was diagnosed with KTS combined with splenomegaly, splenectomy was performed. Macroscopic and microscopic spleen examination indicated the presence of tumor of vascular origin, presenting a combination of lymphangioma and hemangioma. Conclusion. Diagnosed KTS demands a thorough clinical examination of the patient because of the potential presence of visceral manifestations. When splenomegaly is present, even though being often benign, splenectomy is usually performed to alleviate accompanying symptoms which occur as a result of organ enlargement and compression, to prevent rupture and consequential bleeding when the vascular spleen tumor is large, and finally to avoid a possibility of malignant transformation.

  13. Blunt splenic injury: are early adverse events related to trauma, nonoperative management, or surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandon, Julien; Rodiere, Mathieu; Arvieux, Catherine; Vendrell, Anne; Boussat, Bastien; Sengel, Christian; Broux, Christophe; Bricault, Ivan; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to compare clinical outcomes and early adverse events of operative management (OM), nonoperative management (NOM), and NOM with splenic artery embolization (SAE) in blunt splenic injury (BSI) and identify the prognostic factors. Medical records of 136 consecutive patients with BSI admitted to a trauma center from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were separated into three groups: OM, NOM, and SAE. We focused on associated injuries and early adverse events. Multivariate analysis was performed on 23 prognostic factors to find predictors. The total survival rate was 97.1%, with four deaths all occurred in the OM group. The spleen salvage rate was 91% in NOM and SAE. At least one adverse event was observed in 32.8%, 62%, and 96% of patients in NOM, SAE, and OM groups, respectively (P events: simplified acute physiology score 2 ≥25 for almost all adverse events, age ≥50 years for acute respiratory syndrome, limb fracture for secondary bleeding, thoracic injury for pleural drainage, and at least one associated injury for pseudocyst. Adverse events were not related to the type of BSI management. Patients with BSI present worse outcome and more adverse events in OM, but this is related to the severity of injury. The main predictor of adverse events remains the severity of injury.

  14. Massive upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage due to direct visceral erosion of splenic artery aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahani R

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available Six male patients (age group: 30-60 years with aneurysm of the splenic artery presented with massive upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage. Five patients presented with hematemesis and one with melena. Chronic pancreatitis was noted in all the patients, four of whom were chronic alcoholics. Endoscopy was not useful in diagnosis. Bleeding through the Ampulla of Vater was seen in the patient with melena. Angiography was diagnostic in all. Pancreatic resection including the aneurysm(2, and bipolar ligation with underrunning of the aneurysm (3 were the operative procedures. Distal pancreatectomy with pancreatogastrostomy was carried out in the patient with hemosuccus pancreaticus. If endoscopy is inconclusive, angiography and early intervention is recommended to reduce the high mortality associated with conservative management.

  15. Decreased splenic enhancement on CT in traumatized hypotensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berland, L.L.; VanDyke, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with transient episodes of hypotension following blunt abdominal trauma incurred in motor vehicle accidents were examined by computed tomography within 6 hours of injury. None of the patients had splenic injury evident on autopsy, surgery, or clinical follow-up study (one case each), nor did they have other characteristic features of splenic infarction. However, in each case the spleen was less enhanced than the liver, leading to an erroneous impression in one patient that the splenic artery had been disrupted. Physiologic studies have shown that splenic perfusion decreases with sympathetic stimulation; this may have been the cause of the diminished enhancement. Decreased splenic enhancement should be interpreted cautiously in traumatized hypotensive patients

  16. Decreased splenic enhancement on CT in traumatized hypotensive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, L.L.; VanDyke, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    Three patients with transient episodes of hypotension following blunt abdominal trauma incurred in motor vehicle accidents were examined by computed tomography within 6 hours of injury. None of the patients had splenic injury evident on autopsy, surgery, or clinical follow-up study (one case each), nor did they have other characteristic features of splenic infarction. However, in each case the spleen was less enhanced than the liver, leading to an erroneous impression in one patient that the splenic artery had been disrupted. Physiologic studies have shown that splenic perfusion decreases with sympathetic stimulation; this may have been the cause of the diminished enhancement. Decreased splenic enhancement should be interpreted cautiously in traumatized hypotensive patients.

  17. Laparoscopic splenic hilar lymphadenectomy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogi, Hisahiro; Okabe, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Hisashi; Tsunoda, Shigeru; Hisamori, Shigeo; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy has recently become accepted as a surgical option for early gastric cancer in the distal stomach, but laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) has not become widespread because of technical difficulties of esophagojejunal anastomosis and splenic hilar lymphadenectomy. Splenic hilar lymphadenectomy should be employed in the treatment of advanced proximal gastric cancer to complete D2 dissection, but laparoscopically it is technically difficult even for skilled surgeons. Based on the evidence that prophylactic combined resection of spleen in total gastrectomy increased the risk of postoperative morbidity with no survival impact, surgeons have preferred laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (LSPL) for advanced tumors without metastasis to splenic hilar nodes or invasion to the greater curvature of the stomach, and reports with LSPL have been increasing rather than LTG with splenectomy. In this paper, recent reports with laparoscopic splenic hilar lymphadenectomy were reviewed.

  18. Spontaneous splenic rupture. Radiological findings in three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenal, F.; Barrera, J.; Merino, S.; Pedrosa, C. S.

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture not associated with previous trauma is an uncommon disease. It can appear in the course of multiple systemic diseases or over a normal splenic architecture, which is even more infrequent. An early diagnosis results mandatory, since it is a potentially fatal disease if it is not promptly diagnosed and managed. We present three cases of spontaneous splenic rupture (two sub capsular hematomas opened to peritoneum and a rupture of splenic parenchyma). One patient had infectious mononucleosis, other was in the acute phase of a chronic pancreatitis and the third one had a normal splenic architecture. We emphasize the importance of CT in the early diagnosis of this entity. (Author) 21 refs

  19. [Giant splenic cyst in a teenager girl: Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Torres, Beatriz; Medina García, Manuel; Zafra Anta, Miguel Ángel; García Muñoz-Najar, Alejandro José; Tardío Dovao, Juan C

    2017-06-01

    Giant nonparasitic splenic epidermoid cysts are relatively uncommon. These lesions can lead abdominal pain, but most of then are asymptomatic, and they are discovered incidentally. We report a 13-y old female with a giant splenic epidermoid cystic, given the special interest of diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making of this rare entity. A 13-y old female with clinical history of abdominal pain since the last two months. On physical examination a firm, tender mass was palpable in left hypochondrium. Diagnosis of a large cystic splenic mass was made based on ultrasound and abdominal computed tomography scan. Splenectomy was performed, and histopathological-immunohistochemistry studies revealed findings suggestive of primary epithelial cyst. The post-operative clinical course was satisfactory and uneventful. Treatment of giant nonparasitic splenic cysts is surgical. Preserve splenic parenchyma must be the aim in an individualized decision-making. The different types of surgical modalities will be according to the diagnosis and clinical situation (cyst size, age, comorbidities).

  20. Continuous delivery of propranolol from liposomes-in-microspheres significantly inhibits infantile hemangioma growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo XN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaonan Guo,1,* Xiaoshuang Zhu,1,* Dakan Liu,1 Yubin Gong,1 Jing Sun,2 Changxian Dong1 1Department of Hemangioma and Vascular Malformation, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To reduce the adverse effects and high frequency of administration of propranolol to treat infantile hemangioma, we first utilized propranolol-loaded liposomes-in-microsphere (PLIM as a novel topical release system to realize sustained release of propranolol.Methods: PLIM was developed from encapsulating propranolol-loaded liposomes (PLs in microspheres made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid-b-poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid copolymers (PLGA-PEG-PLGA. The release profile of propranolol from PLIM was evaluated, and its biological activity was investigated in vitro using proliferation assays on hemangioma stem cells (HemSCs. Tumor inhibition was studied in nude mice bearing human subcutaneous infantile hemangioma.Results: The microspheres were of desired particle size (~77.8 µm and drug encapsulation efficiency (~23.9% and achieved sustained drug release for 40 days. PLIM exerted efficient inhibition of the proliferation of HemSCs and significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis factors (vascular endothelial growth factor-A [VEGF-A] and basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF] in HemSCs. Notably, the therapeutic effect of PLIM in hemangioma was superior to that of propranolol and PL in vivo, as reflected by significantly reduced hemangioma volume, weight, and microvessel density. The mean hemangioma weight of the PLIM-treated group was significantly lower than that of other groups (saline =0.28 g, propranolol =0.21 g, PL =0.13 g, PLIM =0.03 g; PLIM vs saline: P<0.001, PLIM vs propranolol: P<0.001, PLIM vs PL: P<0.001. The mean microvessel density of

  1. Splenic Rupture Diagnosed with Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient with Shock in the Emergency Department Following Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Mulkerin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED with near syncope and worsening left flank and shoulder pain. He had undergone a difficult colonoscopy two days prior due to a tortuous colon. Initial vital signs were normal. He looked uncomfortable and had significant left upper quadrant abdominal tenderness with guarding. Thirty minutes after ED arrival, his blood pressure dropped to 73/59 mmHg, requiring aggressive fluid resuscitation. Bedside focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST exam demonstrated free fluid in the abdomen with mixed echogenicity of the spleen, suggestive of splenic injury. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a large subcapsular splenic hematoma with active extravasation and surrounding intraperitoneal free fluid (Figure, Video. He was admitted to the surgical intensive care unit. Hemorrhage continued after interventional radiology performed embolization of the splenic artery. He then required laparoscopic splenectomy on hospital day 2 to control bleeding. He subsequently did well and was discharged on hospital day 10.

  2. Non-operative management for penetrating splenic trauma : how far can we go to save splenic function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerman, Roy; Teuben, Michel Paul Johan; Hoosain, Fatima; Taylor, Liezel Phyllis; Hardcastle, Timothy Craig; Blokhuis, Taco Johan; Warren, Brian Leigh; Leenen, Luke Petrus Hendrikus

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selective non-operative management (NOM) for the treatment of blunt splenic trauma is safe. Currently, the feasibility of selective NOM for penetrating splenic injury (PSI) is unclear. Unfortunately, little is known about the success rate of spleen-preserving surgical procedures. The aim

  3. Splenic Infarction in Acute Infectious Mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naviglio, Samuele; Abate, Maria Valentina; Chinello, Matteo; Ventura, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of a febrile patient with acute abdominal pain represents a frequent yet possibly challenging situation in the emergency department (ED). Splenic infarction is an uncommon complication of infectious mononucleosis, and may have a wide range of clinical presentations, from dramatic to more subtle. Its pathogenesis is still incompletely understood, yet it may be associated with the occurrence of transient prothrombotic factors. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who presented with fever, sore throat, left upper quadrant abdominal pain, and splenomegaly, with no history of recent trauma. Laboratory tests revealed a markedly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and positive lupus anticoagulant. Abdominal ultrasonography showed several hypoechoic areas in the spleen consistent with multiple infarctions. Magnetic resonance imaging eventually confirmed the diagnosis. He was admitted for observation and supportive treatment, and was discharged in good condition after 7 days. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Spontaneous splenic infarction should be considered in the differential list of patients presenting with left upper quadrant abdominal pain and features of infectious mononucleosis; the diagnosis, however, may not be straightforward, as clinical presentation may also be subtle, and abdominal ultrasonography, which is often used as a first-line imaging modality in pediatric EDs, has low sensitivity in this scenario and may easily miss it. Furthermore, although treatment is mainly supportive, close observation for possible complications is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Medical image of the week: splenic infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey DJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 52-year-old Hispanic woman with a past medical history significant for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, hypertension, and rheumatoid arthritis presented with left upper quadrant pain for one day. Her review of systems was positive for bloating, severe epigastric and left upper quadrant tenderness that radiated to the back and left shoulder, nausea with non-bilious emesis, and diarrhea for one day prior to admission. Physical exam only revealed epigastric and left upper quadrant tenderness to light palpation without rebound or guarding. Abdominal computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated a new acute or subacute splenic infarct with no clear evidence of an embolic source in the abdomen or pelvis (Figure 1. Echocardiogram with bubble study and contrast did not demonstrate valve abnormalities, cardiac mass, vegetation, valve or wall motion abnormalities and no evidence of patent foramen ovale. Splenic infarction should be suspected when patients present with sharp, acute left upper quadrant pain ...

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus and splenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnizo Z, Pilar; Ramirez R, Francisco Alejandro; Ramirez G, Luis Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease in which there is an increase risk of infections by common germ as by opportunistic germs. This fact is explained by the alterations in the humoral and cellular immunity, and phagocytic mononuclear system due to the disease and the immunosuppressive therapy use for its treatment. Multiple infectious processes have been describes in patients with SLE and within them, the splenic abscess, although in few cases. Usually its presence is associated with an underlying disease such as sepsis or peritonitis, with multiple outcomes. Due to its low frequency as well as the unusual presentation, we reported a case of a solitary splenic abscess documented by ultrasound in a teenager with SLE and immunosuppressive treatment, without any underlying infection, who presents with fever, abdominal pain, leucocytosis and elevation of acute phase reactants. He received antibiotic therapy with clindamycin and ceftriaxone and percutaneous drainage of the abscess guided by ultrasound and sent to culture in which grew non-typificable anaerobe germs, with a favorable evolution after 5 year of follow up

  6. Laparoscopy of a splenic flexure volvulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Sesumi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Splenic flexure volvulus (SFV is a very rare condition that is unlikely to be suspected even when a patient has repeated episodes of abdominal pain and dyschezia. We describe the case of SFV diagnosed and treated laparoscopically in the non-volvulus condition. A 14-year-old boy with no medical history had severe left upper abdominal pain and dyschezia for approximately 1 year. Although contrast enema examination revealed no characteristic findings of volvulus, such as a bird-beak sign, a redundant part of the colon was found to be the site of abdominal pain. We suspected that this part of the colon was the cause of the left upper abdominal pain and performed laparoscopic exploration. The colon at the splenic flexure formed a long loop and was predisposed to twisting; therefore, we performed resection and functional anastomosis of this redundant colon. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the left upper abdominal pain and dyschezia did not recur. Laparoscopic exploration can play a role in patients who are suspected to have recurrent colonic volvulus with radiographic evidence of a redundant portion of the colon, as indicated in our case.

  7. Splenic function in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covas, D.T.; Zago, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Spleen function was evaluated by measurement of the clearance of autologous heat-damaged /sup 99m/Tc-labelled erythrocytes from the circulation and into the spleen and the enumeration of pitted erythrocytes by interference contrast microscopy, and the spleen area was determined by scintillation scanning. All measurements were performed on 12 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and compared with 10 controls with apparently normal spleens, 6 splenectomized subjects and 9 patients with a reactive splenomegaly. Patients with CML had spleen function test results similar to normal controls in spite of having enlarged spleens whose projection area did not differ from that of the patients with reactive splenomegaly. Thus, patients with CML have a decreased spleen function per unit volume and signs of splenic hypofunction in the peripheral blood. The reduction of spleen function per unit volume in CML is the result of a severe decrease of the splenic blood perfusion which could result from the combined effects of the myeloid metaplasia and the increased whole-blood viscosity due to high white-cell counts.

  8. Splenic function in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covas, D.T.; Zago, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Spleen function was evaluated by measurement of the clearance of autologous heat-damaged 99m Tc-labelled erythrocytes from the circulation and into the spleen and the enumeration of pitted erythrocytes by interference contrast microscopy, and the spleen area was determined by scintillation scanning. All measurements were performed on 12 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and compared with 10 controls with apparently normal spleens, 6 splenectomized subjects and 9 patients with a reactive splenomegaly. Patients with CML had spleen function test results similar to normal controls in spite of having enlarged spleens whose projection area did not differ from that of the patients with reactive splenomegaly. Thus, patients with CML have a decreased spleen function per unit volume and signs of splenic hypofunction in the peripheral blood. The reduction of spleen function per unit volume in CML is the result of a severe decrease of the splenic blood perfusion which could result from the combined effects of the myeloid metaplasia and the increased whole-blood viscosity due to high white-cell counts. (author)

  9. Juvenile colon cancer at the splenic flexure with a splenic abscess developing 22 years after irradiation for a neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Toshihisa; Higure, Aiichiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Nagata, Naoki; Hirata, Keiji; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2010-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman who had an operation and chemo-radiation therapy for a neuroblastoma of the left adrenal gland at the age of five months developed a fever and left hypochondralgia when she was 22 years old. A splenic abscess was noted. Percutaneous drainage was done, but the splenic abscess recurred. There was no recurrence of the neuroblastoma. Conservative therapy was unsuccessful and a laparotomy was performed. Operative findings included a bulky mass at the splenic flexure which involved the spleen, pancreas tail, and jejunum. Colectomy at the splenic flexure was performed with coresection of the spleen, pancreas tail, and jejunum. The surgical specimen showed mucinous carcinoma of the splenic flexure which invaded the spleen. This case was considered to be an radiation-induced secondary colon cancer. (author)

  10. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for Focal Hepatic Tumors: Usefulness for Differentiating Hemangiomas from Malignant Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Radiology and Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kyung Soo [Department of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology and Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography with ARFI quantification and ARFI 2-dimensional (2D) imaging is useful for differentiating hepatic hemangiomas from malignant hepatic tumors. One-hundred-and-one tumors in 74 patients were included in this study: 28 hemangiomas, 26 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), three cholangiocarcinomas (CCCs), 20 colon cancer metastases and 24 other metastases. B-mode ultrasound, ARFI 2D imaging, and ARFI quantification were performed in all tumors. Shear wave velocities (SWVs) of the tumors and the adjacent liver and their SWV differences were compared among the tumor groups. The ARFI 2D images were compared with B-mode images regarding the stiffness, conspicuity and size of the tumors. The mean SWV of the hemangiomas was significantly lower than the malignant hepatic tumor groups: hemangiomas, 1.80 ± 0.57 m/sec; HCCs, 2.66 ± 0.94 m/sec; CCCs, 3.27 ± 0.64 m/sec; colon cancer metastases, 3.70 ± 0.61 m/sec; and other metastases, 2.82 ± 0.96 m/sec (p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of SWV for differentiating hemangiomas from malignant tumors was 0.86, with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 65.8% at a cut-off value of 2.73 m/sec (p < 0.05). In the ARFI 2D images, the malignant tumors except HCCs were stiffer and more conspicuous as compared with the hemangiomas (p < 0.05). ARFI elastography with ARFI quantification and ARFI 2D imaging may be useful for differentiating hepatic hemangiomas from malignant hepatic tumors.

  11. Propranolol for extensive hemangiomas of infancy: two case reports Hemangiomas extensos da infância tratados com propranolol: relato de dois caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luíza Helena dos Santos Cavaleiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are the most common benign tumors of childhood. They show rapid growth, followed by a regression phase that culminates in the partial or total disappearance of the lesion. Therapeutic options should be evaluated for extensive cases. Systemic glucocorticoids are the therapy of choice; however, there are reports that propranolol offers better and faster results. We report two cases of large volume infantile hemangioma associated with functional limitation and aesthetic disfigurement, treated successfully with propranolol, a drug that comes as a therapeutic option providing satisfactory and maintained results, with few side effects.Hemangiomas são os tumores benignos mais frequentes da infância, apresentando como história natural crescimento rápido, seguido de uma fase de regressão que culmina com o desaparecimento parcial ou total da lesão. Opções terapêuticas devem ser avaliadas para casos extensos. Os glicocorticoides sistêmicos são a terapia de escolha; contudo, há relatos de que o propranolol oferece resultados melhores e mais rápidos. Este trabalho descreve dois casos de hemangioma infantil de grande volume associados à limitação funcional e desfiguração estética com significativa resposta ao propranolol, droga esta que surge como uma proposta terapêutica oferecendo resultados satisfatórios e mantidos, com poucos efeitos colaterais.

  12. Late follow-up of patients submitted to subtotal splenectomy: late clinical, laboratory, imaging and functional with preservation of the upper splenic pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Petroianu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available objective: To evaluate the follow-up of patients submitted to splenectomy with preservation of the upper splenic pole. Methods: All patients undergoing subtotal splenectomy were invited to be reviewed. A total of 86 patients submitted to this surgery were studied. The procedure was performed due to one of the following conditions: portal hypertension due to schistosomiasis (n = 43, trauma (n = 31, Gaucher’s disease (n = 4, myeloid hepatosplenomegaly due to myelofibrosis (n = 3, splenomegalic retarded growth and sexual development (n = 2, severe pain due to splenic ischemia (n = 2 and pancreatic cystadenoma (n = 1. All patients underwent hematologic tests, immunological assessment, abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT, scintigraphy and endoscopy. Rresults: Increased white blood cell and platelet counts were the only hematological abnormalities. No immune deficit was found. Esophageal varices were still present in patients who underwent surgery because of portal hypertension, but none had a re-bleeding event. The ultrasonography, tomography and scintigraphy confirmed the presence of functional splenic remnants without significant size alteration. Conclusions: Subtotal splenectomy seems to be a safe procedure that can be useful to treat conditions involving the spleen. The functions of the splenic remnants are preserved during long periods of time.

  13. Scintigraphic evaluation of traumatic splenic lesions in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erasmie, U.; Mortensson, W.; Persson, U.; Laennergren, K.; St. Goerans Children's Hospital, Stockholm

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-eight children with recent blunt abdominal trauma which initially evoked clinical suspicion of splenic injury were examined with colloid scintigraphy of the spleen and the liver using multiple imaging views and with abdominal survey. Nineteen children were, in addition, examined with tomographic scintigraphy. The clinical findings and the course of the disorder were reanalysed. Scintigraphy indicated splenic injury in 56 children and hepatic injury in another 5 children. The left lateral and the left oblique were the optimum imaging views for detecting splenic ruptures. Tomographic scintigraphy did not improve the diagnostic yield. Abdominal survey failed to indicate almost every second case of splenic rupture and provided no additional information of significance. The clinical review agreed with the scintigraphic diagnosis of splenic lesions but, in addition, it suggested possible splenic lesions in another 10 children with normal scintigraphy. This discrepancy cannot be explained as surgery was not employed; the occurrence of splenic lesions too small to become detectable at scintigraphy or to provoke clinically evident symptoms may be supposed. (orig.)

  14. Bacterial phagocytosis by macrophage of autogenous splenic implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques R. G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Autogenous splenic implant seems to be the only alternative for preservation of splenic tissue after total splenectomy. This work was carried out to analyze the morphologic regeneration of autotransplanted splenic tissue in Wistar rats and to determine the bacterial phagocytic function of their macrophages. We utilized an experimental model with thirty-two rats, of both sexes, submitted to total splenectomy combined with autotransplantation in greater omentum of slices of the whole spleen mass. The animals were divided into two groups: I - young rats weighing 100 to 150 g; and II - adult rats weighing 250 to 300 g. Sixteen weeks later animals were intravenously inoculated with a suspension of Escherichia coli AB1157. Twenty minutes after inoculation, the animals were sacrificed and the splenic autotransplants were removed for morphological study. There was regeneration of autotransplanted splenic tissue in all animals. A similar morphological aspect among all animals was observed, with splenic tissue showing red and white pulps, lymphoid follicles, and marginal zone, with a moderate architectural disarrangement. Macrophages containing gram-negative bacterial aggregates as well as macrophages with hemosiderin pigments within the cytoplasm were observed. Blood vessels showed preserved walls, with no signs of vasculitis or thrombosis. The present results suggest that autogenous splenic implants in the greater omentum of the rat acquire the macro- and microscopic architecture of a normal spleen, with reduced dimensions, and preserve bacterial phagocyte function.

  15. Splenic rupture masquerading ruptured ectopic pregnancy | Kigbu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The classical triad of presentation of delayed menses, irregular vaginal bleeding and abdominal pain may not be encountered at all! Overwhelming features of abdominal pain, amenorrhea, pallor, abdominal tenderness, shifting dullness with positive pregnancy test gave a clinical diagnosis of ruptured ectopic pregnancy.

  16. A creative therapy in treating cavernous hemangioma of penis with copper wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Haiyang; Sun, Peng; Li, Peng; Xue, Aibing; Jin, Xunbo

    2014-10-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of penis are rare benign lesions infrequently described in the literature. No completely satisfactory treatment has been found to correct the cosmetic deformities especially the extensive hemangiomas of corpus penis. In light of the promising application of copper wire/needle in vascular malformations, we began a clinical study to investigate the safety, feasibility, and cosmetic effect of copper wire therapy in treating cavernous hemangioma of penis. Seven patients ranging in age from 12 to 32 years with penile cavernous hemangiomas entered our study from 2005 to 2011. All patients received treatments with percutaneous copper wires. Perioperative data including mean operation time, estimated blood loss, length of copper wire retention, and length of hospital stay were analyzed. All possible complications were noted, and cosmetic result was evaluated. Patients were followed up after discharge from the hospital. All operations were successful, and no obvious complications were observed. The patients were satisfied with the aesthetic results. Follow-up time ranged from 1 to 5 years. Recurrence was discovered in a patient with the largest lesion of corpus penis 2 months after the treatment. Secondary procedure was carried out with the same technique, and no lesions were found later. The shortage of studies on this topic prevented us from defining a therapeutic reference standard. The results of our study confirmed that copper wire therapy was a simple, safe, and useful option for penile cavernous hemangioma. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  17. Epithelioid hemangioma of bone: radiologic and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenker, Kathleen; Blumer, Steven [Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Jaramillo, Diego [Nicklaus Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Treece, Amanda L. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children' s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Bhatia, Aashim [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Epithelioid hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor that can occur in soft tissues or bone. The tumor is part of a spectrum of vascular tumors that also includes epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and angiosarcoma. When involving the bone, the tumor usually involves the metaphysis or diaphysis of the long tubular bones and most commonly occurs in adults. It has been rarely reported in pediatric patients, and in these reported patients, the tumor primarily involves the epiphysis. To review three cases of epithelioid hemangioma of bone occurring in pediatric patients involving the epiphysis and to explore the imaging features of this tumor. Retrospectively review three cases of epithelioid hemangioma occurring in skeletally immature patients. These tumors primarily involved the epiphyses or epiphyseal equivalent bones. One lesion was centered in the metaphysis but extended to the epiphysis. These are three cases presenting in an unusual location and at an unusual age. Epithelioid hemangioma, though rare, can occur in pediatric patients and appears to involve the epiphyses in these patients. This is in contrast to the usual age and location reported. Epithelioid hemangioma may be considered for an epiphyseal lesion in a skeletally immature patient. (orig.)

  18. Parenteral corticosteroids followed by early surgical resection of large amblyogenic eyelid hemangiomas in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Essawy R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rania El Essawy,1 Rasha Essameldin Galal21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, EgyptBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of early surgical resection of large amblyogenic subdermal eyelid hemangiomas in infants after prior short-term parenteral administration of corticosteroids.Methods: Sixteen infants were given dexamethasone 2 mg/kg/day in two divided doses for three consecutive days prior to scheduled surgical excision of large eyelid hemangiomas. The lesions were accessed via an upper eyelid crease, subeyebrow incision, or a lower eyelid subciliary incision.Results: In all cases, surgical excision of the entire lesion was possible with no significant intraoperative or postoperative complications. The levator muscle/aponeurosis complex was involved in 31.25% of cases and was managed by reinsertion or repositioning without resection. A satisfactory lid position and contour with immediate clearing of the visual axis was achieved in all but one case (93.8%.Conclusion: Parenteral corticosteroids helped in reducing volume and blood flow from the hemangiomas, allowing for very early total excision of large subdermal infantile hemangiomas without significant intraoperative hemorrhage. This resulted in immediate elimination of any reason for occlusion amblyopia. Long-term follow-up of visual development in these patients would help to demonstrate the effectiveness of this strategy compared with more conservative measures.Keywords: large eyelid hemangiomas, early surgical resection, parenteral corticosteroids

  19. Perinatal subglottic and hepatic hemangiomas as potential emergencies: effect of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, V.; Abrahamova, J.; Koutecky, J.; Kolihova, E.

    1980-01-01

    5 cases are analysed of perinatal hemangiomas in internal localizations representing relative or immediate emergencies. Three cases were subglottic proliferating hemangiomas with threatening suffocation, the other two were large hemangiomas of the liver causing significant hepatomegaly. In 3 children there were also hemangiomas of the skin and'or in the oral cavity seen as important signs in the diagnostic reflections on the nature of the urgent clinical pictures. Moreover one child with subglottic hemangioma suffered from hematological disorders characterizing the Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. In all the children transcutaneous radiotherapy was performed (ranging from 12 Gy in two weeks up to an exceptional dose of 25 Gy over 3 months). This resulted in recession of subjective complaints and, eventually, in complete regression of the irradiated angiomatous lesions, both subglottic and hepatic. The disorders of hemocoagulation also disappeared quickly and completely. At present, i.e., after 3 to 21 years, there are no adverse post-irradiattion changes in any of the patients. Nevertheless, in view of possible post-irradiation effects particularly on the thyroid gland, all the patients continue to be regularly followed up at the respective clinical departments. (author)

  20. Perinatal subglottic and hepatic hemangiomas as potential emergencies: effect of radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bek, V; Abrahamova, J; Koutecky, J; Kolihova, E [Karlova Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia). Fakulta Vseobecneho Lekarstvi; Fajstavr, J [Oto-rhino-laryngological Clinic, Pediatric Faculty, Charles University, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1980-01-01

    5 cases are analysed of perinatal hemangiomas in internal localizations representing relative or immediate emergencies. Three cases were subglottic proliferating hemangiomas with threatening suffocation, the other two were large hemangiomas of the liver causing significant hepatomegaly. In 3 children there were also hemangiomas of the skin and or in the oral cavity seen as important signs in the diagnostic reflections on the nature of the urgent clinical pictures. Moreover one child with subglottic hemangioma suffered from hematological disorders characterizing the Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. In all the children transcutaneous radiotherapy was performed (ranging from 12 Gy in two weeks up to an exceptional dose of 25 Gy over 3 months). This resulted in recession of subjective complaints and, eventually, in complete regression of the irradiated angiomatous lesions, both subglottic and hepatic. The disorders of hemocoagulation also disappeared quickly and completely. At present, i.e., after 3 to 21 years, there are no adverse post-irradiation changes in any of the patients. Nevertheless, in view of possible post-irradiation effects particularly on the thyroid gland, all the patients continue to be regularly followed up at the respective clinical departments.

  1. Laser therapy and sclerotherapy in the treatment of oral and maxillofacial hemangioma and vascular malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crişan, Bogdan; BǎciuÅ£, Mihaela; BǎciuÅ£, Grigore; Crişan, Liana; Bran, Simion; Rotar, Horatiu; Moldovan, Iuliu; Vǎcǎraş, Sergiu; Mitre, Ileana; Barbur, Ioan; Magdaş, Andreea; Dinu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Hemangioma and vascular malformations in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery is a pathology more often found in recent years in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the laser photocoagulation performed with a diode laser (Ga-Al-As) 980 nm wavelength in the treatment of vascular lesions which are located on the oral and maxillofacial areas, using color Doppler ultrasonography for evaluation of the results. We also made a comparison between laser therapy and sclerotherapy in order to establish treatment protocols and recommendations associated with this pathology. We conducted a controlled study on a group of 92 patients (38 male and 54 female patients, with an average age of 36 years) having low flow hemangioma and vascular malformations. Patients in this trial received one of the methods of treatment for vascular lesions such as hemangioma and vascular malformations: laser therapy or sclerotherapy. After laser therapy we have achieved a reduction in size of hemangioma and vascular malformations treated with such a procedure, and the aesthetic results were favorable. No reperfusion or recanalization of laser treated vascular lesions was observed after an average follow-up of 6 to 12 months. In case of sclerotherapy a reduction in the size of vascular lesions was also obtained. The 980 nm diode laser has been proved to be an effective tool in the treatment of hemangioma and vascular malformations in oral and maxillofacial area. Laser therapy in the treatment of vascular lesions was more effective than the sclerotherapy procedure.

  2. Synovial hemangiomas of the knee: magnetic resonance findings in six cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepcion, L.; Marti-Bonmati, L. M.; Dosda, R.; Llauger, J.; Palmer, J.; Mellado, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The synovial hemangioma is an uncommon benign vascular tumor that is difficult to diagnose on the basis of clinical signs Moreover, it has no characteristic radiographic features. The objective of the present report was to describe the MR findings associated with synovial hemangioma of the knee. We review the clinical and MR findings in six patients, with histologically confirmed synovial hemangioma of the Knee, studied with different MR systems and techniques. Synovial hemangiomas were isointense with respect to muscle in T1-weighted images, strongly hyperintense in T2-weighted sequences and presented wavy hypointense linear images. Gadolinium administration resulted in a marked enhancement, although it was heterogeneous in two of three cases analyzed. Although the findings are not pathognomonic, the presence of an intraarticular tumor of the knee that is isointense with respect to muscle in T1 and hyperintense in T2, and shows wavy hypointense images and a marked contrast uptake, may suggest the presence of synovial hemangioma. (Author) 11 refs

  3. Isolated splenic metastasis from a thymic carcinoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Xiangying; Zhao, Yaowei; Wu, Shikai

    2016-09-01

    Thymic carcinomas are rare tumors that arise in the anterior mediastinum. Most of these malignancies develop local metastases limited in the thorax. Splenic metastases from thymic carcinomas are extremely rare. Here we report a case of isolated splenic metastasis from a 38-year-old female patient with Stage IV thymic carcinoma, who was treated with chemoradiotherapy. At twenty-2 months follow-up, the patient was found to have an isolated spleen metastasis, which was treated by Cyberknife with a reduced size of the metastasis, representing a partial response. Although splenic metastasis is a rare phenomenon, physicians need to be aware of the possibility of such metastases.

  4. Splenic Infarct: A Rare Presentation in a Pediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palla Bhattarai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 16-year-old male presented with a two day history of persistent epigastric pain. His physical examination was significant for tenderness in the left hypochondriac region with a palpable spleen 2cm below the left sub-costal margin. A CT scan of the abdomen showed a splenic infarct. Heterophile and EBV VCA IgM antibody test were positive. This is a rare case of infectious mononucleosis presenting with splenic infarct in an adolescent male without comorbidities. Keywords: infectious mononucleosis; splenic infarct.

  5. Bacterial clearance after total splenectomy and splenic autotransplantation in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, R.G. E-mail: rmarques@uerj.br; Petroianu, Andy; Oliveira, M.B.N. de; Bernardo-Filho, M.; Boasquevisque, E.M.; Portela, M.C

    2002-12-01

    Wistar rats submitted to isolated total splenectomy or total splenectomy combined with splenic autotransplantation were inoculated with {sup 99m}technetium-labeled Escherichia coli. Measurement of isotope uptake in the organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system showed a greater bacterial bloodstream clearance in rats with splenic autotransplantation. Although uptake of bacteria in the spleen was higher in the control group, the number of bacteria remaining in the bloodstream did not differ between groups. These results indicate that splenic autotransplantation preserves the phagocytic function of the spleen.

  6. Bacterial clearance after total splenectomy and splenic autotransplantation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, R.G.; Petroianu, Andy; Oliveira, M.B.N. de; Bernardo-Filho, M.; Boasquevisque, E.M.; Portela, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Wistar rats submitted to isolated total splenectomy or total splenectomy combined with splenic autotransplantation were inoculated with 99m technetium-labeled Escherichia coli. Measurement of isotope uptake in the organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system showed a greater bacterial bloodstream clearance in rats with splenic autotransplantation. Although uptake of bacteria in the spleen was higher in the control group, the number of bacteria remaining in the bloodstream did not differ between groups. These results indicate that splenic autotransplantation preserves the phagocytic function of the spleen

  7. Gastric dilatation-volvulus after splenic torsion in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, D L; Nemzek, J; Riggs, C; Walshaw, R

    1995-08-01

    Two dogs developed gastric dilatation-volvulus 2 and 17 months, respectively, after splenectomy for treatment of splenic torsion. Splenic displacement and torsion may stretch the gastric ligaments, allowing increased mobility of the stomach. After splenectomy, an anatomic void may be created in the cranioventral part of the abdomen, contributing to the mobility of the stomach. Veterinarians treating dogs with isolated splenic torsion may wish to consider prophylactic gastropexy at splenectomy, to reduce the chance of future gastric dilatation-volvulus. Prophylactic gastropexy should be done only if the dog's hemodynamic status is stable enough to allow for performance of the additional surgery.

  8. [Application of degree of portal systemic shunting in assessing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with schistosomiasis cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Ju; Ying, Li; Chang-Xue, Ji; Biao, Zhang

    2017-03-27

    To discuss the application of the degree of portal systemic shunting in assessing the upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hepatic schistosomiasis. Thirty-three patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by hepatic schistosomiasis (a bleeding group) and 29 schistosomiasis cirrhosis patients without bleeding (a non-bleeding group) were enrolled as investigation subjects in Jinshan Hospital. The subjects were scanned by the 128 abdominal slice spiral CT. The portal systemic shunting vessels were reconstructed by using thin slab maximum intensity projection (TSMIP) and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). The degrees of the shunting vessels of the subjects were evaluated and compared, and the relationship between upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the degree of the shunting was analyzed. In the bleeding group, the occurrence rates of the shunting vessels were found as follows: 86.4% in left gastric varices, 68.2% in short gastric varices, 50.0% in esophageal varices, 50.0% in para-esophageal varices, 37.9% in gastric varices, 69.7% in gastric-renal varices, 51.5% in spleen-renal varices, 25.8% in abdominal wall varices, 15.2% in omentum varices, 63.6% in para-splenic varices, 34.8% in umbilical varices, 40.9% in retroperitoneal-paravertebral varices, and 36.4% in mesenteric varices. In the bleeding group, the occurrence rates and the degree of shunt were significantly higher than those in the non-bleeding group in esophageal varices, esophageal vein, left gastric vein and gastric varices (all P upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hepatic schistosomiasis. The patents with higher degree of the shunting vessels have a higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  9. Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngu, JH; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Chin, YK

    2017-01-01

    Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study.......Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study....

  10. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takamatsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  11. Prospective study of ultrasound with perflutrene contrast compared to magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Schmillevitch

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT:The incidence of hepatic hemangiomas ranges from 0.4% to 20% in the general population. Conventional ultrasound is usually the first diagnostic method to identify these hemangiomas, typically as an incidental finding. Ultrasonography with second generation contrast materials is being used in various areas of hepatology, yielding similar results to those obtained with computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the agreement between ultrasound with perflutrene contrast and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. METHODS: A total of 37 patients were prospectively examined between January 2006 and August 2008. A total of 57 hepatic nodules were documented in this group as incidental findings on routine ultrasound exams. The 37 patients were administered perflutrene contrast without adverse reactions, and were all submitted to magnetic resonance exams. RESULTS: Conventional ultrasound identified 15 patients with nodules typical of hemangiomas and 22 patients with other nodules. In 35 patients, the contrast characteristics were consistent with hepatic hemangiomas. CONCLUSION: Agreement between the data obtained from ultrasound with contrast and magnetic resonance was 94.5%. In discordant cases, the magnetic resonance diagnosis prevailed. In the case which presented indeterminate findings on contrast ultrasonography, magnetic resonance was repeated after 3 months, confirming the diagnosis of a hepatic hemangioma. A biopsy was performed on the suspected malignant nodule which also confirmed the presence of a hepatic hemangioma. Ultrasonography with contrast has the advantages of being more accessible to the public at large and lower cost than magnetic resonance. The results of our study highlight the need for a new protocol in hepatic nodules incidentally identified on conventional ultrasonography. In the case of typical hemangiomas

  12. Knowledge of doses from radiumtherapy for skin hemangioma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsaldin, A.; Diallo, I.; Ligot, L.; Chavaudra, J.; De-Vathaire, F.

    1997-01-01

    Before 1974 about 5000 children were irradiated at the Institut Gustave-Roussy for a skin hemangioma of whom 20% were treated with radium applicators. To evaluate the absorbed doses to these patients at any site, we have developed a software program which permits simulation of the actual patient and treatment conditions. Part of this software is devoted to constructing an Individual Computerized Tomography Anatomy (ICTA) based on real human transverse slices and auxological tables. From the generated phantom, 160 anatomical sites of epidemiological interest are defined and localized according to a Cartesian co-ordinate system. The gamma doses at all sites from Ra-226 applicators are calculated by an algorithm which permits separation of the radiation paths in air, tissue, and lungs. It includes a correction for attenuation and scatters in infinite and semi-infinite mediums. To evaluate the factor φ(r) for these corrections at any distance or position from the applicator, we have modelled the results from several Monte Carlo simulations. In the range of 1 to 10 cm, the φ(r) values obtained from our model showed good agreement with those obtained by published methods. For several cases, the absorbed doses at points in water and patients from radium applicators estimated by this software, were compared to those measured and estimated at the Karolinska Hospital. The results showed good agreement. (author)

  13. Liver hemangioma: diagnosis with double 99mTc labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piga, M.; Satta, L.; Loi, G.; Careddu, A.; Corrias, N.; Montaldo, C.; Schiffini, P.; Dore, F.; Madeddu, G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report on their experience with liver hemangioma (LH) diagnosis by means of a semplified method- that is, the simultaneous, in vivo, double labelling of liver reticuloendothelial system (RES) and of red blood cells (RBC) by 99m Tc. Twenty-eight patients with US diagnosis of suspected LH and 15 controls were examined after sequential iv injection of SnCl 2 , of 99m Tcμcolloid albumin and, after liver scintigraphy, of 99m Tc-pertechnetate to conclude in vivo RBC labelling. All patients underwent CT and, if necessary, CT-guided biopsy. Focal colloid defects were shown in 6/28 cases (expansive process). 15/15 controls showed unchanged non-filling defects after double labelling. Finally, the authors point out that, in the diagnosis of LH, sequential double labelling of liver RES and RBC appears to be a quicker scintigraphic techique than conventional ones. Moreover, this technique has the same high specificity and sensitivity as more time-consuming ones

  14. Expanded flap to repair facial scar left by radiotherapy of hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Donghong; Ma, Xinrong; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Lingfeng; Zhu, Baozhen

    2014-09-01

    This study explored the feasibility and clinical efficacy of expanded flap to repair facial scar left by radiotherapy of hemangioma. From March 2000 to April 2011, 13 cases of facial cicatrices left by radiotherapy of hemangioma have been treated with implantation surgery of facial skin dilator under local anesthesia. After water flood expansion for 1-2 months, resection of facial scar was performed, and wound repairing with expansion flap transfer was done. Thirteen patients were followed up from 5 months to 3 years. All patients tolerated flap transfer well; no contracture occurred during the facial expansion flap transfer. The incision scar was not obvious, and its color and texture were identical to surrounding skin. In conclusion, the use of expanded flap transfer to repair the facial scar left by radiotherapy of hemangioma is advantageous due to its simplicity, flexibility, and large area of repairing. This method does not affect the subsequent facial appearance.

  15. Hepatic hemangioma: contrast enhancement patterns on two-phase spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Jang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Ah Young; Lee, Ki Yeol

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate contrast enhancement patterns of hemangioma according to size, as seen during the arterial and portal venous phase of spiral CT. Overall, the most common enhancement pattern was peripheral high (44/82, 53.7%), during the arterial and portal venous phase. The second and third most common patterns were uniform high (11/82, 13.4%) and peripheral high-uniform high (9/82, 11.0%), also during the arterial and portal venous phase. In tumors smaller than 20 mm, low-low attenuation was seen in eight (9.8%), and iso-low attenuation in two (2.4%), during the arterial and portal venous phase, respectively. On two-phase spiral CT, the most common enhancement pattern of hemangioma was peripheral high, seen during the arterial and portal venous phase. However, a small hemangioma less than 2cm may show atypical patterns, including low and iso attenuation. (author). 23 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  16. Occipital Intraosseous Hemangioma over Torcula: Unusual Presentation with Raised Intracranial Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K V L N; Beniwal, Manish; Vazhayil, Vikas; Somanna, Sampath; Yasha, T C

    2017-12-01

    Hemangiomas of the bone are benign, uncommon, slow-growing lesions accounting for occipital hemangiomas are rare, and occipital hemangiomas presenting with features of raised intracranial tension are, with only 2 cases reported to date. In this case report, we describe the unique case of a 30-year-old male patient presenting with raised intracranial pressure due to venous obstruction at the torcula. The patient underwent excision of the lesion and became symptom free. Although these are benign lesions, they can have a varied clinical presentation. An understanding of the different clinical presentations and surgical nuances in excising such tumors can lead to early diagnosis and good patient outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  18. Radioisotope spleen scan in patients with splenic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishalany, H.G.; Miller, J.H.; Woolley, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The technetium /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid liver-spleen scan is a valuable aid in diagnosis and treatment of patients with splenic injury. After reviewing the charts of 47 patients who were ill as a result of splenic trauma, we came to the following conclusions: (1) the scan identified the injury, accurately mapped its extent, and indicated the presence or absence of associated liver injuries; (2) the scans were useful in following the extent and rate of healing of the splenic injury; (3) the scan is an indirect measurement of of return of splenic fuction; (4) the procedure can be performed in a reasonable time frame with no serious morbidity; and (5) the indications, contraindications, and timing of scans are now reasonably well established

  19. A case of posttraumatic splenic translocation into the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosnowski, P.; Sikorski, L.; Ziemianski, A.

    1993-01-01

    A case of the left diaphragmatic hernia due to blunt thoracic and abdominal trauma is presented. Characteristic radiological signs of splenic translocation into the thorax contributed to quick diagnosis and immediate surgical intervention. (author)

  20. Radioisotope spleen scan in patients with splenic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishalany, H.G.; Miller, J.H.; Woolley, M.M.

    1982-09-01

    The technetium /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid liver-spleen scan is a valuable aid in diagnosis and treatment of patients with splenic injury. After reviewing the charts of 47 patients who were ill as a result of splenic trauma, we came to the following conclusions: (1) the scan identified the injury, accurately mapped its extent, and indicated the presence or absence of associated liver injuries; (2) the scans were useful in following the extent and rate of healing of the splenic injury; (3) the scan is an indirect measurement of of return of splenic fuction; (4) the procedure can be performed in a reasonable time frame with no serious morbidity; and (5) the indications, contraindications, and timing of scans are now reasonably well established.

  1. Embolization of a large, symptomatic splenic artery pseudoaneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukliński, Adam; Batycki, Krzysztof; Matuszewski, Wiesław; Ostrach, Andrzej; Kupis, Zbigniew; Łęgowik, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysm is the third most common abdominal aneurysm. Most often it is due to pancreatitis. There were only 19 cases of aneurysms larger than 5 cm in diameter described in the literature. Management of splenic artery aneurysms depends on the size and symptoms. Invasive treatment modalities involve open procedures and interventional radiology methods (endovascular). A 44-years-old male with chronic pancreatitis, in a gradually worsening general condition due to a large splenic artery aneurysm, was subjected to the procedure. Blood flow through the aneurysm was cut-off by implanting a covered stent between celiac trunk and common hepatic artery. Patient’s general condition rapidly improved, allowing discharge home in good state soon after the procedure. Percutaneous embolization appears to be the best method of treatment of large splenic artery aneurysms. Complications of such treatment are significantly less dangerous than those associated with surgery

  2. US and CT findings in splenic focal lesions in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinina, V.; Rizzi, E.B.; Mazzuoli, G.; Bibbolilno, C.; David, V.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the role of US and CT in focal splenic lesions in AIDS patients in relation to etiology. Material and Methods: A total of 66 patients with AIDS and focal splenic lesions were examined with sonography. CT with administration of contrast medium was performed in 12 cases. Results: Of the focal splenic lesions, 67% were correlated with an infective pathology with prevalence of Mycobacteria tuberculosis (75%), 26% were neoplastic and 6% splenic infarcts. The lesions were hypoechoic in 60% of the cases, while 10% were hypoanechoic and 1% anechoic. At CT, all lesions appeared hypodense, even after i.v. administration of contrast medium. Conclusion: The combination of echographic reports and clinical and laboratory data allows for a diagnosis that can be confirmed, and making a decision for effective therapy of AIDS is possible. CT does not provide any additional information

  3. Splenic Operations In A Teaching Hospital, South-Western Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %. Conclusion: As trauma is the most common indication for operations on the spleen, spleen conservation should be practiced more often where open procedures are indicated. Keywords: Splenic operations, Spleen conservation surgery, ...

  4. Melioidosis Presenting with Isolated Splenic Abscesses: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Lin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscesses caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei are rarely reported in Taiwan. Here we report a middle-aged man who presented with fever, chills, and general malaise for several days. Abdominal echo revealed isolated splenic abscesses and he received antibiotics treatment according to the initial blood culture result, Serratia marcescens. However, fever did not subside. Then he was referred to our hospital and meropenem was prescribed. Fever subsided 5 days after the beginning of meropenem administration. Repeated fine-needle aspiration of splenic abscesses drained out the pus, which was cultured as B. pseudomallei. He was finally diagnosed as a case of melioidosis based on microbiological evidence. Physicians must take melioidosis into consideration when splenic abscesses are encountered clinically.

  5. Lobular Capillary Hemangioma of the Nasal Cavity: A Retrospective Study of 15 Cases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hang Chi Chi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lobular capillary hemangioma of the nasal cavity is an uncommon benign vascular tumor of unknown etiology. There have been only very few case reports in Taiwan. Aims: This study aimed to analyze the clinical features, radiological findings, treatment modalities, and outcome of lobular capillary hemangioma treated at a teaching hospital in Taiwan during a period of 10 years. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Retrospective chart reviews were performed on patients who were diagnosed with lobular capillary hemangioma of the nasal cavity at Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, from January 2003 to December 2012. Data retrieved included age, gender, clinical symptoms, computed tomography (CT findings, treatment modalities, and outcome for further analysis. Results: Of the 15 patients identified, there were five males and ten females ranging from 17 to 86 years of age, with a mean age of 43.8±20.2. Epistaxis was the most common presenting symptom. All patients presented a unilateral nasal lobular capillary hemangioma. The most commonly affected site was the anterior nasal septum, followed by the inferior turbinate, vestibule, middle turbinate, and posterior nasal septum. All lesions presented as soft tissue density without bony erosions under CT examination. Endoscopic excisional surgery (n=12 or classical local excision (n=3 was performed for complete removal of the hemangioma. No evidence of recurrence was observed with 6 to 75 months of follow-up. Conclusion: Lobular capillary hemangioma of the nasal cavity was usually found to occur in anterior septum with epistaxis. Complete excision with endoscopic surgery or classical local excision was recommended and recurrence can be prevented.

  6. Diagnostic problems with parasitic and non-parasitic splenic cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adas Gokhan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The splenic cysts constitute a very rare clinical entity. They may occur secondary to trauma or even being more seldom due to parasitic infestations, mainly caused by ecchinocccus granulosus. Literature lacks a defined concencus including the treatment plans and follow up strategies, nor long term results of the patients. In the current study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnosis, management of patients with parasitic and non-parasitic splenic cysts together with their long term follow up progresses. Methods Twenty-four patients with splenic cysts have undergone surgery in our department over the last 9 years. Data from eighteen of the twenty-four patients were collected prospectively, while data from six were retrospectively collected. All patients were assessed in terms of age, gender, hospital stay, preoperative diagnosis, additional disease, serology, ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT, cyst recurrences and treatment. Results In this study, the majority of patients presented with abdominal discomfort and palpable swelling in the left hypochondrium. All patients were operated on electively. The patients included 14 female and 10 male patients, with a mean age of 44.77 years (range 20–62. Splenic hydatid cysts were present in 16 patients, one of whom also had liver hydatid cysts (6.25%. Four other patients were operated on for a simple cyst (16% two patients for an epithelial cyst, and the last two for splenic lymphangioma. Of the 16 patients diagnosed as having splenic hydatit cysts, 11 (68.7% were correctly diagnosed. Only two of these patients were administered benzimidazole therapy pre-operatively because of the risk of multicystic disease The mean follow-up period was 64 months (6–108. There were no recurrences of splenic cysts. Conclusion Surgeons should keep in mind the possibility of a parasitic cyst when no definitive alternative diagnosis can be made. In the treatment of splenic hydatidosis, benzimidazole

  7. Splenic Pregnancy: A New Minimally Invasive Approach to Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klang, Eyal, E-mail: eyalkla@hotmail.com; Keddel, Nicholas; Inbar, Yael; Rimon, Uri; Amitai, Michal [Tel Hashomer Hospital, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Israel)

    2016-09-15

    The spleen is a rare site of abdominal ectopic pregnancy. In a review of the literature, we found 16 published cases of primary splenic pregnancies. Of the cases identified, all received surgical intervention, with one case successfully treated with laparoscopic methotrexate injection, and the rest underwent splenectomy. We would like to present a case of primary splenic pregnancy in a 35-year-old woman successfully treated with percutaneous image-guided injection of methotrexate and KCl.

  8. Splenic simulation by left hepatic lobe following splenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, A.; Harbert, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Remodeling of the liver following splenectomy may simulate hypertrophy of an accessory spleen on sulfur colloid scans. Two patients are reported. In one case splenic simulation is attributed to unusual hepatic scarring confirmed at autopsy. In the second the unusual configuration appears to have been caused by molding of the liver. The clinician should be aware of possible splenic simulation in postsplenectomy patients suspected of hypersplenism

  9. Splenic Pregnancy: A New Minimally Invasive Approach to Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klang, Eyal; Keddel, Nicholas; Inbar, Yael; Rimon, Uri; Amitai, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The spleen is a rare site of abdominal ectopic pregnancy. In a review of the literature, we found 16 published cases of primary splenic pregnancies. Of the cases identified, all received surgical intervention, with one case successfully treated with laparoscopic methotrexate injection, and the rest underwent splenectomy. We would like to present a case of primary splenic pregnancy in a 35-year-old woman successfully treated with percutaneous image-guided injection of methotrexate and KCl.

  10. Recurrent Bleeding After Perimesencephalic Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauw, Frans; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kizilates, Ufuk; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-12-01

    Perimesencephalic hemorrhage (PMH) is a type of subarachnoid hemorrhage with excellent long-term outcomes. Only 1 well-documented case of in-hospital rebleeding after PMH is described in the literature, which occurred after initiating antithrombotic treatment because of myocardial ischemia. We describe a patient with PMH without antithrombotic treatment who had 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding on the day of ictus. To validate the radiologic findings, we conducted a case-control study. Six neuroradiologists and 2 neuroradiology fellows performed a blinded assessment of serial unenhanced head computed tomography (CT) scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern (1 index patient, 6 patients with PMH, 1 patient with perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and basilar artery aneurysm) to investigate a potential increase in amount of subarachnoid blood. A 56-year-old woman with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and negative CT angiography had 2 episodes after the onset headache with a sudden increase of the headache. Blinded assessment of serial head CT scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern identified the patient who was clinically suspected to have 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding to have an increased amount of subarachnoid blood on 2 subsequent CT scans. Recurrent bleeding after PMH may also occur in patients not treated with antithrombotics. Even after early rebleeding, the prognosis of PMH is excellent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Generalized enchondromatosis with unusual complications of soft tissue calcifications and hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaibara, N.; Katsuki, I.; Hotokebuchi, T.; Takagishi, K.

    1982-01-01

    Generalized enchondromatosis is a newly delineated type of enchondromatosis. Radiographically there are multiple enchondromata in almost all metaphyses of the long and short tubular bones and the lesions are in almost the same stage of development with mild platyspondyly and skull deformity. The pelvic changes are characteristic and, together with the metaphyseal changes of the long and short tubular bones, are probably diagnostic of this disorder. The present case demonstrates advanced radiographic features of this disorder associated with unusual soft tissue calcifications and hemangiomas. The presence of hemangiomas in our case as well as three cases in the literature suggests this feature is more than a coincidence. (orig.)

  12. A hemangioma on the floor of the mouth presenting as a ranula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoulakis, Charalampos E; Khaldi, Lubna; Serletis, Demetre; Semertzidis, Themistoklis

    2008-11-01

    A painless, bluish, submucosal swelling on one side of the floor of the mouth usually indicates the presence of a ranula. Rarely, such a swelling may be caused by an inflammatory disease process in a salivary gland, a neoplasm in the sublingual salivary gland, a lymphatic nodular swelling, or embryologic cysts. We report a patient with swelling in the floor of her mouth that was clinically diagnosed as a ranula. Suspicion arose during surgery that it was a vascular tumor and, on histologic testing, the swelling was confirmed to be a hemangioma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of a hemangioma presenting as a ranula.

  13. Non-operative management of adult blunt splenic injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; GAO Jin-mou; Jean-Claude Baste

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indication of nonoperative management of adult blunt splenic injuries.Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all adult patients (age > 15 years ) with blunt splenic injuries admitted to the department of vascular surgery of Pellegrin hospital in France from 1999 to 2003. We managed splenic injuries non-operatively in all appropriate patients without regard to age.Results: During the 4 years, 54 consecutive adult patients with blunt splenic injuries were treated in the hospital. A total of 27 patients with stable hemodynamic status were treated non-operatively at first, of which 2 patients were failed to non-operative treatment. The successful percentage of non-operative management was 92.6 %. In the 54 patients, 7 of 8 patients older than 55 years were treated with non-operative management. Two cases developing postoperatively subphrenic infection were healed by proper treatment. In the series, there was no death.Conclusions: Non-operative management of low-grade splenic injuries can be accomplished with an acceptable low-failure rate. If the clinical and laboratory parameters difficult for surgeons to make decisions, they can depend on Resciniti' s CT (computed tomography)scoring system to select a subset of adults with splenic trauma who are excellent candidates for a trial of nonoperative management. The patients older than 55 years are not absolutely inhibited to receive non-operative management.

  14. Management and treatment of splenic trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Serkan; Guzel, Mahmut; Turan, Cuneyt; Doğanay, Selim; Kopru, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    To assess types of splenic traumas, accompanying injuries, their management and results. We studied the reports of 90 patients (64 boys, 26 girls) who were treated for splenic injuries as a result of blunt abdominal trauma between 2005-2012. Age, sex, hospitalization time, mechanisms of traumas, accompanying injuries and management methods were recorded. Causes of trauma were falls from height (46 patients, 51%), pedestrian traffic accidents (17 patients, 19%), passenger traffic accidents (11 patients, 12%), bicycle accidents (10 patients, 11%) and falling objects from height (6 patients, 6.6%). Splenic injury alone was observed in 57 patients (63.3%) and other organ injuries together with splenic injury in 33 patients (36.7%). Splenectomy was performed in six patients (6.6%) due to hemodynamic instability and small intestine repair due to small intestine injury in one patient (1.1%). None of these patients died from their injuries. A large proportion of splenic injuries recover with conservative therapy. Some of the advantages of conservative therapy include short hospitalization time, less need for blood transfusion, and less morbidity and mortality. Falls from height and traffic accidents are important factors in etiology. The possibility of other organ injuries together with splenic injuries should be considered.

  15. Prune belly syndrome, splenic torsion, and malrotation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Sifrance; Grossman, Eric; Barsness, Katherine A

    2013-02-01

    An 18 year old male with a history of prune belly syndrome (PBS) presented with acute abdominal pain and palpable left upper quadrant mass. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed a medialized spleen with a "whirl sign" in the splenic vessels, consistent with splenic torsion. Coincidentally, the small bowel was also noted to be on the right side of the abdomen, while the colon was located on the left, indicative of malrotation. Emergent diagnostic laparoscopy confirmed splenic torsion and intestinal malrotation. Successful laparoscopic reduction of the splenic torsion was achieved, however, conversion to an open procedure by a vertical midline incision was necessary owing to the patient's unique anatomy. Open splenopexy with a mesh sling and Ladd's procedure were subsequently performed. Malrotation and wandering spleen are known, rare associated anomalies in PBS; however, both have not been reported concurrently in a patient with PBS in the literature. In patients with PBS, acute abdominal pain, and an abdominal mass, high clinical suspicion for gastrointestinal malformations and prompt attention can result in spleen preservation and appropriate malrotation management. We present a case of a teenager who presented with a history of PBS, acute abdominal pain, and a palpable abdominal mass. The patient was found to have splenic torsion and intestinal malrotation. The clinical findings, diagnostic imaging, and surgical treatment options of splenic torsion are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Splenic radionuclide angiography in the portal hypertension assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artiko, V.; Kostic, K.; Perisic-Savic, M.; Janosevic, S.; Obradovic, V.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is the presentation of the hepatic and splenic radionuclide angiograms (SRA) in various portal blood flow disturbances, as well as an analysis of the splenic arterio-venous ratio (SAVR) results, obtained as a slope ratio between inflow, arterial and the outflow, venous phases on the splenic TA curve. Splenic radionuclide angiography was performed after bolus injection of 740 MBq of 99m-Tc-pertechnetate, using ROTA scintillation camera (Siemens) and MicroDelta computer'. Four types of the SRA were established: a) very acute descendent slope (DS) in the controls; b) less acute DS in the patients with LC; c) horisontal venous phase caused by impaired outflow to the portal vein in LC with expressed portal hypertension, collateral circulation and LCEV; d) ascending outflow phase, characterizing the splenic and/or portal venous thrombosis. SAVR values were increased in liver cirrhosis (LC) with esophageal vahces (LCEV, n=10) (6.1 +/- 3.4) in comparison to the controls (n=10)(3.7 +/- 1.3)(U=25, p 0.05). However, in another two patients with LC and in 8 with LCEV it was not possible to access SAVR because of the appearance of the horisontal or rising venous phase on the splenic TA curve, instead of descendent. SRA and increased SAVR values reflect various blood flow alterations in the portal system and give additional data to the more accurate interpretation of the results obtained by hepatic radionuclide angiography. (authors)

  17. [Isolated splenic metastases from cervical cancer: a rare entity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalón-López, José Sebastián; Souto-del Bosque, Rosalía; Montañez-Lugo, Juan Ignacio; Chávez-González, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Splenic metastases from solid tumors are a rare event with an incidence of only 2.9% to 9%. Splenic metastases from cervical cancer are a rare entity. Only a few cases have been reported of isolated spleen metastases from cervical cancer. We present the case of a 76-year-old woman with moderately differentiated endocervical adenocarcinoma stromal and endocervical invasion. Clinical stage was Ib1 and Ca-125 values of 150 U. She was managed with hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. She received pelvic radiotherapy (45 Gy) followed 24 Gy of brachytherapy. Two years later she presented with abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography showed two splenic parenchymal lesions without disease in the remainder of the abdominal cavity and chest with a Ca-125 of 2,733 U. The patient is submitted to splenectomy. Histopathology demonstrates splenic metastases of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma from the endocervix. Immunohistochemical stain showed positivity from carcinoembryonic antigen; estrogen and progesterone receptors are negative. Ca-125 level 8 weeks after surgery was 16 U/ml. The patient received six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin. At 12 months follow-up the patient is alive and without evidence of tumor activity. The spleen is an uncommon site of metastasis. Splenectomy is considered the appropriate treatment in order to avoid complications such as splenic rupture and splenic vein thrombosis as well as to improve pain control from splenomegaly. Twelve months after surgery our patient is alive and without evidence of tumor activity.

  18. A Mysterious Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding Disguising Itself as Diverticulosis and Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Review of Diagnostic Modalities for Aortoenteric Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viplove Senadhi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available An 81-year-old male with a history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and peptic ulcer disease (PUD presented with 2 episodes of maroon stools for 3 days and was found to be orthostatic. His PUD was thought to have accounted for a previous upper gastrointestinal (GI bleed. A colonoscopy revealed 3 polyps and a few diverticuli throughout the colon that were considered to be the source of the bleeding. Two months later, the patient had massive lower GI bleeding and developed hypovolemic shock with a positive bleeding scan in the splenic flexure; however, angiography was negative. A repeat colonoscopy revealed transverse/descending colon diverticular disease and the patient was scheduled for a left hemicolectomy for presumed diverticular bleeding. Intraoperatively, an aortoenteric (AE fistula secondary to an aorto-bi-iliac bypass graft placed during an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair 14 years prior was discovered and was found to be the source of the bleeding. The patient had an AE fistula repair and did well postoperatively without further bleeding. AE fistulas can present with either upper GI or lower GI bleeding, and are universally deadly if left untreated. AE fistulas often present with a herald bleed before life-threatening bleeding. A careful history should always be elicited in patients with risk factors of AAAs such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia and a history of smoking. Strong clinical suspicion in the setting of a scrupulous patient history is the most important factor that allows for the diagnosis of an AE fistula. There are numerous diagnostic modalities for AE fistula, but there is not one specific test that universally diagnoses AE fistulas. Nuclear medicine scans and angiography should not be completely relied on for the diagnosis of AE fistulas or other lower GI bleeds for that manner. Although the conventional paradigm for evaluating lower GI bleeds incorporates nuclear medicine scans and angiography, there is

  19. Fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens; Johansen, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Hypofibrinogenaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but the optimal treatment level, the use of preemptive treatment and the preferred source of fibrinogen remain disputed. Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly used and recommended for bleeding with acquired haemostatic...

  20. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander Ahm; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The management of variceal bleeding remains a clinical challenge with a high mortality. Standardisation in supportive and new therapeutic treatments seems to have improved survival within the last 25 years. Although overall survival has improved in recent years, mortality is still closely related...... to failure to control initial bleeding or early re-bleeding occurring in up to 30-40% of patients. Initial procedures are to secure and protect the airway, and administer volume replacement to stabilize the patient. Treatment with vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as possible, since a reduction...... in portal pressure is associated with a better control of bleeding and may facilitate later endoscopic procedures. Vasopressin and its analogues Terlipressin and somatostatin and analogues are the two types of medicine, which has been evaluated. In meta-analysis, only Terlipressin have demonstrated effects...

  1. Side Effects: Bleeding and Bruising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy, can increase patients’ risk of bleeding and bruising, also called thrombocytopenia. Learn about steps to take if you are at increased risk of a low platelet count.

  2. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benign ulcer. Mallory-Weiss tear .... pressure and direct thermal coagulation. Alternatively, use ... Forrest classification of peptic ulcer bleeding related to risks of rebleeding. (NBVV - non- .... esomeprazole for prevention of recurrent peptic ulcer ...

  3. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for hemangioma of the cavernous sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Chia; Sheehan, Jason P; Kano, Hideyuki; Akpinar, Berkcan; Martinez-Alvarez, Roberto; Martinez-Moreno, Nuria; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Lunsford, L Dade; Liu, Kang-Du

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Cavernous sinus hemangiomas (CSHs) are rare vascular tumors. A direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage and incomplete tumor resection. Although stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a therapeutic alternative to microsurgery, outcome studies are few. Authors of the present study evaluated the role of SRS for CSH. METHODS An international multicenter study was conducted to review outcome data in 31 patients with CSH. Eleven patients had initial microsurgery before SRS, and the other 20 patients (64.5%) underwent Gamma Knife SRS as the primary management for their CSH. Median age at the time of radiosurgery was 47 years, and 77.4% of patients had cranial nerve dysfunction before SRS. Patients received a median tumor margin dose of 12.6 Gy (range 12-19 Gy) at a median isodose of 55%. RESULTS Tumor regression was confirmed by imaging in all 31 patients, and all patients had greater than 50% reduction in tumor volume at 6 months post-SRS. No patient had delayed tumor growth, new cranial neuropathy, visual function deterioration, adverse radiation effects, or hypopituitarism after SRS. Twenty-four patients had presented with cranial nerve disorders before SRS, and 6 (25%) of them had gradual improvement. Four (66.7%) of the 6 patients with orbital symptoms had symptomatic relief at the last follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Stereotactic radiosurgery was effective in reducing the volume of CSH and attaining long-term tumor control in all patients at a median of 40 months. The authors' experience suggests that SRS is a reasonable primary and adjuvant treatment modality for patients in whom a CSH is diagnosed.

  4. Splenic injury caused by therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dailey, M.O.; Coleman, C.N.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1981-01-01

    Splenic irradiation in the course of therapy for lymphoma can result in functional deficit, sometimes as severe as that caused by splenectomy, placing the patient at risk for fatal infection. We examined 33 spleens obtained at necropsy from patients irradiated for lymphomas (mainly Hodgkin's disease) and compared them with 18 nonirradiated spleens from similar patients. One to 8 years after a mean radiation dose of 3899 rads, fractionated over 5-6 weeks, most irradiated spleens were small (average weight 75 g) and had thick, wrinkled capsules, often with focal hemorrhage. There was collapse of the parenchyma, with close apposition of trabeculae and mild to severe diffuse fibrosis of the red pulp. Lymphocyte depletion was obvious in more than 50% of the specimens. The most consistent alteration was myointimal proliferation of arteries. Significant intimal thickening was seen only in the irradiated specimens. Similar myointimal changes were found in the veins of three cases. While none of these changes is specific, their combination appears to be characteristic of delayed radiation injury to the spleen

  5. Isolated Retroperitoneal Hydatid Cyst Invading Splenic Hilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hydatid disease (HD is an infestation that is caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. The liver is affected in approximately two-thirds of patients, the lungs in 25%, and other organs in a small proportion. Primary retroperitoneal hydatid cyst is extremely rare. The most common complaint is abdominal pain; however, the clinical features of HD may be generally dependent on the location of the cyst. Case Presentation. A 43-year-old female was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain. Her physical examination was normal. Computed tomography (CT revealed a 17 × 11 cm cystic lesion, with a thick and smooth wall that is located among the left liver lobe, diaphragm, spleen, tail of the pancreas, and transverse colon and invading the splenic hilum. Total cystectomy and splenectomy were performed. Pathological examination was reported as cyst hydatid. Discussion. Cysts in the peritoneal cavity are mainly the result of the spontaneous or traumatic rupture of concomitant hepatic cysts or surgical inoculation of a hepatic cyst. Serological tests contribute to diagnosis. In symptomatic and large hydatid peritoneal cysts, surgical resection is the only curative treatment. Total cystectomy is the gold standard. Albendazole or praziquantel is indicated for inoperable and disseminated cases. Percutaneous aspiration, injection, and reaspiration (PAIR technique is another nonsurgical option.

  6. The reevaluation of plain roentgenological study in isolated splenic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Ihn; Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Kil Jeong; Oh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul

    1986-01-01

    The spleen is the most common intraabdominal organ injured in blunt trauma. Although physical signs and symptoms, coupled with abdominal paracentesis and peritoneal lavage confirm intraabdominal injury, but isolated splenic injury especially delayed rupture, the diagnosis and clinical course is variable. We are reevaluation of plain roentgenologic findings for the light of early diagnosis of isolated splenic injury. 24 patients of the autopsy and surgically proven isolated splenic injury at Chosun University Hospital in the period from 1980 January to 1986 June were analyzed plain roentgenogram retrospectively. The results were as follows: 1. Male patients predominate, constitution 87.5%. Incidence has been greatest in second to fourth decade. 2. Mode of trauma causing isolated splenic injury is most common in motor vehicle accident and others are fall down, struck by fist, blow to object, uncertain blunt trauma. 3. Delayed rupture of spleen occurred in 2 cases (8.3%). 4. Common patterns of splenic injury is simple laceration that involves both the capsule and the parenchyma and a laceration that involves the splenic pedicle. 5. Plain chest roentgenographic findings were abnormal in 4 cases (16.7%). The most common plain abdominal roentgenographic findings was the evidence of intaabdominal fluid in 21 cases (87.5%). The others are included in order of frequency; gastric dilatation, prominent mucosal folds on greater curvature of the stomach, evidence of pelvic fluid, displacement of stomach to the right or downward, mass density in the region of spleen. 6. No relationship can be shown between patterns of injury, time lapse after trauma and plain roentgenological findings. But the evidence of intraabdominal fluid is most important in the light of early diagnosis. 7. Diagnosis of splenic injury may be most helpful that in combination with clinical history, clinical symptoms and signs and plain film findings. In delayed rupture, diagnostic value of serial examination

  7. The reevaluation of plain roentgenological study in isolated splenic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong Ihn; Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Kil Jeong; Oh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-10-15

    The spleen is the most common intraabdominal organ injured in blunt trauma. Although physical signs and symptoms, coupled with abdominal paracentesis and peritoneal lavage confirm intraabdominal injury, but isolated splenic injury especially delayed rupture, the diagnosis and clinical course is variable. We are reevaluation of plain roentgenologic findings for the light of early diagnosis of isolated splenic injury. 24 patients of the autopsy and surgically proven isolated splenic injury at Chosun University Hospital in the period from 1980 January to 1986 June were analyzed plain roentgenogram retrospectively. The results were as follows: 1. Male patients predominate, constitution 87.5%. Incidence has been greatest in second to fourth decade. 2. Mode of trauma causing isolated splenic injury is most common in motor vehicle accident and others are fall down, struck by fist, blow to object, uncertain blunt trauma. 3. Delayed rupture of spleen occurred in 2 cases (8.3%). 4. Common patterns of splenic injury is simple laceration that involves both the capsule and the parenchyma and a laceration that involves the splenic pedicle. 5. Plain chest roentgenographic findings were abnormal in 4 cases (16.7%). The most common plain abdominal roentgenographic findings was the evidence of intaabdominal fluid in 21 cases (87.5%). The others are included in order of frequency; gastric dilatation, prominent mucosal folds on greater curvature of the stomach, evidence of pelvic fluid, displacement of stomach to the right or downward, mass density in the region of spleen. 6. No relationship can be shown between patterns of injury, time lapse after trauma and plain roentgenological findings. But the evidence of intraabdominal fluid is most important in the light of early diagnosis. 7. Diagnosis of splenic injury may be most helpful that in combination with clinical history, clinical symptoms and signs and plain film findings. In delayed rupture, diagnostic value of serial examination

  8. Hepatic hemangiomas: spectrum of US appearances on gray-scale, power doppler, and contrast-enhanced US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Han Joon Koo; Kim, Ah Young; Lee, Hyun Ju; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Young Hoon; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2000-01-01

    Because US plays a key role in the initial evaluation of hepatic hemangiomas, knowledge of the entire spectrum of US appearances of these tumors is important. Most hemangiomas have a distinctive US appearance, and even with those with atypical appearances on conventional gray-scale US, specific diagnoses can be made using pulse-inversion harmonic US with contrast agents. In this essay, we review the spectrum of US appearances of hepatic hemangiomas on conventional gray-scale, power Doppler, and pulse-inversion harmonic US with contrast agents. (author)

  9. Role of fractionated radiotherapy in patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Min; Yoon, Sang Min; Lee, Su Min; Park, Jin Hong; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Sang Wook; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    We performed this retrospective study to investigate the outcomes of patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus after fractionated radiotherapy. We analyzed 10 patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus who were treated with conventional radiotherapy between January 2000 and December 2016. The median patient age was 54 years (range, 31–65 years), and 8 patients (80.0%) were female. The mean hemangioma volume was 34.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 6.8–83.2 cm{sup 3}), and fractionated radiation was administered to a total dose of 50–54 Gy with a daily dose of 2 Gy. The median follow-up period was 6.8 years (range, 2.2–8.8 years). At last follow-up, the volume of the tumor had decreased in all patients. The average tumor volume reduction rate from the initial volume was 72.9% (range, 18.9–95.3%). All 10 of the cranial neuropathies observed before radiation therapy had improved, with complete symptomatic remission in 9 cases (90%) and partial remission in 1 case (10%). No new acute neurologic impairments were reported after radiotherapy. One probable compressive optic neuropathy was observed at 1 year after radiotherapy. Fractionated radiotherapy achieves both symptomatic and radiologic improvements. It is a well-tolerated treatment modality for hemangiomas of the cavernous sinus.

  10. Urea immunoliposome inhibits human vascular endothelial cell proliferation for hemangioma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Urea injection has been used in hemangioma treatment as sclerotherapy. It shrinks vascular endothelial cells and induces degeneration, necrosis, and fibrosis. However, this treatment still has disadvantages, such as lacking targeting and difficulty in controlling the urea dosage. Thus, we designed a urea immunoliposome to improve the efficiency of treatment. Methods The urea liposome was prepared by reverse phase evaporation. Furthermore, the urea immunoliposome was generated by coupling the urea liposome with a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) monoclonal antibody using the glutaraldehyde cross-linking method. The influence of the urea immunoliposome on cultured human hemangioma vascular endothelial cells was observed preliminarily. Results Urea immunoliposomes showed typical liposome morphology under a transmission electron microscope, with an encapsulation percentage of 54.4% and a coupling rate of 36.84% for anti-VEGFR. Treatment with the urea immunoliposome significantly inhibited the proliferation of hemangioma vascular endothelial cells (HVECs) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conclusions The urea immunoliposome that we developed distinctly and persistently inhibited the proliferation of HVECs and is expected to be used in clinical hemangioma treatment. PMID:24266957

  11. Vulvar Lobular Capillary Hemangioma: A Rare Location for a Frequent Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Abreu-dos-Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lobular capillary hemangioma, or pyogenic granuloma, is an acquired hemorrhagic benign vascular lesion of the skin and mucous membranes. The pyogenic granuloma of the vulva is a rare finding and a limited number of case reports are available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case described as a single pyogenic granuloma on the vulva.

  12. CT-criteria of orbital hemangiomas and their importance in differential diagnosis of intraconal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsoeld, R; Hoyt, W F [California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurosurgery; California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology and Opthalmology; California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neuroradiology)

    1979-12-01

    CT-Scans of 29 histologically proven cavernous hemangiomas were evaluated with respect to their location, shape, delineation from surrounding tissue, contrast-enhancement, and secondary changes of the bony orbit. Whenever a round or oval tumor, located in the outer upper muscle cone, sharply delineated from surrounding tissue, unattached to optic nerve and ocular muscles, spares a small triangular space in the orbital apex, it is in all probability a cavernous hemangioma. Evaluation of the tumors shape and its separation from surrounding tissues requires imaging in multiple sections in two planes oriented, if possible, at right angles. Changes in position of the optic nerve and eye muscles in different directions of gaze demonstrated by CT rule out significant tumor-attachments. The portion of the intraconal space least affected by optic nerve shifts and muscle contractions during eye movements, as demonstrated by CT, is the upper outer quadrant, the site preferred by the mobile tumor. Tumors which cannot be differentiated from cavernous hemangiomas by CT-criteria are rare usually benign. Reports of rare examples of well delineated or encapsulated malignant intraconal lesions indicate the possibility - however remote - of mistaking a malignant tumor for a cavernous hemangioma by CT.

  13. Role of fractionated radiotherapy in patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sun Min; Yoon, Sang Min; Lee, Su Min; Park, Jin Hong; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Sang Wook; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2017-01-01

    We performed this retrospective study to investigate the outcomes of patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus after fractionated radiotherapy. We analyzed 10 patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus who were treated with conventional radiotherapy between January 2000 and December 2016. The median patient age was 54 years (range, 31–65 years), and 8 patients (80.0%) were female. The mean hemangioma volume was 34.1 cm"3 (range, 6.8–83.2 cm"3), and fractionated radiation was administered to a total dose of 50–54 Gy with a daily dose of 2 Gy. The median follow-up period was 6.8 years (range, 2.2–8.8 years). At last follow-up, the volume of the tumor had decreased in all patients. The average tumor volume reduction rate from the initial volume was 72.9% (range, 18.9–95.3%). All 10 of the cranial neuropathies observed before radiation therapy had improved, with complete symptomatic remission in 9 cases (90%) and partial remission in 1 case (10%). No new acute neurologic impairments were reported after radiotherapy. One probable compressive optic neuropathy was observed at 1 year after radiotherapy. Fractionated radiotherapy achieves both symptomatic and radiologic improvements. It is a well-tolerated treatment modality for hemangiomas of the cavernous sinus

  14. Preoperative diagnosis of orbital cavernous hemangioma: a 99mTc-RBC SPECT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroni, Luca; Borsari, Giulia; Pichierri, Patrizia; Polito, Ennio; Toscano, Olga; Grassetto, Gaia; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Rubello, Domenico; Vattimo, Angelo Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to describe 99mTc-labeled RBC scintigraphy as a diagnostic method for orbital cavernous hemangiomas and to evaluate this diagnostic tool according to surgical outcomes. Fifty-five patients with clinical and radiological (US, CT, and/or MRI) suspicion of unilateral cavernous hemangioma of the orbit underwent 99mTc-RBC SPECT study.Qualitative and semiquantitative evaluations were performed, and results were statistically analyzed. SPECT images showed focal uptake in the orbital mass in 36 of 55 patients. Nineteen patients had a negative scintigraphic pattern, with concordance of early and late absence of uptake of 99mTc-RBC.Our procedure showed 100% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity for the diagnosis of orbital cavernous hemangioma, with a positive predictive value of 90.9% and a negative predictive value of 100%. 99mTc-RBC imaging is safe, easy to perform, and highly accurate in providing adequate clinical and surgical management. As a noninvasive and highly specific method for diagnosing orbital hemangioma, 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy can avoid more invasive imaging or biopsy.

  15. Treatment of symptomatic vertebral hemangioma by radiotherapy - case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Douglas Guedes de; Lima, Renato Pierre; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Ferrigno, Robson

    2002-01-01

    We report the clinical and imaging findings of a patient with a symptomatic vertebral hemangioma treated with radiotherapy alone. There was partial relief of the pain 3 months after radiotherapy. We recommend a total dose of 40 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. A review of literature is also presented. (author)

  16. Large cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland: Laparoscopic treatment. Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agrusa

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered the standard treatment in case of diagnosis of benign lesions. In this case report we discussed a large adrenal cavernous hemangioma treated with laparoscopic approach. Fundamental is the study of preoperative endocrine disorders and radiologic findings to exclude signs of malignancy.

  17. Diagnosis of cranial hemangioma: Comparison between logistic regression analysis and neuronal network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, E.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Bautista, D.; Paredes, R.

    1998-01-01

    To study the utility of logistic regression and the neuronal network in the diagnosis of cranial hemangiomas. Fifteen patients presenting hemangiomas were selected form a total of 167 patients with cranial lesions. All were evaluated by plain radiography and computed tomography (CT). Nineteen variables in their medical records were reviewed. Logistic regression and neuronal network models were constructed and validated by the jackknife (leave-one-out) approach. The yields of the two models were compared by means of ROC curves, using the area under the curve as parameter. Seven men and 8 women presented hemangiomas. The mean age of these patients was 38.4 (15.4 years (mea ± standard deviation). Logistic regression identified as significant variables the shape, soft tissue mass and periosteal reaction. The neuronal network lent more importance to the existence of ossified matrix, ruptured cortical vein and the mixed calcified-blastic (trabeculated) pattern. The neuronal network showed a greater yield than logistic regression (Az, 0.9409) (0.004 versus 0.7211± 0.075; p<0.001). The neuronal network discloses hidden interactions among the variables, providing a higher yield in the characterization of cranial hemangiomas and constituting a medical diagnostic acid. (Author)29 refs

  18. Doing the math: A simple approach to topical timolol dosing for infantile hemangiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Costa, Renata; Prindaville, Brea; Wiss, Karen

    2018-03-01

    Topical timolol maleate has recently gained popularity as a treatment for superficial infantile hemangiomas, but calculating a safe dose of timolol can be time consuming, which may limit the medication's use in fast-paced clinical environments. This report offers a simplified calculation of the maximum daily safe dosage as 1 drop of medication per kilogram of body weight. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Enhancement pattern of small hepatic hemangioma: findings on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung In; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae

    1999-01-01

    To compare the enhancement characteristics of small hemangiomas seen on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. Thirteen patients with 20 hepatic hemangiomas less than 25mm in diameter underwent both multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. All lesions were assigned to one of three classified into 3 categories according to the enhancement pattern seen on multiphase spiral CT : typical delayed pooling, atypical early enhancement, or continuous low attenuation. The enhancement patterns seen on spiral CT and on dynamic MRI were correlated. On CT scans, ten lesions (50%) showed delayed pooling. Six (30%) showed early arterial enhancement and four (20%) showed continuous low attenuation. On delayed-phase MRI, all lesions showed delayed high signal intensity compared to adjacent liver parenchyma. Four of six lesions with early enhancement on CT showed peripheral globular enhancement on early arterial-phase MRI. On multiphase spiral CT scans, small hemangiomas can show variable atypical enhancement features. In this situation, contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI is helpful for the diagnosis of hemangiomas

  20. Evaluation of hepatic hemangioma by Tc-99 m red blood cell hepatic blood pool scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Myung Hee

    2005-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common benign tumor of the liver, with a prevalence estimated as high as 7%. Tc-99m red blood cell (RBC) hepatic blood pool scan with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is extremely useful for the confirmation or exclusion of hepatic hemangiomas. The classic finding of absent or decreased perfusion and increased blood pooling ('perfusion/blood pool mismatch') is the key diagnostic element in the diagnosis of hemangiomas. The combination of early arterial flow and delayed blood pooling ('perfusion/blood pool match') is shown uncommonly. In giant hemangioma, filling with radioactivity appears first in the periphery, with progressive central fill-in on sequential RBC blood pool scan. However, the reverse filling pattern, which begins first in the center with progressive peripheral filling, is also rarely seen. Studies with false-positive blood pooling have been reported infrequently in nonhemangiomas, including hemangiosarcoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic adenoma, and metastatic carcinomas (adenocarcinma of the colon, small cell carcinoma of the lung, neruroendocrine carcinoma). False-negative results have been also reported rarely except for small hemagniomas that are below the limits of spatial resolution of gamma camera

  1. Peripheral soft tissue hemangioma: MRI and histo-pathologic correlation (a report of 32 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaojun; Zhou Haiwei; Shao Haijun; Li Chunsheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the MRI findings of hemangiomas derived from soft tissue. Methods: MRI was performed on 32 cases with mass in the peripheral soft tissue. All cases were confirmed to be hemangioma histo-pathologically. Results: The masses were classified as four patterns on this series, namely: cavernous hemangiomas, 15 cases (46.9%), displayed as a spindle-shaped or irregular mass; Racemose, 9 cases (28%), had an honeycombed or racemose appearance; Capillary, 5 cases (15.6%), with an elongated mass-like configuration; Mixed, 3 case(9.4%), showed as an amouphus mass. The masses usually had equal or higher signal intensity as compared to muscle on T 1 WI and markedly high signal intensity on T 2 WI. Focal inhomogeneities of the lesions in pathological study represent areas of fibrosia, fat, thrombosis, smooth muscle or calcificatin. Conclusion: MRI is an useful tool not only to identifying the locatoion of the mass but also could specify the peripheral soft tisure hemangioma. (authors)

  2. Blunt splenic injury: are early adverse events related to trauma, nonoperative management, or surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandon, Julien; Rodiere, Mathieu; Arvieux, Catherine; Vendrell, Anne; Boussat, Bastien; Sengel, Christian; Broux, Christophe; Bricault, Ivan; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to compare clinical outcomes and early adverse events of operative management (OM), nonoperative management (NOM), and NOM with splenic artery embolization (SAE) in blunt splenic injury (BSI) and identify the prognostic factors. METHODS Medical records of 136 consecutive patients with BSI admitted to a trauma center from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were separated into three groups: OM, NOM, and SAE. We focused on associated injuries and early adverse events. Multivariate analysis was performed on 23 prognostic factors to find predictors. RESULTS The total survival rate was 97.1%, with four deaths all occurred in the OM group. The spleen salvage rate was 91% in NOM and SAE. At least one adverse event was observed in 32.8%, 62%, and 96% of patients in NOM, SAE, and OM groups, respectively (P < 0.001). We found significantly more deaths, infectious complications, pleural drainage, acute renal failures, and pancreatitis in OM and more pseudocysts in SAE. Six prognostic factors were statistically significant for one or more adverse events: simplified acute physiology score 2 ≥25 for almost all adverse events, age ≥50 years for acute respiratory syndrome, limb fracture for secondary bleeding, thoracic injury for pleural drainage, and at least one associated injury for pseudocyst. Adverse events were not related to the type of BSI management. CONCLUSION Patients with BSI present worse outcome and more adverse events in OM, but this is related to the severity of injury. The main predictor of adverse events remains the severity of injury. PMID:26081719

  3. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) KidsHealth / For Teens / Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) ... Print en español Sangrado uterino anormal What Is Abnormal Uterine Bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the name doctors ...

  4. Growth of Murine Splenic Tissue Is Suppressed by Lymphotoxin β-Receptor Signaling (LTβR) Originating from Splenic and Non-Splenic Tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milićević, Novica M; Nohroudi, Klaus; Schmidt, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    LTβR signaling. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and subsequent mass spectrometry of stromal splenic tissue was applied to screen for potential factors mediating the LTβR dependent suppressive activity. Thus, LTβR dependent growth suppression is involved in regulating the size...

  5. Sonographic Measurement of Normal Splenic Length in Korean Adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Bum; Cheon, Byung Kook; Kim, Jong Min; Oh, Kyung Seoung; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    To establish upper limit of normal splenic length of Korean adults on ultrasonography and to determice the degree of interobserver and intraobserver variation. Ultrasonographic scans were performed to measure the maximum length of spleen in 105 of 150 adults selected by convenience sampling. Remained 45 cases with any conditions that could alter splenic size were excluded from this study. The maximum length of spleen was measured and correlated with body surface area, patient height, weight, age and sex. In 31 of the 105 adults we evaluated the interobserver and intraobserver variations in sonographic measurements of splenic length obtained by three radiologists in blind fashion. The mean splenic length in 105 adults was 8.56cm ({+-} 0.95). The splenic length positively correlated with body surface area, patient height and weight (P <0.001), and negatively correlated with patient age (P < 0.01). Male spleen (8.87 cm {+-} 1.07) was longer than female spleen (8.35 cm {+-} 0.81) (P < 0.05). The following guidelines are proposed for the upper limit of normal splenic length at different groups of body surface area: no longer than 10 cm at 1.20{approx}1.59 m{sup 2}, 11 cm at1.60{approx}1.79 m{sup 2}, and 12 cm at 1.80{approx}1.99 m{sup 2}. The mean interobserver variation between any two radiologists ranged from 0.32 cm ({+-} 0.29) to 0.39 cm ({+-} 0.33) and interobserver variations were within 1 cm in 96%. The mean intraobserver variations were within 0.5 cm in 91%. The splenic length closely correlated with body surface area, patient height, weight and age. Particularly the upper limit of normal splenic length changed according to body surface area. Interobserver variation about 1 cm and intraobserver variation about 0.5 cm should be considered in the measurement of the splenic length on ultrasonography

  6. Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Presenting as Massive Hematemesis: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Varshney

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Splenic artery Pseudoaneurysm, a complication of chronic pancreatitis, presenting as massive hematemesis is a rare presentation. Case Report. We present a case of 38-year-old male admitted with chief complaints of pain in the upper abdomen and massive hematemesis for the last 15 days. On examination there was severe pallor. On investigating the patient, Hb was 4.0 gm/dL, upper GI endoscopy revealed a leiomyoma in fundus of stomach, and EUS Doppler also supported the UGI findings. On further investigation of the patient, CECT of the abdomen revealed a possibility of distal pancreatic carcinoma encasing splenic vessels and infiltrating the adjacent structure. FNA taken at the time of EUS was consistent with inflammatory pathology. Triple phase CT of the abdomen revealed a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm with multiple splenic infarcts. After resuscitation we planned an emergency laparotomy; splenic artery pseudoaneurysm densely adherent to adjacent structures and associated with distal pancreatic necrosis was found. We performed splenectomy with repair of the defect in the stomach wall and necrosectomy. Postoperative course was uneventful and patient was discharged on day 8. Conclusion. Pseudoaneurysm can be at times a very difficult situation to manage; options available are either catheter embolisation if patient is vitally stable, or otherwise, exploration.

  7. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, SangIk; Shin, Yong Moon; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions. This retrospective study included 30 patients who underwent percutaneous core needle biopsy of their splenic lesions using 18- or 20-gauge needles between January 2001 and July 2016 in a single tertiary care center. The characteristics of the splenic lesions were determined by reviewing the ultrasound and computed tomography examinations. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were calculated, using pathologic results of the splenectomy specimen, clinical course and/or imaging follow-up as a reference standard. Post-procedure complications were identified from electronic medical records, laboratory findings and computed tomography images. Seventy-three specimens were obtained from the 30 patients and splenectomy was performed in 2 patients. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients had focal splenic lesions, while the remaining patient had homogeneous splenomegaly. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were 80.0% (24/30) and 76.7% (23/30), respectively. Perisplenic hemorrhage without hemodynamic instability developed in one patient. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions is a safe method for achieving a histopathologic diagnosis and can be considered as an alternative to splenectomy in patients with a high risk of splenectomy-related complications.

  8. Functional hyposplenia after splenic irradiation for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.N.; McDougall, I.R.; Dailey, M.O.; Ager, P.; Bush, S.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    We previously reported a patients who developed fulminant pneumococcal sepsis 12 years after successful treatment for Hodgkin's disease, which included splenic irradiation. We have since evaluated splenic size and function in 25 patients who had received splenic irradiation 5 to 16 years previously either for Hodgkin's disease (n . 19) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n . 6). Mean maximum splenic diameter as measured on a 99mTc-sulfur colloid liver-spleen scan was 6.2 cm in the irradiated group and 9.7 cm in a control group (p less than 0.001). The mean percentage of erythrocytes containing pits when observed with interference phase microscopy was 13.0% in the irradiated group, which was significantly different (p less than 0.001) from the levels found in each of the control groups: normal subjects, 0.9%; unstaged and untreated lymphoma patients, 0.6%; and patients after splenectomy, 33.7%. Patients who have had splenic irradiation should be considered at risk of developing overwhelming pneumococcal sepsis

  9. Spontaneous splenic rupture in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charakidis Michail

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report the case of a patient with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia complicated by spontaneous splenic rupture. Case presentation A 49-year-old Caucasian woman was referred to our emergency department by her general practitioner following a three-week history of malaise, night sweats, six kilograms of weight loss, intermittent nausea and vomiting, progressive upper abdominal pain and easy bruising. On the fourth day following her admission, she had a rapid clinical deterioration, with subsequent radiological investigations revealing a splenic rupture. Her morphology, biochemistry, flow cytometry and histology were strongly suggestive of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Conclusions Spontaneous splenic rupture is not an expected complication of low-grade lymphoplasmacytic lymphomas, such as Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only reported case of early spontaneous splenic rupture due to Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Our case highlights that despite the typical disease course of low-grade hematological malignancies, signs and symptoms of imminent splenic rupture should be considered when formulating a clinical assessment.

  10. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, SangIk; Shin, Yong Moon; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions. This retrospective study included 30 patients who underwent percutaneous core needle biopsy of their splenic lesions using 18- or 20-gauge needles between January 2001 and July 2016 in a single tertiary care center. The characteristics of the splenic lesions were determined by reviewing the ultrasound and computed tomography examinations. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were calculated, using pathologic results of the splenectomy specimen, clinical course and/or imaging follow-up as a reference standard. Post-procedure complications were identified from electronic medical records, laboratory findings and computed tomography images. Seventy-three specimens were obtained from the 30 patients and splenectomy was performed in 2 patients. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients had focal splenic lesions, while the remaining patient had homogeneous splenomegaly. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were 80.0% (24/30) and 76.7% (23/30), respectively. Perisplenic hemorrhage without hemodynamic instability developed in one patient. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions is a safe method for achieving a histopathologic diagnosis and can be considered as an alternative to splenectomy in patients with a high risk of splenectomy-related complications

  11. Percutaneous Treatment of Splenic Cystic Echinococcosis: Results of 12 Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net; Akkaya, Selçuk, E-mail: selcuk.akkaya85@gmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Dağoğlu, Merve Gülbiz, E-mail: drmgkartal@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Istanbul School of Medicine (Turkey); Akpınar, Burcu, E-mail: burcu-akpinar@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Erbahçeci, Aysun, E-mail: aysunerbahceci@yahoo.com [Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Çiftçi, Türkmen, E-mail: turkmenciftci@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Köroğlu, Mert, E-mail: mertkoroglu@hotmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Akıncı, Devrim, E-mail: akincid@hotmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeCystic echinococcosis (CE) in the spleen is a rare disease even in endemic regions. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of percutaneous treatment for splenic CE.Materials and MethodsTwelve patients (four men, eight women) with splenic CE were included in this study. For percutaneous treatment, CE1 and CE3A splenic hydatid cysts were treated with either the PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, respiration) technique or the catheterization technique.ResultsEight of the hydatid cysts were treated with the PAIR technique and four were treated with catheterization. The volume of all cysts decreased significantly during the follow-up period. No complication occurred in seven of 12 patients. Abscess developed in four patients. Two patients underwent splenectomy due to cavity infection developed after percutaneous treatment, while the spleen was preserved in 10 of 12 patients. Total hospital stay was between 1 and 18 days. Hospital stay was longer and the rate of infection was higher in the catheterization group. Follow-up period was 5–117 months (mean, 44.8 months), with no recurrence observed.ConclusionThe advantages of the percutaneous treatment are its minimal invasive nature, short hospitalization duration, and its ability to preserve splenic tissue and function. As the catheterization technique is associated with higher abscess risk, we suggest that the PAIR procedure should be the first percutaneous treatment option for splenic CE.

  12. Angiographic optical coherence tomography imaging of hemangiomas and port wine birthmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waibel, Jill S; Holmes, Jon; Rudnick, Ashley; Woods, Daniel; Kelly, Kristen M

    2018-03-22

    A current therapeutic challenge of vascular lesions is that they do not always respond effectively to laser treatment. Information on targeted vessels could potentially be used to guide laser treatments. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a useful tool for the non-invasive imaging of tissues, including skin hemangiomas and port wine birthmarks. Dynamic OCT is able to rapidly characterize cutaneous blood vessels. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate the ability of bedside OCT to image (i) overall vessel pattern; (ii) individual vessel morphology, diameter and depth; and (iii) total vessel density as a function of depth in infantile hemangiomas and port wine birthmarks (PWB). This IRB approved, observational clinical trial was performed among healthy volunteers ages 3 months-73 years old. All patients presented for laser treatment of either infantile hemangiomas or PWB with skin types ranging from Fitzpatrick I-V. OCT imaging of 49 hemangioma and PWB scans were performed pre- and post-treatment. The diameter and depth of the blood vessels making up the vascular lesions were measured. In addition, normal skin was scanned for comparison. Five datasets for infantile hemangiomas and five for PWB that were without motion artifacts were analyzed. Scanned lesions exhibited variable and highly heterogeneous blood vessel patterns with vessel diameters ranging from 20 to 160 μm, suggesting that the laser treatment with single pulse durations may not be optimal. The largest blood vessel diameter observed (160 μm) may not be adequately treated by commonly used pulsed dye laser pulse durations. OCT allowed rapid, non-invasive characterization of the diameter and depth of blood vessels in individual vascular lesions. Imaged lesions consisted of a heterogeneous population of vessel sizes, morphologies, and depth. Future studies could utilize this information to assist development of individualized treatment protocols in an effort to improve vascular birthmark

  13. Proton or photon irradiation for hemangiomas of the choroid? A retrospective comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoecht, Stefan; Wachtlin, Joachim; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E.; Schaefer, Christiane; Heufelder, Jens; Cordini, Dino; Kluge, Heinz; Foerster, Michael; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare, on a retrospective basis, the results of therapy in patients with uveal hemangioma treated with photon or proton irradiation at a single center. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2002 a total of 44 patients were treated. Until 1998 radiotherapy was given with 6 MV photons in standard fractionation of 2.0 Gy 5 times per week. In 1998 proton therapy became available and was used since then. A dose of 20 to 22.5 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) 68 MeV protons was given on 4 consecutive days. Progressive symptoms or deterioration of vision were the indications for therapy. Results: Of the 44 patients treated, 36 had circumscribed choroidal hemangiomas and 8 had diffuse choroidal hemangiomas (DCH) and Sturge-Weber syndrome. Of the patients, 19 were treated with photons with a total dose in the range of 16 to 30 Gy. A total of 25 patients were irradiated with protons. All patients with DCH but 1 were treated with photons. Stabilization of visual acuity was achieved in 93.2% of all patients. Tumor thickness decreased in 95.4% and retinal detachment resolved in 92.9%. Late effects, although generally mild or moderate, were frequently detected. In all, 40.9% showed radiation-induced optic neuropathy, maximum Grade I. Retinopathy was found in 29.5% of cases, but only 1 patient experienced more than Grade II severity. Retinopathy and radiation-induced optic neuropathy were reversible in some of the patients and in some resolved completely. No differences could be detected between patients with circumscribed choroidal hemangiomas treated with protons and photons. Treatment was less effective in DCH patients (75%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is effective in treating choroidal hemangiomas with respect to visual acuity and tumor thickness but a benefit of proton therapy could not be detected. Side effects are moderate but careful monitoring for side effects should be part of the follow-up procedures

  14. Quality of life in children with infantile hemangioma: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Li, Yanan; Xiang, Bo; Xiong, Fei; Li, Kai; Yang, Kaiying; Chen, Siyuan; Ji, Yi

    2017-11-16

    Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common vascular tumor in children. It is controversial whether IHs has effects on the quality of life (QOL) in patients of whom IH poses no threat or potential for complication. Thus, we conducted this study to evaluate the q QOL in patients with IH and find the predictors of poor QOL. The PedsQL 4.0 Genetic Core Scales and the PedsQL family information form were administered to parents of children with IH and healthy children both younger than 2-year-old. The quality-of-life instrument for IH (IH-QOL) and the PedsQL 4.0 family impact module were administered to parents of children with IH. We compared the PedsQL 4.0 Genetic Core Scales (GCIS) scores of the two groups. Multiple step-wise regression analysis was used to determine factors that influenced QOL in children with IH and their parents. Except for physical symptom, we found no significant difference in GCIS between patient group and healthy group (P = 0.409). The internal reliability of IH-QOL was excellent with the Cronbach's alpha coefficient for summary scores being 0.76. Multiple step-wise regression analysis showed that the predictors of poor IH-QOL total scores were hemangioma size, location, and mother's education level. The predictors of poor FIM total scores were hemangioma location and father's education level. The predictors of poor GCIS total scores were children's age, hemangioma location and father's education level. The findings support the feasibility and reliability of the Chinese version of IH-QOL to evaluate the QOL in children with IH and their parents. Hemangioma size, location and education level of mother are important impact factors for QOL in children with IH and their parents.

  15. Hepatic hemangioma: Correlation of enhancement types with diffusion-weighted MR findings and apparent diffusion coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goshima, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)], E-mail: gossy@par.odn.ne.jp; Kanematsu, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Department of Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kajita, Kimihiro [Department of Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Tsuge, Yusuke [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Shiratori, Yoshimune [Department of Medical Informatics, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Onozuka, Minoru [Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokosuka (Japan); Moriyama, Noriyuki [Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tsukiji (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: To correlate hepatic hemangioma enhancement types in gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images with diffusion-weighted MR findings and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Materials and methods: Respiratory-triggered diffusion-weighted MR images (TR/TE, 2422/46 ms; parallel imaging factor, 2; b factor, 500 s/mm{sup 2}; number of averaging, 6) obtained in 35 patients with 44 hepatic hemangiomas diagnosed by gadolinium-enhanced MR and by follow-up imaging were retrospectively evaluated. Hemangiomas were classified into three enhancement types based on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging findings: type I, early-enhancement type; type II, peripheral nodular enhancement type; type III, delayed enhancement type. Two blinded readers qualitatively assessed lesion sizes and signal intensities on T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and diffusion-weighted images. The ADCs of hemangiomas were also measured. Results: No significant difference was observed between the three enhancement types in terms of signal intensities on T2-weighted images. Signal intensities on diffusion-weighted images were lower in the order type I to III (P < .01), and mean ADCs were 2.18 x 10{sup -3}, 1.86 x 10{sup -3}, and 1.71 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for types I, II, and III, respectively (P < .01). No correlation was found between lesion sizes and ADCs. Conclusion: Hepatic hemangiomas were found to have enhancement type dependent signal intensities and ADCs on diffusion-weighted MR images. Further studies will have to substantiate that these diffusion patterns might reflect intratumoral blood flow or perfusion.

  16. CT and MR imaging of splenic leiomyoma in a child with ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coskun, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Aydingoez, Ue. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Tacal, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Ariyuerek, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Demirkazik, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Oguzkurt, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    1995-02-01

    Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a splenic leiomyoma in an 8-year-old boy with ataxia telangiectasia are presented. This is the first reported case of a splenic leiomyoma in the literature. (orig.)

  17. CT and MR imaging of splenic leiomyoma in a child with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coskun, M.; Aydingoez, Ue.; Tacal, T.; Ariyuerek, M.; Demirkazik, F.; Oguzkurt, L.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a splenic leiomyoma in an 8-year-old boy with ataxia telangiectasia are presented. This is the first reported case of a splenic leiomyoma in the literature. (orig.)

  18. UPPER GASTRO-INTESTINAL BLEEDING IN THE YOUNG - GASTRIC GIST TUMOR OR PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Atolagbe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available GIST tumors is very unusual in the young and middle aged and a high index of suspicion is needed for the diagnosis in young patients who present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Appropriate imaging such as a Computed tomographic scan (CT scan may identify this tumor which may easily be misdiagnosed as a bleeding Peptic Ulcer Disease in the young. We present a case of a healthy 38 year old man with no alcohol use who presented with epigastric pain and melena and subsequent torrential bleeding uncontrolled during endoscopy necessitating an emergency exploratory laparotomy by the general surgery team. The bleeding intraluminal component of the tumor with gross splenic and pancreatic involvement was identified and surgical management consisted of a wedge resection of the greater curvature of the stomach incorporating the tumor and the spleen with successful dissection of the tumor off the tail of the pancreas. Histology was positive for C-KIT and DOG-1 markers. Postoperative course was uneventful and he is presently on Imatinib Mesylate.

  19. Laser treatment of infantile hemangioma: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Sivakumar; Sathe, Nila A; Surawicz, Tanya

    2016-03-01

    To systematically review studies of laser treatment of infantile hemangioma (IH). We searched multiple databases including MEDLINE® and EMBASE from 1982 to June 2015. Two investigators independently screened studies against predetermined criteria and extracted key data. Investigators independently assessed study risk of bias and the strength of the evidence of the body of literature. We identified 29 studies addressing lasers: 4 randomized controlled trials, 8 retrospective cohort studies, and 17 case series. Lasers varied across studies in type, pulse width, or cooling materials. Most comparative studies (n = 9) assessed variations of pulsed dye laser (PDL) and examined heterogeneous endpoints. Most studies reported on treatment of cutaneous lesions. Overall, longer pulse PDL with epidermal cooling was the most commonly used laser for cutaneous lesions; Nd:YAG was the most commonly used intralesionally. Most studies reported a higher success rate with longer pulse PDL compared with observation in managing the size of IH, although the magnitude of effect differed substantially. CO2 laser was used for subglottic IH in a single study, and was noted to have a higher success rate and lower complication rate than both Nd:YAG and observation. Studies comparing laser with β-blockers or in combination with β-blockers reported greater improvements in lesion size in combination arms versus β-blockers alone and greater effects of lasers on mixed superficial and deep IH. Strength of the evidence for outcomes after laser treatments ranged from insufficient to low for effectiveness outcomes. Strength of the evidence was insufficient for the effects of laser compared with β-blockers or in combination with β-blockers as studies evaluated different agents and laser types. Studies assessing outcomes after CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers typically reported some resolution of lesion size, but heterogeneity among studies limits our abilities to draw conclusions. Studies of laser

  20. Giant cavernous hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis presenting as portal vein thrombosis and hepatic lobar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Reum Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available

    A combination of giant hepatic hemangioma and diffuse hemangiomatosis is extremely rare in adults. Even when they are large, hemangiomas are soft and rarely compress adjacent structures. A 78-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and distension. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large expansile mass replacing the medial segment and caudate lobe with diffusely scattered nodules in the entire liver. The large hilar mass contained a central nonenhancing area and had a mass effect, leading to left portal vein occlusion. The image findings also revealed two unprecedented findings: left lateral segmental atrophy of the liver and recent portomesenteric vein thrombosis. The hepatic lesions were confirmed with hemangiomas by ultrasonography-guided biopsy. We diagnosed intrahepatic portal vein obstruction caused by a mass effect of giant hepatic hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hemangiomatosis, resulting in hepatic segmental atrophy and extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis.

  1. Giant cavernous hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis presenting as portal vein thrombosis and hepatic lobar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Bo Reum; Han, Hyun Young; Choi, So Young; Kim, Joo Heun [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    A combination of giant hepatic hemangioma and diffuse hemangiomatosis is extremely rare in adults. Even when they are large, hemangiomas are soft and rarely compress adjacent structures. A 78-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and distension. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large expansile mass replacing the medial segment and caudate lobe with diffusely scattered nodules in the entire liver. The large hilar mass contained a central nonenhancing area and had a mass effect, leading to left portal vein occlusion. The image findings also revealed two unprecedented findings: left lateral segmental atrophy of the liver and recent portomesenteric vein thrombosis. The hepatic lesions were confirmed with hemangiomas by ultrasonography-guided biopsy. We diagnosed intrahepatic portal vein obstruction caused by a mass effect of giant hepatic hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hemangiomatosis, resulting in hepatic segmental atrophy and extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis.

  2. The pathologic splenic rupture of a patient with scrub typhus: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kum Rae; Park, Won Kyu; Chang, Jay Chun; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Jae Woon; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan

    2008-01-01

    A pathologic splenic rupture is rare, occurring primarily in a spleen affected by infective, hematological, and neoplastic disease. To the best of our knowledge, no prior reports of a pathologic splenic rupture due to scrub typhus exist. Intrasplenic pseudoaneurysms and focal infarctions are visible on an initial CT scan. Moreover, the spontaneous splenic rupture occurred a week later. We report a case of nontraumatic-splenic rupture in a patient with scrub typhus

  3. The pathologic splenic rupture of a patient with scrub typhus: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kum Rae; Park, Won Kyu; Chang, Jay Chun; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Jae Woon; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    A pathologic splenic rupture is rare, occurring primarily in a spleen affected by infective, hematological, and neoplastic disease. To the best of our knowledge, no prior reports of a pathologic splenic rupture due to scrub typhus exist. Intrasplenic pseudoaneurysms and focal infarctions are visible on an initial CT scan. Moreover, the spontaneous splenic rupture occurred a week later. We report a case of nontraumatic-splenic rupture in a patient with scrub typhus.

  4. Partial splenectomy and autotransplantation of splenic fragments in pigs: a model for prevention of septicemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabst, R.; Binns, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Normal young piglets and miniature piglets of the Gottingen breed were used as animal models for autotransplantation of splenic fragments. In pigs, regeneration kinetics seem to be comparable to man. Even after six mo, only small splenic nodules with a reduced blood flow were found. No effective stimulator of splenic regeneration has been found for pigs. Pig spleen size and blood supply enable partial splenectomies and ligation of the splenic artery which are models for spleen surgery in man

  5. A Case of Ruptured Splenic Artery Aneurysm in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth K. Corey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rupture of a splenic artery aneurysm is rare complication of pregnancy that is associated with a significant maternal and fetal mortality. Case. A multiparous female presented in the third trimester with hypotension, tachycardia, and altered mental status. A ruptured splenic artery aneurysm was discovered at the time of laparotomy and cesarean delivery. The patient made a full recovery following resection of the aneurysm. The neonate survived but suffered severe neurologic impairment. Conclusion. The diagnosis of ruptured splenic artery aneurysm should be considered in a pregnant woman presenting with signs of intra-abdominal hemorrhage. Early intervention by a multidisciplinary surgical team is key to preserving the life of the mother and fetus.

  6. Splenic Abscess: A Rare Complication of the UVC in Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer Aslam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscess is one of the rarest complications of the UVC in a newborn and it is hypothesized that it could be due to an infection or trauma caused by a catheter. The case that is being reported presented with abdominal distension and recurrent desaturation with suspicion of neonatal sepsis versus necrotizing enterocolitis. However, the final diagnosis was splenic abscess as a complication of an inappropriate UVC insertion which was discovered by abdominal ultrasound. The patient was given broad spectrum antibiotics empirically and the symptoms were resolved without any surgical intervention. Such cases and controlled studies need to be reported in order to identify further causes and risk factors associated with splenic abscess in a patient with UVC which can eventually help us adopt preventive strategies to avoid such complications.

  7. Unusual long-term complications of a splenic cyst.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, E V M

    2012-02-01

    Splenic cysts are relatively uncommon, and are usually asymptomatic. They are benign, typically treated conservatively and followed up with ultrasound examination, with few reported complications. We report a case of a simple splenic cyst that was followed up on imaging over a seven-year period. During that time, the cyst gradually enlarged from 5 cm to 12 cm in diameter, however the patient remained asymptomatic. After seven years, the patient was admitted with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass. The spleen was located within the pelvis, which was felt to be due to the weight of the cyst which caused the spleen to migrate out of its normal position. This case illustrates an extremely unusual complication, and suggests that while most splenic cysts may be managed conservatively, enlarging cysts may be prone to gravitational effects and prophylactic treatment should be considered.

  8. Unusual long-term complications of a splenic cyst.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, E V M

    2010-01-01

    Splenic cysts are relatively uncommon, and are usually asymptomatic. They are benign, typically treated conservatively and followed up with ultrasound examination, with few reported complications. We report a case of a simple splenic cyst that was followed up on imaging over a seven-year period. During that time, the cyst gradually enlarged from 5 cm to 12 cm in diameter, however the patient remained asymptomatic. After seven years, the patient was admitted with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass. The spleen was located within the pelvis, which was felt to be due to the weight of the cyst which caused the spleen to migrate out of its normal position. This case illustrates an extremely unusual complication, and suggests that while most splenic cysts may be managed conservatively, enlarging cysts may be prone to gravitational effects and prophylactic treatment should be considered.

  9. SOLITARY SPLENIC METASTASIS OF COLON CANCER: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Hashemzadeh M. Safari

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Although splenic metastasis is fairly common in disseminated cancer, solitary splenic metastasis in the absence of diffuse dissemination is rare. We report a case of 44 year-old man who developed isolated splenic metastasis of colon cancer. The patient had undergone right sided hemicolectomy for colon cancer in 1988. In 2001, he underwent reoperation because of local recurrence of tumor in the anastomotic site. The patient was admitted to our hospital on Sep 2003 with abdominal pain. Chest X-ray was normal. Abdominal CT scan showed a large cystic lesion in the spleen. Splenectomy was performed for the patient. The spleen was enlarged, firm and irregular. Histological examination showed metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Based on this case, we recommend that clinicians consider possibility of metastasis in cystic lesions of spleen, especially in patients with a history of a malignant disease.

  10. [Primary infection with cytomegalovirus: An infectious cause of splenic infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, H; Khamadi, K; Farrugia, C; Ho Hio Hen, N; El Gharbi, T; Turner, L

    2017-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus-associated thrombosis has been extensively reported in the medical literature, mainly in immune-compromised patients. However, the association with splenic infarcts has rarely been reported. We report a 32-year-old Caucasian and immunocompetent woman who presented with a splenic infarction during a primary infection with CMV. The differential diagnostic ruled out embolic, hematologic, gastrointestinal and coagulation disorders. The outcome was favorable with symptomatic treatment. A primary infection with CMV must be added to the diagnostic work-up in the presence of a febrile splenic infarction, especially when it is associated with a biological mononucleosis reaction. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Giant splenic hematoma can be a hidden condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Hangaard, Stine

    2014-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 28-year old male presented to his general practitioner with dyspnoea in the morning and abdominal discomfort through months. Four months earlier, he had experienced a blunt trauma to the left side of his abdomen. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a splenic hematoma and the p......An otherwise healthy 28-year old male presented to his general practitioner with dyspnoea in the morning and abdominal discomfort through months. Four months earlier, he had experienced a blunt trauma to the left side of his abdomen. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a splenic hematoma...... and the patient was admitted to hospital. Vital signs were normal, and blood samples revealed a marginal anaemia and elevated C-reactive protein, but were otherwise normal. Computed tomography showed an 18 centimetre wide splenic hematoma. The patient was referred to another hospital for conservative treatment...

  12. Nonoperative treatment of adult splenic trauma: Role of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raptopoulos, V.; Fink, M.; Resciniti, A.; Davidoff, A.; Silva, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Of 27 adult patients with known splenic injuries admitted to a regional referral trauma center and who were initially treated nonoperatively, ten (37%) ultimately required splenectomy. A CT scoring system was developed based on the degree of splenic parenchymal injury and the presence of fluid in the perisplenic region, the upper abdomen, and the pelvis. Adult patients who were successfully treated nonoperatively had a significantly (P=.011) lower total CT score than did patients who required delayed celiotomy. No patient older than 17 years with a total CT score less than 2.5 required delayed operative intervention. CT can be used to select a subset of adults with splenic trauma who are excellent candidates for a trail of nonoperative management

  13. PHACE association with intracranial, oropharyngeal hemangiomas, and an atypical patent ductus arteriosus arising from the tortuous left subclavian artery in a premature infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Hyun Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PHACE association is a rare neurocutaneous condition in which facial hemangiomas associate with a spectrum of posterior fossa malformations, arterial cerebrovascular anomalies, cardiovascular anomalies, and eye anomalies. We reported a case of PHACE association in a premature infant showing facial, intracranial, and oropharyngeal hemangiomas with evidence of the Dandy-Walker variant and complicated cardiovascular anomalies, including a right-sided aortic arch and an atypical patent ductus arteriosus arising from a tortuous left subclavian artery. To our knowledge, intracranial hemangiomas are rare in PHACE association, and a concomitant oropharyngeal hemangioma has not been previously reported in the PHACE association literature. In infants presenting with large, plaque-like facial hemangiomas, it is important to conduct active cardiovascular and neurological evaluations. Special attention should be given to the laryngoscopic examination to search for additional hemangiomas in the airway.

  14. Splenic irradiation before bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratwohl, A.; Hermans, J.; Biezen, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 229 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in chronic phase were randomized between 1986 and 1990 to receive or not receive additional splenic irradiation as part of their conditioning prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both groups, 115 patients with and 114 patients without splenic irradiation, were very similar regarding distribution of age, sex, donor/recipient sex combination, conditioning, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prevention method and blood counts at diagnosis or prior to transplant. 135 patients (59%) are alive as of October 1995 with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. 52 patients have relapsed (23%), 26 patients in the irradiated, 26 patients in the non-irradiated group (n.s.) with a relapse incident at 6 years of 28%. The main risk factor for relapse was T-cell depletion as the method for GvHD prevention, and an elevated basophil count in the peripheral blood prior to transplant. Relapse incidence between patients with or without splenic irradiation was no different in patients at high risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with T-cell-depleted marrows (P = n.s.) and in patients with low risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with non-T-cell-depleted transplants and basophil counts 3% basophils in peripheral blood). In this patient group, relapse incidence was 11% at 6 years with splenic irradiation but 32% in the non-irradiated group (P = 0.05). Transplant-related mortality was similar whether patients received splenic irradiation or not. This study suggests an advantage in splenic irradiation prior to transplantation for CML in this subgroup of patients and illustrates the need for tailored therapy. (Author)

  15. Mixed reality for robotic treatment of a splenic artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrabissa, Andrea; Morelli, Luca; Ferrari, Mauro; Peri, Andrea; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Moglia, Andrea; Pugliese, Luigi; Guarracino, Fabio; Mosca, Franco

    2010-05-01

    Techniques of mixed reality can successfully be used in preoperative planning of laparoscopic and robotic procedures and to guide surgical dissection and enhance its accuracy. A computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) model of the vascular anatomy of the spleen was obtained from the computed tomography (CT) dataset of a patient with a 3-cm splenic artery aneurysm. Using an environmental infrared localizer and a stereoscopic helmet, the surgeon can see the patient's anatomy in transparency (augmented or mixed reality). This arrangement simplifies correct positioning of trocars and locates surgical dissection directly on top of the aneurysm. In this way the surgeon limits unnecessary dissection, leaving intact the blood supply from the short gastric vessels and other collaterals. Based on preoperative planning, we were able to anticipate that the vascular exclusion of the aneurysm would result in partial splenic ischemia. To re-establish the flow to the spleen, end-to-end robotic anastomosis of the splenic artery with the Da Vinci surgical system was then performed. Finally, the aneurysm was fenestrated to exclude arterial refilling. The postoperative course was uneventful. A control CT scan 4 weeks after surgery showed a well-perfused and homogeneous splenic parenchyma. The final 3D model showed the fenestrated calcified aneurysm and patency of the re-anastomosed splenic artery. The described technique of robotic vascular exclusion of a splenic artery aneurysm, followed by re-anastomosis of the vessel, clearly demonstrates how this technology can reduce the invasiveness of the procedure, obviating an otherwise necessary splenectomy. Also, the use of intraoperative mixed-reality technology proved very useful in this case and is expected to play an increasing role in the operating room of the future.

  16. Insulin radioreceptor assay on murine splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, F.; Kahn, R.

    1982-01-01

    Insulin radioreceptor assays were developed using splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes from individual mice. Splenic leukocytes were prepared using an NH 4 Cl buffer which did not alter insulin binding, but gave much higher yields than density gradient methods. Mouse erythrocytes were isolated from heparinized blood by three passages over a Boyum gradient, and a similar buffer was used to separate cells from free [ 125 I]iodoinsulin at the end of the binding incubation. Insulin binding to both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes had typical pH, temperature, and time dependencies, and increased linearly with an increased number of cells. Optimal conditions for the splenic leukocytes (6 x 10 7 /ml) consisted of incubation with [ 125 I]iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.0. In cells from 20 individual mice, the specific [ 125 I]iodoinsulin binding was 2.6 +/- 0.1% (SEM), and nonspecific binding was 0.3 +/- 0.04% (10.6% of total binding). Erythrocytes (2.8 x 10 9 /ml) were incubated with [ 125 ]iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.2. In cells from 25 individual mice, the specific [ 125 I]iodoinsulin binding was 4.5 +/- 0.2%, and nonspecific binding was 0.7 +/- 0.03% (13.6% of total binding). In both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes, analysis of equilibrium binding data produced curvilinear Scatchard plots with approximately 3500 binding sites/leukocyte and 20 binding sites/erythrocyte. These data demonstrate that adequate numbers of splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes can be obtained from individual mice to study insulin binding in a precise and reproducible manner

  17. Rupture of splenic artery aneurysm in primipara five days after cesarean section: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barišić, Tatjana; Šutalo, Nikica; Letica, Ludvig; Kordić, Andrea Vladimira

    2015-11-01

    Splenic artery aneurysm (SAA) is a rare and usually asymptomatic vascular anomaly which carries the risk of rupture and fatal hemorrhage. It is more common in women and is usually associated with pregnancy. We present the case of rupture of SAA, 5 days after giving birth by cesarean section, which was diagnosed with Multi-Slice Computed Tomografy (MSCT) angiography and was successfully operated in the second emergency laparotomy, with the final good outcome for the mother. This case indicates that in case of sudden bleeding in the abdomen, with the development of hypovolemic shock, especially in the peripartum period, should be suspected rupture of SAA. The paper presents a critical review of this case, with a review of the literature.

  18. Efficacy and surgical procedures of preoperative splenic artery embolization for laparoscopic splenectomy of a massive splenomegaly: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikatsu Nitta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe the case of a 58-year-old woman diagnosed with massive splenomegaly with a malignant lymphoma that had a maximum diameter of 24 cm. Splenectomy was indicated because of thrombocytopenia and abdominal distention. Therefore, a balloon catheter was inserted preoperatively through the splenic artery for embolization and continuous infusion to reduce the spleen volume. It enabled easy handling of the spleen and minimized bleeding. The volume of the spleen was estimated at 1896 g through the skin incision, as measured by volumetric computed tomography; thus, laparoscopy seemed difficult. However, the surgery was successfully performed only with laparoscopic surgery, and the volume of the resected spleen was 1020 g. This preoperative preparation is an effective alternative to laparoscopic removal of a huge splenomegaly.

  19. Observation Versus Embolization in Patients with Blunt Splenic Injury After Trauma : A Propensity Score Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, Dominique C.; Joosse, Pieter; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; de Rooij, Philippe P.; Leenen, Loek P. H.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Bloemers, Frank W.; Goslings, J. Carel

    Non-operative management (NOM) is the standard of care in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injury after trauma. Splenic artery embolization (SAE) is reported to increase observation success rate. Studies demonstrating improved splenic salvage rates with SAE primarily compared SAE

  20. Observation Versus Embolization in Patients with Blunt Splenic Injury After Trauma: A Propensity Score Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, Dominique C.; Joosse, Pieter; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; de Rooij, Philippe P.; Leenen, Loek P. H.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Bloemers, Frank W.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2016-01-01

    Non-operative management (NOM) is the standard of care in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injury after trauma. Splenic artery embolization (SAE) is reported to increase observation success rate. Studies demonstrating improved splenic salvage rates with SAE primarily compared SAE

  1. Evaluation of a 15-year experience with splenic injuries in a state trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbrecht, Brian G; Zenati, Mazen S; Ochoa, Juan B; Puyana, Juan C; Alarcon, Louis H; Peitzman, Andrew B

    2007-02-01

    The management of splenic injuries has evolved with a greater emphasis on nonoperative management. Although several institutions have demonstrated that nonoperative management of splenic injuries can be performed with an increasing degree of success, the impact of this treatment shift on outcome for all patients with splenic injuries remains unknown. We hypothesized that outcomes for patients with splenic injuries have improved as the paradigm for splenic injury treatment has shifted. Consecutive patients from 1987 to 2001 with splenic injuries who were entered into a state trauma registry were reviewed. Demographic variables, injury characteristics, and outcome data were collected. The number of patients who were diagnosed with splenic injuries increased from 1987 through 2001, despite a stable number of institutions submitting data to the registry. The number of minor injuries and severe splenic injuries remained stable, and the number of moderately severe injuries significantly increased over time. Overall mortality rate improved but primarily reflected the decreased mortality rates of moderately severe injuries; the mortality rate for severe splenic injuries was unchanged. Trauma centers are seeing increasing numbers of splenic injuries that are less severe in magnitude, although the number of the most severe splenic injuries is stable. The increased proportion of patients with less severe splenic injuries who are being admitted to trauma centers is a significant factor in the increased use and success rate of nonoperative management.

  2. Observation Versus Embolization in Patients with Blunt Splenic Injury after Trauma: A Propensity Score Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Olthof; P. Joosse (Pieter); P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick); P.P. de Rooij (Philippe); L.P.H. Leenen (Luke); K.W. Wendt (Klaus); F.W. Bloemers (Frank); J.C. Goslings (Carel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Non-operative management (NOM) is the standard of care in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injury after trauma. Splenic artery embolization (SAE) is reported to increase observation success rate. Studies demonstrating improved splenic salvage rates with SAE

  3. Identification and management of nontraumatic splenic rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Samanthi

    2017-12-01

    A 43-year old previously fit and well gentleman presented to the emergency department (ED) with a two day history of worsening epigastric pain. He had had coryzal symptoms the preceding week but had no other past medical history. He was haemodynamically stable at presentation and an ultrasound scan (US) performed in the ED could not definitively rule out intra-abdominal fluid. In view of his tender abdomen on examination and a haemoglobin level of 9.2g/dL, a computerised tomography (CT) scan was performed and revealed extensive high-density fluid within the peritoneal cavity, raising the possibility of a concealed bleed but no obvious source was identified by the scan. Copyright the Association for Perioperative Practice.

  4. Blunt splenic trauma in children: are we too careful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, W J J; Nellensteijn, D R; Ten Duis, H J; Albers, M J I J; Moumni, M El; Hulscher, J B F

    2011-08-01

    There has been a shift from operative treatment (OT) to non-operative treatment (NOT) of splenic injury. We evaluated the outcomes of treatment of pediatric patients with blunt splenic trauma in our hospital, with special focus on the outcomes after NOT. The data of all patients splenic injury admitted between 1988 and 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Mechanism of injury, type of treatment, ICU stay, total hospital stay, morbidity and mortality were assessed. Patients suffering isolated splenic injuries were assessed separately from patients with multiple injuries. Patients were subsequently divided into those admitted before and after 2000. There were 64 patients: 49 males and 15 females with a mean age of 13 years (range 0-18). 3 patients died shortly after admission due to severe neurological injury and were excluded. In the remaining 61 patients concomitant injuries, present in 62%, included long bone fractures (36%), chest injuries (16%), abdominal injuries (33%) and head injuries (30%). Mechanisms of injury were: car accidents (26%), motorcycle (20%), bicycle (19%), fall from height (17%) and pedestrians struck by a moving vehicle (8%). A change in treatment strategy was evident for the pre- and post-2000 periods. Significantly more patients had NOT after 2000 in both the isolated splenic injury group and the multi-trauma group [4/11 (36%) before vs. 10/11 (91%) after (p=0.009); 15/19 (79%) before vs. 8/20 (40%) after 2000 (p=0.03)]. There was also a significant shift to spleen-preserving operations. All life-threatening complications occurred within trauma group. Splenic injury in children is associated with substantial mortality. This is due to concomitant injuries and not to the splenic injury. Non-operative treatment is increasingly preferred to operative procedures when treating splenic injuries in hemodynamically, stable children. ICU and hospital stay have, despite the change from OT to NOT, remained the same. Complications after NOT are rare. We

  5. Splenic embolization in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falappa, P.G.; Cotroneo, A.R.; De Cinque, M.; Maresca, G.; Patane', D.

    1988-01-01

    Over the last four years the authors performed transcatheter embolization of the splenic artery by Gianturco coils in 32 consecutive cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension, splenomegaly, cytopenia and gastro-esophageal varices endoscopically proved. This procedure was especially useful for treatement of splenomegaly and cytopenia because a constant reduction of spleen dimensions and increase in platelet count were registered. The effectiveness of transcatheter embolization and follow-up are based on clinic, hematologic and sonographic findings. Sonographic monitoring is believed to be very useful both to evaluate splenomegaly and signs of portal hypertension and to reveal splenic complications (abscesses). Severe complications have been never registered

  6. Splenic embolization in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. US findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falappa, P G; Cotroneo, A R; De Cinque, M; Maresca, G; Patane' , D

    1988-01-01

    Over the last four years the authors performed transcatheter embolization of the splenic artery by Gianturco coils in 32 consecutive cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension, splenomegaly, cytopenia and gastro-esophageal varices endoscopically proved. This procedure was especially useful for treatement of splenomegaly and cytopenia because a constant reduction of spleen dimensions and increase in platelet count were registered. The effectiveness of transcatheter embolization and follow-up are based on clinic, hematologic and sonographic findings. Sonographic monitoring is believed to be very useful both to evaluate splenomegaly and signs of portal hypertension and to reveal splenic complications (abscesses). Severe complications have been never registered. 21 refs.

  7. Asymptomatic appearance of splenic infarction in Wegeners granulomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martusewicz-Boros, M.; Roszkowski-Sliz, K.; Wiatr, E.; Baranska, I.; Bestry, I.

    2011-01-01

    Splenic involvements in Wegeners granulomatosis (WG) are rarely diagnosed ante-mortem, while an autopsy is able to reveal a high rate of spleen lesions (78 - 100%). To date, there have been a few reported cases of splenic abnormalities in WG, including: splenomegaly, capsular adhesion, dysfunction and infarction. We reported a case of biopsy-verified WG with radiological evidence of diffuse spleen infarction despite the lack of any clinical symptoms. We concluded that due to a potential risk of severe hemorrhagic complications when anticoagulant therapy is necessary, radiological assessment of spleen should be performed regularly in this group of patients, particularly because spleen involvement can be asymptomatic. (authors)

  8. CT-guided percutaneous treatment of solitary pyogenic splenic abscesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pombo, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Suarez, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Marini, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Arrojo, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Echaniz, A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain)

    1991-08-01

    Six patients with solitary pyogenic splenic abscesses treated by CT-guided percutaneous drainage (by catheter or needle), are presented. There were 3 unilocular, purely intrasplenic abscesses and 3 complex lesions with loculations and perisplenic involvement. Percutaneous drainage and intravenous antibiotics were curative in 4 patients. In the other 2, who had multiloculated abscesses, despite initially successful drainage, splenectomy was performed because of intractable left upper quadrant pain in one case and persistent fever and drainage of pus after 30 days in the other. These patients also developed large, sterile left pleural effusions. Solitary pyogenic splenic abscesses - particularly if uniloculated - can be effectively treated by CT-guided percutaneous drainage. (orig.)

  9. Radiological characteristics of splenic lesions: how to distinguish them?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, Alberto Ribeiro de Souza; Freire Filho, Edison de Oliveira; Szejnfeld, Jacob; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    The spleen is often overlooked in studies of the upper abdomen probably due to the low frequency in which it occurs when compared to other abdominal solid organs. In this study we describe the main forms of splenic involvement by malignant or benign neoplasms, vascular, inflammatory and traumatic lesions, as well as congenital anomalies and variants of normality. We aimed to evaluate some characteristics and radiological aspects that permit the definition of the nature of splenic changes with considerable precision in order to allow an accurate diagnosis and increase radiologist's confidence on different situations. (author)

  10. Minimally Invasive Approach for Spleen-Preserving Distal Pancreatectomy: a Comparative Analysis of Postoperative Complication Between Splenic Vessel Conserving and Warshaw's Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lip Seng; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-08-01

    Spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy with Warshaw's technique (WT) was reported to have higher spleen-related complication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the postoperative complication between the splenic vessel-conserving technique (SVC) and the WT when they were performed by the minimally invasive approach. From January 2006 to June 2015, data of the patients who had laparoscopic or robotic-assisted spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy for benign or borderline malignant tumors were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into SVC and the WT group for comparison. Of the 89 patients who had the spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, 63 were SVC, whereas 26 were WT. The CT scans showed that patients who had WT were found to have higher rate of splenic infarction (P < 0.001) and had significantly higher rate of collateral vessel formation at 1 year (P < 0.001). All the splenic infarctions were low grade and asymptomatic which resolved spontaneously. None of the patients with collateral formation experienced gastrointestinal bleeding. The postoperative complication of SVC and WT did not differ significantly. SVC and WT were found to have comparable outcome. Both techniques can be used to achieve higher spleen-preserving rate.

  11. A Giant Hepatic Hemangioma Complicated by Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome: Findings of Tc-99m RBC Scintigraphy and SPECT Including a Total Body Blood Pool Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Myung Hee; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Dong Wook; Yim, Chang Yeol [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Kasabach-Merritt syndrome (KMS) consists of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and localized consumption coagulopathy that develops within vascular hemangioma. This syndrome may also be associated with occult hemangiomas located at various sites. Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy and SPECT have proven to be reliable for confirming or excluding hemangioma. Total body blood pool imaging study during the scintigraphy also provides a means of screening for occult lesions. The authors report the case of a 29-year-old man who presented with a giant hepatic hemangioma complicated by KMS, and underwent Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy and SPECT including a total body blood pool imaging study.

  12. Proximal splenic angioembolization does not improve outcomes in treating blunt splenic injuries compared with splenectomy: a cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Juan C; Simmons, Jon D; Schmieg, Robert E; McSwain, Norman E; Bellows, Charles F

    2008-12-01

    Although splenic angioembolization (SAE) has been introduced and adopted in many trauma centers, the appropriate selection for and utility of SAE in trauma patients remains under debate. This study examined the outcomes of proximal SAE as part of a management algorithm for adult traumatic splenic injury compared with splenectomy. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed on all hemodynamically stable (HDS) blunt trauma patients with isolated splenic injury and computed tomographic (CT) evidence of active contrast extravasation that presented to a level 1 Trauma Center over a period of 5 years. The cohorts were defined by two separate 30 month periods and included 78 patients seen before (group I) and 76 patients seen after (group II) the introduction of an institutional SAE protocol. Demographics, splenic injury grade, and outcomes of the two groups were compared using Student's t test, or chi2 test. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Six hundred eighty-two patients with blunt splenic injury were identified; 154 patients (29%) were HDS with CT evidence of active contrast extravasation. Group I (n = 78) was treated with splenectomy and group II (n = 76) was treated with proximal SAE. There was no difference in age (33 +/- 14 vs. 37 +/- 17 years), Injury Severity Score (31 +/- 13 vs. 29 +/- 11), or mortality (18% vs. 15%) between the two groups. However, the incidence of Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) was 4-fold higher in those patients that underwent proximal SAE compared with those that underwent splenectomy (22% vs. 5%, p = 0.002). Twenty two patients failed nonoperative management (NOM) after SAE. This failure appeared to be directly related to the grade of splenic organ injury (grade I and II: 0%; grade III: 24%; grade IV: 53%; and grade V: 100%). Introduction of proximal SAE in NOM of HDS splenic trauma patients with active extravasation did not alter mortality rates at a Level 1 Trauma Center. Increased incidence of ARDS and association of

  13. Molecular detection of vector-borne pathogens in blood and splenic samples from dogs with splenic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movilla, Rebeca; Altet, Laura; Serrano, Lorena; Tabar, María-Dolores; Roura, Xavier

    2017-03-13

    The spleen is a highly perfused organ involved in the immunological control and elimination of vector-borne pathogens (VBP), which could have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of splenic disease. This study aimed to evaluate certain VBP in samples from dogs with splenic lesions. Seventy-seven EDTA-blood and 64 splenic tissue samples were collected from 78 dogs with splenic disease in a Mediterranean area. Babesia spp., Bartonella spp., Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp., Hepatozoon canis, Leishmania infantum, hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. and Rickettsia spp. were targeted using PCR assays. Sixty EDTA-blood samples from dogs without evidence of splenic lesions were included as a control group. More than half (51.56%) of the biopsies (33/64) were consistent with benign lesions and 48.43% (31/64) with malignancy, mostly hemangiosarcoma (25/31). PCR yielded positive results in 13 dogs with spleen alterations (16.67%), for Babesia canis (n = 3), Babesia gibsoni (n = 2), hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. (n = 2), Rickettsia massiliae (n = 1) and "Babesia vulpes" (n = 1), in blood; and for B. canis, B. gibsoni, Ehrlichia canis and L. infantum (n = 1 each), in spleen. Two control dogs (3.3%) were positive for B. gibsoni and H. canis (n = 1 each). Benign lesions were detected in the 61.54% of infected dogs (8/13); the remaining 38.46% were diagnosed with malignancies (5/13). Infection was significantly associated to the presence of splenic disease (P = 0.013). There was no difference in the prevalence of infection between dogs with benign and malignant splenic lesions (P = 0.69); however B. canis was more prevalent in dogs with hemangiosarcoma (P = 0.006). VBP infection could be involved in the pathogenesis of splenic disease. The immunological role of the spleen could predispose to alterations of this organ in infected dogs. Interestingly, all dogs with B. canis infection were diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma in the present survey. As previously

  14. Bleeding diathesis in Noonan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudt, Joost M.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.; Peters, Marjolijn; Melis, Paris

    2005-01-01

    An 18-year-old girl with Noonan syndrome was operated on for prominent ears. Subcutaneous haematomas developed on both sides, and coagulation tests reported a bleeding diathesis. This is seldom mentioned in descriptions of the syndrome, but it has been shown that one-third of all patients with the

  15. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  16. Radiological diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Gross-Fengels, W.; Lorenz, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopy holds the first place today. Radiological investigations are indispensable whenever endoscopy cannot precisely localise the bleeding site, whenever a tumour is present or suspected, in all cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and in haemobilia. A tailored radiological approach is recommended. The radiological basis programme should be at least a complete abdominal ultrasound study and plain abdominal radiograms. CT and ERCP scans may become necessary in selected cases. As a rule, angiographical localisation of the bleeding site will be successful only in the acute stage; selective visceral arteriograms have to be obtained, which may be executed in the digital subtraction technique in patients who are cooperating and clinically stable. Angiodysplasias and aneurysms, however, may be demonstrated angiographically in the interval as well. Upper and/or lower G.I. tract studies with barium or water-soluble contrast media may be indicated in the interval in order to demonstrate tumours, metastatic lesions, diverticula and gut malformations. (orig.) [de

  17. Spontaneous occlusion of post-traumatic splenic pseudoaneurysm: report of two cases in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Ashok; Wong, Christopher Kah Fook; Lam, Albert; Stockton, Vivienne [Department of Medical Imaging, The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney (Australia)

    2004-04-01

    Conservative therapy for splenic injuries is widely advocated. The advantages of conservative therapy for splenic injuries include the preservation of splenic immune function, prevention of overwhelming post-splenectomy sepsis, and avoidance of laparotomy and its associated early and late complications. Pseudoaneurysms of the splenic artery branch are encountered because of the prevalence of conservative management and widespread use of imaging techniques in the follow-up of these cases. We report two cases of post-traumatic splenic pseudoaneurysm in children which thrombosed spontaneously, one during the diagnostic angiogram examination and another on follow-up studies. (orig.)

  18. Antibody response to a T-cell-independent antigen is preserved after splenic artery embolization for trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, D. C.; Lammers, A. J. J.; van Leeuwen, E. M. M.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; ten Berge, I. J. M.; Goslings, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Splenic artery embolization (SAE) is increasingly being used as a nonoperative management strategy for patients with blunt splenic injury following trauma. The aim of this study was to assess the splenic function of patients who were embolized. A clinical study was performed, with splenic function

  19. Social Impact of Facial Infantile Hemangiomas in Preteen Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Victoria A; Haimowitz, Rachel; Cheng, Yao I; Wang, Jichuan; Silverman, Robert A; Bauman, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Involuted infantile facial hemangiomas (IHs) may adversely affect the social skills of children. To assess the social impact of involuted facial IHs, with or without prior treatment, in preteen children. An observational, cross-sectional study of social anxiety and skills in preteen children with facial IHs diagnosed during infancy. The study took place in an academic institution and a community dermatology practice between January 1, 2013, and July 30, 2014. Records on 236 children with IHs located in a cosmetically sensitive area were identified; of those, 144 potential participants (parents) were reached by telephone and mailed study packets. Thirty completed questionnaires were returned. Data analysis was performed from August 1, 2014, to September 7, 2015. The questionnaires included the following psychiatric scales: (1) Social Anxiety Scale for Children-Revised (SASC-R), completed by parents and children, including the domains of Fear of Negative Evaluation and Social Avoidance/Distress in New Situations (SAD-New) (higher scores indicate greater social anxiety), and (2) Social Competency Inventory (SCI), completed by parents, including the domains of Prosocial Behavior and Social Initiative (lower scores indicate poorer social competency). Demographics, clinical details, and survey responses were collected. Analysis was conducted using t tests to compare scores for each survey domain with established normative data and between sex as well as between treatment vs nontreatment groups. Of the 144 potential participants, 30 (21%) responded. The mean age of the preteen subjects was 10.0 years (range, 5.4-12.9 years) with a 2:1 female to male ratio. Twenty-five children (83%) had a single IH, and the remaining 5 participants (17%) had multiple IHs, with at least 1 IH in a cosmetically sensitive area. The periocular region was the most common site of the IH (10 [33%]), followed by the nose (6 [20%]), cheek (5 [17%]), forehead (4 [13%]), lip or perioral region (4 [13

  20. Diagnostic value of diffusion weighted MRI and ADC in differential diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokgoz, Ozlem; Unlu, Ebru; Unal, Ilker; Serifoglu, Ismail; Oz, Ilker; Aktas, Elif; Caglar, Emrah

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the use of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the diagnosis of hemangioma. The study population consisted of 72 patients with liver masses larger than 1 cm (72 focal lesions). DWI examination with a b value of 600 s/mm2 was carried out for all patients. After DWI examination, an ADC map was created and ADC values were measured for 72 liver masses and normal liver tissue (control group). The average ADC values of normal liver tissue and focal liver lesions, the "cut-off" ADC values, and the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the ADC map in diagnosing hemangioma, benign and malignant lesions were researched. Of the 72 liver masses, 51 were benign and 21 were malignant. Benign lesions comprised 38 hemangiomas and 13 simple cysts. Malignant lesions comprised 9 hepatocellular carcinomas, and 12 metastases. The highest ADC values were measured for cysts (3.782±0.53×10(-3) mm(2)/s) and hemangiomas (2.705±0.63×10(-3) mm(2)/s). The average ADC value of hemangiomas was significantly higher than malignant lesions and the normal control group (p<0.001). The average ADC value of cysts were significantly higher when compared to hemangiomas and normal control group (p<0.001). To distinguish hemangiomas from malignant liver lesions, the "cut-off" ADC value of 1.800×10(-3) mm(2)/s had a sensitivity of 97.4% and a specificity of 90.9%. To distinguish hemangioma from normal liver parenchyma the "cut-off" value of 1.858×10(-3) mm(2)/s had a sensitivity of 97.4% and a specificity of 95.7%. To distinguish benign liver lesions from malignant liver lesions the "cut-off" value of 1.800×10(-3) mm(2)/s had a sensitivity of 96.1% and a specificity of 90.0%. DWI and quantitative measurement of ADC values can be used in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant liver lesions and also in the diagnosis and differentiation of hemangiomas. When dynamic examination cannot distinguish cases with