WorldWideScience

Sample records for bleeding gastro-duodenal artery

  1. NSAID-induced gastro-duodenal bleeding: risk of development and patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A P Rebrov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A.P. Rebrov, E.l. Koshkina, A.A. Antonyan, R.V. Lyakisheva NSAID-induced gastro-duodenal bleeding: risk of development and patient management. Retrospective analysis of gastro-duodenal bleeding (GDB report forms was performed. Pts admitted to the department of internal diseases of Saratov regional clinical hospital from 1999 to 2004 were included. 354 cases of GDB were recorded ( 282 from 1999 to 2001 and 72 from 2002 to 2004. Cause ofbleeding, influence of NSAID administration on appearance and relapse ofbleeding, source ofbleeding and pt management were assessed. NSAJD administration was considered trigger factor of GDB in 24% in 1999-2001 and in 18% in 2002-2004. The results of the study show some tendency to decrease of NSAID- induced gastropathy frequency among causes of GDB. The main risk factors ofbleeding during NSAID treatment were age of more than 30 years, ulcer history, the first month of NSAID administration. GDB frequency did not depend on regularity of treatment and NSAID dosage.

  2. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a high prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease in sub Saharan Africa. Peptic ulcer disease in dyspeptic patients, 24.5%, was comparable to prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease among symptomatic individuals in developed countries (12 – 25%). Limited data exists regarding its associated risk ...

  3. Gastro-duodenal perforations: conventional plain film, US and CT findings in 166 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Roberto; Romano, Stefania; Pinto, Antonio; Romano, Luigia

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Gastro-duodenal perforations may be suspected in patients with history of ulceration, who present with acute pain and abdominal wall rigidity, but radiological findings in these cases may be unable to confirm a clinical diagnosis. The aim of our study was to report our experience in the diagnosis of gastro-duodenal perforation by conventional radiography, US and CT examinations. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 166 consecutive patients who presented in the last 2 years to our institutions with symptoms of acute abdomen and submitted to surgery at the Emergency Unit of the ''A.Cardarelli'' Hospital of Naples with a surgical finding of perforated gastro-duodenal ulcer. The evidence of free intraperitoneal air on abdominal plain film was considered as a direct or suggestive finding of perforation. Evidence of intraperitoneal free fluid and/or reduced intestinal peristalsis at sonographic examination were considered indirect signs of gastro-duodenal perforation. Evidence of free peritoneal gas at CT was considered as a direct evidence of gastro-duodenal perforation. Results: Twenty patients underwent immediate surgery with no preoperative imaging evaluation, in 10 of them the site of perforation was found in a juxta-pyloric region and in the others at level of duodenum. In 146 patients submitted to serial radiological investigations before surgery, the site of perforation was in 56 (38.3%) duodenal, in 52 (35.6%) juxta-pyloric, in 28 (19.1%) gastric and in 10 (6.8%) pyloric. The cause of perforation was in all cases gastric or duodenal ulceration, in seven cases involving pancreatic parenchyma. In 110 (75.4%) patients with direct findings of perforation, in 94 cases (85.5%) the correct diagnosis was established on abdominal plain film, in two (1.8%) with radiographic and sonographic examinations and in 14 (12.7%) on CT findings. In 36 (24,6%) patients with no direct findings of perforation, only 24 (16,4%) of them

  4. Gastro-duodenal perforations: conventional plain film, US and CT findings in 166 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Roberto; Romano, Stefania E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Pinto, Antonio; Romano, Luigia

    2004-04-01

    Introduction: Gastro-duodenal perforations may be suspected in patients with history of ulceration, who present with acute pain and abdominal wall rigidity, but radiological findings in these cases may be unable to confirm a clinical diagnosis. The aim of our study was to report our experience in the diagnosis of gastro-duodenal perforation by conventional radiography, US and CT examinations. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 166 consecutive patients who presented in the last 2 years to our institutions with symptoms of acute abdomen and submitted to surgery at the Emergency Unit of the ''A.Cardarelli'' Hospital of Naples with a surgical finding of perforated gastro-duodenal ulcer. The evidence of free intraperitoneal air on abdominal plain film was considered as a direct or suggestive finding of perforation. Evidence of intraperitoneal free fluid and/or reduced intestinal peristalsis at sonographic examination were considered indirect signs of gastro-duodenal perforation. Evidence of free peritoneal gas at CT was considered as a direct evidence of gastro-duodenal perforation. Results: Twenty patients underwent immediate surgery with no preoperative imaging evaluation, in 10 of them the site of perforation was found in a juxta-pyloric region and in the others at level of duodenum. In 146 patients submitted to serial radiological investigations before surgery, the site of perforation was in 56 (38.3%) duodenal, in 52 (35.6%) juxta-pyloric, in 28 (19.1%) gastric and in 10 (6.8%) pyloric. The cause of perforation was in all cases gastric or duodenal ulceration, in seven cases involving pancreatic parenchyma. In 110 (75.4%) patients with direct findings of perforation, in 94 cases (85.5%) the correct diagnosis was established on abdominal plain film, in two (1.8%) with radiographic and sonographic examinations and in 14 (12.7%) on CT findings. In 36 (24,6%) patients with no direct findings of perforation, only 24

  5. Transcatheter arterial embolization for traumatic bleeding control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Choon Wook; Lee, Sang Kwon; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duck Sik

    1989-01-01

    Angiography is essential for the detection of bleeding vessels in traumatic vascular injury. Immediately after the diagnosis, transcatheter embolization can be performed for the control of bleeding effectively and easily with proper use of embolic materials. Transcatheter embolization is believed to be the treatment of choice when emergency control is needed, where surgical approach is difficult and in those who are poor candidate for surgery. We have tried bleeding control in 18 cases of trauma over recent 4 years. The results were as follows; 1. Causes of bleeding(cases): Blunt or penetrating trauma (10), latrogenic trauma (8), (Postoperative (5), Needle biopsy (2), Percutaneous hepatic procedure (1)) 2. Embolized vessels: Renal artery branches (8), Hepatic artery branches (2), Arteries supplying chest wall (2), External carotid artery branches (3), Internal carotid artery (1), Circumflex humeral artery (1), Internal iliac artery branches (1). 3. Embolic agents: Gelfoam cubes (16), Stainless steel coils (3), Detachable latex balloon (1). 4. Successful bleeding control was achieved in 17 cases and reduction of the amount of bleeding in one case without significant complications

  6. Selye's general adaptation syndrome: stress-induced gastro-duodenal ulceration and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, George

    2017-03-01

    Hans Selye in a note to Nature in 1936 initiated the field of stress research by showing that rats exposed to nocuous stimuli responded by way of a 'general adaptation syndrome' (GAS). One of the main features of the GAS was the 'formation of acute erosions in the digestive tract, particularly in the stomach, small intestine and appendix'. This provided experimental evidence for the view based on clinical data that gastro-duodenal (peptic) ulcers could be caused by stress. This hypothesis was challenged by Marshall and Warren's Nobel Prize (2005)-winning discovery of a causal association between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcers. However, clinical and experimental studies suggest that stress can cause peptic ulceration in the absence of H. pylori Predictably, the etiological pendulum of gastric and duodenal ulceration has swung from 'all stress' to 'all bacteria' followed by a sober realization that both factors play a role, separately as well as together. This raises the question as to whether stress and H. pylori interact, and if so, how? Stress has also been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and related disorders; however, there is no proof yet that stress is the primary etiological trigger for IBD. Central dopamine mechanisms seem to be involved in the stress induction of peptic ulceration, whereas activation of the sympathetic nervous system and central and peripheral corticotrophin-releasing factor appears to mediate stress-induced IBD. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Aminoazo dye-protein-adduct enhances inhibitory effect on digestibility and damages to Gastro-Duodenal-Hepatic axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yun Lin

    Full Text Available 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene (DAB, methyl yellow, or butter yellow, a human carcinogen, has been banned for use in foods since 1988. In 2014, DAB adulteration in Tofu occurred in Taiwan. We hypothesize that DAB can form [DAB•SBP]adduct adduct with soybean protein (SBP which could damage Gastro-Duodenal-Hepatic axis. Sprague-Dawley rats gavage fed [DAB•SBP]adduct adduct revealed severely reduced body weight and damaged duodenum, liver, hepatic mitochondria, and spleen. Hepatic levels of glutathione and ATP were severely reduced. Serum GOT and GPT were substantially elevated. Analysis by the adsorption isotherm clearly revealed DAB formed very stable [DAB•SBP]adduct adduct at 1:1 molar ration (Phase A. The equilibrium constant of this colloidal adduct [DAB•SBP]adduct was KeqA = ∝, behaving as the most stable and toxic species. At higher protein concentration (Phase C it formed conjugate [DAB×SBPgross]conjugate, with KeqC = 3.23×10-2 mg/mL, implicating a moderately strong adsorption. The in vitro pepsin digestibility test showed apparently reduced digestibility by 27% (by Ninhydrin assay or 8% (by Bradford assay. Conclusively, this is the first report indicating that [DAB•SBP]adduct potentially is capable to damage the Gastro-Duodenal-Hepatic axis.

  8. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients undergoing upper GI endoscopy at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, Timothy N A; Asmah, Richard H; Wiredu, Edwin K; Gyasi, Richard K; Nkrumah, Kofi N

    2016-06-01

    There is a high prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease in sub-Saharan Africa. Peptic ulcer disease in dyspeptic patients, 24.5%, was comparable to prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease among symptomatic individuals in developed countries (12 - 25%). Limited data exists regarding its associated risk factors despite accumulating evidence indicating that gastroduodenal disease is common in Ghana. This study investigates risk factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. This study utilized a cross-sectional design to consecutively recruit patients referred with upper gastro-intestinal symptoms for endoscopy. The study questionnaire was administered to study participants. Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by rapid-urease examination at endoscopy. Of 242 patients sampled; 64 had duodenal ulcer, 66 gastric ulcer, 27gastric cancer and 64 non-ulcer dyspepsia. Nineteen (19) had duodenal and gastric ulcer while 2 had gastric ulcer and cancer. A third (32.6%) of patients had history of NSAID-use. H. pyloriwas associated with gastric ulcer (p=0.033) and duodenal ulcer (p=0.001). There was an increased prevalence of duodenal ulcer in H. pylori-infected patients taking NSAIDs, P=0.003. H. pylori was a major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease. However, NSAID-related gastro-duodenal injury has been shown to be common in H. pylori infected patients. It highlights the need for awareness of the adverse gastro-intestinal effects in a H. pylori endemic area.

  9. Increased bleeding risk during percutaneous coronary interventions by arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndrepepa, Gjin; Groha, Philipp; Lahmann, Anna L; Lohaus, Raphaela; Cassese, Salvatore; Schulz-Schüpke, Stefanie; Kufner, Sebastian; Mayer, Katharina; Bernlochner, Isabell; Byrne, Robert A; Fusaro, Massimiliano; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Schunkert, Heribert; Kastrati, Adnan

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to assess the association between arterial hypertension and bleeding in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of arterial hypertension on bleeding risk of patients with coronary artery disease undergoing PCI is unknown. This study included 14,180 patients who underwent PCI. Bleeding was defined using the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) criteria. Arterial hypertension was defined as treatment with antihypertensive drugs or a systolic blood pressure >140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure value >90 mm Hg documented on at least 2 occasions. The primary outcome was bleeding rate within 30 days of PCI. Overall, 11,066 patients (78.0%) had arterial hypertension. Bleeding events occurred in 1,232 patients with arterial hypertension and 278 patients without arterial hypertension (11.1% vs 8.9%; odds ratio [OR] = 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-1.46, P arterial hypertension and 175 patients without arterial hypertension (6.6% vs 5.6%: OR = 1.19 [1.01-1.41], P = 0.049). Non-access-site bleeding occurred in 502 patients with and 103 patients without arterial hypertension (4.5% vs 3.3%; OR = 1.39 [1.12-1.72], P = 0.003). After adjustment, arterial hypertension was significantly associated with any bleeding (adjusted OR = 1.41 [1.19-1.67], P arterial hypertension increased the risk of non-access-site bleeding (P = 0.002), whereas systolic blood pressure at the time of PCI increased the risk of access site bleeding (P = 0.018). Arterial hypertension is associated with increased risk of bleeding during PCI procedures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Endovascular treatment of nonvariceal acute arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization as treatment of upper nonvariceal gastrointestinal bleeding is increasingly being used after failed primary endoscopic treatment. The results after embolization have become better and surgery still has a high mortality. Embolization is a safe and effective...... procedure, but its use is has been limited because of relatively high rates of rebleeding and high mortality, both of which are associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and non-gastrointestinal related mortality causes. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a valuable minimal invasive method...

  11. The protective role of Aegle marmelos on aspirin-induced gastro-duodenal ulceration in albino rat model: a possible involvement of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shyamal K; Roy, Chandan

    2012-01-01

    Gastro duodenal ulcer is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Several Indian medicinal plants have been traditionally and extensively used to prevent different diseases. In the present research studies, Bael fruit (Aegle marmelos (AM), family: Rutaceae) which are also called as Bilva in ancient Sanskrit was used as a herbal drug and its antioxidative role in aspirin- induced gastroduodenal ulceration in albino rat was evaluated using essential biochemical parameters. Mucosal thickness (MT), ulcer index (UI), different biochemical parameters, such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were measured in all the groups, to study the possible involvement of antioxidants with gastroduodenal protection. A significant decrease in MT, SOD and CAT activities and GSH level and a significant increase in UI, AST, ALT, and ALP activities and LPO level were observed in aspirin treated stomach and duodenum of albino rats. Pretreatment with AM fruit pulp extract for 14 consecutive days showed the reverse effects of aspirin suggesting gastro-duodenal protective and anti- ulcerogenic properties of AM through its antioxidant mechanism.

  12. Pelvic artery embolization in gynecological bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Schreyer, H.; Bodhal, H.

    2002-01-01

    The most common reasons for gynecological bleeding are pregnancy-related disorders, fibroids of the uterus, and gynecological malignances. Transarterial embolization is an effective treatment modality for gynecological bleeding regardless of its etiology. Depending on the underlying disease, a different technique of embolization is applied. In postpartal bleeding a temporary effect of embolization is desired, therefore gelatine sponge is used as embolizing agent. In fibroids and malignant tumors the effect should permanent, therefore PVA particles are used. Regardless the etiology, the technical and clinical success of transarterial embolization is at least 90%. In nearly every patient a post-embolization syndrome can be observed, represented by local pain and fever. This post-embolization syndrome usually does not last longer than 3 days. If embolization is performed with meticulous attention to angiographic technique and handling of embolic material, ischemic damage of adjacent organs is rarely observed. Transarterial embolization should be an integrative modality in the treatment of gynecological bleeding. (orig.) [de

  13. Transcatheter arterial embolization for upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Širvinskas, Audrius; Smolskas, Edgaras; Mikelis, Kipras; Brimienė, Vilma; Brimas, Gintautas

    2017-12-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization is a possible treatment for patients with recurrent bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract after failed endoscopic management and is also an alternative to surgical treatment. To analyze the outcomes of transcatheter arterial embolization and identify the clinical and technical factors that influenced the rates of morbidity and mortality. A retrospective analysis was carried out, based on the data of 36 patients who underwent transcatheter arterial embolization for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 2013 to 2015 in our center. An analysis was performed between early rebleeding rates, mortality and the following factors: patient sex, age, number of units of packed red blood cells and packed plasma administered to the patients, length of hospital stay, therapeutic or prophylactic embolization. The technical success rate of the embolization procedure was 100%. There were 15 (41.70%) therapeutic embolizations and 21 (58.3%) prophylactic embolizations. There was a 77.8% clinical success rate. Following embolization, 10 (27.80%) patients had repeated bleeding and 9 (25.0%) patients died. Significant associations were found between rebleeding and prophylactic embolization (OR = 10.53; p = 0.04) and between mortality and prophylactic embolization (OR = 10.53; p = 0.04) and units of packed red blood cells (OR = 1.25; p < 0.01). In our experience, transcatheter arterial embolization is a safe treatment method for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and a possible alternative to surgery for high-risk patients.

  14. Emergent Endovascular Management of Acute Arterial Bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multiruka1

    little attention has been paid to the novel endovascular options available .... Fig 1b. Fig 1c. Figure 1a: Mass at gastric fundus enhanced in post contrast CT abdomen. ... 1c: Left gastric artery super selectively coiled to occlusion. Fig 2a. Fig 2b.

  15. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Arterial Esophageal Bleeding with the Use of N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospita, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of arterial esophageal bleeding. Between August 2000 and April 2008, five patients diagnosed with arterial esophageal bleeding by conventional angiography, CT angiography or endoscopy, underwent a TAE with NBCA. We mixed NBCA with iodized oil at ratios of 1:1 to 1:4 to supply radiopacity and achieve a proper polymerization time. After embolization, we evaluated the angiographic and clinical success, recurrent bleeding, and procedure-related complications. The bleeding esophageal artery directly originated from the aorta in four patients and from the left inferior phrenic artery in one patient. Although four patients had an underlying coagulopathy at the time of the TAE, angiographic and clinical success was achieved in all five patients. In addition, no procedurerelated complications such as esophageal infarction were observed during this study. NBCA can be an effective and feasible embolic agent in patients with active arterial esophageal bleeding, even with pre-existing coagulopathy.

  16. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Arterial Esophageal Bleeding with the Use of N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of arterial esophageal bleeding. Between August 2000 and April 2008, five patients diagnosed with arterial esophageal bleeding by conventional angiography, CT angiography or endoscopy, underwent a TAE with NBCA. We mixed NBCA with iodized oil at ratios of 1:1 to 1:4 to supply radiopacity and achieve a proper polymerization time. After embolization, we evaluated the angiographic and clinical success, recurrent bleeding, and procedure-related complications. The bleeding esophageal artery directly originated from the aorta in four patients and from the left inferior phrenic artery in one patient. Although four patients had an underlying coagulopathy at the time of the TAE, angiographic and clinical success was achieved in all five patients. In addition, no procedurerelated complications such as esophageal infarction were observed during this study. NBCA can be an effective and feasible embolic agent in patients with active arterial esophageal bleeding, even with pre-existing coagulopathy

  17. A Renal Perforating Artery Mistaken for Arterial Bleeding after Percutaneous Renal Biopsy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ye Lim; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min

    2009-01-01

    Perirenal hematoma after a renal biopsy is a common complication that usually resolves spontaneously, but this rarely requires transfusions or surgical/radiological intervention. We report here on a case of a renal perforating artery that was mistaken for renal arterial bleeding in a 53-year-old woman who was complicated with perirenal hematoma after undergoing a percutaneous renal biopsy. On the color and pulsed wave Doppler ultrasonography, linear blood flow was seen in the perirenal hematoma, which extended perpendicularly from the renal parenchyma into the perirenal space, and this linear blood flow exhibited an arterial pulse wave. On CT angiography, the renal perforating artery was demonstrated as a curvilinear vessel coursing tangentially to the renal margin and we decided that it was a pseudolesion caused by the renal perforating artery. A renal perforating artery may be mistaken for renal arterial bleeding after a percutaneous renal biopsy. A renal perforating artery and arterial bleeding can be differentiated by the location and shape seen on a color Doppler examination and the pulse waves characteristics

  18. A Renal Perforating Artery Mistaken for Arterial Bleeding after Percutaneous Renal Biopsy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ye Lim; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Perirenal hematoma after a renal biopsy is a common complication that usually resolves spontaneously, but this rarely requires transfusions or surgical/radiological intervention. We report here on a case of a renal perforating artery that was mistaken for renal arterial bleeding in a 53-year-old woman who was complicated with perirenal hematoma after undergoing a percutaneous renal biopsy. On the color and pulsed wave Doppler ultrasonography, linear blood flow was seen in the perirenal hematoma, which extended perpendicularly from the renal parenchyma into the perirenal space, and this linear blood flow exhibited an arterial pulse wave. On CT angiography, the renal perforating artery was demonstrated as a curvilinear vessel coursing tangentially to the renal margin and we decided that it was a pseudolesion caused by the renal perforating artery. A renal perforating artery may be mistaken for renal arterial bleeding after a percutaneous renal biopsy. A renal perforating artery and arterial bleeding can be differentiated by the location and shape seen on a color Doppler examination and the pulse waves characteristics

  19. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lin [Henan Cancer Hospital, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology (China); Shin, Ji Hoon, E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Han, Kichang; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jong-Soo [Kyunghee University, College of Medicine, Kangdong Kyunghee University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Kyu-Bo [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by GI lymphoma.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of 11 patients who underwent TAE for GI bleeding caused by GI lymphoma between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively.ResultsA total of 20 TAE procedures were performed. On angiography, contrast extravasation, and both contrast extravasation and tumor staining were seen in 95 % (19/20) and 5 % (1/20) of the procedures, respectively. The most frequently embolized arteries were jejunal (n = 13) and ileal (n = 5) branches. Technical and clinical success rates were 100 % (20/20) and 27 % (3/11), respectively. The causes of clinical failure in eight patients were rebleeding at new sites. In four patients who underwent repeat angiography, the bleeding focus was new each time. Three patients underwent small bowel resection due to rebleeding after one (n = 2) or four (n = 1) times of TAEs. Another two patients underwent small bowel resection due to small bowel ischemia/perforation after three or four times of TAEs. The 30-day mortality rate was 18 % due to hypovolemic shock (n = 1) and multiorgan failure (n = 1).ConclusionAngiogram with TAE shows limited therapeutic efficacy to manage GI lymphoma-related bleeding due to high rebleeding at new sites. Although TAE can be an initial hemostatic measure, surgery should be considered for rebleeding due to possible bowel ischemic complication after repeated TAE procedures.

  20. TREATMENT OF ULCER GASTRODUODENAL BLEEDINGS: CURRENT STATE OF THE PROBLEM (A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Antonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The problem of ulcer gastro-duodenal bleeding therapy is one of the most essential in urgent surgery. The bleeding is the most serious complication of peptic ulcer desease. It is observed in 15– 20% cases when patients have peptic ulcer diagnosis determined. In general the issues of bleeding therapy in gastroduodenal sphere are surveyed imperfectly. Some patulous endoscopic hemostasis methods don’t fully meet safety and confidence reqirements that preserves high level of general and post-operational lethality in our country and in the rest of the world. 

  1. Arterial embolization of a bleeding gastric Dieulafoy lesion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Rizal, M Y; Kosai, N R; Sutton, P A; Rozman, Z; Razman, J; Harunarashid, H; Das, S

    2013-01-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion is one of an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (U GIB). Endoscopic intervention has always been a preferred non-surgical method in treating UGIB including bleeding from Dieulafoy's lesion. Owing to recent advances in angiography, arterial embolization has become a popular alternative in non- variceal UGIB especially in cases with failed endoscopic treatment. However, managing bleeding Dieulafoy's with selective arterial embolization as the first line of treatment has not been exclusively practiced. We hereby, report a case of bleeding Dieulafoy lesion which had been primarily treated with arterial embolization.

  2. The effect of transcatheter arterial embolisation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolisation with coils for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy.......The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolisation with coils for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy....

  3. Bleeding Risk Profile in Patients With Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Frederic; Husmann, Marc; Benenati, James F; Katzen, Barry T; Del Conde, Ian

    2016-06-01

    To assess the bleeding risk profile using the HAS-BLED score in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD). A post hoc analysis was performed using data from a series of 115 consecutive patients (mean age 72.4±11.4 years; 68 men) with symptomatic PAD undergoing endovascular revascularization. The endpoint of the study was to assess bleeding risk using the 9-point HAS-BLED score, which was previously validated in cohorts of patients with and without atrial fibrillation. For the purpose of this study, the low (0-1), intermediate (2), and high-risk (≥3) scores were stratified as low/intermediate risk (HAS-BLED risk (HAS-BLED ≥3). The mean HAS-BLED score was 2.76±1.16; 64 (56%) patients had a HAS-BLED score ≥3.0. Patients with PAD Rutherford category 5/6 ischemia had an even higher mean HAS-BLED score (3.20±1.12). Logistic regression analysis revealed aortoiliac or femoropopliteal segment involvement, chronic kidney disease, as well as Rutherford category 5/6, to be independent risk factors associated with a HAS-BLED score ≥3. Patients with PAD, especially those presenting with Rutherford category 5/6 ischemic symptoms, have high HAS-BLED scores, suggesting increased risk for major bleeding. Prospective clinical validation of the HAS-BLED score in patients with PAD may help with the risk-benefit assessment when prescribing antithrombotic therapy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Does topical tranexamic acid reduce postcoronary artery bypass graft bleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mirmohammadsadeghi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative bleeding is a common problem in cardiac surgery. We tried to evaluate the effect of topical tranexamic acid (TA on reducing postoperative bleeding of patients undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-six isolated primary CABG patients were included in this clinical trial. They were divided blindly into two groups; Group 1, patients receiving 1 g TA diluted in 100 ml normal saline poured into mediastinal cavity before closing the chest and Group 2, patients receiving 100 ml normal saline at the end of operation. First 24 and 48 h chest tube drainage, hemoglobin decrease and packed RBC transfusion needs were compared. Results: Both groups were the same in baseline characteristics including gender, age, body mass index, ejection fraction, clamp time, bypass time, and operation length. During the first 24 h postoperatively, mean chest tube drainage in intervention group was 567 ml compared to 564 ml in control group (P = 0.89. Mean total chest tube drainage was 780 ml in intervention group and 715 ml in control group (P = 0.27. There was no significant difference in both mean hemoglobin decrease (P = 0.26 and packed RBC transfusion (P = 0.7. Topical application of 1 g TA diluted in 100 ml normal saline does not reduce postoperative bleeding of isolated on-pump CABG surgery. Conclusion: We do not recommend topical usage of 1 g TA diluted in 100 ml normal saline for decreasing blood loss in on-pump CABG patients.

  5. Use of a Stent Graft for Bleeding Hepatic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoncio L. Kaw, Jr

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although uncommon, bleeding following pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with high mortality. Management generally includes surgical reexploration or, alternatively, transarterial embolization. We report the case of a 62-year-old man who presented with massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding 3 weeks after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Selective coeliac angiography revealed a large pseudoaneurysm involving the proper hepatic artery. This was treated successfully with a stent graft. There was no recurrence of bleeding at the 6-month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of stent graft repair of bleeding hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  6. Angiographically Negative Acute Arterial Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Incidence, Predictive Factors, and Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chae, Eun Young; Myung, Seung Jae; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of angiographically negative acute arterial upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. From 2001 to 2008, 143 consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for acute arterial upper or lower GI bleeding were examined. The angiographies revealed a negative bleeding focus in 75 of 143 (52%) patients. The incidence of an angiographically negative outcome was significantly higher in patients with a stable hemodynamic status (p < 0.001), or in patients with lower GI bleeding (p = 0.032). A follow-up of the 75 patients (range: 0-72 months, mean: 8 ± 14 months) revealed that 60 of the 75 (80%) patients with a negative bleeding focus underwent conservative management only, and acute bleeding was controlled without rebleeding. Three of the 75 (4%) patients underwent exploratory surgery due to prolonged bleeding; however, no bleeding focus was detected. Rebleeding occurred in 12 of 75 (16%) patients. Of these, six patients experienced massive rebleeding and died of disseminated intravascular coagulation within four to nine hours after the rebleeding episode. Four of the 16 patients underwent a repeat angiography and the two remaining patients underwent a surgical intervention to control the bleeding. Angiographically negative results are relatively common in patients with acute GI bleeding, especially in patients with a stable hemodynamic status or lower GI bleeding. Most patients with a negative bleeding focus have experienced spontaneous resolution of their condition

  7. Angiographically Negative Acute Arterial Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Incidence, Predictive Factors, and Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chae, Eun Young; Myung, Seung Jae; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of angiographically negative acute arterial upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. From 2001 to 2008, 143 consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for acute arterial upper or lower GI bleeding were examined. The angiographies revealed a negative bleeding focus in 75 of 143 (52%) patients. The incidence of an angiographically negative outcome was significantly higher in patients with a stable hemodynamic status (p < 0.001), or in patients with lower GI bleeding (p = 0.032). A follow-up of the 75 patients (range: 0-72 months, mean: 8 {+-} 14 months) revealed that 60 of the 75 (80%) patients with a negative bleeding focus underwent conservative management only, and acute bleeding was controlled without rebleeding. Three of the 75 (4%) patients underwent exploratory surgery due to prolonged bleeding; however, no bleeding focus was detected. Rebleeding occurred in 12 of 75 (16%) patients. Of these, six patients experienced massive rebleeding and died of disseminated intravascular coagulation within four to nine hours after the rebleeding episode. Four of the 16 patients underwent a repeat angiography and the two remaining patients underwent a surgical intervention to control the bleeding. Angiographically negative results are relatively common in patients with acute GI bleeding, especially in patients with a stable hemodynamic status or lower GI bleeding. Most patients with a negative bleeding focus have experienced spontaneous resolution of their condition.

  8. Acute interventional diagnosis and treatment of upper gastrointestinal arterial hemorrhage: its clinical value and influence factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongli; Cui Shitao; Zhang Jiaxing; Ru Fuming; Xu Jiahua; Xu Jichong

    2009-01-01

    drunk after the treatment. Angiography showed that the original bleeding arteries remained occluded. Gastro-duodenal artery infusion with embolization was carried out in one patient, but the patient died of massive hemorrhage due to esophago-fundal varices caused by arterial portal hypertension which was resulted from the formation of the arteriovenous fistula between hepatic artery and portal vein. Conclusions: Emergent arterial angiography and interventional therapy is an effective measure to promptly find out the bleeding site and to control the hemorrhage. The diagnostic accuracy, the revealing rate of bleeding and the therapeutic effect are influenced by multiple factors. (authors)

  9. Transcatheter arterial embolization for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Cercueil, J P; Krausé, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, transcatheter arterial embolization has become the first-line therapy for the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic hemostasis. Advances in catheter-based techniques and newer embolic agents, as well as recognition of the effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment options, have expanded the role of interventional radiology in the treatment of bleeding for a variety of indications. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a fast, safe, and effective minimally invasive alternative to surgery, when endoscopic treatment fails to control acute bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the role of arterial embolization in the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and summarizes the literature evidence on the outcomes of endovascular therapy in such a setting. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. A splenic artery aneurysm presenting with multiple episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, W S L; Gamlaksha, D S; Jayasekara, D P; Rajamanthri, S D

    2017-05-03

    Splenic artery aneurysm is rare and its diagnosis is challenging due to the nonspecific nature of the clinical presentation. We report a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in which the patient presented with chronic dyspepsia and multiple episodes of minor intragastric bleeding. A 60-year-old, previously healthy Sri Lankan man presented with four episodes of hematemesis and severe dyspeptic symptoms over a period of 6 months. The results of two initial upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and an abdominal ultrasound scan were unremarkable. A third upper gastrointestinal endoscopy detected a pulsatile bulge at the posterior wall of the gastric antrum. A contrast-enhanced computed tomogram of his abdomen detected a splenic artery aneurysm measuring 3 × 3 × 2.5 cm. While awaiting routine surgery, he developed a torrential upper gastrointestinal bleeding and shock, leading to emergency laparotomy. Splenectomy and en bloc resection of the aneurysm with the posterior stomach wall were performed. Histology revealed evidence for a true aneurysm without overt, acute, or chronic inflammation of the surrounding gastric mucosa. He became completely asymptomatic 2 weeks after the surgery. Splenic artery aneurysms can result in recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The possibility of impending catastrophic bleeding should be remembered when managing patients with splenic artery aneurysms after a minor bleeding. Negative endoscopy and ultrasonography should require contrast-enhanced computed tomography to look for the cause of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1 1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy

  12. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1 1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy.

  13. Stent grafting of acute hepatic artery bleeding following pancreatic head resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoupis, Christoforos; Ludwig, Karin; Triller, Juergen; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Do, Dai-Do

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the potential of hepatic artery stent grafting in cases of acute hemorrhage of the gastroduodenal artery stump following pancreatic head resection. Five consecutive male patients were treated because of acute, life-threatening massive bleeding. Instead of re-operation, emergency angiography, with the potential of endovascular treatment, was performed. Because of bleeding from the hepatic artery, a stent graft (with the over-the-wire or monorail technique) was implanted to control the hemmorhage by preserving patency of the artery. The outcome was evaluated. In all cases, the hepatic artery stent grafting was successfully performed, and the bleeding was immediately stopped. Clinically, immediately after the procedure, there was an obvious improvement in the general patient condition. There were no immediate procedure-related complications. Completion angiography (n=5) demonstrated control of the hemorrhage and patency of the hepatic artery and the stent graft. Although all patients recovered hemodynamically, three individuals died 2 to 10 days after the procedure. The remaining two patients survived, without the need for re-operation. Transluminal stent graft placement in the hepatic artery is a safe and technically feasible solution to control life-threatening bleeding of the gastroduodenal artery stump. (orig.)

  14. Emergency transcatheter arterial embolization for critical massive bleeding due to duodenal bulb ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiang; Li Yiyun; Zhao Chunmei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of emergency transcatheter arterial embolization (ETAE) in treating critical massive bleeding due to duodenal bulb ulcer. Methods: ETAE was carried out in seven patients with acute massive bleeding due to endoscopically-proved duodenal bulb ulcer, who failed to respond conservative measures and were critically ill clinically. Super-selective catheterization of gastroduodenal artery or right gastroepiploic artery was performed, which was followed by arterial angiography to identify the bleeding site. According to the angiographic findings, ETAE with Gelfoam particles and coils was carried out. After the operation medical management was given and endoscopy re-examination was conducted. All the patients were follow up for 3∼6 months. Results: Angiographically, gastroduodenal artery bleeding was detected in all seven patients. ETAE was successfully accomplished in all cases. Complete clinical effectiveness was obtained in six patients while partial effectiveness in one case. No procedure-related complications occurred. Conclusion: For critical massive bleeding due to duodenal bulb ulcer ETAE is a highly effective and safe treatment, which can be regarded as an alternative to surgery. It is worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  15. Hepatic artery stent-grafts for the emergency treatment of acute bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellemann, Nadine, E-mail: nadine.bellemann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Mokry, Theresa; Kortes, Nikolas; Gnutzmann, Daniel; Gockner, Theresa; Schmitz, Anne [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Weitz, Jürgen [Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department for Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery at the University Hospital, Technical University Dresden (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Radeleff, Boris; Stampfl, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We report our experiences with stent-grafts for the treatment of acute hemorrhage from the hepatic artery or the stump of the gastroduodenal artery. • The technical success of stent-graft implantation was 88%. • The bleeding ceased immediately after stent-graft implantation in 88%. • The complication rate was 21%. - Abstract: Purpose: We evaluated the technical success and clinical efficacy of stent-graft implantation for the emergency management of acute hepatic artery bleeding. Methods: Between January 2010 and July 2013, 24 patients with hemorrhage from the hepatic artery were scheduled for emergency implantation of balloon expandable stent-grafts. The primary study endpoints were technical and clinical success, which were defined as successful stent-graft implantation with sealing of the bleeding site at the end of the procedure, and cessation of clinical signs of hemorrhage. The secondary study endpoints were complications during the procedure or at follow-up and 30-day mortality rate. Results: In 23 patients, hemorrhage occurred after surgery, and in one patient hemorrhage occurred after trauma. Eight patients had sentinel bleeding. In most patients (n = 16), one stent-graft was implanted. In six patients, two overlapping stent-grafts were implanted. The stent-grafts had a target diameter between 4 mm and 7 mm. Overall technical success was 88%. The bleeding ceased after stent-graft implantation in 21 patients (88%). The mean follow-up was 137 ± 383 days. In two patients, re-bleeding from the hepatic artery occurred during follow-up after 4 and 29 days, respectively, which could be successfully treated by endovascular therapy. The complication rate was 21% (minor complication rate 4%, major complication rate 17%). The 30-day mortality rate was 21%. Conclusions: Implantation of stent-grafts in the hepatic artery is an effective emergency therapy and has a good technical success rate for patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  16. Segmental embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a case of a perforated pseudoaneurysm and gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Cavallaro, A.; Bautz, W.

    2004-01-01

    We present the history of a woman suffering from an extensive gastrointestinal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis and chronic pancreatitis. Selective angiogram of the celiac artery revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery caused by inflammatory wall penetration. The life-threatening hemorrhage was completely stopped by embolization with three stainless steel coils after microcatheter engagement of the gastroduodenal artery. The particularity of this case is the restricted embolization of the aneurysm vessel segment, so the collateral circulation of the gastroduodenal and pancreaticoduodenal artery could be preserved. (orig.)

  17. Detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding by intra-arterial scintigraphy: an experimental study and preliminary clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Joo Hyeong; Kim, Duk Yoon; Yi, Bum Ha; Lee, Dong Ho; Yoon, Yup [Kyunghee Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi Jin [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this animal and clinical study was to compare intra-arterial (IA) scintigraphy with angiography in the localization of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. After sedation with intramuscularly administered ketamine, lower GI bleeding was induced in ten rabbits. Using inguinal cut-down, an arterial femoral 3F catheter was placed in the proximal mesenteric artery. Following abdominal incision to expose the bowel, lower GI bleeding was caused by incising the antimesenteric border of the small bowel wall. Initial angiography was performed, and this was followede by Tc-99m pertechnetate IA scintigarphy. Tc-99m RBC IA scintigraphy involved two patients who had undergone selective mesenteric arterial catheterizaion for the evaluation of acute lower GI bleeding. Ten rabbits, bleeding at a mean rate of 0.7g/min, were studied. IA scintigraphy was superior to angiography in four cases and equal in six. The sensitivity of angiography was 40%(4/10), and IA scintigraphy 80%(8/10). In one patient, Tc-99m RBC was administered directly into the superior mesenteric artery and ulcer bleeding in the transverse colon was identified. PRior to conventional angiography, the bleeding had been occult. In a second patient, in whom angiography had revealed a hypervascular mass, selective injection of Tc-99m RBC into the superior mesenteric artery revealed tumor(leiomyoma) bleeding in the jejunum. Selective IA scintigraphy was valuable for detecting intestinal bleeding, occult during conventional studies and may be useful for detecting acute bleeding at the time of negative angiography.=20.

  18. Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MK Roy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available “Haemosuccus pancreaticus” is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.

  19. A unique case of pulmonary artery catheter bleeding from the oximetry connection port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Rajagopalan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery catheter is an invasive monitor usually placed in high-risk cardiac surgical patients to optimize the cardiac functions. We present this case of blood oozing from the oximetry connection port of the pulmonary artery catheter that resulted in the inability to monitor continuous cardiac output requiring replacement of the catheter. The cause of this abnormal bleeding was later confirmed to be due to a manufacturing defect.

  20. Bronchial artery embolization for therapy of pulmonary bleeding in patients with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Balzer, J.; Straub, R.; Vogl, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Acute pulmonary emergencies in patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) can be found in cases of pneumothorax as well as hemoptysis. If the bleeding cannot be stopped by conservative methods, an embolization of the bronchial arteries should be done. Materials and Method: 11 patients were embolized using a combination of PVA particles and microcoils. Results: From January 1996 to June 2001 17 bronchial arteries in 11 patients were embolized. 7 patients suffered from chronical hemoptysis, 4 patients had an acute hemoptysis. In 4 patients both sides were embolized, in 3 patients only one side. The remaining 4 patients needed a second intervention, embolizing the other side. The primary embolizated bronchial artery was still closed in all 4 patients. In 1 patient the selective catheterization of a bronchial artery was not successful, thus the embolization could not be carried out. 1 patient died 5 days after the intervention due to a fulminant pneumonia (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) without recurrent bleeding. In two patients atypical branches from intercostal arteries feeding the bronchial arteries were detected and successfully embolized. All patients profited from the therapy, as bleeding could be stopped or at least be reduced. 3 patients suffered from back pain during or after intervention. There were no severe complications like neurological deficiencies or necroses. (orig.) [de

  1. Traumatic intercostal arterial bleeding controlled with a novel surgical technique: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miettinen Simo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A blunt thoracic trauma may cause arterial bleeding requiring operative treatment or endovascular embolization or endovascular aortic stenting. A novel damage control technique to stop such bleeding is presented. Case presentation We present the case of an 82-year-old Caucasian man who experienced rib fractures I-VII on the left side and bleeding from damaged intercostal arteries after a blunt thoracic trauma. Emergency thoracotomy was performed. Conclusions Effective hemostasis was achieved by using a rolled surgical swab and inserting it against the chest wall next to the aorta with sutures pulled through the intercostal muscles and then sutured to the back side of the patient. The patient died four days after the surgery due to a head injury sustained in the car crash.

  2. Coronary artery bypass grafting-related bleeding complications in patients treated with dual antiplatelet treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomšič, Anton; Schotborgh, Mark A.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Li, Wilson W. L.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the timing of either ticagrelor or clopidogrel discontinuation and bleeding-related complications in patients undergoing isolated on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Between January 2012 and December 2014, 705 consecutive patients underwent isolated

  3. Coronary artery bypass grafting-related bleeding complications in patients treated with dual antiplatelet treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomsic, A.; Schotborgh, M.A.; Manshanden, J.S.; Li, W.W.L.; Mol, B.A. de

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationship between the timing of either ticagrelor or clopidogrel discontinuation and bleeding-related complications in patients undergoing isolated on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS: Between January 2012 and December 2014, 705 consecutive patients

  4. Arterial lactate does not predict outcome better than existing risk scores in upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Line Aabel; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a frequent medical emergency and several scoring systems are developed to help risk-stratify patients. We aimed to investigate if elevated arterial lactate (AL) was associated with 30-day mortality, need for hospital-based intervention...

  5. Bleeding after dilatation and curettage: the efficacy of transcatheter uterine artery embolisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.; Shin, J.H.; Yoon, H.-K.; Kim, J.W.; Ko, G.-Y.; Won, H.-S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate safety and clinical outcomes of uterine artery embolisation (UAE) for bleeding after dilatation and curettage (D&C) performed for abortion or termination. Materials and methods: The outcomes were analysed in 11 patients who underwent UAE for bleeding after D&C for missed abortions (n=8), caesarean scar pregnancies (n=2), or planned termination (n=1) between October 2001 and December 2013. Angiograms and medical records were retrospectively reviewed in order to obtain the patients' baseline characteristics, technical/clinical success rate, complications, and follow-up data regarding menstruation. Results: Technical success, defined as successful catheterisation of both uterine arteries with embolisation to haemostasis, was 100%, whereas clinical success, defined as cessation of bleeding after the initial session of UAE and without the need for additional UAE or surgery for the purpose of haemostasis, was 81.8% (nine of 11). In the two patients with clinical failure due to recurrent vaginal bleeding after UAE, one patient underwent repeat UAE and showed a successful outcome, whilst the other patient required hysterectomy with pathological results of placenta increta. Two other patients underwent hysterectomy for placenta percreta or hydatidiform mole-mimicking remnant placenta. None of the patients included in the present series had procedure-related complications. Menstruation resumed in all eight patients with an intact uterus during the mean follow-up period. Conclusion: UAE may be a safe and effective treatment for bleeding after D&C, especially for women who wish to preserve their fertility; however, hysterectomy may be indicated for patients with a placental abnormality. - Highlights: • We evaluate outcomes of uterine artery embolization for bleeding after D&C. • UAE may be a safe and effective treatment for bleeding after D&C. • Hysterectomy may be indicated for patients with a placental abnormality.

  6. Empiric transcatheter arterial embolization for massive bleeding from duodenal ulcers: efficacy and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiro, Ikushima; Shushi, Higashi; Akihiko, Ishii; Yasuhiko, Iryo; Yasuyuki, Yamashita

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of empiric transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for patients with massive bleeding from duodenal ulcers. During January 2000 and December 2009, 59 patients with duodenal ulcer bleeding in whom TAE was attempted after endoscopic therapy failed were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into empiric TAE (n = 36) and identifiable TAE (n = 23) groups according to angiographic findings with or without identification of the bleeding sites. The technical and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The technical and clinical success rates of TAE were 100% and 83%. The recurrent bleeding rate, clinical success, duodenal stenosis, and 30-day mortality after TAE were not significantly different between the empiric and identifiable TAE groups. A high rate of technical and clinical success was obtained with empiric TAE comparable to identifiable TAE in patients with massive bleeding from duodenal ulcers. There were no severe complications. Empiric TAE is an effective and safe method when a bleeding site cannot determined by angiography. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. TRANS-ARTERIAL EMBOLIZATION WITH N-BUTYL CYANOACRYLATE GLUE FOR RENAL BLEEDING: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Young

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objectivity in management of renal bleeding is to preserve a significant renal parenchyma tissue and prevent associated morbidities like anemic shock or renal impairment from substantial nephron demise or obstructed uropathy. Trans-arterial embolization therapy by interventional radiology offers a high success rate with potential of reserving normal renal tissue. The selection material for renal arterial embolization largely depends on vasculature anatomy and end-point of procedure. N-butyl cyanoacrylate glue in our experience is applied in lesion supplied by small size of end-artery

  8. Surgical treatment of massive bleeding of a right aberrant subclavian artery after oesophageal stent removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Raum

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 9-year-old female who required surgical treatment and resuscitation after severe transoesophageal bleeding of a right aberrant subclavian artery (RASA. Bleeding of this RASA was caused by a mechanical irritation due to an oesophageal stent. The stent was placed weeks before to dilate the oesophagus after accidental ingestion of a caustic agent. Although conservative management of benign oesophageal stenosis in children is highly recommended, there are still some major complications to be considered. To avoid erosion of aberrant subclavian artery vascular rings and slings, as described in several case reports, these vessels should be excluded by computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans before placement of oesophageal stents. This case suggests that management of caustic ingestion in children is still a major challenge in paediatric surgical departments. Keywords: Paediatric surgery, Chemical Burn, Oesophageal stenosis, Oesophageal stenting, Vascular abnormalities, Right aberrant subclavian artery

  9. Arterial Embolization in the Management of Mesenteric Bleeding Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghelfi, Julien, E-mail: JGhelfi@chu-grenoble.fr; Frandon, Julien, E-mail: JFrandon2@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Barbois, Sandrine, E-mail: SBarbois@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Digestive et d’Urgences (France); Vendrell, Anne, E-mail: AVendrell@chu-grenoble.fr; Rodiere, Mathieu, E-mail: MRodiere@chu-grenoble.fr; Sengel, Christian, E-mail: CSengel@chu-grenoble.fr; Bricault, Ivan, E-mail: IBricault@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Arvieux, Catherine, E-mail: CArvieux@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Digestive et d’Urgences (France); Ferretti, Gilbert, E-mail: GFerretti@chu-grenoble.fr; Thony, Frédéric, E-mail: FThony@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France)

    2016-05-15

    IntroductionMesenteric bleeding is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma. It can induce active hemorrhage and a compressive hematoma leading to bowel ischemia. Emergency laparotomy remains the gold standard treatment. We aimed to study the effectiveness and complications of embolization in patients with post-traumatic mesenteric bleeding.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of 7 consecutive patients with active mesenteric bleeding treated by embolization in a level-one trauma center from 2007 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients presented with active mesenteric bleeding on CT scans without major signs of intestinal ischemia. We focused on technical success, clinical success, and the complications of embolization.ResultsSix endovascular procedures were successful in controlling hemorrhage but 1 patient had surgery to stop associated arterial and venous bleeding. One patient suffered from bowel ischemia, a major complication of embolization, which was confirmed by surgery. No acute renal failure was noted after angiography. For 1 patient we performed combined management as the endovascular approach allowed an easier surgical exploration.ConclusionIn mesenteric trauma with active bleeding, embolization is a valuable alternative to surgery and should be considered, taking into account the risk of bowel ischemia.

  10. Case Report: Uterine Artery Embolization for the Management of Placenta Percreta Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uribe, Jorge Ricardo; Acosta, Mauricio; Otalora, Andres Felipe; Caballero, Ligia Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    Placental adhesion abnormalities, though rare, are of clinical significance due to their high morbidity and mortality. Timely diagnosis using various imaging methods results in a dramatic reduction of these consequences, as it leads to the interdisciplinary management of the pregnant patient. Placenta percreta is the term used to describe the invasion of trophoblast through the different layers of the uterus beyond the serosa. Uterine or hypogastric arterial embolization is the method of choice for reducing peripartum bleeding and facilitating the surgical procedure.

  11. Recurrent life-threatening haemoptysis from a bleeding vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm: A diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Arun; Biswas, Shubhabrata; Hartley, James Leon; Nahser, Hans Christean; Lancaster, Jeffrey; Puthuran, Mani

    2016-10-01

    A bleeding vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare cause of haemoptysis. Pseudoaneurysm can arise due to radionecrosis from previous radiotherapy in the base of skull and neck region and may present with haemoptysis many years later. It is important to be aware of this entity in the work-up of haemoptysis, particularly in patients with previous base of skull and neck radiotherapy. Our patient was successfully treated with endovascular occlusion. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Efficacy of prophylactic uterine artery embolization before obstetrical procedures with high risk for massive bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Heung Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyung; Han, Ki Chang; Lee, Shin Wha

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of prophylactic uterine artery embolization (UAE) before obstetrical procedures with high risk for massive bleeding. A retrospective review of 29 female patients who underwent prophylactic UAE from June 2009 to February 2014 was performed. Indications for prophylactic UAE were as follows: dilatation and curettage (D and C) associated with ectopic pregnancy (cesarean scar pregnancy, n = 9; cervical pregnancy, n = 6), termination of pregnancy with abnormal placentation (placenta previa, n = 8), D and C for retained placenta with vascularity (n = 5), and D and C for suspected gestational trophoblastic disease (n = 1). Their medical records were reviewed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of UAE. All women received successful bilateral prophylactic UAE followed by D and C with preservation of the uterus. In all patients, UAE followed by obstetrical procedure prevented significant vaginal bleeding on gynecologic examination. There was no major complication related to UAE. Vaginal spotting continued for 3 months in three cases. Although oligomenorrhea continued for six months in one patient, normal menstruation resumed in all patients afterwards. During follow-up, four had subsequent successful natural pregnancies. Spontaneous abortion occurred in one of them during the first trimester. Prophylactic UAE before an obstetrical procedure in patients with high risk of bleeding or symptomatic bleeding may be a safe and effective way to manage or prevent serious bleeding, especially for women who wish to preserve their fertility

  13. Efficacy of prophylactic uterine artery embolization before obstetrical procedures with high risk for massive bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Heung Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyung; Han, Ki Chang; Lee, Shin Wha [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of prophylactic uterine artery embolization (UAE) before obstetrical procedures with high risk for massive bleeding. A retrospective review of 29 female patients who underwent prophylactic UAE from June 2009 to February 2014 was performed. Indications for prophylactic UAE were as follows: dilatation and curettage (D and C) associated with ectopic pregnancy (cesarean scar pregnancy, n = 9; cervical pregnancy, n = 6), termination of pregnancy with abnormal placentation (placenta previa, n = 8), D and C for retained placenta with vascularity (n = 5), and D and C for suspected gestational trophoblastic disease (n = 1). Their medical records were reviewed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of UAE. All women received successful bilateral prophylactic UAE followed by D and C with preservation of the uterus. In all patients, UAE followed by obstetrical procedure prevented significant vaginal bleeding on gynecologic examination. There was no major complication related to UAE. Vaginal spotting continued for 3 months in three cases. Although oligomenorrhea continued for six months in one patient, normal menstruation resumed in all patients afterwards. During follow-up, four had subsequent successful natural pregnancies. Spontaneous abortion occurred in one of them during the first trimester. Prophylactic UAE before an obstetrical procedure in patients with high risk of bleeding or symptomatic bleeding may be a safe and effective way to manage or prevent serious bleeding, especially for women who wish to preserve their fertility.

  14. Transcatheter arterial embolization is the first-line therapy of choice in peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jakobsen, Mark; Nielsen, Michael Milek

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. In 5-10% of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) it is impossible to achieve endoscopic hemostasis because of severe bleeding. These patients have traditionally been treated surgically. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) may, however, be associated with a better ou...

  15. Emergency arterial embolization of upper gastrointestinal and jejunal tumors: An analysis of 12 patients with severe bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandrino, F; Tettoni, S M; Gallesio, I; Summa, M

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy of emergency percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization in patients with severe bleeding due to upper gastrointestinal or jejunal tumor. Twelve patients (7 men, 5 women; mean age, 74 years±14 (SD); range: 54-86 years) with severe bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, with failed endoscopic treatment not eligible for emergency surgery were treated by emergency percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization. The bleeding cause was gastric tumor in 7 patients, duodenal tumor in 4 patients and jejunal tumor in one patient. Procedure details and follow-up were reviewed. Twelve embolization procedures were performed using various embolic agents. Embolization was achieved and bleeding was stopped in all patients. Five patients underwent surgery within the 30 days following embolization. In the remaining 7 patients, no bleeding occurred at 1 month follow-up in 6 patients and bleeding recurred in one patient at 1 month. In this later patient, endoscopic treatment was successful. The results of our study suggest that transcatheter arterial embolization is safe and effective in patients with severe arterial bleeding due to upper gastrointestinal or jejunal tumor. In some patients, transcatheter arterial embolization can be used as a bridge to surgery. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcatheter arterial embolization for endoscopically unmanageable non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Hee; Park, Jae Myung; Chun, Ho Jong; Oh, Jung Suk; Ahn, Hyo Jun; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2015-07-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) is a therapeutic option for endoscopically unmanageable upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We aimed to assess the efficacy and clinical outcomes of TAE for acute non-variceal upper GI bleeding and to identify predictors of recurrent bleeding within 30 days. Visceral angiography was performed in 66 patients (42 men, 24 women; mean age, 60.3 ± 12.7 years) who experienced acute non-variceal upper GI bleeding that failed to be controlled by endoscopy during a 7-year period. Clinical information was reviewed retrospectively. Outcomes included technical success rates, complications, and 30-day rebleeding and mortality rates. TAE was feasible in 59 patients. The technical success rate was 98%. Rebleeding within 30 days was observed in 47% after an initial TAE and was managed with re-embolization in 8, by endoscopic intervention in 5, by surgery in 2, and by conservative care in 12 patients. The 30-day overall mortality rate was 42.4%. In the case of initial endoscopic hemostasis failure (n = 34), 31 patients underwent angiographic embolization, which was successful in 30 patients (96.8%). Rebleeding occurred in 15 patients (50%), mainly because of malignancy. Two factors were independent predictors of rebleeding within 30 days by multivariate analysis: coagulopathy (odds ratio [OR] = 4.37; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-15.29; p = 0.021) and embolization in ≥2 territories (OR = 4.93; 95% CI: 1.43-17.04; p = 0.012). Catheterization-related complications included hepatic artery dissection and splenic embolization. TAE controlled acute non-variceal upper GI bleeding effectively. TAE may be considered when endoscopic therapy is unavailable or unsuccessful. Correction of coagulopathy before TAE is recommended.

  17. Volume-rendered hemorrhage-responsible arteriogram created by 64 multidetector-row CT during aortography: utility for catheterization in transcatheter arterial embolization for acute arterial bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Ikoma, Akira; Sanda, Hiroki; Nakata, Kouhei; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Nakai, Motoki; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Murotani, Kazuhiro; Hosokawa, Seiki; Nishioku, Tadayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Aortography for detecting hemorrhage is limited when determining the catheter treatment strategy because the artery responsible for hemorrhage commonly overlaps organs and non-responsible arteries. Selective catheterization of untargeted arteries would result in repeated arteriography, large volumes of contrast medium, and extended time. A volume-rendered hemorrhage-responsible arteriogram created with 64 multidetector-row CT (64MDCT) during aortography (MDCTAo) can be used both for hemorrhage mapping and catheter navigation. The MDCTAo depicted hemorrhage in 61 of 71 cases of suspected acute arterial bleeding treated at our institute in the last 3 years. Complete hemostasis by embolization was achieved in all cases. The hemorrhage-responsible arteriogram was used for navigation during catheterization, thus assisting successful embolization. Hemorrhage was not visualized in the remaining 10 patients, of whom 6 had a pseudoaneurysm in a visceral artery; 1 with urinary bladder bleeding and 1 with chest wall hemorrhage had gaze tamponade; and 1 with urinary bladder hemorrhage and 1 with uterine hemorrhage had spastic arteries. Six patients with pseudoaneurysm underwent preventive embolization and the other 4 patients were managed by watchful observation. MDCTAo has the advantage of depicting the arteries responsible for hemoptysis, whether from the bronchial arteries or other systemic arteries, in a single scan. MDCTAo is particularly useful for identifying the source of acute arterial bleeding in the pancreatic arcade area, which is supplied by both the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries. In a case of pelvic hemorrhage, MDCTAo identified the responsible artery from among numerous overlapping visceral arteries that branched from the internal iliac arteries. In conclusion, a hemorrhage-responsible arteriogram created by 64MDCT immediately before catheterization is useful for deciding the catheter treatment strategy for acute arterial bleeding.

  18. Massive Bleeding from Guidewire Perforation of an External Iliac Artery: Treatment with Hand-made Stent-Graft Placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Vimal, E-mail: drvimalmehta@yahoo.co.in; Pandit, Bhagya Narayan; Mehra, Pratishtha; Nigam, Arima; Vyas, Aniruddha; Yusuf, Jamal; Mukhopadhyay, Saibal; Trehan, Vijay [G.B. Pant Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (India)

    2016-01-15

    We report life-threatening bleeding from an external iliac artery perforation following guidewire manipulation in a patient with atherosclerotic iliac artery disease. This complication was successfully managed by indigenous hand-made stent-graft made from two peripheral stents in the catheterization laboratory.

  19. Massive Bleeding from Guidewire Perforation of an External Iliac Artery: Treatment with Hand-made Stent-Graft Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Vimal; Pandit, Bhagya Narayan; Mehra, Pratishtha; Nigam, Arima; Vyas, Aniruddha; Yusuf, Jamal; Mukhopadhyay, Saibal; Trehan, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    We report life-threatening bleeding from an external iliac artery perforation following guidewire manipulation in a patient with atherosclerotic iliac artery disease. This complication was successfully managed by indigenous hand-made stent-graft made from two peripheral stents in the catheterization laboratory

  20. Angiographic embolization in the treatment of intrahepatic arterial bleeding in patients with blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ya-Lin; Zhang, Hong-Yi; He, Xiao-Jun; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Cheng-Li; Xiao, Mei; Zhen, Yu-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Angiographic embolization (AE) as an adjunct non-operative treatment of intrahepatic arterial bleeding has been widely used. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of selective AE in patients with hepatic trauma. Seventy patients with intrahepatic arterial bleeding after blunt abdominal trauma who had undergone selective AE in 10 years at this institution were retrospectively reviewed. The criteria for selective AE included active extravasation on contrast-enhanced CT, an episode of hypotension or a decrease in hemoglobin level during the non-operative treatment. The data of the patients included demographics, grade of liver injuries, mechanism of blunt abdominal trauma, associated intra-abdominal injuries, indications for AE, angiographic findings, type of AE, and AE-related hepatobiliary complications. In the 70 patients, 32 (45.71%) had high-grade liver injuries. Extravazation during the early arterial phase mainly involved the right hepatic segments. Thirteen (18.57%) patients underwent embolization of intrahepatic branches and the extrahepatic trunk and these patients all developed AE-related hepatobiliary complications. In 19 patients with AE-related complications, 14 received minimally invasive treatment and recovered without severe sequelae. AE is an adjunct treatment for liver injuries. Selective and/or super-selective AE should be advocated to decrease the incidence and severity of AE-related hepatobiliary complications.

  1. Unusual Complication of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Spontaneous Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Hypovolemic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Hsiung Ko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery (SMA syndrome is an unusual form of duodenal obstruction. Complications of SMA syndrome may sometimes develop and are usually associated with marked gastric dilatation, although most complications can be corrected by supportive treatment. In this article, we report a case of severe SMA syndrome with hypovolemic shock in a 24-year-old man. Multidetector-row computed tomography with reconstructed images was performed to establish the diagnosis. Spontaneous gastrointestinal bleeding is an extremely uncommon complication of SMA syndrome, and emergent surgical intervention was unavoidable in our patient. To our knowledge, no other such case has been reported in the English-language literature.

  2. A Case of Traumatic Mesenteric Bleeding Controlled by only Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asayama, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Isoda, Takuro; Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakashima, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of mesenteric hematoma following blunt abdominal trauma that was successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) and did not require surgical repair. A 43-year-old man with blunt abdominal trauma caused in a factory accident was admitted with a stable general condition and laboratory data. On CT examination, a large mesenteric hematoma with extravasation of contrast media was observed. TAE was first attempted to control the bleeding. A superior mesenteric angiogram showed extravasation of contrast medium from a branch of the ileocolic artery and obstruction of the cecal branch. After successful TAE using microcoils, the distal portion of the cecal branch was still preserved via collateral circulation. No abdominal symptoms have occurred during the 7 months following TAE. In mesenteric injury cases with limited intestinal damage, TAE may therefore be a reasonable alternative to emergent laparotomy

  3. Tamai zone I fingertip replantation: is external bleeding obligatory for survival of artery anastomosis-only replanted digits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ko-Kang; Hsieh, Tung-Ying; Chang, Kao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Distal fingertip replantation is associated with good functional and aesthetic results. Venous anastomosis is the most challenging procedure. For replantation with an artery anastomosis-only procedure (no venous anastomosis), some protocols have been designed to relieve venous congestion involve anticoagulation and the creation of wounds for persistent bleeding. This report presents the authors' experience of fingertip survival after artery anastomosis-only replantation with no persistent external bleeding. Twelve Tamai zone I fingertip total amputation patients who underwent artery anastomosis-only replantations were recruited from February 2009 to June 2012. Nerve repair was performed if identified. The patients were not subjected to conventional external bleeding methods. Both the blood color on pinprick and fingertip temperature difference between the replanted and uninjured digits were used as indicators of deteriorated venous congestion. The replanted digits of 11 patients survived. The only failed replant exhibited an average temperature difference of more than 6°C compared with the uninjured digits and consistently exhibited darker blood during the pinprick test. All other replants exhibited average temperature differences of less than 6°C. In these Tamai zone I artery anastomosis-only replantations, fingertips survived without the use of external bleeding method, indicating that external bleeding is probably not obligatory for survival of artery anastomosis-only replanted digits distal to Tamai zone I. An increasing temperature difference between the replanted and uninjured digits and darker blood on pinprick may be used as indicators of deteriorating congestion signs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Emergency Pancreatoduodenectomy with Preservation of Gastroduodenal Artery for Massive Gastrointestinal Bleeding due to Duodenal Metastasis by Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Patient with Celiac Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Neofytou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma is rare, and even rarer is a massive gastrointestinal bleeding from such tumours. Coeliac occlusive disease, although rarely symptomatic, can lead to ischaemic changes with anastomotic dehiscence and leaks when a patient undergoes pancreatoduodenectomy. A 41-year-old man with known metastasis to the adrenal glands and the second part of the duodenum close to the ampulla of Vater from clear cell renal cell carcinoma was admitted to our department due to massive gastrointestinal bleeding from the duodenal metastasis. Endoscopic control of the bleed was not possible, while the bleeding vessel embolization was able to control the haemorrhage only temporarily. An angiography during the embolization demonstrated the presence of stenosis of the coeliac artery and also hypertrophic inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries supplying the proper hepatic artery via the gastroduodenal artery (GDA. The patient underwent emergency pancreatoduodenectomy with preservation of the gastroduodenal artery. The patient had an uneventful recovery and did not experience further bleeding. Also the blood flow to the liver was compromised as shown by the normal liver function tests (LFTs postoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a preservation of the GDA during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy.

  5. Effects of opium addiction on bleeding after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: report from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Mohammad Hassan; Astaneh, Behrooz; Ardekani, Gholamreza Safaee

    2010-09-01

    Opium abuse is a major type of drug abuse in Iran. This study was designed to find the possible relation between opium addiction and excessive bleeding after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. In a historical cohort study during a 1.5-year period, consecutive patients scheduled for elective CABG surgery were assigned to two group on the basis of having or not having the criteria for inhalational opium addiction. Before and after operations, the complete blood count, bleeding time, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and platelet count were checked for all patients. The volumes of infused red blood cells during and after the operation were recorded. After operations, the volumes of bleeding through the patients' chest tubes were recorded. The recorded data were analyzed using SPSS software version 11.5. Independent t, chi-square and repeated measure tests were used; and P Opium-addicted patients received more packed red blood cells during and after the operations. Inhalational opium addiction might lead to more hemorrhage after CABG surgery. It is recommended that cardiac surgeons consider these patients at high risk for major complications after surgery.

  6. Interventional treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients of hepatic carcinoma accompanied with hepatic artery-portal vein shunting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jijun; Shang Jianqiang; Liu Zuoqin; Tang Jun; Sun Zengtao; Chen Jie; Zhang Lei; Liu Hongjun; Zhou Zhaohai

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic and therapeutic efficacy of interventional procedure for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients of hepatic carcinoma accompanied with hepatic artery-portal vein shunting (HAPVS). Methods: Clinical data of 27 patients of hepatic carcinoma accompanied with HAPVS were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent hepatic arterial angiography and transcatheter arterial embolization. Shunts were embolized with coils, Gelfoam particles or PVA particles. Results: Of 27 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, central type HAPVS was seen in 16 and peripheral type HAPVS in 11. Reversed portal venous flow was detected in 20 cases and ascites was found in 23 cases. The abnormal shunts were successfully occluded in all patients and the bleeding ceased within 2 days after embolization. No recurrent bleeding occurred in one month after the treatment. Ascites disappeared in 16 cases and subsided in 7 cases. Conclusion: HAPVS is an important cause for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients of hepatic carcinoma, and the arteriovenous fistula can be confirmed with hepatic artery DSA. Embolization of fistulous orifice is the most effective therapy for such patients. (authors)

  7. A case of gastrointestinal bleeding due to right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following total remnant pancreatectomy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Fujio

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudoaneurysm is a serious complication after pancreatic surgery, which mainly depends on the presence of a preceding pancreatic fistula. Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage following total pancreatectomy is a rare complication due to the absence of a pancreatic fistula. Here we report an unusual case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding due to right hepatic artery (RHA pseudoaneurysm following total remnant pancreatectomy. Presentation of case: A 75-year-old man was diagnosed with intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma recurrence following distal pancreatectomy and underwent total remnant pancreatectomy. After discharge, he was readmitted to our hospital with melena because of the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed to detect the origin of bleeding, but an obvious bleeding point could not be detected. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated an expansive growth, which indicated RHA pseudoaneurysm. Emergency angiography revealed gastrointestinal bleeding into the jejunum from the ruptured RHA pseudoaneurysm. Transcatheter arterial embolization was performed; subsequently, bleeding was successfully stopped for a short duration. Because of improvements in his general condition, the patient was discharged. Discussion: To date, very few cases have described postpancreatectomy hemorrhage following total remnant pancreatectomy. We suspect that the aneurysm ruptured into the jejunum, possibly because of the scarring and inflammation associated with his two complex surgeries. Conclusion: Pseudoaneurysm should be considered when the fragility of blood vessels is suspected, despite no history of anastomotic leak and intra-abdominal abscess. Our case also highlighted that detecting gastrointestinal bleeding is necessary to recognize sentinel bleeding if the origin of bleeding is undetectable. Abbreviations: PPH, RHA, CT, IPMC, RCCs, POD, LHA, GIE, TAE, Keywords: Case report, Pseudoaneurysm, Total

  8. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to iliac artery-cecal fistulax: A late presentation of blunt injury abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an arterio-enteric fistula between an Right iliac artery and otherwise healthy cecum, presenting with torrential lower gastrointestinal bleed in an 14-year-old patient. Whilst fistulization to the aorta and common iliac arteries has been reported, to our knowledge no previous cases of post traumatic fistulization between an right iliac artery and normal cecum has been reported. Successful open exploration primary repair of iliac artery rent with ileostomy and colostomy was done. Later stoma reversal was done successfully.

  9. Clopidogrel is not associated with major bleeding complications during peripheral arterial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David H; Goodney, Philip P; Schanzer, Andres; Nolan, Brian W; Adams, Julie E; Powell, Richard J; Walsh, Daniel B; Cronenwett, Jack L

    2011-09-01

    Persistent variation in practice surrounds preoperative clopidogrel management at the time of vascular surgery. While some surgeons preferentially discontinue clopidogrel citing a perceived risk of perioperative bleeding, others will proceed with surgery in patients taking clopidogrel for an appropriate indication. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preoperative clopidogrel use was associated with significant bleeding complications during peripheral arterial surgery. We reviewed a prospective regional vascular surgery registry recorded by 66 surgeons from 15 centers in New England from 2003 to 2009. Preoperative clopidogrel use within 48 hours of surgery was analyzed among patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA), lower extremity bypass (LEB), endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (oAAA). Ruptured AAAs were excluded. Endpoints included postoperative bleeding requiring reoperation, as well as the incidence and volume of blood transfusion. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance, Fisher exact, χ(2), and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Over the study interval, a total of 10,406 patients underwent surgery, including 5264 CEA, 2883 LEB, 1125 EVAR, and 1134 oAAA repair. Antiplatelet use among all patients varied, with 19% (n = 2010) taking no antiplatelet agents, 69% (n = 7132) taking aspirin (ASA) alone, 2.2% (n = 229) taking clopidogrel alone, and 9.7% (n = 1017) taking both ASA and clopidogrel. Clopidogrel alone or as dual antiplatelet therapy was most frequently used prior to CEA and least frequently prior to oAAA group (CEA 16.1%, LEB 9.0%, EVAR 6.5%, oAAA 5%). Reoperation for bleeding was not significantly different among patients based on antiplatelet regimen (none 1.5%, ASA 1.3%, clopidogrel 0.9%, ASA/clopidogrel 1.5%, P = .74). When analyzed by operation type, no difference in reoperation for bleeding was seen across antiplatelet regimens. There was also no

  10. Recurrent Bleeding Within 24 Hours After Uterine Artery Embolization for Severe Postpartum Hemorrhage: Are There Predictive Factors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, Sébastien; Chabrot, Pascal; Kastler, Adrian; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Cassagnes, Lucie; Gallot, Denis; Boyer, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively identify predictive factors of recurrent bleeding within 24 h after uterine artery embolization (UAE) for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Materials and Methods: A total of 194 patients underwent UAE for PPH between August 1999 and April 2009 at our institution. Twelve patients experienced recurrent bleeding within the next 24 h; a second attempt at UAE was thus necessary, which was successful in 10 cases. In two cases, hemostatic hysterectomy was performed. Epidemiological, gynecological-obstetrical, anatomic, and biological data were analyzed. Results: Complete data were available for 148 of the 194 (76%) included patients. Sixty-four (43%) were primiparous, 18 (12.2%) had a placenta accreta, 21 (14%) had a coagulopathy, and 28 (18.9%) had an anatomic variant of the uterine arterial vasculature. Mean age and pregnancy term were similar in both recurring and nonrecurrent bleeding groups. After multivariate analysis, three criteria emerged as risk factors of recurrent bleeding: primiparity (10 patients, 83%; odds ratio [OR] = 18.84; P = 0.014), coagulation disorders (6 patients, 50%; OR = 12.08; P = 0.006), and anatomic variant of the uterine arterial vasculature (28 patients; OR = 9.83; P = 0.003). Conclusions: earch for uterine collaterals must be performed before UAE for PPH. Primiparity and coagulation disorders increase the risk of recurrent bleeding after UAE for PPH.

  11. Dietoterapia de la úlcera gastro-duodenal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Sánchez Medina

    1956-05-01

    Full Text Available El concepto actual de la dietoterapia de la úlcera gastroduodenal, se refiere no solamente a la utilización de los alimentos como fármacos en el tratamiento de dicha enfermedad, sino también al empleo de los principios alimenticios para el mantenimiento de la correcta nutrición del individuo enfermo. Este trabajo tiene por objeto ofrecer al gastroenterólogo y al médico práctico la manera sencilla de trazar y prescribir una dieta a un ulceroso; en consecuencia, me ocuparé de dar las normas de la dietética de dicha enfermedad, porque considero que es al gastroenterólogo, y no al dietólogo, a quien corresponde indicar cuándo una úlcera es susceptible de ser tratada, médica o quirúrgicamente.

  12. Dietoterapia de la úlcera gastro-duodenal

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Medina, Mario

    2011-01-01

    El concepto actual de la dietoterapia de la úlcera gastroduodenal, se refiere no solamente a la utilización de los alimentos como fármacos en el tratamiento de dicha enfermedad, sino también al empleo de los principios alimenticios para el mantenimiento de la correcta nutrición del individuo enfermo. Este trabajo tiene por objeto ofrecer al gastroenterólogo y al médico práctico la manera sencilla de trazar y prescribir una dieta a un ulceroso; en consecuencia, me ocuparé de dar las normas de ...

  13. Artery-only fingertip replantations using a controlled nailbed bleeding protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erken, H Yener; Takka, Semih; Akmaz, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    We report our experience, treatment protocol, and 2-year follow-up results of 24 fingertip replantations treated using the artery-only technique without vein or nerve repair. We performed a retrospective review of 24 patients who had undergone fingertip replantation at the same center between 2005 and 2011. All patients in this study had complete fingertip amputation at or distal to the distal interphalangeal joint of the fingers or interphalangeal joint of the thumb. Patients with incomplete and complete amputations who had undergone vein and/or nerve repair along with artery repair were excluded. All patients received the same protocol including removal of the nail at the surgery and intravenous heparin 70 U/kg administered at the time of arterial anastomosis. After surgery, the nailbed was mechanically made to bleed with a sterile needle and mechanically scrubbed with a heparin-saline gauze. All patients received the same postoperative medical treatment protocol until physiological outflow was restored. Successful replantation was confirmed with clinical observation. Twenty-one of the 24 fingertip replantations (88%) were successful. The mean length of hospital stay was 7 days (range, 4-9 d). Fifteen of 22 patients required blood transfusion. The average amount of blood transfusion was 1.2 U (range, 0-3 U). This study shows that the described technique and protocol reconstructed circulation without vein anastomosis and with a high success rate. Furthermore, adequate sensory recovery without any nerve repair had occurred by the 2-year follow-up. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recurrent bleeding after arterial embolization in patients with hemoptysis : Comparison of angiographic findings and relapsing period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Seok Jin; Choi, Gi Bok; Kim, Hae Yeon; Park, Auh Whan; Juhn, Jae Ryang; Cha, Seong Sook

    2001-01-01

    To describe the angiographic findings of patients with recurrent hemoptysis after bronchial artery embolization (BAE) according to the point at which relapse occurred. From 125 patients who underwent BAE due to hemoptysis between 1996 and 2000, we selected 18 of 23 who underwent additional BAE due to recurrent bleeding after initial BAE. Depending on the point at which relapse occurred, they were divided into two groups (I and ll, according to whether additional BAE was performed within two weeks of initial BAE or more than two weeks after this) We retrospectively compared the two groups in terms of angiographic findings, number of embolized arteries, and character of feeding arteries at initial and additional BAE. Nine patients in group I (additional BAE: n=10) and nine in group ll (additional BAE: n=13) were admitted for recurrent hemoptysis within two weeks of initial BAE and more than two weeks after this, respectively. In group I (n=29) and ll(n=31), angiography demonstrated two direct and 27 indirect, and two direct and 29 indirect signs of hemorrhage, respectiveIy. No statistically significant differences were observed (x 2 =0.005, ρ=0.945). Among the embolized feeder ressels in group I (n=30) there were 20 bronchial artery and 10 non bronchial systemic collaterals, while for group ll (n=35), the corresponding totals were 21 and 14. Again, no statistically significant differences were encountered(x 2 =0.308; ρ=0.579). In group I, feeders were newly developed in one case(10%), previously embolized in five(50%), and missed in four(40%), while in group two the corresponding figures were none, twelve(92.3%), and one(7.7%) No significant differences were noted, though the incidence of previously embolized feeders in Group ll was very high (x 2 =5.383, ρ=0.068). Among patients in whom hemoptysis after BAE recurred at different times, the angiographic findings and number of embolized arteries were not significantly different, but differences in the nature of the

  15. Arterial hemorrhage from cesarean scar: a rare cause of recurring massive uterine bleeding and successful surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Feng; Hu, Min

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding and other gynecologic complications associated with a previous cesarean section scar are only recently being identified and described. Herein we report a rare case of a woman with recurring massive uterine bleeding after 2 cesarean sections. Curettage and hormone therapy were unsuccessfully used in an attempt to control the bleeding. After she was transferred to our hospital, she had another episode of vaginal bleeding that was successfully managed with oxytocin and hemostatic. Diagnostic hysteroscopy performed under anesthesia revealed an abnormal transected artery in the cesarean section scar with a thrombus visible. In the treatment at the beginning of laparoscopic management, we adopted temporary bilateral uterine artery occlusion with titanium clips to prevent massive hemorrhage. Secondly, with the aid of hysteroscopy, the bleeding site was opened, and then the cesarean scar was wedge resected and stitched interruptedly with 1-0 absorbable sutures. The postoperative recovery was uneventful. It would seem that the worldwide use of cesarean section delivery may contribute to the risk of gynecologic disturbances including some unrecognized and complex conditions as seen in this case. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Retrospective analysis of surgery and trans-arterial embolization for major non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Ewen A; McDonald, Chris R; Bryant, Robert V; Devitt, Peter G; Bright, Tim; Holloway, Richard H; Thompson, Sarah K

    2016-05-01

    With proton pump inhibitors and current sophisticated endoscopic techniques, the number of patients requiring surgical intervention for upper gastrointestinal bleeding has decreased considerably while trans-arterial embolization is being used more often. There are few direct comparisons between the effectiveness of surgery and embolization. A retrospective study of patients from two Australian teaching hospitals who had surgery or trans-arterial embolization (n = 103) for severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage between 2004 and 2012 was carried out. Patient demographics, co-morbidities, disease pathology, length of stay, complications, and overall clinical outcome and mortality were compared. There were 65 men and 38 women. The median age was 70 (range 36-95) years. Patients requiring emergency surgical intervention (n = 79) or trans-arterial embolization (n = 24) were compared. The rate of re-bleeding after embolization (42%) was significantly higher compared with the surgery group (19%) (P = 0.02). The requirement for further intervention (either surgery or embolization) was also higher in the embolization group (33%) compared with the surgery group (13%) (P = 0.03). There was no statistical difference in mortality between the embolization group (5/24, 20.8%) and the surgical group (13/79, 16.5%) (P = 0.75). Emergency surgery and embolization are required in 2.6% of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Both techniques have high mortalities reflecting the age, co-morbidities and severity of bleeding in this patient group. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. Superselective Embolization for Arterial Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Using N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate: A Single-Center Experience in 152 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Saebeom; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Hyukjoon; Lee, Myungsu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate 30-day safety and efficacy of superselective embolization for arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA). This single-center retrospective 10-year study included 152 consecutive patients with UGIB (gastric, n = 74; duodenal, n = 78) who underwent embolization with NBCA for angiographically positive arterial bleeding. The primary endpoint was clinical success rate defined as achievement of hemostasis without rebleeding or UGIB-related mortality within 30 days after embolization. Mean systolic blood pressure and heart rate were 121.2 mm Hg ± 27.4 and 97.9 beats/minute ± 22.5; 31.1% of patients needed intravenous inotropes, and 36.6% had coagulopathy. The etiology of bleeding was ulcer (80.3%) or iatrogenic injury (19.7%). Statistical analysis was performed to identify predictive factors for outcomes. Technical success rate was 100%. Clinical success, 1-month mortality, and major complication rates were 70.4%, 22.4%, and 0.7%. There were significant differences in the clinical success rates between gastric and duodenal bleeding (79.4% vs 62.2%; P = .025). The need for intravenous inotropes at the time of embolization was a significant negative predictive factor in both gastric (odds ratio [OR] = 0.091, P = .004) and duodenal (OR = 0.156, P = .002) bleeding. The use of a microcatheter with a smaller tip (2 F) was associated with better outcomes in duodenal bleeding (OR = 7.389, P = .005). Superselective embolization using NBCA is safe and effective for angiographically positive arterial UGIB. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcatheter arterial embolisation in upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a sample of 29 patients in a gastrointestinal referral center in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heining-Kruz, S; Finkenzeller, T; Schreyer, A; Dietl, K H; Kullmann, F; Paetzel, C; Schedel, J

    2015-09-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of interventional embolisation performed with catheter angiography in 29 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the setting of a secondary care hospital. From April 2007 to February 2013, 29 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding underwent endovascular diagnostics and treatment. The diagnosis was established by endoscopy, computed tomography or clinically based on a significant decrease in hemoglobin. Transcatheter arterial embolisation was performed with coils, liquid embolic agents, and particles. The technical and clinical outcomes were assessed by postinterventional endoscopy, hemoglobin concentrations, number of necessary transfusions, or surgical interventions, as well as by post-interventional mortality within 28 days after the procedure. Selective angiographic embolisation in upper gastrointestinal bleeding was primarily successful technically and clinically in 22 of 29 patients. In 4/29 cases an angiographic reintervention was performed, which was successful in 3 cases. In 3 cases of primarily technically unsuccessful procedures reintervention was not attempted. No catheterisation-related complications were recorded. Peri-interventional mortality was 31%, but only 2 of these patients died due to uncontrolled massive bleeding, whereas the lethal outcome in the other 7 patients was due to their underlying diseases. Transcatheter arterial embolisation is an effective and rapid method in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Radiological endovascular interventions may considerably contribute to reduced mortality in GI bleeding by avoiding a potential surgical procedure following unsuccessful endoscopic treatment. The study underlines the importance of the combination of interventional endoscopy with interventional radiology in secondary care hospitals for patient outcome in complex and complicated upper gastrointestinal bleeding situations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Chitosan pads vs. manual compression to control bleeding sites after transbrachial arterial catheterization in a randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poretti, F.; Rosen, T.; Koerner, B.; Vorwerk, D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: until now, no mechanical closure devices were available to achieve fast and secure hemostasis for vessel closure after catheterization of small arterial vessels. Material and methods: eighty patients were randomized to evaluate the effect on hemostasis by use of a chitosan pad (Chito-Seal, Abbott Vascular Devices, Galway/Ireland) in comparison to manual compression after diagnostic transbrachial arterial catheterization. Hemostasis after three minutes and one hour as well as local development of a hematoma after one and twenty-four hours were assessed. Results: the use of chitosan pads significantly decreased the bleeding time in the first three minutes after manual compression time (p < 0.01). Significant decrease in bleeding risk at three minutes by use of the chitosan closure pads was also found in subgroups of patients with hypertension (p < 0.001) or diabetes (p < 0.01) and also in patients under anticoagulation therapy (p < 0.01). In addition, long-term protection from bleeding complications such as the risk of hematoma was decreased by the use of chitosan closure pads one hour (p < 0.01) or twenty-four hours (p < 0.001) after catheter removal. Conclusion: the use of an intravascular anchor or suture system is not safely applicable in these vessels due to the small diameter of the brachial artery. Our results document a significant improvement in hemostasis by using chitosan pads in these cases. (orig.)

  20. Emergency gastroduodenal artery embolization by sandwich technique for angiographically obvious and oblivious, endotherapy failed bleeding duodenal ulcers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anil, G., E-mail: ivyanil10@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiology, Changi General Hospital (Singapore); Tan, A.G.S.; Cheong, H.-W.; Ng, K.-S.; Teoh, W.-C. [Department of Radiology, Changi General Hospital (Singapore)

    2012-05-15

    Aim: To determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of adopting a standardized protocol for emergency transarterial embolization (TAE) of the gastroduodenal artery (GDA) with a uniform sandwich technique in endotherapy-failed bleeding duodenal ulcers (DU). Materials and methods: Between December 2009 and December 2010, 15 patients with endotherapy-failed bleeding DU were underwent embolization. Irrespective of active extravasation, the segment of the GDA supplying the bleeding DU as indicated by endoscopically placed clips was embolized by a uniform sandwich technique with gelfoam between metallic coils. The clinical profile of the patients, re-bleeding, mortality rates, and response time of the intervention radiology team were recorded. The angioembolizations were reviewed for their technical success, clinical success, and complications. Mean duration of follow-up was 266.5 days. Results: Active contrast-medium extravasation was seen in three patients (20%). Early re-bleeding was noted in two patients (13.33%). No patient required surgery. There was 100% technical success, while primary and secondary clinical success rates for TAE were 86.6 and 93.3%, respectively. Focal pancreatitis was the single major procedure-related complication. There was no direct bleeding-DU-related death. The response time of the IR service averaged 150 min (range 60-360 min) with mean value of 170 min. Conclusion: Emergency embolization of the GDA using the sandwich technique is a safe and highly effective therapeutic option for bleeding DUs refractory to endotherapy. A prompt response from the IR service can be ensured with an institutional protocol in place for such common medical emergencies.

  1. Life-threatening bleeding from a vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm after anterior cervical spine approach: endovascular repair by a triple stent-in-stent method. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alzamora, M.G.; Klisch, J. [Section of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter, University of Freiburg (Germany); Rosahl, S.K.; Lehmberg, J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Neurocenter, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The incidence of injury to the cervical vertebral artery during surgery for stenosis of the cervical neuroforamina is very low. We present a case in which bleeding during microforaminotomy at the level C6/7 occurred. The bleeding could be controlled intraoperatively. Two days later, a life-threatening cervical hematoma required urgent bedside evacuation. A false aneurysm of the left cervical vertebral artery was successfully occluded by a modified triple stent-in-stent technique, maintaining the flow in the vessel.

  2. Life-threatening bleeding from a vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm after anterior cervical spine approach: endovascular repair by a triple stent-in-stent method. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzamora, M.G.; Klisch, J.; Rosahl, S.K.; Lehmberg, J.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of injury to the cervical vertebral artery during surgery for stenosis of the cervical neuroforamina is very low. We present a case in which bleeding during microforaminotomy at the level C6/7 occurred. The bleeding could be controlled intraoperatively. Two days later, a life-threatening cervical hematoma required urgent bedside evacuation. A false aneurysm of the left cervical vertebral artery was successfully occluded by a modified triple stent-in-stent technique, maintaining the flow in the vessel

  3. Superselective transcatheter renal arterial embolization for acute renal bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency: its clinical efficacy and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Tingyang; Zhou Bing; Yu Wenqiang; Luo Zuyan; Mao Yingmin; Chen Fanghong; Li Bo; Yuan Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical efficacy and complications of super selective renal arterial embolization in treating acute renal arterial bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency, and to evaluate the influence of the treatment on the renal function. Methods: During the period of January 2000 December 2009, super selective renal arterial embolization was performed in our institution for acute renal bleeding in 13 patients with renal insufficiency. The complete clinical and imaging materials of all patients were properly collected. The clinical effectiveness, the renal function, the extent of embolization and the complications were observed and the relationship between each other was analyzed. Results: The embolization procedure was successfully completed in all patients with a technical success rate of 100%. The mean embolized territory was 22% of a single kidney. Three days after the procedure, the hemoglobin level, hematocrit, blood pressure and heart rate were considerably improved in all patients. Compared to the corresponding preoperative data, all the differences were statistically significant (P 0.05), while the blood urea nitrogen was markedly decreased (P=0.011). Post embolization syndrome occurred in 5 patients and progressive aggravation of the renal function was observed in one patient, who had to receive hemodialysis finally. The embolized territory in patients occurring complications was larger than that in patients without occurring complications (U=1.500, P=0.006). Conclusion: Super selective renal arterial embolization is an effective and safe treatment for acute renal arterial bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency, the therapy will not significantly worsen the renal function. Appropriate and reasonable extent of embolization, as small as possible, is the key point for reducing the complications. (authors)

  4. Efficacy of plain radiography and computer tomography in localizing the site of pelvic arterial bleeding in trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormagen, Johann B. (Dept. of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)), e-mail: johannd@medisin.uio.no; Toetterman, Anna (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Roeise, Olav (Div. of Neuroscience and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)); Sandvik, Leiv (Center for Clinical Research, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)); Kloew, Nils-E. (Dept. of Cardiovascular Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital - Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-01-15

    Background: Immediate angiography is warranted in pelvic trauma patients with suspected arterial injury (AI) in order to stop ongoing bleeding. Prior to angiography, plain pelvic radiography (PPR) and abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) are performed to identify fracture and hematoma sites. Purpose: To investigate if PPR and CT can identify the location of AI in trauma patients undergoing angiography. Material and Methods: 95 patients with pelvic fractures on PPR (29 women, 66 men), at a mean age of 44 (9-92) years, underwent pelvic angiography for suspected AI. Fifty-six of them underwent CT additionally. Right and left anterior and posterior fractures on PPR were registered, and fracture displacement was recorded for each quadrant. Arterial blush on CT was registered, and the size of the hematoma in each region was measured in cm2. AIs were registered for anterior and posterior segments of both internal iliac arteries. Presence of fractures, arterial blush, and hematomas were correlated with AI. Results: Presence of fracture in the corresponding skeletal segment on PPR showed sensitivity and specificity of 0.86 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.87 and 0.44 anteriorly. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.77 and 0.69, respectively. Fracture displacement on PPR >0.9 cm posteriorly and >1.9 cm anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.84. Sensitivities of arterial blush and hematoma on CT were 0.38 and 0.82 posteriorly, and 0.24 and 0.82 anteriorly. The specificities were 0.96 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.79 and 0.53 anteriorly, respectively. For hematomas, the AUC was 0.79 posteriorly and 0.75 anteriorly. Size of hematoma >22 cm2 posteriorly and >29 cm2 anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.85 and 0.86, respectively. Conclusion: CT findings of arterial blush and hematoma predicted site of arterial bleeding on pelvic angiography. Also, PPR predicted the site of bleeding using location of fracture and size of displacement. In the hemodynamically unstable patient, PPR may

  5. Efficacy of plain radiography and computer tomography in localizing the site of pelvic arterial bleeding in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormagen, Johann B; Tötterman, Anna; Røise, Olav; Sandvik, Leiv; Kløw, Nils-E

    2010-02-01

    Immediate angiography is warranted in pelvic trauma patients with suspected arterial injury (AI) in order to stop ongoing bleeding. Prior to angiography, plain pelvic radiography (PPR) and abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) are performed to identify fracture and hematoma sites. To investigate if PPR and CT can identify the location of AI in trauma patients undergoing angiography. 95 patients with pelvic fractures on PPR (29 women, 66 men), at a mean age of 44 (9-92) years, underwent pelvic angiography for suspected AI. Fifty-six of them underwent CT additionally. Right and left anterior and posterior fractures on PPR were registered, and fracture displacement was recorded for each quadrant. Arterial blush on CT was registered, and the size of the hematoma in each region was measured in cm(2). AIs were registered for anterior and posterior segments of both internal iliac arteries. Presence of fractures, arterial blush, and hematomas were correlated with AI. Presence of fracture in the corresponding skeletal segment on PPR showed sensitivity and specificity of 0.86 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.87 and 0.44 anteriorly. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.77 and 0.69, respectively. Fracture displacement on PPR >0.9 cm posteriorly and >1.9 cm anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.84. Sensitivities of arterial blush and hematoma on CT were 0.38 and 0.82 posteriorly, and 0.24 and 0.82 anteriorly. The specificities were 0.96 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.79 and 0.53 anteriorly, respectively. For hematomas, the AUC was 0.79 posteriorly and 0.75 anteriorly. Size of hematoma >22 cm(2) posteriorly and >29 cm(2) anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.85 and 0.86, respectively. CT findings of arterial blush and hematoma predicted site of arterial bleeding on pelvic angiography. Also, PPR predicted the site of bleeding using location of fracture and size of displacement. In the hemodynamically unstable patient, PPR may contribute equally to effective assessment of injured arteries.

  6. Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding from a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Caused by a Penetrating Gastric Ulcer: Case Report and Review of Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, Marcin; Marlicz, Wojciech; Czapla, Norbert; Łokaj, Marek; Skoczylas, Michał M.; Donotek, Maciej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysm and pseudoaneurysm are rare pathologies. True aneurysms are usually asymptomatic. Aneurysm rupture occurring in 2–3% of cases results in bleeding into the lesser sack, peritoneal space or adjacent organs typically presenting as abdominal pain and hemodynamic instability. In contrast, pseudoaneurysms are nearly always symptomatic carrying a high risk of rupture of 37–47% and mortality rate of 90% if untreated. Therefore, prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential in the management of patients with splenic artery pseudoaneurysm. Typical causes include pancreatitis and trauma. Rarely, the rupture of a pseudoaneurysm presents as upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding. Among causes, peptic ulcer is the casuistic one. This report describes a very rare case of recurrent UGI bleeding from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm caused by a penetrating gastric ulcer. After negative results of endoscopy and ultrasound, the diagnosis was established in CT angiography. The successful treatment consisted of surgical ligation of the bleeding vessel and suture of the ulcer with preservation of the spleen and pancreas, which is rarely tried in such situations. The most important factor in identifying a ruptured splenic artery pseudoaneurysm as a source of GI bleeding is considering the diagnosis. UGI hemorrhage from splenic artery pseudoaneurysm can have a relapsing course providing false negative results of endoscopy and ultrasound if performed between episodes of active bleeding. In such cases, immediate CT angiography is useful in establishing diagnosis and in application of proper therapy before possible recurrence

  7. Acute retroperitoneal bleeding due to inferior mesenteric artery aneurysm: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrón JA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral artery aneurysms (VAA, although uncommon, are increasingly being detected. We describe a case of spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured IMA aneurysm associated with stenosis of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA and celiac trunk, successfully treated with surgery. Methods A 65-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock. Abdominal CT scan showed an aneurysm of the inferior mesenteric artery with retroperitoneal hematoma. In addition, an obstructive disease of the superior mesenteric artery and celiac axis was observed. Results Upon emergency laparotomy a ruptured inferior mesenteric artery aneurysm was detected. The aneurysm was excised and the artery reconstructed by end-to-end anastomosis. Conclusions This report discusses the etiology, presentation, diagnosis and case management of inferior mesenteric artery aneurysms.

  8. Intractable Postpartum Bleeding: A Comparison of the Retrospective Analysis of Angiographic Findings and Transcatheter Arterial Embolization According to Delivery Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Eun Jung; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Si Hyung; Choi, Jin Soo; Park, Jun Cheol; Kwon, Sang Hun; Jo, Chi Heum; Cha, Soon Do [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    We evaluated the technical aspect and efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in cases of intractable postpartum bleeding by comparing the angiographic findings women patients according to their delivery pattern. Between July of 2003 and March of 2008, 55 female patients were enrolled in this study. Of the 55 patients, 36 underwent a vaginal delivery (group 1), whereas 19 underwent a cesarean section delivery (group 2). We retrospectively evaluated the angiographic findings and the embolization technique between groups, using a Pearson Chi-Square test. Medical records and telephone interview findings were also reviewed to evaluate the efficacy of TAE and the outcome of fertility. Significantly greater positive angiographic findings were found in group 2 (63.2%) relative to group 1 (30.6%). For positive angiographic findings, except for AVM, the embolization was performed using coil or glue with gelfoam. For the negative angiographic findings or AVM, the gelfoam was the only embolic agent used. In all patients except for one, bleeding stopped after embolization. Major complications occurred in 2 patients only, and included uterine synechia and perforation. All patients except for one recovered after menstruation. In total, four patients became pregnant and one patient delivered a healthy infant. Positive angiographic findings requiring embolization with coil or glue, as well as gelfoam, were more commonly encountered in group 2 than in group 1. Based on the outcome of the study group, TAE is a safe and effective treatment for intractable postpartum bleeding and is also useful for preserving fertility.

  9. Intractable Postpartum Bleeding: A Comparison of the Retrospective Analysis of Angiographic Findings and Transcatheter Arterial Embolization According to Delivery Pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Eun Jung; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Si Hyung; Choi, Jin Soo; Park, Jun Cheol; Kwon, Sang Hun; Jo, Chi Heum; Cha, Soon Do

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the technical aspect and efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in cases of intractable postpartum bleeding by comparing the angiographic findings women patients according to their delivery pattern. Between July of 2003 and March of 2008, 55 female patients were enrolled in this study. Of the 55 patients, 36 underwent a vaginal delivery (group 1), whereas 19 underwent a cesarean section delivery (group 2). We retrospectively evaluated the angiographic findings and the embolization technique between groups, using a Pearson Chi-Square test. Medical records and telephone interview findings were also reviewed to evaluate the efficacy of TAE and the outcome of fertility. Significantly greater positive angiographic findings were found in group 2 (63.2%) relative to group 1 (30.6%). For positive angiographic findings, except for AVM, the embolization was performed using coil or glue with gelfoam. For the negative angiographic findings or AVM, the gelfoam was the only embolic agent used. In all patients except for one, bleeding stopped after embolization. Major complications occurred in 2 patients only, and included uterine synechia and perforation. All patients except for one recovered after menstruation. In total, four patients became pregnant and one patient delivered a healthy infant. Positive angiographic findings requiring embolization with coil or glue, as well as gelfoam, were more commonly encountered in group 2 than in group 1. Based on the outcome of the study group, TAE is a safe and effective treatment for intractable postpartum bleeding and is also useful for preserving fertility

  10. Different Bleeding Patterns with the Use of Levonorgestrel Intrauterine System: Are They Associated with Changes in Uterine Artery Blood Flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bastianelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluate if different bleeding patterns associated with the use of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS are associated with different uterine and endometrial vascularization patterns, as evidenced by ultrasound power Doppler analysis. Methodology. A longitudinal study, with each subject acting as its own control was conducted between January 2010 and December 2012. Healthy volunteers with a history of heavy but cyclic and regular menstrual cycles were enrolled in the study. Ultrasonographic examination was performed before and after six months of LNG-IUS placement: uterine volume, endometrial thickness, and subendometrial and myometrial Doppler blood flow patterns have been evaluated. Results. A total of 32 women were enrolled out of 186 initially screened. At six months of follow-up, all subjects showed a reduction in menstrual blood loss; for analysis, they were retrospectively divided into 3 groups: normal cycling women (Group I, amenorrheic women (Group II, and women with prolonged bleedings (Group III. Intergroup analysis documented a statistically significant difference in endometrial thickness among the three groups; in addition, mean pulsatility index (PI and resistance index (RI in the spiral arteries were significantly lower in Group I and Group III compared to Group II. This difference persisted also when comparing—within subjects of Group III—mean PI and RI mean values before and after insertion. Conclusions. The LNG-IUS not only altered endometrial thickness, but—in women with prolonged bleedings—also significantly changed uterine artery blood flow. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and enable gynecologists to properly counsel women, improving initial continuation rates.

  11. Percutaneous artery embolization of bleeding rectus sheath hematomas in hemodynamically unstable patients: Outcomes of 43 patients in a tertiary referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cereda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain that can lead to life-threatening bleeding, particularly in elderly patients receiving anticoagulation therapy. Type III RSHs, based on computer tomography (CT evaluation, is characterized by active bleeding with intramuscular or intraperitoneal extension and hemodynamic instability. Medical contemporary knowledge of this condition is contentious and overall 20% of acute mortality has been reported. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review our experience and outcomes in the management of RSHs treated with percutaneous arterial embolization of the epigastric vessels. We retrospectively analyzed 43 patients with RSH type III, submitted to percutaneous epigastric artery embolization from 2007 to 2015. Percutaneous arterial embolization was feasible and successful in patients with a high burden of comorbidities and receiving anticoagulation therapy. There was no acute mortality and a late mortality at 3 months of 9.1% (4/43 was not directly related to RSHs or arterial embolization. Patients with late mortality had lower ejection fraction, prolonged PTT, greater RDW and warfarin in overlapping with low-molecular-weight heparins. Transcatheter arterial embolization of the epigastric vessels was safe, feasible and effective in stopping the bleeding. Despite anti-platelets/anti-coagulation therapy and a high burden of comorbidities, there was no acute mortality related to RSH.

  12. Endoscopic findings of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadayat, R.; Rehman, A.U.; Gandapur, A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical emergency. A common risk factor of upper GI bleeding is cirrhosis of liver, which can lead to variceal haemorrhage. 30-40% of cirrhotic patients who bleed may have non-variceal upper GI bleeding and it is frequently caused by peptic ulcers, portal gastropathy, Mallory-Weiss tear, and gastro-duodenal erosions. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings among patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding with liver cirrhosis. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from February 2012 to June 2013. 252 patients diagnosed with cirrhosis, presenting with upper GI bleed, age ?50 years of either gender, and were included in the study. Non-probability consecutive sampling was used. Endoscopy was performed on each patient and the findings documented. Results: The mean age was 57.84 ± 6.29 years. There were 158 (62.7%) males and 94 (37.3%) females. The most common endoscopic finding was oesophageal varices (92.9%, n=234) followed by portal hypertensive gastropathy (38.9%, n=98) with almost equal distribution among males and females. Gastric varices were found in 33.3% of patients (n=84). Among other non-variceal lesions, peptic ulcer disease was seen in 26 patients (10.3%) while gastric erosions were found in 8 patients (3.2%). Conclusion: In patients with acute upper GI bleeding and liver cirrhosis, the most common endoscopic finding is oesophageal varices, with a substantially higher value in our part of the country, apart from other non-variceal causes. (author)

  13. Intra-Arterial Treatment in Patients with Acute Massive Gastrointestinal Bleeding after Endoscopic Failure: Comparisons between Positive versus Negative Contrast Extravasation Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Wei Chou; Liu, Chang Hsien; Hsu, Hsian He; Huang, Guo Shu; Hsieh, Tasi Yuan; Tsai, Shin Hung; Hsieh, Chung Bao; Yu, Chin Yung; Tung, Ho Jui

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether treatment outcome is associated with visualization of contrast extravasation in patients with acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding after endoscopic failure. From January 2007 to December 2009, patients that experienced a first attack of acute gastrointestinal bleeding after failure of initial endoscopy were referred to our interventional department for intra-arterial treatment. We enrolled 79 patients and divided them into two groups: positive and negative extravasation. For positive extravasation, patients were treated by coil embolization; and in negative extravasation, patients were treated with intra-arterial vasopressin infusion. The two groups were compared for clinical parameters, hemodynamics, laboratory findings, endoscopic characteristics, and mortality rates. Forty-eight patients had detectable contrast extravasation (positive extravasation), while 31 patients did not (negative extravasation). Fifty-six patients survived from this bleeding episode (overall clinical success rate, 71%). An elevation of hemoglobin level was observed in the both two groups; significantly greater in the positive extravasation group compared to the negative extravasation group. Although these patients were all at high risk of dying, the 90-day mortality rate was significantly lower in the positive extravasation than in the negative extravasation (20% versus 42%, p < 0.05). A multivariate analysis suggested that successful hemo stasis (odds ratio [OR] = 28.66) is the most important predictor affecting the mortality in the two groups of patients. Visualization of contrast extravasation on angiography usually can target the bleeding artery directly, resulting in a higher success rate to control of hemorrhage.

  14. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckle, T.; Stuber, G.; Hoffmann, M.H.K.; Jeltsch, M.; Schmitz, B.L.; Aschoff, A.J. [University Hospital of Ulm, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT. (orig.)

  15. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckle, T.; Stuber, G.; Hoffmann, M.H.K.; Jeltsch, M.; Schmitz, B.L.; Aschoff, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT. (orig.)

  16. Investigation of the effect of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution and Tranexamic Acid on the amount of bleeding during off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Jalaeian Taghadoomi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative bleeding and transfusion remain a source of morbidity and cost after open heart operations . To evaluate the effect of ANH method and tranexamic acid on blood transfusion requirements and blood loss after off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB. Materials and Methods: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception to December 2014; reference lists of published guidelines, reviews, and associated articles, as well as conference proceedings.We included articles with available abstract in English language. Manual searching was done within the reference list of articles. Three reviewers independently reviewed and assessed eligibility criteria, assessed quality, and extracted data. Results: Bleeding and hemorrhagic complications and the consequent need for allogeneic transfusion are still major problems after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery that can reduced in combination of ANH method and tranexamic acid. Conclusion: Tranexamic acid and ANH appear to be effective in reducing postoperative bleeding and the need for allogeneic blood products.

  17. The role of point-of-care assessment of platelet function in predicting postoperative bleeding and transfusion requirements after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Thekkudan, Joyce; Sahajanandan, Raj; Gravenor, Mike; Lakshmanan, Suresh; Fayaz, Khazi Mohammed; Luckraz, Heyman

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE platelet function assessment after cardiac surgery can predict postoperative blood loss, guide transfusion requirements and discriminate the need for surgical re-exploration. We conducted this study to assess the predictive value of point-of-care testing platelet function using the Multiplate® device. Patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively recruited ( n = 84). Group A ( n = 42) patients were on anti-platelet therapy until surgery; patients in Group B ( n = 42) stopped anti-platelet treatment at least 5 days preoperatively. Multiplate® and thromboelastography (TEG) tests were performed in the perioperative period. Primary end-point was excessive bleeding (>2.5 ml/kg/h) within first 3 h postoperative. Secondary end-points included transfusion requirements, re-exploration rates, intensive care unit and in-hospital stays. Patients in Group A had excessive bleeding (59% vs. 33%, P = 0.02), higher re-exploration rates (14% vs. 0%, P function testing was the most significant predictor of excessive bleeding (odds ratio [OR]: 2.3, P = 0.08), need for blood (OR: 5.5, P functional assessment with Multiplate® was the strongest predictor for bleeding and transfusion requirements in patients on anti-platelet therapy until the time of surgery.

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  19. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use two weeks preceding endoscopic analysis and patients with oesophageal disease were excluded from further study. Korle-Bu receives out-patient referrals from sever- al primary and specialist centres across Southern Ghana. One hundred ...

  20. Impact of femoral artery puncture using digital subtraction angiography and road mapping on vascular and bleeding complications after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mawardy, Mohamed; Schwarz, Bettina; Landt, Martin; Sulimov, Dmitriy; Kebernik, Julia; Allali, Abdelhakim; Becker, Bjoern; Toelg, Ralph; Richardt, Gert; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2017-01-20

    The use of large-diameter sheaths carries the risk of significant vascular and bleeding complications after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In this analysis, we sought to assess the impact of a modified femoral artery puncture technique using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and road mapping during transfemoral TAVI on periprocedural vascular and bleeding events. This is a retrospective analysis of transfemoral TAVI patients included in a prospective institutional database. The modified femoral artery puncture technique using DSA-derived road mapping guidance was introduced in October 2012. Before the introduction of this technique, vascular puncture was acquired based on an integration of angiographic data, the bony iliofemoral landmarks and a radiopaque object. Consecutive patients who underwent TAVI with the road mapping technique (RM group, n=160) were compared with consecutive patients who underwent TAVI without road mapping (control group, n=160) prior to its introduction. A standardised strategy of periprocedural anticoagulation was adopted in both groups as well as the use of a single suture-based closure device. All endpoints were defined according to the VARC-2 criteria for event definition. The mean age in the RM group was 80±7.7 years compared to 81±5.9 years in the control group (p=0.19), and females were equally distributed between both groups (63.1% vs. 58.1%, p=0.36). The baseline logistic EuroSCORE was 20.7±14.4% vs. 24.9±15.2% in the RM and control group, respectively (p=0.01). Notably, sheath size was significantly larger in the RM compared to the control group due to the more frequent use of the 20 Fr sheath (23.8% vs. 1.8%, proad map group but did not reach statistical significance (8.1% vs. 13.8%, p=0.1). Other forms of vascular and bleeding complications as well as all-cause mortality were comparable in both groups. A modified femoral artery puncture technique using DSA and road mapping was associated

  1. Evaluation of Superselective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in Treating Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Retrospective Study on Seven Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate the safety and efficacy of superselective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA in treating lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by angiodysplasia. Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the clinical data of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by angiodysplasia. The patients were treated with superselective TAE with NBCA between September 2013 and March 2015. Angiography was performed after the embolization. The clinical signs including melena, anemia, and blood transfusion treatment were evaluated. The complications including abdominal pain and intestinal ischemia necrosis were recorded. The patients were followed up to evaluate the efficacy in the long run. Results. Seven cases (2 males, 5 females; age of 69.55±2.25 were evaluated in the study. The embolization was successfully performed in all cases. About 0.2–0.8 mL (mean 0.48±0.19 mL NCBA was used. Immediate angiography after the embolization operation showed that the abnormal symptoms disappeared. The patients were followed up for a range of 2–19 months and six patients did not reoccur. No serious complications, such as femoral artery puncture point anomaly, vascular injury, and intestinal necrosis perforation were observed. Conclusion. For the patients with refractory and repeated lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to angiodysplasia, superselective TAE with NBCA seem to be a safe and effective alternative therapy when endoscopy examination and treatment do not work.

  2. Abnormal uterine bleeding due to vascular abnormality caused by D and E : doppler sonography for diagnosis and transcatheter arterial embolization for treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Jo; Heo, Chan; Jung, Tae Gun; Kim, Gi Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Po; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kwon, Jung Hyeok [Dongkang Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeong Hwan [Taegu Catholic Univ. School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    We attempted to evaluate the usefulness of Doppler sonography in the diagnosis of uterine vascular abnormality caused by previous D and E, and to report that transarterial embolization is an excellent treatment modality. We analyzed gray-scale US, color/duplex Doppler US and angiographic findings in seven patients with radiologically proven uterine vascular abnormality. Two of the seven cases were pseudoaneurysms and five of the seven cases were AVMs. n one of the AVMS, two small pseudoaneurysms were combined. In all cases, transarterial embolizations using 3 mm coil or/and gelfoam particles were performed. Follow-up US studies, including color Doppler US, were performed. on color/duplex Doppler sonography, two cases of pseudoaneurysm showed blood pools with turbulent arterial flow, and five cases of AVM showed asymmetrically increased cascularity, with vailable high velocities composed of the pulsatile arterial flow, with a high diastolic component. on angiography, the former showed pseudoaneruysmal sacs, and the latter densely opacified vascular tangles. No more abnormal uterine bleeding was shown following transarterial embolization in all cases. Color/duplex Doppler sonography was valuable in the diagnosis or treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding caused by uterine vascular abnormality such as acquired AVM or pseudoaneruysm.

  3. Abnormal uterine bleeding due to vascular abnormality caused by D and E : doppler sonography for diagnosis and transcatheter arterial embolization for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Jo; Heo, Chan; Jung, Tae Gun; Kim, Gi Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Po; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Lee, Yeong Hwan

    1996-01-01

    We attempted to evaluate the usefulness of Doppler sonography in the diagnosis of uterine vascular abnormality caused by previous D and E, and to report that transarterial embolization is an excellent treatment modality. We analyzed gray-scale US, color/duplex Doppler US and angiographic findings in seven patients with radiologically proven uterine vascular abnormality. Two of the seven cases were pseudoaneurysms and five of the seven cases were AVMs. n one of the AVMS, two small pseudoaneurysms were combined. In all cases, transarterial embolizations using 3 mm coil or/and gelfoam particles were performed. Follow-up US studies, including color Doppler US, were performed. on color/duplex Doppler sonography, two cases of pseudoaneurysm showed blood pools with turbulent arterial flow, and five cases of AVM showed asymmetrically increased cascularity, with vailable high velocities composed of the pulsatile arterial flow, with a high diastolic component. on angiography, the former showed pseudoaneruysmal sacs, and the latter densely opacified vascular tangles. No more abnormal uterine bleeding was shown following transarterial embolization in all cases. Color/duplex Doppler sonography was valuable in the diagnosis or treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding caused by uterine vascular abnormality such as acquired AVM or pseudoaneruysm

  4. Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or period, is a woman's monthly bleeding.Abnormal vaginal bleeding is different from normal menstrual periods. It ... therapy) Cancer of the cervix, ovaries, uterus or vagina Thyroid problems Bleeding during pregnancy can have several ...

  5. Triple antithrombotic therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary artery stenting: hovering among bleeding risk, thromboembolic events, and stent thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menozzi Mila

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dual antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel is the antithrombotic treatment recommended after an acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary artery stenting. The evidence for optimal antiplatelet therapy for patients, in whom long-term treatment oral anticoagulation is mandatory, is however scarce. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the various antithrombotic strategies adopted in this population, we reviewed the available evidence on the management of patients receiving oral anticoagulation, such as a vitamin-k-antagonists, referred for coronary artery stenting. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent indication for oral anticoagulation. The need of starting antiplatelet therapy in this clinical scenario raises concerns about the combination to choose: triple therapy with warfarin, aspirin, and a thienopyridine being the most frequent and advised. The safety of this regimen appeared suboptimal because of an increased risk in hemorrhagic complications. On the other hand, the combination of oral anticoagulation and an antiplatelet agent is suboptimal in preventing thromboembolic events and stent thrombosis; dual antiplatelet therapy may be considered only when a high hemorrhagic risk and low thromboembolic risk are perceived. Indeed, the need for prolonged multiple-drug antithrombotic therapy increases the bleeding risks when drug eluting stents are used. Since current evidence derives mainly from small, single-center and retrospective studies, large-scale prospective multicenter studies are urgently needed.

  6. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fractures (Part II) Additional Content Medical News Internal Bleeding By Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, ... Emergency First Aid Priorities Cardiac Arrest Choking Internal Bleeding Severed or Constricted Limbs or Digits Soft-Tissue ...

  7. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  8. Postpartum bleeding: efficacy of endovascular management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo; Yoon, Hyun Ki

    2003-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization for the treatment of massive postpartum bleeding. Transcatheter arterial embolization was attempted in 25 patients with massive postpartum bleeding. After identification at bilateral internal iliac arteriography, the bleeding artery was embolized using gelfoam, polyvinyl alcohol particles or microcoils, and to prevent rebleeding through collateral pathways, the contralateral uterine artery or anterior division of the internal iliac artery was also embolized. Clinical success and complications were retrospectively assessed and documented. Active bleeding foci were detected in 13 patients (52%), and involved the unilateral (n=10) or bilateral (n=2) uterine artery and unilateral vaginal artery (n=1). Twelve (92%) of the 13 patients recovered completely following embolization, but one underwent hysterectomy due to persistent bleeding. The focus of bleeding was not detected in 12 patients (48%), but 11 (92%) of these also recovered following embolization of the bilateral uterine or internal iliac arteries. One patient, however, died due to sepsis. Two of the 12 patients underwent hysterectomy due ro rebleeding on the 12 th and 13 th day, respectively, after embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization is relatively safe and effective for the treatment massive postpartum bleeding

  9. Postpartum bleeding: efficacy of endovascular management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo; Yoon, Hyun Ki [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization for the treatment of massive postpartum bleeding. Transcatheter arterial embolization was attempted in 25 patients with massive postpartum bleeding. After identification at bilateral internal iliac arteriography, the bleeding artery was embolized using gelfoam, polyvinyl alcohol particles or microcoils, and to prevent rebleeding through collateral pathways, the contralateral uterine artery or anterior division of the internal iliac artery was also embolized. Clinical success and complications were retrospectively assessed and documented. Active bleeding foci were detected in 13 patients (52%), and involved the unilateral (n=10) or bilateral (n=2) uterine artery and unilateral vaginal artery (n=1). Twelve (92%) of the 13 patients recovered completely following embolization, but one underwent hysterectomy due to persistent bleeding. The focus of bleeding was not detected in 12 patients (48%), but 11 (92%) of these also recovered following embolization of the bilateral uterine or internal iliac arteries. One patient, however, died due to sepsis. Two of the 12 patients underwent hysterectomy due ro rebleeding on the 12{sup th} and 13{sup th} day, respectively, after embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization is relatively safe and effective for the treatment massive postpartum bleeding.

  10. Chitosan pads vs. manual compression to control bleeding sites after transbrachial arterial catheterization in a randomized trial; Randomisierte Untersuchung zur Anwendung eines Chitosan-Gerinnungspads zur Blutstillung bei transbrachialen Angiographien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poretti, F.; Rosen, T.; Koerner, B.; Vorwerk, D. [Inst. fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum Ingolstadt (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: until now, no mechanical closure devices were available to achieve fast and secure hemostasis for vessel closure after catheterization of small arterial vessels. Material and methods: eighty patients were randomized to evaluate the effect on hemostasis by use of a chitosan pad (Chito-Seal, Abbott Vascular Devices, Galway/Ireland) in comparison to manual compression after diagnostic transbrachial arterial catheterization. Hemostasis after three minutes and one hour as well as local development of a hematoma after one and twenty-four hours were assessed. Results: the use of chitosan pads significantly decreased the bleeding time in the first three minutes after manual compression time (p < 0.01). Significant decrease in bleeding risk at three minutes by use of the chitosan closure pads was also found in subgroups of patients with hypertension (p < 0.001) or diabetes (p < 0.01) and also in patients under anticoagulation therapy (p < 0.01). In addition, long-term protection from bleeding complications such as the risk of hematoma was decreased by the use of chitosan closure pads one hour (p < 0.01) or twenty-four hours (p < 0.001) after catheter removal. Conclusion: the use of an intravascular anchor or suture system is not safely applicable in these vessels due to the small diameter of the brachial artery. Our results document a significant improvement in hemostasis by using chitosan pads in these cases. (orig.)

  11. Acute Myocardial Infarction Risk in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Doubled after Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding: A Nationwide Nested Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jung Wu

    Full Text Available Prior studies of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB and acute myocardial infarction (AMI are small, and long-term effects of UGIB on AMI have not been delineated. We investigated whether UGIB in patients diagnosed with coronary artery disease (CAD increased their risk of subsequent AMI. This was a population-based, nested case-control study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. After propensity-score matching for age, gender, comorbidities, CAD date, and follow-up duration, we identified 1,677 new-onset CAD patients with AMI (AMI[+] between 2001 and 2006 as the case group and 10,062 new-onset CAD patients without (AMI[-] as the control group. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine the association between UGIB and AMI. Compared with UGIB[-] patients, UGIB[+] patients had twice the risk for subsequent AMI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72-2.50. In the subgroup analysis for gender and age, UGIB[+] women (AOR = 2.70; 95% CI, 2.03-3.57 and patients < 65 years old (AOR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.56-3.18 had higher odds of an AMI. UGIB[+] AMI[+] patients used nonsignificantly less aspirin than did UGIB[-] AMI[+] patients (27.69% vs. 35.61%, respectively. UGIB increased the risk of subsequent AMI in CAD patients, especially in women and patients < 65. This suggests that physicians need to use earlier and more aggressive intervention to detect UGIB and prevent AMI in CAD patients.

  12. The prognostic value of bleeding academic research consortium (BARC)-defined bleeding complications in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: a comparison with the TIMI (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction), GUSTO (Global Utilization of Streptokinase and Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Occluded Coronary Arteries), and ISTH (International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis) bleeding classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikkert, Wouter J.; van Geloven, Nan; van der Laan, Mariet H.; Vis, Marije M.; Baan, Jan; Koch, Karel T.; Peters, Ron J.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Piek, Jan J.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Henriques, José P. S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present analysis was to compare 1-year mortality prediction of Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC)-defined bleeding complications with existing bleeding definitions in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and to investigate the prognostic value of

  13. Case report and systematic literature review of a novel etiology of sinistral portal hypertension presenting with UGI bleeding: Left gastric artery pseudoaneurysm compressing the splenic vein treated by embolization of the pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Seifeldin; Bortman, Jared; Orosey, Molly; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2017-03-01

    A novel case is reported of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension, caused by a left gastric artery (LGA) pseudoaneurysm (PA) compressing the splenic vein (SV) that was successfully treated with PA embolization. A 41-year-old man with previous medical history of recurrent, alcoholic pancreatitis presented with several episodes of hematemesis and abdominal pain for 48 hours. Physical examination revealed a soft abdomen, with no abdominal bruit, no pulsatile abdominal mass, and no stigmata of chronic liver disease. The hemoglobin declined acutely from 12.3 to 9.3 g/dL. Biochemical parameters of liver function and routine coagulation profile were entirely within normal limits. Abdominal CT revealed a 5-cm-wide peripancreatic mass compressing the stomach and constricting the SV. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed blood oozing from portal hypertensive gastropathy, small nonbleeding gastric cardial and fundal varices, gastric compression from the extrinsic mass, and no esophageal varices. MRCP and angiography showed that the mass was vascular, arose from the LGA, compressed the mid SV without SV thrombosis, and caused sinistral portal hypertension. At angiography, the PA was angioembolized and occluded. The patient has been asymptomatic with no further bleeding and a stable hemoglobin level during 8 weeks of follow-up. Literature review of the 14 reported cases of LGA PA revealed that this report of acute UGI bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA constricting the SV is novel; one previously reported patient had severe anemia without acute UGI bleeding associated with sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA. A patient presented with UGI bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA compressing the SV that was treated by angiographic obliteration of the PA which relieved the SV compression and arrested the UGI bleeding. Primary therapy for this syndrome should be addressed to obliterate the PA and not

  14. Provocative Endoscopy to Identify Bleeding Site in Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Novel Approach in Transarterial Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Minobu; Fuwa, Sokun; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    This report describes a novel approach to endoscopically induce bleeding by removing a clot from the bleeding site during angiography for upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage. This procedure enabled accurate identification of the bleeding site, allowing for successful targeted embolization despite a negative initial angiogram. Provocative endoscopy may be a feasible and useful option for angiography of obscure bleeding sites in patients with UGI arterial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recurrent Bleeding After Perimesencephalic Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauw, Frans; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kizilates, Ufuk; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-12-01

    Perimesencephalic hemorrhage (PMH) is a type of subarachnoid hemorrhage with excellent long-term outcomes. Only 1 well-documented case of in-hospital rebleeding after PMH is described in the literature, which occurred after initiating antithrombotic treatment because of myocardial ischemia. We describe a patient with PMH without antithrombotic treatment who had 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding on the day of ictus. To validate the radiologic findings, we conducted a case-control study. Six neuroradiologists and 2 neuroradiology fellows performed a blinded assessment of serial unenhanced head computed tomography (CT) scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern (1 index patient, 6 patients with PMH, 1 patient with perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and basilar artery aneurysm) to investigate a potential increase in amount of subarachnoid blood. A 56-year-old woman with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and negative CT angiography had 2 episodes after the onset headache with a sudden increase of the headache. Blinded assessment of serial head CT scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern identified the patient who was clinically suspected to have 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding to have an increased amount of subarachnoid blood on 2 subsequent CT scans. Recurrent bleeding after PMH may also occur in patients not treated with antithrombotics. Even after early rebleeding, the prognosis of PMH is excellent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. www. ...

  17. Hemosuccus pancreaticus successful treatment by double balloon-assisted coil embolization for active bleeding from the main trunk of the superior mesenteric artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Yoshida, MD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 63-year-old man with hemosuccus pancreaticus due to large pseudoaneurysm originating from the main trunk of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The patient was treated successfully with the double balloon-assisted coil embolization technique combined with proximal and distal balloon inflation in the short segment of the SMA. This technique preserved the pancreaticoduodenal arterial arcade and the supply to the distal part of the SMA by embolizing SMA in a short segment. Keywords: Hemosuccus pancreaticus, Pseudoaneurysm, Superior mesenteric artery

  18. Bleeding Duodenal Varices Successfully Treated with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (B-RTO) Assisted by CT During Arterial Portography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Sugimoto, Koji; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Izaki, Kenta; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Akasaka, Yoshinobu; Fujii, Masahiko; Hirota, Shozo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman with massive hemorrhage from duodenal varices was transferred to our hospital for the purpose of transcatheter intervention. Although digital subtraction arterial portography could not depict the entire pathway of collateral circulation, the efferent route of the duodenal varices was clearly demonstrated on subsequent CT during arterial portography. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) of the varices was performed via the efferent vein and achieved complete thrombosis of the varices

  19. Transcatheter emboilization therapy of massive colonic bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, G. H.; Oh, J. H.; Yoon, Y.

    1996-01-01

    To evaulate the efficacy and safety of emergent superselective transcatheter embolization for controlling massive colonic bleeding. Six of the seven patients who had symptom of massive gastrointestinal bleeding underwent emergent transcatheter embolization for control of the bleeding. Gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients was originated from various colonic diseases: rectal cancer(n=1), proctitis(n=1), benign ulcer(n=1), mucosal injury by ventriculoperitoneal shunt(n=1), and unknown(n=2). All patients except one with rectal cancer were critically ill. Superselective embolization were done by using Gelfoam particles and/or coils. The vessels embolized were ileocolic artery(n=1). superior rectal artery(n=2), inferior rectal artery (n=1), and middle and inferior rectal arteries(n=1). Hemostasis was successful immediately in all patients. Two underwnet surgery due to recurrent bleeding developed 3 days after the procedure(n=1) or in associalion with underlying rectal cancer(n=1). On surgical specimen of two cases, there was no mucosal ischemic change. Transcatheter embolization is a safe and effective treatment of method for the control of massive colonic bleeding

  20. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - vaginal bleeding; Maternal blood loss - vaginal ... Up to 1 in 4 women have vaginal bleeding at some time during their pregnancy. Bleeding is more common in the first 3 months (first trimester), especially with twins.

  1. Bleeding Disorders in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... might be heavy, print and use a menstrual chart to track your bleeding and talk to your ... you’re “low in iron.” Heavy bleeding after dental surgery, other surgery, or childbirth. Prolonged bleeding episodes ...

  2. The analysis of the causes of uterine bleeding occurred after cesarean section and the evaluation of interventional therapy for bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Peng; Li Yuwei; Li Yunhui; Luo Bin; Wen Wen; Yang Bo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the causes of uterine hemorrhage occurred after cesarean section and to investigate the value of angiography and transcatheter artery embolization (TAE) in the diagnosis and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage after cesarean section. Methods: During the period from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2011, a total of 65 cases suffering from uterine bleeding after cesarean section had underwent uterine arteriography to clarify the diagnosis, which was followed by transcatheter uterine artery embolization (TUAE). The clinical data, the causes of bleeding and the angiographic features were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The causes of uterine bleeding after cesarean section included uterine artery pseudoaneurysm (n=26), uterine atony (n=18), placental factors (n=11), gestational hypertension (n=8), coexisting uterine fibroids (n=1) and uterine bleeding of unknown reason (n=1). Uterine artery angiography revealed contrast extravasation in all patients except one patient. The angiographic findings confirmed the diagnosis of uterine artery bleeding after cesarean section. The bleeding stopped after TUAE, and the patients were in stable condition. No serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Pseudoaneurysm is the primary cause of postpartum uterine hemorrhage after cesarean section. Transcatheter uterine artery angiography can promptly and reliably determine the causes of bleeding, and, at the same time, embolization therapy can be carried out to effectively stop the bleeding. (authors)

  3. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  4. Ulcera gastro duodenal y parasitosis en Bogotá, D.E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Albornoz Plata

    1956-08-01

    Full Text Available Posiblemente la úlcera péptica ocupa los primeros puestos en frecuencia en las Estadísticas Gastroenterológicas. Su tratamiento contempla la erradicación o control de cualquier otra enfermedad concomitante: así es frecuente que al tratar una Sinusitis o al controlar un estado emocional, el tratamiento antiulceroso adquiere un terreno firme y así hay más probabilidad de éxito.

  5. Periodic activity of secretory glands of stomach in ulcer erosion of gastro-duodenal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Rudenko

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available It was fixed, that development of atophanum-carbacholimun ulcer of the gastroduodenal zone invoked various changes of secretory activity of the stomach. The changes directly depend on a progress of pathological process. As this takes place the reaction of stomach secretory glands varies under the stimulation with histamine: the decrease of stomach secretory glands’ work capacity till 10th day and its increase after 10–15th day were observed. Disorders of the glands’ ultradian rhythms at initial stages of modeling of gastrointestinal nervous regulation disturbances testify to dependence of periodic activity of gastrointestinal tract on resistance of regulatory mechanisms correlation.

  6. Angiographic diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Sung, Kyu Bo; Koo, Kyung Hoi; Bae, Tae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Han, Man Chung

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic angiographic evaluations were done in 33 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding for recent 5 years at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. On 11 patients of them, therapeutic interventional procedures were made and the results were analysed. 1. In a total of 33 cases, there were 18 cases of upper GI bleeding and 15 cases of lower GI bleeding. The most frequent causes were peptic ulcer in the former and intestinal typhoid fever in the latter. 2. Bleeding sites were localized angiographically in 28 cases, so the detection rate was 85%. Four of the five angiographically negative cases were lower GI bleeding cases. 3. The most frequent bleeding site was left gastric artery (7/33). The next was ileocecal branch of superior mesenteric artery (6/33). 4. Among the 11 interventional procedures, Gelfoam embolization was done in 7 cases and Vasopressin infusion was tried in 4 cases. They were successful in 4 and 3 cases, suggesting 57% and 47% success rates respectively.

  7. Angiographic diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Sung, Kyu Bo; Koo, Kyung Hoi; Bae, Tae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    Diagnostic angiographic evaluations were done in 33 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding for recent 5 years at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. On 11 patients of them, therapeutic interventional procedures were made and the results were analysed. 1. In a total of 33 cases, there were 18 cases of upper GI bleeding and 15 cases of lower GI bleeding. The most frequent causes were peptic ulcer in the former and intestinal typhoid fever in the latter. 2. Bleeding sites were localized angiographically in 28 cases, so the detection rate was 85%. Four of the five angiographically negative cases were lower GI bleeding cases. 3. The most frequent bleeding site was left gastric artery (7/33). The next was ileocecal branch of superior mesenteric artery (6/33). 4. Among the 11 interventional procedures, Gelfoam embolization was done in 7 cases and Vasopressin infusion was tried in 4 cases. They were successful in 4 and 3 cases, suggesting 57% and 47% success rates respectively.

  8. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other menstrual conditions; Abnormal menstrual periods; Abnormal vaginal bleeding ... There are many causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding. HORMONES ... Doctors call the problem abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) . AUB ...

  9. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment. (orig.) [de

  10. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment.

  11. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  12. GI bleeding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Gastrointestinal Bleeding A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  13. Bleeding into the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003235.htm Bleeding into the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bleeding into the skin can occur from broken blood ...

  14. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003156.htm Vaginal bleeding between periods To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses vaginal bleeding that occurs between a woman's monthly menstrual ...

  15. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Menorrhagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Blood Disorders Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... It can also be bleeding that is very heavy. How do you know if you have heavy ...

  16. Transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uflacker, R.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of lower gastrointestinal bleeding was attempted in 13 patients by selective embolization of branches of the mesenteric arteries with Gelfoam. Bleeding was adequately controlled in 11 patients with active bleeding during the examination. One patient improved after embolization but bleeding recurred within 24 hours and in another patient the catheterization was unsuccessful. Five patients with diverticular hemorrhage were embolized in the right colic artery four times, and once in the middle colic artery. Three patients had embolization of the ileocolic artery because of hemorrhage from cecal angiodysplasia, post appendectomy, and leukemia infiltration. Three patients had the superior hemorrhoidal artery embolized because of bleeding from unspecific proctitis, infiltration of the rectum from a carcinoma of the bladder, and transendoscopic polypectomy. One patient was septic and bled from jejunal ulcers. Ischemic changes with infarction of the large bowel developed in two patients and were treated by partial semi-elective colectomy, three and four days after embolization. Four other patients developed pain and fever after embolization. Transcatheter embolization of branches of mesenteric arteries in an effective way to control acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, but still has a significant rate of complications that must be seriously weighed against the advantages of operation. (orig.)

  17. Bleeding aneurysms of the celiac trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziviello, M.; D'Isa, L.; Siani, A.; Maglione, F.; Cataldo, B.; Ziviello, R.; Capalbogiliberti, R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience in the study of bleeding aneurysms of the celiac arteries. Eleven patients were examined with US,CT, and angiography (8 hepatic artery aneurysms and 3 splenic artery aneurysms). Clinical findings included digestive bleeding, upper abdominal pain, palpable pulsating masses, and jaundice. Patient history included blunt abdominal trauma, penetrating trauma due to gunshot, acute pancreatitis, recent hepatic biospy. In all cases US showed an abdominal mass ranging in size from 2 to 10 cm. US findings included cyst-like lesions (8 cases), anobulated solid-like lesion, and complex lesion (2 cases). Continuity of the lesion with adjancent arterial vessels was noted in 5/11 cases, and pulsing activity in 3/11 cases. US patterns, although not specific, play an important role in the diagnosis when associated to other elements such as arterial continuity, mass pulsatility, patient history, and gastrointestinal bleeding. They suggest the need for more specific imaging exams, i.e. CT and angiography, and help avoid dangerous diagnostic biopsies. CT was performed to confirm US findings in 5 cases, and detected either hypodense cystic masses, or inhomogeneous masses with arterial enhancement after bolus injection of cm. CT was used to better demonstrate the lumen, patency of the vessel, the walls of the vessel, and the parietal thrombotic component. The typical arterial enhancement was the decisive finding for the diagnosis, even though a total continuity with arterial vessels was never observed. Angiography was the method of choice for the preoperative demonstration of hepatic artery aneurysms (10 cases) and for occlusive treatment with Gianturco coils (3 cases)

  18. Bleeding during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in pregnancy? • What problems with the placenta can cause bleeding during pregnancy? • Can bleeding be a sign of preterm labor? • ... the hospital. What problems with the placenta can cause bleeding during pregnancy? Several problems with the placenta later in pregnancy ...

  19. Transarterial embolization of massive gastric ulcer bleeding in gastrostomy patients caused by a balloon replacement tube: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Byong Jong; Hur, Jin; Lee, Kwang Hun; Won, Jong Yun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    We present the case of a 77-year-old woman with massive gastric ulcer bleeding caused by a balloon replacement tube that required emergent transcatheter left gastric arterial embolization in stop the ulcer bleeding.

  20. Clinical utility of new bleeding criteria: a prospective study of evaluation for the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium definition of bleeding in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hyuk; Seo, Jeong-Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Kyungil; Kim, Young-Dae

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the new bleeding criteria, proposed by the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC), compared with the old criteria for determining the action of physicians in contact with bleeding events, after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The BARC criteria were independently associated with an increased risk of 1-year mortality after PCI, and provided a predictive value, in regard to 1-year mortality. The standardized bleeding definitions will be expected to help the physician to correctly analyze the bleeding events, to select an optimal treatment, and to objectively compare the results of multiple trials and registries. All the patients undergoing PCI from June to September 2012 were prospectively enrolled. Patients who experienced a bleeding event were further classified, based on three different bleeding severity criteria: BARC, Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI), and Global Use of Strategies To Open coronary arteries (GUSTO). The primary outcome was the occurrence of bleeding events requiring interruption of antiplatelet therapy (IAT) by physicians. A total of 376 consecutive patients were included in this study. Total bleeding events occurred in 46 patients (12.2%). BARC type ≥2 bleeding occurred in 30 patients (8.0%); however, TIMI major or minor bleeding, and GUSTO moderate or severe bleeding occurred in 6 (1.6%) and 11 patients (2.9%), respectively. Of the 46 patients, 28 (60.9% of patients) required IAT. On receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, bleeding defined BARC type ≥2 effectively predicted IAT, with a sensitivity of 89.3%, and a specificity of 98.5% (pdefinition may be a more useful tool for the detection of bleeding with clinical relevance, for patients undergoing PCI. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang; Golzarian, Jafar

    2007-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  2. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  3. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Severe Bleeding: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12, 2017. Jevon P, et al. Part 5 — First-aid treatment for severe bleeding. Nursing Times. 2008;104:26. Oct. 19, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-severe-bleeding/basics/ART-20056661 . Mayo ...

  5. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid —This medication treats heavy menstrual bleeding. • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs—These drugs, which include ibuprofen, may help control heavy bleeding and relieve menstrual cramps. • Antibiotics—If you have an infection, you may be ...

  6. N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolotherapy for acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Seong, Chang Kyu; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Various embolic agents have been used for embolization of acute gastrointestinal (GI) arterial bleeding. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is not easy to handle, but it is a useful embolic agent. In this retrospective study, we describe our experience with NBCA embolization of acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. NBCA embolization was performed in seven patients with acute upper GI arterial bleeding; they had five gastric ulcers and two duodenal ulcers. NBCA embolization was done in the left gastric artery (n = 3), right gastric artery (n = 2), gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) and pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 1). Coil was used along with NBCA in a gastric bleeding patient because of difficulty in selecting a feeding artery. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:2. The blood pressure and heart rate around the time of embolization, the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and the transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Technical success was achieved in all the cases. Two procedure-related complications happened; embolism of the NBCA mixture to the common hepatic artery occurred in a case with embolization of the left gastric artery, and reflux of the NBCA mixture occurred into the adjacent gastric tissue, but these did not cause any clinical problems. Four of seven patients did not present with rebleeding, but two had rebleeding 10 and 16 days, respectively, after embolization and they died of cardiac arrest at 2 months and 37 days, respectively. One other patient died of sepsis and respiratory failure within 24 hours without rebleeding. NBCA embolization with or without other embolic agents could be safe and effective for treating acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding.

  7. N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolotherapy for acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Seong, Chang Kyu; Song, Chi Sung

    2007-01-01

    Various embolic agents have been used for embolization of acute gastrointestinal (GI) arterial bleeding. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is not easy to handle, but it is a useful embolic agent. In this retrospective study, we describe our experience with NBCA embolization of acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. NBCA embolization was performed in seven patients with acute upper GI arterial bleeding; they had five gastric ulcers and two duodenal ulcers. NBCA embolization was done in the left gastric artery (n = 3), right gastric artery (n = 2), gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) and pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 1). Coil was used along with NBCA in a gastric bleeding patient because of difficulty in selecting a feeding artery. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:2. The blood pressure and heart rate around the time of embolization, the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and the transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Technical success was achieved in all the cases. Two procedure-related complications happened; embolism of the NBCA mixture to the common hepatic artery occurred in a case with embolization of the left gastric artery, and reflux of the NBCA mixture occurred into the adjacent gastric tissue, but these did not cause any clinical problems. Four of seven patients did not present with rebleeding, but two had rebleeding 10 and 16 days, respectively, after embolization and they died of cardiac arrest at 2 months and 37 days, respectively. One other patient died of sepsis and respiratory failure within 24 hours without rebleeding. NBCA embolization with or without other embolic agents could be safe and effective for treating acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

  8. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit blood ...

  9. Endovascular uterine artery interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan J Das

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vascular embolization plays an important role in the management of various gynecologic and obstetric abnormalities. Transcatheter embolization is a minimally invasive alternative procedure to surgery with reduced morbidity and mortality, and preserves the patient's future fertility potential. The clinical indications for transcatheter embolization are much broader and include many benign gynecologic conditions, such as fibroid, adenomyosis, and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs, as well as intractable bleeding due to inoperable advanced-stage malignancies. The most well-known and well-studied indication is uterine fibroid embolization. Uterine artery embolization (UAE may be performed to prevent or treat bleeding associated with various obstetric conditions, including postpartum hemorrhage (PPH, placental implantation abnormality, and ectopic pregnancy. Embolization of the uterine artery or the internal iliac artery also may be performed to control pelvic bleeding due to coagulopathy or iatrogenic injury. This article discusses these gynecologic and obstetric indications for transcatheter embolization and reviews procedural techniques and outcomes.

  10. Monitoring and treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenjani, Basri; Zeka, Sadik; Krasniqi, Salih; Bunjaku, Ilaz; Jakupi, Arianit; Elshani, Besni; Xhafa, Agim

    2012-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding-massive acute bleeding from gastrointestinal section is one of the most frequent forms of acute abdomen. The mortality degree in emergency surgery is about 10%. It's very difficult to identify the place of bleeding and etiology. The important purpose of this research is to present the cases of acute gastrointestinal bleeding from the patients which were monitored and treated at The University Clinical Center of Kosova-Emergency Center in Pristina. These inquests included 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding who were treated in emergency center of The University Clinical Center in Pristina for the period from January 2005 until December 2006. From 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding 41% or 29% was female and 96% or 70.1% male. Following the sex we gained a high significant difference of statistics (p < 0.01). The gastrointestinal bleeding was two times more frequent in male than in female. Also in the age-group we had a high significant difference of statistics (p < 0.01) 63.5% of patients were over 55 years old. The mean age of patients with an acute gastrointestinal bleeding was 58.4 years SD 15.8 age. The mean age for female patients was 56.4 age SD 18.5 age. The patients with arterial systolic pressure under 100 mmHg have been classified as patients with hypovolemic shock. They participate with 17.5% in all prevalence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. From the number of prevalence 2 {1.5%} patients have been diagnosed with peptic ulcer, 1 {0.7%} as gastric perforation and 1 {0.7%} with intestine ischemia. Abdominal Surgery and Intensive Care 2 or 1.5% died, 1 at intensive care unit and 1 at nephrology. As we know the severe condition of the patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and etiology it is very difficult to establish, we need to improve for the better conditions in our emergency center for treatment and initiation base of clinic criteria.

  11. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2012-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  12. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  13. Transarterial embolization for management of severe postcoital bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Eskandari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Postcoital bleeding is an uncommon cause of gynecologic hemorrhage; however, it can be severe in a majority of cases necessitating surgical management. Methods: We report a case of severe postcoital bleeding in a young woman requiring blood transfusion. Results: Hemostasis was achieved using subselective embolization of cervical artery by metallic coils. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates a minimally invasive treatment for control of non-obstetric hemorrhage.

  14. Acquired bleeding disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B one marrow aplasia ... Laboratory approach to a suspected acquired bleeding disorder. (LER = leuko- .... lymphocytic leukaemia, and lymphoma). ... cells), a bone marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy (BMAT) is not ..... transplantation.

  15. Small Bowel Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pouchings in the wall of the colon), or cancer. Upper GI (esophagus, stomach, or duodenum) bleeding is most often due ... begins transmitting images of the inside of the esophagus, stomach, and small bowel to a ... Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome ...

  16. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially the progestin-only pill (also called the “mini-pill”) can actually cause abnormal bleeding for some ... Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality ...

  17. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without...

  18. The International Bleeding Risk Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Laine, L.; Dalton, H.

    2017-01-01

    The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding.......The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding....

  19. Management and outcome of bleeding pseudoaneurysm associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Yi-Yin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A bleeding pseudoaneurysm in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a rare and potentially lethal complication. Optimal treatment of bleeding peripancreatic pseudoaneurysm remains controversial. This study reports on experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH in managing of bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis. Methods The medical records of 9 patients (8 males and 1 female; age range, 28 – 71 years; median, 36 years with bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis treated at CGMH between Aug. 1992 and Sep. 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Alcohol abuse (n = 7;78% was the predominant predisposing factor. Diagnoses of bleeding pseudoaneurysms were based on angiographic (7/7, computed tomographic (4/7, ultrasound (2/5, and surgical (2/2 findings. Whether surgery or angiographic embolization was performed was primarily based on patient clinical condition. Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 4 – 87 months. Results Abdominal computed tomography revealed bleeding pseudoaneurysms in 4 of 7 patients (57%. Angiography determined correct diagnosis in 7 patients (7/7, 100%. The splenic artery was involved in 5 cases, the pancreaticoduodenal artery in 2, the gastroduodenal artery in 1, and the middle colic artery in 1. Initial treatment was emergency (n = 4 or elective (n = 3 surgery in 7 patients and arterial embolization in 2. Rebleeding was detected after initial treatment in 3 patients. Overall, 5 arterial embolizations and 9 surgical interventions were performed; the respective rates of success of these treatments were 20% (1/5 and 89% (8/9. Five patients developed pseudocysts before treatment (n = 3 or following intervention (n = 2. Pseudocyst formation was identified in 2 of the 3 rebleeding patients. Five patients underwent surgical treatment for associated pseudocysts and bleeding did not recur. One patient died from angiography-related complications. Overall mortality

  20. Selective CT mesentericography in the diagnostics of obscure overt intestinal bleeding: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuermann, K.; Buecker, A.; Tacke, J.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Guenther, R.W.; Jansen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate intra-arterial CT mesentericography (CTM) in the diagnostics of severe obscure overt intestinal bleeding in comparison with conventional mesentericography (MG) and surgery. Methods: In 8 patients (23 - 82 years, mean 59 years), CTM was performed via the catheter left in the superior mesenteric artery after MG to detect the source of bleeding. Early and late-phase spiral CT scans were acquired after administration of contrast medium. Active bleeding was considered to be present if extravasation of contrast medium into the bowel was found. The results of MG and CTM were compared with the results of surgery. Results: With MG active bleeding was found in one patient, with CTM in five patients. In three patients, both MG and CTM were negative. Six patients underwent surgery. Five cases of bleeding detected with CTM were confirmed by surgery. In one case, bleeding found with CTM was not confirmed by surgery. One patient underwent surgery although all imaging procedures were negative. The source of bleeding remained unknown. Surgically, the site of bleeding was located in the jejunum in 3 patients (jejunitis, jejunal ulcers, carcinoid), one patient had a diverticulum in the ascending colon. The colonic bleeding site was correctly localized with CTM, whereas the small bowel bleeding could only roughly be assigned to the proximal or distal jejunum or jejunoileal transition area. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate that selective CTM is superior to MG in the evaluation of severe obscure overt intestinal bleeding. (orig.) [de

  1. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wildi, Stefan [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauerfeind, Peter [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Gastroenterology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  2. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Wildi, Stefan; Bauerfeind, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  3. Embolisation of the splenic artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essler, G; Duex, A

    1982-09-01

    In bleeding of oesophageal varices with resistance to common treatment embolisation of the splenic artery causes depression of the portal hypertension by forty per cent. Thrombosis of the splenic or portal vein as in splenectomies are not to be expected. The splenic vein remains open for later spleno-renal anastomosis. By occlusion of the splenic artery we were successful in stopping oesophageal bleeding. In a patient with dominant hypersplenism in portal hypertension the severity of the syndrome decreased after embolisation of the splenic artery. Thrombocytes, leukocytes and gammaglobulin increased.

  4. Application of transcatheter arterial embolization in the intractable epistaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhaodong; Li Mingjun; Zhang Chuanwen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in the treatment of intractable epistaxis. Methods: TAE using gel form or polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles of forty-one patients with intractable epistaxis were undertaken by the femoral artery approach, through selective catheterization of involved maxillary artery or the bleeding arteries for the stoppage of bleeding. Results: Of the forty-one patient, 39 cases were cured by once TAE and the other 2 with recurrent bleeding on the next day after the TAE, to whom a second interventional treatment full filled the requirement. Conclusions: Transcatheter arterial embolization is a simple, safe and effective treatment for the intractable epistaxis. (authors)

  5. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing ... JavaScript. One out of 10 women will have vaginal bleeding during their 3rd trimester. At times, it ...

  6. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne; Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age ± 95% confidence interval = 70 ± 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 ± 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 ± 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding

  7. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, Henrik; Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  8. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without...... a stent dual antiplatelet therapy with a P2Y12 receptor antagonist and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is recommended for 12 months, preferable with prasugrel or ticagrelor unless there is an additional indication of warfarin or increased risk of bleeding. In patients with AF, warfarin is recommended...

  9. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Ahmed, Aamer B; Afshari, Arash

    2017-01-01

    : The management of perioperative bleeding involves multiple assessments and strategies to ensure appropriate patient care. Initially, it is important to identify those patients with an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. Next, strategies should be employed to correct preoperative anaemia...... and to stabilise macrocirculation and microcirculation to optimise the patient's tolerance to bleeding. Finally, targeted interventions should be used to reduce intraoperative and postoperative bleeding, and so prevent subsequent morbidity and mortality. The objective of these updated guidelines is to provide...

  10. [Management of intractable epistaxis and bleeding points localization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Da-Zhang; Cheng, Jing-Ning; Han, Jun; Shu, Ping; Zhang, Hua

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the common nasal bleeding points and the management of intractable epistaxis. The bleeding points and its correlation with age distribution, surgical techniques as well as its effects were studied retrospectively in 92 patients, in whom the bleeding points were not found by routine nasal endoscopy and the hemorrhage was not controlled with standard nasal packing. The bleeding points were found in the following different sites: superior wall of inferior nasal meatus (56.5%, 52/92), olfactory cleft of nasal septum (27.2%, 25/92), posterosuperior wall of middle nasal meatus (8.7%, 8/92) and uncertain (7.6%, 7/92). The results showed that the bleeding points had correlation with age. Epistaxis was well controlled by electrocoagulation in 83 cases, gelfoam packing in 8 cases, and transcatheter maxillary artery embolization in 1 case. There were no complications during a followed-up for 1 - 3 months after management. Among the 92 cases, the numbers of treatment needed to stop bleeding were 82 cases (89.1%) after 1 time of treatment, 9 cases (9.8%) after 2 times and in one case (1.1%) after 4 times. Endoscopy combined with displacement of the middle and inferior turbinate gives good visualization and direct management of the deeply-sited bleeding points, which were difficult in localization. The combined method provides an effective and safe way to control intractable epistaxis.

  11. Chronic kidney disease and bleeding risk in patients at high cardiovascular risk: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, G; Rookmaaker, M B; Algra, A; de Borst, G J; Doevendans, P A; Kappelle, L J; Verhaar, M C; Visseren, F L

    2018-01-01

    Essentials The association between chronic kidney disease and bleeding is unknown. We followed 10 347 subjects at high cardiovascular risk for bleeding events. Chronic kidney disease was associated with a 1.5-fold increased bleeding risk. Especially albuminuria rather than decreased kidney function was associated with bleeding events. Background There are indications that patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased bleeding risk. Objectives To investigate the association between chronic kidney disease and bleeding in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Methods We included 10 347 subjects referred to the University Medical Center Utrecht (the Netherlands) from September 1996 to February 2015 for an outpatient visit with classic risk factors for arterial disease or with symptomatic arterial disease (Second Manifestation of Arterial disease [SMART] cohort). Patients were staged according to the KDIGO guidelines, on the basis of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria, and were followed for the occurrence of major hemorrhagic events until March 2015. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for bleeding were calculated with Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results The incidence rate for bleeding in subjects with chronic kidney disease was 8.0 per 1000 person-years and that for subjects without chronic kidney disease was 3.5 per 1000 person-years. Patients with chronic kidney disease (n = 2443) had a 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.2-1.9) increased risk of bleeding as compared with subjects without chronic kidney disease (n = 7904) after adjustment. Subjects with an eGFR of Chronic kidney disease is a risk factor for bleeding in patients with classic risk factors for arterial disease or with symptomatic arterial disease, especially in the presence of albuminuria. © 2017 University Medical Center Utrecht. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  12. Pinworms and postmenopausal bleeding.

    OpenAIRE

    al-Rufaie, H K; Rix, G H; Pérez Clemente, M P; al-Shawaf, T

    1998-01-01

    The human pinworm Enterobius vermicularis is normally found within the human gastrointestinal tract. Pregnant females migrate out of their host's anus at night to lay their eggs perianally. As a consequence of this nocturnal migration some worms find their way into adjacent orifices, most commonly the female genitourinary tract, producing irritative symptoms such as vulvovaginitis. A case of pinworm infestation of the uterus presented as postmenopausal bleeding.

  13. Severe gastric variceal haemorrhage due to splenic artery thrombosis and consecutive arterial bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasmuth Hermann E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage is mainly caused by ulcers. Gastric varicosis due to portal hypertension can also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertension causes the development of a collateral circulation from the portal to the caval venous system resulting in development of oesophageal and gastric fundus varices. Those may also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Case presentation In this study, we describe the case of a 69-year-old male with recurrent severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by arterial submucosal collaterals due to idiopathic splenic artery thrombosis. The diagnosis was secured using endoscopic duplex ultrasound and angiography. The patient was successfully treated with a laparoscopic splenectomy and complete dissection of the short gastric arteries, resulting in the collapse of the submucosal arteries in the gastric wall. Follow-up gastroscopy was performed on the 12th postoperative week and showed no signs of bleeding and a significant reduction in the arterial blood flow within the gastric wall. Subsequent follow-up after 6 months also showed no further gastrointestinal bleeding as well as subjective good quality of life for the patient. Conclusion Submucosal arterial collaterals must be excluded by endosonography via endoscopy in case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Laparoscopic splenectomy provides adequate treatment in preventing any recurrent bleeding, if gastric arterial collaterals are caused by splenic artery thrombosis.

  14. Selective Embolization for Post-Endoscopic Sphincterotomy Bleeding: Technical Aspects and Clinical Efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young Ho; Choi, Young Ho [Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Soon Young [Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the technical aspects and clinical efficacy of selective embolization for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. We reviewed the records of 10 patients (3%; M:F 6:4; mean age, 63.3 years) that underwent selective embolization for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding among 344 patients who received arteriography for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from 2000 to 2009. We analyzed the endoscopic procedure, onset of bleeding, underlying clinical condition, angiographic findings, interventional procedure, and outcomes in these patients. Among the 12 bleeding branches, primary success of hemostasis was achieved in 10 bleeding branches (83%). Secondary success occurred in two additional bleeding branches (100%) after repeated embolization. In 10 patients, post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleedings were detected during the endoscopic procedure (n = 2, 20%) or later (n = 8, 80%), and the delay was from one to eight days (mean, 2.9 days; {+-} 2.3). Coagulopathy was observed in three patients. Eight patients had a single bleeding branch, whereas two patients had two branches. On the selective arteriography, bleeding branches originated from the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 8, 67%) and anterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 4, 33%), respectively. Superselection was achieved in four branches and the embolization was performed with n-butyl cyanoacrylate. The eight branches were embolized by combined use of coil, n-butyl cyanoacrylate, or Gelfoam. After the last embolization, there was no rebleeding or complication related to embolization. Selective embolization is technically feasible and an effective procedure for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. In addition, the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery is the main origin of the causative vessels of post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding.

  15. Selective Embolization for Post-Endoscopic Sphincterotomy Bleeding: Technical Aspects and Clinical Efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Young Ho; Choi, Young Ho; Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung; Song, Soon Young

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the technical aspects and clinical efficacy of selective embolization for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. We reviewed the records of 10 patients (3%; M:F 6:4; mean age, 63.3 years) that underwent selective embolization for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding among 344 patients who received arteriography for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from 2000 to 2009. We analyzed the endoscopic procedure, onset of bleeding, underlying clinical condition, angiographic findings, interventional procedure, and outcomes in these patients. Among the 12 bleeding branches, primary success of hemostasis was achieved in 10 bleeding branches (83%). Secondary success occurred in two additional bleeding branches (100%) after repeated embolization. In 10 patients, post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleedings were detected during the endoscopic procedure (n = 2, 20%) or later (n = 8, 80%), and the delay was from one to eight days (mean, 2.9 days; ± 2.3). Coagulopathy was observed in three patients. Eight patients had a single bleeding branch, whereas two patients had two branches. On the selective arteriography, bleeding branches originated from the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 8, 67%) and anterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 4, 33%), respectively. Superselection was achieved in four branches and the embolization was performed with n-butyl cyanoacrylate. The eight branches were embolized by combined use of coil, n-butyl cyanoacrylate, or Gelfoam. After the last embolization, there was no rebleeding or complication related to embolization. Selective embolization is technically feasible and an effective procedure for post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. In addition, the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery is the main origin of the causative vessels of post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding.

  16. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Tai; Lee, Choon Keun; Lee, Sun Wha; Choi, Woo Suk; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1988-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major diagnostic problem. Although advances have been made in the medical and surgical methods of managing gastrointestinal bleeding, the commonly employed techniques of barium radiography, endoscopy, and angiography may not successfully localize the site and define the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two widely available technetium-99m-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, sulfur colloid and red blood cells are currently used in the evaluation of patients who are bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgically confirmed 19 patients with use of 99m Tc-sulfur colloid (7 cases) and 99m Tc-RBC (12 cases) were retrospectively evaluated. The overall sensitivity of scintigraphy in detection of bleeding and localization of bleeding site was 68% and 84%, respectively. The authors conclude that bleeding scintigraphy is a safe, sensitive, and non-invasive method as an effective screening test before performing angiography or surgery.

  17. DSA diagnosis and interventional management of postoperative bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuwei; Zhang Fuqiang; Li Yunhui; Yuan Liang; Si Guangyan; Liu Lili

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical application of DSA and interventional management in diagnosing and treating the bleeding after surgery. Methods: The clinical data and the interventional management of 14 patients with DSA-proved postoperative bleeding, encountered during the period of Aug. 2005-Jan. 2008, were retrospectively analyzed. The surgeries included subtotal gastrectomy (n=4), pancreatoduodenectomy (n=3), cesarean section (n=2), nephrolithotomy (n=3), heminephrectomy (n=1), internal hemorrhoidectomy (n=1). Results: Seventeen arterial bleeding sites were demonstrated, including gastroduodenal (n=2), left gastric (n=4), phrenic (n=1), short gastric (n=1), superior mesenteric (n=2), renal (n=4), uterine (n=2) and internal pudendal (n=1) artery. The diagnosis was confirmed with DSA in all 14 patients, of which embolization was successfully carried out in 13 in one session (92.8%). The remaining one case had to be operated again to stop the bleeding because of the failure of the superselective catheterization. No serious complications, such as organ necrosis or visceral dysfunction, occurred. Conclusion: As a safe, minimally-invasive and effective technique, DSA and interventional management are very helpful in diagnosing and treating the bleeding after surgery. (authors)

  18. Management of bleeding and open wounds in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Barbara J; Smith, Danny

    2012-06-01

    Bleeding or open wounds of the integumentary system occur frequently in athletics. Integumentary wounds vary from minor scrapes, blisters, and small punctures to more serious lacerations and arterial wounds that could threaten the life of the athlete. The Sports physical therapist (PT) must realize that integumentary wounds and subsequent bleeding can occur in many sports, and assessment and care of such trauma is an essential skill. The purpose of this "On the Sidelines" clinical commentary is to review types of integumentary wounds that may occur in sport and their acute management. 5.

  19. Evaluation and management of abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Mary Gayle; Schmidt-Dalton, Tarin A; Weiss, Patrice M; Madsen, Keith P

    2012-01-01

    Up to 14 percent of women experience irregular or excessively heavy menstrual bleeding. This abnormal uterine bleeding generally can be divided into anovulatory and ovulatory patterns. Chronic anovulation can lead to irregular bleeding, prolonged unopposed estrogen stimulation of the endometrium, and increased risk of endometrial cancer. Causes include polycystic ovary syndrome, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction, hyperprolactinemia, and use of antipsychotics or antiepileptics. Women 35 years or older with recurrent anovulation, women younger than 35 years with risk factors for endometrial cancer, and women with excessive bleeding unresponsive to medical therapy should undergo endometrial biopsy. Treatment with combination oral contraceptives or progestins may regulate menstrual cycles. Histologic findings of hyperplasia without atypia may be treated with cyclic or continuous progestin. Women who have hyperplasia with atypia or adenocarcinoma should be referred to a gynecologist or gynecologic oncologist, respectively. Ovulatory abnormal uterine bleeding, or menorrhagia, may be caused by thyroid dysfunction, coagulation defects (most commonly von Willebrand disease), endometrial polyps, and submucosal fibroids. Transvaginal ultrasonography or saline infusion sonohysterography may be used to evaluate menorrhagia. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is an effective treatment for menorrhagia. Oral progesterone for 21 days per month and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are also effective. Tranexamic acid is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovulatory bleeding, but is expensive. When clear structural causes are identified or medical management is ineffective, polypectomy, fibroidectomy, uterine artery embolization, and endometrial ablation may be considered. Hysterectomy is the most definitive treatment.

  20. Detection of intestinal bleeding with multi-detector row CT in an experimental setup. How many acquisitions are necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobritz, Martin; Engels, Heinz-Peter; Bauer, Jan; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Schneider, Armin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) acquired in different acquisitions (unenhanced, and arterial and portal venous phase following intravenous contrast medium) for detection of intestinal bleeding using an experimental bowel model. The model consisted of an injector tube with a perforation placed in a 7-m-long small bowel of a pig. The bowel was filled with water/contrast medium solution of 30-40 HU and was incorporated in a phantom model. Intestinal bleeding in different locations and bleeding velocities varying from zero to 0.75 ml/min (0.05 ml/min increments) were simulated. Twenty-six datasets in simulated unenhanced, arterial and portal venous contrast phase using increasing bleeding velocities and ten negative controls were measured using 64-row MDCT. Two radiologists blinded to the experimental settings evaluated the datasets in a random order. The likelihood of intestinal bleeding was assessed using a 5-point scale with subsequent ROC analysis. The overall sensitivity for detecting bleeding was 0.44 for an arterial acquisition alone, 0.68 for a portal venous acquisition, 0.68 for the combination unenhanced/arterial, 0.72 for unenhanced/portal venous and 0.80 for arterial/portal. Bleeding velocities of above 0.25 ml/min were detected with a sensitivity of 0.59 for arterial, 0.88 for portal venous, 0.85 for unenhanced/arterial, 0.94 for unenhanced/portal venous and 0.97 for arterial/portal venous contrast phase protocols, respectively. The specificity was 1.00. MDCT provides the highest sensitivity and specificity in the detection of intestinal bleeding using arterial and portal venous acquisition in comparison to mono-phase protocols. (orig.)

  1. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, T.P.; Gulati, M.S.; Makharia, G.K.; Bandhu, S.; Garg, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding

  2. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, T.P. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Gulati, M.S. [Department of Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Makharia, G.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)]. E-mail: govindmakharia@aiims.ac.in; Bandhu, S. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Garg, P.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding.

  3. Pseudoaneurysm embolization and vasopressin infusion for lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to recurrence of urinary bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizawa, Hideaki; Toyota, Naoyuki; Mita, Koji; Fujimura, Yoshio; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Tachikake, Toshihiro; Ito, Katsuhide

    2006-05-01

    We report a case that was successfully treated for massive lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding due to a recurrent urinary bladder carcinoma. Treatment consisted of combination therapy including embolization of an inferior gluteal artery (IGA) pseudoaneurysm and low-dose arterial vasopressin infusion via a sigmoid artery (SA). A 57-year-old man presented with life-threatening sudden, massive LGI bleeding due to an obturator lymph node (LN) metastasis from a urinary bladder carcinoma. Computed tomography showed that the LN recurrence had invaded all the way to the sigmoid colon, and there was a pseudoaneurysm with extravasation inside the recurrence. An angiogram revealed a left IGA pseudoaneurysm. We therefore excluded the pseudoaneurysm by embolization with microcoils. Following this treatment the bleeding decreased, but intermittent LGI bleeding continued. Endoscopic examination showed the tumor with a huge ulcer inside the colonic lumen, and continuous oozing was confirmed. A second angiogram showed no recurrence of the IGA pseudoaneurysm and no apparent findings of bleeding. Then a 3F microcatheter was placed in the SA selectively using a coaxial catheter system, and vasopressin was infused at a rate 0.05 U/min for 12 h. Bleeding completely ceased 2 days later. There were no signs of ischemic gastrointestinal complications. Massive LGI bleeding has not recurred in 5 months.

  4. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of hemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients. The aims of the present thesis were: 1. To examine which risk scoring system is best at predicting need of hospital-based intervention, rebleeding, and mortality in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Study I) 2. To evaluate if supplementary transcatheter arterial embolization (STAE) after

  5. Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngu, JH; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Chin, YK

    2017-01-01

    Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study.......Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study....

  6. Rediscovering the wound hematoma as a site of hemostasis during major arterial hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, N J; Mehic, E; Wang, X; Chien, D; Lim, E; St John, A E; Stern, S A; Mourad, P D; Rieger, M; Fries, D; Martinowitz, U

    2015-12-01

    Treatments for major internal bleeding after injury include permissive hypotension to decrease the rate of blood loss, intravenous infusion of plasma or clotting factors to improve clot formation, and rapid surgical hemostasis or arterial embolization to control bleeding vessels. Yet, little is known regarding major internal arterial hemostasis, or how these commonly used treatments might influence hemostasis. (i) To use a swine model of femoral artery bleeding to understand the perivascular hemostatic response to contained arterial hemorrhage. (ii) To directly confirm the association between hemodynamics and bleeding velocity. (iii) To observe the feasibility of delivering an activated clotting factor directly to internal sites of bleeding using a simplified angiographic approach. Ultrasound was used to measure bleeding velocity and in vivo clot formation by elastography in a swine model of contained femoral artery bleeding with fluid resuscitation. A swine model of internal pelvic and axillary artery hemorrhage was also used to demonstrate the feasibility of local delivery of an activated clotting factor. In this model, clots formed slowly within the peri-wound hematoma, but eventually contained the bleeding. Central hemodynamics correlated positively with bleeding velocity. Infusion of recombinant human activated factor VII into the injured artery near the site of major internal hemorrhage in the pelvis and axillae was feasible. We rediscovered that clot formation within the peri-wound hematoma is an integral component of hemostasis and a feasible target for the treatment of major internal bleeding using activated clotting factors delivered using a simplified angiographic approach. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  7. Prognostic Significance of Bleeding Location and Severity Among Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavalle, John P.; Clare, Robert; Chiswell, Karen; Rao, Sunil V.; Petersen, John L.; Kleiman, Neal S.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Wang, Tracy Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine if there is an association between bleed location and clinical outcomes in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) patients. Background The prognostic significance of bleeding location among ACS patients undergoing cardiac catheterization is not well known. Methods We analyzed in-hospital bleeding events among 9,978 patients randomized in the SYNERGY (Superior Yield of the New Strategy of Enoxaparin, Revascularization, and Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Inhibitors) study. Bleeding events were categorized by location as access site, systemic, surgical, or superficial, and severity was graded using the GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definition. We assessed the association of each bleeding location and severity with 6-month risk of death or myocardial infarction using a multicovariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model. Results A total of 4,900 bleeding events were identified among 3,694 ACS patients with in-hospital bleeding. Among 4,679 GUSTO mild/moderate bleeding events, only surgical and systemic bleeds were associated with an increased risk of 6-month death or myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.52 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.16 to 2.94, and 1.40 [95% CI: 1.16 to 1.69], respectively). Mild/moderate superficial and access-site bleeds were not associated with downstream risk (adjusted HR: 1.17 [95% CI: 0.97 to 1.40], and 0.96 [95% CI: 0.82 to 1.12], respectively). Among 221 GUSTO severe bleeds, surgical bleeds were associated with the highest risk (HR: 5.27 [95% CI: 3.80 to 7.29]), followed by systemic (HR: 4.48 [95% CI: 2.98 to 6.72]), and finally access-site bleeds (HR: 3.57 [95% CI: 2.35 to 5.40]). Conclusions Among ACS patients who develop in-hospital bleeding, systemic and surgical bleeding are associated with the highest risks of adverse outcomes regardless of bleeding severity. Although the most frequent among bleeds, GUSTO mild/moderate access-site bleeding is not

  8. Clinical value of arteriography in postpartum hemorrhage by transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kai; Jiang Guomin; Zhao Jinwei; Huang Wenhua; Liu Yizhi; Jin Yonghai

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the arterial supply in postpartum hemorrhage and to evaluate the clinical value of arteriography in transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for treating postpartum hemorrhage. Methods: The arteriography of 37 patients with postpartum hemorrhage was analyzed. TAE were performed after the bleeding artery was identified. Post TAE angiography was performed to confirm the success of embolization. Results: The bleeding artery in atonic uterus and abnormal placenta was the uterine artery. The bleeding artery in birth canal laceration is mainly non-uterine artery. Postpartum hemorrhage was successfully controlled in all 37 patients without sever complication of TAE. Conclusion: Arteriography in postpartum hemorrhage can demonstrate the bleeding artery and is potential collaterals allowing adequate embolization without complication. (authors)

  9. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  10. ENDOVASCULAR HEMOSTASIS IN UTERINE BLEEDING IN PATIENTS WITH UTERINE LEIOMYOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Damirov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report results of treatment for 72 patients with uterine leiomyoma (LM of various sizes and location, who had arrived with excessive uterine bleeding. All patients underwent urgent or urgently-delayed endovascular hemostasis by performing uterine arteries embolization (UAE. We analyzed clinical features of the disease after UAE in various sizes of tumors and studied immediate and long-term results of UAE in patients with LM.

  11. Endovascular management for significant iatrogenic portal vein bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Woo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Park, Jonathan K; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2017-11-01

    Background Despite conservative treatment, hemorrhage from an intrahepatic branch of the portal vein can cause hemodynamic instability requiring urgent intervention. Purpose To retrospectively report the outcomes of hemodynamically significant portal vein bleeding after endovascular management. Material and Methods During a period of 15 years, four patients (2 men, 2 women; median age, 70.5 years) underwent angiography and embolization for iatrogenic portal vein bleeding. Causes of hemorrhage, angiographic findings, endovascular treatment, and complications were reported. Results Portal vein bleeding occurred after percutaneous liver biopsy (n = 2), percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (n = 1), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (n = 1). The median time interval between angiography and percutaneous procedure was 5 h (range, 4-240 h). Common hepatic angiograms including indirect mesenteric portograms showed active portal vein bleeding into the peritoneal cavity with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) an arterioportal (AP) fistula, and portal vein pseudoaneurysm alone with an AP fistula (n = 1). Successful transcatheter arterial embolization (n = 2) or percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (n = 2) was performed. Embolic materials were n-butyl cyanoacrylate alone (n = 2) or in combination with gelatin sponge particles and coils (n = 2). There were no major treatment-related complications or patient mortality within 30 days. Conclusion Patients with symptomatic or life-threatening portal vein bleeding following liver-penetrating procedures can successfully be managed with embolization.

  12. Fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens; Johansen, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Hypofibrinogenaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but the optimal treatment level, the use of preemptive treatment and the preferred source of fibrinogen remain disputed. Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly used and recommended for bleeding with acquired haemostatic...

  13. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander Ahm; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The management of variceal bleeding remains a clinical challenge with a high mortality. Standardisation in supportive and new therapeutic treatments seems to have improved survival within the last 25 years. Although overall survival has improved in recent years, mortality is still closely related...... to failure to control initial bleeding or early re-bleeding occurring in up to 30-40% of patients. Initial procedures are to secure and protect the airway, and administer volume replacement to stabilize the patient. Treatment with vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as possible, since a reduction...... in portal pressure is associated with a better control of bleeding and may facilitate later endoscopic procedures. Vasopressin and its analogues Terlipressin and somatostatin and analogues are the two types of medicine, which has been evaluated. In meta-analysis, only Terlipressin have demonstrated effects...

  14. Side Effects: Bleeding and Bruising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy, can increase patients’ risk of bleeding and bruising, also called thrombocytopenia. Learn about steps to take if you are at increased risk of a low platelet count.

  15. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benign ulcer. Mallory-Weiss tear .... pressure and direct thermal coagulation. Alternatively, use ... Forrest classification of peptic ulcer bleeding related to risks of rebleeding. (NBVV - non- .... esomeprazole for prevention of recurrent peptic ulcer ...

  16. A randomized, double blind trial of prophylactic fibrinogen to reduce bleeding in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Postoperative bleeding has a great clinical importance and can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, we evaluated the effect of prophylactic administration of fibrinogen concentrate on post-coronary artery bypass graft surgery bleeding. METHODS: A total of 60 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in the fibrinogen group received 1 g of fibrinogen concentrate 30 min prior to the operation, while patients in the control group received placebo. Post-operative bleeding volumes, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, INR, hemoglobin and transfused blood products in both groups were recorded. A strict red blood cell transfusion protocol was used in all patients. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between intra-operative packed red blood cells infusion in the studied groups (1.0 ± 1.4 in fibrinogen group, and 1.3 ± 1.1 in control group. Less postoperative bleeding was observed in the fibrinogen group (477 ± 143 versus 703 ± 179, p = 0.0001. Fifteen patients in the fibrinogen group and 21 in the control group required post-op packed red blood cells infusion (p = 0.094. No thrombotic event was observed through 72 h after surgery. CONCLUSION: Prophylactic fibrinogen reduces post-operative bleeding in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft.

  17. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) KidsHealth / For Teens / Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) ... Print en español Sangrado uterino anormal What Is Abnormal Uterine Bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the name doctors ...

  18. The Clinical Outcomes of Transcatheter Microcoil Embolization in Patients with Active Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Small Bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Soo Teik

    2009-01-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes of the transcatheter microcoil embolization in patients with active lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding in the small bowel, as well as to compare the mortality rates between the two groups based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus determined by an angiography. We retrospectively evaluated all of the consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for treatment of acute LGI bleeding between January 2003 and October 2007. In total, the study included 36 patients who underwent a colonoscopy and were diagnosed to have an active bleeding in the LGI tracts. Based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus, determined by an angiography, the patients were classified into two groups. The clinical outcomes included technical success, clinical success (no rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (> 30 days), as well as the major and minor complication rates. Of the 36 patients, 17 had angiography-proven bleeding that was distal to the marginal artery. The remaining 19 patients did not have a bleeding focus based on the angiography results. The technical and clinical success rates of performing transcatheter microcoil embolizations in patients with active bleeding were 100% and 88%, respectively (15 of 17). One patient died from continued LGI bleeding and one patient received surgery to treat the continued bleeding. There was no note made on the delayed bleeding or on the major or minor complications. Of the 19 patients without active bleeding, 16 (84%) did not have recurrent bleeding. One patient died due to continuous bleeding and multi-organ failure. The superselective microcoil embolization can help successfully treat patients with active LGI bleeding in the small bowel, identified by the results of an angiography. The mortality rate is not significantly different between the patients of the visualization and non-visualization groups on angiography

  19. Recurrent Massive Epistaxis from an Anomalous Posterior Ethmoid Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, Marco Giuseppe; Mattioli, Francesco; Alberici, Maria Paola; Presutti, Livio

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man, with no previous history of epistaxis, was hospitalized at our facility for left recurrent posterior epistaxis. The patient underwent surgical treatment three times and only the operator’s experience and radiological support (cranial angiography) allowed us to control the epistaxis and stop the bleeding. The difficult bleeding management and control was attributed to an abnormal course of the left posterior ethmoidal artery. When bleeding seems to come from the roof of the ...

  20. Postoperative internal iliac artery embolisation as salvage therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative internal iliac artery embolisation as salvage therapy for ... of blood products. Damage control surgery was performed, and bleeding was ultimately only ... abdomen was packed with adrenalin-soaked swabs. Coagulation.

  1. Arterial Complications of Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Hermine, Claude; Ernst, Olivier; Delemazure, Olivier; Sergent, Geraldine

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the frequency and treatment of arterial complications due to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD).Materials: Lesions of the intrahepatic artery were encountered in 10 of 525 patients treated by PTBD (2%). Hemobilia followed in 9 patients and subcapsular hematoma in 1. Seven patients had a benign biliary stenosis and 3 had a malignant stenosis.Results: The bleeding resolved spontaneously in 3 patients. In 7 it required arterial embolization, which was successfully achieved either through the percutaneous catheter (n= 3) or by arteriography (n= 4).Conclusion: Arterial bleeding is a relatively rare complication of PTBD that can easily be treated by selective arterial embolization when it does not resolve spontaneously. In this series its frequency was much higher (16%) when the stenosis was benign than when it was malignant (0.6%)

  2. Aberrant Left Inferior Bronchial Artery Originating from the Left Gastric Artery in a Patient with Acute Massive Hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Sen; Sun, Xi-Wen; Yu, Dong; Jie, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Massive hemoptysis is a life-threatening condition, and the major source of bleeding in this condition is the bronchial circulation. Bronchial artery embolization is a safe and effective treatment for controlling hemoptysis. However, the sites of origin of the bronchial arteries (BAs) have numerous anatomical variations, which can result in a technical challenge to identify a bleeding artery. We present a rare case of a left inferior BA that originated from the left gastric artery in a patient with recurrent massive hemoptysis caused by bronchiectasis. The aberrant BA was embolized, and hemoptysis has been controlled for 8 months

  3. Aberrant Left Inferior Bronchial Artery Originating from the Left Gastric Artery in a Patient with Acute Massive Hemoptysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Sen, E-mail: jasfly77@vip.163.com; Sun, Xi-Wen, E-mail: xwsun@citiz.net; Yu, Dong, E-mail: yudong_mail@126.com; Jie, Bing, E-mail: jbshh@163.com [Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (China)

    2013-10-15

    Massive hemoptysis is a life-threatening condition, and the major source of bleeding in this condition is the bronchial circulation. Bronchial artery embolization is a safe and effective treatment for controlling hemoptysis. However, the sites of origin of the bronchial arteries (BAs) have numerous anatomical variations, which can result in a technical challenge to identify a bleeding artery. We present a rare case of a left inferior BA that originated from the left gastric artery in a patient with recurrent massive hemoptysis caused by bronchiectasis. The aberrant BA was embolized, and hemoptysis has been controlled for 8 months.

  4. Emergency Backwards Whipple for Bleeding: Formidable and Definitive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Lupascu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. During the past decades, the safety of pancreatoduodenectomy has improved, with low mortality and reduced morbidity, particularly in centers with extensive experience. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy is an uncommon event, for treatment of pancreaticoduodenal trauma, bleeding, or perforation. We herein present a single center experience concerning nontrauma emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreaticoduodenal bleeding. Methods. From January 2007 to December 2015, from a population of 134 PD (70 males and 64 females, mean age 62.2, range 34–82, 5 patients (3.7%; 2 males and 3 females, mean age 64, range 57–70 underwent one-stage emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for uncontrollable nontrauma pancreaticoduodenal bleeding in our tertiary center. Results. All the 5 patients underwent a backwards Whipple with a morbidity of 60% and a mortality of 20% (1/5. The other 4 patients were recovered and discharged with a median postoperative length of stay of 17 days (range 14–23. Conclusion. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy is a definitive life-saving procedure allowing for a rapid control of bleeding when other less invasive approaches (transcatheter arterial embolization or interventional endoscopy are exhausted, unavailable, or unsafe. It should be particularly considered in neoplastic disease and tailored by surgeons with a high level of experience in pancreatic surgery.

  5. Embolotherapy using N-butyl cyanoacrylate for abdominal wall bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Cha, Joo Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    We describe our experience with the use of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of abdominal wall bleeding and we evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Embolization was performed in nine patients with abdominal wall bleeding. The sites of embolization were the left first lumbar (n = 1), left second lumbar (n = 1), right inferior epigastric (n 2), left inferior epigastric (n = 3), right circumflex iliac (n = 1), and left circumflex iliac artery (n = 1). A coil was used with NBCA in one patient due to difficulty in selecting only a bleeding focus and anticipated reflux. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:4. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the embolization procedure, and the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Hemostasis was obtained in six out of the nine patients and technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Four out of the nine patients died due to rebleeding of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hepatic failure (n =2) that occurred two to nine days after the embolization procedure. One patient had rebleeding. The five surviving patients had no rebleeding, and the patients continue to visit the clinical on an outpatient basis. NBCA embolization is a clinically safe procedure and is effective for abdominal wall bleeding.

  6. Emergency Backwards Whipple for Bleeding: Formidable and Definitive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupascu, Cristian; Trofin, Ana; Zabara, Mihai; Vornicu, Alexandra; Cadar, Ramona; Vlad, Nutu; Apopei, Oana; Grigorean, Valentin; Lupascu-Ursulescu, Corina

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, the safety of pancreatoduodenectomy has improved, with low mortality and reduced morbidity, particularly in centers with extensive experience. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy is an uncommon event, for treatment of pancreaticoduodenal trauma, bleeding, or perforation. We herein present a single center experience concerning nontrauma emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreaticoduodenal bleeding. From January 2007 to December 2015, from a population of 134 PD (70 males and 64 females, mean age 62.2, range 34-82), 5 patients (3.7%; 2 males and 3 females, mean age 64, range 57-70) underwent one-stage emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for uncontrollable nontrauma pancreaticoduodenal bleeding in our tertiary center. All the 5 patients underwent a backwards Whipple with a morbidity of 60% and a mortality of 20% (1/5). The other 4 patients were recovered and discharged with a median postoperative length of stay of 17 days (range 14-23). Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy is a definitive life-saving procedure allowing for a rapid control of bleeding when other less invasive approaches (transcatheter arterial embolization or interventional endoscopy) are exhausted, unavailable, or unsafe. It should be particularly considered in neoplastic disease and tailored by surgeons with a high level of experience in pancreatic surgery.

  7. Embolotherapy using N-butyl cyanoacrylate for abdominal wall bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Ho; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Cha, Joo Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Chi Sung

    2008-01-01

    We describe our experience with the use of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of abdominal wall bleeding and we evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Embolization was performed in nine patients with abdominal wall bleeding. The sites of embolization were the left first lumbar (n = 1), left second lumbar (n = 1), right inferior epigastric (n 2), left inferior epigastric (n = 3), right circumflex iliac (n = 1), and left circumflex iliac artery (n = 1). A coil was used with NBCA in one patient due to difficulty in selecting only a bleeding focus and anticipated reflux. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:4. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the embolization procedure, and the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Hemostasis was obtained in six out of the nine patients and technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Four out of the nine patients died due to rebleeding of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hepatic failure (n =2) that occurred two to nine days after the embolization procedure. One patient had rebleeding. The five surviving patients had no rebleeding, and the patients continue to visit the clinical on an outpatient basis. NBCA embolization is a clinically safe procedure and is effective for abdominal wall bleeding

  8. Bleeding diathesis in Noonan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudt, Joost M.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.; Peters, Marjolijn; Melis, Paris

    2005-01-01

    An 18-year-old girl with Noonan syndrome was operated on for prominent ears. Subcutaneous haematomas developed on both sides, and coagulation tests reported a bleeding diathesis. This is seldom mentioned in descriptions of the syndrome, but it has been shown that one-third of all patients with the

  9. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  10. Radiological diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Gross-Fengels, W.; Lorenz, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopy holds the first place today. Radiological investigations are indispensable whenever endoscopy cannot precisely localise the bleeding site, whenever a tumour is present or suspected, in all cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and in haemobilia. A tailored radiological approach is recommended. The radiological basis programme should be at least a complete abdominal ultrasound study and plain abdominal radiograms. CT and ERCP scans may become necessary in selected cases. As a rule, angiographical localisation of the bleeding site will be successful only in the acute stage; selective visceral arteriograms have to be obtained, which may be executed in the digital subtraction technique in patients who are cooperating and clinically stable. Angiodysplasias and aneurysms, however, may be demonstrated angiographically in the interval as well. Upper and/or lower G.I. tract studies with barium or water-soluble contrast media may be indicated in the interval in order to demonstrate tumours, metastatic lesions, diverticula and gut malformations. (orig.) [de

  11. Recurrent Massive Epistaxis from an Anomalous Posterior Ethmoid Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Marco Giuseppe; Mattioli, Francesco; Alberici, Maria Paola; Presutti, Livio

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man, with no previous history of epistaxis, was hospitalized at our facility for left recurrent posterior epistaxis. The patient underwent surgical treatment three times and only the operator's experience and radiological support (cranial angiography) allowed us to control the epistaxis and stop the bleeding. The difficult bleeding management and control was attributed to an abnormal course of the left posterior ethmoidal artery. When bleeding seems to come from the roof of the nasal cavity, it is important to identify the ethmoid arteries always bearing in mind the possible existence of anomalous courses.

  12. Recurrent Massive Epistaxis from an Anomalous Posterior Ethmoid Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Giuseppe Greco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old man, with no previous history of epistaxis, was hospitalized at our facility for left recurrent posterior epistaxis. The patient underwent surgical treatment three times and only the operator’s experience and radiological support (cranial angiography allowed us to control the epistaxis and stop the bleeding. The difficult bleeding management and control was attributed to an abnormal course of the left posterior ethmoidal artery. When bleeding seems to come from the roof of the nasal cavity, it is important to identify the ethmoid arteries always bearing in mind the possible existence of anomalous courses.

  13. Transarterial embolization for the treatment of massive bleeding in gynecologic and obstetric emergencies: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongsakul, Keerati; Songjamrat, Apiradee; Rookkapan, Sorracha

    2014-08-01

    Delayed treatment of the massive bleeding in gynecologic and obstetric conditions can cause high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to assess the angiographic findings and outcomes of transarterial embolization in cases of massive hemorrhage from underlying gynecological and obstetrical conditions. This is a retrospective study of 18 consecutive patients who underwent transarterial embolization of uterine and/or hypogastric arteries due to massive bleeding from gynecological and obstetrical causes from January 2006 to December 2011. The underlying causes of bleeding, angiographic findings, technical success rates, clinical success rates, and complications were evaluated. Massive gynecological and obstetrical bleeding occurred in 12 cases and 6 cases, respectively. Gestational trophoblastic disease was the most common cause of gynecological bleeding. The most common cause of obstetrical hemorrhage was primary post-partum hemorrhage. Tumor stain was the most frequent angiographic finding (11 cases) in the gynecological bleeding group. The most common angiographic findings in obstetrical patients were extravasation (2 cases) and pseudoaneurysm (2 cases). Technical and final clinical success rates were found in all 18 cases and 16 cases. Collateral arterial supply, severe metritis, and unidentified cervical laceration were causes of uncontrolled bleeding. Only minor complications occurred, which included pelvic pain and groin hematoma. Percutaneous transarterial embolization is a highly effective and safe treatment to control massive bleeding in gynecologic and obstetric emergencies.

  14. Aberrant overian artery originating from the Ilolumbar artery: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jae Myeong [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Here, we report a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with primary postpartum hemorrhage due to uterine atony. She received uterine artery embolization (UAE). During left internal iliac arteriography, an aberrant left ovarian artery originating from the left iliolumbar artery was visualized. The aberrant left ovarian artery was connected to the left uterine artery via prominent collateral vessels. It supplied a significant amount of blood to the fundus of the uterus. Bilateral hypertrophied uterine arteries were embolized very carefully so that the embolic material did not reflux into the aberrant left ovarian artery. After the procedure, her vaginal bleeding was successfully controlled. Accurate understanding of anatomical variations of the ovarian artery is essential to avoid failure in controlling postpartum hemorrhage with UAE.

  15. Aberrant overian artery originating from the Ilolumbar artery: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jae Myeong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with primary postpartum hemorrhage due to uterine atony. She received uterine artery embolization (UAE). During left internal iliac arteriography, an aberrant left ovarian artery originating from the left iliolumbar artery was visualized. The aberrant left ovarian artery was connected to the left uterine artery via prominent collateral vessels. It supplied a significant amount of blood to the fundus of the uterus. Bilateral hypertrophied uterine arteries were embolized very carefully so that the embolic material did not reflux into the aberrant left ovarian artery. After the procedure, her vaginal bleeding was successfully controlled. Accurate understanding of anatomical variations of the ovarian artery is essential to avoid failure in controlling postpartum hemorrhage with UAE

  16. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Bleeding Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Bleeding Problems “My nurse said that chemotherapy could make ... with a clean cloth. Keep pressing until the bleeding stops. If you bruise: Put ice on the ...

  17. Postpolypectomy lower GI bleeding: descriptive analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorbi, D.; Norton, I.; Conio, M.; Balm, R.; Zinsmeister, A.; Gostout, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postpolypectomy hemorrhage may warrant intensive care monitoring, transfusions, and surgery. We sought factors predicting significant bleeding requiring blood transfusion and the benefits of critical care monitoring. METHODS: Patients with postpolypectomy bleeding between April 1989 and

  18. Endoscopic Injection Therapy in Bleeding Peptic Ulcers. Low Mortality in a High Risk Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaqulm Balanzó

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscoric injection therapy was performed in 341 patients consecutively admitted with a bleeding peptic ulcer at high risk of further hemorrhage, assessed by the presence of active arterial bleeding or a nonbleeding visible vessel at emergency endoscopy. Initial hemostasis was achieved in 111 of 119 actively bleeding patients (93%. Rebleeding ocurred in 75 cases (23%, at a mean interval of 53±52 h. A second emergency injection was a ttempted in 36 therapeutic failures, and was successful in 20 (55%. Emergency surgery was finally required in 52 patients (15%. Overall mortality was 4.9%. Major complications occurred in four patients (1.2% (two perforations and two aspiration pneumonia; therefore, injection therapy is an effective and simple method for treating bleeding ulcers, achieving the initial control of hemorrhage in a majority of cases although the rate of further hemorrhage is not negligible and complications are not irrelevant.

  19. Development of optimal management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to pancreatic sinistral portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of pancreatic sinistral portal hypertension (PSPH is quite different from that of cirrhotic portal hypertension, and PSPH is the only curable type of portal hypertension. Gastric variceal bleeding is a less common manifestation of PSPH; however, it probably exacerbates the patient’s condition and leads to critical illness, and inappropriate management would result in death. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the optimal management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in PSPH patients. Splenectomy is considered as a definitive procedure, together with surgical procedures to treat underlying pancreatic diseases. For patients in poor conditions or ineligible for surgery, splenic artery coil embolization is a preferable and effective method to stop bleeding before second-stage operation. The therapeutic decision should be made individually, and the further multi-center study to optimize the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from PSPH is warranted.

  20. Caliber-Persistent Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Araújo Pinho Costa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Caliber-persistent artery (CPLA of the lip is a common vascular anomaly in which a main arterial branch extends to the surface of the mucous tissue with no reduction in its diameter. It usually manifests as pulsatile papule, is easily misdiagnosed, and is observed more frequently among older people, suggesting that its development may involve a degenerative process associated with aging; CPLA is also characterized by the loss of tone of the adjacent supporting connective tissue. Although the diagnosis is clinical, high-resolution Doppler ultrasound is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating the lesion. This report describes the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of a lesion of the lower lip with bleeding and recurrent ulceration. The patient was successfully treated in our hospital after a diagnosis of CPLA and is currently undergoing a clinical outpatient follow-up with no complaints.

  1. Sphenopalatine artery ligation: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothier, David D; Mackeith, Samuel; Youngs, Robin

    2005-10-01

    Epistaxis is a common problem. Most patients presenting to hospital will stop bleeding with simple first-aid measures or with nasal packing. Those who do not stop will usually require surgical management. For persistent posterior epistaxis, the sphenopalatine artery may be ligated as the artery leaves the sphenopalatine foramen to enter the nasal mucosa of the lateral wall of the nose. This may be performed endoscopically. We describe the anatomy of the area and the surgical technique. We also present a brief review of the literature on this technique.

  2. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: the Usefulness of Rotational Angiography after Endoscopic Marking with a Metallic Clip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Soo; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    We wanted to assess the usefulness of rotational angiography after endoscopic marking with a metallic clip in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients with no extravasation of contrast medium on conventional angiography. In 16 patients (mean age, 59.4 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (13 gastric ulcers, 2 duodenal ulcers, 1 malignant ulcer), a metallic clip was placed via gastroscopy and this had been preceded by routine endoscopic treatment. The metallic clip was placed in the fibrous edge of the ulcer adjacent to the bleeding point. All patients had negative results from their angiographic studies. To localize the bleeding focus, rotational angiography and high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip were used. Of the 16 patients, seven (44%) had positive results after high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip and they underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with microcoils. Nine patients without extravasation of contrast medium underwent TAE with microcoils as close as possible to the clip. The bleeding was stopped initially in all patients after treatment of the feeding artery. Two patients experienced a repeat episode of bleeding two days later. Of the two patients, one had subtle oozing from the ulcer margin and that patient underwent endoscopic treatment. One patient with malignant ulcer died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation one month after embolization. Complete clinical success was achieved in 14 of 16 (88%) patients. Delayed bleeding or major/minor complications were not noted. Rotational angiography after marking with a metallic clip helps to localize accurately the bleeding focus and thus to embolize the vessel correctly.

  3. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: the Usefulness of Rotational Angiography after Endoscopic Marking with a Metallic Clip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji Soo; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to assess the usefulness of rotational angiography after endoscopic marking with a metallic clip in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients with no extravasation of contrast medium on conventional angiography. In 16 patients (mean age, 59.4 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (13 gastric ulcers, 2 duodenal ulcers, 1 malignant ulcer), a metallic clip was placed via gastroscopy and this had been preceded by routine endoscopic treatment. The metallic clip was placed in the fibrous edge of the ulcer adjacent to the bleeding point. All patients had negative results from their angiographic studies. To localize the bleeding focus, rotational angiography and high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip were used. Of the 16 patients, seven (44%) had positive results after high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip and they underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with microcoils. Nine patients without extravasation of contrast medium underwent TAE with microcoils as close as possible to the clip. The bleeding was stopped initially in all patients after treatment of the feeding artery. Two patients experienced a repeat episode of bleeding two days later. Of the two patients, one had subtle oozing from the ulcer margin and that patient underwent endoscopic treatment. One patient with malignant ulcer died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation one month after embolization. Complete clinical success was achieved in 14 of 16 (88%) patients. Delayed bleeding or major/minor complications were not noted. Rotational angiography after marking with a metallic clip helps to localize accurately the bleeding focus and thus to embolize the vessel correctly.

  4. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved by the D......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......) again as soon as cardiovascular risks outweigh gastrointestinal risks. Patients in need of continued treatment with ASA or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug should be put on prophylactic treatment with PPI at standard dosage. The combination of 75mg ASA and PPI should be preferred to monotherapy...

  5. Fatal Peritoneal Bleeding Following Embolization of a Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usinskiene, Jurgita; Mazighi, Mikael; Bisdorff, Annouk; Houdart, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old woman treated for a spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula in a context of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. Embolization with a transvenous approach was achieved without complications; however, the patient died 72 hr later of massive intraperitoneal bleeding. At autopsy, no lesion of the digestive arteries was identified. Possible causes of this bleeding are discussed

  6. Intractable epistaxis: which arteries are responsible? An angiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bonnecaze, Guillaume; Gallois, Y; Chaynes, P; Bonneville, F; Dupret-Bories, A; Chantalat, E; Serrano, E

    2017-11-01

    Epistaxis constitutes a significant proportion of the Otolaryngologist's emergency workload. Optimal management differs in relation to the anatomic origin of the bleeding. The outcome of our study was to determine which artery(ies) could be considered as the cause of severe bleeding in the context of severe epistaxis. Fifty-five procedures of embolization preceded by angiography were reviewed. Medical records of interventionally treated patients were analysed for demographics, medical history, risk factors and clinical data. Angiographic findings were also assessed for active contrast extravasation (blush), vascular abnormality and embolised artery. Previous angiography showed an active contrast extravasation in only 20 procedures. The most common bleeding source was the sphenopalatine artery (SPA) followed by anterior ethmoïdal artery (AEA) and facial artery. Majority of multiple or bilateral extravasations occured in patients with systemic factors. A better understanding of the potential bleeding source might help and limit the risk of treatment failures. Our study confirms that the SPA is the most common cause of severe bleeding. We also emphasise the role of the AEA not only in traumatic context. Others arteries are rarely involved except in patients with comorbidities or frequent recurrences.

  7. Automated registration of tail bleeding in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter B; Henriksen, Lars; Andresen, Per R; Lauritzen, Brian; Jensen, Kåre L; Juhl, Trine N; Tranholm, Mikael

    2008-05-01

    An automated system for registration of tail bleeding in rats using a camera and a user-designed PC-based software program has been developed. The live and processed images are displayed on the screen and are exported together with a text file for later statistical processing of the data allowing calculation of e.g. number of bleeding episodes, bleeding times and bleeding areas. Proof-of-principle was achieved when the camera captured the blood stream after infusion of rat whole blood into saline. Suitability was assessed by recording of bleeding profiles in heparin-treated rats, demonstrating that the system was able to capture on/off bleedings and that the data transfer and analysis were conducted successfully. Then, bleeding profiles were visually recorded by two independent observers simultaneously with the automated recordings after tail transection in untreated rats. Linear relationships were found in the number of bleedings, demonstrating, however, a statistically significant difference in the recording of bleeding episodes between observers. Also, the bleeding time was longer for visual compared to automated recording. No correlation was found between blood loss and bleeding time in untreated rats, but in heparinized rats a correlation was suggested. Finally, the blood loss correlated with the automated recording of bleeding area. In conclusion, the automated system has proven suitable for replacing visual recordings of tail bleedings in rats. Inter-observer differences can be eliminated, monotonous repetitive work avoided, and a higher through-put of animals in less time achieved. The automated system will lead to an increased understanding of the nature of bleeding following tail transection in different rodent models.

  8. [Antithrombotic therapy and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanová, Veronika; Gřiva, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is about 85-108/100,000 inhabitants per year, nonvariceal bleeding accounts for 80-90%. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation treatment are the significant risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To evaluate the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the general community of patients in a county hospital. And to compare the role played by antiplatelet and anticoagulation drugs and other risk medication. Retrospective analysis of patients over 18 years of age who underwent endoscopy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia (haemoglobinupper gastrointestinal tract during a hospital stay in 2013 (from January to June). We included 111 patients of average age 69±15 years, men 60%. Nonvariceal bleeding accounted for 90% of the cases. None of the patients with variceal bleeding (10% of patients) took antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy. There were 100 patients with nonvariceal bleeding of average age 70±15, 61% men. With the symptoms of acute bleeding (hematemesis, melena) presented in 73% of patients. The most frequent cause of bleeding was gastric and duodenal ulcer (54%). 32% of patients with nonvariceal bleeding had antiplatelets, 19% anticoagulants and 10% used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or corticosteroids. 30-days mortality of patients with nonvariceal bleeding was 11%, annual mortality was 23%. There was no significant difference in mortality, blood transfusion requirements or surgical intervention between the patients with antithrombotic agents and without them. 25% of patients (8 patients) using acetylsalicylic acid did not fulfil the indication for this treatment. Among the patients examined by endoscopy for symptomatic nonvariceal bleeding and/or anaemia (haemoglobingastrointestinal bleeding. With regard to that, it is alarming, that there still exists a nonnegligible percentage of patients taking acetylsalicylic acid even

  9. Uterine artery embolisation for uterine leiomyomas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presenting symptoms were menorrhagia, dysmenorrhoea, pressure symptoms and intermenstrual bleeding. Three women were treated for primary infertility. Uterine artery sub-selection and embolisation was successful in all patients. Complications included low-grade pyrexia (3/36, 8.3%) and readmission (1/36, 2.8%).

  10. Von Willebrand disease protects against arterial thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Y.V.; Eikenboom, J.C.; De Wee, E.M.; Van Der Bom, J.G.; Cnossen, M.H.; Degenaar-Dujardin, M.E.; Fijnvandraat, K.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Laros-Van Gorkum, B.A.; Meijer, K.; Mauser -Bunschoten, E.P.; Leebee k, F.W.

    Background and Aims: Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is caused by reduced levels of or dysfunctional von Willebrand factor (VWF) and is characterized by a bleeding tendency. It is well known that individuals with high VWF levels have a higher risk for arterial thrombosis. Although it has never been

  11. CORRELATION BETWEEN UTERINE ARTERY FLOW VELOCITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CORRELATION BETWEEN UTERINE ARTERY FLOW VELOCITY WAVEFORMS AND ENDOMETRIAL HISTOPATHOLOGY IN WOMEN WITH PERIMENOPAUSAL AND POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING. Dr. Ebtesam Saied, Dr. Ismail El Garhy(MD), Dr. Farid I. Hassan(MD), Dr. Adel-Gamil Abd-Allah, Abd El Shafy Ibrahim ...

  12. Evaluation of dual-phase multi-detector-row CT for detection of intestinal bleeding using an experimental bowel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobritz, Martin; Engels, Heinz-Peter; Wieder, Hinrich; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Stollfuss, Jens C.; Schneider, Armin; Feussner, Hubertus

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate dual-phase multi-detector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in the detection of intestinal bleeding using an experimental bowel model and varying bleeding velocities. The model consisted of a high pressure injector tube with a single perforation (1 mm) placed in 10-m-long small bowel of a pig. The bowel was filled with water/contrast solution of 30-40 HU and was incorporated in a phantom model containing vegetable oil to simulate mesenteric fat. Intestinal bleeding in different locations and bleeding velocities varying from zero to 1 ml/min (0.05 ml/min increments, constant bleeding duration of 20 s) was simulated. Nineteen complete datasets in arterial and portal-venous phase using increasing bleeding velocities, and seven negative controls were measured using a 64 MDCT (3-mm slice thickness, 1.5-mm reconstruction increment). Three radiologists blinded to the experimental settings evaluated the datasets in a random order. The likelihood for intestinal bleeding was assessed using a 5-point scale with subsequent ROC analysis. The sensitivity to detect bleeding was 0.44 for a bleeding velocity of 0.10-0.50 ml/min and 0.97 for 0.55-1.00 ml/min. The specificity was 1.00. The area under the curve was calculated to be 0.73, 0.88 and 0.89 for reader 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Dual-phase MDCT provides high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of intestinal bleeding with bleeding velocities of 0.5-1.0 ml/min. Therefore, MDCT should be considered as a primary diagnostic technique in the management of patients with suspected intestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  13. Permanent Cortical Blindness After Bronchial Artery Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorn, Colette S. van, E-mail: cvandoorn@gmail.com; De Boo, Diederick W., E-mail: d.w.deboo@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Weersink, Els J. M., E-mail: e.j.m.weersink@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van, E-mail: o.m.vandelden@amc.uva.nl; Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl; Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  14. Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/pubmed/24641269 . Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 52. ...

  15. Gastric ulcer bleeding: diagnosis by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voloudaki, Argyro; Tsagaraki, Kaliopi; Mouzas, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nickolas

    1999-06-01

    A case of CT demonstration of a bleeding gastric ulcer is presented, in a patient with confusing clinical manifestations. Abdominal CT was performed without oral contrast medium administration, and showed extravasation of intravenous contrast into a gastric lumen distended with material of mixed attenuation. It is postulated that if radiopaque oral contrast had been given, peptic ulcer bleeding would probably have been masked. CT demonstration of gastric ulcer bleeding, may be of value in cases of differential diagnostic dilemmas.

  16. Gastric ulcer bleeding: diagnosis by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloudaki, Argyro; Tsagaraki, Kaliopi; Mouzas, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nickolas

    1999-01-01

    A case of CT demonstration of a bleeding gastric ulcer is presented, in a patient with confusing clinical manifestations. Abdominal CT was performed without oral contrast medium administration, and showed extravasation of intravenous contrast into a gastric lumen distended with material of mixed attenuation. It is postulated that if radiopaque oral contrast had been given, peptic ulcer bleeding would probably have been masked. CT demonstration of gastric ulcer bleeding, may be of value in cases of differential diagnostic dilemmas

  17. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Usefulness of angiographic embolization endoscopic metallic clip placement in patient with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Min Jae; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Kim, Ho Jun; Cho, Young Jun; Bae, Seok Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok; Ohm, Joon Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chae Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Pusan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of angiographic embolization after endoscopic metallic clip placement around the edge of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding ulcers. We have chosen 41 patients (mean age, 65.2 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (22 gastric ulcers, 16 duodenal ulcers, 3 malignant ulcers) between January 2010 and December 2012. We inserted metallic clips during the routine endoscopic treatments of the bleeding ulcers. Subsequent transcatheter arterial embolization was performed within 2 hours. We analyzed the angiographic positive rates, angiographic success rates and clinical success rates. Among the 41 patients during the angiography, 19 patients (46%) demonstrated active bleeding points. Both groups underwent embolization using microcoils, N-butyl-cyano-acrylate (NBCA), microcoils with NBCA or gelfoam particle. There are no statistically significant differences between these two groups according to which embolic materials are being used. The bleeding was initially stopped in all patients, except the two who experienced technical failures. Seven patients experienced repeated episodes of bleeding within two weeks. Among them, 4 patients were successful re-embolized. Another 3 patients underwent gastrectomy. Overall, clinical success was achieved in 36 of 41 (87.8%) patients. The endoscopic metallic clip placement was helpful to locate the correct target vessels for the angiographic embolization. In conclusion, this technique reduced re-bleeding rates, especially in patients who do not show active bleeding points.

  19. Usefulness of angiographic embolization endoscopic metallic clip placement in patient with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Min Jae; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Kim, Ho Jun; Cho, Young Jun; Bae, Seok Hwan; Shin, Byung Seok; Ohm, Joon Young; Kang, Chae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of angiographic embolization after endoscopic metallic clip placement around the edge of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding ulcers. We have chosen 41 patients (mean age, 65.2 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (22 gastric ulcers, 16 duodenal ulcers, 3 malignant ulcers) between January 2010 and December 2012. We inserted metallic clips during the routine endoscopic treatments of the bleeding ulcers. Subsequent transcatheter arterial embolization was performed within 2 hours. We analyzed the angiographic positive rates, angiographic success rates and clinical success rates. Among the 41 patients during the angiography, 19 patients (46%) demonstrated active bleeding points. Both groups underwent embolization using microcoils, N-butyl-cyano-acrylate (NBCA), microcoils with NBCA or gelfoam particle. There are no statistically significant differences between these two groups according to which embolic materials are being used. The bleeding was initially stopped in all patients, except the two who experienced technical failures. Seven patients experienced repeated episodes of bleeding within two weeks. Among them, 4 patients were successful re-embolized. Another 3 patients underwent gastrectomy. Overall, clinical success was achieved in 36 of 41 (87.8%) patients. The endoscopic metallic clip placement was helpful to locate the correct target vessels for the angiographic embolization. In conclusion, this technique reduced re-bleeding rates, especially in patients who do not show active bleeding points.

  20. Management of acute gastric varices bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Jung Chang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal varices bleeding is a major complication in patients with cirrhosis. Gastric varices (GVs occur in approximately 20% of patients with portal hypertension. However, GV bleeding develops in only 25% of patients with GV and requires more transfusion and has higher mortality than esophageal variceal (EV bleeding. The best strategy for managing acute GV bleeding is similar to that of acute EV bleeding, which involves airway protection, hemodynamic stabilization, and intensive care. Blood transfusion should be cautiously administered in order to avoid rebleeding. Vasoactive agents such as terlipressin or somatostatin should be used when GV bleeding is suspected. Routine use of prophylactic antibiotics reduces bacterial infection and lowers rebleeding rates. By administering endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection, the initial hemostasis rate achieved is at least 90% in most cases; the average mortality rate of GV bleeding is approximately 10–30% and the rebleeding rate is between 22% and 37%. Although endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate is superior to sclerotherapy and band ligation, and has remained the treatment of choice for treating acute GV bleeding, the outcome of this treatment is still unsatisfactory. New treatment options, such as thrombin injection, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, or balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration, have shown promising results for acute GV bleeding. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to compare the efficacy of these therapies with cyanoacrylate.

  1. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value

  2. Minor Bleeds Alert for Subsequent Major Bleeding in Patients Using Vitamin K Antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Veeger , Nic J.G.M.; Piersma-Wichers , Margriet; Meijer , Karina; Hillege , Hans L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) have shown to be effective in primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolism, but the associated risk of bleeding is an important limitation. The majority of the bleeds are clinically mild. In this study, we assessed whether these minor bleeds are associated with major bleeding, when controlling for other important risk indicators, including the achieved quality of anticoagulation. For this, 5898 patients of a specialised anticoagulation cl...

  3. Menstrual Patterns and Treatment of Heavy Menstrual Bleeding in Adolescents with Bleeding Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlut-McElroy, Tazim; Williams, Karen B; Carpenter, Shannon L; Strickland, Julie L

    2015-12-01

    To characterize menstrual bleeding patterns and treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding in adolescents with bleeding disorders. We conducted a retrospective review of female patients aged nine to 21 years with known bleeding disorders who attended a pediatric gynecology, hematology, and comprehensive hematology/gynecology clinic at a children's hospital in a metropolitan area. Prevalence of heavy menstrual bleeding at menarche, prolonged menses, and irregular menses among girls with bleeding disorders and patterns of initial and subsequent treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding in girls with bleeding disorders. Of 115 participants aged nine to 21 years with known bleeding disorders, 102 were included in the final analysis. Of the 69 postmenarcheal girls, almost half (32/69, 46.4%) noted heavy menstrual bleeding at menarche. Girls with von Willebrand disease were more likely to have menses lasting longer than seven days. Only 28% of girls had discussed a treatment plan for heavy menstrual bleeding before menarche. Hormonal therapy was most commonly used as initial treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding. Half (53%) of the girls failed initial treatment. Combination (hormonal and non-hormonal therapy) was more frequently used for subsequent treatment. Adolescents with bleeding disorders are at risk of heavy bleeding at and after menarche. Consultation with a pediatric gynecologist and/or hematologist prior to menarche may be helpful to outline abnormal patterns of menstrual bleeding and to discuss options of treatment in the event of heavy menstrual bleeding. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Bhinder, Nimarta; Kim, David H; Holly, Brian P; Johnson, Pamela T; Hanley, Michael; Carucci, Laura R; Cash, Brooks D; Chandra, Ankur; Gage, Kenneth L; Lambert, Drew L; Levy, Angela D; Oliva, Isabel B; Peterson, Christine M; Strax, Richard; Rybicki, Frank J; Dill, Karin E

    2017-05-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality with mortality rates as high as 14%. This document addresses the indications for imaging UGIB that is nonvariceal and unrelated to portal hypertension. The four variants are derived with respect to upper endoscopy. For the first three, it is presumed that upper endoscopy has been performed, with three potential initial outcomes: endoscopy reveals arterial bleeding source, endoscopy confirms UGIB without a clear source, and negative endoscopy. The fourth variant, "postsurgical and traumatic causes of UGIB; endoscopy contraindicated" is considered separately because upper endoscopy is not performed. When endoscopy identifies the presence and location of bleeding but bleeding cannot be controlled endoscopically, catheter-based arteriography with treatment is an appropriate next study. CT angiography (CTA) is comparable with angiography as a diagnostic next step. If endoscopy demonstrates a bleed but the endoscopist cannot identify the bleeding source, angiography or CTA can be typically performed and both are considered appropriate. In the event of an obscure UGIB, angiography and CTA have been shown to be equivalent in identifying the bleeding source; CT enterography may be an alternative to CTA to find an intermittent bleeding source. In the postoperative or traumatic setting when endoscopy is contraindicated, primary angiography, CTA, and CT with intravenous contrast are considered appropriate. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to

  5. Fatal Intraventricular Hemorrhage After the Extracranial Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stent Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajickova, Dagmar; Krajina, Antonin; Nova, Marketa; Raupach, Jan

    2005-01-01

    We report on a 72-year-old female with an unusual intracranial bleeding complication after an extracranial carotid artery stenting procedure performed for a tight left ICA stenosis associated with contralateral carotid occlusion. Two hours after the procedure, the initial signs of intracranial bleeding appeared that led to the patient's demise 5 days later. A brain CT showed and autopsy proved massive intraventricular bleeding. To our knowledge, our case is only the second report of isolated reperfusion intraventricular hemorrhage post-CAS

  6. Duodenal application of Li+ in a submaximal therapeutic dose inhibits exocrine pancreatic secretion and modulates gastro-duodenal myoelectrical activity in a conscious pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naughton, Violetta; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Naughton, Patrick Joseph

    2013-01-01

    for electromyography of smooth muscles, and with a pancreatic duct catheter and a duodenal T-cannula for collection and re-entrant flow of pancreatic juice. After the recovery period, on alternative days, each animal was tested once with an intraduodenal infusion of Li+ (100 mmol·L–1 C3H5LiO3, 10 mL·kg−1·h−1) for 1 h...

  7. A comparative study on the effects of domperidone, metoclopramide, clebopride and trimebutine on the gastro-duodenal preparation of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurkes, J A; Helsen, L F; Van Nueten, J M

    1985-10-01

    Domperidone (dopamine antagonist), metoclopramide and clebopride (both dopamine antagonists and stimulators of the intramural cholinergic system), and trimebutine (spasmolytic) are used in the treatment of digestive disorders such as dyspepsia or gastritis. Our aim was to compare the effects of these compounds on the isolated intact gastroduodenal preparation of the guinea pig. Domperidone (IC50 = 10(-6) M), clebopride (10(-5) M) and metoclopramide (2 X 10(-5) M) antagonized gastric relaxations induced by dopamine. In contrast with clebopride, domperidone and metoclopramide enhanced the amplitude of gastric contractions, moderately reduced contractile frequency, and enhanced antroduodenal coordination in a dose-dependent manner (EC50 for domperidone 3 X 10(-7) M, for metoclopramide 2 X 10(-5) M). Trimebutine reduced gastric spontaneous activity and antroduodenal coordination. Trimebutine had a direct relaxatory effect on gastric tone (EC50 = 4 X 10(-6) M). The mechanism of this inhibitory effect remains unknown but our data indicate that it is not mediated via dopamine or opiate receptor subtypes. domperidone, clebopride, metoclopramide and trimebutine exert distinct and diverse effects on the motility parameters of the gastroduodenal preparation of the guinea pig. These diverging actions may help explain the differences in patients' responsiveness to the treatment of digestive disorders such as dyspepsia or gastritis.

  8. Severe hyponatraemia after terlipressin treatment in the patient with surgically untreatable bleeding into gastrointestinal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtko, M.; Smolar, M.; Laca, L.; Danova, I.; Strelka, L.; Hulo, E.; Mikolajcik, A.; Kicina, R.; Laca, L.; Zelenak, K.

    2014-01-01

    The authors present the case report of a 46 year old woman. In personal history, she was operated for congenital duodenal stenosis at the age 2 days, later reoperated due to restenosis. The patient had congenital vascular malformations of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and was recurrently hospitalized for recidivous bleeding into GIT with concurrent development of portal hypertension. In 2012 she was admitted to our department because of relapsing bleeding into GIT which was impossible surgically treated so the patient was treated conservatively. In the course of terlipressin use, sharp decline of natremia developed with subsequent altered consciousness with CT verified brain edema. Further management included discontinuation of terlipressin, slow correction of hyponatraemia, embolization of arterial lienalis, hemosubstitution and recombinant factor VIIa. This treatment led to stop bleeding and improvement of state of consciousness however mild form of organic psycho syndrome persists. (author)

  9. Pelvic Arterial Embolisation in a Trauma Patient with a Pre-Existing Aortobifemoral Graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulaban, Osama; Hopkins, Jonathan; Willis, Andrew P.; Jones, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Pelvic fractures secondary to blunt trauma are associated with a significant mortality rate due to uncontrolled bleeding. Interventional radiology (IR) can play an important and central role in the management of such patients, offering definitive minimally invasive therapy and avoiding the need for high-risk surgery. Rapid access to whole-body computed tomography has been shown to improve survival in polytrauma patients and allows rapid diagnosis of vascular injury and assessment of suitability for endovascular therapy. IR can then target and treat the specific area of bleeding. Embolisation of bleeding pelvic arteries has been shown to be highly effective and should be the treatment of choice in this situation. The branches of the internal iliac artery (IIA) are usually involved, and these arteries are accessed by way of IIA catheterisation after abdominal aortography. Occasionally these arteries cannot be accessed by way of this conventional route because of recent IIA ligation carried out surgically in an attempt to stop the bleeding or because (in the rare situation we describe here) these vessels are excluded secondary to previous aortoiliac repair. In this situation, knowledge of pelvic arterial collateral artery pathways is important because these will continue to supply pelvic structures whilst making access to deep pelvic branches challenging. We describe a rare case, which has not been previously reported in the literature, in which successful embolisation of a bleeding pelvic artery was carried out by way of the collateral artery pathways.

  10. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine; Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  11. First trimester bleeding and maternal cardiovascular morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob A; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2012-01-01

    First trimester bleeding without miscarriage is a risk factor for complications later in the pregnancy, such as preterm delivery. Also, first trimester miscarriage has been linked to subsequent maternal ischemic heart disease. We investigated the link between maternal cardiovascular disease prior...... to and subsequent to first trimester bleeding without miscarriage....

  12. Rectal bleeding in children: endoscopic evaluation revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ridder, Lissy; van Lingen, Anna V.; Taminiau, Jan A. J. M.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Rectal bleeding is an alarming event both for the child and parents. It is hypothesized that colonoscopy instead of sigmoidoscopy and adding esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy in case of accompanying complaints, improves the diagnostic accuracy in children with prolonged rectal bleeding. Study

  13. RESEARCH Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Portal hypertension due to intrahepatic disease or extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is an important cause of upper gastro- intestinal bleeding in children. About 50% of children with EHPVO present with bleeding from oesophageal varices.1-3 Improvements in the management of children with intrahepatic ...

  14. Duodenal diverticular bleeding: an endoscopic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Valdivielso-Cortázar

    Full Text Available Duodenal diverticula are an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Until recently, it was primarily managed with surgery, but advances in the field of endoscopy have made management increasingly less invasive. We report a case of duodenal diverticular bleeding that was endoscopically managed, and review the literature about the various endoscopic therapies thus far described.

  15. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Kim, Kun Dong; You, In Sool

    2016-01-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a...

  16. Gastric cirsoid aneurysm: Uncommon cause of death from upper GI bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Bihun, BA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cirsoid aneurysm is an arterial malformation found in the submucosa of the stomach. It is a rare, but potentially life-threatening cause of gastrointestinal bleed. We present a case of a 48 year old male who presented to the ER unconscious, unresponsive, pale, and tachycardic. Patient expired and an autopsy was performed. Upon examination blood was found in the GI tract. During examination an arterial malformation was found in the body of the stomach. Histological samples were taken and the findings were consistent with gastric cirsoid aneurysm. Diagnosis can be made through endoscopy, angiography, or red cell scanning. Current treatment is hemostasis achieved by either thermal, regional injection or mechanical therapies. Multiple therapies are found to be more successful than monotherapy. Gastric cirsoid aneurysms are thought to make up <5% of upper GI bleeds, however clinicians should be mindful when working up a differential diagnosis.

  17. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding treatment by methods of interventional radiology; Leczenie krwotokow z gornego odcinka przewodu pokarmowego metodami radiologii zabiegowej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jargiello, T.; Szajner, M.; Janczarek, M.; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, M. [Akademia Medyczna, Lublin (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The results of arterial vasopressin infusion and transcatheter embolization in 26 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding were presented and evaluated. In all 26 patients vasopressin infusion was performed. The procedure was successful in 21 patients. In 5 who did not respond to the therapy hemorrhage was successfully controlled by transcatheter embolization. No complications were observed. (author). 14 refs, 2 figs.

  18. [Re-bleeding predictors in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and delayed neurosurgical treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Rodríguez, Dannys; Scherle Matamoros, Claudio; Fernández Cúe, Leda; Miranda Hernández, José Luis; Pernas Sánchez, Yanelis; Pérez Nellar, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the re-bleeding predictors in patients with delayed treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A prospective cohort study enrolled 261 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, attending in Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital from October 2005, and June 2014. An increased re-bleeding risk in the multivariate analysis was associated with grade III (OR 2.01; 95% CI; 1.06-3.84) and grade IV (OR 3.84; 95% CI; 2.06-7.31) on World Federation Neurological Surgeon (WFNS) scale; grade III (OR 2.04; 95% CI; 1.01-4.13) and grade IV (OR 2.12, 95% CI; 1.05-4.28) on the Fischer scale, aneurism location in posterior circulation (OR 2.45, 95% CI; 1.33-4.44), and anterior communicant artery (OR 1.57, 95% CI;1.00-2.46). Hypertension history was present in 60.9% (159 patients) and was also associated with risk of re-bleeding (OR 2.70, 95% CI; 1.00-7.30). Blood pressure, haematocrit, glycemic, aneurysm size, multiple aneurysms, and location in the middle cerebral artery, do not show any relationship. Hypertension history, poor grade (III and IV) on WFNS and Fisher scale and aneurysm location were independent risks factors of re-bleeding in patients with delayed aneurysmal treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Primary aortojejunal fistula: a rare cause for massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulasir, Sylvester; Khorfan, Rhami; Harsant, Christina; Anderson, Harry Linne

    2017-04-26

    A 68-year-old man presented to the emergency department with haematemesis and shock. Upper endoscopy and selective angiography could not identify the source of bleeding. He underwent selective embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery. The patient then had a period of about 24 hours with relative haemodynamic stability before having another episode of massive upper gastrointestinal bleed. A second attempt to embolise the common hepatic artery and distal coeliac axis was unsuccessful. Hence, he was urgently taken to the operating room for exploratory laparotomy. The source of bleeding could not be identified in the operating room. The patient went into cardiac arrest and expired. Autopsy revealed a fistula between proximal jejunum and a previously unknown abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We present an entity that has only been described a few times in the literature while highlighting the importance of having a broad differential with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when the source is not clearly evident. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Acquired uterine arteriovenous fistula following dilatation and curettage: an uncommon cause of vaginal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Evans, DO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is a common presentation of women in the emergency department. We describe the case of a 33-year-old female who presented with intermittent spotting due to an acquired uterine AVF. The patient underwent a transvaginal pelvic ultrasound as well as a CT angiogram. The patient was treated conservatively and elected to undergo uterine artery embolization in an effort to preserve fertility. She successfully delivered a healthy baby boy at 39-week gestation via an emergent caesarian section due to a prolapsed umbilical cord 17 months after undergoing the uterine artery embolization.

  1. Universal definition of perioperative bleeding in adult cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyke, Cornelius; Aronson, Solomon; Dietrich, Wulf; Hofmann, Axel; Karkouti, Keyvan; Levi, Marcel; Murphy, Gavin J.; Sellke, Frank W.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; von Heymann, Christian; Ranucci, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Perioperative bleeding is common among patients undergoing cardiac surgery; however, the definition of perioperative bleeding is variable and lacks standardization. We propose a universal definition for perioperative bleeding (UDPB) in adult cardiac surgery in an attempt to precisely describe and

  2. Intrarenal punctate bleedings after PTA of a poorly perfused kidney: a rare complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mali, W.P.T.M.; Straalen, A. van; Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.; Klinge, J.; Geyskes, C.G.; Feldberg, M.A.M.; Kooiker, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    A 52-year-old male was treated with percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTA) for hypertension due to renal artery stenosis. After successful dilatation, a CT scan showed extravasation of material with a high CT number thought to be blood. An emergency nephrectomy, however, revealed contrast containing urine. Pathologic examination of the kidney showed numerous punctate bleedings possibly caused by high blood pressure. 7 refs.; 3 figs

  3. Endoscopic management of bleeding peptic ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, J.I.; Farooqi, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peptic ulcers account for more than half of the cases of non variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and therefore, are the focus of most of the methods of endoscopic hemostasis. Surgical intervention is now largely reserved for patients in whom endoscopic hemostasis has failed. A variety of endoscopic techniques have been employed to stop bleeding and reduce the risk of rebleeding, with no major differences in outcome between these methods. These include injection therapy, fibrin injection, heater probe, mono polar electrocautery, bipolar electrocautery, lasers and mechanical hemo clipping. The most important factor in determining outcome after gastrointestinal bleeding is rebleeding or persistent bleeding. The endoscopic appearance of an ulcer, however, provides the most useful prognostic information for bleeding. Recurrent bleeding after initial endoscopic hemostasis occurs in 15-20% of patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer. The best approach to these patients remains controversial; the current options are repeat endoscopic therapy with the same or a different technique, emergency surgery or semi elective surgery after repeat endoscopic hemostasis. The combination of epinephrine injection with thermal coagulation may be more effective than epinephrine injection alone. Newer modalities such as fibrin injection or the application of hemo clips appear promising and comparative studies are awaited. (author)

  4. THROMBIN GENERATION AND BLEEDING IN HEMOPHILIA A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Whelihan, Matthew F.; Gissel, Matthew; Mann, Kenneth G.; Rivard, Georges E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A displays phenotypic heterogeneity with respect to clinical severity. Aim To determine if tissue factor (TF)-initiated thrombin generation profiles in whole blood in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) are predictive of bleeding risk in hemophilia A. Methods We studied factor(F) VIII deficient individuals (11 mild, 4 moderate and 12 severe) with a well-characterized five-year bleeding history that included hemarthrosis, soft tissue hematoma and annual FVIII concentrate usage. This clinical information was used to generate a bleeding score. The bleeding scores (range 0–32) were separated into three groups (bleeding score groupings: 0, 0 and ≤9.6, >9.6), with the higher bleeding tendency having a higher score. Whole blood collected by phlebotomy and contact pathway suppressed by 100μg/mL CTI was stimulated to react by the addition of 5pM TF. Reactions were quenched at 20min by inhibitors. Thrombin generation, determined by ELISA for thrombin – antithrombin was evaluated in terms of clot time (CT), maximum level (MaxL) and maximum rate (MaxR) and compared to the bleeding score. Results Data are shown as the mean±SD. MaxL was significantly different (phemophilia A. PMID:19563500

  5. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding.

  6. Lumbar Artery Pseudoaneurysm: A Complication of Percutaneous Nephrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Djuimo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A 21 year-old male underwent nephrostomy tube insertion for hydronephrosis due to a large para-aortic adenopathy of a testicular tumor. In order to reduce infections during chemotherapy, a ureteral stent was placed. While removing the nephrostomy tube, a pulsatile bleeding was found and a renal angiography was done. A pseudoaneurysm of his first left lumbar (L1 artery communicating with the nephrostomy's access site was found. An embolization was performed with coils in the left L1 artery and one of its subdivisions. Post-embolization controls revealed no bleeding. On the follow-up CT, there were no suspicious retroperitoneal mass.

  7. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding. PMID:28163815

  8. Endovascular control of the acute bleeding in patients with advanced neoplasms of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachvarov, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Advanced neoplastic processes in the neck can cause acute life-threatening bleeding. Source of the bleeding can be vessels from a tumor mass or invasion of the main cervical arterial vessels. Poor general condition of the patients and accompanying complications create additional difficulties in getting these situations under control. What you will learn: Endovascular embolization of acute bleeding from advanced cervical neoplasms requires detailed knowledge of anatomical structures in this area and precision equipment with the possibility of super selective catheterization of small caliber vessels. The presentation discusses the various embolization materials and possibilities for their application in the neck. The experience of 5 embolization sessions in 4 patients is presented. An important point is discussion of the possible complications and how to avoid them. Discussion: Acute bleeding from large tumor formation is often a real risk to the life of the patient. Getting these conditions under control usually postpones the poor prognosis of the main disease. Postembolization syndrome and postembolization tissue necrosis define the basic cares in the early and late period after such a procedure. Conclusion: Acute bleeding from advanced neoplastic processes in the neck offers a real challenge. For their successful mastery it is required certain technical skills, unconventional solutions and a wide range of materials for embolization. A multidisciplinary approach is required to view the specific care these patients need and the possible complications

  9. Diagnostic evaluation and aggressive surgical approach in bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with pancreatic pseudocysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaeranta, P.; Haapiainen, R.; Kivisaari, L.; Schroeder, T.

    1991-01-01

    Hemorrhage is an uncommon but serious complication of pancreatic pseudocysts. When gastrointestinal bleeding or intra-abdominal hemorrhage is associated with a pancreatic pseudocysts and the usual sources of bleeding are not detected by endoscopy, the rupture of a pseudoaneurysm inside the pseudocyst should be suspected. The article present 13 cases, 11 associated with chronic and 2 with late complications after acute necrotizing pancreatitis. On the basis of sonographic findings, bleeding site was suspected in 8 of 11 patients. Computed tomography (CT) was performed on 10, and bleeding was suspected in 8. The pseudoaneurysm itself was detected by CT in one and by ultrasonography in none. Visceral angiography was performed on five patients, and the pseudoaneurysm was evident in all. External drainage with arterial ligation was done as a primary operation in five patients; four of them later underwent pancreatic resection because of rebleeding. In eight cases pancreatic resection was the initial operation; none of these patients continued to bleed or needed reoperation because of the same pseudoaneurysm. There were no intraoperative deaths, but one patient died postoperatively. Aggressive diagnostic evaluation and surgical approach are associated with a reduction in mortality and morbidity in this serious complication of pancreatic pseudocysts. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Bleeding points in cerebral hemorrhage caused by Moyamoya disease in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Shimizu, Yukihiko; Ogawa, Akira; Komatsu, Shinro.

    1983-01-01

    Even before the introduction of CT we reported that the intracranial hemorrhage in Moyamoya disease was not subarachnoid hemorrhage but intraventricular hemorrhage and that the bleeding point was the paraventricular subependymal region of lateral ventricles; these findings were based on our experience with three Moyamoya cases in which ventricular hemorrhage occurred and pseudoaneurysms were revealed in the territory of the posterior choroidal artery. Twelve cases with intracranial hemorrhage caused by Moyamoya disease have now been studied by CT in order to determine (1) whether the hemorrhage is subarachnoid or intraventricular, and (2) where the bleeding point is. In the results for the eight cases for which the CT scan was performed within one day after the onset, intraventricular hemorrhage was shown in all cases. The bleeding point was examined in twelve cases; in four cases it was recognized by initial CT only, but if five cases in which ventricular hemorrhage only appeared in the initial CT,follow-up plain and contrast-enhanced CT were necessary. In a total of nine cases, then, bleeding points were recognized. In one case putaminal hemorrhage penetrated into the lateral ventricle, while in eight cases the intracerebral hematoma was located in the paraventricular region of the lateral ventricle, such as at the head of the caudate nucleus or the thalamus. In some cases, small subependymal hematoma projected into the lateral ventricle. In cases with symptoms of intracranial hemorrhage at the onset, the bleeding points were at the paraventricular parenchyma of the lateral ventricle in almost all cases. (author)

  11. Bronchial Artery and Systemic Artery Embolization in the Management of Primary Lung Cancer Patients with Hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyae Young; Zo, Jae-Ill; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Jin Soo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the safety and effectiveness of arterial embolization in lung cancer patients with hemoptysis. Methods. Nineteen primary lung cancer patients with hemoptysis underwent bronchial artery and systemic artery embolization from April 2002 to March 2005. There were 17 men and 2 women, with a mean age of 59 years. Histologic analysis revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 10 patients and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 9 patients. The amount of hemoptysis was bleeding of 25-50 ml within 24 hr in 8 patients, recurrent blood-tinged sputum in 6, and bleeding of 100 ml or more per 24 hr in 5. Embolization was done with a superselective technique using a microcatheter and polyvinyl alcohol particles to occlude the affected vessels. Results. Arterial embolization was technically successful in all patients and clinically successful in 15 patients (79%). The average number of arteries embolized was 1.2. Bronchial arteriography revealed staining (all patients), dilatation of the artery or hypervascularity (10 patients), and bronchopulmonary shunt (6 patients). The recurrence rate was 33% (5/15) and 11 patients were alive with a mean follow-up time of 148 days (30-349 days). Conclusion. Arterial embolotherapy for hemoptysis in patients with primary lung cancer is an effective, safe therapeutic modality despite the fact the vascular changes are subtle on angiography

  12. Pulmonary Artery Dissection: A Fatal Complication of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery dissection is extremely rare but it is a really life-threatening condition when it happens. Most patients die suddenly from major bleeding or tamponade caused by direct rupture into mediastinum or retrograde into the pericardial sac. What we are reporting is a rare case of a 46-year-old female patient whose pulmonary artery dissection involves both the pulmonary valve and right pulmonary artery. The patient had acute chest pain and severe dyspnea, and the diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection was confirmed by ultrasonography and CT angiography. Moreover, its etiology, clinical manifestations, and management are also discussed in this article.

  13. Hepatic telangiectasia in Osler's disease treated with arterial embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethlin, J H; Nordgard, K; Jonsson, K; Nyman, U

    1982-02-01

    Hepatic hereditary telangiectasia in 2 females was treated with hepatic artery embolization. In one patient both peripheral and central arterial occlusion was performed; the patient died of massive gastro-intestinal bleeding 2 months later. Autopsy showed extensive regions with necrosis in the right liver lobe. In the next patient only central occlusion of the right hepatic artery was performed and the arterio-venous shunting in the left liver lobe left remaining. After a long reconvalescence period the patient recovered completely. It is advocated to centrally occlude only that hepatic artery supplying the most affected parts of the liver in Osler's disease. Thus extensive necrosis with possible ensuing death may be avoided.

  14. Causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding on colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.U.; Gul, R.; Khursheed, L.; Hadayat, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bleeding from anus is usually referred as rectal bleeding but actually rectal bleeding is defined as bleeding from lower colon or rectum, which means bleeding from a place distal to ligament of Treitz. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of different causes of rectal bleeding in patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. Methods: One hundred and seventy-five patients with evidence of rectal bleed, without gender discrimination were selected by non-probability convenient sampling from the out-patient department and general medical wards. Patients with suspected upper GI source of bleeding; acute infectious bloody diarrhoea and any coagulopathy were excluded from the study. All patients were subjected to fibre optic colonoscopy after preparation of the gut and findings were recorded. Where necessary, biopsy samples were also taken. Diagnosis was based on colonoscopic findings. Results: A total of 175 patients (92 males and 83 females) with mean age 35.81±9.18 years were part of the study. Colonoscopy showed abnormal findings in 150 (85.7%) patients. The commonest diagnosis was haemorrhoids, which was found in 39 (22.3%) patients. It was followed by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 30 (17.1%) patients, solitary rectal ulcer in 13 (7.4%) patients and polyps in 25 (14.3%) patients. Other less frequent findings were non-specific inflammation and fungating growths in rectum. Conclusion: Haemorrhoids was the leading cause of bleeding per rectum in this study, followed by evidence of IBD while infrequent findings of polyps and diverticuli indicate that these are uncommon in this region. (author)

  15. [The causes of recurrent ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnitsky, E M; Alekberzade, A V; Gasanov, M R

    To explore microcirculatory changes within the first 48 hours after admission, to compare them with clinical manifestations of bleeding and to define the dependence of recurrent bleeding from the therapy. The study included 108 patients with ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding who were treated at the Clinical Hospital #71 for the period 2012-2014. There were 80 (74.1%) men and 28 (25.9%) women. Age ranged 20-87 years (mean 54.4±16.8 years). Patients younger than 45 years were predominant (33.4%). J. Forrest classification (1974) was used in endoscopic characterization of bleeding. Roccal Prognostic Scale for gastroduodenal bleeding was applied in all patients at admission to assess the risk of possible recurrence. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 included 53 (49.1%) patients without recurrent bleeding; group 2-55 (50.1%) patients who had recurrent bleeding within the first two days of treatment. Investigation of microcirculation showed the role of vegetative component including blood circulation centralization, blood flow slowing, blood cells redistribution providing sufficient blood oxygenation. By the end of the first day we observed pronounced hemodilution, decreased blood oxygenation, blood flow restructuring with its acceleration above 1 ml/s, violation of tissue oxygenation, signs of hypovolemia. These changes were significantly different from group 2 and associated with circulatory decentralization with possible pulmonary microcirculation disturbances and interstitial edema. This processes contribute to disruption of tissue oxygenation. We assume that recurrent bleeding in group 2 was caused by fluid therapy in larger volumes than it was necessary in this clinical situation. Infusion therapy should be significantly reduced for the debut of gastroduodenal ulcerative bleeding. Sedative therapy is advisable to reduce the influence of central nervous system.

  16. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding - state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a condition requiring immediate medical intervention, with high associated mortality exceeding 10%. The most common cause of upper GI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, which largely corresponds to the intake of NSAIDs and Helicobacter pylori infection. Endoscopy is the essential tool for the diagnosis and treatment of active upper GI hemorrhage. Endoscopic therapy together with proton pump inhibitors and eradication of Helicobacter pylori significantly reduces rebleeding rates, mortality and number of emergency surgical interventions. This paper presents contemporary data on the diagnosis and treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, A.

    1980-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding may be localized using noninvasive radionuclide methods. We have favored the use of technetium-99m sulfur colloid with sequential imaging because of the rapid clearance of background activity. Definition of the site of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, however, may be obscured by intense uptake of radioactivity by liver and spleen. The sensitivity of the method is such that the bleeding rates of 0.05-0.1 ml/min can be detected compared to a sensitivity of 0.5 ml/min for angiography.

  18. Bleeding and starving: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Meira, Tânia; Nunes, Ana; Santos, Carla Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. The aim of this study was obtaining objective data on refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. From 1 year span records of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients that underwent urgent endoscopy: clinical features; rockall score; endoscopic data, including severity of lesions and therapy; feeding related records of seven days: liquid diet prescription, first liquid intake, soft/solid diet prescription, first soft/solid intake. From 133 patients (84 men) Rockall classification was possible in 126: 76 score ≥5, 50 score bleeding, eight rebled, two underwent surgery, 13 died. Ulcer was the major bleeding cause, 63 patients underwent endoscopic therapy. There was 142/532 possible refeeding records, no record 37% patients. Only 16% were fed during the first day and half were only fed on third day or later. Rockall upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients must be refed earlier, according to guidelines.

  19. AL Amyloidosis Complicated by Persistent Oral Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Liarte Marconcini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of amyloid light chain (AL amyloidosis is presented here with uncontrolled bleeding after a nonsurgical dental procedure, most likely multifactorial in nature, and consequently treated with a multidisciplinary approach.

  20. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are many possible causes of GI bleeding, including hemorrhoids , peptic ulcers , tears or inflammation in the esophagus, ... blood Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Hemorrhoids Peptic Ulcer National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  1. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy; alarming variables for postoperative bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakhawan H.A. Said

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: According to our present results stone complexity (GSS grade 3 and 4, history of ipsilateral renal stone surgery, and occurrence of intraoperative pelvicalyceal perforation are alarming variables for post-PCNL bleeding.

  2. Intrathoracic Gastric Volvulus presenting with GIT Bleed

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Kadam; VSV Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Intrathoracic gastric volvulus in neonatal period is a life-threatening surgical emergency. We report a case of neonate with respiratory distress and GI bleeding who was diagnosed to have congenital diaphragmatic eventration with Intrathoracic gastric volvulus.

  3. Transfusion strategy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, James; Lang, Eddy

    2015-09-01

    Clinical question Does a hemoglobin transfusion threshold of 70 g/L yield better patient outcomes than a threshold of 90 g/L in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding? Article chosen Villanueva C, Colomo A, Bosch A, et al. Transfusion strategies for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. N Engl J Med 2013;368(1):11-21. Study objectives The authors of this study measured mortality, from any cause, within the first 45 days, in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, who were managed with a hemoglobin threshold for red cell transfusion of either 70 g/L or 90 g/L. The secondary outcome measures included rate of further bleeding and rate of adverse events.

  4. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in irbid, jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banisalamah, A.A.; Mraiat, Z.M.

    2007-01-01

    To define the various causes of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to outline management modalities and to determine the final outcome of patients. A retrospective analysis of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding from January 2003 to December 2006 (4 years) was conducted. Patients with endoscopically proven variceal bleeding were excluded. Out of the 120 patients, most of the patients belonged to an age group of more than 50 years (mean 48.5 years). Haematemesis was the most common presentation and Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesion (AGML) was the most frequently encountered lesion. The cause of bleeding was not identified in 10 patients (undetermined group). Twenty-two (18.3%) underwent surgery and we had an overall mortality of 15.8%. AGML being the leading cause can be managed conservatively most of the time. There is a male preponderance and the incidence and mortality increases with advancing age. The undetermined group remains a diagnostic problem. (author)

  5. Endovascular treatment of acute arterial complications after living-donor liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, G.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ajou University Hospital, School of Medicine, San 5, Wonchun-dong, Youngtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggido 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Won, J.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ajou University Hospital, School of Medicine, San 5, Wonchun-dong, Youngtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggido 443-721 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: wonkwak@ajou.ac.kr; Wang, H.J.; Kim, B.W. [Department of Surgery, Ajou University Hospital, School of Medicine, San 5, Wonchun-dong, Youngtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggido 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B.M. [Department of Surgery, Aerospace medical center, Ssangsu-ri, Cheongwon-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do 363-849 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of endovascular treatment for acute arterial complications following living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Materials and methods: Of 79 LDLT patients, 17 (mean age 48 {+-} 8 years, range 33-66 years) who had acute arterial complications and underwent endovascular treatment were evaluated. Transcatheter arterial embolization was performed to control peritoneal bleeding. Catheter-directed thrombolysis using urokinase was performed in hepatic artery thromboses. The locations of complications and materials used were evaluated. The technical and clinical success rates were calculated. Results: Twenty-three acute arterial complications, including four hepatic artery thromboses and 19 cases of peritoneal haemorrhages were identified in 22 angiographic sessions in 17 patients. The mean duration between LDLT and first angiography was 3.2 {+-} 3.5 days (range 1-13 days). Hepatic artery recanalization with catheter-directed thrombolysis using urokinase was achieved in two patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization for peritoneal bleeding was successfully performed in 16 cases. The most common bleeding focus was the right inferior phrenic artery. Additional surgical management was needed in five patients to control bleeding or hepatic artery recanalization. Technical and clinical success rates of transcatheter arterial embolization were 84.2 and 63.1%, respectively. Overall technical success was achieved in 18 of 23 arterial complications (78.2%), and clinical success was achieved in 14 of 23 arterial complications (60.8%). Conclusion: Endovascular treatment for the acute arterial complications of haemorrhage or thrombosis in LDLT patients is safe and effective. Therefore, it should be considered as the first line of treatment in selective cases.

  6. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...

  7. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  8. Arterial supply of the stomach of the Egyptian native goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the origin, course and distribution of the arteries supplying the stomach of the goat which is of extreme clinical importance for surgeon during caprine rumenotomy. Materials and methods: Fifteen adult goats were used in this study to demonstrate the arterial supply of the stomach by injection of the thoracic aorta with red gum milk latex after general anesthesia and slaughtering of the animals. Gross dissection of the arteries of the stomach was done to detect the origin, course and distribution of these arteries. Results: The study revealed that the rumen was richly supplied by the right and left ruminal arteries as well as ruminal branches from the reticular artery. The reticulum was supplied with reticular branches of reticular and accessory reticular arteries. The omasum was vascularized by omasal branches of the left gastric artery. While the abomasum received its entire arterial supply from abomasal branches of the left gastric, left gastroepiploic, right gastric and right gastroepiploic arteries. Conclusion: The stomach of the goat receives its arterial supply from the branches of the right ruminal, left ruminal, reticular, left gastric and hepatic arteries. Rumenotomy could be done in the left aspect of the dorsal ruminal sac, between the area of anastomoses of the terminal branches of the left and right ruminal arteries as the blood supply was minimal, so that bleeding will be low. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(1.000: 80-87

  9. [Hysteroscopic polypectomy, treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Rios, P José F; López, R Claudia; Cifuentes, P Carolina; Angulo, C Mónica; Palacios-Barahona, Arlex U

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic polypectomy in terms of the decrease of the abnormal uterine bleeding. A cross-sectional and analytical study was done with patients to whom a hysteroscopic polypectomy was done for treating the abnormal uterine bleeding, between January 2009 and December 2013. The response to the treatment was evaluated via a survey given to the patients about the behavior of the abnormal uterine bleeding after the procedure and about overall satisfaction. The results were obtained after a hysteroscopic polypectomy done to 128 patients and were as follows. The average time from the polypectomy applied until the survey was 30.5 months, with a standard deviation of 18 months. 67.2% of the patients reported decreased abnormal uterine bleeding and the 32.8% reported a persistence of symptoms. On average 82.8% of the. patients were satisfied with the treatment. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed no association between the variables studied and no improvement of abnormal uterine bleeding after surgery (polypectomy). There were no complications. Hysteroscopic polypectomy is a safe surgical treatment, which decreases on two of three patients the abnormal uterine bleeding in the presence of endometrial polyps, with an acceptable level of satisfaction.

  10. Bleeding from gastrointestinal angioectasias is not related to bleeding disorders - a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lärfars Gerd

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angioectasias in the gastrointestinal tract can be found in up to 3% of the population. They are typically asymptomatic but may sometimes result in severe bleeding. The reasons for why some patients bleed from their angioectasias are not fully understood but it has been reported that it may be explained by an acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS. This condition has similar laboratory findings to congenital von Willebrand disease with selective loss of large von Willebrand multimers. The aim of this study was to find out if AVWS or any other bleeding disorder was more common in patients with bleeding from angioectasias than in a control group. Methods We compared bleeding tests and coagulation parameters, including von Willebrand multimers, from a group of 23 patients with anemia caused by bleeding from angioectasias, with the results from a control group lacking angioectasias. Results No significant differences between the two groups were found in coagulation parameters, bleeding time or von Willebrand multimer levels. Conclusion These results do not support a need for routine bleeding tests in cases of bleeding from angioectasias and do not show an overall increased risk of AVWS among these patients.

  11. Pharmaco-induced vasospasm therapy for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Huei-Lung, E-mail: hlliang@vghks.gov.tw [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chia-Ling [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu [Department of Radiology, Yuan' s General Hospital, Kaohsiung. Taiwan (China); Lin, Yih-Huie; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Pan, Huay-Ben [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To report a novel technique and preliminary clinical outcomes in managing lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB). Materials and methods: Eighteen LGIB patients (11 men and 7 women, mean age: 66.2 years) were treated with artificially induced vasospasm therapy by semi-selective catheterization technique. Epinephrine bolus injection was used to initiate the vascular spasm, and followed by a small dose vasopressin infusion (3–5 units/h) for 3 h. The technical success, clinical success, recurrent bleeding and major complications of this study were evaluated and reported. Results: Sixteen bleeders were in the superior mesenteric artery and 2 in the inferior mesenteric artery. All patients achieved successful immediate hemostasis. Early recurrent bleeding (<30 days) was found in 4 patients with local and new-foci re-bleeding in 2 (11.1%) each. Repeated vasospasm therapy was given to 3 patients, with clinical success in 2. Technical success for the 21 bleeding episodes was 100%. Lesion-based and patient-based primary and overall clinical successes were achieved in 89.4% (17/19) and 77.7% (14/18), and 94.7% (18/19) and 88.8% (16/18), respectively. None of our patients had complications of bowel ischemia or other major procedure-related complications. The one year survival of our patients was 72.2 ± 10.6%. Conclusions: Pharmaco-induced vasospasm therapy seems to be a safe and effective method to treat LGIB from our small patient-cohort study. Further evaluation with large series study is warranted. Considering the advanced age and complex medical problems of these patients, this treatment may be considered as an alternative approach for interventional radiologists in management of LGIB.

  12. Reperfusion hemorrhage following superior mesenteric artery stenting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael

    2012-02-03

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement is now an established treatment option for chronic mesenteric ischemia and is associated with low mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of reperfusion hemorrhage complicating endovascular repair of superior mesenteric artery stenosis. Although a recognized complication following repair of carotid stenosis, hemorrhage has not previously been reported following mesenteric endovascular reperfusion. We describe both spontaneous cessation of bleeding and treatment with coil embolization.

  13. Transcatheteral occlusion of the inferior mesenteric artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H; Buecheler, E

    1981-06-01

    Three times the inferior mesenteric artery was embolized in one patient with recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to hypernephroma invading the left colon (tumorrecurrency after nephrectomy and radiation-therapy). The patient was inoperable. The bleeding could be stopped repetedly for several weeks. Fibrospum particles were used with the aim to obtain incomplete ischemia. So the danger to produce local necrosis was thought to be limited.

  14. Life-threatening bleeding and radiologic intervention after aesthetic surgeries with minimal invasive approaches: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Do; Visconti, Giuseppe; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2010-10-01

    In this article, the authors report two cases of life-threatening bleeding after cosmetic surgeries that have been successfully treated with radiologic intervention. A 25-year-old female and a 35-year-old female presented at their institutions because of postoperative bleeding after intraoral mandibular angle ostectomy and endoscopic-guided trans-axillary breast augmentation, respectively. A ruptured traumatic pseudo-aneurysm of the right superficial temporal artery was diagnosed in the first case and a haematoma posterior to the right pectoralis major, due to active bleeding from a perforator of internal mammary artery, in the second case. Attempts were made to stop the haemorrhage using standard methods, but failed. Therefore, superselective microcatheter angioembolisation has been successfully performed in both the cases. At 22-month follow-up for the first case and at 12-month follow-up for the second case, the patients are asymptomatic and the cosmetic outcomes are being preserved. With radiologic intervention, the authors gained satisfactory results in the above-mentioned situations. Using this, with only local anaesthesia and the absence of incisions, a precise approach with immediate treatment to the haemorrhaging site is possible. This can be an excellent solution for arterial bleeding that is difficult to access anatomically after aesthetic surgeries, and in selected cases. Furthermore, this procedure is less disfiguring and preserves the aesthetic surgery outcomes. Copyright 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antifibrinolytics for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Smith, Alison C; Lethaby, Anne; Farquhar, Cindy; Hickey, Martha

    2018-04-15

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is an important physical and social problem for women. Oral treatment for HMB includes antifibrinolytic drugs, which are designed to reduce bleeding by inhibiting clot-dissolving enzymes in the endometrium.Historically, there has been some concern that using the antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid (TXA) for HMB may increase the risk of venous thromboembolic disease. This is an umbrella term for deep venous thrombosis (blood clots in the blood vessels in the legs) and pulmonary emboli (blood clots in the blood vessels in the lungs). To determine the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic medications as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility (CGF) Group trials register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and two trials registers in November 2017, together with reference checking and contact with study authors and experts in the field. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antifibrinolytic agents versus placebo, no treatment or other medical treatment in women of reproductive age with HMB. Twelve studies utilised TXA and one utilised a prodrug of TXA (Kabi). We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary review outcomes were menstrual blood loss (MBL), improvement in HMB, and thromboembolic events. We included 13 RCTs (1312 participants analysed). The evidence was very low to moderate quality: the main limitations were risk of bias (associated with lack of blinding, and poor reporting of study methods), imprecision and inconsistency.Antifibrinolytics (TXA or Kabi) versus no treatment or placeboWhen compared with a placebo, antifibrinolytics were associated with reduced mean blood loss (MD -53.20 mL per cycle, 95% CI -62.70 to -43.70; I² = 8%; 4 RCTs, participants = 565; moderate-quality evidence) and higher rates of improvement (RR 3.34, 95% CI 1.84 to 6.09; 3 RCTS, participants = 271; moderate-quality evidence). This suggests that

  16. Utility of the puncture of the radial artery in interventionist radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triana Rodriguez, Carlos Eduardo; Montes S, Mauricio; Barragan F, Jaime; Ucros Diaz Pablo; Ucros Diaz, Ignacio; Castillo, Luis Fernando

    1998-01-01

    We present the radial artery access, previous evaluation of collateral circulation with Allen's Test, as an alternative vascular access in patients with contraindications for femoral or axillary approaches. The radial artery puncture offers advantages, such as diminished bleeding and hematoma formation

  17. Arterial stick

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be some throbbing. Why the Test Is Performed Blood transports oxygen, nutrients, waste products, and other materials within ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the blood before any ...

  18. Accessory Meningeal Arterial Supply to the Posterior Nasal Cavity: Another Reason for Failed Endovascular Treatment of Epistaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, I.C.; Santos, C. Dos

    2003-01-01

    A patient with intractable posterior epistaxis was treated with embolization of the ipsilateral sphenopalatine and facial arteries and contralateral sphenopalatine artery. She continued to bleed despite a seemingly adequate embolization procedure. A second angiogram revealed a significant collateral blood supply to the posterior nasal cavity from the accessory meningeal artery not identified during the first procedure. This was then embolized with no further epistaxis encountered. This case demonstrates yet another collateral arterial pathway that might account for a failed embolization

  19. Blood oozing: A cause of life-threatening bleeding without overt source after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Giuseppe; Mojoli, Marco; Barioli, Alberto; Battistel, Michele; Généreux, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Post-procedure non-access site-related bleedings have a significant impact on mortality in patients treated by transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Notwithstanding, the source of these bleedings is frequently indeterminate, with potentially serious clinical implications related to lack of diagnosis and treatment. Out of 513 TAVR performed between June 2007 and January 2016 in the Interventional Cardiology Laboratory of the Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University Hospital of Padua, we identified few proven cases of concealed bleeding after TAVR due to blood oozing. We report three cases of angiographically confirmed post-TAVR non-access bleedings related to spontaneous blood oozing, a life-threatening condition consisting of diffuse capillary hemorrhage developing from vessels not directly involved by the procedure. We hypothesize that spontaneous post-procedural blood oozing may account for a substantial proportion of non-overt, non-access site-related bleeding after TAVR. The possibility of post-TAVR blood oozing is largely neglected in the literature, and comprehensive categorization of non-access site bleedings in current standardized endpoints of TAVR studies is missing. Early assessment with arterial and venous contrast phase angio-MDCT scans in case of post-TAVR unexplained and persistent anemia may allow diagnosis and treatment of this subtle condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of Over-the-Scope Clips in Management of High-Risk Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandler, Justin; Baruah, Anushka; Zeb, Muhammad; Mehfooz, Ayesha; Pophali, Prachi; Wong Kee Song, Louis; AbuDayyeh, Barham; Gostout, Christopher; Mara, Kristin; Dierkhising, Ross; Buttar, Navtej

    2018-05-01

    Standard endoscopic therapies do not control bleeding or produce complications in as many as 20% of patients with nonvariceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Most bleeding comes from ulcers with characteristics such as high-risk vascular territories and/or large vessels. We evaluated the efficacy of using over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) as primary or rescue therapy for patients with bleeding from lesions that have a high risk for adverse outcomes. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 67 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding from high-risk lesions who were treated with OTSCs as primary (n = 49) or rescue therapy (n = 18) at a quaternary center, from December 2011 through February 2015. The definition of high-risk lesions was lesions that were situated in the area of a major artery and larger than 2 mm in diameter and/or a deep penetrating, excavated, fibrotic ulcer with high-risk stigmata, in which a perforation could not be ruled out or thermal therapy would cause perforation, or lesions that could not be treated by standard endoscopy. Clinical severity was determined based on the Rockall score and a modified Blatchford score. Our primary outcome was the incidence of rebleeding within 30 days after OTSC placement. We assessed risk factors for rebleeding using univariate hazard models followed by multivariable analysis. Of the 67 patients, 47 (70.1%) remained free of rebleeding at 30 days after OTSC placement. We found no difference in the proportion of patients with rebleeding who received primary or rescue therapy (hazard ratio, 0.639; 95% confidence interval, 0.084-4.860; P = .6653). Only 9 rebleeding events were linked clearly to OTSCs and required intervention, indicating an OTSC success rate of 81.3%. We found no significant associations between rebleeding and clinical scores. However, on multivariable analysis, patients with coronary artery disease had a higher risk of rebleeding after OTSC independent of international normalized ratio and

  1. Cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for the management of abnormal uterine bleeding (heavy menstrual bleeding and post-menopausal bleeding): a decision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, Natalie A. M.; Barton, Pelham M.; Breijer, Maria; Caffrey, Orla; Opmeer, Brent C.; Timmermans, Anne; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.; Clark, T. Justin

    2014-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and post-menopausal bleeding (PMB) together constitute the commonest gynaecological presentation in secondary care and impose substantial demands on health service resources. Accurate diagnosis is of key importance to realising effective treatment, reducing morbidity

  2. Reliability measures in managing GI bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Amnon

    2012-06-01

    Multiple procedures and devices are used in a complex interplay to diagnose and treat GI bleeding. To model how a large variety of diagnostic and therapeutic components interact in the successful management of GI bleeding. The analysis uses the concept of reliability block diagrams from probability theory to model management outcome. Separate components of the management process are arranged in a serial or parallel fashion. If the outcome depends on the function of each component individually, such components are modeled to be arranged in series. If components complement each other and can mutually compensate for each of their failures, such components are arranged in a parallel fashion. General endoscopy practice. Patients with GI bleeding of unknown etiology. All available endoscopic and radiographic means to diagnose and treat GI bleeding. Process reliability in achieving hemostasis. Serial arrangements tend to reduce process reliability, whereas parallel arrangements increase it. Whenever possible, serial components should be bridged and complemented by additional alternative (parallel) routes of operation. Parallel components with low individual reliability can still contribute to overall process reliability as long as they function independently of other pre-existing alternatives. Probability of success associated with individual components is partly unknown. Modeling management of GI bleeding by a reliability block diagram provides a useful tool in assessing the impact of individual endoscopic techniques and administrative structures on the overall outcome. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracranial hemorrhage in congenital bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibian, Shadi; Motlagh, Hoda; Naderi, Majid; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2018-01-01

    : Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), as a life-threatening bleeding among all kinds of congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs), is a rare manifestation except in factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency, which is accompanied by ICH, early in life, in about one-third of patients. Most inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) are mild to moderate bleeding disorders that can never experience a severe bleeding as in ICH; however, Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, a common and severe inherited platelet function disorder, can lead to ICH and occasional death. This bleeding feature can also be observed in grey platelet syndrome, though less frequently than in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. In hemophilia, intracerebral hemorrhage is affected by various risk factors one of which is the severity of the disease. The precise prevalence of ICH in these patients is not clear but an estimated incidence of 3.5-4% among newborns with hemophilia is largely ascertained. Although ICH is a rare phenomenon in CBDs, it can be experienced by every patient with severe hemophilia A and B, FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), FVIID, FXD, FVD, FIID, and afibrinogenemia. Upon observing the general signs and symptoms of ICH such as vomiting, seizure, unconsciousness, and headache, appropriate replacement therapies and cranial ultrasound scans must be done to decrease ICH-related morbidity and mortality.

  4. Surgery of traumatic peripheral arterial injury with delayed transfer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xjla. l1.ltients with a false aneurysm presented with a pulsai;le mass. Brisk uncontrolled bleeding also suggested a probable arterial Injury. Operative Technique. A pneumatic tourniquet inflated by compressed air was, whenever possible, applied before removal of pressure bandages. The tourniquet remained inflated.

  5. Prevalence and anatomical pattern of the median artery among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of the anatomy of median arteries is important in the diagnosis and management of carpal tunnel and pronator teres syndromes, reconstructive surgery in the forearm, minimizing inadvertent vascular injury as well as in limiting operative complications due to unexpected bleeding. The anatomical pattern displays ...

  6. Popliteal artery aneurysms. Clinical relevance of dynamics and vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropman, R.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of anatomic variations of the popliteal artery is essential for the management of peripheral vascular disease. It influences the success of femoropopliteal and crural reconstructions and may also be important in orthopedic surgery. Variations may increase the risk of bleeding, dissections,

  7. Myocardial Infarction as a Complication of Bronchial Artery Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbé, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.labbe.1@ulaval.ca [Université Laval, Department of Medicine (Canada); Bordeleau, Simon [Université Laval, Department of Emergency Medicine (Canada); Drouin, Christine [Université Laval, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine (Canada); Archambault, Patrick [Université Laval, Department of Emergency Medicine (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    Bronchial artery embolization is now a common treatment for massive pulmonary hemoptysis if flexible bronchoscopy at the bedside failed to control the bleeding. Complications of this technique range from benign chest pain to devastating neurological impairments. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who developed an ST elevation myocardial infarction during bronchial artery embolization, presumably because of coronary embolism by injected particles. In this patient who had no previously known coronary artery disease, we retrospectively found a communication between the left bronchial artery and the circumflex coronary artery. This fistula was not visible on the initial angiographic view and likely opened because of the hemodynamic changes resulting from the embolization. This case advocates for careful search for bronchial-to-coronary arterial fistulas and the need for repeated angiographic views during embolization procedures.

  8. Accuracy of rockall score for in hospital re bleeding among cirrhotic patients with variceal bleed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgher, S.; Saleem, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of Roc kall scoring system for predicting in-hospital re-ble- eding in cirrhotic patients presenting with variceal bleed. Material and Methods: This descriptive case series study was conducted at Department of Medicine Combined Military Hospital Lahore from December 2013 to May 2014. We included patients with liver cirrhosis who presented with upper GI bleeding and showed varices as the cause of bleeding on endoscopy. Clinical and endoscopic features were noted to calculate Rockall score. Patients with score < 2 and > 8 were included. After treating with appropriate pharmacological and endoscopic therapy, patients were followed for re-bleeding for 10 days. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values using 2 x 2 tables. Results: In the study, 175 patients were included. Mean age was 51.5 ± 1.22 years. Male to female ratio was 1.5 to 1.0 out of 175 patients, 157 patients (89.7%) were of low risk group (score = 2) while 18 patients (10.3%) were in high risk group (score > 8). In low risk group, re-bleeding occurred only in 2 patients (1.2%) while in high risk group, re-bleeding occurred in 14 patients (78%). Rockall score was found to have good diagnostic accuracy with sensitivity of 87.5%, specificity of 97.48%, positive predictive value of 77.8% and negative predictive value of 98.7%. Conclusion: In cases of variceal bleed, frequency of re-bleed is less in patients who are in low risk category with lower Rockall score and high in high risk patients with higher rockall score. The Rockall score has a good diagnostic accuracy in prediction of re-bleed in variceal bleeding. (author)

  9. Arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Quinn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of biomechanical properties of arteries have become an important surrogate outcome used in epidemiological and interventional cardiovascular research. Structural and functional differences of vessels in the arterial tree result in a dampening of pulsatility and smoothing of blood flow as it progresses to capillary level. A loss of arterial elastic properties results a range of linked pathophysiological changes within the circulation including increased pulse pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, subendocardial ischaemia, vessel endothelial dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. With increased arterial stiffness, the microvasculature of brain and kidneys are exposed to wider pressure fluctuations and may lead to increased risk of stroke and renal failure. Stiffening of the aorta, as measured by the gold-standard technique of aortic Pulse Wave Velocity (aPWV, is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes across many different patient groups and in the general population. Therefore, use of aPWV has been proposed for early detection of vascular damage and individual cardiovascular risk evaluation and it seems certain that measurement of arterial stiffness will become increasingly important in future clinical care. In this review we will consider some of the pathophysiological processes that result from arterial stiffening, how it is measured and factors that may drive it as well as potential avenues for therapy. In the face of an ageing population where mortality from atheromatous cardiovascular disease is falling, pathology associated with arterial stiffening will assume ever greater importance. Therefore, understanding these concepts for all clinicians involved in care of patients with cardiovascular disease will become vital.

  10. Standardized protocol for artery-only fingertip replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntic, Rudolf F; Brooks, Darrell

    2010-09-01

    Artery-only fingertip replantation can be reliable if low-resistance flow through the replant is maintained until venous outflow is restored naturally. Injuring the tip of the replant to promote ongoing bleeding augmented with anticoagulation usually accomplishes this; however, such management results in prolonged hospitalization. In this study, we analyzed the outcomes of artery-only fingertip replantation using a standardized postoperative protocol consisting of dextran-40, heparin, and leech therapy. Between 2001 and 2008, we performed 19 artery-only fingertip replants for 17 patients. All patients had the replanted nail plate removed and received intravenous dextran-40, heparin, and aspirin to promote fingertip bleeding and vascular outflow. Anticoagulation was titrated to promote a controlled bleed until physiologic venous outflow was restored by neovascularization. We used medicinal leeches and mechanical heparin scrubbing for acute decongestion. By postoperative day 6, bleeding was no longer promoted. We initiated fluorescent dye perfusion studies to assess circulatory competence and direct further anticoagulant intervention if necessary. The absence of bleeding associated with an initial rise followed by an appropriate fall in fluorescent dye concentration would trigger a weaning of anticoagulation. All of the 19 replants survived. The average length of hospital stay was 9 days (range, 7-17 d). Eleven patients received blood transfusions. The average transfusion was 1.8 units (range, 0-9 units). All patients were happy with the decision to replant, and the cosmetic result. A protocol that promotes temporary, controlled bleeding from the fingertip is protective of artery-only replants distal to the distal interphalangeal joint until physiologic venous outflow is restored. The protocol described is both safe and reliable. The patient should be informed that such replant attempts may result in the need for transfusions and extended hospital stays, factors that

  11. Hemospray application in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Lyn A; Stanley, Adrian J; Bergman, Jacques J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemospray TM (TC-325) is a novel hemostatic agent licensed for use in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe. GOALS: We present the operating characteristics and performance of TC-325 in the largest registry to date of patients presenting with NVUGIB in everyday...... in combination with other hemostatic modalities at the endoscopists' discretion. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients (44 men, 19 women), median age 69 (range, 21 to 98) years with NVUGIB requiring endoscopic hemostasis were treated with TC-325. There were 30 patients with bleeding ulcers and 33 with other NVUGIB...... pathology. Fifty-five (87%) were treated with TC-325 as monotherapy; 47 [85%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 76%-94%] of them achieved primary hemostasis, and rebleeding rate at 7 days was 15% (95% CI, 5%-25%). Primary hemostasis rate for TC-325 in patients with ulcer bleeds was 76% (95% CI, 59%-93%). Eight...

  12. Fibrinogen concentrate for bleeding - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, J; Stensballe, J; Wikkelsø, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibrinogen concentrate as part of treatment protocols increasingly draws attention. Fibrinogen substitution in cases of hypofibrinogenaemia has the potential to reduce bleeding, transfusion requirement and subsequently reduce morbidity and mortality. A systematic search for randomised controlled...... trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies investigating fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients was conducted up to November 2013. We included 30 studies of 3480 identified (7 RCTs and 23 non-randomised). Seven RCTs included a total of 268 patients (165 adults and 103 paediatric), and all were...... determined to be of high risk of bias and none reported a significant effect on mortality. Two RCTs found a significant reduction in bleeding and five RCTs found a significant reduction in transfusion requirements. The 23 non-randomised studies included a total of 2825 patients, but only 11 of 23 studies...

  13. Endovascular management of acute bleeding arterioenteric fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonhardt, H.; Mellander, S.; Snygg, J.

    2008-01-01

    follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed....... All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean...... arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered. Patients with cancer may only need treatment for the acute bleeding episode, and an endovascular approach has the advantage...

  14. Bleeding stomal varices in portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Tran-Harding, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 50-year-old man with a history of liver cirrhosis and colon cancer post end colostomy presenting to the emergency department with stomal bleeding and passage of clots into the colostomy bag. The patient was treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS and concomitant embolization of the stomal varices via the TIPS shunt using N-butyl cyanoacrylate mixed with ethiodol. Although stomal variceal bleeding is uncommon, this entity can have up to 40% mortality upon initial presentation, given the challenges in diagnosis and management. Currently, there are no established standard treatments for stomal variceal bleeding. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, there are no cases in the current literature in which treatment of this entity is performed with a combination of TIPS shunt placement and N-butyl cyanoacrylate variceal embolization. Keywords: Stomal varices, TIPS, Cirrhosis, Colon cancer, Embolization, NBCA

  15. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  16. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  17. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Successful Management of Neobladder Variceal Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwal, Dinesh; Chatterjee, Kshitij, E-mail: kchatterjee@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States); Osborne, Scott [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Kakkera, Krishna; Deas, Steven [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States); Li, Ruizong [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Erbland, Marcia [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Hematuria from a neobladder can occur due to a variety of pathologies including tumors, stones, and fistulas. Variceal bleeding in a neobladder is a very rare condition with only one case reported in literature. We present a case of a patient with cirrhosis and portal hypertension and an ileocolic orthotopic neobladder presenting with hematuria. Computed tomographic angiography showed dilated varices around the neobladder which were successfully embolized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report case of variceal bleeding in a neobladder successfully managed with the combination of TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure and embolization.

  19. [Epidemiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Gabon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudong Mbethe, G L; Mounguengui, D; Ondounda, M; Magne, C; Bignoumbra, R; Ntsoumou, S; Moussavou Kombila, J-B; Nzenze, J R

    2014-01-01

    The department of internal medicine of the military hospital of Gabon managed 92 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from April 2009 to November 2011. The frequency of these hemorrhages in the department was 8.2%; they occurred most often in adults aged 30-40 years and 50-60 years, and mainly men (74%). Erosive-ulcerative lesions (65.2%) were the leading causes of hemorrhage, followed by esophageal varices (15.2%). These results underline the importance of preventive measures for the control of this bleeding.

  20. Interventional therapy of hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Songnian; Feng Bo; Su Hongying; Xu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the causes and clinical manifestations of hepatic arterial hemorrhage which occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and to summarize the practical experience in its diagnosis and treatment in order to decrease its incidence and mortality. Methods: During the period from June 2007 to June 2010, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was carried out in 622 cases, of which DSA-proved postoperative hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred in 11, including bile duct hemorrhage (n=6), abdominal cavity bleeding (n=3) and combination of bile duct and abdominal cavity (n=2). Interventional embolization of the bleeding branches of hepatic artery with Gelfoam and coils was carried out in all 11 patients. The clinical data such as clinical manifestations and therapeutic results were retrospectively analyzed. Results: After interventional embolization therapy for postoperative hepatic arterial hemorrhage the bleeding stopped in ten patients, who were discharged from hospital when the clinical conditions were alleviated. The remaining one patient died of sustained deterioration in hepatic and renal functions although the bleeding was ceased. Conclusion: Though hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a rare complication, it is dangerous and fatal. Hepatic arterial angiography together with interventional embolization is a sate and effective therapy for hepatic arterial hemorrhage. (authors)

  1. Prospective analysis of delayed colorectal post-polypectomy bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Kyung; Seo, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Min-Gu; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Choi, Kyu Yong; Kim, Hungdai; Kim, Hyung Ook; Jung, Kyung Uk; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Park, Dong Il

    2018-01-17

    Although post-polypectomy bleeding is the most frequent complication after colonoscopic polypectomy, only few studies have investigated the incidence of bleeding prospectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of delayed post-polypectomy bleeding and its associated risk factors prospectively. Patients who underwent colonoscopic polypectomy at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were prospectively enrolled in this study. Trained nurses contacted patients via telephone 7 and 30 days after polypectomy and completed a standardized questionnaire regarding the development of bleeding. Delayed post-polypectomy bleeding was categorized as minor or major and early or late bleeding. Major delayed bleeding was defined as a > 2-g/dL drop in the hemoglobin level, requiring hospitalization for control of bleeding or blood transfusion; late delayed bleeding was defined as bleeding occurring later than 24 h after polypectomy. A total of 8175 colonoscopic polypectomies were performed in 3887 patients. Overall, 133 (3.4%) patients developed delayed post-polypectomy bleeding. Among them, 90 (2.3%) and 43 (1.1%) patients developed minor and major delayed bleeding, respectively, and 39 (1.0%) patients developed late delayed bleeding. In the polyp-based multivariate analysis, young age ( 10 mm (OR 2.45; 95% CI 1.38-4.36) were significant risk factors for major delayed bleeding, while young age (< 50 years; OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.35-5.12) and immediate bleeding (OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.49-7.30) were significant risk factors for late delayed bleeding. Young age, aspirin use, polyp size, and immediate bleeding were found to be independent risk factors for delayed post-polypectomy bleeding.

  2. Transpedal approach for iliac artery stenting: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachariah, Jips J., E-mail: jzachariah@chpnet.org [Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital, New York, NY (Israel); Ratcliffe, Justin A.; Ruisi, Michael; Puma, Joseph [Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital, New York, NY (Israel); Bertrand, Olivier [Quebec Heart and Lung Institute, Quebec (Canada); Kwan, Tak [Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital, New York, NY (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    Objective: To demonstrate the safety and feasibility of the transpedal approach as an alternate arterial access site for iliac artery intervention. Background: The common femoral artery is the traditional access site for the endovascular treatment of iliac artery stenoses. However, this approach is associated with complication rates as high as 2%, including retroperitoneal bleeding which carries high patient morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the standard femoral approach is associated with longer recovery times and longer time to ambulation which are important considerations especially when performing procedures in an ambulatory setting. Methods: Twelve patients were prospectively followed after treatment for symptomatic iliac artery stenosis via transpedal access. Under ultrasound guidance, one of the pedal arteries was visualized and accessed, and stenting of the iliac arteries were performed as per protocol. The patient was monitored immediately post procedure and clinical follow up was performed at one week and one month later. Results: The average age of the patients was 71 years old. 58% were male. Most patients had Rutherford class III symptoms. Successful stent placement was achieved in all 12 patients via transpedal access. No conversion to femoral access was required. No complications immediately post procedure nor at any time period during follow up were noted. Lower extremity arterial duplex at one month showed patent stents and patent pedal access site vessels in all patients. Conclusion: Transpedal arterial access may be a safe and feasible approach for iliac artery stenting. Given the possible benefits of avoiding femoral artery access, larger studies should be conducted directly comparing the different approaches.

  3. Scintigraphic pattern of small bowel bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshu Rajnish Sharma; Charan, S.; Silva, I.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Small intestine is the longest part of gastrointestinal tract. Intra-luminal haemorrhage occurring anywhere in its long and tortuous course is difficult to trace. It is relatively inaccessible to endoscopic evaluation. Upper GI endoscopy can see only up to distal duodenum, whereas colonoscope can view maximum of 30 centimeters of terminal ileum after negotiating the scope through ileo-caecal valve. Hence, localization of bleeding source from small bowel remains a difficult clinical problem. This group of patients can be evaluated with scintigraphy for localizing the site of bleeding before undergoing either angiography or surgery. To our best of knowledge, there is no study, which has utilized scintigraphy for evaluation of small bowel bleed exclusively. The present study has been designed to know the efficacy of 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy in detecting small bowel bleed and to know whether it can differentiate between jejunal and ileal bleeding ? Materials and methods: Thirteen patients presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (malena) were enrolled for the study. In all cases, upper GI endoscopy (UGIE) was unremarkable. Colonoscopic examination was either negative or suspected bleeding occurring proximal to ileo-caecal valve. Thus, in these patients, it is presumed clinically that bleeding is originating from small bowel. Barium meal follow through (BMFT) studies, however, could not delineate any etiological lesion in these patients. There were 8 men and 5 women (mean age 48 years). All patients were anemic (Hb- 6 gm%) and mean 3 units of blood were transfused.These patients were subjected to Tc-99m labeled red blood cells scintigraphy (15 mci, in-vivo method) for localization of source of bleeding. The scintiscan was acquired in two phases. A first pass phase acquired at a rate of 2 seconds per frame for 60 seconds followed by acquisition of static abdominal images (500 K, 256 x 256 matrix) at 5 minutes intervals up to 90 minutes on LFOV gamma

  4. Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: Variceal and Nonvariceal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is generally defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz, which leads to hematemesis. There are several causes of UGI bleeding necessitating a detailed history to rule out comorbid conditions, medications, and possible exposures. In addition, the severity, timing, duration, and volume of the bleeding are important details to note for management purposes. Despite the source of the bleeding, acid suppression with a proton-pump inhibitor has been shown to be effective in minimizing rebleeding. Endoscopy remains the interventional modality of choice for both nonvariceal and variceal bleeds because it can be diagnostic and therapeutic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Parsley extract inhibits in vitro and ex vivo platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadi, Dounia; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Legrand, Chantal; Lafeve, Françoise Fauvel; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2009-08-17

    Many cardiovascular diseases are associated with an increase in blood platelet activity. In Morocco, parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) is one of the medicinal herbs used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arterial hypertension. In this study, crude aqueous extract (CAE) of parsley was evaluated for its anti-platelet activity in experimental animals on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo; and on bleeding time in vivo. The in vitro aggregation was monitored after pre-incubation of platelets with CAE. The bleeding time and ex vivo aggregation were performed after oral treatment. CAE inhibited dose dependently platelet aggregation in vitro induced by thrombin, ADP, collagen and epinephrine. The oral administration of CAE (3g/kg) inhibited significantly (pparsley may be benefit in the normalization of platelet hyperactivation, in the nutritional prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are potentially interesting in the development of new prevention strategies.

  6. Hepatic Artery Angiography and Embolization for Hemobilia Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, Tony; Travis, Simon; Ettles, Duncan; Dyet, John; Sedman, Peter; Wedgewood, Kevin; Royston, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The effectiveness of angiography and embolization in diagnosis and treatment were assessed in a cohort of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Over a 6-year period 1513 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were carried out in our region. Nine of these patients (0.6%) developed significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 5-43 days after surgery. All underwent emergency celiac and selective right hepatic artery angiography. All were treated by coil embolization of the right hepatic artery proximal and distal to the bleeding point. Results: Pseudoaneurysms of the hepatic artery adjacent to cholecystectomy clips were demonstrated in all nine patients at selective right hepatic angiography. In three patients celiac axis angiography alone failed to demonstrate the pseudoaneurysm. Embolization controlled hemorrhage in all patients with no further bleeding and no further intervention. One patient developed a candidal liver abscess in the post-procedure period. All patients are alive and well at follow-up. Conclusion: Selective right hepatic angiography is vital in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Embolization offers the advantage of minimally invasive treatment in unstable patients, does not disrupt recent biliary reconstruction, allows distal as well as proximal control of the hepatic artery, and is an effective treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication

  7. Evaluation of emergency transcatheter arterial embolization in intractable postpartum hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Weihong; Wang Song; Zhan Ying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of emergency transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of intractable postpartum hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty-five patients with intractable postpartum hemorrhage were undertaken superselective catheterization into the bilateral internal iliac arteries or uterial arteries to find the causes and sites of bleeding through DSA and then followed by arterial embolization with gelfoam particles. Result: All of the 25 patients with obstetrical bleeding were successfully controlled by TAE, the procedure lasted for 25-60 min, (mean 42.5 ± 4.6 min); with both catheterization and bleeding halt successful rates of 100%. Comparison of hemoglobin and heartbeat before and after the procedure showed significance (t=29.49, P<0.01; t=16.51, P<0.01). The uterus showed reintegration on time and menstruation resumed in all patients. Conclusions: Emergency arterial embolization is a safe and effective means for control of intractable postpartum hemorrhage, providing less trauma and no severe complications, especially as an unique management for fetal postpartum hemorrhage. (authors)

  8. The application of super-selective external carotid artery embolization in head and neck diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin Yongtong; Wei Dingtai; Lin Shifeng; Ye Jian'an; Chen Youying

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the application of super-selective external carotid artery embolization in head and neck diseases. Methods: DSA and super-selective external carotid artery embolization were carried out in 41 cases of head and neck diseases including 12 cases of epistaxis, 7 nasopharyngeal fibroangioma, 1 traumatic arterial bleeding, 14 vascular malformation, and 7 malignancies. Results: No recurrence of nose bleeding after embolization of epistaxis was seen within 6-12 month follow up. The operative bleeding was reduced significantly by preoperative embolization in nasopharyngeal fibroangioma. No recurrence of bleeding was reduced significantly by preoperative embolization in nasopharyngeal fibroangioma. No recurrence of bleeding was achieved after embolization of traumatic artery. Among the case of vascular malformation, 3 were proven to be significantly efficient, 6 efficient, and 5 inefficient in the 6-12 month follow up. Among the 7 malignant cases, 3 survived more than 2 years. Conclusion: Super-selective external carotid artery embolization is safe and effective in the treatment of head and neck diseases. (authors)

  9. Emergency readmission following acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömdahl, Martin; Helgeson, Johan; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the occurrence, clinical predictors, and associated mortality of all-cause emergency readmissions after acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB). PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients with AUGIB from an area of 600 000 inhabitants in Sweden admitted in a single institution...

  10. Continued bleeding following acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    In this Ph.D. thesis, ‘Continued bleeding following acute intracerebral hemorrhage’, we have discussed the background literature, risk factors, and underlying biology of hematoma expansion, as well as the clinical applicability of the CT angiography (CTA) 'spot sign' as an imaging marker of this

  11. Massive rectal bleeding from colonic diverticulosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    barium enema studies have indicated increasing world prevalence ... Other diagnostic modalities include barium enema, computerised ... This is in contrast to the findings in our patient when colonoscopy was carried out, in which the diverticula were more at the descending colon-left sided, and were found to be bleeding.

  12. Management of Acute Bleeding Per Rectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benita K.T. Tan

    2004-01-01

    Conclusion: Perianal conditions contributed to the majority of acute patient admissions. Colonic causes of bleeding were less common and were most stable. There were differences in the frequencies of aetiologies in our population compared to Western populations. Understanding the common pathologies and outcomes guides the management of our patients.

  13. Medical treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jen Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy menstrual bleeding, or menorrhagia, is subjectively defined as a “complaint of a large amount of bleeding during menstrual cycles that occurs over several consecutive cycles” and is objectively defined as menstrual blood loss of more than 80 mL per cycle that is associated with an anemia status (defined as a hemoglobin level of <10 g/dL. During their reproductive age, more than 30% of women will complain of or experience a heavy amount of bleeding, which leads to a debilitating health outcome, including significantly reduced health-related quality of life, and a considerable economic burden on the health care system. Although surgical treatment might be the most important definite treatment, especially hysterectomy for those women who have finished bearing children, the uterus is still regarded as the regulator and controller of important physiological functions, a sexual organ, a source of energy and vitality, and a maintainer of youth and attractiveness. This has resulted in a modern trend in which women may reconsider the possibility of organ preservation. For women who wish to retain the uterus, medical treatment may be one of the best alternatives. In this review, recent trends in the management of women with heavy menstrual bleeding are discussed.

  14. Systemic causes of heavy menstrual bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common problem in fertile women. In addition to local factors, such as a polyp or a uterine fibroid, systemic causes may lead to HMB. These systemic causes are discussed in this thesis. For years, women with HMB were tested underlying thyroid disorder, but our

  15. Endometrial biopsy findings in postmenopausal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfraz, T.; Tariq, H.

    2007-01-01

    To study endometrial histopathology in women presenting with postmenopausal bleeding. A two-year study from January 2003 to December 2004 of 100 cases of postmenopausal bleeding was conducted at Combined Military Hospital, Sialkot. The histopathology of endometrial biopsy specimens was done to find out the causes of postmenopausal bleeding in these ladies. All these 100 patients had confirmed menopause and the average age was 55 years and above. The most common histopathological diagnosis was senile endometrial atrophy (27%), followed by simple cystic hyperplasia in (17%). Three cases of simple cystic hyperplasia had coexistent ovarian tumors. Glandular hyperplasia without atypia was seen in 6% and with atypia in 4%. Other causes were endometritis (13%), endometrial polyps (8%), proliferative phase endometrium (6%) and secretary phase endometrium (5%). Endometrial carcinoma was seen in (6%) cases, (8%) biopsy specimens were non-representative. Although senile endometrial atrophy was most commonly found in these ladies but a significant percentage of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer implies the need for investigating all cases of postmenopausal bleeding. Bimanual examination and pelvic ultrasonography should be combined with endometrial sampling so that rare pelvic pathologies may not be missed. (author)

  16. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other...

  17. Gastrointestinal bleeding following NSAID ingestion in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both presented with a history of fever and passage of bloody stools. There was a positive history of NSAID ingestion in both patients that was prescribed in the referring hospitals. ..... Bostwick HE, Halata MS, Feerick J, Newman LJ, Medow MS. Gastrointestinal bleeding in children following ingestion of low-dose. Ibuprofen.

  18. Dysfunctional uterine bleedings of a climacteric period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prilepskaya, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    Climacteric period of some women is complicated by dysfunctional uterine bleedings (DUB). Bearing in mind the fact that DUBS are caused by disorder of estrin rhysmic secretion, the paper presents the methods of differential diagnostics for investigations into functional disorders in the hypothalamus -hypophysis - ovaries - uterus system. The preference is given to roentgenologic and radioimmunologic diagnostic methods

  19. Arterial embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when a clot in a vein enters the right side of the heart and passes through a hole into the left side. The clot can then move to an artery and block blood flow to the brain (stroke) or other organs. If a clot involves ...

  20. Ligation of the internal maxillary artery for intractable epistaxis. 3D imaging of internal maxillary artery using helical CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Toru; Yazin, Koji; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro; Fukushima, Noriyuki; Takumida, Masaya; Hirata, Shitau; Iguchi, Tetsuhiko; Amano, Yoshiharu

    2001-01-01

    Sever posterior epistaxis is one of the serious clinical problems. Nasal bleeding usually occurs in the anterior septal region, where it can be seen easily and controlled with topical cautery or localized packing. When the bleeding occurs in the posterior nose, it becomes a more serious problem. Many methods have been used to control posterior epistaxis. Some of these are electrocautery, posterior nasal packing, vascular ligation and therapeutic percutaneous embolization. Between 1997 and 2000, nineteen patients were admitted to our hospital because of intractable epistaxis. There were 16 male and 3 female patients whose average age was 55 years. Ten of 19 patients were hypertensive, and none of these had undergoing treatment. Five of 19 patients received maxillary artery ligation. Clinical applications of 3D imaging of the internal maxillary artery using helical CT scan were done for 5 patients. These images were helpful for planning of ligation of the internal maxillary artery. (author)

  1. Ligation of the internal maxillary artery for intractable epistaxis. 3D imaging of internal maxillary artery using helical CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, Toru [Akitsu Prefectual Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Yazin, Koji; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro; Fukushima, Noriyuki; Takumida, Masaya; Hirata, Shitau; Iguchi, Tetsuhiko; Amano, Yoshiharu

    2001-03-01

    Sever posterior epistaxis is one of the serious clinical problems. Nasal bleeding usually occurs in the anterior septal region, where it can be seen easily and controlled with topical cautery or localized packing. When the bleeding occurs in the posterior nose, it becomes a more serious problem. Many methods have been used to control posterior epistaxis. Some of these are electrocautery, posterior nasal packing, vascular ligation and therapeutic percutaneous embolization. Between 1997 and 2000, nineteen patients were admitted to our hospital because of intractable epistaxis. There were 16 male and 3 female patients whose average age was 55 years. Ten of 19 patients were hypertensive, and none of these had undergoing treatment. Five of 19 patients received maxillary artery ligation. Clinical applications of 3D imaging of the internal maxillary artery using helical CT scan were done for 5 patients. These images were helpful for planning of ligation of the internal maxillary artery. (author)

  2. Splenic Arterial Embolization in the Treatment of Severe Portal Hypertension Due to Pancreatic Diseases: The Primary Experience in 14 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi, E-mail: wqtjmu@gmail.com; Xiong, Bin, E-mail: herrxiong@126.com; Zheng, ChuanSheng, E-mail: hqzcsxh@sina.com; Liang, Ming, E-mail: whliangming@163.com; Han, Ping, E-mail: cjr.hanping@vip.163.com [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College (China)

    2016-03-15

    ObjectiveThis retrospective study reports our experience using splenic arterial particle embolization and coil embolization for the treatment of sinistral portal hypertension (SPH) in patients with and without gastric bleeding.MethodsFrom August 2009 to May 2012, 14 patients with SPH due to pancreatic disease were diagnosed and treated with splenic arterial embolization. Two different embolization strategies were applied; either combined distal splenic bed particle embolization and proximal splenic artery coil embolization in the same procedure for acute hemorrhage (1-step) or interval staged distal embolization and proximal embolization in the stable patient (2-step). The patients were clinically followed.ResultsIn 14 patients, splenic arterial embolization was successful. The one-step method was performed in three patients suffering from massive gastric bleeding, and the bleeding was relieved after embolization. The two-step method was used in 11 patients, who had chronic gastric variceal bleeding or gastric varices only. The gastric varices disappeared in the enhanced CT scan and the patients had no gastric bleeding during follow-up.ConclusionsSplenic arterial embolization, particularly the two-step method, proved feasible and effective for the treatment of SPH patients with gastric varices or gastric variceal bleeding.

  3. Bleeding in cancer patients and its treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Candice; Rich, Shayna E

    2017-12-18

    Bleeding is a common problem in cancer patients, related to local tumor invasion, tumor angiogenesis, systemic effects of the cancer, or anti-cancer treatments. Existing bleeds can also be exacerbated by medications such as bevacizumab, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and anticoagulants. Patients may develop acute catastrophic bleeding, episodic major bleeding, or low-volume oozing. Bleeding may present as bruising, petechiae, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematemesis, hematochezia, melena, hematuria, or vaginal bleeding. Therapeutic intervention for bleeding should start by establishing goals of care, and treatment choice should be guided by life expectancy and quality of life. Careful thought should be given to discontinuation of medications and reversal of anticoagulation. Interventions to stop or slow bleeding may include systemic agents or transfusion of blood products. Noninvasive local treatment options include applied pressure, dressings, packing, and radiation therapy. Invasive local treatments include percutaneous embolization, endoscopic procedures, and surgical treatment.

  4. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  5. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@126.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology (China)

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  6. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications

  7. To Bleed or Not to Bleed: That is the Question. The Side Effects of Apixaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Zito, Annapaola; Devito, Fiorella; Maiello, Maria; Palmiero, Pasquale

    2018-01-01

    Apixaban is a new oral anticoagulant (NOACs: Novel Oral Anticoagulant), like dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban. All of them are prescribed to patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolism, to replace warfarin, because of the lower probability of bleeding, however they can cause bleeding by themselves. Bleeding is an adverse event in patients taking anticoagulants. It is associated with a significant increase of morbidity and risk of death. However, these drugs should be used only for the time when anticoagulation is strictly required, especially when used for preventing deep vein thrombosis. Prolonged use increases the risk of bleeding. In the ARISTOTLE Trial Apixaban, compared with warfarin, was associated with a lower rate of intracranial hemorrhages and less adverse consequences following extracranial hemorrhage. Many physicians still have limited experience with new oral anticoagulants and about bleeding risk managment. We reviewed the available literature on extracranial and intracranial bleeding concerning apixaban. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. EFFECT OF POSITIONING ON BLEEDING COMPLICATION AND LOW BACK PAIN AFTER DIAGNOSTIC CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE IN AN INTEGRATED HEART CARE CENTER IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia Febriana Christi Tyas Utami

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary angiography can cause complications of arterial and subcutaneous bleeding (hematoma and back pain. Changing the position of the patient (positioning in bed can reduce the pain post-diagnostic catheterization complications. Objective: This study was to examine the effect of positioning on bleeding complication and low back pain after diagnostic coronary angiography in patients with coronary heart disease patient in the Integrated Heart Care Center in Indonesia. Methods: This study was a true-experimental study with randomized posttest-only control group design. Thirty respondents were randomly selected using simple random sampling, which 15 respondents were randomly assigned in the experiment group and control group. The experiment group was given a positioning with 150, 300, 450 head-of-bed elevation in left and right lateral position. An arc tool was used to measure the height of head of bed elevation, a measuring cup to measure arterial bleeding using, a perforated transparent plastic with 5 cm diameter to measure subcutaneous bleeding (hematoma, and Numeric Pain Rating Scale to measure low back pain. Data were analyzed using Kolmogorov- Smirnov and Repeated Measured ANOVA. Results: Findings showed that positioning had no effect on arterial hemorrhage (ρ=1.000 and subcutaneous bleeding (hematoma (ρ=0.999. Repeated ANOVA test results revealed that positioning had a significant effect on low back pain (ρ=0.017. Conclusion: There was no significant effect of positioning on the occurrence of arterial and subcutaneous bleeding (hematoma, but there was a significant effect in reducing low back pain.

  9. Traumatic Anterior Cerebral Artery Pseudoaneurysmal Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing Lin; Xue, Hao; Qi, Chang Jing; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Dong Hai; Li, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is a rare but emergent condition. We report a case of traumatic anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis and review the published literature. A 49-year-old man sustained severe head trauma. He was diagnosed with multiple skull bone fractures, left subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pneumocephalus, and right frontal hematoma. Subdural hematoma evacuation was done at a local hospital. In the following months, he experienced repeated epistaxis that required nasal packing to stop the bleeding. Digital subtraction angiography showed an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm protruding into the posterior ethmoid sinus. Embolization of the aneurysm was performed with microcoils, and the parent artery was occluded by thrombosis. The patient presented 1 month later with another epistaxis episode. Digital subtraction angiography showed recanalization of the parent artery and recurrence of the aneurysm. The parent artery was occluded for the second time with coils and Onyx embolic agent. Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is rare, and this is the first report of an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm that manifested with epistaxis. Endovascular intervention has become the first choice of treatment for this disease. The high recurrence rate is the main disadvantage of endovascular intervention. Aneurysm trapping with bypass surgery is another treatment option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. No increased systemic fibrinolysis in women with heavy menstrual bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiewel-Verschueren, S.; Knol, H. M.; Lisman, T.; Bogchelman, D. H.; Kluin-Nelemans, J. C.; van der Zee, A.G.J.; Mulder, A.B.; Meijer, K.

    BackgroundBleeding disorders have been recognized as important etiologic or contributory factors in women with heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibrinolysis in the endometrium plays a role in heavy menstrual bleeding. It is unknown whether increased systemic fibrinolysis might also increase the risk of

  11. Scintigraphic detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, A.

    1988-01-01

    Successful management of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding usually depends on accurate localization of the bleeding site. History and clinical findings are often misleading in determination of the site of hemorrhage. The widespread application of flexible endoscopy and selective arteriography now provide accurate diagnoses for the majority of patients bleeding from the upper GI tract, but lower GI bleeding still poses a serious diagnostic challenge. Endoscopy and barium studies are of limited value in examining the small bowel and colon in the face of active hemorrhage. Arteriography, although successful in many cases (3-5), has limitations. The angiographic demonstration of bleeding is possible only when the injection of contrast material coincides with active bleeding at a rate greater than 0.5 ml/min, and since lower GI bleeding is commonly intermittent rather than continuous, a high rate of negative angiographic examinations has been reported. The diagnosis of lower GI bleeding is usually easy to make. In contrast, localizing the site of bleeding may be extremely difficult. Using the techniques described the nuclear physician may be able to detect the bleeding site precisely. However, if the cautions detailed are not observed, the tracer studies will show GI bleeding, but not at the true bleeding site. This must be carefully understood and avoided. Done correctly, these tests can have a major impact on patient care

  12. Comparing Bleeding Risk Assessment Focused on Modifiable Risk Factors Only Versus Validated Bleeding Risk Scores in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yutao; Zhu, Hang; Chen, Yundai

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUNDThere is uncertainty whether a focus on modifiable bleeding risk factors offers better prediction of major bleeding than other existing bleeding risk scores.METHODSThis study compared a score based on numbers of the modifiable bleeding risk factors recommended in the 2016 European...... guidelines ("European risk score") versus other published bleeding risk scores that have been derived and validated in atrial fibrillation subjects (HEMORR2HAGES, HAS-BLED, ATRIA, and ORBIT) in a large hospital-based cohort of Chinese inpatients with atrial fibrillation.RESULTSThe European score had modest...... predictive ability for major bleeding (c-index 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.56-0.69) and intracranial hemorrhage (0.72, 0.65-0.79) but nonsignificantly (and poorly) predicted extracranial bleeding (0.55, 0.54-0.56; P = .361). The HAS-BLED score was superior to predict bleeding events compared...

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding- evaluation by Endometrial Aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pratibha

    2018-01-01

    Endometrial evaluation is generally indicated in cases presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB), especially in women more than 35 years of age. AUB encompasses a variety of presentation, for example, heavy menstrual bleeding, frequent bleeding, irregular vaginal bleeding, postcoital and postmenopausal bleeding to name a few. Many methods are used for the evaluation of such cases, with most common being sonography and endometrial biopsy with very few cases requiring more invasive approach like hysteroscopy. Endometrial aspiration is a simple and safe office procedure used for this purpose. We retrospectively analyzed cases of AUB where endometrial aspiration with Pipette (Medgyn) was done in outpatient department between January 2015 and April 2016. Case records (both paper and electronic) were used to retrieve data. One hundred and fifteen cases were included in the study after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most cases were between 46 and 50 years of age followed by 41-45 years. No cases were below 25 or more than 65 years of age. Heavy menstrual bleeding was the most common presentation of AUB. Adequate samples were obtained in 86% of cases while 13.9% of cases' sample was inadequate for opinion, many of which were later underwent hysteroscopy and/or dilatation and curettage (D and C) in operation theater; atrophic endometrium was the most common cause for inadequate sample. Uterine malignancy was diagnosed in three cases. Endometrial aspiration has been compared with traditional D and C as well as postoperative histopathology in various studies with good results. Many such studies are done in India as well as in western countries confirming good correlation with histopathology and adequate tissue sample for the pathologist to give a confident diagnosis. No complication or side effect was noted with the use of this device. Endometrial aspiration is a simple, safe, and effective method to sample endometrium in cases of AUB avoiding risk of

  14. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding- evaluation by Endometrial Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Singh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial evaluation is generally indicated in cases presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB, especially in women more than 35 years of age. AUB encompasses a variety of presentation, for example, heavy menstrual bleeding, frequent bleeding, irregular vaginal bleeding, postcoital and postmenopausal bleeding to name a few. Many methods are used for the evaluation of such cases, with most common being sonography and endometrial biopsy with very few cases requiring more invasive approach like hysteroscopy. Endometrial aspiration is a simple and safe office procedure used for this purpose. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed cases of AUB where endometrial aspiration with Pipette (Medgyn was done in outpatient department between January 2015 and April 2016. Case records (both paper and electronic were used to retrieve data. Results: One hundred and fifteen cases were included in the study after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most cases were between 46 and 50 years of age followed by 41–45 years. No cases were below 25 or more than 65 years of age. Heavy menstrual bleeding was the most common presentation of AUB. Adequate samples were obtained in 86% of cases while 13.9% of cases' sample was inadequate for opinion, many of which were later underwent hysteroscopy and/or dilatation and curettage (D and C in operation theater; atrophic endometrium was the most common cause for inadequate sample. Uterine malignancy was diagnosed in three cases. Discussion: Endometrial aspiration has been compared with traditional D and C as well as postoperative histopathology in various studies with good results. Many such studies are done in India as well as in western countries confirming good correlation with histopathology and adequate tissue sample for the pathologist to give a confident diagnosis. No complication or side effect was noted with the use of this device. Conclusion: Endometrial aspiration is a simple, safe, and

  15. A coincidental variation of the axillary artery: the brachioradial artery and the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Konarik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery was encountered and described in a left upper limb of a male cadaver. A series of 214 upper limbs of Caucasian race was dissected. A variant artery, stemming from the very end of the axillary artery followed a superficial course distally. It passed the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm as usual radial artery, crossed ventrally to the palm and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of the brachioradial artery (incorrectly termed as the “radial artery with high origin”. Moreover, it was associated with another variation, concerning the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is essential for radiodiagnostic, surgical and traumatologic procedures. The superficially located artery brings an elevated danger of heavy bleeding in all unexpected situations, its variant branching can cause problems in radial catheterization procedures and the anomalously coursing other arterial variant poses an elevated danger in surgical procedures concerning the surgical neck of humerus.

  16. Rare case-series of electrocautery burn following off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Niazi, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: With an increasing number of off-pump coronary artery surgery procedures in high-risk patients with coagulopathy, including renal failure, hepatic failure and anticoagulant drug-using patients, the frequency of related complications such as repeated exploration for bleeding is also increasing. The associated co-morbidity and repeated use of electrocautery in postoperative bleeding leaves patients susceptible to electrocautery ulcers. In this case series, rare cases of cautery burn with unique causative mechanisms are described. PMID:23669602

  17. Treatment Modalities in Adolescents Who present With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaqzam, Tasneem S; Stanley, Angela C; Simpson, Pippa M; Flood, Veronica H; Menon, Seema

    2018-03-07

    This study sought to determine the relationship of bleeding disorders to iron deficiency anemia. Additionally, this study was undertaken to examine all current treatment modalities used in a menorrhagia clinic with respect to heavy menstrual bleeding management to identify the most effective options for menstrual management in the setting of an underlying bleeding disorder. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANT, INTERVENTION, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Retrospective chart review of adolescent <21 years with heavy menstrual bleeding attending a multidisciplinary hematology-adolescent gynecology clinic. Information included demographics, bleeding diathesis, hematologic parameters, treatment, and the diagnosis was extracted from each chart. Subjects were grouped into two categories based on the diagnosis of a bleeding disorder. Hemoglobin level, iron deficiency anemia, and need for transfusion were compared between a bleeding disorder and no bleeding disorder group. Subjects were grouped into categories depending on hormonal modality and treatment success of the groups were compared. 73 subjects tested for a bleeding disorder. Of the subjects completing testing, 34 (46%) were diagnosed with a bleeding disorders. 39 (54%) subjects had heavy menstrual bleeding due to other causes. There was no significant difference in hemoglobin between those with and without a bleeding disorder. Iron deficiency anemia was significantly higher in subjects without bleeding disorder. When comparing hormone therapy success, the levonorgestrel IUD (LNG-IUD) (89%) had the highest rate of menstrual suppression followed by norethindrone acetate 5-10mg/day (83%), and the transdermal patch (80%). All subjects using both tranexamic acid and hormonal therapy had 100% achievement of menstrual suppression. A high frequency of bleeding disorder was found in those tested. Subjects with a bleeding disorder were less likely to present with severe anemia requiring blood transfusion and less likely to have iron

  18. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  19. Bleeding risk in 'real world' patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison of two established bleeding prediction schemes in a nationwide cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J B; Lip, G Y H; Hansen, P R

    2011-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is a double-edged sword, because it decreases the risk of stroke at the cost of an increased risk of bleeding. We compared the performance of a new bleeding prediction scheme, HAS-BLED, with an older bleeding prediction scheme...

  20. Bleeding during gonioscopy after deep sclerectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Montañés, Javier; Rodríguez-Conde, Rosa

    2003-10-01

    To show a new complication after deep sclerectomy (DS). We described two eyes of two patients with open-angle glaucoma and cataract who were operated on of an uneventful phacoemulsification and DS with SK-gel implantation. Bleeding during gonioscopic examination occurred in both eyes 7 and 8 months after combined surgery. The blood originated from the vessels around the Descemet window, and was probably due to manipulation or rocking of the goniolens. Pressure was immediately applied to the gonioscopic lens and the hyphema was interrupted. These cases show the presence of new vessels around the Descemet window after DS with SK-gel. Bleeding from the Descemet window vessels can occur during gonioscopy even months after DS. We recommend conducting a careful gonioscopic examination in patients who have undergone DS to avoid this complication.

  1. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection using urease rapid test in patients with bleeding duodenal ulcer: influence of endoscopic signs and simultaneous corporal and antral biopsies Diagnóstico de la infección por Helicobacter pylori mediante el test rápido de la ureasa en pacientes con hemorragia por úlcera duodenal: influencia de los signos endoscópicos de sangrado y de la obtención simultánea de biopsias de cuerpo y antro gástrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castro Fernández

    2004-09-01

    patients with combined antral and fundic biopsies. In group A, urease test was positive in 90.5% of patients; in group B, it was positive in 89.5% of patients, and in group C, the test turned positive in 75.4% of patients. Statistical differences were only reached when patients in group C were compared to patients in groups A and B together (p = 0.037. Conclusions: 1. The presence of either blood in the stomach or recent bleeding endoscopic signs appeared not to be the conditioning factor for the decreased sensitivity of urease test among patients with bleeding duodenal ulcer. 2. The decreased sensitivity of this test in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding is more evident during the resolution stage, and it does not seem to occur because of H. pylori migration from the antrum to the corporal gastric region.Introducción: la sensibilidad de los métodos diagnósticos invasivos de infección por H. pylori, especialmente el test rápido de la ureasa, disminuye en los casos de úlcera gastro-duodenal y hemorragia digestiva. Objetivos: valorar la influencia de la presencia de sangre en estómago o de signos endoscópicos de sangrado en la sensibilidad del test rápido de la ureasa en pacientes con hemorragia por úlcera duodenal, así como la influencia de la obtención de biopsias de cuerpo y antro gástrico. Pacientes y métodos: incluimos 120 pacientes, 85 varones y 35 mujeres, con edad media de 62 (18-88 años, con hemorragia por úlcera duodenal y diagnóstico endoscópico en las primeras 24 horas del ingreso. Ningún paciente había consumido antiinflamatorios no esteroideos, inhibidores de la bomba de protones o antibióticos en las dos semanas previas a la hemorragia digestiva, ni había recibido tratamiento frente a H. pylori. En este grupo seleccionado de pacientes admitimos una tasa de infección de prácticamente el 100%. Investigamos la infección por H. pylori mediante biopsias de antro (69 casos o de cuerpo y antro (51 casos gástricos para test de

  2. Risk Factors for Post-TAVI Bleeding According to the VARC-2 Bleeding Definition and Effect of the Bleeding on Short-Term Mortality: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayang; Yu, Wenyuan; Jin, Qi; Li, Yaqiong; Liu, Nan; Hou, Xiaotong; Yu, Yang

    2017-04-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) bleeding (per Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 [VARC-2] bleeding criteria) on 30-day postoperative mortality and examined the correlation between pre- or intraoperative variables and bleeding. Multiple electronic literature databases were searched using predefined criteria, with bleeding defined per Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria. A total of 10 eligible articles with 3602 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that post-TAVI bleeding was associated with a 323% increase in 30-day postoperative mortality (odds risk [OR]; 4.23, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.80-6.40; P logistic regression analysis revealed that atrial fibrillation (AF) was independently correlated with TAVI-associated bleeding (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.33-5.21; P = 0.005). Meta-regression showed that potential modifiers like the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score, mortality, the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE), aortic valve area, mean pressure gradient, left ventricular ejection fraction, preoperative hemoglobin and platelet levels, and study design had no significant effects on the results of the meta-analysis. Post-TAVI bleeding, in particular, major bleeding/life-threatening bleeding, increased 30-day postoperative mortality. Transapical access was a significant bleeding risk factor. Preexisting AF independently correlated with TAVI-associated bleeding, likely because of AF-related anticoagulation. Recognition of the importance and determinants of post-TAVI bleeding should lead to strategies to improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Heavy menstrual bleeding: An update on management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Joanna; Kadir, Rezan A

    2017-03-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is defined as excessive menstrual blood loss (MBL) >80 mL per cycle, that interferes with a woman's physical, emotional, social wellbeing and quality of life. Aetiology is due to underlying uterine pathologies, coagulopathy, ovulation dysfunction, or iatrogenic. Up to 20% of women with HMB will have an underlying inherited bleeding disorder (IBD). Assessment of HMB should entail a menstrual and gynaecological history and a bleeding score to distinguish those women who require additional haematological investigations. A pelvic examination and ultrasound scan help to rule out presence of any underlying pathology. Management depends on the underlying cause and the woman's preference and her fertility wishes. Medical therapies include hormonal treatments; levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and combined hormonal contraceptives are most commonly used. Ulipristal acetate is an approved preoperative treatment for uterine fibroids, and has demonstrated efficacy in reducing MBL. Haemostatic therapies include tranexamic acid and DDAVP (1-deamino-8-D-arginine). DDAVP is used for HMB associated with certain IBDs. These therapies can be used in isolation or in combination with hormonal treatments. HMB associated with certain severe IBDs may require factor concentrate administration during menses to alleviate symptoms. Endometrial ablation is a minor surgical procedure that is associated with low operative morbidity and can be performed as an outpatient. Hysterectomy remains the definitive treatment of choice when medical therapies have failed and endometrial ablation is not suitable. Crown Copyright © 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Peripheral arterial disease in a female using high-dose combined oral contraceptive pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavee, P; Samal, Sunita; Samal, Rupal

    2013-01-01

    The association between oral contraceptive (OC) pills and vascular diseases is well-known, although, the present generation of pills is considered to be relatively safer in this regard. Hormonal treatment for severe abnormal uterine bleeding is usually considered after ruling out malignancy, when such bleeding is resistant to all other forms of treatment. We report a case of severe peripheral arterial disease in a female, who had been on high-dose OC pills for an extended period of time for severe uterine bleeding.

  5. The usefulness of MDCT in acute intestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kum Rae; Park, Won Kyu; Kim, Jae Woon; Chang, Jay Chun; Jang, Han Won

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of MDCT for localizing a bleeding site and for helping make a decision on further management for acute intestinal bleeding. We conducted a retrospective review of 17 consecutive patients who presented with acute intestinal bleeding and who also underwent MDCT before angiography or surgery. The sensitivity of MDCT for detecting acute intestinal bleeding was assessed and compared with that of conventional angiography. The sensitivity of MDCT for the detection of acute intestinal bleeding was 77% (13 or 17), whereas that of angiography was 46% (6 or 13). All the bleeding points that were subsequently detected on angiography were visualized on MDCT. In three cases, the bleeding focus was detected on MDCT and not on angiography. In four cases, both MDCT and angiography did not detect the bleeding focus; for one of these cases, CT during SMA angiography was performed and this detected the active bleeding site. In patients with acute intestinal bleeding, MDCT is a useful image modality to detect the bleeding site and to help decide on further management before performing angiography or surgery. When tumorous lesions are detected, invasive angiography can be omitted

  6. Uterine artery embolization: an effective treatment for intractable obstetric haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, T.-M.; Tseng, H.-S. E-mail: hstseng@vghtpe.gov.tw; Lee, R.-C.; Wang, J.-H.; Chang, C.-Y

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To present the findings of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in the management of obstetric haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From October 1999 to February 2003, 10 women with postpartum haemorrhage (n=7) and post-abortion haemorrhage with placenta accreta (n=3), were referred to our department for pelvic angiography and possible arterial embolization. RESULTS: Angiography revealed engorged and tortuous uterine arteries in all patients; and contrast medium extravasation in three patients. Eight patients (three with and five without detectable active bleeding) then underwent bilateral UAE. Medium-sized (250-355 {mu}m) polyvinyl alcohol particles were injected via a coaxial catheter into the uterine arteries, followed by gelatin sponge pieces via a 4 F Cobra catheter. Microcoil devascularization was also performed in the two patients with visible, active bleeding. The vaginal bleeding resolved in all patients, without any ischaemic complications. At follow-up, all patients who underwent UAE had normal menstruation; three of them subsequently gave birth to full-term healthy babies. CONCLUSION: Selective UAE by the coaxial method is safe and effective to control obstetric haemorrhage, with the potential to preserve fertility.

  7. [Minimally invasive coronary artery surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalaquett, R; Howard, M; Irarrázaval, M J; Morán, S; Maturana, G; Becker, P; Medel, J; Sacco, C; Lema, G; Canessa, R; Cruz, F

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing interest to perform a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) on a beating heart through a minimally invasive access to the chest cavity. To report the experience with minimally invasive coronary artery surgery. Analysis of 11 patients aged 48 to 79 years old with single vessel disease that, between 1996 and 1997, had a LIMA graft to the LAD performed through a minimally invasive left anterior mediastinotomy, without cardiopulmonary bypass. A 6 to 10 cm left parasternal incision was done. The LIMA to the LAD anastomosis was done after pharmacological heart rate and blood pressure control and a period of ischemic pre conditioning. Graft patency was confirmed intraoperatively by standard Doppler techniques. Patients were followed for a mean of 11.6 months (7-15 months). All patients were extubated in the operating room and transferred out of the intensive care unit on the next morning. Seven patients were discharged on the third postoperative day. Duplex scanning confirmed graft patency in all patients before discharge; in two patients, it was confirmed additionally by arteriography. There was no hospital mortality, no perioperative myocardial infarction and no bleeding problems. After follow up, ten patients were free of angina, in functional class I and pleased with the surgical and cosmetic results. One patient developed atypical angina on the seventh postoperative month and a selective arteriography confirmed stenosis of the anastomosis. A successful angioplasty of the original LAD lesion was carried out. A minimally invasive left anterior mediastinotomy is a good surgical access to perform a successful LIMA to LAD graft without cardiopulmonary bypass, allowing a shorter hospital stay and earlier postoperative recovery. However, a larger experience and a longer follow up is required to define its role in the treatment of coronary artery disease.

  8. A clinical evaluation of the intraluminal bronchial artery infusion with reptilase or plus additional target artery embolization in treatment of severe hemoptysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Puxuan; Cai Xiongmao; Cao Mairui; Yu Weiye; Yang Gendong; Chen Xinchun; Sun Yanzhi; Liu Jinqing; Gong Xiaolong; Fu Xiangdong; Deng Yongcong; Liu Zhi; Zheng Guangping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of bronchial artery infusion with Reptilase or plus additional target artery embolization in treatment of massive hemoptysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Among 34 patients with massive hemoptysis (≥600 ml/24 hours) resultant from pulmonary tuberculosis, 21 cases (group 1) received by bronchial artery infusion with Reptilase (1-3KU) plus target artery embolization with gelfoam sponge. In the rest 13 cases (group 2) a simple bronchial artery infusion with Reptilase (1-3KU) was performed because the bleeding target arteries were inaccessible. Results: In total 32 cases out of 34 (94.1%) the hemoptysis ceased after the intervention, while 1 case in each group respectively needed further surgery. Among the cured 34 cases, single treatment was done in 32 cases, twice interventions were performed in 1 case and triple intraluminal therapies were done in 1 case. There is no significant difference between the efficiency of the treatment applied in group 1 and group 2 (P>0.05). Conclusion: Bronchial artery infusion with Reptilase or plus additional target artery embolization is effective and safe method in the management of massive hemoptysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. When the target the bleed artery is inaccessible, local intraluminal infusion with Reptilase (1-3KU) is an acceptable option

  9. Temporary balloon occlusion as therapy for uncontrollable arterial hemorrhage in multiply injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, J.; Linsenmaier, U.; Rock, C.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Euler, E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Presentation of temporary balloon occlusion as an interventional radiological method for managing hemorrhage in multiply injured patients with uncontrollable loss of blood. Method: Temporary, non-selective arterial occlusion by introduction of a balloon catheter contralaterally to the source of bleeding has been performed since 1992 on 7 patients with multiple injuries, hemorrhagic shock requiring reanimation, and angiographic demonstration of an arterial hemorrhage in the supply region of the internal iliac artery with complex pelvic fracture. In each case a PTA balloon catheter was introduced transfemorally, non-selectively positioned proximal to the bleeding source, and left in place for 24-48 h under manometric control. Control angiographies were performed prior to catheter removal. Results: The bleeding was stopped immediately in all 7 patients. The hemodynamic stability made transport and thus further surgical management and/or a short-term treatment in the intensive-care station possible. Control angiographies confirmed that the bleeding had stopped in all patients. Conclusions: We recommend temporary balloon occlusion as a rapid and effective method for the management of bleeding in otherwise uncontrollable traumatic hemorrhages in the supply region of the internal iliac artery. (orig.) [de

  10. Primary observation of clinical curative effect of superselective uterine artery embolization for treatment of placenta increta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changfu; Zhang Heping; Zhang Hongxia; Jin Haiying; Wang Binjie; He Xiang; Zhang Jie; Li Changbo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the curative effect on superselective uterine artery embolization for treatment of placenta increta. Methods: Pelvic arteriography was performed to confirm bleeding vessels. Then a 5 F Cobra catheter was inserted superselectively into uterine artery ipsilateral to bleeding, through which methotrexatum (MTX) and gelatin sponge were injected for embolization. After the procedure, bleeding, blood pressure, dischargement of placenta tissue, uterine recuperation, and plasma β-HCG were monitored. Results: Bleeding vessels were confirmed in all of the 5 cases of placenta increta. Uterine artery embolization was successful at sole procedure. The operation time was 25.0 to 60.0 min, with the mean time (37.4 ± 5.8) min. Vaginal bleeding stoped in 3.0 to 12.0 minutes after embolization and the mean time was (5.7 ± 2.4) min. Blood pressure returned to normal after operation and vital signs were stable. Placenta tissue discharged on the 5th day to the 4th week after embolization and the mean time was 17 d. The uterus recuperated and blood β-HCG recovered simutaneously. The menstruation and ovulation during follow-up returned to normal. Conclusion: Superselective uterine artery embolization for treatment of placenta increta has advantages such as short operation time, minimal invasion, definite curative effect and reservation of uterus, which is worthy in clinical application. (authors)

  11. Double profunda brachii artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavishiddappa A Hadimani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial artery (BA is a continuation of the axillary artery at the lower border of teres major. In the cubital fossa, BA divides into radial artery and ulnar artery as terminal branches. Large branch given from the BA in the upper part is profunda brachii artery. In the present case, we noticed double profunda brachii that arises from the BA. They are profunda brachii artery 1 and profunda brachii artery 2. Profunda brachii artery 1 arises in the proximal part of the BA and profunda brachii artery 2 arises distal to the profunda brachii artery 1. Both the arteries run inferolaterally in the spiral groove along with radial nerve. Variations of profunda brachii artery are important during harvesting of the lateral arm flaps and may lead to inadvertent injury during percutaneous arterial catheterization or injection of drugs.

  12. Nonbronchial systemic arteries: incidence and endovascular interventional management for hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Sen; Zhu Xiaohua; Sun Xiwen; You Zhengqian; Ma Jun; Yu Dong; Peng Gang; Jie Bing; Sun Chunyi

    2009-01-01

    result was satisfactory and the bleeding ceased immediately in 69 cases including 19 cases of failed or repeated bronchial artery embolization (the arteries had been obstructive) and 4 cases of the normal bronchial arteries. No severe complications occurred except ipsilateral cerebellar infarction after subclavian artery angiography in 1 case and respiratory failure after internal thoracic artery embolization in another case. Sixty patients were followed up for more than 6 months. The result demonstrated episodic bloody sputum in 16 patients, re-bleeding in 11 and non-bleeding in another after TAE. Eight patients had non-bleeding and 2 patients had episodic bloody sputum who were rebleeding and underwent repeated TAE. Conclusions The stimulation of adjacent lesions and the cardiovascular diseases with weakened or defected pulmonary perfusion can lead to the responsible NBSA supply to the lung in hemoptysis. During TAE for hemoptysis, the integrity angiography and TAE can improve the curative effect. (authors)

  13. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. Reduced blood flow through the renal artery can hurt kidney function. ... need include: Duplex Doppler ultrasound exam of the renal arteries to test blood flow MRI of the kidney arteries, which can show ...

  14. RECOMBINANT FACTOR VIIa – NEW TREATMENT OPTION FOR CONTROL OF INTRACTABLE BLEEDING IN SURGICAL AND TRAUMA PATIENTS AND IN OTHER HAEMOSTASIS DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Zver

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa, which is currently registered only for the treatment of haemophilia A and B patients with inhibitors, is seen increasingly as a possible universal haemostatic agent in untractable bleedings. One possible mechanism for the efficacy rFVIIa may be a consequence of it’s from the tissue factor (TF and from the level of disfunction in haemostatic system independant activity, which generates »thrombin burst« formation. It seems that rFVIIa remains active only at the site of tissue injury/bleeding.Conclusions. There are two components of bleeding in surgery and trauma patients. One is bleeding from large calibre arteries and veins which requires surgical intervention. The other, which goes along with the first one, is coagulopathic bleeding. The latter is a consequence of consumptional and dilutional coagulopathy, hypothermia, multitransfusion syndrom and metabolic disbalances in patients. rFVIIa effects coagulopathic component of the bleeding. For effective treatment with rFVIIa in such patients, replacement therapy with erythrocytes, platelets and fresh frozen plasma is mandatory and requires a haematologist assistance in the treatment strategy.Most reported cases of effective rFVIIa usage are from the field of traumatology. Until now, there have been no universal recommendations when to start treatment with rFVIIa in a bleeding trauma patient. Most experience with rFVIIa are from Israel and their recommendations are perhaps the most valuable ones. rFVIIa was used several times during intra-operative and post-operative bleeding episodes. There are reports of clinical studies and usage in patients with/ after prostate surgery, cardiovascular operations and liver transplants.There are data about effective rFVIIa usage in neurology and neurosurgery patients (intracranial haemorrhages, obstetrics and gynecology field. Possible future indications are thrombocytopenias, thrombocytopathias (Glanzmann

  15. Comparison of detectable bleeding rates of radiopharmaceuticals for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in sheep using a closed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owunwanne, A.; Sadek, S.; Yacoub, T.; Awdeh, M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M. (Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S. (Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait). Dept. of Surgery)

    1989-06-01

    The closed experimental animal model system was used to compare the detectable gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding rates of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA, {sup 99m}Tc-RBCs and {sup 99m}Tc tin colloid in sheep. The three radiopharmaceuticals were used to detect the upper GI bleeding sites at rates of 0.57 and 0.25 ml/min. At the lower bleeding rate of 0.1 ml/min, both {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA and {sup 99m}Tc-RBCs were successful in detecting the bleeding site. At the lowest rate of 0.07 ml/min only {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA was successful in detecting the bleeding site. The results indicate that {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA is the most useful {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceutical for detecting the upper GI bleeding site at the slowest bleeding rate studied. (orig.).

  16. Comparison of detectable bleeding rates of radiopharmaceuticals for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in sheep using a closed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owunwanne, A.; Sadek, S.; Yacoub, T.; Awdeh, M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S.

    1989-01-01

    The closed experimental animal model system was used to compare the detectable gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding rates of 99m Tc-DTPA, 99m Tc-RBCs and 99m Tc tin colloid in sheep. The three radiopharmaceuticals were used to detect the upper GI bleeding sites at rates of 0.57 and 0.25 ml/min. At the lower bleeding rate of 0.1 ml/min, both 99m Tc-DTPA and 99m Tc-RBCs were successful in detecting the bleeding site. At the lowest rate of 0.07 ml/min only 99m Tc-DTPA was successful in detecting the bleeding site. The results indicate that 99m Tc-DTPA is the most useful 99m Tc radiopharmaceutical for detecting the upper GI bleeding site at the slowest bleeding rate studied. (orig.) [de

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Persistent Epistaxis due to Pseudoaneurysm Formation of the Ophthalmic Artery Secondary to Nasogastric Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selcuk, Hakan, E-mail: hakanselcuk73@yahoo.com; Soylu, Nur; Albayram, Sait; Selcuk, Dogan; Ozer, Harun; Kocer, Naci; Islak, Civan [Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology (Turkey)

    2005-04-15

    We present the case of a 60-year-old man with persistent epistaxis for 20 days that had started 2 weeks after removal of a nasogastric tube placed for an abdominal operation. There was no pathologic finding at selective facial and internal maxillary artery injections. An injury to the ethmoidal branches of the ophthalmic arteries or other arterial origins of bleeding was suspected. The internal carotid artery angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm of an anterior ethmoidal branch of the left ophthalmic artery. The pseudoaneurysm was occluded with NBCA-histoacryl (25%) injection.

  18. Endovascular Treatment of Persistent Epistaxis due to Pseudoaneurysm Formation of the Ophthalmic Artery Secondary to Nasogastric Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcuk, Hakan; Soylu, Nur; Albayram, Sait; Selcuk, Dogan; Ozer, Harun; Kocer, Naci; Islak, Civan

    2005-01-01

    We present the case of a 60-year-old man with persistent epistaxis for 20 days that had started 2 weeks after removal of a nasogastric tube placed for an abdominal operation. There was no pathologic finding at selective facial and internal maxillary artery injections. An injury to the ethmoidal branches of the ophthalmic arteries or other arterial origins of bleeding was suspected. The internal carotid artery angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm of an anterior ethmoidal branch of the left ophthalmic artery. The pseudoaneurysm was occluded with NBCA-histoacryl (25%) injection

  19. Post-Operative hemorrhage after myomectomy: Safety and efficacy of transcatheter uterine artery embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Alvin Yu Hon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Ko, Gi Young; Park, Sang Gik; Seong, Nak Jong; Yoon, Chang Jin

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and clinical efficacy of transcatheter uterine artery embolization (UAE) for post-myomectomy hemorrhage. We identified eight female patients (age ranged from 29 to 51 years and with a median age of 37) in two regional hospitals who suffered from post-myomectomy hemorrhage requiring UAE during the time period from 2004 to 2012. A retrospective review of the patients' clinical data, uterine artery angiographic findings, embolization details, and clinical outcomes was conducted. The pelvic angiography findings were as follows: hypervascular staining without bleeding focus (n = 5); active contrast extravasation from the uterine artery (n = 2); and pseudoaneurysm in the uterus (n = 1). Gelatin sponge particle was used in bilateral uterine arteries of all eight patients, acting as an empirical or therapeutic embolization agent for the various angiographic findings. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate was administered to the target bleeding uterine arteries in the two patients with active contrast extravasation. Technical and clinical success were achieved in all patients (100%) with bleeding cessation and no further related surgical intervention or embolization procedure was required for hemorrhage control. Uterine artery dissection occurred in one patient as a minor complication. Normal menstrual cycles were restored in all patients. Uterine artery embolization is a safe, minimally invasive, and effective management option for controlling post-myomectomy hemorrhage without the need for hysterectomy.

  20. Persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation: value of pelvic embolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargeaudou, Yann; Soyer, Philippe; Sirol, Marc; Boudiaf, Mourad; Dahan, Henri; Dref, Olivier le [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP et Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Abdominal and Interventional Imaging, Paris (France); Morel, Olivier; Barranger, Emmanuel [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Paris (France); Gayat, Etienne; Mebazaa, Alexandre [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    To evaluate the role and efficacy of pelvic embolisation in the treatment of persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation and to identify the complications of this procedure in this specific population. The clinical files and angiographic examinations of 12 consecutive women (mean age 32 years) who were treated with pelvic embolisation because of persistent, severe postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation were reviewed. Angiography revealed that persistent bleeding was due to incomplete arterial ligation (n = 4) or the presence of newly developed anastomotic routes (n = 8). In 11 women, pelvic embolisation stopped the bleeding. Hysterectomy was needed in one woman with retained placenta. Two complications due to pelvic embolisation, including leg ischaemia and transient sciatic nerve ischaemia, were identified, both after internal iliac artery ligation. In women with persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation, pelvic embolisation is an effective treatment in most cases. However, embolisation of the anastomotic routes that contribute to persistent bleeding may result in ischaemic complications. These potential complications reaffirm that arterial ligation should not be the favoured option for postpartum haemorrhage and that special care must be given during pelvic embolisation after failed arterial ligation. (orig.)

  1. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  2. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  3. Hepatic falciform artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaques, Paul F.; Mauro, Matthew A.; Sandhu, Jeet

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic falciform artery is an occasional terminal branch of the left or middle hepatic artery, and may provide an uncommon but important collateral route when the principal visceral arteries are occluded

  4. Management of bleeding in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Y E; Liu, S E; Irwin, M G

    2016-09-01

    Management of acute coagulopathy and blood loss during major vascular procedures poses a significant haemostatic challenge to anaesthetists. The acute coagulopathy is multifactorial in origin with tissue injury and hypotension as the precipitating factors, followed by dilution, hypothermia, acidemia, hyperfibrinolysis and systemic inflammatory response, all acting as a self-perpetuating spiral of events. The problem is confounded by the high prevalence of antithrombotic agent use in these patients and intraoperative heparin administration. Trials specifically examining bleeding management in vascular surgery are lacking, and much of the literature and guidelines are derived from studies on patients with trauma. In general, it is recommended to adopt permissive hypotension with a restrictive fluid strategy, using a combination of crystalloid and colloid solutions up to one litre during the initial resuscitation, after which blood products should be administered. A restrictive transfusion trigger for red cells remains the mainstay of treatment except for the high-risk patients, where the trigger should be individualized. Transfusion of blood components should be initiated by clinical evidence of coagulopathy such as diffuse microvascular bleeding, and then guided by either laboratory or point-of-care coagulation testing. Prophylactic antifibrinolytic use is recommended for all surgery where excessive bleeding is anticipated. Fibrinogen and prothrombin complex concentrates administration are recommended during massive transfusion, whereas rFVIIa should be reserved until all means have failed. While debates over the ideal resuscitative strategy continue, the approach to vascular haemostasis should be scientific, rational, and structured. As far as possible, therapy should be monitored and goal directed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Antiplatelet therapy at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremke, Michael; Jensen, Mariann Tang; Bak, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this multicentre cohort study was to examine the relationship between antiplatelet therapy (APT) at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and postoperative bleeding complications, transfusion requirements and adverse cardiovascular events. METHODS: A matched...... Denmark Heart Registry. RESULTS: Of the 6350 patients enrolled, 1846 (29%) had been exposed to aspirin or clopidogrel within 5 days prior to CABG (the APT group). Matching with the remaining 4504 (71%) patients of the control group resulted in 1132 pairs of patients. Patients in the APT group had greater...... postoperative bleeding (OR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.55-2.80). Overall, preoperative APT had no significant effect on postoperative 30-day mortality, incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke or need for dialysis. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative APT is associated with increased bleeding and greater transfusion requirements...

  6. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N. Fiorino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA, which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. 123Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine (123MIBG scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and 123MIBG in evaluation and treatment.

  7. Somatostatin analogues for acute bleeding oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Hrobjartsson, A.

    2008-01-01

    or recent bleeding from oesophageal varices. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The outcome measures extracted were: mortality, blood transfusions, use of balloon tamponade, initial haemostasis and rebleeding. Intention-to-treat analyses including all randomised patients were conducted if possible; a random...... it was substantially reduced in the other trials, relative risk 0.36 (0.19 to 0.68). Use of balloon tamponade was rarely reported. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The need for blood transfusions corresponded to one half unit of blood saved per patient. It is doubtful whether this effect is worthwhile. The findings do...

  8. Taeniasis: A possible cause of ileal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settesoldi, Alessia; Tozzi, Alessandro; Tarantino, Ottaviano

    2017-12-16

    Taenia spp. are flatworms of the class Cestoda, whose definitive hosts are humans and primates. Human infestation (taeniasis) results from the ingestion of raw meat contaminated with encysted larval tapeworms and is considered relatively harmless and mostly asymptomatic. Anemia is not recognized as a possible sign of taeniasis and taeniasis-induced hemorrhage is not described in medical books. Its therapy is based on anthelmintics such praziquantel, niclosamide or albendazole. Here we describe a case of acute ileal bleeding in an Italian man affected with both Taenia spp. infestation resistant to albendazole and Helicobacter pylori -associated duodenal ulcers.

  9. Severe gastrointestinal tract bleeding in a two-month-old infant due to congenital intrahepatic arterioportal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarts, R. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St. Radboud, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Ijland, M.M. [Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center St. Radboud, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Blaauw, I. de [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center St. Radboud, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Y. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St. Radboud, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boetes, C. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St. Radboud, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: C.Boetes@rad.umcn.nl; van Proosdij, M. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St. Radboud, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2006-07-15

    A 2-month-old boy was referred for assessment of severe upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding and melena. On physical examination, a continuous murmur was heard over the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. A splenomegaly and dilated veins were also noted on the abdominal wall. Liver functions were normal. There was no history of trauma or jaundice. Doppler ultrasonography, magnetic resonance arteriography and angiography suggested the presence of an intrahepatic arteriovenous fistula between the phrenic artery and the portal vein. Management consisted of successful embolization by coiling of the phrenic artery. To our knowledge this is the first documented case report of a congenital fistula between the phrenic artery and the portal vein.

  10. Severe gastrointestinal tract bleeding in a two-month-old infant due to congenital intrahepatic arterioportal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarts, R.; Ijland, M.M.; Blaauw, I. de; Hoogeveen, Y.; Boetes, C.; van Proosdij, M.

    2006-01-01

    A 2-month-old boy was referred for assessment of severe upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding and melena. On physical examination, a continuous murmur was heard over the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. A splenomegaly and dilated veins were also noted on the abdominal wall. Liver functions were normal. There was no history of trauma or jaundice. Doppler ultrasonography, magnetic resonance arteriography and angiography suggested the presence of an intrahepatic arteriovenous fistula between the phrenic artery and the portal vein. Management consisted of successful embolization by coiling of the phrenic artery. To our knowledge this is the first documented case report of a congenital fistula between the phrenic artery and the portal vein

  11. Double profunda brachii artery

    OpenAIRE

    Gavishiddappa A Hadimani; Jyoti V Hadimani; Ishwar B Bagoji; Shardha Bai Rathod; Balappa M Bannur

    2016-01-01

    Brachial artery (BA) is a continuation of the axillary artery at the lower border of teres major. In the cubital fossa, BA divides into radial artery and ulnar artery as terminal branches. Large branch given from the BA in the upper part is profunda brachii artery. In the present case, we noticed double profunda brachii that arises from the BA. They are profunda brachii artery 1 and profunda brachii artery 2. Profunda brachii artery 1 arises in the proximal part of the BA and profunda brachii...

  12. The use of 111In-labelled platelets for scintigraphic localization of gastrointestinal bleeding with special reference to occult bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjerloeff Schmidt, K.; Waever Rasmussen, J.; Grove, O.; Andersen, D.

    1986-01-01

    Gamma-camera imaging of the abdomen after injection of autologous 111 In-labelled platelets was applied for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in a study of 22 patients. In 15 studies showing scintigraphic signs of bleeding, the clinical presentation included occult bleeding in 6, melaena in 4, and bloody stools in 5 patients. Scintigraphy could be done repeatedly for up to 1 week after a single tracer injection. The time interval between the injection and scintigraphic visualization of bleeding ranged from 10 min to 68 h, being longest in cases of occult bleeding. In most cases the scintigraphic findings were supported by other diagnostic modalities, including surgical removal of presumed sources of bleeding. In seven studies without scintigraphic signs of bleeding, a probable source of bleeding was identified by other means in one patient. The 111 In-platelet method seems to be a promising method for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding which may prove particularly useful in cases of occult or recurrent bleeding

  13. Emergency and elective implantation of covered stent systems in iatrogenic arterial injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltz, J.P.; Kickuth, R.; Bastuerk, P.; Hoppe, H.; Triller, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of covered stents for the management of iatrogenic arterial injury. Materials and Methods: Between 03/1998 and 12/2009, 31 patients underwent selective covered stent implantation after iatrogenic arterial injury. 12/31 of these patients (38.7 %) were hemodynamically unstable. Six different endovascular covered stent types were utilized. The primary endpoints of this study were technical and clinical success and rates of minor and major complications. Results: Initial angiograms demonstrated active extravasation in 19 (61.3 %) patients and pseudoaneurysms in 12 (38.7 %) patients. The following sites of bleeding origin were detected: axillary artery, subclavian artery, common iliac artery, external iliac artery, internal iliac artery, common femoral artery, superficial femoral artery, popliteal and fibular artery, femoro-popliteal and popliteo-crural bypasses, common hepatic artery, aberrant hepatic artery, cystic and gastroduodenal artery. In all patients bleeding was effectively controlled by covered stent implantation resulting in an immediate technical success of 100 %. Clinical success attributed to covered stent implantation was documented in 30 of the 31 patients (96.8 %). Major complications included death in four patients (11.1 %), acute thrombosis with arm ischemia in one patient (2.8 %) and stent fracture with associated pseudoaneurysm in another patient (2.8 %). In 2/31 patients (6.5 %) covered stent failure was detected and successfully treated by implantation of a second covered stent. Conclusion: Emergency and elective implantation of covered stents may be used for minimally invasive and effective management of iatrogenic arterial injury. (orig.)

  14. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  15. Timing of onset of gastrointestinal bleeding in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, A; Lange, T; Anthon, C T

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Critically ill patients are at risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, but clinically important gastrointestinal bleeding is rare. The majority of intensive care unit (ICU) patients receive stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP), despite uncertainty concerning the balance between benefit and harm....... For approximately half of ICU patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, onset is early, ie within the first two days of the ICU stay. The aetiology of gastrointestinal bleeding and consequently the balance between benefit and harm of SUP may differ between patients with early vs late gastrointestinal bleeding...... will describe baseline characteristics and assess the time to onset of the first clinically important episode of GI bleeding accounting for survival status and allocation to SUP or placebo. In addition, we will describe differences in therapeutic and diagnostic procedures used in patients with clinically...

  16. Use of heparin in the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; O'Donovan, N.; Somers, S.; Gill, G.; Sridhar, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine if the administration of heparin improves the predictive value of angiography in the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. 18 patients with a history of chronic GI bleeding were investigated with angiography. For 6 patients, the cause of GI bleeding was established with angiography; the 12 patients who had negative results were given heparin for 24 h and were reassessed with angiography. After heparin administration, the source of GI bleeding was determined with angiography for 6 of the remaining 12 patients. Thus, heparinization increased diagnostic yield from 33% (6 of 18) to 67% (12 of 18). No significant complications, such as uncontrolled GI bleeding, occurred. Heparinization improves the diagnostic yield of angiography when obscure GI bleeding is being investigated. (author)

  17. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: American College of Nurse-Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Variations in uterine bleeding, termed abnormal uterine bleeding, occur commonly among women and often are physiologic in nature with no significant consequences. However, abnormal uterine bleeding can cause significant distress to women or may signify an underlying pathologic condition. Most women experience variations in menstrual and perimenstrual bleeding in their lifetimes; therefore, the ability of the midwife to differentiate between normal and abnormal bleeding is a key diagnostic skill. A comprehensive history and use of the PALM-COEIN classification system will provide clear guidelines for clinical management, evidence-based treatment, and an individualized plan of care. The purpose of this Clinical Bulletin is to define and describe classifications of abnormal uterine bleeding, review updated terminology, and identify methods of assessment and treatment using a woman-centered approach. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  18. Two Cases of True Uterine Artery Aneurysms Diagnosed during Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlütter, Jacob Mørup; Johansen, Gry; Helmig, Rikke Bek

    2016-01-01

    We report 2 cases of true uterine artery aneurysms diagnosed during pregnancy. Both cases presented with nonspecific symptoms such as urethral obstruction, minimal vaginal bleeding and lower abdominal pain in the 2nd trimester. Both aneurysms were diagnosed by color Doppler ultrasound. In the fir...... masses, vague bladder symptoms or radiating pelvic pain. The diagnosis is readily made by color Doppler imaging. Elective Caesarean section should be the preferred mode of delivery to avoid rupture of the aneurysm during labor.......We report 2 cases of true uterine artery aneurysms diagnosed during pregnancy. Both cases presented with nonspecific symptoms such as urethral obstruction, minimal vaginal bleeding and lower abdominal pain in the 2nd trimester. Both aneurysms were diagnosed by color Doppler ultrasound. In the first...

  19. Arterial embolization therapy of traumatic renal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Changxu; Chen Xiaolin; Huang Changhai; Pu Ge

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the angiographic manifestations and arterial embolizatin for traumatic renal hemorrhage when conservative treatment had failed. methods: 5 cases, all male, ranging in age from 12-29 years. All cases had history of injury. the main symptoms included severe abdominal pain, hematuria or coffee colored urine, rapid heart rate, hypotension. 3 suffered hemorrhagic shock. All cases underwent angiographic exam and the diagnosis was confirmed. Embolization materials were mainly self-blood clot and gelfoam. Results: Symptoms in all cases subsided quickly after embolization. Blood pressure recovered to normal within 12 hours; Hematuresis and abdominal pain disappeared or reduced in 1-2 days. One month later, intravenous urographic exam revealed recovered function of the injured kidneys. Conclusion: Renal arterial embolization in treating traumatic renal hemorrhage can control the bleeding while preserving the injured kidneys

  20. Aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebauer, A

    1984-11-01

    This is a report about 4 patients with aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery of arteriosclerotic, mycotic and probably congenital etiology together with a review of the literature as to the etiology, diagnostic possibilities and therapy. Arteriography is the method of choice even though a diagnosis may be possible by sonography or CT in special cases. Even though an aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery is rare, it has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of persisting abdominal problems of unknown origin. This is especially true for patients with a predisposing history such as previous or existing endocarditis, sepsis, arteriosclerosis and hypertension. Because of the possibility of rupture followed by life threating bleeding an adequate diagnostic step such as arteriography has to be considered finally.

  1. Aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, A.

    1984-01-01

    This is a report about 4 patients with aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery of arteriosclerotic, mycotic and probably congenital etiology together with a review of the literature as to the etiology, diagnostic possibilities and therapy. Arteriography is the method of choice even though a diagnosis may be possible by sonography or CT in special cases. Even though an aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery is rare, it has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of persisting abdominal problems of unknown origin. This is especially true for patients with a predisposing history such as previous or existing endocarditis, sepsis, arteriosclerosis and hypertension. Because of the possibility of rupture followed by life threating bleeding an adequate diagnostic step such as arteriography has to be considered finally. (orig.) [de

  2. Radiotherapy Can Cause Haemostasis in Bleeding Skin Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Sung-In Jang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT can cause haemostasis in select cases of malignant bleeding. We present two cases where RT was used to prevent fatal exsanguination from bleeding skin malignancies. Treatment was with radical intent in one case and palliative intent in the other. The dose used in both cases was 20 Gray (Gy in 5 fractions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation-induced haemostasis in bleeding skin malignancies.

  3. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, Markus; Gei?, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-J?rgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20?% of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediat...

  4. Assessing Bleeding Risk in Patients Taking Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Marwa; Fang, Margaret C.

    2013-01-01

    Anticoagulant medications are commonly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolism. Although highly effective, they are also associated with significant bleeding risks. Numerous individual clinical factors have been linked to an increased risk of hemorrhage, including older age, anemia, and renal disease. To help quantify hemorrhage risk for individual patients, a number of clinical risk prediction tools have been developed. These risk prediction tools differ in how they were derived and how they identify and weight individual risk factors. At present, their ability to effective predict anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage remains modest. Use of risk prediction tools to estimate bleeding in clinical practice is most influential when applied to patients at the lower spectrum of thromboembolic risk, when the risk of hemorrhage will more strongly affect clinical decisions about anticoagulation. Using risk tools may also help counsel and inform patients about their potential risk for hemorrhage while on anticoagulants, and can identify patients who might benefit from more careful management of anticoagulation. PMID:23479259

  5. Vascular parenchymal sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savastano, S.; Feltrin, G.P.; Miotto, D.; Chiesura-Corona, M.; Rubaltelli, L.; Candiani, F.

    Fourteen cases of upper gastrointenstinal bleeding (UGIB) were reviewed: 6 (group A) were caused by pancreatitis, 3 (group B) by hemobilia, and 5 (group C) by rupture of esophageal varices due to arterioportal shunts. Elective endoscopy carried out in 7 patients in groups A and B was negative; in 2 actively bleeding patients in group A emergency endoscopy could not detect the source of hemorrhage. Endoscopy was carried out in 4 patients in group C for diagnosis and sclerosis, but severe hemorrhage recurred in spite of treatment. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) were carried out prior to angiography in 5 and 4 patients, respectively, and always suggested a parenchymal lesion. All patients underwent angiography. Transcatheter control of the hemorrhage was attempted as an emergency in 2 patients (as a presurgical step in one); elective embolization was the treatment of choice for 8 patients, with good results in 6. This study suggests the usefulness of US and CT both in the detection of parenchymal lesions causing UGIB not clarified by endoscopy, and in the selection of patients for angiographic treatment.

  6. Vascular parenchymal sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savastano, S.; Feltrin, G.P.; Miotto, D.; Chiesura-Corona, M.; Rubaltelli, L.; Candiani, F.

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen cases of upper gastrointenstinal bleeding (UGIB) were reviewed: 6 (group A) were caused by pancreatitis, 3 (group B) by hemobilia, and 5 (group C) by rupture of esophageal varices due to arterioportal shunts. Elective endoscopy carried out in 7 patients in groups A and B was negative; in 2 actively bleeding patients in group A emergency endoscopy could not detect the source of hemorrhage. Endoscopy was carried out in 4 patients in group C for diagnosis and sclerosis, but severe hemorrhage recurred in spite of treatment. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) were carried out prior to angiography in 5 and 4 patients, respectively, and always suggested a parenchymal lesion. All patients underwent angiography. Transcatheter control of the hemorrhage was attempted as an emergency in 2 patients (as a presurgical step in one); elective embolization was the treatment of choice for 8 patients, with good results in 6. This study suggests the usefulness of US and CT both in the detection of parenchymal lesions causing UGIB not clarified by endoscopy, and in the selection of patients for angiographic treatment. (orig.)

  7. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding during anticoagulant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas-Gimeno, Aitor; Lanas, Angel

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a major problem in patients on oral anticoagulation therapy. This issue has become even more pressing since the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in 2009. Areas covered: Here we review current evidence related to GIB associated with oral anticoagulants, focusing on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and post-marketing observational studies. Dabigatran 150 mg twice daily and rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily increase the risk of GIB compared to warfarin. The risk increase with edoxaban is dose-dependent, while apixaban shows apparently, no increased risk. We summarize what is known about GIB risk factors for individual anticoagulants, the location of GIB in patients taking these compounds, and prevention strategies that lower the risk of GIB. Expert opinion: Recently there has been an important shift in the clinical presentation of GIB. Specifically, upper GIB has decreased with the decreased incidence of peptic ulcers due to the broad use of proton pump inhibitors and the decreased prevalence of H. pylori infections. In contrast, the incidence of lower GIB has increased, due in part to colonic diverticular bleeding and angiodysplasia in the elderly. In this population, the addition of oral anticoagulation therapy, especially DOACs, seems to increase the risk of lower GIB.

  8. Splenic artery embolisation for portal hypertention in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisheri Ila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleeding from esophageal varices is one of the most common causes of serious gastrointestinal haemorrhage in children. We analysed our experience with the use of splenic artery embolisation and variceal sclerotherapy for bleeding oesophageal varices. Patients and Methods: Records of all patients treated for bleeding oesophageal varices caused by portal hypertension from 1998 to 2004 were retrospectively analysed. Patients were followed up for five years. Results: Out of 25 patients treated, ten belonged to sclerotherapy (group A, eight to combined sclerotherapy and embolisation (group B, and seven to only embolisation (group C. The patients were selected randomly, only two patients who had active bleed recently were directly sclerosed. The splenic artery was embolised at the hilum using steel coils in 15 patients with portal hypertension and hypersplenism. Follow-up findings showed decrease in splenic mass, varices, and hyperdynamic flow. Conclusion: In spite of few patients and a short period of follow-up, our results pointed out that a serious consideration should be given to this procedure, as it slowed the sequel of portal hypertension and the complications associated with it. Patients who were embolised and followed up for five years had lesser rebleeds and complications than sclerotherapy patients.

  9. Uncontrolled Epistaxis Secondary to Traumatic Pseudoaneurysm of the Maxillary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eelam Adil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a rare case of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the maxillary artery following a fall. The patient presented with epistaxis that could not be controlled with anterior and posterior nasal packing. She was urgently taken to the angiography suite for evaluation and ultimately underwent embolization of a left maxillary artery pseudoaneurysm with 500–700 micron Contour PVA followed by coiling with two 3 mm Tornado coils. Bleeding subsided after embolization, and the patient suffered no neurologic sequelae.

  10. Aberrant hepatic arterial anatomy and the whipple procedure: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Ronald S; El-Sedfy, Abraham; Rajkumar, Dhiraj

    2011-05-01

    Appreciation and study of hepatic arterial anatomical variability is essential to the performance of a pancreaticoduodenectomy to avoid surgical complications such as bleeding, hepatic ischemia/failure, and anastomotic leak/stricture. Awareness of this variability permits the surgeon to adapt the surgical technique to deal with anomalies identified preoperatively or intraoperatively thereby preventing unnecessary surgical morbidity and mortality. The objective of our study is to provide a comprehensive review of the anatomic arterial anomalies and discuss surgical strategies that will equip the surgeon to deal with all anomalies that may be encountered a priori or en passant during the course of a Whipple procedure.

  11. Evaluation of rectal bleeding factors associated with prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Manabu; Miki, Kenta; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kido, Masato; Shirahama, Jun; Takagi, Sayako; Kobayashi, Masao; Honda, Chikara; Kanehira, Chihiro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze rectal bleeding prognostic factors associated with prostate brachytherapy (PB) or in combination with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and to examine dosimetric indications associated with rectal bleeding. The study included 296 patients followed up for >36 months (median, 48 months). PB was performed alone in 252 patients and in combination with EBRT in 44 patients. PB combined with EBRT is indicated for patients with a Gleason score >6. The prescribed dose was 144 Gy for monotherapy and 110 Gy for PB+EBRT (44-46 Gy). Although 9.1% who received monotherapy had 2.3% grade 2 rectal bleeding, 36.3% who received combined therapy had 15.9% grade 2 rectal bleeding. Combined therapy was associated with higher incidence of rectal bleeding (P=0.0049) and higher percentage of grade 2 bleeding (P=0.0005). Multivariate analysis revealed that R-150 was the only significant factor for rectal bleeding, and modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade in monotherapy and biologically equivalent dose (BED) were significant for combined therapy. Moreover, grade 2 rectal bleeding increased significantly at D90 >130 Gy. Although R-150 was the significant prognostic factor for rectal bleeding and modified RTOG rectal toxicity grade, BED was the significant prognostic factor for modified RTOG rectal toxicity grade. (author)

  12. A rare case of bleeding disorder: Glanzmann's thrombasthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, Jami; Gowrishankar, A; Jayakumar, S A; Jain, Karun

    2017-01-01

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare bleeding disorder, which is characterized by a lack of platelet aggregation. It is characterized by qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of the platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Physiologically, this platelet receptor normally binds several adhesive plasma proteins, and this facilitates attachment and aggregation of platelets to ensure thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. The lack of resultant platelet aggregation in GT leads to mucocutaneous bleeding whose manifestation may be clinically variable, ranging from easy bruising to severe and potentially life-threatening hemorrhages. To highlight this rare but potentially life-threating disorder, GT. We report a case of GT that was first detected because of the multiple episodes of gum bleeding. The patient was an 18-year-old girl who presented with a history of repeated episodes of gum bleeding since childhood. Till the first visit to our hospital, she had not been diagnosed with GT despite a history of bleeding tendency, notably purpura in areas of easy bruising, gum bleeding, and prolonged bleeding time after abrasions and insect stings. GT was diagnosed on the basis of prolonged bleeding time, lack of platelet aggregation with adenosine di phosphate, epinephrine and collagen. GT should always be considered as differential diagnosis while evaluating any case of bleeding disorder.

  13. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  14. Appendiceal hemorrhage – An uncommon cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chung Chiang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a common disease among elderly patients. The common sources of lower gastrointestinal bleeding include vascular disease, Crohn’s disease, neoplasms, inflammatory bowel disease, hemorrhoids, and ischemic colitis. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding arising from the appendix is an extremely rare condition. We report a case of appendiceal hemorrhage in a young male. Diagnosis was made by multidetector computerized tomography during survey for hematochezia. The patient recovered well after appendectomy. The histological finding revealed focal erosion of appendix mucosa with bleeding.

  15. Abnormal Bleeding during Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Freitas De Medeiros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman's characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT, it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies.

  16. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding.

  17. Intraoperative intermittent blocking of the common iliac arteries in cases of placenta percreta without the use of fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinze, S.; Klinikum Oldenburg; Filsinger, B.; Kastenholz, G.; Schroeder, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with placenta accreta, percreta and increta is increasing. The morbidity and mortality are higher mostly due to hemorrhage. Therefore, new methods to reduce the risk of severe bleeding are necessary. Three patients were treated in collaboration by obstetricians, urologists, anesthesiologists, and radiologists. An MRI of the pelvis was performed and the diameters and lengths of the iliac arteries were measured to avoid fluoroscopy during the preoperative placement of catheter balloons into the iliac arteries. During the operational procedure the balloons were inflated and deflated depending on the operative site and the occurrence of bleeding. In comparison to the literature, severe bleeding was clearly reduced. No complications of the intervention were observed. The presented method to reduce severe bleeding might represent significant progress in the management of abnormal placenta implantation. Nevertheless, further controlled studies are needed in order to establish evidence-based recommendations.

  18. The fatal risk in hepatic artery embolization for hemostasis after pancreatic and hepatic surgery: importance of collateral arterial pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akihiro; Yamada, Takayuki; Takase, Kei; Matsuhashi, Toshio; Higano, Shuichi; Kaneda, Tomohiro; Egawa, Shinichi; Takeda, Kazunori; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shoki

    2011-03-01

    To assess retrospectively the cause of hepatic failure related to hepatic arterial embolization (HAE) for hemostasis after pancreaticoduodenectomy or hepatic lobectomy. Between June 1993 and March 2006, Twenty HAEs in 17 patients (15 men, two women; mean age, 64 years) were performed. Angiographic findings, including portal vein stenosis, collateral arterial pathways after HAE, and the difference of embolic materials, were recorded. The morbidity (hepatic failure and abscess) and mortality were detailed according to collateral arterial pathways, portal vein stenosis, and embolic material used. Bleeding was controlled in all patients, although two patients required repeat embolization. Hepatic failure (n = 8) and abscess (n = 2) arose in nine of 20 HAEs. Death occurred after six of eight HAEs complicated by hepatic failure. The morbidity and mortality rates of HAE were 45% and 30%, respectively. Hepatic complication was eight times more likely to occur (P = .005) in cases with no hepatic collaterals involving hepatic, replaced, or accessory hepatic arteries. Death was observed only in the cases without hepatic collaterals (P = .011). The correlation between the embolization outcome and the presence of portal vein stenosis or the difference of embolic materials was not significant (P > .61). HAE can be used to successfully control bleeding secondary to hepatic arterial rupture. In the absence of hepatic collaterals, collateral circulation distal to the occlusion from nonhepatic sources may be inadequate and lead to hepatic failure after HAE. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Two cases of upper gingival cancer with a new superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy method from superficial temporal artery. Combined with arterial redistribution and preoperative embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tange, Kazuhisa; Fukuta, Kohta; Higa, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    We have begun to apply arterial redistribution and preoperative embolization in superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy from the superficial temporal artery. This study examines two typical cases of upper gingival cancer. Case 1 was a male, age 61, with T4N0M0 upper gingival cancer. Drug dosage began with 50-100 mg/m 2 /day of 5-fluorouracil (FU), while 15 mg/m 2 /hour of Docetaxel was also given once a week for three weeks. At the same time, radiation therapy with a total of 30 Gy (2 Gy at a time) was given. Immediately before the operation, embolization in the internal maxillary artery was performed in order to limit bleeding. Case 2 was a female, age 73, with T3N0M0 upper gingival cancer. This patient was also given 5-FU and Docetaxel for four weeks respectively with a total of 40 Gy radiation therapy. No operation was performed. Both cases gained complete response (CR) with a sole side effect of grade 3 mucositis. Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy with arterial redistribution in the oral area is highly effective due to local, concentrated dosage of anticancer drug and reduced side effects. It is a promising method to replace surgical operation especially in cases of upper gingival cancer, whose tumor is often limited to the internal maxillary artery alone. (author)

  20. Treatment for preventing bleeding in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonio; Windyga, Jerzy; Tufano, Antonella; Yeung, Cindy; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-02-09

    In people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgical interventions, haemostatic treatment is needed in order to correct the underlying coagulation abnormalities and minimise the bleeding risk. This treatment varies according to the specific haemostatic defect, its severity and the type of surgical procedure. The aim of treatment is to ensure adequate haemostatic coverage for as long as the bleeding risk persists and until wound healing is complete. To assess the effectiveness and safety of different haemostatic regimens (type, dose and duration, modality of administration and target haemostatic levels) administered in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders for preventing bleeding complications during and after surgical procedures. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of the last search: 20 November 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any hemostatic treatment regimen to no treatment or to another active regimen in children and adults with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing any surgical intervention. Two authors independently assessed trials (eligibility and risks of bias) and extracted data. Meta-analyses were performed on available and relevant data. Of the 16 identified trials, four (112 participants) were eligible for inclusion.Two trials evaluated 59 people with haemophilia A and B undergoing 63 dental extractions. Trials compared the use of a different type (tranexamic acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid) and regimen of antifibrinolytic agents as haemostatic support to the initial replacement treatment. Neither trial specifically addressed mortality (one of this review's primary outcomes); however, in the frame

  1. Uterine artery embolization for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Wang, Z.; Chen, J.; Shi, H.; Zhang, X.; Pan, J.; Liu, W.; Yang, N.; Jin, Z.; Lang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of uterine artery embolization for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta. Materials and methods: Between January 2005 and August 2011, 45 women with placenta accreta, which was discovered during delivery, were managed conservatively in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. They did not experience severe bleeding during delivery. Ten patients (mean age 31 ± 6.4 years) developed secondary postpartum haemorrhage and underwent uterine artery embolization. The complications, control of haemorrhage, and outcome of the placenta left inside the uterus were retrospectively reviewed. Results: All patients underwent transcatheter embolization of bilateral uterine arteries. The median time between delivery and uterine artery embolization was 11 days (range 3–76 days). The technical success rate of embolization was 100%. Bleeding was controlled in all patients during follow-up (11 ± 6.9 months; range 3–24 months), and no further bleeding occurred. One patient developed lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis after uterine artery embolization, and no other major complications occurred. The placentae that were left inside the uteri gradually decreased in size during follow-up, except in one case. Nine patients resumed normal menstruation. One patient subsequently became pregnant and had an uneventful intrauterine pregnancy carried to term. Conclusion: Uterine artery embolization is safe and effective for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta.

  2. Risk of bleeding with dabigatran in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Inmaculada; Baik, Seo Hyon; Piñera, Antonio; Zhang, Yuting

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear whether dabigatran etexilate mesylate is associated with higher risk of bleeding than warfarin sodium in real-world clinical practice. To compare the risk of bleeding associated with dabigatran and warfarin using Medicare data. In this retrospective cohort study, we used pharmacy and medical claims in 2010 to 2011 from a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries. We identified participants as those newly diagnosed as having atrial fibrillation from October 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011, and who initiated dabigatran or warfarin treatment within 60 days of initial diagnosis. We followed up patients until discontinued use or switch of anticoagulants, death, or December 31, 2011. Dabigatran users (n = 1302) and warfarin users (n = 8102). We identified any bleeding events and categorized them as major and minor bleeding by anatomical site. Major bleeding events included intracranial hemorrhage, hemoperitoneum, and inpatient or emergency department stays for hematuria, gastrointestinal, or other hemorrhage. We used a propensity score weighting mechanism to balance patient characteristics between 2 groups and Cox proportional hazards regression models to evaluate the risk of bleeding. We further examined the risk of bleeding for 4 subgroups of high-risk patients: those 75 years or older, African Americans, those with chronic kidney disease, and those with more than 7 concomitant comorbidities. Dabigatran was associated with a higher risk of bleeding relative to warfarin, with hazard ratios of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.20-1.41) for any bleeding event, 1.58 (95% CI, 1.36-1.83) for major bleeding, and 1.85 (95% CI, 1.64-2.07) for gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of intracranial hemorrhage was higher among warfarin users, with a hazard ratio of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.20-0.50) for dabigatran compared with warfarin. Dabigatran was consistently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding and gastrointestinal hemorrhage for all subgroups analyzed. The risk of

  3. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benedeto-Stojanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB is a common medical emergency problem with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this paper is to establish the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to sex and age, determine the prevalence of bleeding lesions and perform analysis of bleeding peptic ulcer in relation to the location, age, gender, Forrest classification and the need for endoscopic hemostasis. Thе prospective study included 70 patients with UGB, 42 men and 28 women, mean age 68.64±13.66 years. The diagnosis of bleeding lesions was made exclusively by means of esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Forrest classification was used in the evaluation of the activity of bleeding ulcers of the stomach and duodenum. The largest number of bleeding patients was of male sex (60%. Bleeding most commonly occurred in patients older than 60 years (84.29%. Statistically, female patients were significantly older than patients of male gender (p=0.001. The most common cause of bleeding was peptic ulcer (65.71%. The average age of patients with gastric ulcer was 70.57±15.68 years, with a duodenal ulcer 63.78±16.70 years. In the duodenum, Forrest Ib, IIa and IIb ulcers were usually confirmed, whereas Forrest IIc ulcers were identified in the stomach. Endoscopic hemostasis was required in 55.56% of patients with duodenal and in 23.81% of patients with gastric ulcer. The incidence of UGB is higher in men and it increases with age. The most common cause of bleeding is ulcer disease. Patients with gastric ulcer are older than patients with duodenal ulcer, while both gastric and duodenal ulcers are found in the oldest patients. Duodenal ulcers cause serious bleeding and more often require endoscopic hemostasis.

  4. Uterine artery embolization to treat uterine fibroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machan, L.; Martin, M.

    2001-01-01

    The first reported application of uterine artery embolization, in 1979, was to treat life-threatening hemorrhage after a failed hysterectomy. Since then, uterine artery embolization has been used very successfully to control acute or delayed post-partum hemorrhage, post-surgical hemorrhage and hemorrhage from ectopic pregnancy, to treat uterine arteriovenous malformations and as prophylaxis before high-risk surgery, such as cesarean delivery in women with placenta previa. In contrast to these proven but underutilized applications, uterine embolization for fibroids has, in a short time, achieved significant notice in the lay press and is being widely offered. Ravina and colleagues, first reported uterine fibroid shrinkage after embolization for the treatment of acute bleeding. Since then, his group has performed over 100 procedures with up to a 6-year follow-up. The cumulative clinical success rate for the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding due to fibroids is reported to be approximately 85% and for treatment of pain or pressure symptoms, about 75%. Six-month follow-up sonography reveals an average reduction of fibroid size of approximately 40%. However, to date, no studies have compared patients who undergo embolization with a nontreatment cohort or with surgical intervention. (author)

  5. Uterine artery embolization to treat uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machan, L.; Martin, M. [Univ. of British Columbia Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    The first reported application of uterine artery embolization, in 1979, was to treat life-threatening hemorrhage after a failed hysterectomy. Since then, uterine artery embolization has been used very successfully to control acute or delayed post-partum hemorrhage, post-surgical hemorrhage and hemorrhage from ectopic pregnancy, to treat uterine arteriovenous malformations and as prophylaxis before high-risk surgery, such as cesarean delivery in women with placenta previa. In contrast to these proven but underutilized applications, uterine embolization for fibroids has, in a short time, achieved significant notice in the lay press and is being widely offered. Ravina and colleagues, first reported uterine fibroid shrinkage after embolization for the treatment of acute bleeding. Since then, his group has performed over 100 procedures with up to a 6-year follow-up. The cumulative clinical success rate for the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding due to fibroids is reported to be approximately 85% and for treatment of pain or pressure symptoms, about 75%. Six-month follow-up sonography reveals an average reduction of fibroid size of approximately 40%. However, to date, no studies have compared patients who undergo embolization with a nontreatment cohort or with surgical intervention. (author)

  6. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Cathy; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe

    2014-01-01

    Background Tranexamic acid reduces haemorrhage through its antifibrinolytic effects. In a previous version of the present review, we found that tranexamic acid may reduce mortality. This review includes updated searches and new trials.Objectives To assess the effects of tranexamic acid versus......-effect and random-effects model meta-analyses and presented results as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used I² as a measure of between-trial heterogeneity. We analysed tranexamic acid versus placebo or no intervention and tranexamic acid versus antiulcer drugs separately. To analyse...... sources of heterogeneity and robustness of the overall results, we performed subgroup, sensitivity and sequential analyses.Main results We included eight randomised controlled trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Additionally, we identified one large ongoing pragmatic randomised...

  7. Obliteration of gastric bleeding varices with NBCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zaibo; Li Zhengran; Qian Jiesheng; Zhu Kangshun; Huang Mingsheng; Zhao Dabing; Pang Pengfei; Guan Shouhai; Shan Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of obliteration with NBCA(N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate)for the treatment of gastric bleeding varices in terminal stage of portal hypertension. Methods: All 17 cases of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with portal hypertension, mean age 54 years, including 11 cases of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with portal venous tumor emboli, 6 eases of cirrhosis and 3 cases with moderate to severe ascites; were selected for this study. According to the Child-Pugh classification, 3 cases were in class B and 14 cases in class C at admission. Left gastric, posterior and short gastric varices were shown in all patients on CT or MRI enhancement scannings, together with splenorenal and gastrorenal shunts in 3 and 3 cases respectively. Seven cases were approached through right midaxillary line transhepatic route, 4 cases through infra-cartilago ensiformis transhepatic route, and 6 cases through transsplenic approach. Nine eases took scheduled operation, and 8 cases under emergency operation. According to blood flow rate and variceal internal diameter, the proportion 1:4 of NBCA and lipiodol was selected for the embolization. The survival and symptom relief of the patients were followed up. Results: All cases were successfully engaged in embolization with NBCA, with all varices disappeared on post-operation angiography and CT enhancement scanning during follow-up. Pressure of portal vein rised 3 cmH 2 O after operation with one case having with transient irritable cough. The average survival time was over 5 months during 3-12 months follow-up. Four cases died postoperatively because of hepatic function exhaustion. Conclusion: Utilization of NBCA in obliteration for gastric bleeding varices is effective, feasible and reliable; with less complication, Keeping strict indications would surely raise the long-term efficacy. (authors)

  8. Three-dimensional ultrasonography and power Doppler for discrimination between benign and malignant endometrium in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Mohamed; El-Mazny, Akmal; Ramadan, Wafaa; Hatem, Dina; Abdel-Hafiz, Aly; Hammam, Mohamed; Nada, Adel

    2016-03-16

    Ultrasonography has been extensively used in women suspected of having a gynecological malignancy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of 3D ultrasonography and power Doppler for discrimination between benign and malignant endometrium in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding. This cross-sectional study included 78 premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding scheduled for hysteroscopy and endometrial curettage. The endometrial thickness (ET), uterine artery pulsatility index (PI) and resistance index (RI), and endometrial volume (EV) and 3D power Doppler vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), and vascularization flow index (VFI) were measured and compared with hysteroscopic and histopathologic findings. The ET (P benign and malignant endometrium was the VI with an area under the ROC curve of 0.88 at a cutoff value of 0.81%. 3D ultrasonography and power Doppler, especially endometrial VI, may be useful for discrimination between benign and malignant endometrium in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding.

  9. Packing of Renal Fossa: Useful Technique for Intractable Bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no documented study to indicate the role of prolonged packing of renal fossa (24 to 48 hours) to control bleeding in life threating haemorrhage following open pyelolithotomy without compromise in the renal functions. On the contrary emergency nephrectomy was performed for intractable bleeding during renal stone ...

  10. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.

    1993-01-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. 99 Tc m -sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. 99 Tc m -labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author)

  11. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Patients with Portal Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecker, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension is a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. Most patients bleed from esophageal or gastric varices, but bleeding from ectopic varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy is also possible. The management of acute bleeding has changed over the last years. Patients are managed with a combination of endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is variceal band ligation. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the time point of endoscopy. The first-line treatment for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding is nonselective beta blockers. Pharmacologic therapy is recommended for most patients; band ligation is an alternative in patients with contraindications for or intolerability of beta blockers. Treatment options for secondary prophylaxis include variceal band ligation, beta blockers, a combination of nitrates and beta blockers, and combination of band ligation and pharmacologic treatment. A clear superiority of one treatment over the other has not been shown. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy or ectopic varices is less common. Treatment options include beta blocker therapy, injection therapy, and interventional radiology. PMID:27335828

  12. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  13. First-trimester vaginal bleeding and complications later in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Dideriksen, Katrine Lehrmann; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the association of first-trimester bleeding without miscarriage and complications later in the first pregnancy as well as in the next pregnancy.......To evaluate the association of first-trimester bleeding without miscarriage and complications later in the first pregnancy as well as in the next pregnancy....

  14. Recombinant activated factor VII for uncontrolled bleeding postcardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Makram Habib

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: In this analysis, rFVIIa succefully reduced the chest tube bleeding and blood products transfused during severe post cardiac surgical bleeding. However, safety of rFVIIa remains unclear. Prospective controlled trials are still needed to confirm the role of rFVIIa.

  15. Risk Stratification for Bleeding Complications in Patients With Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Joshua D; Goodin, Amie J; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Hypertension, Abnormal renal/liver function, Stroke, Bleeding, Labile International Normalized Ratio (INR), Elderly, Drugs or alcohol use (HAS-BLED) score has strong predictive validity for major bleeding complications, but limited validation has been conducted in venous thromboem...

  16. Clinical approach to a patient with abnormal uterine bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bleeding, type, appearance, duration, cyclicity and associated ... Clinical approach. In all cases where the main complaint is that of excessive menstrual bleeding, an immediate differentiation must be made between acute severe blood loss and chronic excessive ... management rules can be implemented. In such patients ...

  17. Bleeding Peptic Ulcer - Tertiary Center Experience: Epidemiology, Treatment and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Ivan; Stojsavljević, Sanja; Hrabar, Davor; Kralj, Dominik; Bišćanin, Alen; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Zovak, Mario; Babić, Žarko; Bohnec, Sven; Budimir, Ivan

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate epidemiological, clinical and endoscopic characteristics of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) with special reference to peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). The study included 2198 consecutive patients referred to our emergency department due to acute UGIB from January 2008 to December 2012. All patients underwent urgent upper GI endoscopy within 24 hours of admission, and 842 patients diagnosed with PUB were enrolled and prospectively followed-up. The cumulative incidence of UGIB was 126/100,000 in the 5-year period. Two out of five patients had a bleeding peptic ulcer; in total, 440 (52.3%) had bleeding gastric ulcer, 356 (42.3%) had bleeding duodenal ulcer, 17 (2%) had both bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, and 29 (3.5%) patients had bleeding ulcers on gastroenteric anastomoses. PUB was more common in men. The mean patient age was 65.9 years. The majority of patients (57%) with PUB were taking agents that attenuate the cytoprotective function of gastric and duodenal mucosa. Rebleeding occurred in 77 (9.7%) patients and 47 (5.9%) patients required surgical intervention. The 30-day morality was 5.2% and 10% of patients died from uncontrolled bleeding and concomitant diseases. In conclusion, PUB is the main cause of UGIB, characterized by a significant rebleeding rate and mortality.

  18. Pattern recognition in menstrual bleeding diaries by statistical cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessel Jens

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to empirically identify a treatment-independent statistical method to describe clinically relevant bleeding patterns by using bleeding diaries of clinical studies on various sex hormone containing drugs. Methods We used the four cluster analysis methods single, average and complete linkage as well as the method of Ward for the pattern recognition in menstrual bleeding diaries. The optimal number of clusters was determined using the semi-partial R2, the cubic cluster criterion, the pseudo-F- and the pseudo-t2-statistic. Finally, the interpretability of the results from a gynecological point of view was assessed. Results The method of Ward yielded distinct clusters of the bleeding diaries. The other methods successively chained the observations into one cluster. The optimal number of distinctive bleeding patterns was six. We found two desirable and four undesirable bleeding patterns. Cyclic and non cyclic bleeding patterns were well separated. Conclusion Using this cluster analysis with the method of Ward medications and devices having an impact on bleeding can be easily compared and categorized.

  19. Bleeding complications during anticoagulant treatment in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    Patients with cancer have an increased risk of bleeding complications, of which some are fatal. This risk is influenced by chemotherapy, cancer type and stage, thrombocytopenia, renal function, and previous bleeding. Since many cancer patients receive anticoagulant treatment for prophylaxis or

  20. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time device...

  1. A sensitive venous bleeding model in haemophilia A mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastoft, Anne Engedahl; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Ezban, M.

    2012-01-01

    Haemostatic effect of compounds for treating haemophilia can be evaluated in various bleeding models in haemophilic mice. However, the doses of factor VIII (FVIII) for normalizing bleeding used in some of these models are reported to be relatively high. The aim of this study was to establish a se...

  2. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P. (Saint James' s Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-10-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author).

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Arora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A woman is considered menopausal after 12 months of amenorrhea. The most feared symptom during menopause is postmenopausal bleeding which unless proved otherwise indicates genital malignancy. Objectives: To study Socio-demographic factors related to postmenopausal bleeding and to find time lapse between bleeding and reporting of these cases. Material and Methods: This cross sectional was done in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Pt. J. N. M. Medical College & DR. B. R. Ambedkar Memorial, Hospital, Raipur (C. G. The participants were 146 women who came with the complaint of postmenopausal bleeding. A detailed, preceded, pre-tested, structured, close ended questionnaire was used to collect the data. By interviewing these women, information was collected about different demographic factors like age, socio-economic status, parity etc. The collected data was put in the master chart and analyzed. Results: The proportion of postmenopausal bleeding cases was 3.5% .Maximum cases(50% with postmenopausal bleeding were found in the age group of 45-54yrs . 60 % of patients were from rural areas and 62% were illiterate. 65% of the patients were grand multipara (Parity4. Most of the patients belonged to lower socioeconomic strata. Almost half (48% of patients presented after, more than 6 months since the first episode of bleeding . Conclusions: The proportion of postmenopausal bleeding is high, requiring immediate investigation. Lack of awareness led to very late presentation of most of the patients, so education at community level is required to reduce this time lapse for earlier diagnosis and management

  4. Bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach complicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inferior vena cava filter insertion was not possible due to non-availability. Coexistence of DVT needing anticoagulation and bleeding gastric GIST requiring urgent resection presented a management dilemna. Despite the risk, the patient was taken for an emergency tumor resection primarily to stop the bleeding and facilitate ...

  5. Value of intramuscular methotrexate and bilateral uterine artery embolization for treating cervical ectopic pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Feng; Xiong Bin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of bilateral uterine artery chemotherapy embolization (UACE) for cervical ectopic pregnancy analyzed. Methods: Clinical records of 40 patients with cervical ectopic pregnancy treated using UACE were retrospectively analyzed. Results: 8 patients with severe active vaginal bleeding after curettage were treated urgently with UACE. The remaining 32 patients were treated with UACE combined with sequential ultrasound-guided curettage. Active vaginal bleeding was stopped after UACE. There was no recurrent hemorrhage with the sequential ultrasound-guided curettage procedure. The β-HCG levels of all patients were normalized after 1 month. Conclusion: Bilateral uterine artery chemotherapy embolization is valuable as emergency treatment for patients with severe vaginal bleeding from cervical ectopic pregnancy. UACE combined with sequential ultrasound-guided curettage may be more effective. (authors)

  6. Value of Adjusted Blood Requirement Index in determining failure to control bleed in patients with variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Shahab; Khalid, Abdullah B; Awan, Safia; Shah, Hasnain A; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2015-03-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with cirrhosis. Among the criteria that were proposed in Baveno conferences, the Adjusted Blood Requirement Index (ABRI) has not been validated prospectively in clinical practice. We therefore aim to evaluate the measurement of ABRI as a marker of failure to control bleeding and to evaluate the consistency of ABRI in relation to other criteria of failure to control variceal bleeding. All patients with variceal bleeding who presented to Aga Khan University Hospital from January 2010 to December 2012 who were administered transfusion of packed red blood cells were included after obtaining informed consent. All patients were managed as per the standard protocol with intravenous terlipressin along with band ligation and injection of cyanoacrylate in cases of esophageal and fundal varices, respectively. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured every 6 h for 48 h and then every 12 h until 5 days of index bleed in each patient. Packed cells were transfused if hemoglobin decreased below 8 g/dl. The number of blood units transfused, change in hemoglobin values, and ABRI were calculated after each unit of blood transfusion till 120 h. In patients in whom bleed could not be controlled, an ABRI value of 0.75 or more was compared with other Baveno IV-based parameters that define failure to control variceal bleeding. During the study period, 137 eligible patients with variceal bleed were admitted. The mean age of the patients was 52±12 years. The majority of patients (50.4%) were in Child-Pugh class B, followed by 38% in Child-Pugh class C. According to the Baveno IV criteria, overall failure to control acute variceal bleeding occurred in 52 (37.9%) patients. Excluding ABRI, failure to control bleeding was found in 22/137 (16%) patients, whereas ABRI-based criteria showed that in 34/137 (24.8%) patients, bleeding could not be controlled. There were only four (2.9%) patients with variceal bleeding in whom ABRI and

  7. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding.

  8. Superselective arterial embolisation with a liquid polyvinyl alcohol copolymer in patients with acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhart, Markus; Schneider, Hans [Sozialstiftung Bamberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bamberg (Germany); Paetzel, Christian [Klinikum Weiden, Department of Radiology, Weiden (Germany); Sackmann, Michael [Sozialstiftung Bamberg, Department of Gastroenterology, Bamberg (Germany); Jung, Ernst Michael; Schreyer, Andreas G.; Feuerbach, Stefan; Zorger, Niels [University of Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate the results of emergency embolisation in acute arterial bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract with a liquid polyvinyl alcohol copolymer from two centres. We retrospectively analysed 16 cases (15 patients) of acute arterial bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract where emergency embolotherapy was performed by using the copolymer when acute haemorrhage was not treatable with endoscopic techniques alone. Cause of haemorrhage and technical and clinical success were documented. Arterial embolotherapy was successful in all 16 cases. The technical success rate was 100%. The cause of bleeding was pancreatitis in four, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) of the colon in three, malignancy in three, angiodysplasia in two, ulcer in two and panarteritis no dosa and trauma in one each. There were no procedure-related complications. No bowel necrosis occurred because of embolisation. In 13 cases, the patients were discharged in good condition (81%); the three patients with GVHD died because of the underlying disease. The copolymer seems to have great potential in embolotherapy of acute arterial gastrointestinal bleeding. In our series none of the patients had rebleeding at the site of embolisation and no clinically obvious bowel necrosis occurred. (orig.)

  9. Superselective arterial embolisation with a liquid polyvinyl alcohol copolymer in patients with acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhart, Markus; Schneider, Hans; Paetzel, Christian; Sackmann, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Schreyer, Andreas G.; Feuerbach, Stefan; Zorger, Niels

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the results of emergency embolisation in acute arterial bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract with a liquid polyvinyl alcohol copolymer from two centres. We retrospectively analysed 16 cases (15 patients) of acute arterial bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract where emergency embolotherapy was performed by using the copolymer when acute haemorrhage was not treatable with endoscopic techniques alone. Cause of haemorrhage and technical and clinical success were documented. Arterial embolotherapy was successful in all 16 cases. The technical success rate was 100%. The cause of bleeding was pancreatitis in four, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) of the colon in three, malignancy in three, angiodysplasia in two, ulcer in two and panarteritis no dosa and trauma in one each. There were no procedure-related complications. No bowel necrosis occurred because of embolisation. In 13 cases, the patients were discharged in good condition (81%); the three patients with GVHD died because of the underlying disease. The copolymer seems to have great potential in embolotherapy of acute arterial gastrointestinal bleeding. In our series none of the patients had rebleeding at the site of embolisation and no clinically obvious bowel necrosis occurred. (orig.)

  10. Binding and functional pharmacological characteristics of gepant-type antagonists in rat brain and mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Amandi, Nilofar; Pla, Monica Vidal

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is found in afferent sensory nerve fibers innervating the resistance arteries and plays a pivotal role in a number of neurovascular diseases such as migraine and subarachnoid bleedings. The present study investigates the binding and ant...

  11. BLEEDING AND STARVING: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    FONSECA,Jorge; MEIRA,Tânia; NUNES,Ana; SANTOS,Carla Adriana

    2014-01-01

    This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. See more: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0//deed.en "Context - Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. Objective - The aim of this study was obtain...

  12. Superselective uterine arterial infusion and embolization in the treatment of ectopic pregnancies of 56 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Chaolin; Li Changfu; Zhang Yanhua; Liu Feng; Guan Yafang; Liu Zhen; Wang Weibo; Niu Haijuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To probe a simple, safe, and minimally invasive method to treat ectopic pregnancy with preservation of the organs. Methods: Superselective catheterization of uterine artery through cannulation of right femoral artery was achieved in 56 patients with ectopic pregnancy. Location of the lesions involved, feeding arteries, and active bleeding were observed on angiography. 150 mg of methylamine neopterin diluted in 100 ml of saline water was infused slowly into the target artery. Small gelatin spongy particles with size of 0.5 mm in diameter were used to embolize the uterine artery until its branches were totally obliterated. Follow-up was undertaken to observe the results of the treatment. Results: Superselective uterine arterial infusion and embolization were successfully performed in all 56 patients without any related complications. Active bleeding in the peritoneum in 33 eases ceased soon after embolization. The embryos in 13 patients were confirmed to have died by ultrasound two days after the procedure. Beta-HCG value dropped to below 5 U/L within two to twelve days. Hemorrhage in the peritoneum dissolved after seven days in all cases. Mixed mass disappeared after one month. Histerosalpingography was performed three months after the procedure in 19 patients and patent fallopians were demonstrated in 11 patients. Conclusions: Superselective uterine arterial infusion and embolization is a minimally invasive procedure, which can be used to effectively treat ectopic pregnancy by disabling the ectopic embryo and embolizing leaking arteries with the advantages of preserving the fallopian tubes. (authors)

  13. Preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue after chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomori, Hiroaki; Cong, Yue; Sugimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    It is often difficult to expose the pulmonary artery buried in a scar tissue, especially in lung cancer patients that responded well to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Difficulty to access pulmonary artery branches may lead to potentially unnecessary pneumonectomy. To complete lobectomy in such cases, a technique with preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery is presented. After dissecting the pulmonary vein, the lobar bronchus is cut from the opposite side of the pulmonary artery with scissors. The back wall of the lobar bronchus is cut using a surgical knife from the luminal face, which can expose the pulmonary artery behind the bronchial stump and then complete lobectomy. Fourteen patients have been treated using the present technique, enabling complete resection by lobectomy (including sleeve lobectomy in 3 patients) without major bleeding. The present procedure can expose pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue, resulting in making the lobectomy safer.

  14. Posterior epistaxis: Common bleeding sites and prophylactic electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Sun, Xicai; Guo, Limin; Wang, Dehui

    2016-01-01

    Posterior epistaxis is a frequent emergency, and the key to efficient management is identification of the bleeding point. We performed a retrospective study of 318 patients with posterior epistaxis treated with endoscopic bipolar electrocautery during a 4-year period. Distribution of the bleeding sites was recorded. Patients with no definite bleeding sites in the first operation were assigned to Group A (n = 39) and Group B (n = 34). Patients in Group A were only observed in the ward. Patients in Group B were given prophylactic electrocoagulation at the common bleeding points. Of the 318 patients, bleeding sites were successfully identified and coagulated in 263 patients. All of them were located posteriorly, with 166 on the lateral nasal wall, 86 on the septum, and 11 on the anterior face of the sphenoid sinus. The rebleeding rate of Group B (8.8%) was lower than that of Group A (38.5%) (p < 0.01).

  15. Resin bleed improvement on surface mount semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoo, Indra Kumar; Tahir, Suraya Mohd; Aziz, Faieza Abdul; Shamsul Anuar, Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Resin bleed is a transparent layer of epoxy compound which occurs during molding process but is difficult to be detected after the molding process. Resin bleed on the lead on the unit from the focused package, SOD123, can cause solderability failure at end customer. This failed unit from the customer will be considered as a customer complaint. Generally, the semiconductor company has to perform visual inspection after the plating process to detect resin bleed. Mold chase with excess hole, split cavity & stepped design ejector pin hole have been found to be the major root cause of resin bleed in this company. The modifications of the mold chase, changing of split cavity to solid cavity and re-design of the ejector pin proposed were derived after a detailed study & analysis conducted to arrive at these solutions. The solutions proposed have yield good results during the pilot run with zero (0) occurrence of resin bleed for 3 consecutive months.

  16. Diagnosis and management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owensby, Susan; Taylor, Kellee; Wilkins, Thad

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon but potentially serious, life-threatening condition in children. Rapid assessment, stabilization, and resuscitation should precede all diagnostic modalities in unstable children. The diagnostic approach includes history, examination, laboratory evaluation, endoscopic procedures, and imaging studies. The clinician needs to determine carefully whether any blood or possible blood reported by a child or adult represents true upper gastrointestinal bleeding because most children with true upper gastrointestinal bleeding require admission to a pediatric intensive care unit. After the diagnosis is established, the physician should start a proton pump inhibitor or histamine 2 receptor antagonist in children with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Consideration should also be given to the initiation of vasoactive drugs in all children in whom variceal bleeding is suspected. An endoscopy should be performed once the child is hemodynamically stable. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  17. Scintigraphy in gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, T.R.; Miller, J.H.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) tract bleeding in the pediatric population is not uncommon, especially in chronically ill patients. A total of 29 patients with GI tract bleeding were studied scintigraphically using Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) or sulfur colloid (SC). The patients ranged in age from 3 weeks to 20 years, with an equal sex distribution. Of 19 patients studied with Tc-99m-labeled RBCs using an in vitro labeling technique, evidence of GI tract bleeding was documented scintigraphically in 15. Tc-99m-labeled SC scans in the remaining ten patients demonstrated GI tract bleeding in six. The Tc-99m RBC method was slightly more sensitive than the Tc-99m SC method. Advantages of using labeled RBCs include increased sensitivity in detecting upper abdominal bleeding, ability to delay imaging for up to 18-24 hours, and the use of provocative testing

  18. Endoscopic Management of Tumor Bleeding from Inoperable Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Il

    2015-01-01

    Tumor bleeding is not a rare complication in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. Endoscopy has important roles in the diagnosis and primary treatment of tumor bleeding, similar to its roles in other non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Although limited studies have been performed, endoscopic therapy has been highly successful in achieving initial hemostasis. One or a combination of endoscopic therapy modalities, such as injection therapy, mechanical therapy, or ablative therapy, can be used for hemostasis in patients with endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage. However, rebleeding after successful hemostasis with endoscopic therapy frequently occurs. Endoscopic therapy may be a treatment option for successfully controlling this rebleeding. Transarterial embolization or palliative surgery should be considered when endoscopic therapy fails. For primary and secondary prevention of tumor bleeding, proton pump inhibitors can be prescribed, although their effectiveness to prevent bleeding remains to be investigated. PMID:25844339

  19. [High risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after neurosurgical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kang; Wu, Gang; Cheng, Neng-neng; Yao, Cheng-jun; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2005-12-21

    To analyze high risk factors of postoperative upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after neurosurgery so as to give guidance for prevention of GI bleeding. A questionnaire was developed to investigate the medical records of 1500 patients who were hospitalized and underwent neurosurgical operations in 1997. Logistic regression analysis was made. 1430 valid questionnaires were obtained. Postoperative upper GI bleeding occurred in 75 patients (5.24%). The incidence of upper GI bleeding were 6.64% (54/813) in the male patients and 3.40% (21/617) in the female persons (P = 0.007); 9.88% (41/415) in those aged > 50 and 3.35% in those aged hematoma, intraventricular hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, and extradural hematoma were 15.7%, 10.0%, 6.00%, and 2.94% respectively (P = 0.02). The incidence of upper GI bleeding of the patients with tumors of fourth ventricle of cerebrum, brainstem, cerebral hemisphere, and sellar hypothalamus were 15.79% (3/19), 7.89%, 5.71%, and 3.74% respectively. In the emergent cases, the incidence of upper GI bleeding was higher in those with hypertension. The incidence of upper GI bleeding was 5.46% in the patients undergoing adrenocortical hormone treatment, significantly higher than that in those who did not receive such treatment (2.13%). Patients who are at high risk of developing postoperative upper GI bleeding including that: age greater than 50 years; male; Glasgow Coma Score less than 10 pre and post operation; The lesion was located in brain stem and forth ventricle; Hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage; Intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhagic brain trauma; Postoperative pneumonia, brain edema, encephalic high pressure, pyogenic infection of the central nervous system and other postoperative complications. The mortality of patients with postoperative upper GI bleeding was evidently higher than that of the patients without postoperative upper GI bleeding.

  20. Immunosuppressive agents are associated with peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding can be fatal. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents are administered for long-term usage. The present study assessed the association between peptic ulcer bleeding and administration of NSAIDs, corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents. Furthermore, the efficacy of lowering the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) was evaluated. Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for patients subjected to an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy performed at the National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital (Yotsukaido, Japan) from October 2014 to September 2015. During this period, a total of 1,023 patients underwent an upper GI endoscopy. A total of 1,023 patients, including 431 males (age, 68.1±12.9 years) and 592 females (age, 66.4±12.3 years), who had been administered NSAIDs, corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, PPIs and H2RAs, were respectively enrolled. Endoscopic findings of the patients were reviewed and their data were statistically analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the odds ratio of peptic ulcer bleeding for each medication; immunosuppressive agents had an odds ratio of 5.83, which was larger than that for NSAIDs (4.77). The Wald test was applied to confirm the correlation between immunosuppressive agents and peptic ulcer bleeding. Furthermore, χ 2 tests were applied to the correlation between peptic ulcer bleeding and administration of PPIs or H2RAs. Immunosuppressive agents had the largest χ 2 , and the P-value was 0.03. Administration of PPIs was significantly correlated with non-peptic ulcer bleeding (P=0.02); furthermore, a tendency toward non-peptic ulcer bleeding with administration of H2RA was indicated, but it was not statistically significant (P=0.12). In conclusion, immunosuppressive agents were correlated with peptic ulcer bleeding and PPIs were effective at

  1. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease: Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Yvonne V.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P.; van der Bom, Johanna G.; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J.; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Leebeek, Frank W. G.

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large

  2. The prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in patients with heavy menstrual bleeding with and without gynecologic abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, H. Marieke; Mulder, Andre; Bogchelman, Dick H.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Meijer, Karina

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) with and without gynecologic abnormalities. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a single-center prospective cohort study of 112 consecutive patients who were

  3. Agonist-induced platelet reactivity correlates with bleeding in haemato-oncological patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batman, B.; van Bladel, E. R.; van Hamersveld, M.; Pasker-De Jong, Pieternel C M; Korporaal, S. J.A.; Urbanus, R. T.; Roest, M.; Boven, Leonie A; Fijnheer, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Prophylactic platelet transfusions are administered to prevent bleeding in haemato-oncological patients. However, bleeding still occurs, despite these transfusions. This practice is costly and not without risk. Better predictors of bleeding are needed, and flow cytometric

  4. Severity and Features of Epistaxis in Children with a Mucocutaneous Bleeding Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokhuijzen, Eva; Segbefia, Catherine I.; Biss, Tina T.; Clark, Dewi S.; James, Paula D.; Riddel, Jim; Blanchette, Victor S.; Rand, Margaret L.

    2018-01-01

    Objective To use standardized bleeding questionnaires to compare the severity and patterns of epistaxis in children with a mucocutaneous bleeding disorder and control children. Study design The epistaxis sections of the Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire (PBQ) administered to pediatric patients with

  5. Efficacy of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in the Traumatic Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Hong; Kim, Jeong Ho; Byun, Sung Su; Kim, Hyung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University School of Medicine, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    This study evaluated technical and clinical outcomes and identified factors associated with clinical success in trauma patients that underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in a single regional hospital. A retrospective study was performed of 106 patients with a variety of trauma who were suspected of active arterial bleeding and underwent angiography. Technical success was defined as non-visualization of extravasation and pseudoaneurysm in injured arteries. Clinical success was defined as the patient was not expired within 30 days from the date of TAE. Electronic medical records were reviewed. The risk factors between groups of clinical success and failure were analyzed statistically. Technical and clinical success rates of TAE were 96% (102/106) and 70% (74/106) respectively. Of the factors we assessed, age, older than 60 years, systolic blood pressure and heart rate at admission and after TAE, and combined brain injury were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Old age, low systolic blood pressure after TAE, and combined brain injury were significant predictors of poor prognosis in multivariate analysis. TAE is an effective treatment for active arterial bleeding of the traumatic injury patient.

  6. Efficacy of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in the Traumatic Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dae Hong; Kim, Jeong Ho; Byun, Sung Su; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated technical and clinical outcomes and identified factors associated with clinical success in trauma patients that underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in a single regional hospital. A retrospective study was performed of 106 patients with a variety of trauma who were suspected of active arterial bleeding and underwent angiography. Technical success was defined as non-visualization of extravasation and pseudoaneurysm in injured arteries. Clinical success was defined as the patient was not expired within 30 days from the date of TAE. Electronic medical records were reviewed. The risk factors between groups of clinical success and failure were analyzed statistically. Technical and clinical success rates of TAE were 96% (102/106) and 70% (74/106) respectively. Of the factors we assessed, age, older than 60 years, systolic blood pressure and heart rate at admission and after TAE, and combined brain injury were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Old age, low systolic blood pressure after TAE, and combined brain injury were significant predictors of poor prognosis in multivariate analysis. TAE is an effective treatment for active arterial bleeding of the traumatic injury patient.

  7. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation.

  8. Acquired Inhibitors: A Special Case of Bleeding in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Stefanacci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This literature review is intended to familiarize physicians and healthcare providers of older adults with the potential causes of acute bleeding in older adults and to review diagnostic approaches that can produce prompt identification of acute bleeding and facilitate timely treatment. Adverse events from anticoagulant treatment and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID and aspirin use and abuse are among the most common causes of bleeding in older adults. Diagnoses infrequently considered—mild congenital hemophilia, acquired hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, and platelet dysfunction—can contribute to acute bleeding in older adults. The approach to management of bleeding varies. Management of acute bleeding in older adults can be challenging because these patients often have chronic comorbidity and have been prescribed long-term concomitant medications that can complicate diagnosis and treatment. Prompt recognition of acquired hemophilia, referral to an expert hematologist, and timely initiation of treatment could improve outcome in older patients who experience bleeding episodes resulting from this condition.

  9. Postpartum wound and bleeding complications in women who received peripartum anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Jane S; Grotegut, Chad A; Thames, Elizabeth; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Brancazio, Leo R; James, Andra H

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare wound and bleeding complications between women who received anticoagulation after cesarean delivery due to history of prior venous thromboembolic disease, arterial disease, or being a thrombophilia carrier with adverse pregnancy outcome, to women not receiving anticoagulation. Women in the Duke Thrombosis Center Registry who underwent cesarean delivery during 2003-2011 and received postpartum anticoagulation (anticoagulation group, n=77), were compared with a subset of women who delivered during the same time period, but did not receive anticoagulation (no anticoagulation group, n=77). The no anticoagulation group comprised women who were matched to the anticoagulation group by age, body mass index, type of cesarean (no labor vs. labor), and date of delivery. Bleeding and wound complications were compared between the two groups. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to determine if anticoagulation was an independent predictor of wound complication. Women who received anticoagulation during pregnancy had a greater incidence of wound complications compared to those who did not (30% vs. 8%, p<0.001). Using multivariable logistic regression, while controlling for race, diabetes, chorioamnionitis, and aspirin use, anticoagulation predicted the development of any wound complication (OR 5.8, 95% CI 2.2, 17.6), but there were no differences in the mean estimated blood loss at delivery (782 vs. 778 ml, p=0.91), change in postpartum hematocrit (5.4 vs. 5.2%, p=0.772), or percent of women receiving blood products (6.5 vs. 1.3%, p=0.209) between the two groups. Anticoagulation following cesarean delivery is associated with an increased risk of post-cesarean wound complications, but not other postpartum bleeding complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a prognostic nomogram for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Jie; Zheng, Ji-Na; Zhou, Yi-Fan; Han, Yi-Jing; Zou, Tian-Tian; Liu, Wen-Yue; Braddock, Martin; Shi, Ke-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2017-10-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a complication with a high mortality rate in critically ill patients presenting with cirrhosis. Today, there exist few accurate scoring models specifically designed for mortality risk assessment in critically ill cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (CICGIB). Our aim was to develop and evaluate a novel nomogram-based model specific for CICGIB. Overall, 540 consecutive CICGIB patients were enrolled. On the basis of Cox regression analyses, the nomogram was constructed to estimate the probability of 30-day, 90-day, 270-day, and 1-year survival. An upper gastrointestinal bleeding-chronic liver failure-sequential organ failure assessment (UGIB-CLIF-SOFA) score was derived from the nomogram. Performance assessment and internal validation of the model were performed using Harrell's concordance index (C-index), calibration plot, and bootstrap sample procedures. UGIB-CLIF-SOFA was also compared with other prognostic models, such as CLIF-SOFA and model for end-stage liver disease, using C-indices. Eight independent factors derived from Cox analysis (including bilirubin, creatinine, international normalized ratio, sodium, albumin, mean artery pressure, vasopressin used, and hematocrit decrease>10%) were assembled into the nomogram and the UGIB-CLIF-SOFA score. The calibration plots showed optimal agreement between nomogram prediction and actual observation. The C-index of the nomogram using bootstrap (0.729; 95% confidence interval: 0.689-0.766) was higher than that of the other models for predicting survival of CICGIB. We have developed and internally validated a novel nomogram and an easy-to-use scoring system that accurately predicts the mortality probability of CICGIB on the basis of eight easy-to-obtain parameters. External validation is now warranted in future clinical studies.

  11. Proton-pump inhibitors for prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients undergoing dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Rim; Kim, Hyung Jik; Kim, Jwa-Kyung; Kim, Sung Gyun; Kim, Sung Eun

    2015-04-28

    To investigate the preventive effects of low-dose proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in end-stage renal disease. This was a retrospective cohort study that reviewed 544 patients with end-stage renal disease who started dialysis at our center between 2005 and 2013. We examined the incidence of UGIB in 175 patients treated with low-dose PPIs and 369 patients not treated with PPIs (control group). During the study period, 41 patients developed UGIB, a rate of 14.4/1000 person-years. The mean time between the start of dialysis and UGIB events was 26.3 ± 29.6 mo. Bleeding occurred in only two patients in the PPI group (2.5/1000 person-years) and in 39 patients in the control group (19.2/1000 person-years). Kaplan-Meier analysis of cumulative non-bleeding survival showed that the probability of UGIB was significantly lower in the PPI group than in the control group (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Univariate analysis showed that coronary artery disease, PPI use, anti-coagulation, and anti-platelet therapy were associated with UGIB. After adjustments for the potential factors influencing risk of UGIB, PPI use was shown to be significantly beneficial in reducing UGIB compared to the control group (HR = 13.7, 95%CI: 1.8-101.6; P = 0.011). The use of low-dose PPIs in patients with end-stage renal disease is associated with a low frequency of UGIB.

  12. Blunt renal trauma: comparison of contrast-enhanced CT and angiographic findings and the usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitase, M.; Mizutani, M.; Tomita, H.; Kono, T.; Sugie, C.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced CT and the usefulness of super selective embolization therapy in the management of arterial damage in patients with severe blunt renal trauma. Patients and Methods: Nine cases of severe renal trauma were evaluated. In all cases, we compared contrast enhanced CT findings with angiographic findings, and performed transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in six of them with microcoils and gelatin sponge particles. Morphological changes in the kidney and site of infarction after TAE were evaluated on follow-up CT Chronological changes in blood biochemistry findings after injury, degree of anemia and renal function were investigated. Adverse effects or complications such as duration of hematuria, fever, abdominal pain, renovascular hypertension and abscess formation were also evaluated. Results: The CT finding of extravasation was a reliable sign of active bleeding and useful for determining the indication of TAE. In all cases, bleeding was effectively controlled with super selective embolization. There was minimal procedure-related loss of renal tissue. None of the patients developed abscess, hypertension or other complications. Conclusions: In blunt renal injury, contrast-enhanced CT was useful for diagnosing arterial hemorrhage. Arterial bleeding may produce massive hematoma and TAE was a useful treatment for such cases. By using selective TAE for a bleeding artery, it was possible to minimize renal parenchymal damage, with complications of TAE rarely seen. (author)

  13. Supplementary arteriel embolization an option in high-risk ulcer bleeding--a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Hansen, Jane Møller; Andersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: One of the major challenges in peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is rebleeding which is associated with up to a fivefold increase in mortality. We examined if supplementary transcatheter arterial embolization (STAE) performed after achieved endoscopic hemostasis improves outcome in patients...... with high-risk ulcers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was designed as a non-blinded, parallel group, randomized-controlled trial and performed in a university hospital setting. Patients admitted with PUB from Forrest Ia - IIb ulcers controlled by endoscopic therapy were randomized (1:1 ratio) to STAE...... of rebleeding, need of hemostatic intervention and mortality. Secondary outcomes were rebleeding, number of blood transfusions received, duration of admission and mortality. RESULTS: Totally 105 patients were included. Of the 49 patients allocated to STAE 31 underwent successful STAE. There was no difference...

  14. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyeon Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old woman was admitted to hospital because of generalized edema and proteinuria. Her renal function deteriorated rapidly. Serum immunoglobulin and complement levels were within normal ranges. An autoantibody examination showed negative for antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Histologic examination of a renal biopsy specimen revealed that all of the glomeruli had severe crescent formations with no immune deposits. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy with cyclophosphamide followed by oral prednisolone. Fifteen days later, she experienced massive recurrent hematochezia. Angiography revealed an active contrast extravasation in a branch of the distal ileal artery. We selectively embolized with a permanent embolic agent. On the 45th hospital day, the patient suddenly lost consciousness. Brain computed tomography showed intracerebral hemorrhage. We report a case of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding and cerebral hemorrhage.

  15. Tamoxifen treatment of bleeding irregularities associated with Norplant use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aleem, Hany; Shaaban, Omar M; Amin, Ahmed F; Abdel-Aleem, Aly M

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the possible role of tamoxifen (selective estrogen receptor modulators, SERM) in treating bleeding irregularities associated with Norplant contraceptive use. Randomized clinical trial including 100 Norplant users complaining of vaginal bleeding irregularities. The trial was conducted in the Family Planning Clinic of Assiut University Hospital. Women were assigned at random to receive tamoxifen tablets (10 mg) twice daily for 10 days or similar placebo. Women were followed-up for 3 months. The end points were percentage of women who stopped bleeding during treatment, bleeding/spotting days during the period of follow-up, effect of treatment on their lifestyle, and side effects and discontinuation of contraception. There was good compliance with treatment. At the end of treatment, a significantly higher percentage of tamoxifen users stopped bleeding in comparison to the control group (88% vs. 68%, respectively; p=.016). Women who used tamoxifen had significantly less bleeding and/or spotting days than women who used placebo, during the first and second months. During the third month, there were no significant differences between the two groups. Women who used tamoxifen reported improvement in performing household activities, religious duties and in sexual life, during the first 2 months. In the third month, there were no differences between the two groups. There were no significant differences between tamoxifen and placebo groups in reporting side effects. In the group who used tamoxifen, two women discontinued Norplant use because of bleeding vs. nine women in the placebo group. Tamoxifen use at a dose of 10 mg twice daily orally, for 10 days, has a beneficial effect on vaginal bleeding associated with Norplant use. In addition, the bleeding pattern was better in women who used tamoxifen for the following 2 months after treatment. However, these results have to be confirmed in a larger trial before advocating this line of treatment.

  16. Importance of histopathological examination of endometrium in Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Yaminee Rana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common condition affecting women of reproductive age that has significant social and economic impact. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB is defined as abnormal uterine bleeding in the absence of organic disease. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is one of the most commonly encountered gynaecological problems. Objectives: This study is done to evaluate the histopathological pattern of the endometrial biopsies of patients with dysfunctional uterine bleeding and its correlation with clinical data. Methods: The present prospective study included evaluation of 208 cases of dysfunctional uterine bleeding in the Department of Pathology, B. J. Medical College, Ahmedabad over a period of 10 months, from January 2017 to October 2017. Women presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding were included in the study. Those women in which bleeding is secondary to systemic causes, organic causes and due to cervical and vaginal causes were excluded. The specimens were processed, embedded and cut into sections of 3-4 microns. The histopathological patterns were studied. Results: Age distribution varied from 18 years to 70 years, majority of the patients were between 21 to 30 years. Among the cases of DUB, proliferative phase accounted for 66.3% and secretory phase accounted for 21.3%. 18 cases (8.6% of atrophic endometrium, four cases (1.9% of irregular shedding and two cases of luteal phase insufficiency were received. Conclusion: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is a common and debilitating condition in women of reproductive age. Endometrial biopsy could be effectively used as the first diagnostic step in DUB and thus ensures correct management.

  17. The effective control of a bleeding injury using a medical adhesive containing batroxobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Kyung Eun; Koo, Min-Ah; Lee, Dae-Hyung; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Lee, Mi Hee; Park, Jong-Chul; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Seomun, Young; Kim, Jong-Tak

    2014-01-01

    Many types of hemostatic agents have been studied for the effective control of bleeding. In this study, a powdery medical adhesive composed of aldehyded dextran and ε-poly (L-lysine) was used with the recombinant batroxobin. Batroxobin is a venomous component from the snake Bothrops atrox moojeni and catalyzes fibrinogen conversion to form soluble fibrin clots. This research aims to examine the performance of the batroxobin-containing adhesive for hemostasis, and evaluate its potential as a novel hemostatic adhesive. The fibrinogen conversion ability of batroxobin was evaluated by a fibrinogen clotting assay and a whole blood clotting assay. Both experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the batroxobin-containing adhesive for blood clot formation. Animal experiments were also conducted. After a pricking wound was made in an ICR (imprinting control region) mouse liver, the adhesive and various concentrations of batroxobin were applied. The total amount of blood loss was reduced with increasing concentrations of batroxobin. For excessive bleeding conditions, the femoral artery wound model of SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats was adopted. With higher concentrations of batroxobin, hemostasis was more rapidly achieved. Histological analysis of the liver model also supports the hemostatic effects through fibrin clot formation. In conclusion, batroxobin and medical adhesive effectively facilitate blood coagulation, and could be developed for clinical use. (paper)

  18. Epidemiology and Endoscopic Findings of the Patients Suffering from Upper Gastrointestinal System Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Suat Yalçın

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aim to investigate general and endoscopic findings of the patients who were hospitalized in our clinic because of upper gastrointestinal system bleeding (UGSB. Methods: The files of 403 patients who applied to our clinic between January 2014 and December 2014 with UGSB diagnosis were scanned retrospectively. The de­mographic, laboratorial and endoscopic findings of the patients were examined. Results: The average age of 403 patients were 61.12±17.1 (min. 17- max. 96 and while 263 of these patients were male (65.3(%, 140 of them were female (34.7%. Of all, 234 patients had an additional disease. The most fre­quently observed diseases were hypertension, diabetes mellitus and coronary artery. 259 (64.3% of the patients used to take at least one drug and 212 (52.6% of the patients used to get non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and/or aspirin. The most common reasons of UGSB were duodenal ulcer in 158 patients (39.2%, stomach ulcer in 97 patients (24%, erosive gastroduodenitis in 66 patients (16.3% and esophageal varices in 38 patients (9.4%. Unfortunately, 18 of the patients died. Conclusion: The most common reason of UGSB is duo­denal ulcer bleeding. In spite of the technological devel­opment nowadays, it is a disease which has mortality.

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to ulcer in duodenal diverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramon Banos Madrid; Fernando Alberca de las Parras; Angel Vargas Acosta and others

    2006-01-01

    The reasons more frequent of high gastrointestinal bleeding are the peptic gastric and duodenal, followed by acute erosions and the varicose veins in oesophagus and stomach. The diverticulosis of the small bowel is a very rare reason of gastrointestinal bleeding, must considerate in patients with bleeding without evident reason in oesophagus and stomach, the habitual is to diagnose this entity of accidental form in the course of endoscopic procedures, radiological or surgical. The complications associated with the diverticulosis duodenal are rare; it justifies supporting a not surgical attitude at first

  20. Breast cancer recurrence after reoperation for surgical bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Nørgaard; Bhaskaran, K; Heide-Jørgensen, U

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding activates platelets that can bind tumour cells, potentially promoting metastatic growth in patients with cancer. This study investigated whether reoperation for postoperative bleeding is associated with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Using the Danish Breast Cancer Group...... database and the Danish National Patient Register (DNPR), a cohort of women with incident stage I-III breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy during 1996-2008 was identified. Information on reoperation for bleeding within 14 days of the primary surgery was retrieved from...

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to ulcer in duodenal diverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos Madrid, Ramon; Alberca de las Parras, Fernando; Vargas Acosta, Angel and others

    2006-01-01

    The reasons more frequent of high gastrointestinal bleeding are the peptic gastric and duodenal, followed by acute erosion and the varicose veins in oesophagus and stomachs. The diverticulosis of the small bowel is a very rare reason of gastrointestinal bleeding, must considerate in patients with bleeding without evident reason in oesophagus and stomach the habitual is to diagnose this entity of occidental form in the course of endoscopic procedures, radiological of surgical. The complications associated with the diverticulosis duodenal are rare; it justifies supporting a not surgical attitude at first

  2. Transvaginal Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Karen C; Goldstein, Steven R

    2017-03-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound is the first-line imaging test for the evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Transvaginal ultrasound can be used to diagnose structural causes of abnormal bleeding such as polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyomas, hyperplasia, and malignancy, and can also be beneficial in making the diagnosis of ovulatory dysfunction. Traditional 2-dimensional imaging is often enhanced by the addition of 3-dimension imaging with coronal reconstruction and saline infusion sonohysterography. In this article we discuss specific ultrasound findings and technical considerations useful in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding.

  3. Clival chordoma manifesting as nasal bleeding. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitai, Ryuhei; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Kubota, Toshihiko; Sato, Kazufumi; Handa, Yuji; Kasahara, Kazuma [University of Fukui, Department of Neurosurgery, Fukui (Japan); Nakajima, Hirofumi [Tsuruga Municipal Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Fukui (Japan)

    2005-05-01

    Chordoma is a rare cartilaginous tumor, for which bleeding presentation is unusual. We report a case of rare hemorrhaged clival chordoma, which was diagnosed correctly by magnetic resonance imaging. A 32-year-old man presented with nasal bleeding. The tumor was totally removed via a trans-sphenoidal approach, from which the surgical specimen confirmed chordoma. Epistaxis seemed to be caused by the spreading of the intratumoral hemorrhage into the sphenoid sinus. This case demonstrates the importance of an exact differential diagnostic evaluation, including chordoma, by use of modern imaging techniques for nasal bleeding. (orig.)

  4. Clival chordoma manifesting as nasal bleeding. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitai, Ryuhei; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Kubota, Toshihiko; Sato, Kazufumi; Handa, Yuji; Kasahara, Kazuma; Nakajima, Hirofumi

    2005-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare cartilaginous tumor, for which bleeding presentation is unusual. We report a case of rare hemorrhaged clival chordoma, which was diagnosed correctly by magnetic resonance imaging. A 32-year-old man presented with nasal bleeding. The tumor was totally removed via a trans-sphenoidal approach, from which the surgical specimen confirmed chordoma. Epistaxis seemed to be caused by the spreading of the intratumoral hemorrhage into the sphenoid sinus. This case demonstrates the importance of an exact differential diagnostic evaluation, including chordoma, by use of modern imaging techniques for nasal bleeding. (orig.)

  5. Hepatic artery aneurysms (HAAs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosratini, H.

    2004-01-01

    The hepatic artery aneurysms are rare, especially in interahepatic branches, The frequency consists of 75-80% extrahepatic and 20-25% intrahepatic. Catheterization is achieved usually from common femoral artery, other methods implemented in the case of unsuccessful catheterization from femoral artery, are translumbar and brachial catheterization. The study consist of 565 patients that were referred to the angiography ward, During seven years of assessment, five cases of hepatic artery aneurysm were found; this is a rare condition reported in the English literature. In the literature as well as in this case report the hepatic artery aneurysms are rare. In reported series the extrahepatic artery aneurysms are found more often than in the intrahepatic artery aneurysm but in this case report intrahepatic artery aneurysms are more than extrahepatic one. (author)

  6. Supplementary arteriel embolization an option in high-risk ulcer bleeding--a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Hansen, Jane Møller; Andersen, Poul Erik; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is rebleeding which is associated with up to a fivefold increase in mortality. We examined if supplementary transcatheter arterial embolization (STAE) performed after achieved endoscopic hemostasis improves outcome in patients with high-risk ulcers. The study was designed as a non-blinded, parallel group, randomized-controlled trial and performed in a university hospital setting. Patients admitted with PUB from Forrest Ia - IIb ulcers controlled by endoscopic therapy were randomized (1:1 ratio) to STAE of the bleeding artery within 24 h or continued standard treatment. Randomization was stratified according to stigmata of hemorrhage. Patients were followed for 30 days. Primary outcome was a composite endpoint where patients were classified into five groups based on transfusion requirement, development of rebleeding, need of hemostatic intervention and mortality. Secondary outcomes were rebleeding, number of blood transfusions received, duration of admission and mortality. Totally 105 patients were included. Of the 49 patients allocated to STAE 31 underwent successful STAE. There was no difference in composite endpoint. Two versus eight patients re-bled in the STAE and control group, respectively (Intention-to-treat analysis; p = .10). After adjustment for possible imbalances a strong trend was noted between STAE and rate of rebleeding (p = .079). STAE is potentially useful for preventing rebleeding in high-risk PUB. STAE can safely be performed in selected cases with high risk of rebleeding. Further studies are needed in order to confirm these findings; ClincialTrials.gov number, NCT01125852.

  7. Treatment of non-neoplastic renal hemorrhage with segmental embolization of renal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of segmental embolization of renal artery in dealing with non- neoplastic renal hemorrhage. Methods: Four cases of non-neoplastic hemorrhage, including 2 with bleeding after renal acupuncture biopsy, 2 with bleeding after nephrolithotomy and 1 with congenital renal arteriovenous malformation, were treated with superselective segmental embolization of renal artery. 2 were embolized with coil, 1 with alcohol plus coil and 1 with PVA parcels. Results: Hematuria disappeared in 1-3 days. There was no recurrence in 7-45 months follow up and no complications induced by embolization. Conclusion: It is a safe and reliable therapy to treat non-neoplastic renal hemorrhage with segmental embolization of renal artery. (authors)

  8. Potential early predictors for outcomes of experimental hemorrhagic shock induced by uncontrolled internal bleeding in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid A Abassi

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled hemorrhage, resulting from traumatic injuries, continues to be the leading cause of death in civilian and military environments. Hemorrhagic deaths usually occur within the first 6 hours of admission to hospital; therefore, early prehospital identification of patients who are at risk for developing shock may improve survival. The aims of the current study were: 1. To establish and characterize a unique model of uncontrolled internal hemorrhage induced by massive renal injury (MRI, of different degrees (20-35% unilateral nephrectomy in rats, 2. To identify early biomarkers those best predict the outcome of severe internal hemorrhage. For this purpose, male Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized and cannulas were inserted into the trachea and carotid artery. After abdominal laparotomy, the lower pole of the kidney was excised. During 120 minutes, hematocrit, pO2, pCO2, base excess, potassium, lactate and glucose were measured from blood samples, and mean arterial pressure (MAP was measured through arterial tracing. After 120 minutes, blood loss was determined. Statistical prediction models of mortality and amount of blood loss were performed. In this model, the lowest blood loss and mortality rate were observed in the group with 20% nephrectomy. Escalation of the extent of nephrectomy to 25% and 30% significantly increased blood loss and mortality rate. Two phases of hemodynamic and biochemical response to MRI were noticed: the primary phase, occurring during the first 15 minutes after injury, and the secondary phase, beginning 30 minutes after the induction of bleeding. A Significant correlation between early blood loss and mean arterial pressure (MAP decrements and survival were noted. Our data also indicate that prediction of outcome was attainable in the very early stages of blood loss, over the first 15 minutes after the injury, and that blood loss and MAP were the strongest predictors of mortality.

  9. Bilateral renal artery variation

    OpenAIRE

    Üçerler, Hülya; Üzüm, Yusuf; İkiz, Z. Aslı Aktan

    2014-01-01

    Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery, although renal artery variations are common. Variations of the renal arteryhave become important with the increasing number of renal transplantations. Numerous studies describe variations in renalartery anatomy. Especially the left renal artery is among the most critical arterial variations, because it is the referred side forresecting the donor kidney. During routine dissection in a formalin fixed male cadaver, we have found a bilateral renal...

  10. Synergistic shortening of the bleeding time by desmopressin and ethamsylate in patients with various constitutional bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrinsky, N L; Israels, E D; Bickis, M G

    1991-01-01

    Desmopressin and ethamsylate were evaluated for possible synergistic effects on the bleeding time. The drugs were administered individually and together to 12 patients with markedly prolonged bleeding times known to be relatively or absolutely unresponsive to desmopressin alone. The bleeding disorders studied included Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (one), other disorders of platelet function (four), pseudo-von Willebrand disease (one), and von Willebrand disease type I (three), type II (two), and type III (one). Desmopressin alone shortened the bleeding time from 23.9 +/- 1.5 to 19.5 +/- 2.3 min (p = 0.03). Ethamsylate alone was without effect. Desmopressin and ethamsylate together shortened the bleeding time to 11.2 +/- 1.4 min (p less than 0.01 compared to baseline, p = 0.02 compared to desmopressin alone). The combination was ineffective in three patients, with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (one), and von Willebrand disease type I (one) and type III (one). Toxic effects of the drugs were not observed. Five patients received desmopressin and ethamsylate prior to dental work with mandibular block (one), heart surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (two), and adenotonsillectomy surgery (two). Normal hemostasis was achieved in each case. A synergistic shortening of the bleeding time was observed with the combination of desmopressin and ethamsylate in a wide range of bleeding disorders.

  11. Severe postpartum haemorrhage from ruptured pseudoaneurysm: successful treatment with transcatheter arterial embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyer, Philippe; Fargeaudou, Yann; Boudiaf, Mourad; Le Dref, Olivier; Rymer, Roland [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP Universite Paris 7, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris cedex 10 (France); Morel, Olivier [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP Universite Paris 7, Department of Obstetrics, Paris cedex 10 (France)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to a ruptured pseudoaneurysm and to analyse the clinical symptoms that may suggest a pseudoaneurysm as a cause of postpartum haemorrhage. A retrospective search of our database disclosed seven women with severe postpartum haemorrhage in whom angiography revealed the presence of a uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm and who were treated using transcatheter arterial embolization. Clinical files were reviewed for possible clinical findings that could suggest pseudoaneurysm as a cause of bleeding. Angiography revealed extravasation of contrast material in five out of seven patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization allowed to control the bleeding in all patients and subsequently achieve vaginal suture in four patients with vaginal laceration. No complications related to transcatheter arterial embolization were noted. Only two patients had uterine atony, and inefficiency of sulprostone was observed in all patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization is an effective and secure technique for the treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm. Ineffectiveness of suprostone and absence of uterine atony should raise the possibility of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm. (orig.)

  12. Severe postpartum haemorrhage from ruptured pseudoaneurysm: successful treatment with transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyer, Philippe; Fargeaudou, Yann; Boudiaf, Mourad; Le Dref, Olivier; Rymer, Roland; Morel, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to a ruptured pseudoaneurysm and to analyse the clinical symptoms that may suggest a pseudoaneurysm as a cause of postpartum haemorrhage. A retrospective search of our database disclosed seven women with severe postpartum haemorrhage in whom angiography revealed the presence of a uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm and who were treated using transcatheter arterial embolization. Clinical files were reviewed for possible clinical findings that could suggest pseudoaneurysm as a cause of bleeding. Angiography revealed extravasation of contrast material in five out of seven patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization allowed to control the bleeding in all patients and subsequently achieve vaginal suture in four patients with vaginal laceration. No complications related to transcatheter arterial embolization were noted. Only two patients had uterine atony, and inefficiency of sulprostone was observed in all patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization is an effective and secure technique for the treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm. Ineffectiveness of suprostone and absence of uterine atony should raise the possibility of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm. (orig.)

  13. [Endoscopic transnasal approach for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma without arterial embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Donghui; Qiu, Qianhui; Liang, Minzhi; Tan, Xianggao; Xia, Guangsheng

    2014-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of endoscopic resection without arterial embolism for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and the strategy of decreasing the bleeding during the operation. The clinical data of twenty-five cases of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma were retrospective analyzed, including 3 cases of Radowski stageIIa, 5 cases of stageIIb, 4 cases of stageIIc and with 13 cases of stage IIIa. All cases did not receive the arterial embolism, and controlled hypotension were adopted under endoscopic transnasal approach during the tumor resection. Two cases were added the labiogingival incision. During the operation, under the opening vision, cutting out the outside of the infratemporal fossa, and the pterygoid process to adequate exposure the pterygopalatine fossa and infratemporal fossa.Early recognition of anatomical landmarks and establish the safety plane, along the periphery of the tumor to proceed with micro-separation, early blocking tumor nutrient vessels, en bloc resection of the tumor and some other ways to reduce bleeding and tumor resection. Amount of bleeding during operation was 600-1500 ml, none of them had internal carotid artery injury and intracranial injury or some other complication.Follow-up 2-3 years was available in all patients, except 1 case with residual of tumor surrounding the optic nerve, the other 24 cases had no residual tumor and relapses. The preoperative occlusion and artery ligation may not be needed.Surgical technique is the key to reduce blood loss, and it is feasible to have endoscopic resection of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with proper operating technique.

  14. Clinical application of uterine artery embolization in treating uterine scar pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tonghuai; Zheng Hongfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate uterine artery embolization in treating uterine scar pregnancy. Methods: During the period from November 2007 to February 2010, 11 patients with uterine scar pregnancy were encountered in authors' hospital. All the patients had a history of lower uterine segment cesarean section. Four patients had to receive an emergency uterine artery embolization due to acute massive vaginal bleeding. The other 7 patients received intravenous chemotherapy with MTX (0.4 mg/kg/day, every 5 days as a treatment course). Emergency uterine artery embolization had to be carried out in three patients as they developed acute massive vaginal bleeding (blood loss ≥ 100 ml/hour) during the course of chemotherapy, while subsequent uterine artery embolization was performed in the remaining 4 patients after they had completed two courses of treatment when their blood HCG showed no significant decrease. The clinical results were analyzed. Results: Remarkable decrease in serum HCG was seen in all 11 patients after interventional management. The vaginal bleeding in 7 patients was significantly reduced within half an hour after uterine artery embolization. The uterus together with intact fertility was successfully preserved in all 11 patients. Conclusion: For the treatment of uterine scar pregnancy complicated by massive vaginal bleeding (blood loss ≥ 500 ml/24 h) and/or abnormal elevation of serum HCG (blood β-HCG ≥ 20000 IU/L), ectopic pregnancy with the mass diameter ≥ 5 cm, uterine artery embolization treatment is very safe and effective. This technique can well preserve female patient's uterus and fertility ability. It is of value to employ this treatment in clinical practice. (authors)

  15. Improvements of the base bleed effect using reactive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bournot, Herve; Daniel, Eric [Polytech' Marseille, IUSTI UMR CNRS 6595, 5, rue E. Fermi, Technopole de Chateau Gombert, 13453 Marseille cedex 13 (France); Cayzac, Roxan [Giat Industries, 7, Route de Guerry, F-18023 Bourges cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    A numerical study of the base drag reduction of axisymmetric body projectiles in supersonic flight using a base bleed injection is presented in this paper. Unsteady computations of compressible viscous flow have been achieved in order to investigate the coupled effect of the bleed temperature and the bleed mass flow rate on the base pressure. The idea developed in the study, consists in the addition of metallic particles in the propellant composition used to provide the additional mass injected in order to obtain the lowest base drag. Indeed, for a low mass addition, a significant increase of the mixture energy is expected due to the particles combustion. Base flow with reactive two-phase injection is then simulated. Results show the ability of the method to describe such flows and the efficiency of the particles combustion to increase the base bleed reducing drag effect. (author)

  16. Breast cancer recurrence after reoperation for surgical bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Nørgaard; Bhaskaran, K; Heide-Jørgensen, U

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding activates platelets that can bind tumour cells, potentially promoting metastatic growth in patients with cancer. This study investigated whether reoperation for postoperative bleeding is associated with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Using the Danish Breast Cancer Group...... database and the Danish National Patient Register (DNPR), a cohort of women with incident stage I-III breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy during 1996-2008 was identified. Information on reoperation for bleeding within 14 days of the primary surgery was retrieved from.......i. 0·89 to 1·26). The estimates did not vary by site of breast cancer recurrence. CONCLUSION: In this large cohort study, there was no evidence of an association between reoperation for bleeding and breast cancer recurrence....

  17. No impact of fish oil supplements on bleeding risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begtrup, Katrine Munk; Krag, Andreas Engel; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fish oil supplementation may inhibit platelet aggregation and can potentially increase the risk of bleeding. The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate the effect of fish oil supplements on haemostasis and bleeding risk, and to provide recommendations on whether...... of the included studies were randomised controlled trials or included a control group. Overall, fish oil supplements reduced platelet aggregation in healthy subjects. Fish oil exposure in surgical patients did not increase bleeding or blood transfusions either during or after surgery. Conclusion: Fish oil...... supplements reduced platelet aggregation in healthy subjects. This biochemical effect was not reflected in increased bleeding risk during or after surgery evaluated in randomised controlled trials. Consequently, this systematic review does not support the need for discontinuation of fish oil supplements prior...

  18. Thrombelastography Early Amplitudes in bleeding and coagulopathic trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Holst; Meyer, Martin A S; Meyer, Anna Sina P

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early amplitudes in the viscoelastic hemostatic assays Thrombelastography (TEG) and Rotation Thromboelastometry (ROTEM) provide fast results, which is critical in resuscitation of bleeding patients. This study investigated associations between TEG early amplitudes and standard TEG var...

  19. Systematic review: tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, S.L.; Langholz, S.E.; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid may reduce upper gastrointestinal bleeding and stabilize patients before endoscopic treatments. AIM: To review randomized trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Manual and electronic searches of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE...... and Science Citation Index were combined. Intention-to-treat random effect meta-analyses were performed and results presented as RRs with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Seven double-blind randomized trials on tranexamic acid vs. placebo were included. Of 1754 patients randomized, 21% were excluded. Only...... one trial included endoscopic treatments or proton pump inhibitors. Five per cent of patients on tranexamic acid and 8% of controls died (RR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42-0.89). No significant differences were found on bleeding, bleeding-related mortality, surgery or transfusion requirements. Adverse events...

  20. Modern issues on the treatment of peptic ulcer bleedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potakhin S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of therapeutic treatment of peptic ulcer and the introduction of endoscopic technologies, the problem of peptic ulcer hemorrhage remains valid. A large number of publications in foreign literature are dedicated to epidemiology and prevention of bleeding, evaluation of modern tactics and search for new methods of treatment. The works relating to organization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding are of particular interest. According to the recent data not all clinics even in economically developed countries manage to follow the recommendations of an international consensus-2010 for non-variceal bleeding treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract. Among the causes of non-compliance of international recommendations there are subjective and objective factors, the understanding of which can significantly affect the optimization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding.