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Sample records for bleached hardwood kraft

  1. Optimization of ECF bleaching of kraft pulp. Part 1, Optimal bleaching of hardwood pulps made with different alkali charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. McDonough; Shunichiro Uno; Alan W. Rudie; Charles E. Courchene

    2008-01-01

    In an earlier modeling study, we showed that when a hardwood kraft pulp is bleached in the D0(EO)D1ED2 sequence with a D0 stage kappa factor of 0.20, the brightness of the pulp emerging from the D2 stage can be accurately predicted from the brightness of the pulp entering that stage. The entering brightness, in turn is a well-defined function of the ratio of the D1...

  2. The role of bound chlorine in the brightness reversion of bleached hardwood kraft pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Maria Morais Eiras

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous paper showed fragmentary evidence that pulp brightness reversion may be negatively affected by its organically bound chlorine (OX content. A thorough investigation on eucalyptus kraft pulp led to the conclusion that OX increases reversion of certain pulps but this trend is not universal. Alkaline bleaching stages decrease reversion regardless of pulp OX content. Pulps bleached with high temperature chlorine dioxide revert less than those bleached with conventional chlorine dioxide in sequences ending with a chlorine dioxide stage but similarly in sequences ending with a final peroxide stage. The use of secondary condensate for pulp washing decreases reversion.

  3. SUBSTITUTION OF HIGH-YIELD-PULP FOR HARDWOOD BLEACHED KRAFT PULP IN PAPER PRODUCTION AND ITS EFFECT ON ALKENYL SUCCINIC ANHYDRIDE SIZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijie Chen,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing interest in using high-yield pulp (HYP as a partial replacement for hardwood bleached kraft pulp (HWBKP in the production of high-quality fine papers as a cost-effective way of improving the product performance. This study investigated the substitution of HYP for HWBKP and its effect on the Alkenyl Succinic Anhydride (ASA sizing performance. The results showed that the substitution of an aspen HYP for HWBKP can increase the ASA sizing performance at a HYP substitution as high as 15 to 20%. The ASA addition sequence has an influence on the ASA sizing performance and first adding ASA to the HYP followed by mixing with kraft pulps was the preferred method. Using precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC as a paper filler at a dosage of less than 20% can increase the ASA sizing performance due to the contribution of the calcium soap of the hydrolysed ASA. A PCC dosage greater than 20% resulted in a negative impact on the sizing performance. It was also found that different PCC loading sequences can also affect the ASA sizing performance.

  4. Valorisation of by Products from Bleached Eucalyptus Kraft Pulp Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M. C.; Lopes, O. R.; Colodette, J. L.; Porto, A. O.; Rieumont, J.; Chaussy, D.; Belgacem, M. N.; Silva, G. G.

    2008-08-01

    Three industrial wastes arising from bleached hardwood kraft pulps, namely: unbleached screen rejects (USR), effluent treatment (ETW), and eucalyptus bark (EB) were analyzed with the aim of their possible valorization as an alternative source of cellulose. Their morphological properties were determined using MorFi apparatus. For this study the sample bleached kraft pulp, BKP, was analyzed as a reference. Lignin and carbohydrate contents were also quantified. These by-products were studied as such (i.e. without careful purification) because we intended to find rational and low-cost way of valorization. In fact any additional operation will induce an over cost. The results obtained indicate that these industrial wastes can be potential raw material in fibre-based applications (paper, composites…), since they contain a high proportion of cellulose with preserved fibrillar morphology. Some of these materials have low lignin and inorganic residue contents.

  5. Biochemical methane potential of kraft bleaching effluent and codigestion with other in-mill streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Dahl, Olli; Master, Emma;

    2016-01-01

    and in combination: total bleaching effluent, alkaline bleaching effluent, kraft evaporator condensate, and chemithermomechanical pulping effluent. The total bleaching effluent, consisting of the chlorine dioxide bleaching and alkaline bleaching effluents, exhibited the highest potential for organic matter...

  6. Biochemical methane potential of kraft bleaching effluent and codigestion with other in-mill streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Dahl, Olli; Master, Emma

    2016-01-01

    and in combination: total bleaching effluent, alkaline bleaching effluent, kraft evaporator condensate, and chemithermomechanical pulping effluent. The total bleaching effluent, consisting of the chlorine dioxide bleaching and alkaline bleaching effluents, exhibited the highest potential for organic matter...

  7. 40 CFR 430.20 - Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. 430.20 Section 430.20 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bleached Papergrade Kraft and Soda Subcategory § 430.20 Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply...

  8. REPLACEMENT OF SOFTWOOD KRAFT PULP WITH ECF-BLEACHED BAMBOO KRAFT PULP IN FINE PAPER

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    Guanglei Zhao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-wood fibers such as bamboo and wheat straw have been playing important roles in the pulp and paper industry in China. In this study an ECF-bleached bamboo kraft pulp was compared with a bleached softwood kraft pulp (NBSK as the reinforcement pulp in fine paper production. Areas that were examined include the refining of pure fibers, influence of bamboo on dewatering, retention, and sizing. The influence of bamboo kraft pulp as a part of a furnish replacing NBSK was compared as well. Results show that fiber shortening was more prominent with bamboo when refined. This resulted in a higher amount of fines, and addition wet-end chemicals may be required to compensate. Handsheets with bamboo as a reinforcement fiber showed similar mechanical and optical properties to handsheets containing NBSK.

  9. REINFORCEMENT POTENTIAL OF BLEACHED SAWDUST KRAFT PULP IN DIFFERENT MECHANICAL PULP FURNISHES

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    Risto I. Korpinen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Bleached unrefined and refined sawdust kraft pulps were added to bleached Norway spruce thermomechanical (TMP and pressurised groundwood (PWG pulps in different proportions. Handsheets were prepared and tested for physical properties. In addition, economic calculations were done to estimate the production costs of different bleached pulps in Finland. It was found that the addition of unrefined and refined sawdust kraft pulp improved drainability of the mechanical pulps. Tear strength of PGW furnishes was increased when either unrefined or refined sawdust pulp was added. Tear strength of TMP furnishes was not influenced when different sawdust kraft pulps were added. Up to 30 % of unrefined sawdust kraft pulp could be added and no significant negative effect was observed in TMP and PGW furnishes. On the other hand, when refined sawdust kraft pulp was added into the mechanical pulp furnishes, a clear improvement in the tensile strength was observed. According to the economic calculation the production cost of bleached sawdust kraft pulp is almost as low as the production cost of bleached mechanical pulp. We suggest that economically viable sawdust kraft pulp can be used as a substituent for expensive long fibre reinforcement kraft pulp in the production of mechanical pulp based papers.

  10. Impact of lignin and carbohydrate chemical structures on degradation reactions during hardwood kraft pulping processes

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    Ricardo B. Santos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Most studies aimed at determining rates of hardwood delignification and carbohydrate degradation have focused on understanding the behavior of a single wood species. Such studies tend to determine either the delignification rate or the rate of carbohydrate degradation without examining the potential interactions resulting from related variables. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation on both lignin and carbohydrate degradation during kraft pulping of multiple hardwood species. The kraft delignification rates of E. urograndis, E. nitens, E. globulus, sweet gum, maple, red oak, red alder, cottonwood, and acacia were obtained. Furthermore, the kinetics of glucan, xylan, and total carbohydrate dissolution during the bulk phase of the kraft pulping process for the above species were also investigated. The wide ranges of delignification and carbohydrate degradation rates were correlated to wood chemical characteristics. It appears that the S/G ratio and lignin-carbohydrate-complexes (LCCs are the main characteristics responsible for the differences in kraft pulping performance among the hardwoods studied.

  11. Assessment of reproductive effects in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to bleached/unbleached kraft mill effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Ruessler, D.S.; Denslow, N.D.; Holm, S.E.; Schoeb, T.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential effects of different concentrations of bleached/unbleached kraft mill effluent (B/UKME) on several reproductive endpoints in adult largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). The kraft mill studied produces a 50/50 mix of bleached/unbleached market pulp with an estimated release of 36 million gal of efffluent/day. Bleaching sequences were C90d10EopHDp and CEHD for softwood (pines) and hardwoods (mainly tupelo, gums, magnolia, and water oaks), respectively. Bass were exposed to different effluent concentrations (0 [controls, exposed to well water], 10, 20, 40, or 80%) for either 28 or 56 days. At the end of each exposure period, fish were euthanized, gonads collected for histological evaluation and determination of gonadosomatic index (GSI), and plasma was analyzed for 17??-estradiol, 11-ketotestosterone, and vitellogenin (VTG). Largemouth bass exposed to B/UKME responded with changes at the biochemical level (decline in sex steroids in both sexes and VTG in females) that were usually translated into tissue/organ-level responses (declines in GSI in both sexes and in ovarian development in females). Although most of these responses occurred after exposing fish to 40% B/UKME concentrations or greater, some were observed after exposures to 20% B/UKME. These threshold concentrations fall within the 60% average yearly concentration of effluent that exists in the stream near the point of discharge (Rice Creek), but are above the <10% effluent concentration present in the St. Johns River. The chemical(s) responsible for such changes as well as their mode(s) of action remain unknown at this time.

  12. Kinetics of Strong Acid Hydrolysis of a Bleached Kraft Pulp for Producing Cellulose Nanocrystals (CNCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qianqian Wang; Xuebing Zhao; J.Y. Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrytals (CNCs) are predominantly produced using the traditional strong acid hydrolysis process. In most reported studies, the typical CNC yield is low (approximately 30%) despite process optimization. This study investigated the hydrolysis of a bleached kraft eucalyptus pulp using sulfuric acid between 50 and 64 wt % at temperatures of 35−80 °C...

  13. TCF bleaching sequence in kraft pulping of olive tree pruning residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requejo, A; Rodríguez, A; Colodette, J L; Gomide, J L; Jiménez, L

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to find a suitable Kraft cooking process for olive tree pruning (OTP), in order to produce pulp of kappa number about 17. The Kraft pulp produced under optimized conditions showed a viscosity of 31.5 mPa·s and good physical, mechanical, and optical properties, which are suitable for paper production. The physical-mechanical and optical properties were measured before and after bleaching. Although the OTP pulp was bleached to 90.9% ISO brightness (kappapulp showed a brightness reversion equal to 1.3%. Furthermore, this bleached pulp did not need a high intensity of beating due to high drainability degree in the unbeaten pulp. So that, OTP is suggested as an interesting raw material for cellulosic pulp production because its properties are comparable to those of other agricultural residues, currently used in the paper industry.

  14. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS BETWEEN BIRCH CHEMICAL MECHANICAL PULPS AND ASPEN BLEACHED KRAFT PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric C. Xu; Yajun Zhou

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, two different grades of birch chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) pulps and aspen market bleached kraft pulp were compared by low consistency refining of the pulps separately and in different combinations. In addition, the separately refined pulps were also combined to compare with the pulps from the co-refined pulp blend. The results showed that in both cases there were synergistic effects between the two types of pulps: adding the birch P-RC APMP pulp to the aspen kraft pulp improved pulp properties, and the resultant pulp blends had a higher fiber bonding strength (tensile and tensile energy absorption) than the sum of weighted contributions from the individual components. Understanding this synergistic effect between chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) and kraft pulps can help to improve their applications and performances in various papermaking processes.The results also showed that introducing, at least up to certain percentage of, the birch P-RC APMP pulp into the aspen bleached kraft pulp not only improves optical and bulk properties, but also maintains or improves tensile strength, even though the P-RC APMP pulp used has lower tensile than the kraft pulp.

  15. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS BETWEEN BIRCH CHEMICAL MECHANICAL PULPS AND ASPEN BLEACHED KRAFT PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EricC.Xu; YajunZhou

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, two different grades of birch chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) pulps and aspen market bleached kraft pulp were compared by low consistency refining of the pulps separately and in different combinations. In addition, the separately refined pulps were also combined to compare with the pulps from the co-refined pulp blend. The results showed that in both cases there were synergistic effects between the two types of pulps: adding the birch P-RC APMP pulp to the aspen kraft pulp improved pulp properties, and the resultant pulp blends had a higher fiber bonding strength (tensile and tensile energy absorption) than the sum of weighted contributions from the individual components. Understanding this synergistic effect between chemical mechanical (P-RC APMP) and kraft pulps can help to improve their applications and performances in various papermaking processes. The results also showed that introducing, at least up to certain percentage of, the birch P-RC APMP pulp into the aspen bleached kraft pulp not only improves optical and bulk properties, but also maintains or improves tensile strength, even though the P-RC APMP pulp used has lower tensile than the kraft pulp.

  16. Effects of the bleaching sequence on the optical brighteners action in eucalyptus kraft pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Manfredi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the bleaching process the pulp is treated with chemical reagents that can be retained in the pulp and interfere in the action of the optical brighteners. Different bleaching sequences can produce pulps at the same brightness but with different potential to whiteness increase when treated with optical brighteners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bleaching sequence on the efficiency of disulphonated and tetrasulphonated optical brighteners. Eucalyptus kraft pulp was bleached using four different bleaching sequences. For each pulp three brightness targets were aimeds. For each bleaching sequence mathematical model was generated for predicting the final pulp whiteness according to the initial brightness and the optical brightener charge applied. The presence of organochlorine residues in the pulp reduced the effectiveness of the optical brighteners. Therefore, bleaching sequences that use low chlorine dioxide charge favors for greater gains in whiteness with the application of optical brighteners. The replacement of the final chlorine dioxide bleaching stage with a hydrogen peroxide one in the sequence increased the efficiency of the optical brightening agents.

  17. Biological activity of bleached kraft pulp mill effluents before and after activated sludge and ozone treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Alessandra Cunha; Mounteer, Ann H; Stoppa, Teynha Valverde; Aquino, Davi Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Eucalyptus bleached kraft pulp production, an important sector of the Brazilian national economy, is responsible for generating large volume, high pollutant load effluents, containing a considerable fraction of recalcitrant organic matter. The objectives of this study were to quantify the biological activity of the effluent from a eucalyptus bleached kraft pulp mill, characterize the nature of compounds responsible for biological activity and assess the effect of ozone treatment on its removal. Primary and secondary effluents were collected bimonthly over the course of one year at a Brazilian bleached eucalypt kraft pulp mill and their pollutant loads (biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), adsorbable organic halogen (AOX), lignin, extractives) and biological activity (acute and chronic toxicity and estrogenic activity) quantified. The effluent studied did not present acute toxicity to Daphnia, but presented the chronic toxicity effects of algal growth inhibition and reduced survival and reproduction in Ceriodaphnia, as well as estrogenic activity. Chronic toxicity and estrogenic activity were reduced but not eliminated during activated sludge biological treatment. The toxicity identification evaluation revealed that lipophilic organic compounds (such as residual lignin, extractives and their byproducts) were responsible for the toxicity and estrogenic activity. Ozone treatment (50 mg/L O(3)) of the secondary effluent eliminated the chronic toxicity and significantly reduced estrogen activity.

  18. TCF Bleaching of Populus tomentosa Kraft Pulps with H2O2 Pretreatment under Acid Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The process of peroxide bleaching of Populus tomentosa kraft pulp with H2O2 pretreatment under acid condition was studied. The variations of pulp characteristics such as brightness, Kappa number and viscosity during the peroxide bleaching process were discussed and the concept of the A/B value was presented for the first time. The results show that acid pretreatment with H2O2 is essential to improve pulp brightness and avoid viscosity loss. The conclusion is reached that the A/B value has great influence on pulp properties when the total amount of peroxide used in the bleaching process is 2%-5%. Pulp with a high viscosity and brightness can be obtained when A/B is about 0.15.

  19. Effluent monitoring at a bleached kraft mill: directions for best management practices for eliminating effects on fish reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Pierre H; Kovacs, Tibor G; O'connor, Brian I; Semeniuk, Sharon; Hewitt, L Mark; Maclatchy, Deborah L; McMaster, Mark E; Parrott, Joanne L; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Van Der Kraak, Glen J

    2011-01-01

    A long-term monitoring study was conducted on effluents from a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill located in Eastern Canada. The study was designed to gain insights into temporal effluent variability with respect to fish reproduction as it related to production upsets, mill restarts and conditions affecting biological treatment performance. Final effluent quality was monitored between February 2007 and May 2009 using biochemical and chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, resin and fatty acids, a gas chromatographic profiling index, and the presence of methyl substituted 2-cyclopentenones. Selected effluent samples were evaluated for effects on fish reproduction (egg production) using a shortened version of the adult fathead minnow reproductive test. The events relating to negative effects on fish reproduction were upsets of the pulping liquor recovery system resulting in black liquor losses, operational upsets of the hardwood line resulting in the loss of oxygen delignification filtrates, and conditions that reduced the performance of biological treatment (e.g., mill shutdown and low ambient temperatures). The reductions in egg production observed in fathead minnow were associated with biochemical oxygen demand values > 20 mg/L, GC profiling indices > 1.2 and the presence of methyl-substituted 2-cyclopentenones at concentrations > 100 μg/L. This study demonstrated the importance of both in-plant measures for controlling the loss of organics as well as the optimum operation of biological effluent treatment for eliminating effluent-related effects on fish reproduction (egg production) in the laboratory.

  20. Application of xylanases from Amazon Forest fungal species in bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulps

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    Roseli Garcia Medeiros

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Crude xylanase preparations from Penicillium corylophilum, Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma longibrachiatum were used to treat Eucalyptus kraft pulp, prior to chlorine dioxide and alkaline bleaching sequences. The enzyme pretreatment improved brightness and delignification of non-delignified and oxygen-bleached samples of eucalyptus kraft pulp. Xylanase preparations from T. longibrachiatum and P. corylophilum were more effective to reduce pulp kappa number. A small reduction in viscosity was obtained when the oxygen-bleached pulp was treated with xylanase preparation from A. niger. For all enzyme samples, the best release of chromophoric material from the pulp was at 237 nm. The enzyme preparation from P. corylophilum was responsible for the highest release of reducing sugar at a dosage interval of 10-20 IU/g dry weight pulp. Scanning electron microscopy studies of oxygen-bleached pulp after xylanase treatment revealed morphological changes, including holes, cracks, filament forming and peeling.Amostras de xilanases de extratos brutos de Penicillium corylophilum, Aspergillus niger e Trichoderma longibrachiatum foram utilizadas no branqueamento de polpa kraft de eucalipto antes das seqüências alcalina e dióxido de cloro. O pré-tratamento enzimático melhorou a alvura e o processo de deslignificação de amostras de polpa kraft de eucalipto não-tratada e tratada com oxigênio. Amostras de xilanases de T. longibrachiatum e P. corylophilum foram mais efetivas na redução do número kappa da polpa. A polpa tratada com oxigênio sofreu uma pequena redução na sua viscosidade quando incubada com amostra de xilanase de A. niger. Para todas as amostras de xilanases, a maior liberação de cromóforos da polpa foi a 237 nm. A amostra de xilanase de P. corylophilum liberou maior quantidade de açúcar redutor da polpa, utilizando dosagem de 10-20 UI/g de peso seco da polpa. Estudos de microscopia eletrônica de varredura revelaram várias altera

  1. Acid hydrolysis of cellulosic fibres: Comparison of bleached kraft pulp, dissolving pulps and cotton textile cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Anna; Theliander, Hans; Brelid, Harald

    2016-01-20

    The behaviour of different cellulosic fibres during acid hydrolysis has been investigated and the levelling-off degree of polymerisation (LODP) has been determined. The study included a bleached kraft pulp (both never-dried and once-dried) and two dissolving pulps (once-dried). Additionally, cotton cellulose from new cotton sheets and sheets discarded after long-time use was studied. Experimental results from the investigation, together with results found in literature, imply that ultrastructural differences between different fibres affect their susceptibility towards acid hydrolysis. Drying of a bleached kraft pulp was found to enhance the rate of acid hydrolysis and also result in a decrease in LODP. This implies that the susceptibility of cellulosic fibres towards acid hydrolysis is affected by drying-induced stresses in the cellulose chains. In cotton cellulose, it was found that use and laundering gave a substantial loss in the degree of polymerisation (DP), but that the LODP was only marginally affected. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of bleaching technologies on the aerobic biodegradability of effluents from Eucalyptus kraft pulps factories

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    Gladys Vidal

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic biodegradability of effluents from different Eucalyptus kraft pulp bleaching processes was studied. Bleaching effluents were obtained from: i Chlorine Bleaching (CB processes, with partial substitution of chlorine by chlorine dioxide and ii Total Chlorine Free (TCF processes. The overall biodegradability, in terms of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD was higher for TCF effluents (96-98% than for CB ones (82-93%. Taking into account the higher organic load of CB effluents, this fact implied a much higher residual COD for them (100-180 mg/L than for TCF effluents (10-30 mg/L. Furthermore, a refractory fraction of molecular weight higher than 43,000 Da was found in CB effluent, which implied the necessity of a further specific treatment. The toxicity was completely removed after the biological treatmentA biodegradabilidade aerobica das águas residuais provenientes de diferentes procesos de branqueos de pulpa kraft foi estudada. Os efluentes são gerados no branqueo com cloro ou parcialmente sustituido com dioxido de cloro (CB ou bem em processos livres do cloro (TCF. A biodegradabilidade, quantificada como DQO foi maior para as águas do processo CB. Tendo em conta o elevado conteúdo orgânico do efluente CB obteinse uma maior concentraç&ão do DQO final neste efluente comparado com o efluente TCF. Uma fracçao recalcitrante maior a 43,000 Da no effluente BC foi encontrada, isto significa um tratamento adicional específico para sua eliminaçã o. A toxicidade foi totalmente eliminada despois do tratamento aeração.

  3. Kraft pulp bleaching with molybdenum activated acid peroxide (P{sub Mo} stage); Branqueamento de polpa celulosica kraft de eucalipto com peroxido acido ativado por molibdenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Marcos Sousa [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Lauro de Freitas, BA (Brazil). Dept. Regional da Bahia; Silva, Vanessa Lopes; Barros, Denise Pires de; Colodette, Jorge Luiz [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Florestal; Sacon, Vera Maria; Silva, Marcelo Rodrigues da [Votorantim Celulose e Papel, Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Optimum conditions to run the P{sub Mo} stage for bleaching eucalyptus kraft pulp were 90 deg C, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/t Mo and 5 kg/t H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The P{sub Mo} stage efficiency increased with decreasing pH (1.5-5.5) and increasing temperature (75-90 deg C), time (2-4 h), and hydrogen peroxide (3-10 kg/t) and molybdenum concentration (0.1-0.4 kg/t). The implementation of the P{sub Mo} stage, as replacement for the A stage, decreased total active chlorine demand of the OAZDP sequence by 6 kg/t to reach 90% ISO, both in laboratory and mill scale. Such practice resulted in decreased bleaching chemical costs to produce fully bleached pulp of 90% ISO. (author)

  4. Characterization of Softwood and Hardwood LignoBoost Kraft Lignins with Emphasis on their Antioxidant Activity

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    Jevgenija Ponomarenko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation of softwood and hardwood LignoBoost kraft lignins, using sequential extraction with organic solvents of increasing hydrogen-bonding ability (dichloromethane, n-propanol, and methanol, was carried out. Using SEC, analytical pyrolysis, FTIR and UV/VIS spectroscopy, and chemical analytical methods, four fractions were obtained and characterized in terms of their yield, composition, functionality, lignin structural features, and antioxidant properties. In tests with free radicals (ABTS●+, DPPH●, O2●- and the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the high radical scavenging capacity of the lignin’s soluble fractions was demonstrated. The antioxidant activity of the fractions was tested by their influence on thermo-oxidative destruction of model polyurethane elastomers. The TGA data clearly revealed the antioxidant effect of the three fractions, with the most prominent activity for the propanol-soluble fraction. The dichloromethane fraction has potential as an antioxidant for non-polar products. Novel correlations between lignin’s structural features and its radical scavenging activity were found that can be used for tuning lignin’s antioxidant properties.

  5. The impact of cleaner processing on nutrient availability in the bleached kraft industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, A H; Maclean, P H; van Otterdijk, F F H

    2007-01-01

    The pulp and paper industry has invested heavily over recent years in cleaner processing, to reduce losses and minimise its impact on the environment. Over the past fifteen years, a New Zealand integrated bleached kraft mill has undergone a comprehensive programme of upgrades to increase production, reduce water consumption and streamline its biological treatment process. Whilst the overall discharge of contaminants from the site decreased, the treatment system performance did not show a concurrent improvement as may have been expected. Reduced BOD removal, low dissolved oxygen levels, and poor solids settlability were symptomatic of phosphorus limitation in the aerated lagoon treatment system. The wastewater entering the system was found to be phosphorus limited at a BOD:P ratio of 100:0.2. Mono-ammonium-phosphate was supplemented, at approximately 30 kg P/d, to raise the phosphorus levels to a BOD:P ratio of 100:0.3. Treatment efficiencies improved very quickly after phosphorus dosage, with a 50% reduction in BOD and TSS discharge, a significant increase in dissolved oxygen levels, and improved BOD removal (85% to 93%). This case study demonstrates that whilst more closed operation can result in reduced discharge of organic loads, there may be negative impacts on the availability of nutrients for balanced biological growth.

  6. HYDROPHOBIZATION OF BLEACHED SOFTWOOD KRAFT FIBERS VIA ADSORPTION OF ORGANO-NANOCLAY

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    Jieming Chen,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Montmorillonite clay particles that had been prepared with an alklyl-ammonium surfactant were used to modify the moisture-sensitivity of bleached softwood kraft fibers through solvent exchange and adsorption methods. Moisture absorption and water uptake of the wood pulp fibers were significantly lower after the organo-nanoclay treatment. Thermal stability, surface energy, and surface morphology of the treated fibers were characterized using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC, Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM-EDX, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM imaging. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectral characteristics of the treated fibers were obtained to better understand the modified surface functional groups of the treated fibers. The treated bio-fibers had nano-scale surface roughness and a much reduced surface energy. The contact angle of water on the treated fiber mat was found to be higher than 160º. The thermal stability of the treated fibers was not affected by the modification.

  7. Removal of the organic content from a bleached kraft pulp mill effluent by a treatment with silica-alginate-fungi biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Katia; Justino, Celine I L; Pereira, Ruth; Panteleitchouk, Teresa S L; Freitas, Ana C; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-01-01

    This study attempts a treatment strategy of a bleached kraft pulp mill effluent with Rhizopus oryzae or Pleurotus sajor caju encapsulated on silica-alginate (biocomposite of silica-alginate-fungi, with the purpose of reducing its potential impact in the environment. Active (alive) or inactive (death by sterilization) Rhizopus oryzae or Pleurotus sajor caju was encapsulated in alginate beads. Five beads containing active and inactive fungus were placed in a mold and filled with silica hydrogel (biocomposites). The biocomposites were added to batch reactors containing the bleached kraft pulp mill effluent. The treatment of bleached kraft pulp mill effluent by active and inactive biocomposites was performed throughout 29 days at 28°C. The efficiency of treatment was evaluated by measuring the removal of organic compounds, chemical oxygen demand and the relative absorbance ratio over time. Both fungi species showed potential for removal of organic compounds, colour and chemical oxygen demand. Maximum values of reduction in terms of colour (56%), chemical oxygen demand (65%) and organic compounds (72-79%) were attained after 29 days of treatment of bleached kraft pulp mill effluent by active Rhizopus oryzae biocomposites. The immobilization of fungi, the need for low fungal biomass, and the possibility of reutlization of the biocomposites clearly demonstrate the industrial and environmental interest in bleached kraft pulp mill effluent treatment by silica-alginate-fungi biocomposites.

  8. Effect of hot-water extraction (HWE) severity on bleached pulp based biorefinery performance of eucalyptus during the HWE-Kraft-ECF bleaching process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Meng; Luo, Xiaolin; Chen, Lihui; Huang, Liulian

    2015-04-01

    The effectiveness of a biorefinery based on an HWE-Kraft-ECF bleaching process and the end use of pulp was systematically evaluated. Using a P-factor of 198, nearly 30% of xylan-based sugars were recovered. The resulting pulp and paper properties were found to be comparable with the control. A maximum xylan-based sugar recovery of nearly 50% was achieved at a P-factor of 738. Although the strength of this P-factor induced handsheet was lower than that of the control by about 20%, the corresponding pulp was sufficient for dissolving pulp application. However, once the P-factor rose above 1189, hemicellulose sugars were significantly degraded into furans; pulp and paper properties were also deteriorated due to cellulose degradation, lignin deposition and condensation. Thus, considering the different end use of pulps, the performance of an HWE-based biorefinery could be balanced by its HWE severity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ozone bleaching of South African Eucalyptus grandis kraft pulps containing high levels of hexenuronic acids

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Andrew, JE

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available was to compare the performance of ozone to other technologies used to remove HexA, such as acid hydrolysis (A) and hot chlorine dioxide (DHT) stages. Bleaching sequences using chlorine dioxide (i.e OAD0ED1D2 and ODHTED1D2) were compared to bleaching sequences...

  10. Branqueamento de polpa celulósica kraft de eucalipto com peróxido ácido ativado por molibdênio Kraft pulp bleaching with molybdenum activated acid peroxide (P Mo stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Sousa Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum conditions to run the P Mo stage for bleaching eucalyptus kraft pulp were 90 ºC, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/t Mo and 5 kg/t H2O2. The P Mo stage efficiency increased with decreasing pH (1.5-5.5 and increasing temperature (75-90 ºC, time (2-4 h, and hydrogen peroxide (3-10 kg/t and molybdenum concentration (0.1-0.4 kg/t. The implementation of the P Mo stage, as replacement for the A stage, decreased total active chlorine demand of the OAZDP sequence by 6 kg/t to reach 90% ISO, both in laboratory and mill scale. Such practice resulted in decreased bleaching chemical costs to produce fully bleached pulp of 90% ISO.

  11. NEWSPRINT FROM SODA BAGASSE PULP IN ADMIXTURE WITH HARDWOOD CMP PULP

    OpenAIRE

    Seed Rahman Jafari Petroudy; Hossein Resalati Mail; pejman Rezayati Charani Mail

    2011-01-01

    Based on global research and experiences producing newsprint from bagasse, the possibility of using bagasse chemical pulp in the furnish of local mill-made mixed hardwood CMP pulp was studied at laboratory scale, for making newsprint. Bagasse soda chemical pulp at digester yield of about 47% was bleached to about 60% brightness by single stage hydrogen peroxide. The effects of using up to 30% bagasse chemical pulp in a blend with hardwood CMP pulp, with or without softwood kraft pulp, were st...

  12. Toxicity to Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri of Kraft bleach plant effluents treated by catalytic wet-air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Albin; Besson, Michèle; Gallezot, Pierre; Gibert, Janine; Martin, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Two Kraft-pulp bleaching effluents from a sequence of treatments which include chlorine dioxide and caustic soda were treated by catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) at T=463 K in trickle-bed and batch-recycle reactors packed with either TiO2 extrudates or Ru(3 wt%)/TiO2 catalyst. Chemical analyses (TOC removal, color, HPLC) and bioassays (48-h and 30-min acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, respectively) were used to get information about the toxicity impact of the starting effluents and of the treated solutions. Under the operating conditions, complex organic compounds are mostly oxidized into carbon dioxide and water, along with short-chain carboxylic acids. Bioassays were found as a complement to chemical analyses for ensuring the toxicological impact on the ecosystem. In spite of a large decrease of TOC, the solutions of end products were all more toxic to Daphnia magna than the starting effluents by factors ranging from 2 to 33. This observation is attributed to the synergistic effects of acetic acid and salts present in the solutions. On the other hand, toxicity reduction with respect to Vibrio fischeri was achieved: detoxification factors greater than unity were measured for end-product solutions treated in the presence of the Ru(3 wt%)/TiO2 catalyst, suggesting the absence of cumulative effect for this bacteria, or a lower sensitivity to the organic acids and salts. Bleach plant effluents treated by the CWAO process over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst were completely biodegradable.

  13. NEWSPRINT FROM SODA BAGASSE PULP IN ADMIXTURE WITH HARDWOOD CMP PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seed Rahman Jafari Petroudy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on global research and experiences producing newsprint from bagasse, the possibility of using bagasse chemical pulp in the furnish of local mill-made mixed hardwood CMP pulp was studied at laboratory scale, for making newsprint. Bagasse soda chemical pulp at digester yield of about 47% was bleached to about 60% brightness by single stage hydrogen peroxide. The effects of using up to 30% bagasse chemical pulp in a blend with hardwood CMP pulp, with or without softwood kraft pulp, were studied. The results showed that superior hand sheet properties could be achieved by using bagasse chemical pulp; in comparison with main mill pulp furnish (83% hardwood CMP pulp and 17% imported long fiber pulp. In other words, by using bagasse chemical pulp in a blend with local mill made hardwood CMP pulp, acceptable newsprint could be made with considerable reduction in the consumptions of hardwood species and softwood reinforcing kraft pulp.

  14. Treatment of the effluent from a kraft bleach plant with the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatoroseus sing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Z. Santos

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The ligninolytic fungus Pleurotus ostreatoroseus (synonymy of Pleurotus ëous was used to treat the first alkali extraction stage (E1 effluent of a kraft bleach plant. It was pelletized and used for two continuous experiments in a two-liter turbulent-flow bioreactor. In the first experiment, the average removal of color and of total phenols was 18.6 and 11.6%, respectively, after the addition of glucose. During the second experiment, which was developed with the addition of several quantities of glucose, the maximum removal of color, of total phenols and of lignin/chlorolignin was 19.4, 9.4 and 44.5%. For both experiments, the best results were obtained when the effluent was diluted and enriched with glucose. This indicated the need for an extra carbon source for the fungal treatment. Using the mycelial mass in suspension, three experiments were carried out. The best results were obtained with 20% fungus and shaking of the effluent. During the last three days of the experiment the average removal of color, of total phenols and of lignin/chlorolignin was 84.4± 6.1, 82.1± 5.7 and 72.4± 8.9, respectively. The results indicate the potential of Pleurotus ostreatoroseus for use in the treatment of E1 effluent.

  15. Isolation and characterization of resin acid degrading bacteria found in effluent from a bleached kraft pulp mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C A; Wyndham, R C

    1996-05-01

    Thirteen resin acid degrading bacteria enriched on abietic or dehydroabietic acids were isolated from waste water from the aerated stabilization basin of a bleached kraft pulp mill. Standard biochemical tests were used to characterize each isolate. Each isolate was tested for its ability to degrade six abietane- and pimarane-type resin acids. Resin acid concentrations were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography and UV absorbance. Cluster analysis based on phenotypic characteristics identified two distinct clusters of degraders that differed in their ability to utilize carbohydrates as carbon sources. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis of representative isolates from each cluster identified A19-6a and D11-13 as Comamonas and Alcaligenes species, respectively. To determine genotypic relatedness, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences were used to amplify genomic DNA fragments from 10 isolates. These results supported the phenotypic analysis for all isolates tested except A19-5 and A19-6b. These two organisms were clustered closely together based on phenotype but had distinctly different banding patterns, suggesting that they are not related genotypically. All isolates degraded a subset of the six resin acid congeners. Isolates A19-3, A19-6a, A19-6b, and D11-37 were the most effective at degrading all six congeners.

  16. Exposure to bleached kraft pulp mill effluent disrupts the pituitary-gonadal axis of white sucker at multiple sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Kraak, G.J.; Munkittrick, K.R.; McMaster, M.E.; Portt, C.B.; Chang, J.P. (Department of Zoology, University of Guelph, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated reproductive problems in white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) exposed to bleached kraft pulp mill effluent (BKME) at Jackfish Bay on Lake Superior. These fish exhibit delayed sexual maturity, reduced gonadal size, reduced secondary sexual characteristics, and circulating steroid levels depressed relative to those of reference populations. The present studies were designed to evaluate sites in the pituitary-gonadal axis of prespawning white sucker affected by BKME exposure. At the time of entry to the spawning stream, plasma levels of immunoreactive gonadotropin (GtH)-II (LH-type GtH) in male and female white sucker were 30- and 50-fold lower, respectively, than the levels in fish from a reference site. A single intraperitoneal injection of D-Arg6, Pro9N-Et sGnRH (sGnRH-A, 0.1 mg/kg) increased plasma GtH levels in male and female fish at both sites, although the magnitude of the response was greatly reduced in BKME-exposed fish. Fish at the BKME site did not ovulate in response to sGnRH-A, while 10 of 10 fish from the reference site ovulated within 6 hr. Plasma 17 alpha,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20 beta-P) levels were depressed in BKME-exposed fish and unlike fish at the reference site, failed to increase in response to sGnRH-A. Testosterone levels in both sexes and 11-ketostestosterone levels in males were elevated in fish from the reference site but were not further increased by GnRH treatment. In contrast, BKME-exposed fish exhibit a transitory increase in testosterone levels in response to the GnRH analog. In vitro incubations of ovarian follicles obtained from fish at the BKME site revealed depressed basal secretion of testosterone and 17,20 beta-P and reduced responsiveness to the GtH analog human chorionic gonadotropin and to forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase.

  17. Light ECF bleaching for kraft pulp of eucalyptus and acacia%桉木和相思木硫酸盐浆在轻ECF漂白中性能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    逄锦江; 刘忠; 蒋华朋; 惠兰峰

    2013-01-01

      对桉木和相思木硫酸盐浆在轻ECF漂序中对比实验,其中对漂白前后纸张的物理性能、纤维长度、结晶度及纸浆基本性能进行检测。实验得出:在相同的漂白工艺下,相思木硫酸盐浆的选择性较好;相同漂白流程下,相思木硫酸盐浆可漂性高;在相同的盘磨转数下,桉木浆经过盘磨之后抗张强度和耐破强度都优于相思木浆;相思木和桉木浆经过漂白之后,纤维素的结晶度不同程度的降低,相思木硫酸盐浆无论原浆还是经过漂白的纸浆结晶度都高于桉木硫酸盐浆。%Comparison experiments of eucalyptus and acacia kraft pulp was carried out in light ECT bleaching sequence, in which the physical properties of paper, fiber length, degree of crystallinity and pulp basic performance were tested before and after bleaching. The results show that the acacia kraft pulp has the better selectivity, the bleachability of the aca-cia kraft pulp is higher than eucalyptus under the same bleaching process;the tensile strength and bursting strength of eucalyptus pulp are better than acacia wood pulp at the same revolution of refiner; the crystallinity degree of cellulose of both acacia and eucalyptus are reduced to some extent after bleaching, but the crystallinity of acacia kraft pulp, whether unbleached or bleached, is higher than eucalyptus kraft pulp.

  18. BIO-CONVENTIONAL BLEACHING OF KRAFT-AQ PULP OF A. CADAMBA BY CRUDE XYLANASES FROM COPRINELLUS DISSEMINATUS MLK-03 AND EFFECT OF RESIDUAL ENZYME ON EFFLUENT LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Lal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A new thermo-alkali-tolerant crude xylanase from Coprinellus disseminatus decreased kappa number by 34.38% and improved brightness and viscosity by 1.6 and 6.47% respectively after XE1-stage during prebleaching of Anthocephalus cadamba kraft-AQ pulp. At 2.4% chlorine demand, crude xylanase in a XECEHH (X= enzymatic prebleaching stage, E= extraction stage, C= chlorination stage, H= hypochlorite stage bleaching sequence improved pulp brightness, tensile index, burst index, and double fold numbers by 3.66%, 4.78%, 6.38%, and 11.11%, respectively with a reduction in viscosity (10.59% and tear index (10.77% compared to the control. Combined bleach effluent of the XECEHH sequence mitigated adsorable organic halides (AOX by 21% and increased chemical oxygen demand (COD, bio-chemical oxygen demand (BOD, and colour by 67.18%, 84.78%, and 97.53%, respectively, compared to the control. Residual enzymes that entered during enzymatic prebleaching stage decreased AOX, COD, BOD, and colour of combined effluent of the XECEHH bleaching sequence progressively and on 6th day, and these were reduced by 23.78%, 0.04%, 15.00%, and 0.61%, respectively, compared to the control.

  19. 漂白硫酸盐苇浆制浆废水的处理%Treatment of the Waste Water from a Mill Producing Bleached Kraft Reed Pulp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马乐凡; 李晓林; 王跃泉

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory results of the treatment of pulping black liquor,washing and bleaching waste wate of a mill producing bleached kraft reed pulp were presented. Process and installation of reed BKP pulping waste water treatment were designed, operation parameters and running results of treatment stages were discussed. Black liquor after anaerobic treatment and acid precipitating of lignin could be mixed with washing and bleaching waste water based on the discharged ratio of the mill to discharge, the pollution load of the mixed effluent will meet the national regulation requirement after further treatment by active sludge.%讨论了漂白硫酸盐苇浆厂制浆黑液和中段废水的实验室处理结果。设计了芦苇BKP制浆废水的处理工艺流程和装置,并重点讨论了各处理段的运行参数和运行结果。BKP苇浆蒸煮黑液首先经厌氧和酸析木素处理,然后再与制浆中段水按工厂排放比例混合,混合废水经活性污泥法处理后,可达到国家标准排放。

  20. Bleaching of kraft pulps produced from green liquor pre-hydrolyzed South African Eucalyptus grandis wood chips

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Andrew, JE

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available -ability. Savings in chlorine dioxide for PHK pulps ranged between 2-18% for sequences that used chlorine dioxide as the primary oxidative bleaching chemical. When ozone was used in combination with chlorine dioxide, mixed results were obtained – PHK pulps showed...

  1. Bio-conventional bleaching of kadam kraft-AQ pulp by thermo-alkali-tolerant xylanases from two strains of Coprinellus disseminatus for extenuating adsorbable organic halides and improving strength with optical properties and energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Mohan; Dutt, Dharm; Tyagi, C H

    2012-04-01

    Two novel thermo-alkali-tolerant crude xylanases namely MLK-01 (enzyme-A) and MLK-07 (enzyme-B) from Coprinellus disseminatus mitigated kappa numbers of Anthocephalus cadamba kraft-AQ pulps by 32.5 and 34.38%, improved brightness by 1.5 and 1.6% and viscosity by 5.75 and 6.47% after (A)XE(1) and (B)XE(1)-stages, respectively. The release of reducing sugars and chromophores was the highest during prebleaching of A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulp at enzyme doses of 5 and 10 IU/g, reaction times 90 and 120 min, reaction temperatures 75 and 65°C and consistency 10% for MLK-01 and MLK-07, respectively. MLK-07 was more efficient than MLK01 in terms of producing pulp brightness, improving mechanical strength properties and reducing pollution load. MLK-01 and MLK-07 reduced AOX by 19.51 and 42.77%, respectively at 4% chlorine demands with an increase in COD and colour due to removal of lignin carbohydrates complexes. A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulps treated with xylanases from MLK-01 to MLK-07 and followed by CEHH bleaching at half chlorine demand (2%) showed a drastic reduction in brightness with slight improvement in mechanical strength properties compared to pulp bleached at 4% chlorine demand. MLK-01 reduced AOX, COD and colour by 43.83, 39.03 and 27.71% and MLK-07 by 38.34, 40.48 and 30.77%, respectively at half chlorine demand compared to full chlorine demand (4%). pH variation during prebleaching of A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulps with strains MLK-01 and MLK-07 followed by CEHH bleaching sequences showed a decrease in pulp brightness, AOX, COD and colour with an increase in mechanical strength properties, pulp viscosity and PFI revolutions to get a beating level of 35 ± 1 °SR at full chlorine demand.

  2. Geração de finos no branqueamento de pasta kraft de eucalipto e seu efeito nas propriedades do papel Genarations of fines in eucalyptus kraft pulp bleaching and their effect on paper properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Silveira Comelato

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a quantidade de finos gerada por diferentes reagentes de branqueamento e seu efeito nas propriedades físicas e mecânicas da celulose kraft de eucalipto. A polpa foi branqueada por quatro sequências diferentes. Parte das amostras foi classificada em equipamento Bauer-McNett, sendo a parte não classificada (global refinada para 40 ºSR, em moinho laboratorial PFI. As duas maiores porções de cada amostra proveniente da classificação foram também refinadas com o mesmo número de revoluções que a sua amostra global. Realizaram-se ensaios físicos e mecânicos das amostras refinadas, e suas fibras foram analisadas em equipamento FQA (Fiber Quality Analyser, antes e depois do refino. A maior quantidade de finos foi observada nas polpas refinadas e na sequência-referência. Os resultados de tração foram mais elevados e significativos nas amostras globais; as polpas classificadas não apresentaram diferença entre si, sendo atribuída a maior resistência à tração na presença de finos. A resistência ao rasgo foi afetada pelo comprimento das fibras e não pelo teor de finos. Os maiores valores de ascensão capilar Klemm ocorreram nas amostras classificadas em razão da ausência de finos e do maior comprimento de fibras.The objective of this work was to evaluate the generation of fines by different bleaching reagents and its effect on physical and mechanical properties of eucalyptus kraft pulp. The pulp was bleached by four different sequences. Some of these samples was classified in Bauer-McNett equipment. The unclassified part of the pulp (global was refined to 40ºSR in a laboratory PFI mill. The two major classified portions of each sample were also refined at the same revolutions as its global sample. Physical and mechanical tests were performed for both classified and unclassified samples, and their fibers were analyzed in FQA (Fiber Quality Analyzer, before and after refining.The greater

  3. COMPARISON OF PLATE AND CONICAL FILLINGS IN REFINING OF BLEACHED SOFTWOOD AND HARDWOOD PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Koskenhely; K.Nieminen; E.Hiltunen; H.Paulapuro

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare plate and conical refiner fillings in refining of softwood and hardwood pulp fibers. Contrary to expectations,better tensile strength values were achieved when BSW was refined with conical fillings and the development of strength Was found to be insensitive to variations in refining intensity. A bar microprocile was measured with the aid of a profilometer. The leading edges of conicalfilling bars.were found to be rounder. A possible reason for the better tensile strength of pulp refined with conical fillings is that the round edge helps large SW fiber flocs to enter the space between the bars, resulting in less heterogeneous or more efficient treatment of fibers.The recorded gap closure values supported the above interpretation. The gap between conical fillings was found to become wider when pulp consistency and thus fiber flocculation increased, whereas increased pulp consistency decreased the gap between plate fillings, which was further reflected as increased fiber cutting. The reduction in fiber length was proportional to the increase in gap closure,supporting the earlier theory that fibers are squeezed and crushed between the bars. More attention should be paid to the wear of filling materials when refining BSW. A filling material which wears so that the bar edges are rounded would seem to promote high tensile strength and high average fiber length.

  4. COMPARISON OF PLATE AND CONICAL FILLINGS IN REFINING OF BLEACHED SOFTWOOD AND HARDWOOD PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Koskenhely; K.Nieminen; E.Hiltunent; H.Paulapuro

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare plate and conical refiner fillings in refining of softwood and hardwood pulp fibers. Contrary to expectations, better tensile strength values were achieved when BSW was refined with conical fillings and the development of strength was found to be insensitive to variations in refining intensity. A bar microprofile was measured with the aid of a profilometer. The leading edges of conical filling bars were found to be rounder. A possible reason for the better tensile strength of pulp refined with conical fillings is that the round edge helps large SW fiber flocs to enter the space between the bars, resulting in less heterogeneous or more efficient treatment of fibers. The recorded gap closure values supported the above interpretation. The gap between conical fillings was found to become wider when pulp consistency and thus fiber flocculation increased, whereas increased pulp consistency decreased the gap between plate fillings, which was further reflected as increased fiber cutting. The reduction in fiber length was proportional to the increase in gap closure, supporting the earlier theory that fibers are squeezed and crushed between the bars. More attention should be paid to the wear of filling materials when refining BSW. A filling material which wears so that the bar edges are rounded would seem to promote high tensile strength and high average fiber length.

  5. Detection of Chlorophenolic Compounds in Bleaching Effluents of Chemical Pulps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chhaya Sharma; S.Mohanty; S.Kumar; N.J.Rao; li qian

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory bleaching effluents from the chlorination and caustic extraction stages of mixed wood kraft pulp processing have been analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively for various chlorophenolics by using GC.A number of chlorinated derivaties of phenols,catechols,guaiacols and syringaldehydes have been detected and their concentrations are estimated.The results are compared with that of different agriculture residue / hardwood pulps,which were reported in literature.The concentrations of various compounds detected have also been compared with their reported 96LC50 values.

  6. MINERAL ELEMENTS IN WOODS OF EUCALYPTUS AND BLACK WATTLE AND ITS INFLUENCE IN A BLEACHED KRAFT PULP MILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Fredo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Effluents are one of the most important problems in a pulp mill regarding to environmental subjects. With the purpose to reduce them, the mills are closing the internal cycles and reducing the water consumption. The wood, as the most significant source of non-process elements to the system, is responsible for some troubles to the industrial process. With the aim of evaluating their intake and to offer some informations for closing the loop, the contents of Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Si were analysed in Acacia mearnsii, Eucalyptus dunnii, Eucalyptus globulus globulus, Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus saligna woods. Wood samples were prepared by oven burning and acidic digestion methods, following analysis by ICP (inductively coupled plasm. Using also the results from silvicultural evaluation of trees and stands, they were calculated which elements were carried out from the site in larger amounts (K, Ca, Na, Al, Mn and Si and the species which exported largest amount of these elements (Eucalyptus dunnii and Eucalyptus globulus. The species with lower growth were Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus dunnii, that leads to a bigger elements input and more potential industrial troubles. It was observed a range of 3.8 (Eucalyptus grandis up to 6 (Eucalyptus dunnii kg of analised mineral elements introduced to the process per ton of umbleached pulp produced. The Acacia mearnsii showed the lower level for Fe, Mn and Ni, being useful for oxygen, ozone and peroxide bleaching. The silicon observed in woods was in low concentration although the high values of this element in industrial liquor cycle. This leads to state that there is some contamination with soil when harvesting and handling the wood. Special care must be taken with both high ash and high mineral elements species, such as Eucalyptus dunnii and Eucalyptus globulus.

  7. Kraft pulping and ECF bleaching of Eucalyptus globulus pretreated by the white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i3.12410

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Salazar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus globulus wood chips were decayed by the lignin-degrading fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora as a pretreatment step before kraft pulping. Weight and component losses of wood after the biotreatment were the following: weight (5%, glucans (1.5%, xylans (4.3%, lignin (5.7% and extractives (57.5%. The residual amount of lignin (expressed by the kappa number in pulps from biotreated wood chips was lower than that of pulps from the undecayed control. Depending on the delignification degree, kraft biopulps presented similar or up to 4% increase in pulp yield and 20% less hexenuronic acids (HexA than control pulps. The extended delignification with O2 decreases approximately 50% of the kappa number of the pulps and increases brightness, but had no effect in HexA reduction. The bleaching steps with chlorine dioxide (D0ED1 sequence decreased the kappa number up to 97%, increased pulp brightness up to 84% ISO and decreased HexA amount up to 91%. The use of C. subvermispora in biopulping of E. globulus generated important benefits during the production of kraft pulps that are reflected in a high pulp yield, low residual lignin content, low HexA amount, high brightness and viscosity of the biopulps as compared with pulps produced from untreated wood chips.

  8. STUDIES ON XYLANASE AND LACCASE ENZYMATIC PREBLEACHING TO REDUCE CHLORINE-BASED CHEMICALS DURING CEH AND ECF BLEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanta V. Thakur,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biobleaching efficiency of xylanase and laccase enzymes was studied on kraft pulps from wood and nonwood based raw materials employed in the Indian paper industry. Treatment of these pulps with xylanase enzyme could result in improved properties, showing 2.0% ISO gain in pulp brightness and/or reducing the demand of chlorine-based bleach chemicals by up to 15% with simultaneous reduction of 20 to 25% in AOX generation in bleach effluents. Further, mill-scale trial results revealed that enzymatic prebleaching can be successfully employed with xylanases to reach the same bleach boosting efficacy. Laccase bleaching was also studied on hardwood pulp at a pH around 8.0, where most of the pulp mills in India are operating, in contrast to earlier studies on laccase enzyme bleaching, which were conducted at acidic pHs, i.e. 4.0 to 5.0. In case of laccase bleaching, interesting results were found wherein a bleach-boosting effect was observed even at pH 8.0. Further studies carried out with HOBT as mediator in comparison to the commonly used and expensive ABTS laccase mediator system (LMS resulted in improvement of the bleaching efficiency with reduction in demand of chlorine dioxide by more than 35%. Potential for further reduction was indicated by the brightness gain, when compared with a control using the DE(pD bleach sequence.

  9. Gas Chromatography Analysis of Resin and Fatty Acids from Laboratory Generated Bleach Plant Effluents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chhaya Sharma; S. Mohanty; S. Kumar; N.J. Rao

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory generated spent bleached liquor from the chlorination, caustic extraction stage of mixed wood kraft pulp processing has been analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively for various resin & fatty acids by using GC. A number of resin acids,saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, chloro fatty and resin acid have been detected and their concentrations are estimated. The results are compared with results on different agriculture residue/hardwood pulps, which were reported earlier. The concentrations of various compounds detected have also been compared with their reported LC50 values.

  10. Improve Acidic H2O2bleaching with Molybdate for Eucalyptus Kraft Pulp%钼酸盐对桉木 KP 浆 H2O2 漂白的改善效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建; 石淑兰; 胡惠仁; 范兴刚

    2001-01-01

    研究了钼酸盐对桉木硫酸盐氧漂浆酸性 H2O2 漂白的改善效果,探讨了各种影响因素(钼酸盐用量、漂液 pH 值、H2O2 用量、氧强化的碱抽提和洗涤方式)对酸性 H2O2 漂白结果的影响。结果表明:添加少量的钼酸盐能有效地促进酸性 H2O2 的脱木素反应,提高脱木素效率,增加纸浆的白度。当钼酸盐用量为 01% 时,脱木素程度比单纯的 H2O2 漂段提高 278%,白度增加 43%(ISO),而粘度的损失不大。%In this paper,effect of various conditions(molybdate charge,PH,peroxide charge,reinforced-alkali-extraction with oxygen,and washing method) on bleaching results in the activated acidic hydrogen peroxide bleaching with molybdate for eucalyptus kraft pulp is investigated. The results indicated that adding molybdate to the acidic hydrogen peroxide bleaching stage improved delignification degree and increased ISO brightness of bleached pulp(for example,with 0.1% molybdate charge,delignification degree and pulp brightness could be increased 27.8% and 4.3 points respectively)but had little effect on the pulp viscosity.

  11. Recovering/concentrating of hemicellulosic sugars and acetic acid by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis from prehydrolysis liquor of kraft based hardwood dissolving pulp process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Laboni; Jahan, M Sarwar; Ni, Yonghao

    2014-03-01

    This work investigated the feasibility of recovering and concentrating sugars and acetic acid (HAc) from prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) of the kraft-based dissolving pulp process prior to fermentation of hemicellulosic sugars, by the combination of activated carbon adsorption, nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) processes. To reduce the fouling PHL was subjected to adsorption on activated carbon, then the treated PHL (TPHL) passed through a nanofiltration (NF DK) membrane to retain the sugars, and the permeate of acetic acid rich solution was passed through a reverse osmosis membrane (RO SG). It was found that for NF process sugars were concentrated from 48 to 227g/L at a volume reduction factor (VRF) of 5 while 80 to 90% of acetic acid was permeated. For the reverse osmosis process, 68% of acetic acid retention was achieved at pH 4.3 and 500 psi pressure and the HAc concentration increased from 10 to 50g/L.

  12. Studies on refining properties of kraft bamboo pulp, hardwood pulp and wheat straw pulp%竹浆、阔叶木浆和麦草浆打浆性能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴乾斌; 张美云; 夏新兴; 赵琳

    2012-01-01

      对竹浆、阔叶木浆和麦草浆进行了筛分,得出竹浆中R16目纤维和R200目细小纤维组分含量均最高。收集三种浆料的长纤维,进行打浆,得出:麦草纤维细胞壁容易破除,打浆度和保水值较高,纤维本身强度较差;竹纤维难分丝帚化;竹浆中的细小纤维组分容易破裂,吸水润胀。麦草纤维结合力强,成纸的抗张指数和耐破指数较高,撕裂指数和耐折度低;竹纤维成纸的各项物理指标均较高。%  After screened classification of the kraft bamboo pulp, hardwood pulp and wheat straw pulp, the fibers (above 16 mesh) content and fines (below 200 mesh) content of bamboo pulp are both high. Long fibers (over 200 mesh) of three kinds of pulp being refined, the fiber’s wall of wheat straw is removed easily and fiber’s strength is low. Fiber’s wall of bamboo brooms hardly. Fines of bamboo are beaten easily. The binding strength of wheat straw is high, so the tensile index and burst index are high, while the tear index and folding endurance are low. The entire physical index of bamboo fiber is high.

  13. Utilización de Eucalyptus spp. Alternativas de plantaciones uruguayas para pulpa Kraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Doldán

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Las plantaciones de Eucalyptus globulus han mostrado desiguales tasas de crecimiento en diferentes regiones de Uruguay. Esto ha motivado la búsqueda de otros orígenes de semilla y especies para la producción de pulpa de celulosa. Propiedades papeleras de las pulpas blanqueadas (ECF de especies alternativas llevan a intuir que podrían ser atractivas para mercados de pulpa de fibra corta. En este trabajo se realiza un comparativo del E. grandis, E. dunnii, E. maidenii y E. globulus (procedencia de semilla “Jeeralang” con el E. globulus predominante en Uruguay. Se discute el potencial de estas maderas como base para una mezcla en cocción, basándose en el análisis de propiedades físicas (densidad aparente básica, propiedades pulpables (rendimiento, carga de álcali activo en cocción Kraft y consumo de madera y propiedades papeleras. En trabajos previos se han encontrado diferencias significativas entre el comportamiento pulpable del Eucalyptus globulus y Eucalyptus maidenii, sugiriendo que nosería recomendable mezclar estas especies. La misma conclusión se podría extender a las especies de Eucalyptus estudiadas. Sin embargo, teniendo en cuenta los similares requerimientos en las cargas de álcali activo, la mezcla entre especies alternativas podría ser aplicada.AbstractEucalyptus globulus plantations have shown different growth rates in different sites in Uruguay. This fact has triggered the search for other pulp wood species and seed provenance. Paper making properties of ECF bleached pulps of alternative speciessuggest that these species could be perfectly used as hardwood bleached pulp raw materials. This study intends to compare alternativeUruguayan pulpwood species E. grandis, E. dunnii, E. maidenii and “Jeeralang” a seed provenance of E. globulus to the E. globulus most widely cultivated in the country. Physical properties of wood (Basic Density, Kraft pulping performance (pulp yield, active alkali and wood consumption

  14. ON THE RECOVERY OF HEMICELLULOSE BEFORE KRAFT PULPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vila,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility of implementing hemicellulose recovery stages in kraft mills, Eucalyptus globulus wood samples were subjected to aqueous treatments with hot, compressed water (autohydrolysis processing to achieve partial dissolution of xylan. Autohydrolyzed solids were subjected to kraft pulping under selected conditions to yield a pulp of low kappa number, and to an optimized TCF bleaching sequence made up of three stages (alkaline oxygen delignification, chelating, and pressurized hydrogen peroxide, with minimized additions of pulping and bleaching chemicals. The final product had a relatively low kappa number (1.4, 641 mL/g ISO intrinsic viscosity, and 86.4% brightness.

  15. Kraft kasvatab Nordea haaret Eestis / Vahur Kraft

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kraft, Vahur, 1961-

    2006-01-01

    Avades lähikuudel seitse uut harukontorit, toimub Nordea Panga juhatuse esimehe Vahur Krafti juhtimisel suurim laienemine ettevõtte ajaloos. Ühtlasi peab Kraft jätkuvalt oluliseks internetipanga ja teiste elektrooniliste teenuste arendamist

  16. Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation: Engineering of Syringyl Lignin in Softwood Species Through Xylem-Specific Expression of Hardwood Syringyl Monolignol Pathway Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrashekhar P. Joshi; Vincent L. Chiang

    2009-01-29

    Project Objective: Our long-term goal is to genetically engineer higher value raw materials with desirable wood properties to promote energy efficiency, international competitiveness, and environmental responsiveness of the U.S. forest products industry. The immediate goal of this project was to produce the first higher value softwood raw materials engineered with a wide range of syringyl lignin quantities. Summary: The most important wood property affecting directly the levels of energy, chemical and bleaching requirements for kraft pulp production is lignin. Softwoods contain almost exclusively chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin, whereas hardwoods have more reactive or easily degradable lignins of the guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) type. It is also well established that the reactive S lignin component is the key factor that permits much lower effective alkali and temperature, shorter pulping time and less bleaching stages for processing hardwoods than for softwoods. Furthermore, our pulping kinetic study explicitly demonstrated that every increase in one unit of the lignin S/G ratio would roughly double the rate of lignin removal. These are clear evidence that softwoods genetically engineered with S lignin are keys to revolutionizing the energy efficiency and enhancing the environmental performance of this industry. Softwoods and hardwoods share the same genetic mechanisms for the biosynthesis of G lignin. However, in hardwoods, three additional genes branch out from the G-lignin pathway and become specifically engaged in regulating S lignin biosynthesis. In this research, we simultaneously transferred aspen S-specific genes into a model softwood, black spruce, to engineer S lignin.

  17. Understanding the Nature and Reactivity of Residual Lignin for Improved Pulping and Bleaching Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan-Zong Lai

    2001-11-30

    One of the most formidable challenges in kraft pulping to produce bleached chemical pulps is how to effectively remove the last 5-10% of lignin while maintaining the fiber quality. To avoid a severe fiber degradation, kraft pulping is usually terminated in the 25-30 kappa number range and then followed by an elementally chlorine free (ECF) or a totally chlorine free (TCF) bleaching sequence to reduce the environmental impacts.

  18. Comment on 'evaluation of dechlorination mechanisms during anaerobic fermentation of blached kraft mill effluent by W.J. Parker, E.R. Hall and G.J. Farquhar'

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    Comment on "Evaluation of dechlorination mechanisms during anaerobic fermentation of bleached kraft mill effluent", is put forth. The data reproduced in Table 1 does not seem to be authentic as the method of preprationo of the chlorinated organic...

  19. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF CMP PULP USING MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Zeinaly

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional bleaching of hardwood CMP pulp with magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2 show significant benefits over bleaching with sodium hydroxide (NaOH under various conditions. Magnesium hydroxide bleaching generate higher optical properties, higher pulp yield and lower effluent COD at the same chemical charge, but the physical properties were found to be similar for both processes. The initial freeness of the bleached pulps and refining value to reach a target freeness (about 350 ml. CSF were more for the Mg(OH2-based process. The residual peroxide of filtrate from the Mg(OH2-based process was very high as compared to conventional bleaching.

  20. 有机结合氯对漂白硫酸盐阔叶木浆返黄的影响%The Role of Bound Chlorine in the Brightness Reversion of Bleached Hardwood Kraft Pulp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳玲

    2010-01-01

    以前的研究证明了纸浆中的有机结合氯会对纸浆返黄造成不利影响.通过对漂白硫酸盐桉木浆的全面研究发现,有机结合氯会加剧某些浆料的返黄,但这种趋势并不适于所有浆种.不论有机结合氯的含量是多少,碱性漂白均会降低浆料的返黄程度.在以二氧化氯漂白作为终段漂的漂白流程中,高温二氧化氯漂白浆比一般二氧化氯漂白浆的返黄程度小,但与以过氧化氢作终段漂的漂白流程的返黄程度相当.用黑液蒸发的二次冷凝液洗涤浆料能降低返黄程度.

  1. Pulping of the giant leucaena wood. I. Pulping by the kraft process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, K.; Ogino, T.; Takano, I.; Shimada, K.; Nishida, A.

    1980-01-01

    Cooking of Leucaena latisiliqua with kraft liquor (30% sulfidity as Na/sub 2/O) at 160 degrees gave 59.1% pulp with Kappa number 59.0 and Hunter brightness 19.9. The strength properties of pulp were comparable to those of beech pulp. It was confirmed that the extractives remaining in the bleached pulp adversely affect the color reversion.

  2. Combustion properties of kraft black liquors; Mustalipeaen koostumuksen vaikutus lipeaen poltto-ominaisuuksiin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alen, R.; Siistonen, H.; Heikkinen, T.; Malkavaara, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    The aim of this work is to study the combustion properties of kraft black liquors from modified cooking. Both the industrial and laboratory-made black liquors are included. In addition, changes in the combustion properties of the spent liquors obtained by mixing prior to combustion different chlorine-free bleach liquors with black liquor are studied. (author)

  3. 不同打浆设备对漂白针叶木浆纤维细纤维化程度的影响%Effects of different beating equipment on the degree of bleached softwood kraft pulp fiber′s fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永建; 王家泳; 闫瑛

    2015-01-01

    Bleached softwood kraft pulp was used as raw material to study the influence of varied pretreatment of on fluff pulp fiber ,by compareing the different beating equipment on the degree of pluff fiber fibrosis ,which was delt with different ways of beating preprocess‐ing .It turned out that ,water retention value increased by 7 .8% ,internal bond strength in‐creased by 31 .3% ,fiber single point of specific surface area increased by 12 .3% ,mean specif‐ic surface area increased by 12 .7% ,when compared with the fiber after groove beater beating pretreatment .PFI beating pretreatment showed a relative clear advantage on the realization of fiber fibrosis ,as well as the improvement of fiber absorbent .%以漂白针叶木硫酸盐浆作为原料,通过不同的打浆设备进行预处理,对比不同处理方式对纤维各项性能的影响,研究了打浆预处理对漂白针叶木纤维细纤维化程度的影响.结果表明,与槽式打浆处理相比,纤维经 PFI 预处理后保水值增加了7.8%,内结合强度增加了31.3%,纤维单点比表面积增加了12.3%,平均比表面积增加了12.7%.由此可知,PFI打浆预处理较槽式打浆方式更有利于纤维细纤维化,并提高了纤维的吸收性.

  4. Alkaline xylan extraction of bleached kraft pulp-effect of extraction time on pulp chemical composition and physical properties%漂白硫酸盐浆的碱性木聚糖抽提对纸浆化学组分和物理性质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林庆旭; 夏新兴

    2013-01-01

    In this pilot scale study, we examined the effects of alkaline extraction time on xylan removal, pulp and paper properties, and the consequences that need to be addressed when scaling up and intensifying the process. Alkaline extraction of bleached birch kraft pulp yields two fractions:pure polymeric xylan and pulp with reduced xylan content. Our results indicate that a similar amount of xylan can be extracted in 5 min as the amount obtained in 60 min. We found, however, that the shorter extraction time is beneficial to maintain the fiber and paper properties at an acceptable level. This pilot trial demonstrated that the washing procedure of the alkali-treated fibers must be selected with care to avoid causing mechanical damage to fibers and to avoid the loss of fines.%  研究了扩大和强化过程时碱抽提时间对木聚糖去除、纸浆和纸张性能及结果的影响。漂白桦木硫酸盐浆的碱抽提产生了两部分产物:纯木聚糖和木聚糖含量降低的纸浆。研究结果表明:抽提5m in得到的木聚糖量与抽提60m in得到的木聚糖量是相近的;在合理的范围内,缩短提取时间有利于保持纤维和纸张的性能;碱处理纤维的洗涤必须小心进行,以避免造成对纤维的机械损伤,以及细小纤维的流失。

  5. 木聚糖酶诱导释放负电荷及其对漂白硫酸盐浆纤维胶体作用和留着的影响%Xylanase-induced liberation of negatively charged species and their effect on colloidal interactions and the retention of bleached kraft pulp ifbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗成; 刘忠

    2016-01-01

    The ability and specificity of various monocomponent endo-1,4-β-xylanases to release negatively charged species from never-dried, bleached, birch kraft pulp was studied. The effects of dissolution of these xylan-based components on pulp ifltrate properties and the subsmoluent chemical retention were determined. The results revealed that the amount of charged species released depended on the xylanase and that the ratio of charged species released to dissolved xylan is not linear. Chemical retention tests showed that high levels of dissolved xylan interfere with the ifxation of colloidal species, which was conifrmed by removing the dissolved hemicelluloses. The roles of residual hemicellulose and the properties of modified fibers on chemical retention and the level of internal sizing are discussed.%本文研究未干燥的漂白硫酸盐浆中各种内切-1,4-β-木聚糖酶组分释放负电荷的能力和特异性,同时分析木聚糖组分溶解液对浆料滤液性能和化学留着的影响。实验结果表明,电荷释放的数量和木聚糖酶相关,溶解木聚糖的质量和电荷释放量不成线性关系。化学留着实验表明,高含量溶解木聚糖能够影响胶体的固化作用,因为该过程能够移除溶解的半纤维素。本文探究残留的半纤维素和改性纤维性能对化学留着的作用和浆内施胶的影响。

  6. INVESTIGATION ON THE CAUSES OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP BRIGHTNESS REVERSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia M. M. Eiras

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Some high brightness eucalyptus Kraft pulps have shown poor brightness stability. In most cases, the causes have notbeen identified and permanent solutions have not been found. This work focused on evaluating the brightness stability profile of pulpsbleached by in sequences such as O(DC(PODD, O(DC(PODP, OD(PODD, OD(PODP, ODHT(PODD, ODHT(PODP, OA/D(PODD, OA/D(PODP, OAD(PODD and O(ZeD(PO. Brightness stability tests induced by according to Tappi UM200 procedureon samples bleached to 90±0.5% ISO. Brightness stability was measured after each bleaching stage of the various sequences andexpressed as brightness loss in % ISO. The results indicate that pulps bleached with sequences ending with a peroxide stage havehigher brightness stability compared to those ending with a chlorine dioxide stage. Pulps bleached with a standard sequence, initiatingwith a (DC stage, show brightness stability similar to that of pulp bleached by an ECF (Elementary chlorine free sequence initiatingwith a regular D0 stage. ECF sequences, initiated with hot stages produce pulps with higher brightness stability than sequencesinitiating with a regular D0 stage. The profile across the bleaching sequences shows a tendency of increased brightness stability inalkaline stages containing peroxide and decreased stability in those stages containing chlorine and/or chlorine dioxide, parallelingpulp carbonyl group content.

  7. The effect of introducing ozone in elemental chlorine free bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulp%桉木硫酸盐浆ECF漂白引入臭氧漂白的效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红峰

    2015-01-01

    ZDED and DEDD sequences were applied on an oxygen-delignified eucalyptus (mixture of E.grandisand E.saligna) kraft pulp from Brazil. When ZDED and DEDD were compared, the displacement ratio calculated as the quantity of pure chlorine dioxide replaced by 1 kg ozone was found between 2.5 and 3.5 kg, as compared to 1.7 kg in theory—indicating that less wasting reactions occur in the ZDED sequence. The cellulose viscosity decreased substantially with the increase in the ozone charge (down to 50% at 0.8% ozone). Other typical characteristics of the ZDED pulps were easier beating, lower water retention value, higher proportion of kinked fibers, and lower wet zerospan breaking length (seen only at 0.8% ozone charge), as compared to DEDD. The viscosity loss due to the introduction of ozone in an elemental chlorine free sequence did not translate into a similar loss in strength. A comparison with the depolymerizing effect of cellulase suggests that the determining factoris not the extent of the drop in viscosity but rather the heterogeneity of the attack along the fibers. It is concluded that ozone oxidation of cellulose in the fibers would be rather homogeneous. Moreover, the appearance of morecurls and kinks would not be necessarily related to the viscosity loss. For example, a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl) oxidanyl (TEMPO) treated DEDD pulp, enriched in carboxyl groups, had more straight fibers than the original DEDD pulp, despite its lower viscosity. The presence of ionic groups would be a more important factor; the lower content in carboxyl groups in the ZDED pulps, compared to the DEDD pulps, could promote the easier formation of curl and kinks during the ZDED sequence.%巴西桉木浆(巨桉和柳桉)氧脱木素采用了ZDED和DEDD漂白工序.对比ZDED和DEDD漂白工序,计算出的置换率(1kg臭氧可代替的纯二氧化氯量)为2.5~3.5kg,而理论值为1.7kg,表明ZDED漂白工序中无效反应较少.随着臭氧用量的增加,纤维

  8. BLEACHING EUCALYPTUS PULPS WITH SHORT SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Reis Milagres

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp, due to its high content of hexenuronic acids, is quite easy to bleach. Therefore, investigations have been made attempting to decrease the number of stages in the bleaching process in order to minimize capital costs. This study focused on the evaluation of short ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free sequences for bleaching oxygen delignified Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp to 90% ISO brightness: PMoDP (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoD/P (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, without washing PMoD(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and pressurized peroxide, D(EPODP (chlorine dioxide, extraction oxidative with oxygen and peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoQ(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide, and XPMoQ(PO (Enzyme, molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide. Uncommon pulp treatments, such as molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide (PMo and xylanase (X bleaching stages, were used. Among the ECF alternatives, the two-stage PMoD/P sequence proved highly cost-effective without affecting pulp quality in relation to the traditional D(EPODP sequence and produced better quality effluent in relation to the reference. However, a four stage sequence, XPMoQ(PO, was required to achieve full brightness using the TCF technology. This sequence was highly cost-effective although it only produced pulp of acceptable quality.

  9. Peroxy bleaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, P.A. [Unilever Research, Port Sunlight Laboratory (United States) and Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States)]. E-mail: pcarson2005@aol.com; Fairclough, C.S. [Unilever Research, Port Sunlight Laboratory (United States); Mauduit, C. [Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States); Colsell, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States)

    2006-08-25

    Fabric laundering is now a sophisticated chemical process involving a variety of operations including bleaching. The chemistry of peroxy bleaches is described including the use of novel organic compounds to provide effective bleaching at the lower temperatures of modern wash cycles. The instability of peroxy compounds is illustrated using cameo case histories to relate theory and practice. Techniques available for determining their thermochemistry are summarised. A model is provided for hazard and risk assessment of development projects in general (particularly those involving new molecules, processes or formulations) from ideas phase through exploratory laboratory investigations to pilot plant scale-up and eventual manufacture and commercial exploitation. This paper is a prelude to Part 2, which describes the determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of peroxy bleaches and discusses the implication of the results in terms of precautions for their safe storage and incorporation into detergent formulations during processing.

  10. Hemicellulases in the bleaching of chemical pulps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurnäkki, A; Tenkanen, M; Buchert, J; Viikari, L

    1997-01-01

    Hemicellulase-aided bleaching is the first full-scale biotechnical application in the pulp and paper industry which truly exploits the unique specificity and safety of biocatalysts. Hemicellulases are used to modify the structure of xylan and glucomannan in pulp fibers in order to enhance the chemical delignification. This technology can be combined with various types of kraft pulping processes and bleaching sequences. The aims of the enzymatic treatment depend on the actual mill conditions, and may be related to environmental demands, reduction of chemical costs, or maintenance or even improvement of product quality. The technology is applied on the mill scale in several countries. This review describes the principles of the enzyme-aided bleaching, the composition of the fiber substrates, the basic enzymology involved, and the present knowledge of the mechanisms of the action of enzymes, as well as the practical results and advantages obtained on the laboratory and industrial scale.

  11. Effect of shortening kraft pulping integrated with extended oxygen delignification on biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunyun; Hu, Huichao; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of shortening kraft pulping (KP) process integrated with extended oxygen delignification (OD) on the biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus. Data showed that using kraft pulps with high kappa number could improve the delignification efficiency of OD, reduce hexenuronic acid formation in kraft pulps. Pulp viscosity for a target kappa number of ∼10 was comparable to that obtained from conventional KP and OD process. The energy and alkali consumption in the integrated biorefinery process could be optimized when using a KP pulp with kappa number of ∼27. The process could minimize the overall methanol formation, but greater amounts of carbonate and oxalate were formed. The information from this study will be helpful to the future implementation of short-time KP integrated with extended OD process in actual pulp mill applications for biorefinery, aiming at further improvement in the biorefinery effectiveness of hardwood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efeito do conteúdo e da natureza da lignina residual na eficiência e na seletividade do branqueamento com ozônio Effect of residual lignin content and nature on the efficiency and selectivity of ozone bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Pereira Maia

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo foram avaliados os efeitos do conteúdo e da natureza da lignina residual na eficiência e na seletividade do branqueamento com ozônio de polpa kraft convencional (kraft e pré-deslignificada com oxigênio (kraft-O. Constatou-se que a eficiência do branqueamento com ozônio se eleva com o aumento do conteúdo de lignina residual da polpa. O tratamento com ozônio é mais seletivo para polpas kraft-O, mas para um mesmo tipo de polpa a seletividade de branqueamento com ozônio se eleva com o aumento de lignina residual. A eficiência do branqueamento com ozônio aumenta com o teor de lignina fenólica na polpa, entretanto a seletividade é negativamente afetada pela presença destas estruturas.This study aimed to evaluate the effect of residual lignin content and nature on the efficiency and selectivity of ozone bleaching of conventional (kraft and oxygen delignified (kraft-O pulps. Ozone bleaching efficiency was found to be enhanced by increasing pulp residual lignin content. Ozone treatment is more selective for kraft-O pulps, but for a given type of pulp (kraft or kraft-O, ozone bleaching selectivity increases with increasing pulp lignin content. Ozone bleaching efficiency increases with increasing pulp lignin phenolic hydroxyl content whereas selectivity is negatively affected by these structures.

  13. Influence of the chemical composition on the combustion properties of kraft black liquor; Mustalipeaen koostumuksen vaikutus lipeaen poltto-ominaisuuksiin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alen, R.; Siistonen, H.; Malkavaara, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Inst. of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this work is to study the combustion properties of kraft black liquors from modified cooking. Both the industrial and laboratory-made black liquors are included. In addition, changes in the combustion properties of the spent liquors obtained by mixing prior to combustion different chlorine-free bleach liquors with black liquor are studied. (orig.)

  14. Advanced oxidation process H^sub 2^O^sub 2^/UV combined with anaerobic digestion to remove chlorinated organics from bleached kraft pulp mill wastewater/Proceso de oxidación avanzada H^sub 2^O^sub 2^/UV combinado con digestión anaerobia para remoción de compuestos organoclorados presentes en efluentes de papel y celulosa kraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diego Botelho Ruas; Tatiana Rodríguez Chaparro; Eduardo Cleto Pires

    2012-01-01

    .... Bleaching plant effluent was treated in the HAIB reactor processed over 19 h of hydraulic retention time, reaching the expected removal efficiencies for COD (61% ± 3%), TOC (69% ± 9%), BOD^sub 5^ (90% ± 5%) and AOX (55% ± 14...

  15. Caracterização de compostos reduzidos de enxofre gerados na produção de celulose kraft e pré-hidró lise kraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso Moura Moraes de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An environmental concern in the kraft pulping is the odor caused by the reduced sulphur compounds.There are many simple equipments to detect on-line the total reduced sulphur (TRS, like the coulometric titrator. This study had as aim to measure the components of the total reduced sulphur compounds generated in kraft and pre-hydrolysis kraft laboratory cooking. Two types of hardwood chips were used in the cookings: one with 25% of lignin (on dry wood, the other with 20% lignin. The wood containing less lignin generated less total reduced sulphur compounds. Considering the gases formed i n the two types of cooking processes, no significant differences could be detected in terms of generated amounts of reduced sulphur compounds. However, the lignin content of the woods under evaluation had important role in generating TRS. The pre-hydrolysis kraft process was proved to be more sensitive to the higher lignin content in the wood. It is recomended to work with low lignin content wood when cooking by this process. Dimethyl sulphide and methyl mercaptan were the dominant TRS compounds in the reli ef gases from the digester.

  16. Skin Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Samira M.

    2015-01-01

    In this project, I aim to investigate the reasoning behind the practice of skin bleaching by analyzing the documentary ”Dark Girls”, to gain a better understanding of race and colorism issues. Also this project tries to see if there is a connection with history and if this has been a part of making the european beauty ideal determine the choices black’s make in regards to beauty.

  17. Kraft lignin biorefinery: A proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2017-09-01

    Lignin is a huge energy and carbon reserve but owing to its highly biologically recalcitrant nature it is commonly regarded as a waste in lignocellulosic biomass biorefinery. To realize the lignin biorefinery, it is proposed to use Kraft lignin, isolated from black liquor from Kraft pulping mills, as starting material to be fragmented by fast pyrolysis or selective catalysis to aromatic sub-units and to be post-refining with additional cleavage reaction and separation/purification as commodity aromatics pool in chemical industries. This Note calls for research efforts on detailed investigation of the feasibility of this proposed scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Vahur Kraft soovitab elektritootmise erastada / Vahur Kraft ; interv. Vallo Toomet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kraft, Vahur, 1961-

    2003-01-01

    Eesti Panga president Vahur Kraft soovitab seoses Iraagi sõja ja ebakindlusega maailmas suhtuda ettevaatlikult majanduskasvu prognoosi ning näeb maksureformi läbiviimiseks vajaliku kokkuhoiu võimalusi hariduse, tervishoiu ja sotsiaalkindlustuse reformimisel. Diagramm. Tabel. Vt. samas: Andrus Säälik. Tulude alla jõuavad ka toetused

  19. ESTUDO DA BRANQUEABILIDADE DA POLPA KRAFT DE EUCALIPTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Morais de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate how the pulp bleachability ability is correlated with the wood chemical characteristics, the cooking conditions, the kappa number of the brown pulp and the bleaching sequences, based on the pulp bleached brightness, viscosity, bleaching chemical consumption and bleachability. The eucalyptus wood (A, B, and C, appropriately characterized as the chemical constituents (holocellulose content, insoluble and soluble lignin content, total extractive content, ash and insoluble ash in hydrochloric acid were used for pulp production by modified kraft cooking, using two different pulping conditions: Condition I (PI - 16.5% effective alkali, 30% sulfide, and 155ºC cooking temperature; and Condition II (PII - 17.5% effective alkali, 32% sulfide, and 147ºC cooking temperature. Both conditions were performed to kappa number 15.5 ± 0.5 and 18.0 ± 0.5. The pulping parameters and pulp properties evaluated were: screened yield, viscosity, brightness, hexenuronic acid content, and index k/corrected kappa (ratio between the light absorption rate, a brightness formula term, and the corrected kappa number, disregarding the hexenuronic acid contribution. Each one of the pulps was bleached, to achieve 90 ± 1% ISO brightness, following three pre-defined bleaching sequences: 1 Sequence - OA(ZEDP; 2 Sequence - OA/D(EOPDP; and 3 Sequence - OD(EOPDP. The pulps were investigated for brightness, viscosity, bleaching chemical consumption and bleachability. The bleachability was affected by the wood. Furthermore, the bleaching abilities were affected by the cooking condition and the brown pulp kappa number. The 1 and 2 sequences were satisfactory to achieve the required brightness (90 ± 1% ISO unlike to the verified to the 3 sequence. The best bleachabilities were obtained from the brown pulps with higher kappa number 18.0 ± 0.5. It was verified close correlation between bleaching ability and index k/corrected kappa, which indicated

  20. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current

  1. The impact of kappa number composition on eucalyptus kraft pulp bleachability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Costa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of chemicals during ECF bleaching of kraft pulp correlates reasonably well with kappa number, which measures with KMnO4 the total amount of oxidizable material in the pulp. However, the method does not distinguish between the oxidizable material in residual lignin and other structures susceptible to oxidation, such as hexenuronic acids (HexAs, extractives and carbonyl groups in the pulp. In this study an attempt is made to separate the main contributors to the kappa number in oxygen - delignified eucalyptus Kraft pulps and evaluate how these fractions behave during ECF bleaching using chlorine dioxide as the sole oxidant (DEDD sequence. Residual lignin and HexAs proved to be the main fractions contributing to the kappa number and chlorine dioxide consumption in ECF bleaching. Pulp bleachability with chlorine dioxide increases with increasing HexAs content of the pulp but chlorine dioxide per se does not react with HexAs. Reduction of pulp with sodium borohydride under conditions for removing carbonyl groups has no impact on bleachability. No correlation was found between the pulp of the extractive content and pulp bleachability. The removal of HexAs prior to ECF bleaching significantly decreases the formation of chlorinated organics in the pulp (OX and filtrates (AOX as well as of oxalic acids in the filtrates.

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF Eucalyptus benthamii WOOD FOR KRAFT PULP PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Nogueira Alves

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of Eucalyptus benthamii wood for kraft pulp production. A hybrid of Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis, probably the most planted Eucalyptus clone in Brazil, was also analyzed for comparison purposes. Basic density, chemical composition and fiber dimensions were determined for the two species. The Eucalyptus benthamii wood presented an anatomical structure, basic density and fiber dimensions quite similar to those of other species planted by the Brazilian pulp industry. However, it presented poorer wood quality characteristics when compared to the hybrid urograndis species, with higher amounts of extractives and lignin, lower amount of glucans, more galactans and lower S/G ratio, characteristics leading to lower pulping yield. Additional studies should be carried out to establish its pulping, bleaching and paper strength properties.

  3. Effects of ozone on kraft process pulp mill effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, A. (Stanley Industrial Consultants, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Smith, D.W. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    Effluent from a kraft process pulp mill was studied in a batch reactor for ozone doses between 50 and 200 mg O[sub 3]/L to identify the suitability of ozone application locations in the treatment process and see the improvements in biotreatability of wastewaters from a kraft process pulp mill. Laboratory acclimatized seed were used for (Biochemical Oxygen Demand) BOD tests for ozonated and unozonated samples. The inhibitory effects were minimized by using optimum dilutions. The studies were divided into three major sections: characterization of mill effluent; ozone system calibration, and reactor design; and ozonation of mill effluent. Seed for BOD tests were acclimatized in batch units for primary, bleach and secondary effluents separately. The results were analyzed using the [open quote]t[close quote] test for paired experiments and an ANOVA table for statistical confirmation. Residuals were plotted to check the assumptions of constant variance and normal distribution. It was concluded that ozone is most effective for the removal of color and the increase of BOD in secondary effluent. 21 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Properties of extracted Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulps

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, G. V.; Gamelas, J.A.F.; Ramarao, B. F.; Amidon, T. E.; Ferreira, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    This work was a comprehensive study of the properties of extracted Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulps. Five levels of hot water extraction were performed, each followed by kraft cooking to three different kappa numbers. As extraction took place, the hemicelluloses content of the kraft pulps was reduced from 21%-22% to 3%-4% and, conversely, the cellulose fraction increased from 73%-75% to 85%-90%. Fiber length decreased for all pulps and kink index increased greatly with extraction. The dispersi...

  5. Evaluation of bleachability on pine and eucalyptus kraft pulps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Freitas Andrade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the pulp industry has been changing and improving its manufacturing processes in order to enhance production capacity, product quality and environmental performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bleachability effect on the efficient washing and alkaline leaching in eucalyptus and pine Kraft pulps using three different bleaching sequences: AD(EPD, A/D(EPDP and DHT(EPDP. This study was carried out in two stages. In the first part, the optimum conditions for pulp bleaching in order to achieve a brightness of 90% ISO were established. The second step was a comparative study between the pulps that received alkaline leaching and efficient washing with reference pulp (without treatment. The brightness, viscosity, kappa number and HexA in pulp were analyzed. The three sequences studied reached the desired brightness, but the sequence AD(EPD produced a lower reagent consumption for the same brightness. In the three sequences studied, the efficient washing of the pulp after oxygen delignification has contributed significantly to the removal of dissolved organic and inorganic materials in the pulp and the alkaline leaching decreased significantly the pulp kappa number due to a higher pulp delignification and bleachability.

  6. Fertilization of Northern Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Lea; D.G. Brockway

    1986-01-01

    Northern hardwoods grow over a considerable range of climatic and edaphic conditions and exhibit a wide range in productivity.Many northern hardwood forests are capable of high production relative to other forest types, but are often slow to reach maximum productivity because of low nutrient availability.Altering the patterns of biomass accumulation so that managers...

  7. Nanocrystalline cellulose from aspen kraft pulp and its application in deinked pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinghua; Gao, Yang; Qin, Menghua; Wu, Kaili; Fu, Yingjuan; Zhao, Jian

    2013-09-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) isolated from bleached aspen kraft pulp was characterized, and its application as pulp strengthening additive and retention aid was investigated. Results showed that NCC with high crystallinity of more than 80% can be obtained using 64 wt% sulfuric acid. The structure of nanocrystalline cellulose is parallelepiped rod-like, and their cross-sectional dimension is in the nanometer range with a high aspect ratio. The formation of microparticle retention systems during the application of NCC together with cationic polyacrylamide and cationic starch in deinked pulp was able to further improve pulp retention and strength properties without negative influence on the drainage.

  8. Combustion properties of kraft black liquors; Ligniinifraktion vaikutus mustalipeaen poltto-ominaisuuksiin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alen, R.; Rantanen, K.; Ekman, J.; Malkavaara, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to find relationships between the structure of the dissolved lignin and the combustion properties (pyrolysis time, char burning time, and swelling) of softwood and hardwood kraft black liquors. In this conjunction, pine and birch chips, as well as their two mixtures (the mass ratios of pine chips to birch chips were 80:20 and 60:40), were delignified by conventional kraft pulping. In each cook series, a liquor sample was withdrawn at certain time intervals to obtain liquor samples with different chemical composition. The black liquors obtained were analyzed with respect to the content of lignin and `lignin monomers`, but also the molecular-mass distribution and the mass average molecular mass of lignin were made. In addition, the dissolved lignin was characterized by NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Further data on the chemical structures of lignin in black liquors were obtained by identifying various degradation products formed from this material during oxidative (CuO oxidation) and pyrolytic treatments. Several correlations between the `structural parameters` of the dissolved lignin and the combustion properties of black liquor were found. These correlations were significant especially in the case of pine cook. The results revealed many findings which are, together with the earlier data, useful for a better understanding of the thermochemical behavior of different kraft black liquors during combustion in a recovery furnace. (author)

  9. Biobutanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum using xylose recovered from birch Kraft black liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudahettige-Nilsson, Rasika L; Helmerius, Jonas; Nilsson, Robert T; Sjöblom, Magnus; Hodge, David B; Rova, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied using acid-hydrolyzed xylan recovered from hardwood Kraft black liquor by CO2 acidification as the only carbon source. Detoxification of hydrolyzate using activated carbon was conducted to evaluate the impact of inhibitor removal and fermentation. Xylose hydrolysis yields as high as 18.4% were demonstrated at the highest severity hydrolysis condition. Detoxification using active carbon was effective for removal of both phenolics (76-81%) and HMF (38-52%). Batch fermentation of the hydrolyzate and semi-defined P2 media resulted in a total solvent yield of 0.12-0.13g/g and 0.34g/g, corresponding to a butanol concentration of 1.8-2.1g/L and 7.3g/L respectively. This work is the first study of a process for the production of a biologically-derived biofuel from hemicelluloses solubilized during Kraft pulping and demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing xylan recovered directly from industrial Kraft pulping liquors as a feedstock for biological production of biofuels such as butanol. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Papermaking fibers from giant reed (Arundo donax L. by advanced ecologically friendly pulping and bleaching technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, H.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical structure and chemical composition of the stem-wall material of giant reed is considered from the viewpoint of raw material characterization for industrial fiber production. The effect of stem morphology (nodes and internodes on pulping results and general pulp properties is discussed. The advantages of application of modern organic solvent based (organosolv pulping technologies to giant reed are shown in comparison with the conventional (kraft method. The conditions optimization for Ethanol-Alkali pulping (a selected organosolv pulping process is given, and the chemical kinetics of the principal macromolecular components during ethanol-alkali pulping is described. The bleachability of organosolv pulps by short totally chlorine free (TCF bleaching sequences using hydrogen peroxide and ozone as the active bleaching chemicals without pulp pre-delignification is examined and compared with kraft pulps. The enzymatic pre-treatment of reed organosolv pulps by commercial xylanase preparation is considered as a possibility toward the improvement of pulp bleachability.

  11. WOOD BASIC DENSITY EFFECT OF Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla CLONES ON BLEACHED PULP QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Rodrigues dos Santos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzed the wood basic density effect in two Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla hybrid clones (440 kg/m3 e 508 kg/m3 on bleached pulp quality (fiber dimensions and physical-mechanical properties. The woods performance on pulping, bleaching and beating results were analyzed. The Kraft pulping was carried out in forced circulation digester in order to obtain 17±1 kappa number targets. The pulps were bleached to 90±1 using delignification oxygen and D0EOPD1 bleaching sequence. Bleached pulp of low basic density clone showed, significantly, lowest revolutions number in the PFI mill to reach tensile index of 70 N.m/g, low Schopper Riegler degree and generated sheets with higher values to bulk and opacity. These characteristics and properties allow concluding that bleached pulp of low basic density clone was the most indicated to produce printing and writing sheets. The bleached pulp of high basic density clone showed higher values of bulk and capillarity Klemm and lower water retention value when analyzed without beating. The bleached pulp of high basic density clone showed more favorable characteristics to the production of tissue papers.

  12. Preventing Strength Loss of Unbleached Kraft Pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Hubbe; Richard Venditti; John Heitmann

    2003-04-16

    Kraft pulp fibers lose inter-fiber bonding ability when they are dried during the manufacture of paper. Adverse environmental consequences of this loss include (a) limitations on the number of times that kraft fibers can be recycled, (b) reduced paper strength, sometimes making it necessary to use heavier paper or paperboard to meet product strength requirements, increasing the usage of raw materials, (c) decreased rates of paper production in cases where the fiber furnish has been over-refined in an attempt to regain inter-fiber bonding ability. The present study is the first of its type to focus on unbleached kraft fibers, which are a main ingredient of linerboard for corrugated containers. About 90 million tons of unbleached kraft fiber are used worldwide every year for this purpose.

  13. Bleach Plant Capital Reduction with Rapid DO Bleaching and Simplified (D/E/D) Stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. McDonough; C. E. Courchene; J-C. Baromes

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the capabilities of a bleaching sequence that combined a short retention time initial chlorine dioxide stage, referred to as rapid D0, (D0R), with simplified bleaching stages, (D1/E/D2), that required only one final bleach washer. The test sequence DR(EPO)(D/E/D/) was compared to a control sequence, D(EPO)D, for both hardwood and softwood pulps. The capabilities of the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence were successfully demonstrated. An existing three- or four-stage bleach plan can be converted to the more powerful DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence without the major capital cost of additional washers. The results from this study showed that the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence can reach 85 brightness on SW with 2.8% total C1O2, while the control sequence, D(EPO)D, required 3.9% C1O2. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX for the test sequence. The strength of pulp bleached in the test sequence was similar to or slightly higher than the control. For the HW pu lp, the test sequence reached 88 brightness with 2.2% C1O2 compared to 3.3% C1O2 for the control. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX generation with the lower chemical requirements. The final viscosity and pulp strength for the test sequence on HW was significantly higher than the corresponding values for the control sequence.

  14. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  15. Effect of replacing polyol by organosolv and kraft lignin on the property and structure of rigid polyurethane foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin is one of the three major components in plant cell walls, and it can be isolated (dissolved from the cell wall in pretreatment or chemical pulping. However, there is a lack of high-value applications for lignin, and the commonest proposal for lignin is power and steam generation through combustion. Organosolv ethanol process is one of the effective pretreatment methods for woody biomass for cellulosic ethanol production, and kraft process is a dominant chemical pulping method in paper industry. In the present research, the lignins from organosolv pretreatment and kraft pulping were evaluated to replace polyol for producing rigid polyurethane foams (RPFs. Results Petroleum-based polyol was replaced with hardwood ethanol organosolv lignin (HEL or hardwood kraft lignin (HKL from 25% to 70% (molar percentage in preparing rigid polyurethane foam. The prepared foams contained 12-36% (w/w HEL or 9-28% (w/w HKL. The density, compressive strength, and cellular structure of the prepared foams were investigated and compared. Chain extenders were used to improve the properties of the RPFs. Conclusions It was found that lignin was chemically crosslinked not just physically trapped in the rigid polyurethane foams. The lignin-containing foams had comparable structure and strength up to 25-30% (w/w HEL or 19-23% (w/w HKL addition. The results indicated that HEL performed much better in RPFs and could replace more polyol at the same strength than HKL because the former had a better miscibility with the polyol than the latter. Chain extender such as butanediol could improve the strength of lignin-containing RPFs.

  16. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellulose kraft pulp reinforced polylactic acid (PLA composites: effect of fibre moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Retulainen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available PLA offers a competitive and CO2 neutral matrix to commonly used polyolefin polymer based composites. Moreover, the use of PLA reduces dependency on oil when producing composite materials. However, PLA has a tendency of hydrolytic degradation under melt processing conditions in the presence of moisture, which remains a challenge when processing PLA reinforced natural fibre composites. Natural fibres such as cellulose fibres are hygroscopic with 6–10 wt% moisture content at 50–70% relative humidity conditions. These fibres are sensitive to melt processing conditions and fibre breakage (cutting also occur during processing. The degradation of PLA, moisture absorption of natural fibres together with fibre cutting and uneven dispersion of fibres in polymer matrix, deteriorates the overall properties of the composite. In the given research paper, bleached softwood kraft pulp (BSKP reinforced PLA compounds were successfully melt processed using BSKP with relatively high moisture contents. The effect of moist BSKP on the molecular weight of PLA, fibre length and the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. By using moist never-dried kraft pulp fibres for feeding, the fibre cutting was decreased during the melt compounding. Even though PLA degradation occurred during the melt processing, the final damage to the PLA was moderate and thus did not deteriorate the mechanical properties of the composites. However, comprehensive moisture removal is required during the compounding in order to achieve optimal overall performance of the PLA/BSKP composites. The economic benefit gained from using moist BSKP is that the expensive and time consuming drying process steps of the kraft pulp fibres prior to processing can be minimized.

  18. Branes and the Kraft-Procesi Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The Coulomb and Higgs branches of certain 3d N=4 gauge theories can be understood as closures of nilpotent orbits. Furthermore, a new theorem by Namikawa suggests that this is the simplest possible case, thus giving this class a special role. In this note we use branes to reproduce the mathematical work by Kraft and Procesi. It studies the classification of all nilpotent orbits for classical groups and it characterizes an inclusion relation via minimal singularities. We show how these minimal singularities arise naturally in the Type IIB superstring embedding of the 3d theories. The Higgs mechanism can be used to remove the minimal singularity, corresponding to a transition in the brane configuration that induces a new effective 3d theory. This reproduces the Kraft-Procesi results, endowing the family of gauge theories with a new underlying structure. We provide an efficient procedure for computing such brane transitions.

  19. PEROXYACID ENHANCED OXYGEN DELIGNIFICATION OF KRAFT PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianZhao; XuezhiLi; ShulanShi; HuirenHu

    2004-01-01

    Effect of peroxyacid (a mixture ofperoxymonosulfuric acid and peroxyacetic acid)pretreatment on oxygen delignification of kraft pulpfrom eucalyptus was studied, and the conditions ofpretreatment (e.g. DTPA charge, peroxyacid charge,pretreatment time, pretreatment temperature and pHvalue) were optimized. The results show thatperoxyacid pretreatment prior to oxygendelignification could enhance oxygen delignificationof kraft pulp, and result in selective delignificationand increased delignified-pulp brightness. Theoptimum conditions of peroxyacid pretreatment wereas follows: peroxyacid charge 3% (onperoxymonosulfuric acid), 60~C, 30min, 12% pulpconsistency, pH5.0. Pretreatment with 0.5%DTPAwas essential before peroxyacid pretreatment. Underthe optimum conditions, the degree of delignificationand brightness of final pulp were increased by 12.4%(from 44.9% to 57.3%) and 4.9%(ISO, from 54.0%to 58.9%) respectively while maintaining a similarviscosity of final pulps compared to single oxygendelignification.

  20. OZONE BLEACHING AT NEUTRAL PH – A NEW CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Carvalho

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of medium consistency ozone stage pH was evaluated for brown and oxygen delignified eucalyptus kraft pulp samples obtained from VCP - Luiz Antônio pulp mill. These samples were used as such or previously treated with the hot acid stage (A. The main objective of this study was to determine the viability of increasing the ozone stage pH aiming at decreasing bleaching variable costs. The ozone stage was studied in the pH range of 2.5-9.0, taking into account some important variables which affect ozone bleaching: (1 pulp kappa number entering the ozone stage, (2 reactivity of ozone towards lignin versus hexenuronic acids (HexA´s, (3 pulp treatments prior to ozone stage (acid hydrolysis, and (4 pulp treatments after the ozone stage (extraction or a chlorine dioxide stage.  Therefore, the impact of ozone stage pH was investigated in bleaching process such as Z/DEop vs AZ/DEop, Z/DEopD vs AZ/DEopD, Z/E vs AZ/E. The results were interpreted based on ozone stage efficiency and selectivity, and overall bleaching performance measured by the total bleaching chemical consumption required to achieve full brightness, pulp quality and environmental impact. It was concluded that the increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 has a slightly negative impact on the efficiency and selectivity, measured after Z/DEop sequence, but this effect is not expressive in the end of Z/DEopD bleaching sequence. The increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 in the sequence Z/DEopD is cost-effective at industrial level because it represents expressive reduction of sulphuric acid and caustic soda demand for pH control in the bleaching plant. These gain areas achieved without any significant changes in pulp quality and effluent load discharge. Nevertheless, the increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 has a very high negative impact on the efficiency and selectivity for the Z/E and AZ/E processes and it is not recommended in such cases.

  1. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  2. BLEACHING NEPTUNE BALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONET Maria Angeles

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Posidonia Oceanic is a seaweed from Mediterranean Sea and it is more concentrated at the Balerian SEA. This implies the Valencian Community also. It forms vaste underwater meadows in the sea and are part of the Mediterranean ecosystem. It is a sea-grass specie with fruits and flowers. Leaves are ribbon-like and they grow in winter and at the end of summer some of them are separated and arrive to some sea line. Fuit is separated and can floate, it is known as “the olive of the sea” mainly in Italy, or as the Neptune Balls. As it can be used in different fields, it is is being studied in order ro have the precitice tests. Some authors have reported the manufacturing of fully bio-based comites with a gluten matrix by hot-press molding. And it has been considered as an effective insulator for building industry or even though to determine the presence of mercure in the Mediterranean sea some years ago. As many applications can be designed from that fibers, it has been considered to be bleached in order to used them in fashionable products. Consequently, its original brown color is not the most suitable one and it should be bleached as many other cellulosic fibers. The aim of this paper is to bleache neptune balls however, the inner fibers were not accessible at all and it implied not to bleach the inner fibers in the neptune ball. Further studiesd will consider bleaching the individualized fibers.

  3. Bleaching of Wool with Sodium Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Yilmazer, MSc.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An untreated wool fabric was bleached both with sodium borohydride (SBH in the presence of sodium bisulphite (SBS solution and with a commercial H2O2 bleaching method. The concentration effects of SBH and SBS, bleaching time, pH and temperature on SBH bleaching process were investigated. Whiteness, yellowness and alkali solubility results were assessed for both bleaching methods. The results showed that whiteness degrees obtained with SBH bleaching was comparable with that of H2O2 bleaching method; whereas the alkali solubility values of the SBH bleaching was superior to the H2O2 bleaching.

  4. Metabolites of chlorinated syringaldehydes in fish bile as biomarkers of exposure to bleached eucalypt pulp effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, C M; Haritos, V S; Ahokas, J T; Holdway, D A

    1996-04-01

    Metabolites of chlorinated phenolic compounds in fish bile have been found to be sensitive biomarkers of bleached pulp mill effluent exposure. Chlorinated syringaldehydes are largely unstudied chlorophenolics found in bleached hardwood effluent. Sand flathead (Platycephalus bassensis), Australian marine fish, were exposed to 100% chlorine dioxide-bleached eucalypt pulp effluent at concentrations of 0.5, 2, and 8% (v/v) for 4 days. Metabolites of 2-chlorosyringaldehyde (2-CSA), the predominant chlorophenolic in this effluent, were measured in the bile. The major metabolite was the conjugate of 2-chloro-4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-benzylalcohol (2-CB-OH), the reduced product of 2-CSA. 2-CB-OH was found in all fish exposed to diluted effluent and was concentrated in the bile over 1000 times above 2-CSA levels in the effluent. A separate experiment examined the metabolic fate of 2,6-dichlorosyringaldehyde (2,6-DCSA), which is one of the major chlorophenolics in chlorine-bleached eucalypt pulp effluent. Sand flathead were exposed to 2,6-DCSA by intraperitoneal injection at 15 mg/kg or through the water to 0.5, 2, or 8 micrograms/liter for 4 days. Analysis of the bile revealed the major metabolite of 2,6-DCSA to be the conjugate of 2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzylalcohol, which was found in all exposed fish and was concentrated in the bile over 20,000 times above 2,6-DCSA exposure levels. Results reveal that the analysis of metabolites of chlorinated syringaldehydes in fish bile can provide a biomarker of bleached hardwood effluent exposure that is sensitive to low levels of exposure, specific to certain bleaching sequences, and correlates well with exposure concentrations.

  5. Yield and utilization of hardwood fiber grown on short rotations. [Platanus occidentalis, Liquidambar styraciflua, Liriodendron tulipifera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, K.; Brown, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    Plantations of broad-leaved tree species harvested in cycles of less than 10 years can help meet man's increasing cellulose and energy needs. A system of growing hardwoods like an agricultural row crop, harvested with equipment equivalent to corn silage cutters and using the ensuing sprout growth as the next crop, was conceived by foresters in Georgia in 1965. Research has focused on the tree species, sites, and cultural practices suited for this concept as well as the biomass yields and the utility of the fiber that was produced. About 70 hectares of American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) test plantings have been established in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions of Georgia. These species, when given proper care, can be grown successfully on many sites previously deemed unsuitable for hardwood growth. Stumps will resprout throughout the year, ensuring a continuous flow of raw material to the user. The biomass yields from hardwood fields vary with species, site, cultural practices, and rotation age. Fresh weight yields of unfoliated sycamore sprouts grown on an upland site varied from 14.3 tons/ha/yr when harvested annually to 21.8 tons/ha/yr with harvest at age four. When sprouts were harvested every two years, 46 kg/ha/2 yrs of nitrogen, 35 kg calcium, 22 kg potassium, and 6 kg phosphorus were removed in the harvested material. Juvenile American sycamore stump sprouts have been successfully converted into corrugating medium, particleboard, fiberboard, hardboard, and newsprint. It can be cooked by the Kraft and NSSC processes. One-, two-, and four-year-old sycamore sprouts presented no unusual problems in the Kraft process, and yields ranged from 45 to 57 percent with an average yield of 52 percent. Cooking times were relatively short.

  6. 辐射和过氧乙酸综合预处理纸浆,改善全无氯漂白选择性%Application of photo, peracetic acid, and combination pre-treatments in improving totally chlorine-free bleaching selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗成; 刘忠

    2015-01-01

    全无氯漂白(TCF)能够很好的适应环保需要,然而,TCF漂白应用和二氧化氯漂序相比较都受到了严格的限制,TCF漂白制备的浆料可能具备较低的白度和强度性能。氧脱木素(O段)通常作为漂白段的第一阶段,因此漂序的漂白选择性影响TCF漂白性能。O段和Op段前的辐射预处理改善了漂白选择性,使得所得浆料的卡伯值减少量分别达到53.7%和59.2%,漂白选择性分别增强至1.00和0.73。红外光谱分析表明,辐射预处理能够保护纤维素,避免其中的羰基和其它物质发生反应,以此来改善漂白选择性;研究发现O段比Op段对纤维的保护作用更明显。在任何一个阶段,过氧乙酸和辐射预处理的混合应用不会进一步增加漂白的选择性。简而言之,蓝光和UV辐射处理前是否添加过氧乙酸对最终成浆表现出相似的影响;该过程所处理的浆料为普通的或者过氧化氢强化的氧脱木素浆,是否添加过氧乙酸对最终成浆性能的影响不大。%The application of totally chlorine-free bleaching (TCF) is well recognized for its environmental compatibility. However, its application is restricted in comparison to a chlorine-based bleaching sequence. TCF bleaching produces pulp with relatively lower brightness and strength properties. Oxygen deligniifcation (O-stage) is commonly used as a ifrst bleaching stage;therefore its selectivity inlfuences TCF bleaching performance. In this study, the selectivity of the O-stage and hydrogen peroxide-reinforced O-stage (Op-stage) on tropical hardwood kraft pulp were 0.53 and 0.71, with 37.8%and 55.5%kappa number (Kn) reductions, respectively. The addition of photo pre-treatment prior to the O-stage and Op-stage improved the Kn reduction to 53.7%and 59.2%;consequently the selectivity was enhanced to 1.0 and 0.73;respectively. The Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that photo pre-treatments improved the

  7. Bleaching of Black Human Hair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琳

    2001-01-01

    Bleaching of black human hair has been studied systematically. On the basis of experimental data the technology of human hair bleaching through five processes was established. The optimum technology of improving the whiteness and reducing damage on fibers has been found. The technology can provide good luster,smooth handle and relatively high strength retention to human hair used for wigs or drama articles, meeting the needs of people better. Moreover, it also has important reference value to bleaching of other colored fibers.

  8. Recycling cellulase towards industrial application of enzyme treatment on hardwood kraft-based dissolving pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Shanshan; Yang, Guihua; Chen, Jiachuan; Ji, Xingxiang; Ni, Yonghao

    2016-07-01

    Cost-effectiveness is vital for enzymatic treatment of dissolving pulp towards industrial application. The strategy of cellulase recycling with fresh cellulase addition was demonstrated in this work to activate the dissolving pulp, i.e. decreasing viscosity and increasing Fock reactivity. Results showed that 48.8-35.1% of cellulase activity can be recovered from the filtered liquor in five recycle rounds, which can be reused for enzymatic treatment of dissolving pulp. As a result, the recycling cellulase with addition fresh cellulase of 1mg/g led to the pulp of viscosity 470mL/g and Fock reactivity 80%, which is comparable with cellulase charge of 2mg/g. Other pulp properties such as alpha-cellulose, alkaline solubility and molecular weight distribution were also determined. Additionally, a zero-release of recycling cellulase treatment was proposed to integrate into the dissolving pulp production process.

  9. POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL-BASED AQUEOUS BIPHASIC SYSTEMS AS IMPROVEMENT FOR KRAFT HARDWOOD PULPING PROCESS. (R826732)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. 1997 Hardwood Research Award Winner: "Automatic Color Sorting of Hardwood Edge-Glued Panel Parts"

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Richard Conners; Qiang Lu; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    The National Hardwood Lumber Association's 1997 Hardwood Research Award was presented to D. Earl Kline, Richard Conners, Qiang Lu and Philip Araman at the 25th Annual Hardwood Symposium for developing an automatic system for color sorting hardwood edge-glued panel parts. The researchers comprise a team from Virginia Tech University and the USDA Forest Service in...

  11. Refining Properties of Kraft Bamboo Pulp%漂白硫酸盐竹浆的打浆特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张美云; 吴乾斌; 夏新兴; 赵琳

    2011-01-01

    针对竹浆难打浆的特点,本实验系统研究了漂白硫酸盐竹浆及其长纤维(200目以上纤维)的打浆性能,并与漂白阔叶木化学浆打浆性能进行对比。研究发现,竹浆纤维组分中16目以上纤维含量约为24%,而阔叶木浆仅为0.8%;竹浆200目以下纤维含量约为28%,而阔叶木浆为7%。相同磨浆转数下,竹浆打浆度略高于阔叶木浆,竹浆长纤维浆打浆度较阔叶木浆长纤维低,竹浆和竹浆长纤维均比阔叶木浆和阔叶木浆长纤维的湿重高。相同打浆度下,竹浆成纸撕裂指数、耐破指数和耐折度均高于阔叶木浆;竹浆长纤维成纸的抗张指数、撕裂指数、耐破指数和耐折度均高于阔叶木浆长纤维。这些都说明利用竹浆能够抄造出质量较高的纸张..%Aiming at the difficulty of bamboo beating situation, this paper mainly focused on the refining properties of kraft bamboo pulp and it long fibers (over 200 mesh) compared with the kraft hardwood pulp by PFI beater. The results showed that the percentage of fibers over 16 mesh of bamboo pulp was about 24% compared to the 0.8% of hardwood pulp; the percentage of fibers below 200 mesh of bamboo pulp was about 28% compared to the 7% of hardwood pulp. The beating degree and wet weight of bamboo pulp were both higher than hardwood pulp in the same revolution of PFI beater. The beating degree of bamboo long fibers pulp was lower than the hardwood long fibers pulp. The tear index, burst index and folding number of bamboo pulp are all higher than the hardwood pulp in the same beating degree. "Ihe tensile index, tear index, burst index and folding number of bamboo long fibers pulp are all higher than hardwood pulp in the same beating degree. All of these showed that bamboo pulp can be used to produce high quality paper.

  12. Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart E. Strand

    2001-12-06

    The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

  13. Harvesting costs and utilization of hardwood plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim P. McDonald; Bryce J. Stokes

    1994-01-01

    The use of short rotation, intensive culture (SRIC) practices in hardwoods to meet fiber supply needs is becoming increasingly widespread. Total plated area of short rotation hardwood fiber plantations is currently about 22,000 ha (McDonald and Stokes 1993). That figure should certainly to grow in response to public concerns over loss of natural hardwood stands. With...

  14. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive.

  15. Effect of hot acid hydrolysis and hot chlorine dioxide stage on bleaching effluent biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, C M; Colodette, J L; Delantonio, N R N; Mounteer, A H; Silva, C M

    2007-01-01

    The hot acid hydrolysis followed by chlorine dioxide (A/D*) and hot chlorine dioxide (D*) technologies have proven very useful for bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulp. Although the characteristics and biodegradability of effluents from conventional chlorine dioxide bleaching are well known, such information is not yet available for effluents derived from hot acid hydrolysis and hot chorine dioxide bleaching. This study discusses the characteristics and biodegradability of such effluents. Combined whole effluents from the complete sequences DEpD, D*EpD, A/D*EpD and ADEpD, and from the pre-bleaching sequences DEp, D*Ep, A/D*Ep and ADEp were characterized by quantifying their colour, AOX and organic load (BOD, COD, TOC). These effluents were also evaluated for their treatability by simulation of an activated sludge system. It was concluded that treatment in the laboratory sequencing batch reactor was efficient for removal of COD, BOD and TOC of all effluents. However, colour increased after biological treatment, with the greatest increase found for the effluent produced using the AD technology. Biological treatment was less efficient at removing AOX of effluents from the sequences with D*, A/D* and AD as the first stages, when compared to the reference D stage; there was evidence of the lower treatability of these organochlorine compounds from these sequences.

  16. Control of the Accumulation of Non-Process Elements in Pulp Mills with Bleach Filtrate Reuse: A Chemical Equilibrium Approach to Predicting the Partitioning of Metals in Pulp Mill and Bleach Plant Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, G.W.; Sinquefield, S.A.; Rorrer, G.L.; Laver, M.L.; Yantasee, W.; Ming, D.

    2000-08-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop fundamental, experimentally based methods for predicting the solubility or organic and inorganic matter and their interactions in recycled effluent from kraft pulp mills and bleach plants. This included: characterizing the capacity of wood pulp and dissolved organic matter to bind metal ions, developing a thermodynamic database of properties needed to describe the solubility of inorganic matter in pulp mill streams, incorporation of the database into equilibrium calculation software for predicting the solubility of the metals of interest, and evaluating its capability to predict the distribution of the metals between pulp fibers, inorganic precipitates, and solution.

  17. Anthracnose Diseases of Eastern Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick H. Berry

    1985-01-01

    Anthracnose diseases of hardwood trees are widespread throughout the Eastern United States. The most common symptom of these diseases is dead areas or blotches on the leaves. Because of the brown and black, scorched appearance of the leaves, the diseases are sometimes called leaf blight.

  18. Production of furfural from waste aqueous hemicellulose solution of hardwood over ZSM-5 zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongling; Liu, Haitang; Pang, Bo; Yu, Guang; Du, Jian; Zhang, Yuedong; Wang, Haisong; Mu, Xindong

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to produce furfural from waste aqueous hemicellulose solution of a hardwood kraft-based dissolving pulp production processing in a green method. The maximum furfural yield of 82.4% and the xylose conversion of 96.8% were achieved at 463K, 1.0g ZSM-5, 1.05g NaCl and organic solvent-to-aqueous phase ratio of 30:15 (V/V) for 3h. The furfural yield was just 51.5% when the same concentration of pure xylose solution was used. Under the optimized condition, furfural yield was still up to 67.1% even after the fifth reused of catalyst. Catalyst recycling study showed that ZSM-5 has a certain stability and can be efficiently reused.

  19. Influência da densidade básica da madeira na qualidade da polpa kraft de clones hibrídos de Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden X Eucalyptus urophylla S. T. Blake Effect of wood basic density on kraft pulp quality of hybrid Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden X Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cristina Setúbal Queiroz

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados dois clones de Eucalyptus com densidades básicas de 447 e 552 kg/m³. O processo kraft foi utilizado para a produção de celulose, tendo sido aplicadas diferentes cargas de álcali para se obterem polpas com número kappa 18 ± 0,5. As polpas foram branqueadas pela seqüência ODEopDD, a alvuras de 90 ± 1% ISO, e refinadas, sendo suas propriedades físico-mecânicas e ópticas analisadas. A madeira de baixa densidade mostrou-se mais recomendável para a produção de celulose, por ter apresentado maior rendimento depurado, viscosidade da polpa mais elevada, ter requerido menor carga de álcali no cozimento, ter proporcionado menor teor de sólidos no licor residual e menor consumo de reagentes químicos no branqueamento. As propriedades mecânicas e estruturais das polpas não foram afetadas significativamente pela densidade básica das madeiras.Two hybrid Eucalyptus clones having 447 kg/m³ and 552 kg/m³ basic densities were used for this study. The kraft process was used for pulping the wood chips to kappa number 18±0.5 and different alkali charges were applied to reach this delignification target. Pulp was bleached to 90±1% ISO using the ODEopDD bleaching sequence. The bleached pulp was refined and its physical-mechanical properties were determined. The lower density wood was recommended for pulp production due to its lower alkali requirement for pulping, higher screened yield, superior pulp viscosity, lower black liquor solids content and lower bleaching chemical requirement. Wood basic density did not affect significantly the mechanical and structural pulp properties.

  20. Comparative toxicities of oxygen, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chlorine bleaching filtrates - microtox toxicities of raw and processed filtrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ard, T.A.; McDonough, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    It has claimed that effluents from the bleaching of kraft pulp with chlorine and its compounds have deleterious effects on the aquatic environment. It has been further suggested that bleaching without the use of chlorine or its compounds will produce innocuous effluents. To obtain information on the validity of these claims, we have conducted a laboratory study of the toxicity of filtrates from chlorine-based and nonchlorine bleaching processes. We have also examined two related issues. The first is whether any toxicants generated during bleaching are rendered harmless (by neutralization, storage, and biological treatment) before being discharged to the environment. The second related issue is whether any toxicity observed in mill effluents actually originates in the bleaching process, as opposed to being due to raw material components or compounds formed during the pulping step that precedes bleaching. Several conclusions were drawn from this study. (1) There is a background level of toxicity which originates in the oxygen stage, process steps prior to bleaching, or in the wood raw material. It is decreased by neutralization and storage, but residual toxicity may still be detected after two weeks. (2) If the sum of the first and second stage toxicities is taken as an indicator of overall toxicity, the untreated filtrates may be ranked as follows: Control (Background) > D(EO) > Z(EO) > C(EO). However, these toxicities are of no importance in regard to environmental effects because of their ephemeral nature and the likelihood of their being reduced or eliminated prior to effluent discharge. Evidence for this statement is the ease with which all except the C(EO) were detoxified by neutralization and storage. (3) After neutralization and storage for two weeks at room temperature the ranking of toxicities becomes: C(EO) > D(EO) > Z(EO) > Background. The last three are similar in magnitude.

  1. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF KRAFT LIGNIN-BASED EPOXY RESINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Eddine El Mansouri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Epoxidization is an interesting way to develop a new application of lignin and therefore to improve its application potential. In this work, kraft lignin-based epoxy resins were obtained by the epoxidization reaction, using the kraft lignin recovered directly from pulping liquor and modified by a methylolation reaction. The methylolated lignins were obtained by the reaction of original kraft lignin with formaldehyde and glyoxal, which is a less volatile and less toxic aldehyde. 1H-NMR spectroscopy showed that methylolated kraft lignin has more hydroxymethyl groups than glyoxalated kraft lignin. For the epoxidization reaction we studied the influence of the lignin:NaOH (w/w ratio, temperature, and time of the reaction on the properties of the prepared epoxidized lignins. The structures of lignin-based epoxy resins were followed by epoxy index test and FTIR spectroscopy. Optimal conditions were obtained for lignin-based epoxy resin produced at lignin/NaOH = 1/3 at 70 ºC for 3h. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA revealed that the epoxidization enhances the thermal stability of lignins and may allow a wider temperature range for applications with lignin epoxy-PF blends.

  2. Delignification of Pinus radiata kraft pulp by treatment with a yeast genetically modified to produce laccases; Deslignificacion de pasta kraft de Pinus radiata con una levadura geneticamente modificada para producir lacasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana-Cuenca, A.; Tellez-Jurado, A.; Yague, S.; Ferminan, E.; Carbajo, J. M.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez, T.; Villar, J. C.; Gonzalez, A. E.

    2010-07-01

    Cellulose pulp bleaching is one of the main biotechnological applications of fungal laccases due to their capacity to degrade lignin from unbleached pulp. This application requires low cost enzyme production and higher enzyme concentrations than those obtained from the natural fungal producers. Heterologous expression of laccase in yeasts is an option for producing these enzymes on an industrial scale. In this work, we have demonstrated the heterologous expression of the cglcc1 gene, responsible for laccase production in the basidiomicetous fungus Coriolopsis gallica, in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. In order to know if the transformed yeast has delignificant capability, a Pinus radiata kraft pulp has been incubated with it. After the treatment, a significant decrease in kappa number (13%) and in lignin content (22%) was observed. These results showed the delignificant capability of this transformed yeast. It can be concluded that the use of genetically modified microorganisms that do not demonstrate cellulolitic activity can produce high laccase levels and delignify cellulose pulps with a potential applications in cellulose pulp bleaching. (Author) 25 refs.

  3. ISOTHERMAL PYROLYSIS OF KRAFT PULP MILL SLUDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamsudin Syamsudin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kraft pulp mill sludge cake composed of rejected wood fibers and activated sludge microorganisms. With a heating value about 14 MJ/kg (dried basis, this type of biomass had a potential as an alternative energy source. Unfortunately, it had an ash content of 27.6% and a moisture content of 80%. For reducing moisture content with minimum energy consumption, a combination of mechanical dewatering and thermal drying was studied previously. Meanwhile, experiments on isothermal pyrolysis had been carried out for further improvement on ultimate and proximate analysis of solid fuel. Final mass of char obtained from pyrolysis at 500oC was not significantly different from that of 700oC, so pyrolysis was considered to be optimum at 500oC. A char obtained from pyrolysis at temperature of 500oC had a pore surface area of 77.049 m2/g (highest among other temperatures. Kinetic of isothermal pyrolysis was well represented with a first order modified volumetric model with a frequency factor of 0.782 1/s and an activation of 34.050 kJ/mol.

  4. Identification and analysis of energy saving projects in a kraft mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, E. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    The pulp and paper industry consumes large amounts of energy in the form of heat and electricity. Energy efficiency has become a priority to keep Canada's primary industry competitive. This paper presented the results of a project in which the energy efficiency of a Quebec kraft pulp mill was improved in order to reduce steam consumption. The Pinch Analysis was used to identify potential sources for energy recovery. Unrecovered heat in bleaching and evaporator effluents along with boiler flue gases can serve as alternative heat sources in heat transfers. Predicting heating and cooling demands using Pinch rules becomes increasingly complicated as more streams are involved. Heat cannot be transferred across the pinch point. In addition, no cold utility should be used above the pinch point and no hot utility should be used below the pinch point. Violating these rules results in an increase in both heating and cooling requirements. This paper addressed pinch rule violations with reference to pulp machines and hotwell tank and deaerators. The economic evaluation of the energy savings was determined by considering investment costs versus energy saved. CADSIM Plus was used to simulate the heat exchanger that was developed with Aspen HX-Net software. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Potential of thermo and alkali stable xylanases from Thielaviopsis basicola (MTCC-1467) in biobleaching of wood kraft pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goluguri, Baby Rani; Thulluri, Chiranjeevi; Cherupally, Madhu; Nidadavolu, Nagaraju; Achuthananda, Das; Mangamuri, Lakshmi Narasu; Addepally, Uma

    2012-08-01

    Thermo- and alkali-stable xylanases produced from Thielaviopsis basicola (MTCC-1467) on low-cost carbon source like rice straw were evaluated for their potential application in biobleaching of wood kraft pulp. Enzyme treatment at retention time of 240 min with 20 IU/gm of dried pulp resulted in ~85.2 % of reduction in kappa number. When compared to control, 110.8, 93, and 72.2 % of enhancement in brightness (percent International Organization of Standardization), whiteness, and fluorescence, respectively, were observed for enzyme-treated pulp. Spectroscopic analysis showed significant release of chromophoric compounds from enzyme-treated pulp. Furthermore, scanning electron microscope studies of unbleached and enzyme bleached pulp revealed the effectiveness of enzymatic treatment. The enzyme-treated pulp subjected to later stages of chemical bleaching resulted in 16 % decrease in chlorine consumption along with considerable reduction in chemical oxygen demand percentage (14.5 %) level of effluent. Various pulp properties like fiber length, fiber width, burst strength, burst index, tear strength, tear index, tensile strength, and breaking length were also significantly improved after enzyme treatment when compared to control.

  6. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  7. The pallet industry: a changing hardwood market

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.P. Dempsey; D.G. Martens

    1991-01-01

    From its inception during World War II, the wooden pallet industry has grown to become the Nation's largest industrial consumer of hardwood lumber products. Since most of the raw material in wooden pallets is lower grade lumber, the pallet industry's growth, efficiency, and changing raw material inputs must be of concern to the grade hardwood lumber industry...

  8. Flexural Properties of Eastern Hardwood Pallet Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. McLeod; Marshall S. White; Paul A. Ifju; Philip A. Araman

    1991-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the flexural properties of pallet parts are critical to the safe, yet efficient, design of wood pallets. To develop more accurate data for hardwood pallet parts, 840 stringers and 2,520 deckboards, representing 14 hardwood species, were sampled from 35 mills distributed throughout the Eastern United States. The parts were sorted by species,...

  9. Automated computer grading of hardwood lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Klinkhachorn; J.P. Franklin; Charles W. McMillin; R.W. Conners; H.A. Huber

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an improved computer program to grade hardwood lumber. The program was created as part of a system to automate various aspects of the hardwood manufacturing industry. It enhances previous efforts by considering both faces of the board and provides easy application of species dependent rules. The program can be readily interfaced with a computer...

  10. Võlakoorem tuhmistab Eesti võimalusi / Vahur Kraft

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kraft, Vahur, 1961-

    2003-01-01

    Eesti Panga president Vahur Kraft hoiatab liiga kergekäelise laenuvõtmise eest. Tema sõnul on Eesti Pank valmis vajaduse korral kasutama võimalusi nii laenuandjate kui ka -võtjate mõjutamiseks. Riigi stabiliseerimisreservist

  11. Critical review of kraft recovery boiler air systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Callum, C.; Blackwell, B.R.

    1987-10-01

    Combustion air systems offered by major world suppliers of kraft recovery boilers are reviewed. A preliminary mathematical analysis of the air-jet trajectories in the furnace indicated that the conventional air systems leave room for improving the jet penetration into the furnace core. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Jüri Kraft : Eesti eksport nõuab Euroopa Liitu minekut / Jüri Kraft ; interv. Sulev Oll

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kraft, Jüri, 1935-

    2003-01-01

    Kahe kergetööstusettevõtte, Sangari ja Mivari nõukogu esimees, endine ENSV kergetööstusminister Jüri Kraft leiab, et kui Eesti ei astu EL-i ja loobub soodsast ekspordivõimalusest, kordub Eestis 1990. aastate alguse olukord

  13. Chemical characteristics and Kraft pulping of tension wood from Eucalyptus globulus labill Características químicas e polpação Kraft de madeira de tração de Eucalyptus globulus labill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Graciela Aguayo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tension (TW and opposite wood (OW of Eucalyptus globulus trees were analyzed for its chemical characteristics and Kraft pulp production. Lignin content was 16% lower and contained 32% more syringyl units in TW than in OW. The increase in syringyl units favoured the formation of β-O-4 bonds that was also higher in TW than in OW (84% vs. 64%, respectively. The effect of these wood features was evaluated in the production of Kraft pulps from both types of wood. At kappa number 16, Kraft pulps obtained from TW demanded less active alkali in delignification and presented slightly higher or similar pulp yield than pulps made with OW. Fiber length, coarseness and intrinsic viscosity were also higher in tension than in opposite pulps. When pulps where refined to 30°SR, TW pulps needed 18% more revolutions in the PFI mill to achieve the same beating degree than OW pulps. Strength properties (tensile, tear and burst indexes were slightly higher or similar in tension as compared with opposite wood pulps. After an OD0(EOD1 bleaching sequence, both pulps achieved up to 89% ISO brightness. Bleached pulps from TW presented higher viscosity and low amount of hexenuronic acids than pulps from OW. Results showed that TW presented high xylans and low lignin content that caused a decrease in alkali consumption, increase pulp strength properties and similar bleaching performance as compared with pulps from OW.Madeira de tração e oposta de árvores de Eucalyptus globulus foram analisadas quanto a suas características químicas e produção de polpa Kraft. A caracterização química da madeira de tração (TW de Eucalyptus globulus Labill. mostrou um conteúdo similar de celulose, alto conteúdo de xilanas e baixo conteúdo de lignina quando comparada com a madeira oposta (OW de uma mesma árvore. O conteúdo de lignina foi 16% menor e contém 32% mais unidades siringila em TW que em OW. O aumento das unidades siringila favoreceu a formação de ligações

  14. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  15. Internationalisation; KonKraft-rapport 4; Internasjonalisering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    disintegrate. The obvious strategy to pursuit is to strengthen Norway's position as a dynamic and leading competence center for oil- and gas activities. Recruitment and development of sufficient competencies is generally a major challenge for the oil- and gas trade. Shortage of human capital leads to increased wage pressure which in the long run may weaken profits and competitiveness. In some of the petroleum clusters the companies try to find solutions to counteract the negative effects of the battle for the best brains. Through the project KonKraft INTSOK has unveiled high ambitions concerning increased internationalisation throughout the Norwegian petroleum cluster, except for Northern Norway. Here there is still an opposition against activities in the region, as well as in the Barents sea. INTSOK's intention with the project has been to describe its multitude. Therefore eight very different environments where selected to make a closer study on the development in different regions. The environments represent a variety of sizes, geography and trades. Some of the clusters are new or under establishment, others are already in full operation. Together the eight environments cover a major part of the value chain in the Norwegian offshore sector. The project has clearly demonstrated that cluster development contributes both to internationalisation as well as keeping the companies in Norway. Some main findings: The positive development in the drilling cluster of Southern Norway - the Node cluster - has created strong impact: The cluster ranks among the world's leading on drilling equipment and barely any oil or gas environment has had a similar expansion. The Kongsberg environment is not an offshore cluster, but an overall technology cluster where offshore applications is one of several technology areas. The companies develop and produce a broad range of advanced products and systems. The turnover among the offshore companies amounts to 65% of the total turnover for

  16. Caracterização tecnológica da madeira de Eucalyptus benthamii para produção de celulose kraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Nogueira Alves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of Eucalyptus benthamii wood for kraft pulp production. A hybrid of Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis, probably the most planted Eucalyptus clone in Brazil, was also analyzed for comparison purposes. Basic density, chemical composition and fiber dimensions were determined for the two species. The Eucalyptus benthamii wood presented an anatomical structure, basic density and fiber dimensions quite similar to those of other species planted by the Brazilian pulp industry. However, it presented poorer wood quality characteristics when compared to the hybrid urograndis species, with higher amounts of extractives and lignin, lower amount of glucans, more galactans and lower S/G ratio, characteristics leading to lower pulping yield. Additional studies should be carried out to establish its pulping, bleaching and paper strength properties.

  17. Non-bleached colonies of massive Porites may attract fishes for selective grazing during mass bleaching events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Ikeuchi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the variation in grazing scar densities between bleached and non-bleached colonies of massive Porites species in Sekisei Lagoon (Okinawa, southwestern Japan during a mass bleaching event in 2016. The grazing scar densities and bleaching susceptibility varied among neighboring colonies of massive Porites spp. However, non-bleached colonies had significantly more surface scars than bleached colonies. One explanation for these variations is that corallivorous fishes may selectively graze on non-bleached, thermally tolerant colonies. This is the first report of a relationship between grazing scars and the bleaching status of massive Porites spp. colonies during a mass bleaching event.

  18. Small Hardwoods Reduce Growth of Pine Overstory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles X. Grano

    1970-01-01

    Dense understory hardwoods materially decreased the growth of a 53-year-old and a 47-year-old stand of loblolly and shortleaf pines. Over a 14-year period, hardwood eradication with chemicals increased average annual yield from the 53-year-old stand by 14.3 cubic feet, or 123 board-feet per acre. In the 47-year-old stand the average annual treatment advantage was...

  19. Modeling chlorine dioxide bleaching of chemical pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Tarvo, Ville

    2010-01-01

    This doctoral thesis deals with the phenomenon-based modeling of pulp bleaching. Previous bleaching models typically utilize one or two empirical correlations to predict the kinetics in kappa number development. Empirical correlations are simple to develop, but their parameters are often tied to the validation system. A major benefit of physico-chemical phenomenon models is that they are valid regardless of the reaction environment. Furthermore, modeling the bleaching processes at molecular l...

  20. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongLiu; Y.Ni; Z.Li,G.Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation toproduce value-added mechanical pulp-based papergrade. In this paper, we presented the results fromperoxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for theproduction of SC paper. Two aspects wereaddressed; the effect of pulp strength and theformation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, areimproved after the peroxide bleaching process. Theamount of anionic trashes formed is almostproportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  1. Utilization of by-product sulfur in Kraft pulping process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.; Liu, S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; Chung, K.H. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Edmonton Research Centre

    2004-07-01

    This presentation describes how sulfur derived from heavy oil processing can be used by the pulp and paper industry to increase yield, accelerate delignification and shorten the cooking time in the kraft pulping process. The liquor used in the kraft pulping process is a solution of sodium sulfide and sodium hydroxide. The reaction kinetics of delignification in the cooking process was examined and a new method was proposed. The 3 key kinetic steps in the new method include: (1) adsorption of hydroxide and hydrosulfide ions on the fiber wall, (2) chemical reaction on the solid surface to produce degraded lignin products, and (3) desorption of degradation products from the solid surface. The surface reaction is the most important step in the delignification process. A newly developed kinetic model based on the proposed mechanism can be used to accurately predict the pulping behaviour under a variety of conditions.

  2. Reducing sugar production of sweet sorghum bagasse kraft pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solihat, Nissa Nurfajrin; Fajriutami, Triyani; Adi, Deddy Triyono Nugroho; Fatriasari, Widya; Hermiati, Euis

    2017-01-01

    Kraft pulping of sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB) has been used for effective delignification method for cellulose production. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance pulp kraft of SSB for reducing sugar production. The study intended to investigate the effect of active alkali and sulfidity loading variation of SSB pulp kraft on reducing sugar yield per biomass. The SSB pulp was prepared after pulping using three variations of active alkali (17, 19, and 22%) and sulfidity loading (20, 22, and 24%) at 170°C for 4 h with liquor to wood ratio of 10. A total of 9 pulps were obtained from these pretreatments. Delignification pretreatment has been succesfully removed lignin and hemicellulose more than 90% and 50%, respectively. Increasing active alkali and sulfidity loading has significantly increased lignin removal caused by disruption of the cell wall structure for releasing lignin into black liquor in the cellulose extraction. The enzymatic hydrolysis of pulp was carried out with cellulase loading of 40 FPU per g substrate in the shaking incubator at 50°C and 150 rpm for 78 h. For each 24 h, the reducing sugar yield (DNS assay) has been observed. Even though the lignin and hemicellulose loss occurred along with higher active alkali loading, this condition tends to decrease its yield. The reducing sugar concentration varied between 7-8 g/L. Increasing active alkali and sulfidity was significantly decreased the reducing sugar per biomass. Pulp delignified by 17% active alkali and 20% sulfidity has demonstrated the maximum reducing sugar yield per biomass of 45.57% resulted after 72 h enzymatic hydrolysis. These results indicated that kraft pulping was success to degrade more lignin and hemicellulose content to facilitate the enzyme for breaking down the cellulose into its sugar monomer. A high loss of lignin and hemicellulose are not single factor to improve digestibility of SSB. This sugar has potential for yeast fermented into bioethanol.

  3. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  4. Internationalisation; KonKraft-rapport 4; Internasjonalisering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    disintegrate. The obvious strategy to pursuit is to strengthen Norway's position as a dynamic and leading competence center for oil- and gas activities. Recruitment and development of sufficient competencies is generally a major challenge for the oil- and gas trade. Shortage of human capital leads to increased wage pressure which in the long run may weaken profits and competitiveness. In some of the petroleum clusters the companies try to find solutions to counteract the negative effects of the battle for the best brains. Through the project KonKraft INTSOK has unveiled high ambitions concerning increased internationalisation throughout the Norwegian petroleum cluster, except for Northern Norway. Here there is still an opposition against activities in the region, as well as in the Barents sea. INTSOK's intention with the project has been to describe its multitude. Therefore eight very different environments where selected to make a closer study on the development in different regions. The environments represent a variety of sizes, geography and trades. Some of the clusters are new or under establishment, others are already in full operation. Together the eight environments cover a major part of the value chain in the Norwegian offshore sector. The project has clearly demonstrated that cluster development contributes both to internationalisation as well as keeping the companies in Norway. Some main findings: The positive development in the drilling cluster of Southern Norway - the Node cluster - has created strong impact: The cluster ranks among the world's leading on drilling equipment and barely any oil or gas environment has had a similar expansion. The Kongsberg environment is not an offshore cluster, but an overall technology cluster where offshore applications is one of several technology areas. The companies develop and produce a broad range of advanced products and systems. The turnover among the offshore companies amounts to 65% of the total turnover for

  5. Hardwood Lumber Scaling [and] Hardwood Log Scaling and Grading. Slide Scripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, D. E.; Touse, Robert D.

    These two slide scripts, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deal with scaling and grading hardwood logs and lumber. The first script includes narrations for use with 39 slides, which explain the techniques of scaling and grading hardwood logs, and the second script contains the narrations to…

  6. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  7. On luminescence bleaching of tidal channel sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Pejrup, Morten; Murray, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the processes responsible for bleaching of the quartz OSL signal from tidal channel sediment. Tidal dynamics are expected to play an important role for complete bleaching of tidal sediments. However, no studies have examined the amount of reworking occurring in tidal channels and o...

  8. Side effects of external tooth bleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruzell, E.M.; Pallesen, Ulla; Thoresen, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    General practices and university clinics during the years 2007‑2009 in Scandinavia. Subjects Patients with tooth bleaching as part of the treatment plan. Results The prevalence of experienced tooth sensitivity at first follow-up was independent of bleaching procedure (at-home = 50.3% [n = 143]; in...

  9. Effect of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching of liquid Cheddar whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Barbano, D M; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2012-01-01

    The use of whey protein as an ingredient in foods and beverages is increasing, and thus demand for colorless and mild-tasting whey protein is rising. Bleaching is commonly applied to fluid colored cheese whey to decrease color, and different temperatures and bleach concentrations are used. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of hot and cold bleaching, the point of bleaching (before or after fat separation), and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of liquid colored and uncolored Cheddar whey. First, Cheddar whey was manufactured, pasteurized, fat-separated, and subjected to one of a number of hot (68°C) or cold (4°C) bleaching applications [hydrogen peroxide (HP) 50 to 500 mg/kg; benzoyl peroxide (BP) 25 to 100 mg/kg] followed by measurement of residual norbixin and color by reflectance. Bleaching agent concentrations were then selected for the second trial. Liquid colored Cheddar whey was manufactured in triplicate and pasteurized. Part of the whey was collected (no separation, NSE) and the rest was subjected to fat separation (FSE). The NSE and FSE wheys were then subdivided and bleaching treatments (BP 50 or 100 mg/kg and HP 250 or 500 mg/kg) at 68°C for 30 min or 4°C for 16 h were applied. Control NSE and FSE with no added bleach were also subjected to each time-temperature combination. Volatile compounds from wheys were evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and norbixin (annatto) was extracted and quantified to compare bleaching efficacy. Proximate analysis, including total solids, protein, and fat contents, was also conducted. Liquid whey subjected to hot bleaching at both concentrations of HP or at 100mg/kg BP had greater lipid oxidation products (aldehydes) compared with unbleached wheys, 50mg/kg BP hot-bleached whey, or cold-bleached wheys. No effect was detected between NSE and FSE liquid Cheddar whey on the relative abundance of volatile lipid oxidation products. Wheys bleached with BP had

  10. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  11. U.S. Hardwood Imports Grow as World Supplies Expand

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Siegel; Clark Row

    1965-01-01

    Rapidly increasing imports have captured a significant share of America's hardwood markets. Total imports of hardwood raw materials and building products are now four times as large as exports. Before World War II the U. S. was a net exporter of hardwoods, and imports were limited to high-quality mahogany and specialty logs and lumber. Availability of large...

  12. Are there regional differences in US hardwood product exports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt Bumgardner; Scott Bowe; William Luppold

    2016-01-01

    Exporting is a critical component of the product mix for many domestic hardwood firms. Previous research has identified factors associated with hardwood lumber exporting behavior, but less is known about the advantages and disadvantages to exporting associated with the region within which a firm is located, or about exporting of secondary hardwood products. A procedure...

  13. U.S. hardwood lumber production: 1963 to 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Luppold; Matthew Bumgardner

    2008-01-01

    Between 1963 and 2003 northern hardwood lumber production more than doubled while production in the southern regions increased by less than 25 percent. In 1963 the major users of hardwood lumber were the furniture manufacturers located in the southeast region, and hardwood flooring producers located in the south central region. By contrast more than 60 percent of the...

  14. Growth, induction, and substrate specificity of dehydroabietic acid-degrading bacteria isolated from a kraft mill effluent enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, P A; Martin, V; Saddler, J N

    1995-09-01

    We investigated resin acid degradation in five bacteria isolated from a bleach kraft mill effluent enrichment. All of the bacteria grew on dehydroabietic acid (DHA), a resin acid routinely detected in pulping effluents, or glycerol as the sole carbon source. None of the strains grew on acetate or methanol. Glycerol-grown, high-density, resting-cell suspensions were found to undergo a lag for 2 to 4 h before DHA degradation commenced, suggesting that this activity was inducible. This was further investigated by spiking similar cultures with tetracycline, a protein synthesis inhibitor, at various times during the DHA disappearance curve. Cultures to which the antibiotic was added prior to the lag did not degrade DHA. Those that were spiked with the antibiotic after the lag phase (4 h) degraded DHA at the same rate as did controls with no added tetracycline. Therefore, de novo protein synthesis was required for DHA biodegradation, confirming that this activity is inducible. The five strains were also evaluated for their ability to degrade other resin acids. All strains behaved in a similar fashion. Unchlorinated abietane-type resin acids (abietic acid, DHA, and 7-oxo-DHA) were completely degraded within 7 days, whereas pimarane resin acids (sandaracopimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and pimaric acid) were poorly degraded (25% or less). Chlorination of DHA affected biodegradation, with both 12,14-dichloro-DHA and 14-chloro-DHA showing resistance to degradation. However, 50 to 60% of the 12-chloro-DHA was consumed within the same period.

  15. Furfural formation from the pre-hydrolysis liquor of a hardwood kraft-based dissolving pulp production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitang; Hu, Huiren; Jahan, M Sarwar; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to produce furfural from the PHL. Results showed best furfural yield of 32.8% and the furfural selectivity of 37.7% in the monophase system (170 °C, 100 min), while they were 60.1% and 69.8%, respectively in the biphase system. The lower furfural selectivity in the monophase system was explained by more side reactions, such as fragmentation, condensation reactions, resinification and others. Model compounds such as: xylose, furfural, syringaldehyde, were used to confirm/identify these side reactions. The addition of dilute sulfuric acid/acetic acid in the system under the same conditions decreased the recovery of furfural. The addition of syringaldehyde into the PHL also led to a decrease in the furfural yield, supporting the conclusion that lignin structures in the PHL may also be involved in the side reactions, thus decreasing the furfural yield.

  16. [Gingival bleaching: teaching and ethnocentrism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Edson Daruich; Goldenberg, Paulete

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify buccal/gingival cosmetic dentistry patterns subjacent to formation and professional practice of the dental surgeon from the ethnocentrism point of view. This is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach based on the thematic analysis. Initially a documental analysis was carried out. Thereafter, dental surgeons were interviewed and semi-structured questions were applied. In the Periodontal teaching field, this study showed that the presence of racial melanosis is omitted or treated as an alteration in the normality patterns and it is considered anti-aesthetic. All the interviewers learnt how to practice gingival bleaching in the post-graduation courses, they were all encouraged to offer this cosmetic dentistry procedure with the opportunity of obtaining a beautiful and healthy smile, thus assuring the belief of the Caucasian racial aesthetic superiority. This study make us think that the offer of gingival bleaching is oriented by the Caucasian pattern of beauty evidencing the ethnocentric character of this procedure.

  17. THE STUDY ON TCF BLEACHING OF NS REED PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meihong Niu; Shulan Shi; Jinghui Zhou; Yunzhan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have researched TCF bleaching on reed pulp including oxygen delignification, oxygen delignification with H2O2 intensification and H2O2 bleaching. The results show that Op-P bleaching process on NS reed pulp is suitable and the brightness of bleached pulp is up to 82% ISO.

  18. THE STUDY ON TCF BLEACHING OF NS REED PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeihongNiu; ShulanShi; JinghuiZhou; YunzhanZhang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have researched TCF bleaching on reed pulp including oxygen delignification, oxygen delignification with H202 intensification and H2O2 bleaching. The results show that Op-P bleaching process on NS reed pulp is suitable and the brightness of bleached pulp is up to 82%ISO.

  19. Assessment of Population Status for a White Sucker (Catostomus commersoni) Population Exposed to Bleached Kraft Pulp Mill Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credible ecological risk assessments often need to include analysis of population-level impacts. In the present study, a predictive model was developed to translate changes in the fecundity and the age structure of a breeding population of white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) co...

  20. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-10-01

    This factsheet describes a research project to replacing the more chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin with the less resistant hardwood guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) lignin genes. Achieving this genetic change would reduce the energy, chemical, and bleaching required in Kraft pulp production of softwoods.

  2. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Liu; Y. Ni; Z. Li; G. Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation to produce value-added mechanical pulp-based paper grade. In this paper, we presented the results from peroxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for the production of SC paper. Two aspects were addressed; the effect of pulp strength and the formation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, are improved after the peroxide bleaching process. The amount of anionic trashes formed is almost proportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  3. Coral bleaching: the role of the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Andrew H; Bhagooli, Ranjeet; Ralph, Peter J; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2009-01-01

    Coral bleaching caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. Very recently, research has focused on the possibility of corals switching symbionts as a means of adjusting to accelerating increases in sea surface temperature. Although symbionts are clearly of fundamental importance, many aspects of coral bleaching cannot be readily explained by differences in symbionts among coral species. Here we outline several potential mechanisms by which the host might influence the bleaching response, and conclude that predicting the fate of corals in response to climate change requires both members of the symbiosis to be considered equally.

  4. The role of microorganisms in coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Kushmaro, Ariel; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Banin, Ehud; Yossi, Loya

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiosis between the coral host and its endosymbiotic algae. The prevalence and severity of the disease have been correlated with high seawater temperature. During the last decade, the major hypothesis to explain coral bleaching is that high water temperatures cause irreversible damage to the symbiotic algae resulting in loss of pigment and/or algae from the holobiont. Here, we discuss the evidence for an alternative but not mutually exclusive concept, the microbial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  5. Impact of lignin and carbohydrate chemical structures on kraft pulping processes and biofuel production%木素和碳水化合物化学结构对硫酸盐法制浆工艺及生物燃料生产的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红峰

    2014-01-01

    Most studies aimed at determining rates of hardwood delignification and carbohydrate degradation have focused on understanding the behavior of a single wood species. Such studies tend to determine either the delignification rate or the rate of carbohydrate degradation without examining the potential interactions resulting from related variables. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation of lignin and carbohydrate degradation during kraft pulping of multiple hardwood species. The kraft deligniifcation rates of Eucalyptus urograndis, E. nitens, E. globulus, sweet gum, maple, red oak, red alder, cottonwood, and acacia were obtained. The kinetics of glucan, xylan, and total carbohydrate dissolution during the bulk phase of the kraft pulping process for those species also were investigated. The wide ranges of deligniifcation and carbohydrate degradation rates were correlated to wood chemical characteristics. It appears that the syringyl: guaiacyl lignin ratio and lignin-carbohydrate complexes are the main factors responsible for the differences in kraft pulping performance among the hardwoods studied.%大多数研究将重点放在认识单个木材组分的行为上,其目的旨在确定阔叶木材脱木素和碳水化合物的降解。这些研究倾向于测定脱木素速率或碳水化合物降解速率,但没有考虑某些相关变量引起的潜在相互影响。本文详细研究了大多数阔叶木材硫酸盐法制浆时木素和碳水化合物的降解过程,并测得桉木、山腊梅、蓝桉、枫香树、枫树、红橡树、红桤木、杨木和合欢树的脱木素速率;同时还研究了这些材种在主要脱木素阶段葡聚糖、聚木糖和总碳水化合物的溶解动力学。脱木素速率与碳水化合物的降解速率变化范围较大,与木材化学特性有关。结果表明,阔叶木硫酸盐制浆性能的差异主要受紫丁香基与愈疮木基比率和木素碳水化合物复合体(LCC)的影响。

  6. CLEAVAGE OF SOFTWOOD KRAFT PULP FIBRES BY HCL AND CELLULASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ander

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A new pulp fibre testing procedure called the HCl method was used to compare different spruce and pine fibres and mixtures of these fibres to calculate number of fibre cleavages in dislocations and other weak points. This method was compared with treatment of softwood kraft pulp fibres using different cellulase mixtures. The HCl method can distinguish between mill- and laboratory-made softwood kraft pulp fibres from the same wood batch. The sugar release is characterized by xylose and other hemicellulose sugars and little glucose. This is in contrast to cellulases, which despite strong fibre cleavage, did not distinguish between mill- and laboratory-made pulp fibres and released large amounts of glucose from the fibres. Hemicellulose degradation by HCl and deep penetration of the acid into the primary and secondary fibre cell walls at 80°C seems to be of major importance for the differentiation between mill and laboratory pulp fibres. Cellulases, in contrast, act mostly on the fibre surfaces, and deep penetration only takes place in amorphous regions of dislocations.

  7. THE BLEACHING SYNDROME: MANIFESTATION OF A POST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The post-colonial root of African problems is directly related to skin color. Under the cloak of personal ... KEY TERMS: Bleaching Syndrome; skin color; colonization; women; light skin ..... Through my grandfather's eyes: Ties that bind. National ...

  8. Use of Cover Crops in Hardwood Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy Rentz

    2005-01-01

    Cover crops are as essential a practice in hardwood production as in pine production or any other nursery operation. Without proper cover crop rotation in a nursery plan, we open ourselves up to an array of problems: more diseases, wrong pH, more weeds, reduced fertility, and less downward percolation of soil moisture due, in part, to compaction....

  9. Unsound defect volume in hardwood pallet cants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip Araman; Matt Winn; Firoz Kabir; Xavier Torcheux; Guillaume Loizeaud

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the percentage of unsound defect volume to sound/clear wood in pallet cants at selected sawmills in Virginia and West Virginia. Splits,wane, shake, holes, decay, unsound knots, bark pockets, and mechanical defects were all considered to be unsound. Data were collected from seven Appalachian area sawmills for four hardwood species: red...

  10. Eradicating Understory Hardwoods By Repeated Prescribed Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles X. Grano

    1970-01-01

    In a loblolly-shorleaf pine stand contained abundant litter, one winter fire killed 94 percent of the stems of understory hardwoods up to 3.5 inches in diameter at teh base. Prolific sprouting ensued. Eleven annual summer burns eliminated sprouting on 85 percent of the rootstocks, and seven biennial summer burns eliminated sprouting on 59 percent of them.

  11. 77 FR 71017 - Hardwood Plywood From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... notice in the Federal Register of October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60460). The conference was held in Washington... COMMISSION Hardwood Plywood From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... plywood from China that are allegedly subsidized and sold in the United States at less than fair...

  12. Hydrology of a natural hardwood forested wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    George M. Chescheir; Devendra M. Amatya; R. Wayne Skaggs

    2008-01-01

    This paper documents the hydrology of a natural forested wetland near Plymouth, NC, USA. The research site was located on one of the few remaining, undrained non-riverine, palustrine forested hardwood wetlands on the lower coastal plain of North Carolina. A 137 ha watershed within the 350ha wetland was selected for intensive field study. Water balance components...

  13. Silvics of North America: Volume 2. Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell M. Burns; Barbara H. Honkala; [Technical coordinators

    1990-01-01

    The silvical characteristics of about 200 forest tree species and varieties are described. Most are native to the 50 United States and Puerto Rico, but a few are introduced and naturalized. Information on habitat, life history, and genetics is given for 15 genera, 63 species, and 20 varieties of conifers and for 58 genera, 128 species, and 6 varieties of hardwoods....

  14. Automated Grading of Rough Hardwood Lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Conners; Tai-Hoon Cho; Philip A. Araman

    1989-01-01

    Any automatic hardwood grading system must have two components. The first of these is a computer vision system for locating and identifying defects on rough lumber. The second is a system for automatically grading boards based on the output of the computer vision system. This paper presents research results aimed at developing the first of these components. The...

  15. Yield Improvement and Energy Savings Uing Phosphonates as Additives in Kraft pulping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrike W. Tschirner; Timothy Smith

    2007-03-31

    Project Objective: Develop a commercially viable modification to the Kraft process resulting in energy savings, increased yield and improved bleachability. Evaluate the feasibility of this technology across a spectrum of wood species used in North America. Develop detailed fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which phosphonates improve KAPPA number and yield. Evaluate the North American market potential for the use of phosphonates in the Kraft pulping process. Examine determinants of customer perceived value and explore organizational and operational factors influencing attitudes and behaviors. Provide an economic feasibility assessment for the supply chain, both suppliers (chemical supply companies) and buyers (Kraft mills). Provide background to most effectively transfer this new technology to commercial mills.

  16. Thermal and spectroscopic analyses on the molecular interaction between eucalyptus kraft pulp components and offset printing inks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericka Figueiredo Alves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal and infrared spectroscopic analyzes were carried out in order to study the kind of interaction between the anatomical components of the bleached eucalyptus kraft pulp with offset inks. A Bauer-McNett fiber classifier was used in order to obtain the anatomical components of the pulp, separately. The determinations of the enthalpy of the processes occurring in the samples of inks and pulp, as well as the enthalpy of these components interactions were obtained by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. In the interaction between pulp and offset ink, the reduced enthalpy values of the endothermic peak were interpreted as due to the released energy for adhesion of the ink pigment to the substratum. The low enthalpy value, 58 to 121 cal.g -, ¹indicated that the settling of the ink occurs by physical interactions. The pulp fraction enriched with vessel elements caused a higher energy release during the adherence of the pigment into the pulp.O conhecimento técnico-científico das interações que ocorrem no processo de impressão offset é escasso, embora várias observações mostrem sua importância. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar por análises térmicas e espectroscópicas, na região 1do infravermelho, o tipo de interação dos componentes anatômicos da polpa branqueada kraft de eucalipto com tintas de impressão offset. Foi utilizado um classificador de fibras Bauer-McNett com o intuito de se obter os componentes anatômicos da polpa separadamente. As determinações da entalpia dos processos que ocorrem com as amostras de tintas, polpa e também a entalpia de interação destes componentes foram obtidas por Calorimetria Diferencial de Varredura. Na interação entre polpa e tinta offset, a redução dos valores de entalpia do pico endotérmico foi interpretada como sendo devida à liberação de energia para a adesão do pigmento da tinta ao substrato. Os baixos valores de entalpia (58 a 121 cal.g-1 indicam que o assentamento da tinta

  17. Vahur Kraft kraamis eile oma sahtlid Eesti Pangas tühjaks / Urmas Tooming

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooming, Urmas

    2005-01-01

    6. juunil oli Vahur Krafti viimane tööpäev Eesti Panga presidendina. Lisad: CV; Keskpanga ekspresident Vahur Kraft juhtis 10 aastat Eesti pangandust. Kommenteerivad Eesti Panga endine asepresident Heldur Meerits ja endine Hansapanga juht Indrek Neivelt

  18. Characterization of cassava starch based foam blended with plant proteins, kraft fiber, and palm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisangsri, Nattapon; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin; Laohakunjit, Natta

    2014-09-22

    Cassava starch foam (CSF) trays blended with zein, gluten, soy protein, kraft fiber, and palm oil at various concentrations: 0, 5, 10 and 15% by weight of starch, were characterized. The addition of zein and gluten into CSF resulted in consolidated and homogeneous structural foams compared to its controls. Moreover, the flexural and compressive strength increased with increasing kraft, zein and gluten. CSF containing 15% kraft gave the highest flexural and compressive strength. However, the addition of palm oil into CSF gave the lowest flexural strength and compressive strength. The observed water absorption and water solubility index of CSFs blended with 15% zein and 15% gluten protein was lowest. Although kraft, zein and gluten could improve mechanical properties, water absorption and water solubility were greater than the expanded polystyrene foam (EPS). The CSF trays in this study might be an alternative for packing low water content foods.

  19. Effects of biological pre-treatment of pine chips on the beating performance of Kraft pulp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sami IMAMOGLU; Celil ATIK

    2007-01-01

    The Calabrien pine (Pinus brutia ) wood chips prior to kraft pulping were biologically pre-treated with selected whiterot fungi ( Ceriporiopsis subvermispora ), which was recorded to be preferentially attacking the lignin component of the wood. The effects of this treatment on beating performance and physical strength of resultant papers were studied in detail. Bio-treated samples showed comparable and, in most cases, higher physico-mechanical properties than those obtained from untreated controls. Under the same beating conditions the bio-treated kraft pulp was noted to have the lower SR° indicating a lower degree of external fibrillation. The paper made from bio-treated kraft pulp has a higher density, tensile property, air permeability and swellability. Furthermore, remarkable energy savings up to 33 % were observed when beating bio-treated kraft pulp. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms taking place during bio-treatment and the modification processes of cell wall components.

  20. Ammoxidized Fenton-Activated Pine Kraft Lignin Accelerates Synthesis and Curing of Resole Resins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghorbani, Masoumeh; Konnerth, Johannes; Budjav, Enkhjargal; Silva, Ana; Zinovyev, Grigory; van Herwijnen, Hendrikus; Edler, Matthias; Griesser, Thomas; Liebner, Falk

    2017-01-01

      Ammoxidation of pine kraft lignin in aqueous 5 wt % ammonia affords a novel type of phenol substitute that significantly accelerates resole synthesis and curing as demonstrated for 40 wt % phenol replacement...

  1. Jens Kraft og "De vilde Folk" (1760) - manden, forfatterskbet, værket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Michael Alexander

    2000-01-01

    aspects of the same fundamental reality: that verifiable eternal truths do exist and that they are proof of and a reflection of the Divine. Utilizing the main body of Kraft's work - which includes his student dissertations, his Wolffian textbooks in logic and metaphysics, and article in scientific...... of Kraft's scientific writings. His main (Lockean) thesis is "that what the savage peoples of the present age are, the whole world once used to be." Against this background Kraft compares the non-civilized or "savage" tribes of North and South America with ancient cultures, heathen nations and the old...... forward the following theses: 1. Brief Account of the Savage Peoples is informed by a mathematical/physical epistemology; Kraft's method of reducing forms to types of cultural expression by way of "statistical" comparison followed by generalising inductively to (natural) laws of development, as well...

  2. 78 FR 16250 - Hardwood and Decorative Plywood From the People's Republic of China: Amended Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... or more species of hardwoods, softwoods, or bamboo. Hardwood and decorative plywood may include... Comments. 2. Scope of the Investigation. 3. Respondent Selection. 4. Injury Test. 5. Application...

  3. Caracterização de compostos reduzidos de enxofre gerados na produção de celulose kraft e pré-hidrólise kraft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso Moraes de Moura

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Um problema ambiental da indústria de celulose kraft é o odor causado pela emissão dos compostos reduzidos de enxofre gerados pela deslignificação de madeiras de um modo em geral. Para monitorar essas emissões, existem equipamentos simples, desenvolvidos para a medição contínua do "total reduced sulphur" (TRS, tal como o analisador coulométrico. Neste trabalho, foram analisados sulfeto de hidrogênio (H2S, metil mercaptana (CH3SH, dimetil sulfeto [(CH32S] e dimetil dissulfeto [(CH32S2], gerados em deslignificações laboratoriais kraft e pré-hidrólise kraft de dois grupos de madeiras de folhosas. Um dos grupos de madeiras continha 25% e o outro 20% de lignina, base peso seco. Foi observado que as madeiras com menores teores de lignina geraram significativamente menores quantidades de compostos reduzidos de enxofre de TRS. Não foram notadas diferenças significativas nas quantidades totais geradas entre os processos de deslignificação estudados. O processo pré-hidrólise kraft foi mais sensível aos teores de lignina da madeira que o processo kraft. Recomenda-se, por isso, trabalhar com madeiras com menores teores de lignina quando do uso do processo pré-hidrólise kraft para produção de celulose. As principais formas geradas de TRS foram dimetil sulfeto e metil mercaptana.

  4. Predicting Pallet Part Yields From Hardwood Cants

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Hal Lee

    1999-01-01

    Pallet cant quality directly impacts pallet part processing and material costs. By knowing the quality of the cants being processed, pallet manufacturers can predict costs to attain better value from their raw materials and more accurately price their pallets. The study objectives were 1) to develop a procedure for accurately predicting hardwood pallet part yield as a function of raw material geometry and grade, processing equipment, and pallet part geometry, 2) to develop a model for accur...

  5. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D; Black, Bryan A; Walsh, Sheila M; McField, Melanie

    2009-07-22

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  6. Reactive dye extraction utilizing regenerated bleaching earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite bleaching earth is utilized for purifying used motor oil through a recovery process in order to improve the quality and stability of the final product. Indeed, spent bleaching earth is generated due to adsorbing oil impurities. Polluted spent bleaching earth contains 20-40% (w/w oil and is flammable. Its disposal without pre-treatment leads to loss of oil along with environmental impacts. Accordingly, similar studies have been conducted since 1979 until now. This research was a laboratory study on reactive dye adsorption. Cleaning bleaching clay, thermal remediation and acid washing activation methods were utilized. Response surface methodology was used to design the experiments and determine the optimal parameters in order to run the dye adsorption process. The main experimental parameters have been concluded as temperature (200-800 °C, acid solution concentration (0.1-3 M, dye solution concentration (1-35 ppm, and ratio of activated earth to dye solution (0.1-2 %, w/w. Results revealed that dye adsorption process along with oil removal at a temperature of 650 °C, acid solution concentration of 0.83 M, dye solution concentration of 11.75 ppm and ratio of activated earth to dye solution of 1.52 % (w/w results in an adsorption efficiency of 68.57%. This removal efficiency is a bit higher than activated virgin bleaching earth and much higher than virgin bleaching earth, which has adsorption capacities of 66.75% and 51.56%, respectively. Considering this recycling process, the purified material is quite acceptable technically, environmentally and economically.

  7. Bleaching and recovery patterns of corals in Palk Bay, India: An indication of bleaching resilient reef

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manikandan, B.; Ravindran, J.; Vidya, P.J.; ManiMurali, R.

    to the annual bleaching events in 2013 and 2014. Recovery and mortality of corals after the bleaching event were documented as well the relationship between SST, PAR and severity of bleaching at the study sites were examined. While observing the coral... in Palk Bay are well documented [23, 24]. Palk Bay reef also serves as an important fishing ground for small scale fishermen. Two sites were identified for this study namely Vedhalai and Mandapam as a representative site of Palk Bay to study the overall...

  8. Bleaching and diffusion dynamics in optofluidic dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Asger

    2007-01-01

    The authors have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in optofluidic dye lasers where the liquid laser dye in a microfluidic channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. They find that for microfluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules...... pumping devices. ©2007 American Institute of Physics....

  9. Mass coral bleaching in the northern Persian Gulf, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Kavousi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events due to elevated temperatures are increasing in both frequency and magnitude worldwide. Mass bleaching was recorded at five sites in the northern Persian Gulf during August and September 2012. Based on available seawater temperature data from field, satellite and previous studies, we suggest that the coral bleaching threshold temperature in the northern Persian Gulf is between 33.5 and 34°C, which is about 1.5 to 2.5°C lower than that in the southern part. To assess the bleaching effects, coral genera counted during 60-minute dives were categorized into four groups including healthy, slightly bleached ( 50% bleached tissue and fully bleached colonies. The anomalously high sea surface temperature resulted in massive coral bleaching (~84% coral colonies affected. Acropora spp. colonies, which are known as the most vulnerable corals to thermal stress, were less affected by the bleaching than massive corals, such as Porites, which are among the most thermo-tolerant corals. Turbid waters, suggested as coral refugia against global warming, did not protect corals in this study since most affected corals were found in the most turbid waters. The 2012 bleaching in the northern Persian Gulf was relatively strong from the viewpoint of coral bleaching severity. Long-term monitoring is needed to understand the actual consequences of the bleaching event on the coral reefs and communities.

  10. Anaerobic treatment of cellulose bleach plant wastewater: chlorinated organics and genotoxicity removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Chaparro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the removal efficiency of organic matter and how it relates to the decrease of toxic and mutagenic effects when an anaerobic reactor is used to treat the bleaching effluent from two kraft pulp mills. Parameters such as COD (chemical oxygen demand, DOC (dissolved organic carbon, AOX (adsorbable organic halogen, ASL (acid soluble lignin, color, chlorides, total phenols and absorbance values in the UV-VIS spectral region were measured. The acute and chronic toxicity and genetic toxicity assessments were performed with Daphnia similis, Ceriodaphnia sp. and Allium cepa L, respectively. The removal efficiency of organic matter measured as COD, ranged from 45% to 55%, while AOX removal ranged from 40% to 45%. The acute toxic and chronic effects, as well as the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects, decrease as the biodegradable fraction of the organics is removed. These results, together with the organic load measurement of the effluents of the anaerobic treatment, indicate that these effluents are recalcitrant but not toxic. As expected, color increased when the anaerobic treatment was applied. However, the colored compounds are of microbial origin and do not cause an increase in genotoxic effects. To discharge the wastewater, it is necessary to apply a physico-chemical or aerobic biological post-treatment to the effluents of the anaerobic reactor.

  11. Effect of steam explosion and enzymatic pre-treatments on pulping and bleaching of Hesperaloe funifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sampedro, R; Eugenio, M E; Villar, J C

    2012-05-01

    A non-wood raw material with high potential for pulp and paper applications (Hesperaloe funifera) was subjected to a steam explosion pre-treatment, and the subsequent effect of this pretreatment on biopulping and biobleaching was studied. An increase in the delignification rate, bigger than that reported for autohydrolysis and acid hydrolysis pre-treatments, and a reduction in chemical consumption were found during kraft pulping of the exploded samples. However, biopulping with the laccase-mediator system (LMS) did not lead to a reduction in the kappa number in either non-exploded or exploded unbleached pulps. On the other hand, the steam explosion pretreatment boosted the advantages of the LMS pre-treatment (decrease in kappa number and increase in brightness) favored biobleaching, with a 53.1% delignification rate and a final brightness of 67% ISO. Finally, the steam explosion pre-treatment also improved the color properties of the bleached pulp and reduced the hydrogen peroxide consumption by 24.6%.

  12. Stability improvement in bleached phase holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, K.

    1991-08-01

    An experimental study has been made of the influence of developer composition on the stability against the print-out effect of bleached, photographically recorded two-beam interference grating on Agfa-Gevaert 10E75 NAH plates. The diffraction efficiency has been increased by using potassium iodide and an iodine bleach process that converts a silver image into a dielectric image. An improvement in stability against the print-out effect has been observed by using two new developer compositions. Variation of the maximum diffraction efficiency against exposure to white light is shown graphically.

  13. Do region and gender influence hardwood product selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman

    2013-01-01

    Consumer preference is a fundamental focus of marketing research as it is used in developing marketing strategy and the positioning of products against competitors. This study evaluated consumer hardwood preferences of consumers from three United States geographical regions, which included six different metropolitan areas. Seven hardwood species and three laminate...

  14. A key for the Forest Service hardwood tree grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary W. Miller; Leland F. Hanks; Harry V., Jr. Wiant

    1986-01-01

    A dichotomous key organizes the USDA Forest Service hardwood tree grade specifications into a stepwise procedure for those learning to grade hardwood sawtimber. The key addresses the major grade factors, tree size, surface characteristics, and allowable cull deductions in a series of paried choices that lead the user to a decision regarding tree grade.

  15. Factors affecting the use of hardwood flooring in urban rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Jr. Nevel; Robert L. Jr. Nevel

    1973-01-01

    The continued use of hardwood flooring in urban rehabilitation is being threatened. A study of the influences that determine the choice of flooring indicates that economic, physical, or technological factors dominate. Most factors affecting the use of hardwood flooring are related to cost, availability, and compatibility. Of these factors, time and cost of installation...

  16. Spectral reflectance of five hardwood tree species in southern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale R. Weigel; J.C. Randolph

    2013-01-01

    The use of remote sensing to identify forest species has been ongoing since the launch of Landsat-1 using MSS imagery. The ability to separate hardwoods from conifers was accomplished by the 1980s. However, distinguishing individual hardwood species is more problematic due to similar spectral and phenological characteristics. With the launch of commercial satellites...

  17. Identifying well-bleached quartz using the different bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Masuda, N.;

    2012-01-01

    When dating older sedimentary deposits using quartz, there are no unambiguous methods for identifying the presence of incomplete bleaching. Current statistical analysis of dose distributions depends entirely on the assumption that incomplete bleaching and mixing are the main causes of any excess...... in relative bleaching rates of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 50 °C by infrared light (IR50) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 290 °C by infrared light after a stimulation at 50 °C (pIRIR290), and use recently deposited samples to determine...... that the large aliquot data are more likely to be correct. We conclude that a comparison of quartz and feldspar doses provides a useful independent method for identifying well-bleached quartz samples, and that it is unwise to apply statistical models to dose distributions without clear evidence for the physical...

  18. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion electrode. Results revealed that bleaching with opalescence Xtra caused little increase in fluoride release from Ketac Fil and Photac Fil but has no effect on F2000. However, Opalescence Quick had no significant effect on the three tested materials. Bleaching effect on fluoride release is material dependent and time has a significant role on fluoride release.

  19. STUDIES ON HIBISCUS CANNABINUS, HIBISCUS SABDARIFFA, AND CANNABINUS SATIVA PULP TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR SOFTWOOD PULP- PART 1: AS-AQ DELIGNIFICATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharm Dutt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Hibiscus cannabinus, Hibiscus sabdariffa, and Cannabinus sativa, which are renewable non-woody fiber resources having characteristics similar to that of softwood (bast fibers, when used together with hardwood (core fibers, gave higher pulp yield with good mechanical strength properties when using an alkaline sulphite-anthraquinone (AS-AQ pulping process rather than a conventional kraft pulping process and bleached more readily than kraft and soda pulps with a CEHH bleaching sequence. A comparison of properties AS-AQ pulping processes with soda and kraft pulping processes of H. cannabinus, C. sativa, and H. sabdariffa was made. All the properties were found to be better than soda and kraft pulps except tear index. All of the mechanical strength properties of handsheets of AS-AQ pulp improved except tear index. Therefore, the AS-AQ pulping process can be considered as ideal for manufacturing of paper grades like greaseproof, glassine, and high-quality writing and printing paper.

  20. Planting and care of fine hardwood seedlings: diseases in hardwood tree plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula M. Pijut

    2006-01-01

    Hardwood trees planted for timber production, wildlife habitat, riparian buffers, native woodland restoration, windbreaks, watershed protection, erosion control, and conservation are susceptible to damage or even death by various native and exotic fungal or bacterial diseases. Establishment, growth, and the quality of the trees produced can be affected by these disease...

  1. 78 FR 68297 - Hardwood Lumber and Hardwood Plywood Promotion, Research and Information Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... position of covered hardwood in the marketplace that includes any type of test, study, or analysis designed... governmental action or policy, by local, state, Federal, and foreign governments or subdivision thereof, other... also maintain a monetary reserve and carry over excess funds from one fiscal period to the...

  2. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials

    OpenAIRE

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion ...

  3. Bleaching of the discolored traumatized tooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jon E.; Kopperud, Siemen E.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the treatment of discolored traumatized teeth, most of them being non-vital and subsequently, endodontically treated. Tooth bleaching based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent, applied directly or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide...

  4. REMINERALIZATION POTENTIAL OF A CARBAMIDE BLEACHING AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinova-Takorova Borislavova Mirela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching has gradually became a popular procedure for people searching for aesthetic improvement. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of bleaching with 45% carbamide peroxide on the level of mineralization of enamel, using laser fluorescence. Materials and methods: Sixty extracted human teeth were treated with 45% carbamid peroxide (Opalescence, Ultradent, 4 consecutive days for one hour each day. The effect of the bleaching agent on the level of mineralization of enamel was measured with DIAGNO dent pen. The statistical method we use was descriptive analysis. Results: The average values, measured before the applications of the carbamid peroxide were 6.33. On the first day they were 5.41, on the second 5.38, on the third 5.11 and 5.35 on the forth. Conclusion: There was observed a slight remineralization effect due to the incorporated Ca2+ and F- ions in the bleaching agent that we have used.

  5. Green liquor impregnation and Kraft pulping of South African Pinus Patula – “A practical approach to provide cost savings in a Kraft mill’s pulping operation”

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johakimu, Jonas K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of green liquor pre-treatment (GLP) on Kraft pulping of Pinus Patula has been investigated. Wood chips were pre-treated with green liquor, and subsequently subjected to Kraft pulping to achieve a target Kappa number of 65-70. The results...

  6. Central Hardwoods ecosystem vulnerability assessment and synthesis: a report from the Central Hardwoods Climate Change Response Framework project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie Brandt; Hong He; Louis Iverson; Frank R. Thompson; Patricia Butler; Stephen Handler; Maria Janowiak; P. Danielle Shannon; Chris Swanston; Matthew Albrecht; Richard Blume-Weaver; Paul Deizman; John DePuy; William D. Dijak; Gary Dinkel; Songlin Fei; D. Todd Jones-Farrand; Michael Leahy; Stephen Matthews; Paul Nelson; Brad Oberle; Judi Perez; Matthew Peters; Anantha Prasad; Jeffrey E. Schneiderman; John Shuey; Adam B. Smith; Charles Studyvin; John M. Tirpak; Jeffery W. Walk; Wen J. Wang; Laura Watts; Dale Weigel; Steve. Westin

    2014-01-01

    The forests in the Central Hardwoods Region will be affected directly and indirectly by a changing climate over the next 100 years. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of terrestrial ecosystems in the Central Hardwoods Region of Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri to a range of future climates. Information on current forest conditions, observed climate trends,...

  7. Dust-free bleaching powder may not prevent symptoms in hairdressers with bleaching-associated rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jörn; Nilsson, Patrik; Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Kronholm Diab, Kerstin; Albin, Maria; Kåredal, Monica; Jönsson, Bo; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2016-09-30

    Hairdressers have an increased risk for airway symptoms especially when using hair-bleaching powder containing persulfate. To minimize exposure, dust-free bleaching powder (DFP) has been made available. We studied the effects of regular powder (RP) or DFP on the airway symptoms of hairdressers with hair-bleaching associated rhinitis. Twelve hairdressers each performed three hair-bleachings on a wig in an exposure chamber. Half of the subjects used RP and half used DFP. Exposure to persulfate and ammonia was measured. Before and after each bleaching, the participants stated their degree of airway symptoms on a visual analogue scale. Nasal lavage and blood were sampled before exposure, after the last bleaching, and in the morning after exposure to measure inflammatory markers. Exposure to persulfate was higher when using RP compared to DFP, 22 (11-55) vs. 12 (8-13) μg/m(3); median (min-max). Exposure to ammonia did not differ between the groups. Both groups reported an increase in asthma-like symptoms and this increase was significant. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes increased after exposure in both groups; monocytes decreased the day after. In nasal lavage, IL-8 was increased the morning after for both types of powder, and the increase was significant in the total group. IL-6 increased immediately after exposure and the day after only in the group using RP. Although DFP powder emits lower levels of persulfate, effects are still elicited in symptomatic hairdressers.

  8. Significant damage of the skin and hair following hair bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Mi-Sook; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Won-Ji; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-10-01

    Scalp burns can be caused by hair bleaching with excess procedures such as unnecessary heating and excessive treatment with bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and histological changes of the hair and skin after bleaching. Ammonium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (6% or 9%) solution mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (weight ratio) were sufficiently applied to human hairs and rat skin. The bleached hairs were brightened up to yellow by increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and time of bleach treatment. After bleaching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe that the cuticle scales of the hairs were irregular and lifted. The mechanical properties of the bleached hairs, such as tensile strength and elongation, were slightly different than the untreated hairs. The tested rat skin showed severe swelling after treatment of the bleaching agent (9% hydrogen peroxide). The rat skin bleached with 9% hydrogen peroxide exhibited epidermal thinning and subepidermal vesicle formation. The extracellular matrix of the skin was seriously disrupted after bleaching. Therefore, the use of only suitable bleaching procedures is suggested in order to avoid injuries. © 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  9. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Terry P; Kerry, James T; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G; Anderson, Kristen D; Baird, Andrew H; Babcock, Russell C; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C; Butler, Ian R; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R; Cumming, Graeme S; Dalton, Steven J; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C Mark; Figueira, Will F; Gilmour, James P; Harrison, Hugo B; Heron, Scott F; Hoey, Andrew S; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Kennedy, Emma V; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M; Lowe, Ryan J; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Malcolm, Hamish A; McWilliam, Michael J; Pandolfi, John M; Pears, Rachel J; Pratchett, Morgan S; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R; Willis, Bette L; Wilson, Shaun K

    2017-03-15

    During 2015-2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  10. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Terry P.; Kerry, James T.; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G.; Anderson, Kristen D.; Baird, Andrew H.; Babcock, Russell C.; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R.; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C.; Butler, Ian R.; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E.; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R.; Cumming, Graeme S.; Dalton, Steven J.; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C. Mark; Figueira, Will F.; Gilmour, James P.; Harrison, Hugo B.; Heron, Scott F.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Kennedy, Emma V.; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Malcolm, Hamish A.; McWilliam, Michael J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Pears, Rachel J.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J.; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R.; Willis, Bette L.; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2017-03-01

    During 2015-2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  11. Effects of Adding Recycled Fiber from Deinked Pulp Sludge into Kraft Pulp%添加回收脱墨废渣纤维对硫酸盐浆的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈倩; 宋先亮; 金小娟; 钱桦

    2012-01-01

    The composition of deinked pulp sludge was analyzed and the fine fiber was recycled from it. Water retention value ( WRV) and physical properties of the paper were determined. X-ray diffraction, surface contact angle and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to evaluate the properties of the kraft pulp with different proportions of fine fiber. Results showed that the deinked pulp sludge contained 7.75% fine fibers (R100 fiber) and 7.37% fibers in 100-200 mesh sizes. After a two-stage H2O2-bleaching, the R100 fiber was added into the kraft pulp. The WRV, fiber crystaUinity, and contact angle changed insignificantly with the proportion increasing from 0 to 30%. When 10% R100 fiber was added into the kraft pulp, the physical properties of the paper decreased slightly. SEM analysis exhibited that the fine fibers run through the gaps of intercrossing fibers. The results indicate that recycled fiber from deinked pulp sludge can partially replace kraft pulp.%通过对北京造纸七厂脱墨废渣进行成分分析,并将回收的细小纤维按不同比例添加至硫酸盐浆抄纸,测定浆料的保水值及纸张的物理性能,并进行X-衍射、表面静态接触角、扫描电镜分析.研究结果显示:脱墨废渣中含有7.75%未过100目的纤维,7.37%的100-200目的纤维.将未过100目的纤维经两段2%H2O2漂白后加入硫酸盐浆抄纸,随加入量从0增加到30%,保水值、浆料纤雏结晶度和接触角变化不明显;当细小纤维加入量为10%时,纸张性能略有下降.电镜分析显示加入的细小纤维进入到纤维交织的空隙中.结果表明,废渣可以部分代替原始浆料,为脱墨度渣纤维的回收利用打下基础.

  12. Characterization of Cypress Wood for Kraft Pulp Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António J. A. Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wood samples of Cupressus arizonica, C. lusitanica, and C. sempervirens were evaluated for chemical, anatomical, and pulp characteristics as raw material for pulp production. Two 17-year-old trees per species were harvested, and wood samples were taken at a height of 2 m. Wood chips from Pinus pinaster (Portugal and P. sylvestris (Finland were used as references. C. arizonica differed from C. lusitanica and C. sempervirens with significantly lower (p < 0.05 tracheid diameter and wall thickness in the earlywood. The total extractives contents were 3.9%, 3.3%, and 2.5% for C. lusitanica, C. sempervirens, and C. arizonica, respectively, lower than the 5.1% for P. pinaster and 4.5% for P. sylvestris. Klason lignin content ranged from 33.0 to 35.6%, higher than the 28.0 to 28.7% for the pinewoods. The kraft pulp yields for C. arizonica, C. lusitanica, and C. sempervirens were 37.7%, 36.7%, and 38.7%, respectively, with kappa numbers of 32.0, 31.6, and 28.7, respectively; the yield values were 40.8% and 42.8%, with kappa numbers of 23.4 and 21.0, for P. pinaster and P. sylvestris, respectively. The cypress species are clearly different from pine in relation to wood pulping behavior. Among the cypress, C. sempervirens provided the best pulping results.

  13. Experiences of Kraft Lignin Functionalization by Enzymatic and Chemical Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kalliola

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Linear hydrophilic derivatives are expected to soften lignin and improve its utilization in composite applications. Oxidation by means of laccase in the presence of oxygen was employed in an attempt to functionalize commercial kraft lignin by vanillic acid-PEG ester and ether derivatives. Thielavia arenaria and Melanocarpus albomyces laccases at pH 6 and 8 were used. According to O2 consumption and the increase in molar mass, the tested laccases were active toward the lignin and the vanillic acid derivatives and also formed corresponding phenoxyl radicals. However, homogenous polymerization instead of cross-coupling and functionalization took place. As an alternative, lignin functionalization by the ester derivative by chemical oxidation under alkali-O2 conditions was also tested. Efficient lignin polymerization was observed. However, functionalization was not detected. Interestingly, a clear decrease in lignin glass transition temperature was obtained by an isolation procedure that included freeze-drying. This suggests that functionalization may not be necessary to induce the desired softening effect.

  14. Helmholtz's early empiricism and the Erhaltung der Kraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowitz, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Hermann Helmholtz has often been understood to have started research under the influence of Kant, and then to have made a transition to a later mature empiricist phase. Without claiming that in 1847 Helmholtz held the same positions that he later espoused, I suggest that already in his 1847 'Uber die Erhaltung der Kraft' one may find important aspects of his later empiricism. I highlight the ways in which, from early on, Helmholtz turned Kant to use in developing an empirical program of inquiry into possible basic natural causes. To that end, I indicate how, throughout his arguments, Helmholtz employed, sometimes explicitly, but often tacitly, an empiricist logic, one that ran contrary to any form of transcendental deduction, and even to all a priori knowledge. Instead of deriving aspects about the ultimate constituents of nature, Helmholtz aimed to define the proper project for physical natural science. The first part of the paper describes the context of discussion in which Helmholtz entered. The bulk of the paper then analyzes Helmholtz's arguments in order to make space between (1) Kantian, and other, deductions of characteristics that must be true of nature and (2) Helmholtz's delineation of empirically determinable characteristics of presumed ultimate elements of nature, ones that he meant to be specified and delimited through future experimental research. The paper highlights that throughout his discussion Helmholtz meant to define the proper project for physical natural science, a project rife with empiricist aspects.

  15. Experimental Studies on the Hydrotreatment of Kraft Lignin to Aromatics and Alkylphenolics Using Economically Viable Fe-Based Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agarwal, Shilpa; Chowdari, Ramesh Kumar; Hita, Idoia; Heeres, Hero Jan

    Limonite, a low-cost iron ore, was investigated as a potential hydrotreatment catalyst for kraft lignin without the use of an external solvent (batch reactor, initial H-2 pressure of 100 bar, 4 h). The best results were obtained at 450 degrees C resulting in 34 wt % of liquefied kraft lignin (lignin

  16. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  17. IMPACT OF FURFURAL ON THE SUGAR ANALYSIS OF PRE-HYDROLYSIS LIQUOR OF KRAFT-BASED DISSOLVING PULP PRODUCTION PROCESS USING THE HPAEC TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Saeed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available High performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulse ampero-metric detector (HPAEC-PAD is a reliable method to systematically determine the sugar contents in pulp and paper waste streams, including bleaching and extraction liquors. We used the same method to determine the sugar content of industrially produced pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL from a kraft-based dissolving pulp production process. The analysis showed that the traditional method cannot be applied for sugar analysis, and an improvement on the method was required. In fact, the presence of furfural in the PHL sample was the reason for the required modification. It was noted that the removal of furfural via evaporation could improve the reliability of the HPAEC technique for sugar assessments. If the concentration of furfural was higher than 0.045% (wt. in the PHL, the error introduced in the sugar analysis was profound. Also, the industrially produced PHL contained more furfural than the laboratory produced PHL under the same hydrolysis conditions. Consequently, the concentration of furfural in the PHL should be taken into account for sugar analysis using the HPAEC technique.

  18. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dishon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B isotopic composition (δ11B as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  19. Nova tecnologia de branqueamento de celulose adaptada ao fechamento do circuito de água A novel bleaching technology adapted to partial bleach plant closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Moreira Costa

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A Celulose Nipo-Brasileira é uma das maiores produtoras de celulose kraft branqueada de eucalipto no Brasil. Produz 860.000 tsa/ano em duas linhas, que são equipadas com digestores contínuos. Ambas as linhas fabricam polpa ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free com as seqüências Dhot(EOPD(EPD e D(EOPDP, respectivamente, na linha 1 e 2. A fábrica tem tratamento do efluente com lodo ativado com dois tanques de aeração com capacidade para 20.000 m³, equipados com aeradores superficiais seguidos por quatro clarificadores secundários (dois para cada reator. Nas últimas décadas, a fábrica tem otimizado e vem mudando seus processos, a fim de melhorar a preservação ambiental. Com o objetivo de reduzir o volume de efluente, DQO e carga de AOX, a seqüência Ahot(EOPD(PO proposta foi avaliada em testes laboratoriais, com reciclagem de filtrado parcial. Este artigo propôs a reciclagem de filtrado, que reduz o volume de efluente da fábrica em 9 m³/tsa (tonelada secada ao ar, isto é, mais ou menos 50% do total. O filtrado recuperado é parcialmente desviado para o ciclo de recuperação e para o estágio de deslignificação oxigênio. A reutilização do filtrado Ahot no ciclo de recuperação é para substituir os filtrados, atualmente usados para lavar lama de cal e "dregs". O impacto dos NPEs no ciclo de cálcio não foi significante. Essa estratégia permitiu uma recuperação de carga alcalina de 12 kg NaOH/tsa de polpa, que, do contrário, seria perdida. A branqueabilidade da polpa e a sua qualidade não foram afetadas significativamente. O efluente descartado, proveniente das etapas D(PO, mostrou-se com baixas cargas de cor, de DQO, de AOX e de uma boa biodegradabilidade (DBO5/DQO.Celulose Nipo-Brasileira is one of the largest eucalyptus bleached kraft pulp mills in Brazil. It produces 860,000 tpy in two lines that are equipped with continuous digesters. Line 1 and line 2 produces ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free pulp with the sequences: Dhot

  20. Changes in bleaching susceptibility among corals subject to ocean warming and recurrent bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan S Pratchett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites, during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98% than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species is producing a coral assemblage that is

  1. Changes in bleaching susceptibility among corals subject to ocean warming and recurrent bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratchett, Morgan S; McCowan, Dominique; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Heron, Scott F

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites), during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98%) than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species) is producing a coral assemblage that is more resistant to sustained and ongoing ocean warming.

  2. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  3. Synergy of agroforestry and bottomland hardwood afforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, D.J.; Portwood, J.; Clason, Terry R.

    2003-01-01

    Afforestation of bottomland hardwood forests has historically emphasized planting heavy-seeded tree species such as oak (Quercus spp.) and pecan (Caryaillinoensis) with little or no silvicultural management during stand development. Slow growth of these tree species, herbivory, competing vegetation, and limited seed dispersal, often result in restored sites that are slow to develop vertical vegetation structure and have limited tree diversity. Where soils and hydrology permit, agroforestry can provide transitional management that mitigates these historical limitations on converting cropland to forests. Planting short-rotation woody crops and intercropping using wide alleyways are two agroforestry practices that are well suited for transitional management. Weed control associated with agroforestry systems benefits planted trees by reducing competition. The resultant decrease in herbaceous cover suppresses small mammal populations and associated herbivory of trees and seeds. As a result, rapid vertical growth is possible that can 'train' under-planted, slower-growing, species and provide favorable environmental conditions for naturally invading trees. Finally, annual cropping of alleyways or rotational pulpwood harvest of woody crops provides income more rapidly than reliance on future revenue from traditional silviculture. Because of increased forest diversity, enhanced growth and development, and improved economic returns, we believe that using agroforestry as a transitional management strategy during afforestation provides greater benefits to landowners and to the environment than does traditional bottomland hardwood afforestation.

  4. Incorporating adaptive responses into future projections of coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cheryl A; Dunne, John P; Eakin, C Mark; Donner, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming threatens to increase mass coral bleaching events, and several studies have projected the demise of tropical coral reefs this century. However, recent evidence indicates corals may be able to respond to thermal stress though adaptive processes (e.g., genetic adaptation, acclimatization, and symbiont shuffling). How these mechanisms might influence warming-induced bleaching remains largely unknown. This study compared how different adaptive processes could affect coral bleaching projections. We used the latest bias-corrected global sea surface temperature (SST) output from the NOAA/GFDL Earth System Model 2 (ESM2M) for the preindustrial period through 2100 to project coral bleaching trajectories. Initial results showed that, in the absence of adaptive processes, application of a preindustrial climatology to the NOAA Coral Reef Watch bleaching prediction method overpredicts the present-day bleaching frequency. This suggests that corals may have already responded adaptively to some warming over the industrial period. We then modified the prediction method so that the bleaching threshold either permanently increased in response to thermal history (e.g., simulating directional genetic selection) or temporarily increased for 2-10 years in response to a bleaching event (e.g., simulating symbiont shuffling). A bleaching threshold that changes relative to the preceding 60 years of thermal history reduced the frequency of mass bleaching events by 20-80% compared with the 'no adaptive response' prediction model by 2100, depending on the emissions scenario. When both types of adaptive responses were applied, up to 14% more reef cells avoided high-frequency bleaching by 2100. However, temporary increases in bleaching thresholds alone only delayed the occurrence of high-frequency bleaching by ca. 10 years in all but the lowest emissions scenario. Future research should test the rate and limit of different adaptive responses for coral species across latitudes and

  5. Dry Kraft Pulping at Ambient Pressure for Cost Effective Energy Saving and Pollution Deduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yulin Deng; Art Ragauskas

    2012-08-28

    Sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge program, our research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology conducted laboratory studies and confirmed the concept of making wood pulp using a dry pulping technology. This technology is a new process different from any prior pulping technology used in Kraft and CTMP pulping. Three different kinds of dry pulping methods were investigated. (a) Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure: The first one is to dry and bake the pretreated woodchips in a conventional oven at atmospheric pressure without the use of a catalyst. (b) Dry Pulping at Reduced Pressure: The second method is to dry the pretreated woodchips first in a vacuum oven in the presence of anthraquinone (AQ) as a pulping catalyst, followed by baking at elevated temperature. (c) Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP. The third method is to first remove the free water of pretreated woodchips, followed by dry pulping using a conventional Kraft pulping digester with AQ and triton as additives. Method one: Experimental results indicated that Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure could produce pulp with higher brightness and lower bulk than conventional Kraft pulp. However, tensile strength of the acquired pulp is much lower than traditional Kraft pulp, and their Kappa number and energy consumption are higher than conventional Kraft pulp. By fully analyzing the results, we concluded that wood fibers might be damaged during the drying process at elevated temperature. The main reason for wood fiber damage is that a long drying time was used during evaporation of water from the woodchips. This resulted in an un-uniform reaction condition on the woodchips: the outside layer of the woodchips was over reacted while inside the woodchips did not reacted at all. To solve this problem, dry pulping at reduced pressure was investigated. Method two: To achieve uniform reaction throughout the entire reaction system, the water inside the pretreated woodchips was

  6. Development of a strategy for energy efficiency improvement in a Kraft process based on systems interactions analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Espejel, Enrique

    The objective of this thesis is to develop, validate, and apply a unified methodology for the energy efficiency improvement of a Kraft process that addresses globally the interactions of the various process systems that affect its energy performance. An implementation strategy is the final result. An operating Kraft pulping mill situated in Eastern Canada with a production of 700 adt/d of high-grade bleached pulp was the case study. The Pulp and Paper industry is Canada's premier industry. It is characterized by large thermal energy and water consumption. Rising energy costs and more stringent environmental regulations have led the industry to refocus its efforts toward identifying ways to improve energy and water conservation. Energy and water aspects are usually analyzed independently, but in reality they are strongly interconnected. Therefore, there is a need for an integrated methodology, which considers energy and water aspects, as well as the optimal utilization and production of the utilities. The methodology consists of four successive stages. The first stage is the base case definition. The development of a focused, reliable and representative model of an operating process is a prerequisite to the optimization and fine tuning of its energy performance. A four-pronged procedure has been developed: data gathering, master diagram, utilities systems analysis, and simulation. The computer simulation has been focused on the energy and water systems. The second stage corresponds to the benchmarking analysis. The benchmarking of the base case has the objectives of identifying the process inefficiencies and to establish guidelines for the development of effective enhancement measures. The studied process is evaluated by a comparison of its efficiency to the current practice of the industry and by the application of new energy and exergy content indicators. The minimum energy and water requirements of the process are also determined in this step. The third stage is

  7. Harvesting undelimbed Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from first thinnings for integrated production of kraft pulp and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jylhae, P.

    2011-12-15

    The present study evaluates the feasibility of undelimbed Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) for integrated production of pulp and energy in a kraft pulp mill from the technical, economic and environmental points of view, focusing on the potential of bundle harvesting. The feasibility of tree sections for pulp production was tested by conducting an industrial wood-handling experiment, laboratory cooking and bleaching trials, using conventional small-diameter Scots pine pulpwood as a reference. These trials showed that undelimbed Scots pine sections can be processed in favourable conditions as a blend with conventional small-diameter pulpwood without reducing the pulp quality. However, fibre losses at various phases of the process may increase when using undelimbed material. In the economic evaluation, both pulp production and wood procurement costs were considered, using the relative wood paying capability of a kraft pulp mill as a determinant. The calculations were made for three Scots pine first-thinning stands with the breast-height diameter of the removal (6-12 cm) as the main distinctive factor. The supply chains included in the comparison were based on cut-to-length harvesting, whole-tree harvesting and bundle harvesting (whole-tree bundling). With the current ratio of pulp and energy prices, the wood paying capability declines with an increase in the proportion of the energy fraction of the raw material. The supply system based on the cut-to-length method was the most efficient option, resulting in the highest residual value at stump in most cases. A decline in the pulp price and an increase in the energy price improved the competitiveness of the whole-tree systems. With short truck transportation distances and low pulp prices, however, the harvesting of loose whole trees can result in higher residual value at stump in small-diameter stands. While savings in transportation costs did not compensate for the high cutting and compaction costs by the second

  8. Mass Coral Bleaching in 2010 in the Southern Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Jahson Berhane Alemu I; Ysharda Clement

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision mak...

  9. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; D. Raingeard; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J.T.I.; P. A. Todd; T. C. Toh; McDougald, D.; Chou, L.M.; Steinberg, P D

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on:...

  10. A global protocol for monitoring of coral bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, J.; Setiasih, N.; Marshall, P.; Hansen, L

    2004-01-01

    Coral bleaching and subsequent mortality represent a major threat to the future health and productivity of coral reefs. However a lack of reliable data on occurrence, severity and other characteristics of bleaching events hampers research on the causes and consequences of this important phenomenon. This article describes a global protocol for monitoring coral bleaching events, which addresses this problem and can be used by people with different levels of expertise and resources.

  11. Photothermal bleaching in time-lapse photoacoustic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Liang; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Lihong V. Wang

    2012-01-01

    We studied the phenomenon of photothermal bleaching — a gradual reduction of contrast agent particles during repeated scans in photoacoustic microscopy. The dependence of the photothermal bleaching rate on the excitation pulse energy, pulse duration, and the absorber’s size was determined while the laser focal diameter was held constant. Our results showed that, the dependence of the photothermal bleaching rate on the excitation pulse energy differed before and after the absorbers were raised...

  12. Randomized controlled trial of sealed in-office bleaching effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Mário Artur Pereira; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata; Oliveira, Alaíde Hermínia de Aguiar; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Faria-e-Silva, André Luis

    2014-01-01

    Regardless of the high success rate, patients commonly report the occurrence of tooth sensitivity during the in-office bleaching procedures. Recently, it has been demonstrated that using a customized tray (called sealed in-office bleaching technique) reduces peroxide penetration. The aim of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate tooth sensitivity and bleaching efficacy of sealed bleaching, in comparison with a conventional in-office technique. Twenty patients were randomized allocated in two groups in which 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was used in a single 45-min application. For the sealed technique, a customized bleaching tray was fabricated and carefully positioned over the bleaching agent during the session. The color was recorded at a baseline, 7 and 28 days after the bleaching session, using Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer. Tooth sensitivity was recorded during (20 and 40 min) and immediately after the treatment using a visual analogue scale. The bleaching efficacy was evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA, while the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity and its intensity were evaluated by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). No significant difference on bleaching efficacy was observed between the conventional (7.4 and 8.1 ΔE) and sealed techniques (7.8 and 8.3 ΔE) at both evaluation periods. No significant difference was observed regarding the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity (p=0.15). Sealed technique showed a significant decrease of sensitivity intensity after 40 min (p=0.03). Sealed bleaching technique was able to reduce the sensitivity intensity during the bleaching procedure, without jeopardizing the bleaching efficacy.

  13. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, J R; Low, J.; Tun, K.; B. Wilson; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; K. E. Ulstrup; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P.A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D; Chou, L.M.; P. D. Steinberg

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on:...

  14. Managing mountain hardwoods - a ten-year appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    George R., Jr. Trimble

    1961-01-01

    Ten years ago - in 1949 - four 5-acre plots were established on the Fernow Experimental Forest near Parsons, West Virginia, to show the effects upon mountain hardwoods of each of four management treatments.

  15. Bottomalnd hardwood reforestatoin plan Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Plan describes anticipated hardwood reforestation activites on agricultural fields of Dahomey NWR form 1992 - 1995. Site selection, tree compositon and spacing are...

  16. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahson Berhane Alemu I

    Full Text Available Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  17. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J. R.; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P. A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D.; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P. D.

    2016-02-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  18. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  19. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  20. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guest, James R; Baird, Andrew H; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Muttaqin, Efin; Edwards, Alasdair J; Campbell, Stuart J; Yewdall, Katie; Affendi, Yang Amri; Chou, Loke Ming

    2012-01-01

    Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes...

  1. Superheater corrosion in kraft recovery boilers; Korrosion hos oeverhettare i sodapannor. En oeversikt och diskussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, F. [AaF-IPK, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    Corrosion seems to be the most essential factor limiting the life and the availability of kraft recovery boilers. The steam temperature from the kraft recovery boiler has, seen from the view of electricity production and steam turbine operation, traditionally been kept moderate, especially in comparison with steam data from normal utility power plants. So the corrosion of the superheaters has been more a limitation for the temperature of the steam produced by the boiler than a life length limitation. Both the pressure and the temperature of the steam are limited by corrosion. The temperature of the boiling water, and hence the pressure, is limited by the corrosion in the lower furnace. The temperature of the steam is limited by the corrosion in the superheater. Kraft boiler superheater corrosion is here governed not only by the boiler design, but more by the mill chemistry and boiler operation practice. This report discusses the formation and the properties of the deposits and their relation to boiler operation and the corrosion of the superheater tube material. We have tried to understand the corrosion in the kraft boiler superheaters better by comparing with the experience from the utility boilers. 86 refs, 79 figs

  2. An environmental systems analysis of the Kraft pulp industry in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warit, J.

    2006-01-01

    The pulp industry inThailandis of economic and social importance because of its production value, the revenues from export and the employment in this sector. The eucalyptus-based Kraft pulp industry plays an importan

  3. The effect of temperature on the catalytic conversion of Kraft lignin using near-critical water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thi Dieu Huyen; Maschietti, Marco; Åmand, Lars-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of suspended LignoBoost Kraft lignin was performed in near-critical water using ZrO2/K2CO3 as the catalytic system and phenol as the co-solvent and char suppressing agent. The reaction temperature was varied from 290 to 370 C and its effect on the process was investigated...

  4. Precipitation and valorisation of lignin in South African kraft mill black liquor - first stages: Poster

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namane, M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available environmentally sustainable. The aims objectives of the current project is to precipitate and characterize lignin form kraft black liquor with an attempts to obtain narrow molecular weight lignin that can further be valorised to encourage Biorefineries in South...

  5. Influence of Vegetable Oil on the Thermal Aging Rate of Kraft Paper and its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lijun; DENG Bangfei; LIAO Ruijin; SUN Caixin; ZHU Mengzhao

    2012-01-01

    With the development of new insulation materials,vegetable oil—the best substitute for mineral oil—has gradually been widely used in the liquid insulation of transformers.To investigate the influence of vegetable oil on the thermal aging rate of oil paper,Kraft paper impregnated with mineral oil and vegetable oil have been underwent thermally accelerated aging at three different temperatures.The degree of polymerization(DP) of Kraft paper was measured to indicate the aging degree of insulation paper.The aging rate of Kraft paper in mineral oil and vegetable oil was compared quantitatively,and results showed that vegetable oil retarded paper's degradation rate and extended its useful lifetime.The reasons contributing to such phenomena were analyzed using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy(XPS) and molecular simulation software.Kraft paper in vegetable oil had larger activation energy.Due to the larger interaction force between water and natural ester molecules,water molecules were easily bonded with natural ester,weakening the hydrolysis process of cellulose.Cellulose was chemically modified by natural ester during the thermal aging process,and the reactive-OH(hydroxyl) groups on the cellulose became esterified with fatty acid esters.Water molecules were firmly bounded to the ester groups on glucose produced by esterification.The long-chain fatty acid esterified to cellulose was parallel with cellulose chains and acted as a "water barrier" to further weaken the hydrolysis process.

  6. An environmental systems analysis of the Kraft pulp industry in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warit, J.

    2006-01-01

    The pulp industry inThailandis of economic and social importance because of its production value, the revenues from export and the employment in this sector. The eucalyptus-based Kraft pulp industry plays an importan

  7. Bacterial degradation of synthetic and kraft lignin by axenic and mixed culture and their metabolic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ram; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2013-11-01

    Pulp paper mill effluent has high pollution load due to presence of lignin and its derivatives as major colouring and polluting constituents. In this study, two lignin degrading bacteria IITRL1 and IITRSU7 were isolated and identified as Citrobacter freundii (FJ581026) and Citrobacter sp. (FJ581023), respectively. In degradation study by axenic and mixed culture, mixed bacterial culture was found more effective compared to axenic culture as it decolourized 85 and 62% of synthetic and kraft lignin whereas in axenic conditions, bacterium IITRL1 and IITRSU7 decolourized 61 and 64% synthetic and 49 and 54% kraft lignin, respectively. Further, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 71, 58% TOC; 78, 53% AOX; 70, 58% COD and 74, 58% lignin from synthetic and kraft lignin, respectively. The ligninolytic enzyme was characterized as manganese peroxidase by SDS-PAGE yielding a single band of 43 KDa. The HPLC analysis of degraded samples showed reduction as well as shifting of peaks compared to control indicating the degradation as well as transformation of compounds. Further, in GC-MS analysis of synthetic and kraft lignin degraded samples, hexadecanoic acid was found as recalcitrant compounds while 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-phenol and pentachloro-phenol were detected as new metabolites.

  8. Precipitation and valorisation of lignin obtained from South African Kraft mill black liquor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namane, Mpho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available was established. Lignin was precipitated from kraft mill black liquor by utilising sulphuric acid and three organic acids (acetic, citric, and formic acids). During recovery of the lignin, it was noticed that recovery of the precipitated lignin was a long...

  9. An environmental systems analysis of the Kraft pulp industry in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warit, J.

    2006-01-01

    The pulp industry inThailandis of economic and social importance because of its production value, the revenues from export and the employment in this sector. The eucalyptus-based Kraft pulp industry plays an

  10. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    OpenAIRE

    G. Dishon; Fisch, J; Horn, I.; K Kaczmarek; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D.F.; O. Nir; Y. Popovich; D. Tchernov

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events hav...

  11. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  12. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    OpenAIRE

    G. Dishon; Fisch, J; Horn, I.; K Kaczmarek; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D.F.; O. Nir; Y. Popovich; D. Tchernov

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been ex...

  13. Development of hemicelluloses biorefineries for integration into kraft pulp mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajao, Olumoye Abiodun

    The development and wide spread acceptance of production facilities for biofuels, biochemicals and biomaterials is an important condition for reducing reliance on limited fossil resources and transitioning towards a global biobased economy. Pulp and paper mills in North America are confronted with high energy prices, high production costs and intense competition from emerging economies and low demand for traditional products. Integrated forest biorefineries (IFBR) have been proposed as a mean to diversify their product streams, increase their revenue and become more sustainable. This is feasible because they have access to forest biomass, an established feedstock supply chain and wood processing experience. In addition, the integration of a biorefinery process that can share existing infrastructure and utilities on the site of pulp mill would significantly lower investment cost and associated risks. Kraft pulping mills are promising receptor processes for a biorefinery because they either possess a prehydrolysis step for extracting hemicelluloses sugars prior to wood pulping or it can be added by retrofit. The extracted hemicelluloses could be subsequently transformed into a wide range of value added products for the receptor mill. To successfully implement hemicelluloses biorefinery, novel processes that are technically and economically feasible are required. It is necessary to identify products that would be profitable, develop processes that are energy efficient and the receptor mill should be able to supply the energy, chemicals and material demands of the biorefinery unit. The objective of this thesis is to develop energy efficient and economically viable hemicelluloses biorefineries for integration into a Kraft pulping process. A dissolving pulp mill was the reference case study. The transformation of hemicellulosic sugars via a chemical and biochemical conversion pathway, with furfural and ethanol as representative products for each pathway was studied. In

  14. Composite tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers: A state-of-the-art review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keiser, J.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Beginning in the mid-1960s, increasing energy costs in Finland and Sweden made energy recovery more critical to the cost-effective operation of a kraft pulp mill. Boiler designers responded to this need by raising the steam operating pressure, but almost immediately the wall tubes in these new boilers began to corrode rapidly. Test panels installed in the walls of the most severely corroding boiler identified austenitic stainless steel as sufficiently resistant to the new corrosive conditions, and discussions with Sandvik AB, a Swedish tube manufacturer, led to the suggestion that coextruded tubes be used for water wall service in kraft recovery boilers. Replacement of carbon steel by coextruded tubes has solved most of the corrosion problems experienced by carbon steel wall tubes, however, these tubes have not been problem-free. Beginning in early 1995, a multidisciplinary research program funded by the US Department of Energy was established to investigate the cause of cracking in coextruded tubes and to develop improved materials for use in water walls and floors of kraft recovery boilers. One portion of that program, a state-of-the-art review of public- and private-domain documents related to coextruded tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers is reported here. Sources of information that were consulted for this review include the following: tube manufacturers, boiler manufacturers, public-domain literature, companies operating kraft recovery boilers, consultants and failure analysis laboratories, and failure analyses conducted specifically for this project. Much of the information contained in this report involves cracking problems experienced in recovery boiler floors and those aspects of spout and air-port-opening cracking not readily attributable to thermal fatigue. 61 refs.

  15. A new, high-resolution global mass coral bleaching database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Simon D; Rickbeil, Gregory J M; Heron, Scott F

    2017-01-01

    Episodes of mass coral bleaching have been reported in recent decades and have raised concerns about the future of coral reefs on a warming planet. Despite the efforts to enhance and coordinate coral reef monitoring within and across countries, our knowledge of the geographic extent of mass coral bleaching over the past few decades is incomplete. Existing databases, like ReefBase, are limited by the voluntary nature of contributions, geographical biases in data collection, and the variations in the spatial scale of bleaching reports. In this study, we have developed the first-ever gridded, global-scale historical coral bleaching database. First, we conducted a targeted search for bleaching reports not included in ReefBase by personally contacting scientists and divers conducting monitoring in under-reported locations and by extracting data from the literature. This search increased the number of observed bleaching reports by 79%, from 4146 to 7429. Second, we employed spatial interpolation techniques to develop annual 0.04° × 0.04° latitude-longitude global maps of the probability that bleaching occurred for 1985 through 2010. Initial results indicate that the area of coral reefs with a more likely than not (>50%) or likely (>66%) probability of bleaching was eight times higher in the second half of the assessed time period, after the 1997/1998 El Niño. The results also indicate that annual maximum Degree Heating Weeks, a measure of thermal stress, for coral reefs with a high probability of bleaching increased over time. The database will help the scientific community more accurately assess the change in the frequency of mass coral bleaching events, validate methods of predicting mass coral bleaching, and test whether coral reefs are adjusting to rising ocean temperatures.

  16. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad E. Rokaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n=27 according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n=9 according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide, group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide, group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture, and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture. Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

  17. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusai Baroudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system. Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching.

  18. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning El...

  19. The Bleaching Syndrome: The Role of Educational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Per the Bleaching Syndrome, people of color, including African, Asian, and Latino Americans, are both victims and perpetrators of color discrimination. The Bleaching Syndrome encompasses perceptual, psychological, and behavioral sectors that affect students' schooling experiences. Education professionals, including teachers, administrators, and…

  20. The effects of habitat on coral bleaching responses in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (2007). Differences in bleaching responses between habitats were observed, with shallower sites Kanamai and Vipingo exhibiting lower bleaching incidence than deeper sites Nyali and Mombasa. These shallower lagoons display more fluctuating thermal and light environments than the deeper sites, suggesting that corals in the shallower lagoons have acclimatized and/or adapted to the fluctuating environmental conditions they endure on a daily basis and have become more resistant to bleaching stress. In deeper sites that did exhibit higher bleaching (Mombasa and Nyali), it was found that coral recovery occurred more quickly in the protected area than in the non-protected area.

  1. Eyebrow bleaching among females: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; Moussa, Noura A

    2011-06-01

    Eyebrow bleaching is a common practice among women with dark hair that allows for alterations in the eyebrows' shape without the use of hair removal. A literature search on this topic failed to reveal any extant studies. To explore the prevalence, associated motives, and side effects of eyebrow bleaching among women. Methods  A questionnaire about eyebrow bleaching was distributed randomly to female patients attending the outpatient clinics at a university hospital between June and August 2008. The response rate was 87.2%; with 567 of the 650 distributed questionnaires returned. The mean age was 32.01±10.17 years. 48.4% (253/522) of the participants reported having bleached their eyebrows. Of these individuals, 55.8% (101/181) experienced side effects related to eyebrow bleaching. These side effects included increased or decreased density of the eyebrow hair, and redness, itching, and scaling of the eyebrow skin. The motives behind eyebrow bleaching varied widely, but were primarily esthetic in nature. Younger women, students, and participants with higher monthly incomes reported bleaching their eyebrows a greater number of times than others (Pbleaching was reported to be a common practice. Bleaching was associated with local side effects in over 50% of those who use the technique. Thus, there is a need to educate the public about these side effects. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Investigating Motivations for Women's Skin Bleaching in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kelly M.; Robkin, Navit; Gaska, Karie; Njoki, Lillian Carol

    2011-01-01

    Why do many African women continue to use damaging skin-bleaching cosmetics that contain dangerous chemicals (e.g., mercury) that may increase their rates of infertility, skin cancer, and serious skin/brain/kidney disease? To address this question, our study investigated motivations driving the preservation of skin-bleaching practices in Tanzania.…

  3. Comparative bacterial degradation and detoxification of model and kraft lignin from pulp paper wastewater and its metabolites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amar Abhishek; Ashish Dwivedi; Neeraj Tandan; Urwashi Kumar

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, the chemical texture of kraft lignin in terms of pollution parameters (COD, TOC, BOD, etc.) was quite different and approximately twofold higher as compared to model lignin at same optical density...

  4. Centrifugal washing and recovery as an improved method for obtaining lignin precipitated from South African kraft mill black liquor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namane, M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study describes centrifugal recovery as an improved method for collection of lignin isolated from black liquor obtained from a South African kraft mill. Precipitation of lignin was achieved by utilising 6 M sulphuric acid. Recovery...

  5. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p 3.3). PMID:27034897

  6. The effect of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion of resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Hajizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This experimental study was designed to focus on the effects of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion in three types of composites with different filler size. Materials and Methods: Forty eight disks were prepared from three types of composite and divided into 6 groups. In the first three groups the abrasion test was done. The remaining groups were bleached and the abrasion test was performed. The weight of the samples before and after abrasion was measured. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: There was a significant difference in abrasion of composites with different filler size (P < 0.05. The most amount of abrasion was observed in Z100 after being bleached. An increase in abrasion was noticed in all three types of tested composite after bleaching. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is suggested to use a nano filled resin composite for restoration if the bleaching treatment is required.

  7. Database for estimating tree responses of walnut and other hardwoods to ground cover management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.W. Van Sambeek

    2010-01-01

    The ground cover in plantings of walnut and other hardwoods can substantially affect tree growth and seed production. The number of alternative ground covers that have been suggested for establishment in tree plantings far exceeds the number that have already been tested with walnut and other temperate hardwoods. Knowing how other hardwood species respond to ground...

  8. Examination of worldwide hardwood lumber production, trade, and apparent consumption: 1995-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    William G. Luppold; Matthew S. Bumgardner

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide hardwood lumber production fluctuated between 1995 and 2013 and changed considerably with respect to regional market shares. Similarly, worldwide hardwood lumber imports and exports have been constantly changing. Understanding these changes is important because collectively, they define the hardwood lumber consumption of a region or country. In 1995, North...

  9. Manufacturers and distributors in the U.S. hardwood lumber supply chain: Perceptions of industry trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar Espinoza; Urs Buehlmann; Matthew Bumgardner; Bob. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Global competition, a slowing housing market, and shifts in the customer base have contributed to reduced demand for hardwood lumber and have increased the need for specialized services by suppliers of hardwood lumber such as sawmills or distributors. Customers of hardwood lumber suppliers also have started initiatives to reduce internal costs dramatically, frequently...

  10. Environmental impact of producing hardwood lumber using life-cycle inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Bowe Bergman

    2008-01-01

    Using sustainable building materials is gaining a significant presence in the US. This study examined hardwood lumber manufacturing using life-cycle inventory methodology. Material flow and energy use were identified for hardwood sawmills in northeastern US. A hardwood log volume conversion of 43.7% to planed dry lumber was found. Values of 608 MJ/m3 of electrical and...

  11. The effect of wood supply and bleaching process on pulp brightness stability O efeito do tipo de madeira e do processo de branqueamento na estabilidade da alvura da polpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romildo Lopes Oliveira

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available One hundred different 5.5-year-old Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla wood clones were cooked to kappa number 15-17.5 and the resulting kraft pulps oxygen-delignified to kappa 9.5-11.5 under fixed conditions, except for chemical charges. Thirteen samples showing large variations in effective alkali requirement, pulp yield and O-stage efficiency and selectivity were selected for brightness reversion studies. These samples were bleached to 90-91% ISO by DEDD and DEDP sequences and their brightness stability and chemical characteristics determined. Heat reversion of the eucalyptus kraft pulps was strongly influenced by the wood supply, with brightness loss varying in the range of 2.1-3.6 and 0.8-1.7 %ISO for ODEDD and ODEDP bleached pulps, respectively. Pulps bleached by the ODEDP sequence showed reversion values 1.3-1.9 % ISO lower than those bleached by the ODEDD sequence. Pulp carbonyl content decreased by 35-40% during the final peroxide bleaching stage. Carbonyl and carboxyl groups correlated positively with brightness reversion, as did permanganate number and acid soluble lignin. Pulp final viscosity and metal and DCM extractives contents showed no significant correlation with brightness reversion. Pulping, oxygen delignification and ECF bleaching performances also showed no correlation with brightness reversion.Madeiras de 100 diferentes clones de Eucalyptus grandis e Eucalyptus urophylla, com aproximadamente 5,5 anos de idade, foram cozidas ao número kappa 15-17,5. As polpas kraft produzidas foram pré-deslignificadas com oxigênio ao número kappa 9,5-11,5, sob condições fixas. Treze polpas, que mostraram grandes variações na exigência da carga de álcali efetivo e rendimento no processo de polpação, seletividade e eficiência no estágio de Pré-O, foram selecionadas e branqueadas à alvura DE 90-91% ISO pelas seqüências DEDD e DEDP, para estudos de estabilidade de alvura e características químicas. A reversão de

  12. U.S. Hardwood Sawmill Log Procurement Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienn Andersch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available U.S. hardwood sawmill log procurement practices are evolving because of the recent economic recession, market and supply chain shifts, and changing landowner objectives, among other factors. The objective of this study was to characterize the log procurement practices of hardwood sawmills and to characterize the role that log brokers play in supplying the sawmill industry with raw material. To meet this objective, a mail survey on hardwood log procurement practices in the U.S. hardwood sawmill industry was conducted. Survey respondents highlighted several factors that had major effects on their businesses, including “Increasing fuel and trucking cost,” “High logging cost,” “Unpredictable log supply,” “Log shortages,” “Logger shortages,” and “Low log quality,” among others. Results showed that large sawmills tend to rely more on gatewood from loggers and stumpage harvested by company contract loggers than do small- and medium-sized sawmills. This study failed to find an increase in the role of log brokers as an intermediary between landowners and hardwood sawmills during the last decade. Moreover, sawmills indicated only a limited demand for log broker services, with log delivery and the procurement of specialty logs identified as being the most highly demanded broker services.

  13. IMPACT OF APPLYING BCTMP TO WOOD-FREE LWC ON ITS PERFORMANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaitang Hu,; Yonghao Ni; Xuejun Zou; Yajun Zhou

    2004-01-01

    Substituting bleached CTMP (BCTMP) for chemical pulps, such as bleached hardwood kraft pulp in many paper grades is in rising demand for reducing cost and improving product performance. In this paper we investigated the effect of substituting aspen BCTMP for hardwood kraft pulp (varying from 10% to 30%)on product performance of light weight coated paper.The results show that the tensile index increases and other strength properties are essentially unchanged as the substitution level increases. With the increased BCTMP substitution level, the surface roughness of base sheets increases slightly, while coating coverage of base sheets is not affected significantly. The increased BCTMP substitution results in an increase in porosity of the base sheets, but does not change the average pore diameter. Increasing BCTMP substitution level leads to a slight decrease in gloss and an increase in surface roughness of the coated paper, however the latter can be compensated by a higher nip load calendering.

  14. Brushing with a potassium nitrate dentifrice to reduce bleaching sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Van B; Cordero, Rafael; Wright, Kellie; Gendreau, Linda; Rupp, Ronald; Kotler, Mitchell; Littlejohn, Sonya; Fabyanski, Joyce; Smith, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    This research systematically evaluated the use of a clinically proven desensitizing dentifrice prior to a bleaching regimen in a randomized, multi-center, parallel group, open label clinical study following Good Clinical Practice guidelines. Fourteen dental offices in West Palm Beach, Florida participated in the study during April/May 2004. Fourteen days prior to bleaching, impressions and oral soft tissue assessments were performed, and patients were randomized to either a KNO3 plus fluoride dentifrice (Sensodyne Fresh Mint), or a standard fluoride dentifrice (Crest Regular), brushing 2x per day. On Day 14, patients returned to the dental office for their custom tray and the dispensation of a bleaching kit (Day White Excel 3; 9.5% hydrogen peroxide and KNO3). This was used daily according to the manufacturer's instructions for 30 minutes, and normal oral hygiene continued to be performed using the assigned toothbrush and dentifrice, brushing 2x per day. At the end of each bleaching day, patients answered diary questions about the occurrence and intensity of sensitivity. At the conclusion of the 14-day bleaching period (Day 28), patients returned to their dental office for re-examination, returning all products and diaries. Within seven days of completing the study, patients answered a telephone patient satisfaction survey. A total of 202 patients in fourteen (14) dental offices completed all aspects of the study and were used for the analysis. The professionally dispensed bleaching product provided an improvement of approximately 4.4 Vita shades, regardless of whether it was used with the KNO3 plus fluoride (Sensodyne) or a standard fluoride (Crest) dentifrice. The patient perception of increased sensitivity caused by the bleaching treatment was low but measurable. In the first week of the bleaching, significantly more patients using the KNO3 plus fluoride dentifrice were free from sensitivity (58%) than the standard fluoride dentifrice group (42%). During the 14

  15. The use of lactoperoxidase for the bleaching of fluid whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R E; Kang, E J; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2012-06-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) is the second most abundant enzyme in bovine milk and has been used in conjunction with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and thiocyanate (SCN⁻) to work as an antimicrobial in raw milk where pasteurization is not feasible. Thiocyanate is naturally present and the lactoperoxidase system purportedly can be used to bleach dairy products, such as whey, with the addition of very little H₂O₂ to the system. This study had 3 objectives: 1) to quantify the amount of H₂O₂ necessary for bleaching of fluid whey using the LP system, 2) to monitor LP activity from raw milk through manufacture of liquid whey, and 3) to compare the flavor of whey protein concentrate 80% (WPC80) bleached by the LP system to that bleached by traditional H₂O₂ bleaching. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk, annatto with 3% wt/vol norbixin content) was manufactured using a standard Cheddar cheesemaking procedure. Various levels of H₂O₂ (5-100 mg/kg) were added to fluid whey to determine the optimum concentration of H₂O₂ for LP activity, which was measured using an established colorimetric method. In subsequent experiments, fat-separated whey was bleached for 1h with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg (traditional) or 20 mg of H₂O₂/kg (LP system). The WPC80 was manufactured from whey bleached with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg or 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. All samples were subjected to color analysis (Hunter color values and norbixin extraction) and proximate analysis (fat, protein, and moisture). Sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were conducted on WPC80. Optimal LP bleaching in fluid whey occurred with the addition of 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. Bleaching of fluid whey at either 35 or 50°C for 1 h with LP resulted in > 99% norbixin destruction compared with 32 or 47% destruction from bleaching with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg, at 35 or 50°C for 1 h, respectively. Higher aroma intensity and increased lipid oxidation compounds were documented in WPC80 from

  16. The Acoustical Properties of Indonesian Hardwood Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcisius Rio Mardikanto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The acoustical properties of four Indonesian tropical hardwood species were evaluated in this study. The objectives of this study were to determine acoustical parameters e.g. logarithmic decrement, sound absorption, sound velocity as well as density and wood stiffness; and to evaluate the potential of those species for acoustical purposes. Sonokeling (Dalbergia latifolia, Mahoni (Swietenia mahagony, Acacia (Acacia mangium and Manii wood (Maesopsis eminii were selected in this research. Three different cutting plane patterns of sawn timber (quarter-sawn, flat-sawn, and plain-sawn were converted into small specimens. The methods for determining acoustical properties were longitudinal vibration testing and time of flight of ultrasonic wave method. The result showed no significant difference (α=0.05 of acoustical properties in logarithmic decrement, sound absorption, and ultrasonic velocity means on quarter-sawn, flat-sawn, and plain-sawn for all wood species tested. We found that Mahoni and Sonokeling had good acoustical properties of logarithmic decrement, ultrasonic wave velocity, and ratio of wood stiffness to wood density; and is preferred for crafting musical instruments. Acacia and Manii woods are recommended for developing acoustic panels in building construction because those species possess higher sound absorption values.

  17. Alternative Technologies for Biofuels Production in Kraft Pulp Mills—Potential and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esa Vakkilainen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The current global conditions provide the pulp mill new opportunities beyond the traditional production of cellulose. Due to stricter environmental regulations, volatility of oil price, energy policies and also the global competitiveness, the challenges for the pulp industry are many. They range from replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy sources to the export of biofuels, chemicals and biomaterials through the implementation of biorefineries. In spite of the enhanced maturity of various bio and thermo-chemical conversion processes, the economic viability becomes an impediment when considering the effective implementation on an industrial scale. In the case of kraft pulp mills, favorable conditions for biofuels production can be created due to the availability of wood residues and generation of black liquor. The objective of this article is to give an overview of the technologies related to the production of alternative biofuels in the kraft pulp mills and discuss their potential and prospects in the present and future scenario.

  18. Enzymatic polymerisation and effect of fractionation of dissolved lignin from Eucalyptus globulus Kraft liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, S; Fernández-Costas, C; Sanromán, M A; Moldes, D

    2012-10-01

    The potential ability of the laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila, either alone or with low molecular weight (LMW) additives, to polymerise a dissolved lignin from Kraft liquor of eucalypt cooking was investigated. A previous study of enzymatic performance (activity and stability) was carried out using a design experiment methodology. In addition, Kraft dissolved lignin (KDL) was fractionated according to two different protocols (solvent extraction and acidic fractionation) in order to identify possible lignin fractions with noticeable polymerisation ability. KDL and its corresponding lignin fractions were treated with laccase and analysed by size exclusion chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results provide conclusive evidence of notable lignin modifications after incubation with laccase. Moreover, lignin fractionation allows to obtain lignin fractions with different chemical characteristics and polymerisation capability. Depending on the type of raw lignin, molecular weight can increase from 4- to 21-fold by means of laccase polymerisation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Is It Necessary to Prepare the Enamel before Dental Bleaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Erika Michele dos Santos; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of distinct surface treatments on the microhardness and color of enamel that will be bleached. Surface treatments are tested, accordingly: G1, no treatment; G2, 2% sodium fluoride; G3, casein phosphopeptide paste; G4, 2% fluoride+Nd:YAG laser. Forty blocks from bovine teeth composed the sample that were tested in Knoop microhardness (n = 10) and in color change (n = 10). After 24 h, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was performed for 45 min. Microhardness and color changes (using parameters ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb) were assessed before and after bleaching. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p microhardness occurred immediately after bleaching in all groups, being greater in G1. Enamel color changed in all groups. Immediately after bleaching, there was a decrease on enamel microhardness. However, after 7 days, some of those specimens previously treated before bleaching significantly recovered their initial microhardness without influencing the esthetic results of bleaching. PMID:28280508

  20. ECF AND TCF BLEACHING OF SECONDARY FIBER PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ventorim

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ECF and TCF bleaching processes were evaluated for the bleaching of a deinked mixed office waste (MOW pulp sample produced in a pilot plant. The sample was bleached by all processes to a target brightness of 78 % ISO minimum. The results were interpreted on the basis of chemical cost to reach the target brightness, bleaching yield and bleached pulp quality as measured by viscosity, fluorescence and b* color coordinate. Among the ECF sequences, the mosattractive was the DEDD which showed the lowest chemical cost and produced bleached pulp of high quality as measured by viscosity, fluorescence and b* coordinate. The best TCF sequence with ozone was the Q(PO(ZQ(PO which resulted in very high brightness ceiling. This sequence decreased moderately the pulp b* coordinate and viscosity and slightly its fluorescence. Among the TCF sequences without ozone the Q(POQ(PO was the most effective but showed poor flexibility with regard to brightness ceiling. This sequence had little effect on pulp viscosity, fluorescence and b* coordinate. For all three  bleaching processes, it was determined that process yield is negatively affected by hot alkaline stages such as O, P and (PO.

  1. Influence of bleaching on stability of benzodiazepines in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegles, M; Marson, Y; Wennig, R

    2000-01-10

    In order to study the influence of hair bleaching on benzodiazepines concentrations, hair was treated with a bleaching product (Poly Blonde, Schwarzkopf & Henkel) for 20 min. The treated hair specimen was obtained from a person who died after an overdose of several illicit drugs associated with benzodiazepines. Bleached and non bleached hair were washed (acetone and water), pulverised and then incubated for 2 h in a thioglycolic solution. In the extracts obtained by solid-phase extraction on C18 columns, the different drugs with the corresponding deuterated standards were derivatized and determined by GC-MS in a SIM mode. These results show that the concentrations of all the drug detected decreased in bleached hair in comparison with non treated hair. Whereas the diminution was less important for cocaine and benzoylecgonine (decrease of 24.6 and 36.4%, respectively), concentrations for codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine decreased more significantly (decrease of 57.5, 88.6 and 67.4%, respectively) as well as those of diazepam, nordazepam and 7-aminoflunitrazepam (decrease of 39.7, 67.7 and 61.8%, respectively). The results in this study agree with those of other authors that bleaching affects the stability of cocaine and opiates incorporated in hair. These findings also point out that bleaching influences the stability of entrapped benzodiazepines in hair. Finally, these results reconfirm that it is very important to consider the cosmetic history of a hair sample in the interpretation of hair analysis results.

  2. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, M. M.; El-Shami, S. M.; Taha, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Peanut hulls (PNH) were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV), reduction in phospholipids (PL) and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN), PNH and Fuller's earth (FE) and PNH and O-passive (OP) and examined. The oxidative stability of oils was determined. Results for the investigated commercial bleaching clays revealed: TN > FE > F > TF > OP. Highest reduction in PV and PL, and highest bleachability were achieved for soybean oil bleached with 2% PNH carbonized at 500 degree centigrade for 30 min (PNH). Mixtures of PNH with the three chosen bleaching clays indicated that 1PNH : 2TN gave the highest bleachability. CSO was miscella bleached in hexane using PNH and resulted in an appreciable improvement in all oil characteristics, especially in bleachability. Oxidative stability of oils was in the following order: TN > control > FE > PNH with Induction period values of 23.1 > 6.43 > 5.73 > 2.85 h, respectively. (Author) 20 refs.

  3. Intrapulpal temperature variation during bleaching with various activation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Masae de Araujo Michida

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12: (G1 Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2 Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3 Bleaching gel + LED, (G4 Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. RESULTS: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (ºC in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV values were: 1.5ºC (G1, 2.9ºC (G2, 1.7ºC (G3 and 6.9ºC (G4. When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05, but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05 intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05 from each other. CONCLUSIONS: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group.

  4. Use of polymers and a surfactant in the treatment of Kraft process wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Seyffert, Hans J.

    1988-01-01

    This study-investigated the use of cationic polymers, and a surfactant, EHDABr, in the color removal treatment of Kraft pulp and paper wastewater. Four polymers were evaluated for their color removal performance by jar test procedures. The polymers removed between 77 and 87% of the wastewater color. The affect of pH upon polymer performance varied with the polymer tested. Powdered activated carbon addition improved the performance of the polymers. The color removal abili...

  5. Studies of lignin and polysaccharides recovery from kraft liquor for biotechnological applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, Diana; Ruzene, Denise S.; Silva,Daniel Pereira da; Teixeira, J. A; Gonçalves,Adilson Roberto

    2009-01-01

    According to the biorefinery concept, this study has the objective of evaluating alternatives for the valorization of all the kraft liquor fractions. This liquor consists mainly in lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Currently, cellulose pulp industries recover the cooking chemicals by burning and energy is introduced into the process. Sustainable development guidelines, regarding the costs and wastes reduction and biotechnology principles may present new solutions for the produc...

  6. INTEGRATION OF KRAFT PULPING ON A FOREST BIOREFINERY BY THE ADDITION OF A STEAM EXPLOSION PRETREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Martin-Sampedro; Maria E. Eugenio; Esteban Revilla; Juan A. Martin; J. Carlos Villar

    2011-01-01

    Steam explosion has been proposed for a wide range of lignocellulosic applications, including fractionation of biomass, pre-treatment of biomass for ethanol production, or as an alternative to conventional mechanical pulping. Nevertheless, a steam explosion process could also be used as pretreatment before chemical pulping, expecting a reduction in cooking time due to the open structure of the exploded chips. Thus, to evaluate the effect of steam explosion as a pretreatment in the kraft pulpi...

  7. Strukturen der Kraftübertragung im quergestreiften Muskel : Protein-Protein-Wechselwirkungen und Regulationsmechanismen

    OpenAIRE

    Gehmlich, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Im Mittelpunkt dieser Arbeit standen Signaltransduktionsprozesse in den Strukturen der Kraftübertragung quergestreifter Muskelzellen, d. h. in den Costameren (Zell-Matrix-Kontakten) und den Glanzstreifen (Zell-Zell-Kontakten der Kardiomyozyten).Es ließ sich zeigen, dass sich die Morphologie der Zell-Matrix-Kontakte während der Differenzierung von Skelettmuskelzellen dramatisch ändert, was mit einer veränderten Proteinzusammensetzung einhergeht. Immunfluoreszenz-Analysen von Skelettmuskelzelle...

  8. Precipitation and characterisation of lignin obtained from South African kraft mill black liquor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namane, M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available International Conference on Chemical Thermodynamics and South African Institution of Chemical Engineering Conference, Durban, South Africa, 27 July - 1 August 2014 Precipitation and characterisation of lignin obtained from South African kraft mill black... liquor Mpho Namane Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Durban, South Africa, Discipline of Chemical Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College ABSTRACT This presentation discusses what biorefinery means...

  9. KRAFT MILL BIOREFINERY TO PRODUCE ACETIC ACID AND ETHANOL: TECHNICAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Haibo Mao; Joseph M. Genco; Adriaan van Heiningen; Hemant Pendse

    2010-01-01

    The “near neutral hemicellulose extraction process” involves extraction of hemicellulose using green liquor prior to kraft pulping. Ancillary unit operations include hydrolysis of the extracted carbohydrates using sulfuric acid, removal of extracted lignin, liquid-liquid extraction of acetic acid, liming followed by separation of gypsum, fermentation of C5 and C6 sugars, and upgrading the acetic acid and ethanol products by distillation. The process described here is a variant of the “near n...

  10. The Effect of Enzymatic Treatments of Pulps on Fiber and Paper Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Žnidaršič-Plazl, P.; Rutar, V.; Ravnjak, D.

    2009-01-01

    Biotechnological treatment of pulps provides great potential for the reduction of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In the present work, the influence of different commercial cellulases and xylanases or their mixtures on the quality of different bleached kraft pulps was investigated. The effects of enzymes on reducing sugars release and changes in fiber length were assessed for 3 different eucalyptus pulps, for a pulp consisting of a mixture of hardwoods and for softwood pulp. ...

  11. Removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluent by aerobic biological treatment with steroidal metabolite detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Soledad; Vergara, Juan P; Jarpa, Mayra; Hernandez, Victor; Becerra, Jose; Vidal, Gladys

    2016-10-14

    Stigmasterol is a phytosterol contained in Kraft mill effluent that is able to increase over 100% after aerobic biological treatment. This compound can act as an endocrine disrupter as its structure is similar to that of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluents treated by a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with steroidal metabolite detection. The MBBR was operated for 145 days, with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Stigmasterol and steroidal metabolites were detected by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector during MBBR operation. The results show that the MBBR removed 87.4% of biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 61.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 24.5% of phenol and 31.5% of lignin, expressed in average values. The MBBR system successfully removed 100% of the stigmasterol contained in the influent (33 µg L(-1)) after 5 weeks of operation. In that case, the organic load rate was 0.343 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Furthermore, different steroidal compounds (e.g., testosterone propionate, stigmast-4-en-3-one, 5α-pregnan-12-one-20α-hydroxy, 5α-pregnane-3,11,20-trione and 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstane-11,17-dione were detected in the Kraft mill effluent as potential products of phytosterol biotransformation.

  12. A bleaching earth from egyptian local deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Kinawy, Omayma S.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the bleaching of vegetable oils using activated clays collected from some deposits in Egypt as compared to Tonsil FF currently used by local oil industry. The comparison was made; not only on the basis of the decolourising power of the earth, but also on the basis of its effects on the oil acidity, formation of the oil peroxides and the decomposition rate of the formed peroxides to aldehydes and ketones during the bleaching process. The activation of the collected earth samples was made using 4N HCl, 6N HCl and 30 % H2SO4. The bleaching tests of the activated samples were performed using the major four oil types processed in Egypt being cottonseed, sunflower, soybean and palm oils. In addition to the laboratory-evaluation tests, the performance of the activated samples, which showed promise on the lab-scale have been also tested on an industrial scale. The industrial application has proved that the activated local earth's can be successfully used as bleaching earth of local oils. Thus it can be used as a substitute of the varieties currently imported and used by the local oil sector.La presente investigación trata de la decoloración de aceites vegetales usando tierras activadas obtenidas de yacimientos egipcios, comparándola con el Tonsil FF usado normalmente en la industria oleícola local. La comparación se realizó, no sólo sobre la base del poder decolorante de la tierra, sino también sobre la base de sus efectos en la acidez del aceite, la formación de peróxidos y la velocidad de descomposición de los peróxidos formados en aldehidos y cetonas durante el proceso de decoloración. La activación de las muestras de tierras recogidas se hizo utilizando ClH 4N, ClH 6N y H2SO4 30 %. Los tests de decoloración de las muestras activadas se llevaron a cabo usando los cuatro tipos mayoritarios de aceites procesados en Egipto: aceite de semilla de algodón, de girasol, de soja y de palma. Además de los

  13. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  14. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  15. Study of Melanin Bleaching After Immunohistochemistry of Melanin-containing Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Melanin may interfere with immunohistochemical staining. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) bleaching, potassium permanganate bleaching, and potassium dichromate bleaching on melanin, tissue antigen, and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using melanin-containing and melanin-free tissue samples. Our results demonstrated that all 3 bleaching methods efficiently bleached melanin and partially destroyed tissue antigen. In addition, potassium perman...

  16. Recovery of acetic acid from pre-hydrolysis liquor of hardwood kraft-based dissolving pulp production process by reactive extraction with triisooctylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G; Jahan, M Sarwar; Ahsan, Laboni; Zheng, Linqiang; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-06-01

    Acetic acid was one of the main compositions of the pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL), which was recovered by reactive extraction with triisooctylamine (TIOA) diluted with decanol. Dilution of TIOA played an important role in extracting acetic acid from the PHL. The recovery of acetic acid from the PHL by TIOA was increased from 10.34% to 66.60% with the dilution of TIOA to 20% by decanol at the HAc to TIOA molar ratio of 1, consequently, the equilibrium distribution coefficient KD increased. The effects of time, temperature and pH on the extraction process were also studied. The extraction process was very fast. The acetic acid extraction decreased from 65.13% to 57.34% with the rise of temperature to 50°C from 20°C. A higher pH increased the dissociation of acetic acid, as a result, decreased acetic acid extraction. The hemicelluloses in the PHL were unaffected on the extraction process of acetic acid.

  17. Comparative bacterial degradation and detoxification of model and kraft lignin from pulp paper wastewater and its metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Amar; Dwivedi, Ashish; Tandan, Neeraj; Kumar, Urwashi

    2015-05-01

    Continuous discharge of lignin containing colored wastewater from pulp paper mill into the environment has resulted in building up their high level in various aquatic systems. In this study, the chemical texture of kraft lignin in terms of pollution parameters (COD, TOC, BOD, etc.) was quite different and approximately twofold higher as compared to model lignin at same optical density (OD 3.7 at 465 nm) and lignin content (2000 mg/L). For comparative bacterial degradation and detoxification of model and kraft lignin two bacteria Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens were isolated, screened and applied in axenic and mixed condition. Bacterial mixed culture was found to decolorize 87 and 70 % model and kraft lignin (2000 mg/L), respectively; whereas, axenic culture Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens decolorized 64, 60 % model and 50, 55 % kraft lignin, respectively, at optimized condition (34 °C, pH 8.2, 140 rpm). In addition, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 76, 61 % TOC; 80, 67 % COD and 87, 65 % lignin from model and kraft lignin, respectively. High pollution parameters (like TOC, COD, BOD, sulphate) and toxic chemicals slow down the degradation of kraft lignin as compared to model lignin. The comparative GC-MS analysis has suggested that the interspecies collaboration, i.e., each bacterial strain in culture medium has cumulative enhancing effect on growth, and degradation of lignin rather than inhibition. Furthermore, toxicity evaluation on human keratinocyte cell line after bacterial treatment has supported the degradation and detoxification of model and kraft lignin.

  18. Reuse of discarded deactivated bleaching earth in the bleaching of oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girgis, Adel Y.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Discarded bleaching earth was used after its reactivation for the bleaching of sunflower, soybean and corn oils. The efficiency of reactivated bleaching earth was compared to the efficiency of virgin activated bleaching earth. Acid reactivated earth (pH 2.5-3 had a slightly higher content in silicone than virgin activated or neutralized reactivated earths. The best results in the color of sunflower and corn oils were obtained when neutralized earth (pH 6–7 was used at 1 and 2 % levels. Acid reactivated earth used at 2 % achieved a higher reduction in soybean oil color than virgin earth (pH 3 at the same dosage. Both reactivated earths reduced peroxide value, iron, conjugated dienes and soap, while they increased acidity and conjugated trienes. Furthermore, these reactivated earths determined higher decrements in the oil induction period than virgin earth. Reactivated earth could be used for 5 cycles for the bleaching of soybean or corn oils and for more than 6 cycles for sunflower oil.Tierra decolorante desechada, fue empleada, tras su reactivación para decolorar aceites de girasol, soja y maíz. La eficiencia de la tierra decolorante reactivada fue comparada con la de la virgen activada. La tierra reactivada ácida (pH 2,5–3 tuvo ligeramente mayor contenido en silicona que la tierra virgen o la reactivada neutra. Los mejores resultados en el color de los aceites de girasol y maíz fueron obtenidos cuando se emplearon niveles del 1 y 2 % de tierra reactivada neutra (pH 6-7. La tierra ácida reactivada, usada al 2 % consiguió una mayor reducción del color del aceite de soja, que una misma dosis de tierra virgen (pH 3. Ambas tierras reactivadas redujeron el índice de peróxidos, hierro, dienos conjugados y jabón de los aceites, mientras que hicieron aumentar la acidez y los trienos conjugados. Además, estas tierras reactivadas determinaron mayores descensos en los periodos de inducción del aceite que la tierra virgen. Las tierras

  19. Cultivation of fast-growing hardwoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, E.H.; Abrahamson, L.P. (State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (United States). Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1991-10-01

    The intensive culture of hybrid poplar has received in-depth study as part of the Fast-Growing Hardwood Program. Research has concentrated on short-rotation intensive culture systems. Specific studies and operations included establishing and maintaining a nursery/cutting orchard, installing clone-site trials in central and southern New York State and initiating studies of no-till site preparation, nutrient utilization efficiency, wood quality and soil solution chemistry. The nursery/cutting orchard was used to provide material for various research plantings and as a genotype repository. Clone- site trials results showed that hybrid poplar growth potential was affected by clone type and was related to inherent soil-site conditions. No-till techniques were shown to be successful in establishing hybrid poplar in terms of survival and growth when compared to conventional clean tillage and/or no competition control, and can be considered for use on sites that are particularly prone to erosion. Nutrient use efficiency was significantly affected by clone type, and should be a consideration when selecting clones for operational planting if fertilization is to be effectively and efficiently used. Wood quality differed among clones with site condition and tree age inferred as important factors. Soil solution chemistry was minimally affected by intensive cultural practices with no measured adverse effect on soil water quality. Generally, results of these studies showed that appropriate hybrid poplar clones grown in short-rotation intensively cultured systems can be used successfully in New York State if proper site conditions exist and appropriate establishment and maintenance techniques are used. 37 refs., 4 figs., 22 tabs.

  20. anolyte as an alternative bleach for stained cotton fabrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    anolyte, colour change, sodium hypochlorite, bleach, stain ... Cotton is a natural fibre that is high in demand worldwide. ... various dyes are commonly used in the processing and .... prepared an hour before any test was carried out whereby ...

  1. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning......: 2h); G3- four 2-hour exposures to 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure: 8h); G4- two applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide, which was light-activated with halogen lamp at 700mW/cm² during 7min and remained in contact with enamel for 20min (total exposure: 40min). All bleaching treatments adopted...... analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were...

  2. Through bleaching and tsunami: Coral reef recovery in the Maldives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica; Lasagna, Roberta; Gatti, Giulia; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, Giuseppe; Colantoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Carlo Nike

    2015-09-15

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cover, which dropped to less than 10% after the bleaching, returned to pre-bleaching values of around 50% by 2013. The 2004 tsunami had comparatively little effect. In 2014, the coral community was similar to that existing before the bleaching. According to descriptors and metrics adopted, recovery of Maldivian coral reefs took between 6 and 15years, or may even be considered unachieved, as there are species that had not come back yet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bleaching of the red anthocyanin induced by superoxide radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, H; Uefuji, H; Sakihama, Y

    1996-08-01

    Red anthocyanin prepared from petals of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. was photobleached in the EDTA-riboflavin system. The rate of bleaching monitored at 565 nm depended on the light intensity and EDTA concentrations. Anaerobic conditions and/or addition of superoxide dismutase prevented the bleaching of anthocyanin, whereas mannitol and catalase did not. A similar bleaching was observed under dark conditions in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. The results indicate that anthocyanin is bleached by the nonenzymatic reaction with the superoxide radical and suggest that the pigment can function as an antioxidant. The antioxidative efficiency of cyanidin to superoxide was 10-fold higher than that of cyanidin-3-sophoroside as a Hibiscus anthocyanin.

  4. Ecology: Deep and complex ways to survive bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, John M.

    2015-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events can drive reefs from being the domains of corals to becoming dominated by seaweed. But longitudinal data show that more than half of the reefs studied rebound to their former glory. See Letter p.94

  5. Yield-increasing additives in kraft pulping: Effect on carbohydrate retention, composition and handsheet properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaaler, David Andre Grimsoeen

    2008-07-01

    In this thesis, increased hemicellulose retention during kraft pulping has been studied. The work has been divided into three parts: i) Development of an accessible and reliable method for determination of carbohydrate composition of kraft pulps ii) Investigation of the composition and molecular mass distributions of the carbohydrates in kraft pulps with increased hemicellulose content iii) Investigation of the effect of increased hemicellulose content on the sheet properties of kraft pulps with increased hemicellulose content. A method for carbohydrate determination was developed. In this method, enzymes are used to hydrolyse the pulp into monosaccharides. A relatively mild acid hydrolysis is performed prior to detection on an HPLC with an RI-detector. The pulp is not derivatized and no pre-treatment (mechanical or chemical) is needed to determine the carbohydrate composition using the method developed here. Peak deconvolution software is used to improve the accuracy. Polysulphide and H2S primarily increase the glucomannan yield, which can be boosted by up to 7 % on o.d. wood. However, the cellulose yield is more affected by the cooking time and the maximum yield increase of cellulose is approximately 2 % on o.d. wood compared to an ordinary kraft pulp. The cooking time is influenced by sulphide ion concentration, AQ addition and the final Kappa number. The xylan yield is remarkably stable, however the alkali profile during the cook may influence the xylan yield. Surface xylan content of the fibres depends on residual alkali concentration in the black liquor. The molecular mass distributions of cellulose and hemicellulose were determined for pulps with increased hemicellulose content using size exclusion chromatography. Deconvolution by peak separation software is used to gain information about the degree of polymerization for cellulose and hemicellulose. The average DP of glucomannan in the kraft fibre was found to be 350 +- 30 and the average DP of xylan in the

  6. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia MONDELLI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser, a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05. Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C. The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C. The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures.

  7. BLEACHING OF SULFONATED CMP FROM BIO-TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongYu; MenghuaQin; XuemeiLu; YinboQu; PeijiGao

    2004-01-01

    Wheat straw chemi-mechanical pulp was pretreated with a crude xylanase which was secreted by white rot fungus Phanerochaete Chrysosporium prior to hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The process of xylanase pretreatment and hydrogen peroxide bleaching was optimized. The xylanase treated pulp achieved a brightness gain of 5.8% ISO over the untreated pulp. The xylanase treatment was found to liberate reducing sugars and facilitating lignin removal. Fiber morphology of pulp treated with xylanase was also studied by SEM.

  8. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; SOARES, Ana Flávia; PANGRAZIO, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; WANG, Linda; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sergio Kiyoshi; BOMBONATTI, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  9. Peroxide Bleaching of Bagasse Kraft Pulp with Enzymes Pretreatment%木腐菌胞外酶漂白蔗渣硫酸盐浆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄峰; 陈嘉翔; 詹怀宇; 高培基

    1999-01-01

    利用木腐菌Phanerochaete chrysosporium ME446和LIP14菌株所产胞外酶结合H2O2对蔗渣硫酸盐浆进行几种漂序漂白实验,结果表明酶处理段放在氧脱木素后漂白效果较好;ME446酶和LIP14酶处理使蔗渣硫酸盐浆氧脱木素浆终漂白度分别比对照提高4.2%ISO和6.0%ISO,LIP14酶漂白效果好于ME446酶,表明锰依赖过氧化物酶(MnP)在硫酸盐浆漂白中作用重要;木腐菌胞外酶中纤维素酶活力有损漂白浆强度,应用中应予以控制;酶处理结合碱抽提能有效降低漂白浆卡伯值,但漂白浆终漂白度不一定因此有所提高.

  10. Study on Kraft Pulping and Bleaching of the Pulp from E. Globulus%蓝桉硫酸盐法制浆和漂白性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建; 李雪芝; 石淑兰; 胡惠仁

    2003-01-01

    对蓝桉硫酸盐法制浆和漂白性能进行了研究.结果表明,蓝桉具有优良的制浆造纸性能,其较佳的蒸煮工艺条件为:用碱量14%(Na2O),硫化度30%,液比1:5,H-因子1000.采用有元素氯漂白、ECF漂白和TCF漂白程序,均可制得高白度、高强度的蓝桉漂白硫酸盐浆.其中采用CEpH、DEpP漂白程序,漂白浆白度均在86%ISO以上,抗张指数分别达到85.26N@m/g和78.12N@m/g,撕裂指数分别达到7.48mN@m2/g和9.06mN@m2/g.

  11. Advanced oxidation process H2O2/UV combined with anaerobic digestion to remove chlorinated organics from bleached kraft pulp mill wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Botelho Ruas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tuvo como objetivo investigar la aplicación de un proceso de oxidación avanzada basado en la combinación de peróxido de hidrógeno con la radiación ultravioleta (H2O2/UV para eliminar compuestos recalcitrantes de presentes en los efluentes de blanqueamiento de pulpa celulosita. Con el fin de degradar la materia orgánica fácilmente hidrolizable, se utilizo como pretratamiento el reactor anaerobio horizontal de lecho fijo (RAHLF. El reactor RAHLF operó con un tiempo de detención hidráulica (TRH de 19 horas, alcanzando eficiencias de remoción de DQO (61 ± 3%, COT (69 ± 9%, DBO5 (90 ± 5% y AOX (55 ± 14%. Sin embargo, en el tratamiento anaerobio no se observo una reducción considerable de compuestos aromáticos medidos como UV254. Adicional a lo anterior, se presento un aumento de la lignina, medida como fenoles totales. La aplicación del proceso de oxidación avanzada como postratamiento del efluente anaerobio, mostró una ampliagama de eficiencias de remoción en función de la dosis aplicada de peróxido de hidrógeno y la radiación ultravioleta: la DQO varió de 0 a 11%, la UV254 del 16 al 35%, la lignina 0-29% y los AOX variaron del 23 al 54%. Todas las dosis de peróxido aplicado en este trabajo promovieron un aumento en la razón de biodegradabilidad aerobia (DBO5/DQO. Con este estudio se demuestra la viabilidad técnica del uso de H2O2/UV como post-tratamiento de efluentes previamente tratados por procesos anaerobios.

  12. Application of Biochemical Markers for Population Level Assessment of a White Sucker (Catostomus commersoni) Population Exposed to Bleached Kraft Pulp Mill Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    A need in ecological risk assessment is an approach that can be used to link chemically-induced alterations in molecular and biochemical endpoints to adverse outcomes in whole organisms and populations. A predictive population model was developed to translate changes in fecundit...

  13. Stand structure and stocking control in Appalachian mixed hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    George R., Jr. Trimble; H. Clay Smith

    1976-01-01

    Uneven-aged management using a "q" technique for structure control is discussed for Appalachian mixed hardwoods. The success in attaining stand structure goals with periodic selection cuts was evaluated. Where these goals had not been reached, the authors speculated, on the basis of current stand conditions, whether they would be reached, and if so, when. For...

  14. A century of progress in weed control in hardwood seedbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South

    2009-01-01

    Weeds have existed in nurseries since before the time Bartram grew hardwoods during the 18th century. Hand weeding was the primary method of weed control during the first part of the 20th century. From 1931 to 1970, advances in chemistry increased the use of herbicides, and advances in engineering increased the reliance on machines for cultivation. Many managers now...

  15. Validation of an internal hardwood log defect prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The type, size, and location of internal defects dictate the grade and value of lumber sawn from hardwood logs. However, acquiring internal defect knowledge with x-ray/computed-tomography or magnetic-resonance imaging technology can be expensive both in time and cost. An alternative approach uses prediction models based on correlations among external defect indicators...

  16. Testing and analysis of internal hardwood log defect prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The severity and location of internal defects determine the quality and value of lumber sawn from hardwood logs. Models have been developed to predict the size and position of internal defects based on external defect indicator measurements. These models were shown to predict approximately 80% of all internal knots based on external knot indicators. However, the size...

  17. Indicators of regenerative capacity for eastern hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; Todd W. Bowersox; Patrick H. Brose; Daniel A. Devlin; James C. Finley; Steve Horsley; Kurt W. Gottschalk; Tonya W. Lister; Larry H. McCormick; Gary W. Miller; Kim C. Steiner; Susan L. Stout; James A. Westfall; Robert L. White

    2004-01-01

    Hardwood forests of the eastern United States are characterized by a complex mix of species associations that make it difficult to construct useful indicators of long-term sustainability, in terms of future forest composition and stocking levels. The Pennsylvania Regeneration Study examines regeneration adequacy in the state. The study uses the Forest Service's...

  18. Simulation of hydrology of short rotation hardwood plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Parsons; Carl C. Trettin

    2001-01-01

    A 76 ha hardwood plantation at Trice Research Forest near Sumter, SC is being usedto study forest hydrology on an operational scale. The overall objective of this project is to develop tools to enable forest managers to assess and manage sustainable short rotation woody crop production systems. This paper reports on the use of the water management model, WATRCOM, as a...

  19. Decay fungi of oaks and associated hardwoods for western arborists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessie A. Glaeser; Kevin T. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Examination of trees for the presence and extent of decay should be part of any hazard tree assessment. Identification of the fungi responsible for the decay improves prediction of tree performance and the quality of management decisions, including tree pruning or removal. Scouting for Sudden Oak Death (SOD) in the West has drawn attention to hardwood tree species,...

  20. OPTIGRAMI: Optimum lumber grade mix program for hardwood dimension parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    David G. Martens; Jr., Robert L. Nevel; Jr. Nevel

    1985-01-01

    With rapidly increasing lumber prices and shortages of some grades and species, the furniture industry must find ways to use its hardwood lumber resource more efficiently. A computer program called OPTIGRAMI is designed to help managers determine the best lumber to use in producing furniture parts. OPTIGRAMI determines the least-cost grade mix of lumber required to...

  1. Technical considerations in harvesting and sawing defective hardwood butts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas W., Jr. Church; Thomas W. Church

    1971-01-01

    How important are butt defects in hardwoods? We have no reliable estimate of the volume or value of timber lost through basal injuries. However, butt defects will be almost as important in future timber harvests as they are at present. Why? Because most butt defects are due to two causes: fire and logging. Damage from both these agents may be reduced, but it certainly...

  2. Butt-log grade distributions for five Appalachian hardwood species

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Myers; Gary W. Miller; Harry V., Jr. Wiant; Joseph E. Barnard; Joseph E. Barnard

    1986-01-01

    Tree quality is an important factor in determining the market value of hardwood timber stands, but many forest inventories do not include estimates of tree quality. Butt-log grade distributions were developed for northern red oak, black oak, white oak, chestnut oak, and yellow-poplar using USDA Forest Service log grades on more than 4,700 trees in West Virginia. Butt-...

  3. Regional analysis of hardwood lumber production: 1963 - 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Luppold; Matthew Bumgardner

    2008-01-01

    Between 1963 and 2005 hardwood lumber production in the eastern United States increased by more than 50%. Production more than doubled in the northeastern and north central regions while increasing by less than 25% in the southeastern and south central regions. Increased lumber production in the northern regions was facilitated by an expanding sawtimber inventory,...

  4. Mistletoes on Hardwoods in the United States (FIDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert F. Scharpf; Frank G. Hawksworth

    1974-01-01

    The traditional use of mistletoes during holiday seasons, their involvement in folklore and legend, their consumption by domestic and wild animals, and their use for medicinal purposes make mistletoes of widespread interest to the public. The fact that these plants are parasites that injure and eventually kill trees both conifers and hardwoods is not well known. Two...

  5. A Machine Vision System for Automatically Grading Hardwood Lumber - (Proceedings)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Conners; Tai-Hoon Cho; Chong T. Ng; Thomas H. Drayer; Joe G. Tront; Philip A. Araman; Robert L. Brisbon

    1990-01-01

    Any automatic system for grading hardwood lumber can conceptually be divided into two components. One of these is a machine vision system for locating and identifying grading defects. The other is an automatic grading program that accepts as input the output of the machine vision system and, based on these data, determines the grade of a board. The progress that has...

  6. Machine Vision Systems for Processing Hardwood Lumber and Logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip A. Araman; Daniel L. Schmoldt; Tai-Hoon Cho; Dongping Zhu; Richard W. Conners; D. Earl Kline

    1992-01-01

    Machine vision and automated processing systems are under development at Virginia Tech University with support and cooperation from the USDA Forest Service. Our goals are to help U.S. hardwood producers automate, reduce costs, increase product volume and value recovery, and market higher value, more accurately graded and described products. Any vision system is...

  7. Current status of the U.S. hardwood industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urs Buehlmann; Matthew Bumgardner; Michael. Sperber

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. manufacturing sector has seen challenging years during the past decades. The major driver behind the decline of U.S. manufacturing prowess has been the ongoing globalization of trade, which has brought market share losses for U.S.-based manufacturing in many hardwood lumber consuming industries. The wood furniture, flooring, and millwork industries, for...

  8. Hardwood biochar influences calcareous soil physicochemical and microbiological status

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of biochar application to calcareous soils are not well documented. In a laboratory incubation study, a hardwood-based, fast pyrolysis biochar was applied (0, 1, 2, and 10% by weight) to a calcareous soil. Changes in soil chemistry, water content, microbial respiration, and microbial com...

  9. Computer Vision Systems for Hardwood Logs and Lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip A. Araman; Tai-Hoon Cho; D. Zhu; R. Conners

    1991-01-01

    Computer vision systems being developed at Virginia Tech University with the support and cooperation from the U.S. Forest Service are presented. Researchers at Michigan State University, West Virginia University, and Mississippi State University are also members of the research team working on various parts of this research. Our goals are to help U.S. hardwood...

  10. The effect of combined bleaching techniques on oral microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz-Montan Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of 10% and 37% carbamide peroxide during dental bleaching in three different modes. Materials and Methods : This five-week double-blind randomized controlled trial included 32 volunteers assigned to four groups (n = 8. Each group received bleaching agents or placebo as an in-office and at-home treatment. The dental bleaching techniques were: In-office bleaching (37% carbamide peroxide: CP37; at-home bleaching (10% carbamide peroxide: CP10 and the association of both (CP37 and CP10. Saliva samples were collected right before (baseline, right after, 12 hours after, and seven days after the treatment. Counts of total microorganisms, Streptococci, and Mutans streptococci were carried out. Friedman test (α = 0.05 was used to compare the microorganism counts. Results : The number of the all oral microorganisms remained stable during all experiment. Conclusions : No bleaching agent (CP37, CP10 or the combination of both was able to reduce the oral microorganisms tested.

  11. Effect of Kraft Pulping Pretreatment on the Chemical Composition, Enzymatic Digestibility, and Sugar Release of Moso Bamboo Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoxing Huang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, kraft pulping was carried out on moso bamboo residues as a pretreatment and its impact on the chemical compositions and the digestibility of the sample was investigated. Meanwhile, steam explosion and sulfuric acid pretreatments were also carried out on the sample to determine their impacts on enzymatic saccharification. Results showed that kraft pulping pretreatment removed a significant amount of lignin from the sample, and its enzymatic saccharification was enhanced. Approximately 95% of the lignin was removed with the optimized kraft pulping pretreatment (26% effective alkali charge, 24% sulfidity, 160 °C, and 70 min cooking time. Consequently, about 79% and 77% yields of glucan and xylan, respectively, were achieved with enzymatic saccharification from the pretreated sample. As a result, 352 g, 128 g, and 88 g sugars were generated from 1000 g of samples pretreated by kraft pulping, steam explosion, and sulfuric acid, respectively. The results suggested that kraft pulping can be a remarkably effective pretreatment applied on moso bamboo residues (i.e., lignin-rich biomass for sugars released, compared to steam explosion and sulfuric acid pretreatment.

  12. Validation of degree heating weeks as a coral bleaching index in the northwestern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayanne, Hajime

    2017-03-01

    Mass bleaching is the most significant threat to coral reefs. The United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration monitors world sea surface temperature (SST) and releases warnings for bleaching based on degree heating weeks (DHW), which is the accumulation of temperature anomalies exceeding the monthly maximum mean SST for a given region. DHW values >4.0 °C-weeks are thought to induce bleaching, and those >8.0 °C-weeks are thought to result in widespread bleaching and some mortality. This study validates the effectiveness of DHW as a mass bleaching index by on-site historical observation at eight sites in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The mass bleaching events occurred during different years at different sites. The recorded years of the bleaching events matched well with DHW values >8 °C-weeks, and the logistically projected probability of bleaching against DHW showed a positive relationship. DHW provides a reasonable threshold for bleaching.

  13. A 5-Year Assessment Of Shortleaf Pine And Hardwood Sprouts Relative To Three Methods Of Hardwood Control In The Arkansas Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Cain

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - Compared with untreated checks, manual hardwood control and herbicide injection of hardwoods facilitated the development of direct seeded shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) regeneration following a single-tree selection harvest in a mature natural stand of shortleaf pines in northwest Arkansas. Five years after...

  14. Effects of Alkali Treatment and Polyisocyanate Crosslinking on the Mechanical Properties of Kraft Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Gao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of alkali treatment and polyisocyanate crosslinking on the mechanical properties of kraft fiber-reinforced UPE composites were investigated by means of tensile evaluation, SEM analysis, and XRD analysis. The results indicated that the alkali treatment decreased the tensile strength of the prepared composite before aging from 121 MPa to 97 MPa due to the decreased degree of crystallinity of the alkali-treated kraft fiber. Polyisocyanate crosslinking could apparently improve the mechanical properties and stability in terms of a 43% increase of non-aged tensile strength and 52% increase of hydrothermal-aged tensile strength compared with the controlled composite without crosslinking modification, which was attributable to the formation of strong chemical bonding between the interfaces of kraft fiber and polyester.

  15. Determination of burial dose in incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, A.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    We determine the burial dose in three known-age incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz. Estimation of burial dose in incompletely bleached samples requires that the characteristics of the well-bleached part of the distribution are known in order to distinguish between...... well-bleached and poorly bleached grains. It is especially important to investigate if the uncertainties assigned to individual estimates of dose adequately describe the observed variability in well-bleached dose distributions. We investigate this by quantifying the overdispersion in laboratory...

  16. Characterization of Hairdresser Exposure to Airborne Particles during Hair Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Patrik T; Marini, Sara; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Kåredal, Monica; Blomgren, Eva; Nielsen, Jörn; Buonanno, Giorgio; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory symptoms among hairdressers are often ascribed to the use of bleaching powders that contain persulfate salts. Such salts can act as allergens and airway irritants but the mechanisms behind the negative health effects are not fully known. In order to understand why some hairdressers experience respiratory symptoms during, and after, sessions of hair bleaching, it is of importance to characterize how exposure occurs. In this work we used time and particle size resolved instrumentation with the aim to measure the concentration of particles that hairdressers are exposed to during sessions of hair bleaching. We also used filter samples to collect particles for quantitative determination of persulfate (S2O8(2-)) content and for analysis by light microscopy. Two different types of bleaching powders were used, one marked as dust-free and one without this marking (denoted regular). The time resolved instrumentation revealed that particles 10 µm) were emitted during application of the bleaching, when both the regular and the dust-free powders were used. The measured level of persulfate, sampled in the breathing zone of the hairdressers, was on average 26 µg m(-3) when the regular powder was used and 11 µg m(-3) when the dust-free powder was used. This indicates that use of dust-free powder does not eliminate exposure to persulfates, it only lowers the concentration. We show that the site of sampling, or position of the hairdresser with regards to the hair being bleached, is of high importance in the determination of persulfate levels and exposure. This work focuses on the physical and chemical characterization of the particles released to the air and the results are important for accurate exposure assessments. Accurate assessments may in turn lead to a better understanding of why some hairdressers experience respiratory symptoms from hair bleaching sessions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene

  17. Laccase-initiated cross-linking of lignocellulose fibres using a ultra-filtered lignin isolated from kraft black liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elegir, G; Bussini, D; Antonsson, S; Lindström, M E; Zoia, L

    2007-12-01

    In this work, the effect of Trametes pubescens laccase (TpL) used in combination with a low-molecular-weight ultra-filtered lignin (UFL) to improve mechanical properties of kraft liner pulp and chemi-thermo-mechanical pulp was studied. UFL was isolated by ultra-filtration from the kraft cooking black liquor obtained from softwood pulping. This by-product from the pulp industry contains an oligomeric lignin with almost twice the amount of free phenolic moieties than residual kraft pulp lignin. The reactivity of TpL on UFL and kraft pulp was studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. Laccase was shown to polymerise UFL and residual kraft pulp lignin in the fibres, seen by the increase in their average molecular weight and in the case of UFL as a decrease in the amount of phenolic hydroxyls. The laccase initiated cross-linking of lignin, mediated by UFL, which gives rise to more than a twofold increase in wet strength of kraft liner pulp handsheets without loosing other critical mechanical properties. Hence, this could be an interesting path to decrease mechano-sorptive creep that has been reported to lessen in extent as wet strength is given to papers. The laccase/2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) mediator system showed a greater increase in wet tensile strength of the resulting pulp sheets than the laccase/UFL system. However, other mechanical properties such as dry tensile strength, compression strength and Scott Bond internal strength were negatively affected by the laccase/ABTS system.

  18. Characterization of kraft pulp mill particulate emissions—A summary of existing measurements and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, John E.; Blosser, Russell O.

    Particulate matter emission sources at a kraft pulp mill include kraft recovery furnaces, lime kilns, smelt dissolving tanks and power boilers. Chemical and physical characteristics of these paniculate emissions are reviewed. Measurements of particle size distributions for these sources made with cascade impactors and microscopic counting techniques both before and after paniculate control devices such as multiple cyclones, wet scrubbers, and electrostatic precipitalors are discussed. In general, particles with equivalent diameters less than 3 jim comprise the bulk of the controlled paniculate emissions from all sources. Sodium sulfate is the dominant paniculate emission from kraft recovery furnaces, smelt dissolving tanks and lime kilns. Results from a field investigation of the relationship between human observations of near-stack plume opacity and measured in-stack paniculate concentrations and opacities are summarized. Trained cenified panels of observers were used in the investigation to estimate plume opacities from two kraft recovery furnaces, a combination wood/coal-fired boiler, and a combination wood/oil-fired boiler at four different pulp mill locations. Plume opacities were varied from near-zero to 45 % by adjustment of the paniculate control equipment operation. The effects of different background viewing conditions, observer positions, observer experience levels, and plume characteristics are enumerated. It is concluded that there can be substantial variations between measured in-stack opacities and human perceptions of near-stack plume opacities. The degree of agreement between the human judgements and measured in-stack opacities is significantly affected by the background viewing conditions. It is further shown that even with a panel of six or seven trained observers with similar visual acuity, there can be significant departures of individual opacity readings from the panel mean opacity. Although this investigation deals with questions of human

  19. A comprehensive program to develop correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, A.L.; Zaman, A.A.

    1998-05-01

    The overall objective of the program was to develop correlations to predict physical properties within requirements of engineering precision from a knowledge of pulping conditions and of kraft black liquor composition, if possible. These correlations were to include those relating thermodynamic properties to pulping conditions and liquor composition. The basic premise upon which the research was based is the premise that black liquor behaves as a polymer solution. This premise has proven to be true, and has been used successfully in developing data reduction methods and in interpreting results. A three phase effort involving pulping, analysis of liquor composition, and measurement of liquor properties was conducted.

  20. Eucalyptus kraft black liquor enhances growth and productivity of Spirulina in outdoor cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, V.S.; Singh, G.; Ramamurthy, V. [Thapar Institute of Engineering and Technology, Patiala (India)

    1995-07-01

    Mass cultivation of microalgae for commercial applications suffers from poor productivities when measured against laboratory results or theoretical projections. In an effort to reduce this gap it was discovered that addition of eucalyptus kraft black liquor (BL) enhanced biomass productivity in outdoor cultures of Spirulina by increasing growth rate by 38% and biomass yield by 43%. BL treatment resulted in elevation of nitrogen assimilating enzyme activities and efficiency of phosphate utilization. Analyses of forenoon and afternoon oxygen production rates (OPRs) indicated higher photosynthetic and respiratory activity in BL-treated cultures compared to untreated cultures. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Yield-increasing additives in kraft pulping: Effect on carbohydrate retention, composition and handsheet properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaaler, David Andre Grimsoeen

    2008-07-01

    In this thesis, increased hemicellulose retention during kraft pulping has been studied. The work has been divided into three parts: i) Development of an accessible and reliable method for determination of carbohydrate composition of kraft pulps ii) Investigation of the composition and molecular mass distributions of the carbohydrates in kraft pulps with increased hemicellulose content iii) Investigation of the effect of increased hemicellulose content on the sheet properties of kraft pulps with increased hemicellulose content. A method for carbohydrate determination was developed. In this method, enzymes are used to hydrolyse the pulp into monosaccharides. A relatively mild acid hydrolysis is performed prior to detection on an HPLC with an RI-detector. The pulp is not derivatized and no pre-treatment (mechanical or chemical) is needed to determine the carbohydrate composition using the method developed here. Peak deconvolution software is used to improve the accuracy. Polysulphide and H2S primarily increase the glucomannan yield, which can be boosted by up to 7 % on o.d. wood. However, the cellulose yield is more affected by the cooking time and the maximum yield increase of cellulose is approximately 2 % on o.d. wood compared to an ordinary kraft pulp. The cooking time is influenced by sulphide ion concentration, AQ addition and the final Kappa number. The xylan yield is remarkably stable, however the alkali profile during the cook may influence the xylan yield. Surface xylan content of the fibres depends on residual alkali concentration in the black liquor. The molecular mass distributions of cellulose and hemicellulose were determined for pulps with increased hemicellulose content using size exclusion chromatography. Deconvolution by peak separation software is used to gain information about the degree of polymerization for cellulose and hemicellulose. The average DP of glucomannan in the kraft fibre was found to be 350 +- 30 and the average DP of xylan in the

  2. Influence of remineralizing gels on bleached enamel microhardness in different time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; D'Avila, Thaís Corrêa; Takahashi, Camila Lurie; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alexandre Luis Souto

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH, the effect of applying remineralizing gels after bleaching and the effect of artificial saliva on enamel microhardness. Seventy bovine incisors were divided into three groups: Group 1 (n=10) received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide neutral gel (n=30) and Group 3 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide acid gel (n=30). Each experimental group was subdivided into three groups (n=10) according to the post-bleaching treatment: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel and application of a combination of calcium and fluoride gel. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 7, 15 and 30 days and enamel microhardness was evaluated. The Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by three-way RM ANOVA, which revealed a significant difference only for treatment factor. The Tukey's test showed that the groups bleached followed by no additional treatment exhibited microhardness means significantly lower than the bleached groups treated with remineralizing gels. The Dunnet's test showed a significant difference only for the group bleached with acid gel without remineralizing treatment compared to the control group measured immediately after bleaching. It was concluded that acid bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness and that use of remineralizing gels after bleaching can significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel.

  3. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  4. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  5. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel after dental bleaching associated with fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, John A; Bittencourt, Bruna; Michel, Milton; Sabino, Nilson; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara M M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects on human enamel after two bleaching procedures: with a fluoridated bleaching agent and with topical fluoride application postbleaching. It used 43 enamel blocks (3 mm(2) ) that were ground flat (600-2,000 grit) and polished with polishing paste (one and one-fourth). Specimens were randomly divided into three groups according to the bleaching procedure: (1) control group, (2) hydrogen peroxide 35% (HPF) and topical application of fluoride 1.23%, and (3) HP 38% (OP) with fluoride in its composition. Bleaching agents were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three methodologies were used: nanoindentation, to observe surface hardness and elastic modulus; atomic force microscopy, to observe surface roughness (R(a) - R(z)); and scanning electron microscopy, to observe the enamel surface effects. Group OP had a decrease in the elastic modulus after bleaching, which was recovered at 14 days. An increased roughness (R(a); 32%) was observed on group HPF and had an increased erosion on enamel surface (67%). It was concluded that topical application of fluoride, after using the nonfluoridated whitening agent, increased the roughness values and erosion of enamel.

  6. Coral Reef Bleaching at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep Atolls, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramar Vinoth; Mohan Gopi; Thipramalai Thankappanpillai Ajith Kumar; Thirunavukarassu Thangaradjou; Thangavel Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    A survey on coral bleaching was carried out at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep from May to June 2010.Elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the region exceeded the seasonal average and delayed the onset of monsoon,which triggered widespread bleaching of corals.The Agatti reefs showed an average of 73% bleached corals with apparent bleaching-related mortality of sea anemones (87%) and giant clams (83%).The SST increased up to 34 ℃ with an average maximum SST of 32.5℃ during the study period between May and June 2010.Coral reefs on the southern side of the island are fully or partially exposed to sun light during low tide in contrast to the other side.This suggests that the mortality is more likely due to the low tide exposure than exclusively due to the elevated SST.Observations indicated a clear increase in coral bleaching during April 2010,at levels higher than that in normal summer.

  7. Antioxidant therapy enhances pulpal healing in bleached teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Fonseca Lima

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of an antioxidant therapy on the pulp tissue of rat teeth exposed to a bleaching gel with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods Forty rats were subjected to oral ingestion by gavage of distilled water (DW or ascorbic acid (AA 90 min before the bleaching therapy. For the bleaching treatment, the agent was applied twice for 5 min each to buccal surfaces of the first right mandibular molars. Then, the animals were sacrificed at 6 hr, 24 hr, 3 day, or 7 day post-bleaching, and the teeth were processed for microscopic evaluation of the pulp tissue. Results At 6 hr, the pulp tissue showed moderate inflammatory reactions in all teeth of both groups. In the DW and AA groups, 100% and 80% of teeth exhibited pulp tissue with significant necrosis and intense tissue disorganization, respectively. At 24 hr, the AA-treated group demonstrated a greater regenerative capability than the DW group, with less intense inflammatory reaction and new odontoblast layer formation in 60% of the teeth. For up to the 7 day period, the areas of pulpal necrosis were replaced by viable connective tissue, and the dentin was underlined by differentiated odontoblast-like cells in most teeth of both groups. Conclusions A slight reduction in initial pulpal damage during post-bleaching was promoted by AA therapy. However, the pulp tissue of AA-treated animals featured faster regenerative potential over time

  8. Bacteria associated with the bleached and cave coral Oculina patagonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Omry; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2008-04-01

    The relative abundance of bacteria in the mucus and tissues of Oculina patagonica taken from bleached and cave (azooxanthellae) corals was determined by analyses of the 16S rRNA genes from cloned libraries of extracted DNA and from isolated colonies. The results were compared to previously published data on healthy O. patagonica. The bacterial community of bleached, cave, and healthy corals were completely different from each other. A tight cluster (>99.5% identity) of bacteria, showing 100% identity to Acinetobacter species, dominated bleached corals, comprising 25% of the 316 clones sequenced. The dominant bacterial cluster found in cave corals, representing 29% of the 97 clones sequenced, showed 98% identity to an uncultured bacterium from the Great Barrier Reef. Vibrio splendidus was the most dominant species in healthy O. patagonica. The culturable bacteria represented 0.1-1.0% of the total bacteria (SYBR Gold staining) of the corals. The most abundant culturable bacteria in bleached, cave, and healthy corals were clusters that most closely matched Microbulbifer sp., an alpha-proteobacterium previously isolated from healthy corals and an alpha-protobacterium (AB026194), respectively. Three generalizations emerge from this study on O. patagonica: (1) More bacteria are associated with coral tissue than mucus; (2) tissue and mucus populations are different; (3) bacterial populations associated with corals change dramatically when corals lack their symbiotic zooxanthellae, either as a result of the bleaching disease or when growing in the absence of light.

  9. Labile proteins accumulated in damaged hair upon permanent waving and bleaching treatments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inoue, Takafumi; Ito, Mayumi; Kizawa, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    .... These results suggest that a portion of the stable proteins in normal hair was transformed into labile proteins upon permanent waving and bleaching treatments. Consequently, permed and bleached hair tends to release the resultant labile proteins.

  10. Anaphylaxis, contact urticaria, and allergic asthma caused by persulfates in hair bleaching products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Schuttelaar, M.L.; Coenraads, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Persulfate salts are potent oxidizing agents in hair bleach products that accelerate the bleaching process. Ammonium and potassium persulfates may cause delayedtype and immediate skin reactions. Also allergic asthma and rhinitis have been described. Objectives: Ammonium and potassium

  11. Anaphylaxis, contact urticaria, and allergic asthma caused by persulfates in hair bleaching products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Schuttelaar, M.L.; Coenraads, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Persulfate salts are potent oxidizing agents in hair bleach products that accelerate the bleaching process. Ammonium and potassium persulfates may cause delayedtype and immediate skin reactions. Also allergic asthma and rhinitis have been described. Objectives: Ammonium and potassium per

  12. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent.

  13. Tooth-bleaching procedures and their controversial effects: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Alqahtani, Mohammed Q.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This review article will help clinicians improve their understanding of the history of bleaching procedures, bleaching types, components, mechanisms, and their effects on soft tissue, tooth structures, resin composite, and bonding. Methods: The controversial issues about bleaching procedures and their effects are reviewed. Additionally, the consequences of pre- and post-bleaching on the bonding potential of composite resin restorations to tooth structure are discussed. Conclusion: ...

  14. Bleaching of red lake paints in encaustic mummy portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliani, Costanza; Daveri, Alessia; Spaabaek, Lin; Romani, Aldo; Manuali, Valentina; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    The present paper reports on the study of the development of whitish opacity in pink paints in encaustic mummy portraits. Non-invasive measurements carried out on two encaustic portraits belonging to the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, by reflectance FTIR and UV-vis fluorescence have shown that the areas prone to the bleaching phenomenon had been painted with melted beeswax and an anthraquinone vegetal lake mixed with calcium sulphate hemihydrate and dihydrate. The hypothesis that the bleaching disease was neither related to a degradation of the dyes nor to an alteration of the wax but rather to a dehydration-hydration reaction of the CaSO4-H2O system, has been corroborated by the analyses of two microsamples from the bleached areas and ascertained by accelerated ageing experiments on encaustic models.

  15. Combined ultrasound-laccase assisted bleaching of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Carlos; Tzanov, Tzanko; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluates the potential of using ultrasound to enhance the bleaching efficiency of laccase enzyme on cotton fabrics. Ultrasound of low intensity (7W) and relatively short reaction time (30 min) seems to act in a synergistic way with the enzyme in the oxidation/removal of the natural colouring matter of cotton. The increased bleaching effect could be attributed to improved diffusion of the enzyme from the liquid phase to the fibres surface and throughout the textile structure. On the other hand inactivation of the laccase occurred increasing the intensity of the ultrasound. However, at the ultrasound power applied in the bleaching experiments the loss of enzyme activity was not significant enough to justify the use stabilizer such as polyvinyl alcohol. Furthermore, the polyvinyl alcohol appears to be a substrate for the laccase.

  16. SUGARCANE BAGASSE PULPING AND BLEACHING: THERMAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Fernandes Pereira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose fibers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse in three stages. Initially sugarcane bagasse was subjected to a pre-treatment process with hydrolyzed acid to eliminate hemicellulose. Whole cellulosic fibers thus obtained were then subjected to a two-stage delignification process and finally to a bleaching process. The chemical structure of the resulting cellulose fibers was studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to analyze the effects of hydrolysis, delignification, and bleaching on the structure of the fibers. Two different thermal analysis techniques were used to study the bleaching cellulose fibers. These techniques confirmed that cellulose fibers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse. A future goal is to use these fibers as reinforcement elements in composites, organic-inorganic hybrid, and membranes for nanofiltration.

  17. Enzymatic Transesterification of Kraft Lignin with Long Acyl Chains in Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Hulin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Valorization of lignin is essential for the economic viability of the biorefinery concept. For example, the enhancement of lignin hydrophobicity by chemical esterification is known to improve its miscibility in apolar polyolefin matrices, thereby helping the production of bio-based composites. To this end and due to its many reactive hydroxyl groups, lignin is a challenging macromolecular substrate for biocatalyzed esterification in non-conventional media. The present work describes for the first time the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of Kraft lignin in ionic liquids (ILs. Three lipases, three 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ILs and ethyl oleate as long chain acyl donor were selected. Best results were obtained with a hydrophilic/hydrophobic binary IL system (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate/1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluoro- phosphate, 1/1 v/v and the immobilized lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB that afforded a promising transesterification yield (ca. 30%. Similar performances were achieved by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as a coating agent for CALB rather than as a co-solvent in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethane-sulfonate thus limiting the use of hydrophobic IL. Structural characterization of lignin oleate was performed by spectroscopic studies (FTIR and 1H-NMR. The synthesized lignin oleate exhibited interesting thermal and textural properties, different from those of the original Kraft lignin.

  18. Prediction of kraft mill total reduced sulphur emissions using vapour-liquid equilibrium theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, A.; Branion, R.; Duff, S.; Posarac, D. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Pageau, G. [Howe Sound Pulp and Paper Ltd., Port Mellon, BC (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    Most kraft pulp mills in Canada have installed some form of noncondensable gas (NCG) system to collect and treat air emissions that include odorous total reduced sulphur compounds with hydrogen sulphide and the organic compounds methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide or dimethyl disulphide. However, the extent of these systems varies greatly. Therefore, in order to optimize the design and operation of these NCG systems, it would be beneficial to have a simple but accurate method of predicting emissions without direct measures. This paper presented a method to predict total reduced sulphur (TRS) emissions from kraft pulp mills using correlations based on the vapour-liquid equilibrium (VLE) theory. The brown stock washing area of the Howe Sound mill provided samples which were tested to determine the concentration of TRS compounds. Heat and material balances of the washing line were constructed using CADSim Plus simulation software. Emissions of these volatile sulphur compounds were simulated by incorporating a VLE module into the software. This study also extended the simulation balances to include NCG emissions from process equipment. It was concluded that the newly proposed method can be used to optimize the operation of NCG systems, to evaluate TRS control alternatives and to improve the accuracy of environmental reporting. 14 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  19. Combination of steam explosion and laccase-mediator treatments prior to Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sampedro, R; Eugenio, M E; Carbajo, J M; Villar, J C

    2011-07-01

    The effect of a pretreatment consisting of steam explosion (SE) followed by a laccase mediator system (LMS) stage on Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulping has been evaluated and compared with fungal pretreatments. Pretreatment with SE and LMS was more efficient than pretreatments using Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes sp. I-62. Steam explosion not only improved the enzyme penetration into the wood chips and shortened the pulping process by 60%, but also extracted around 50% of the hemicelluloses which could be converted into value-added products. The optimal conditions for the LMS treatment were 3h, 3UA/g and 40°C. Compared to SE, the SE/LMS treatment yielded an increase in delignification of 13.9% without affecting pulp properties, provided a similar screened kraft yield, and reduced consumption of chemical reagents Na(2)S and NaOH by 11.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Therefore, SE/LMS is a promising pretreatment for converting the pulp mill into a forest bio-refinery.

  20. INTEGRATION OF KRAFT PULPING ON A FOREST BIOREFINERY BY THE ADDITION OF A STEAM EXPLOSION PRETREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martin-Sampedro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Steam explosion has been proposed for a wide range of lignocellulosic applications, including fractionation of biomass, pre-treatment of biomass for ethanol production, or as an alternative to conventional mechanical pulping. Nevertheless, a steam explosion process could also be used as pretreatment before chemical pulping, expecting a reduction in cooking time due to the open structure of the exploded chips. Thus, to evaluate the effect of steam explosion as a pretreatment in the kraft pulping of Eucalyptus globulus, steam exploded chips and control chips were subjected to kraft cookings. Steam exploded chips provided pulps with reductions of kappa number by up to 70% with no significant change in viscosity. Therefore, the cooking time could be shortened by 60%, increasing the productivity and obtaining pulps with similar delignification degree to those of the control pulp. Furthermore, not only the production rate could be increased, but also most of the hemicelluloses could be recovered before pulping and converted to a value-added product. Finally, although exploded pulp had inferior mechanical strength, the optical properties, which are more important in eucalyptus pulps, were found to be better.

  1. Krafting an agreement: Negotiations to reduce pollution from the Nordic pulp industry, 1985--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, M. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1996-05-01

    International environmental accords frequently contain obligations that may be easily satisfied by their signatories. Observers have speculated why it is in a state`s interests to sign agreements that lack strict conditions, but policy analysts lack a coherent model explaining how such agreements are formalized. Knowledge, values, and authority are key forces that elucidate how environmental accords are developed with provisions that are easily executable. This dissertation examines the formulation of Helsinki Commission recommendations to reduce emissions of organochlorines from Nordic kraft pulp mills. The kraft pulp industry, the largest industrial pollution emitter to the Baltic Sea, is also a crucial foreign exchange earner for both Sweden and Finland. Hence, Swedes and Finns were the most active participants in regional negotiations to reduce organochlorine emissions. Key variable analysis explains how obstacles in various regional negotiations were overcome, and how parties constructed a recommendation with obligations that could be easily accommodated. The two sides never agreed about the level of risk posed by organochlorines in the marine environment. This problem influenced the strictness of pollution limits specified in the final agreement. But, the parties overcame formidable obstacles in the negotiations, including: (1) concerns about costs to industry and competitive disadvantages in the pulp and paper sector; (2) disagreement about technologies to combat the problem; and (3) domestic rule-making schedules that were out of sync.

  2. Biofilms from micro/nanocellulose of NaBH$_4$-modified kraft pulp

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AYHAN TOZLUOGLU; BAYRAM POYRAZ; ZEKI CANDAN; MUSTAFA YAVUZ; RECAI ARSLAN

    2017-08-01

    Industrial applications of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) have been inuse for some time; however, there is a need to improve the production steps and at the same time to obtain better qualityproducts. NFC and MFC were generated from NaBH$_4$-modified kraft pulp, produced from a red gum tree plant (Eucalyptuscamaldulensis). The generated NFC and MFC were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, Fouriertransform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ${}^{13}$C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).Morphological and viscoelastic properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and rheometry, respectively.The storage moduli of biofilms produced from NFC and MFC were investigated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis(DMTA). Both exhibited mostly identical FTIR spectra. When the spectra were compared with those of NaBH4-modifiedkraft pulp, minor shifts were observed due to crystallinity. In NMR spectra, disordered cellulose structures were observedfor both NFC and MFC, and these findings were also confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. Rheology studiesrevealed that the lowest viscosity was observed with MFC. TGA results showed that NFC degraded earlier compared withNaBH$_4$-modified kraft pulp. DMTA exhibited that NFC films had about six times higher storage modulus compared withMFC.

  3. Growth of Pinus radiada in soil containing solid waste from the kraft pulp industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, M.; Vicuna, R.; Gonzalez, B.; Bronfman, M. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Santiago (Chile); Osses, M. [Celulosa Arauco y Constitucion, Arauco (Chile); Toro, J.; Balocchi, C.; Rodriguez, E. [Bioforest, S.A, Concepcion (Chile)

    2000-06-01

    The germination and growth of Pinus radials Don. plantlets in solid residues deriving from a Kraft pulp industry was evaluated. Plant conditions were monitored by histological studies of roots and shoot-tips, as well as by plant analyses of several essential and non essential elements. The solids employed consisted of ashes, fly-ashes, dregs, grits, primary sludge, brown stock screening rejects and various mixtures of them. Their addition, in a range of combinations to sandy/metamorphic or marine terrace/clay soils, resulted in effective and sustained growth under greenhouse conditions. Low proportions of wastes favored growth in most cases, indicating that they may act as fertilisers. In some experiments, especially in those where waste was added in proportions ranging from 50% to 60%, germination and/or development were slightly affected. Two-year old field experiments have confirmed that in spite of the high pH values, Na ion content or elevated water retention capacity exhibited by some of the solids tested, their use is beneficial for the growth of radiate pine. To date, we have not observed negative effects other than growth inhibition when some solids are present at concentrations above 60%. Our preliminary results suggest that an adequate use as fertiliser of solid waste from the Kraft pulp industry may constitute a profitable alternative in its management. (orig.)

  4. Bio-based polyurethane prepared from Kraft lignin and modified castor oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Tavares

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Current challenges highlight the need for polymer research using renewable natural sources as a substitute for petroleum-based polymers. The use of polyols obtained from renewable sources combined with the reuse of industrial residues such as lignin is an important agent in this process. Different compositions of polyurethane-type materials were prepared by combining technical Kraft lignin (TKL with castor oil (CO or modified castor oil (MCO1 and MCO2 to increase their reactivity towards diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI. The results indicate that lignin increases the glass transition temperature, the crosslinking density and improves the ultimate stress especially for those prepared from MCO2 and 30% lignin content from 8.2 MPa (lignin free to 23.5 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs of rupture surface after uniaxial tensile tests show ductile-to-brittle transition. The results show the possibility to develop polyurethane-type materials, varying technical grade Kraft lignin content, which cover a wide range of mechanical properties (from large elastic/low Young modulus to brittle/high Young modulus polyurethanes.

  5. Estimation of Acacia melanoxylon unbleached Kraft pulp brightness by NIR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António J. A. Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The ability of NIR spectroscopy for predicting the ISO brightness was studied on unbleached Kraft pulps of Acacia melanoxylon R. Br. Area of study: Sites covering littoral north, mid interior north and centre interior of Portugal. Materials and methods: The samples were Kraft pulped in standard identical conditions targeted to a kappa number of 15. A Near Infrared (NIR partial least squares regression (PLSR model was developed for the ISO brightness prediction using 75 pulp samples with a variation range of 18.9 to 47.9 %. Main results: Very good correlations between NIR spectra and ISO brightness were obtained. Ten methods were used for PLS analysis (cross validation with 48 samples, and a test set validation was made with 27 samples. The 1stDer pre-processed spectra coupling two wavenumber ranges from 9404 to 7498 cm-1 and 4605 to 4243 cm-1 allowed the best model with a root mean square error of ISO brightness prediction of 0.5 % (RMSEP, a r2 of 99.5 % with a RPD of 14.7. Research highlights: According to AACC Method 39-00, the present model is sufficiently accurate to be used for process control (RPD ≥ 8

  6. Chlorine dioxide project allows Stora to clean up, use hardwoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butters, G.

    1988-10-01

    Effluent fouling into the Strait of Canso between Nova Scotia mainland and Cape Breton Island has caused Stora Forest Industries Ltd. to develop a $5.6 million solution to its chlorine and acid problems. In 1987, Stora produced about 160,000 tonnes of market pulp where their resource base increasingly consisted of hardwood. The company uses hardwood chips for a growing percentage of its annual pulp production and for its hog fuel boiler, but became faced with having to use more local hardwoods which contributes to the resin problem. Their solution was to construct a 12-tpd chlorine dioxide generator, a process using dry sodium chlorate added to concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, The products are chlorine dioxide and highly concentrated sulphuric acid resulting from the elimination of water at the starting point. This will eliminate the acid effluent from the generator and the sulphuric acid will be recycled to the top of the chlorine dioxide generation process. In the new process, ClCO/sub 2/ replaces 70% of the chlorine in the first stage, with 100% substitution a goal. In addition to eliminating the chlorine, other benefits include an increase in pulp production, a nominal increase in pulp strength, lower production costs, and an economic incentive to harvest the area's mixed-wood stands.

  7. Coral diseases and bleaching on Colombian Caribbean coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Camacho, Raúl; Gil-Agudelo, Diego Luis; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Alberto; Reyes-Nivia, María Catalina; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Since 1998 the National Monitoring System for the Coral Reefs of Colombia (SIMAC) has monitored the occurrence of coral bleaching and diseases in some Colombian coral reefs (permanent stations at San Andres Island, Rosario Islands, Tayrona, San Bernardo Islands and Urabá). The main purpose is to evaluate their health status and to understand the factors that have been contributing to their decline. To estimate these occurrences, annual surveys in 126 permanent belt transects (10 x 2m) with different depth intervals (3-6 meters, 9-12 meters and 15-18 meters) are performed at all reef sites. Data from the 1998-2004 period, revealed that San Andrés Island had many colonies with diseases (38.9 colonies/m2), and Urabá had high numbers with bleaching (54.4 colonies/m2). Of the seven reported coral diseases studied, Dark Spots Disease (DSD), and White Plague Disease (WPD) were noteworthy because they occurred in all Caribbean monitored sites, and because of their high interannual infection incidence. Thirty five species of scleractinian corals were affected by at least one disease and a high incidence of coral diseases on the main reef builders is documented. Bleaching was present in 34 species. During the whole monitoring period, Agaricia agaricites and Siderastrea siderea were the species most severely affected by DSD and bleaching, respectively. Diseases on species such as Agaricia fragilis, A. grahamae, A. humilis, Diploria clivosa, Eusmilia fastigiata, Millepora complanata, and Mycetophyllia aliciae are recorded for first time in Colombia. We present bleaching and disease incidences, kinds of diseases, coral species affected, reef localities studied, depth intervals of surveys, and temporal (years) variation for each geographic area. This variation makes difficult to clearly determine defined patterns or general trends for monitored reefs. This is the first long-term study of coral diseases and bleaching in the Southwestern Caribbean, and one of the few long

  8. Effect of nightguard vital bleaching gel on the color stability of provisional restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Omar Bajunaid

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Composite-based provisional material showed highest color stability when exposed to vital tooth bleaching gel, whereas methacrylate-based material was the least color stable. Polycarbonate crowns were more color stable when exposed to 15% bleaching gel as opposed to 10% bleaching gel.

  9. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage "Chicha Morada" in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio; Tay, Lidia Yileng

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3).

  10. Improvement in thermostability of metagenomic GH11 endoxylanase (Mxyl) by site-directed mutagenesis and its applicability in paper pulp bleaching process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Digvijay Verma T

    2013-12-01

    An attempt has been made for enhancing the thermostability of xylanase (Mxyl) retrieved from a compost-soil-based metagenomic library. The analysis of the structure of xylanase by molecular dynamics simulation revealed more structural fluctuations in β-sheets. When the surface of β-sheets was enriched with arginine residues by substituting serine/threonine by site-directed mutagenesis, the enzyme with four arginine substitutions (MxylM4) exhibited enhanced thermostability at 80 °C. The T 1/2 of MxylM4 at 80 °C, in the presence of birchwood xylan, increased from 130 to 150 min at 80 °C without any alteration in optimum pH and temperature and molecular mass. Improvement in thermostability of MxylM4 was corroborated by increase in T m by 6 °C over that of Mxyl. The K m of MxylM4, however, increased from 8.01 ± 0.56 of Mxyl to 12.5 ± 0.32 mg ml(-1), suggesting a decrease in the affinity as well as specific enzyme activity. The Mxyl as well as MxylM4 liberated chromophores and lignin-derived compounds from kraft pulp, indicating their applicability in pulp bleaching.

  11. KINETICS OF DELIGNIFICATION AND CARBOHYDRATE DEGRADATION DURING OXYGEN BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L Nguyen

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate degradation during oxygen bleaching is associated with cleavage reactions. It is apparent that the loss of the cellulose DP (degree ofpolymisation)is strongly affected by the extent of the delignification. A strong linear correlation can be established between the DP of cellulose chains and the residual lignin in the pulp. The Nuclear Growth concept and Percolation Theory for heterogenous system can be combined to formulate kinetic models for both the delignification and the degradation of carbohydrate. The models prediction is statistically robust and can be applied to different pulps at different bleaching conditions.

  12. Sunflower oil bleaching by adsorption onto acid-activated bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Foletto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Two bentonite clays with different mineralogical compositions from Mendoza, Argentine, were activated with H2SO4 solutions of 4 and 8 N at 90ºC for 3.5 hours. This treatment affected clay structural properties, as was shown by thermogravimetry, infrared spectrometry and chemical analysis. Bleaching efficiency for sunflower oil was strongly dependent on the acid concentration used for clay activation. The samples have bleaching capacity comparable to that observed with a commercial adsorbent standard. The mineralogical composition of natural clays influenced the properties of the activated clays.

  13. Climatological context for large-scale coral bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, A. D.; Casey, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching was first observed in 1979 and has occurred throughout virtually all of the tropics since that time. Severe bleaching may result in the loss of live coral and in a decline of the integrity of the impacted coral reef ecosystem. Despite the extensive scientific research and increased public awareness of coral bleaching, uncertainties remain about the past and future of large-scale coral bleaching. In order to reduce these uncertainties and place large-scale coral bleaching in the longer-term climatological context, specific criteria and methods for using historical sea surface temperature (SST) data to examine coral bleaching-related thermal conditions are proposed by analyzing three, 132 year SST reconstructions: ERSST, HadISST1, and GISST2.3b. These methodologies are applied to case studies at Discovery Bay, Jamaica (77.27°W, 18.45°N), Sombrero Reef, Florida, USA (81.11°W, 24.63°N), Academy Bay, Galápagos, Ecuador (90.31°W, 0.74°S), Pearl and Hermes Reef, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (175.83°W, 27.83°N), Midway Island, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (177.37°W, 28.25°N), Davies Reef, Australia (147.68°E, 18.83°S), and North Male Atoll, Maldives (73.35°E, 4.70°N). The results of this study show that (1) The historical SST data provide a useful long-term record of thermal conditions in reef ecosystems, giving important insight into the thermal history of coral reefs and (2) While coral bleaching and anomalously warm SSTs have occurred over much of the world in recent decades, case studies in the Caribbean, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, and parts of other regions such as the Great Barrier Reef exhibited SST conditions and cumulative thermal stress prior to 1979 that were comparable to those conditions observed during the strong, frequent coral bleaching events since 1979. This climatological context and knowledge of past environmental conditions in reef ecosystems may foster a better understanding of how coral reefs will

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL EMPIRICAL MODEL TO ESTIMATE THE KRAFT PULP YIELD OF FAST-GROWING EUCALYPTUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several kraft pulps were produced by kraft pulping of fast-growing Eucalyptus with a wide range of cooking conditions. The dependences between pulp yields and some pulp properties, namely, kappa number, HexA contents, and cellulose viscosities, were well investigated. It was found that kraft pulp yields linearly decreased with the reduction of HexA-free kappa number in two different stages, respectively, in which a transition point of measured pulp yield of 48.7% was observed. A similar relationship between pulp yield and HexA was also found, in which the resulting transition point of HexA content was 67 μmol/g. Moreover, the logarithm of pulp viscosity was linearly proportional to the reduction of lignin-free pulp yields. Then, a novel empirical model was successfully developed based on these findings. The parameters in this empirical model were calculated by least-squares estimation using the experimental data from active alkali values of 13.2, 14.7 and 17.8. Another data set was used to verify the effectiveness of this model in predicting the pulp yields. Finally, a good agreement (a linear regression coefficient of 90.59% between experimental and fitting data was obtained, which indicated that the kraft pulp yield of fast-growing Eucalyptus could be accurately predicted by this novel empirical model.

  15. Solvent free depolymerization of Kraft lignin to alkyl-phenolics using supported NiMo and CoMo catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Chowdari Ramesh; Anand, Narani; Kloekhorst, Arjan; Cannilla, Catia; Bonura, Giuseppe; Frusteri, Francesco; Barta, Katalin; Heeres, Hero Jan

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic hydrotreatment of Kraft lignin using sulfided NiMo and CoMo catalysts on different acidic and basic supports (Al2O3, ZSM-5, activated carbon (AC) and MgO-La2O3) was studied in the absence of a solvent. Experiments were carried out in a batch set-up at a reaction temperature of 350

  16. Preparation and characterization of Kraft lignin-based moisture-responsive films with reversible shape-change capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmeyer, Ian; Chowdhury, Sudip; Kadla, John F

    2013-07-08

    Preparation of moisture-responsive Kraft lignin-based materials by electrospinning blends of Kraft lignin fractions with different physical properties is presented. The differences in thermal mobility between lignin fractions are shown to influence the degree of interfiber fusion occurring during oxidative thermostabilization of electrospun nonwoven fabrics, resulting in different material morphologies including submicrometer fibers, bonded nonwovens, porous films, and smooth films. The relative amount of different lignin fractions and degree of fiber flow and fiber fusion is shown to influence the tendency for the electrospun materials to be transformed into moisture-responsive materials capable of reversible changes in shape. Material characterization by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy as well characterization of the chemical and physical properties of Kraft lignin fractions by dynamic rheology, 1H and 13C NMR, and gel permeation chromatography combined with multiangle laser light scattering are presented. A proposed mechanism underlying moisture-responsiveness, shape change, and shape recovery is discussed based on the differences in chemical structure and physical properties of Kraft lignin fractions.

  17. Future trends in environmental impact of eucalyptus-based Kraft pulp industry in Thailand: a scenario analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jawjit, W.; Kroeze, C.; Soontaranun, W.; Hordijk, L.

    2008-01-01

    This study explores possible future trends in the environmental impact of the Kraft pulp industry in Thailand between 2000 and 2020. Scenarios were developed to analyze the effect of different options to reduce the future environmental impact, and the costs associated with the implementation of thes

  18. Solvent free depolymerization of Kraft lignin to alkyl-phenolics using supported NiMo and CoMo catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Chowdari Ramesh; Anand, Narani; Kloekhorst, Arjan; Cannilla, Catia; Bonura, Giuseppe; Frusteri, Francesco; Barta, Katalin; Heeres, Hero Jan

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic hydrotreatment of Kraft lignin using sulfided NiMo and CoMo catalysts on different acidic and basic supports (Al2O3, ZSM-5, activated carbon (AC) and MgO-La2O3) was studied in the absence of a solvent. Experiments were carried out in a batch set-up at a reaction temperature of 350 degr

  19. MASCULINIZATION OF FEMALE MOSQUITO FISH IN KRAFT MILL EFFLUENT -CONTAMINATED FENHOLLOWAY RIVER WATER IS ASSOCIATED WITH ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AGONIST ACTIVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Female mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis holbrooki) downstream from Kraft paper mills in Florida display masculinization of the anal fin, an androgen-dependent trait. The current investigation was designed to determine if water contaminated with pulp-mill effluent (PME) from the Fen...

  20. Future trends in environmental impact of eucalyptus-based Kraft pulp industry in Thailand: a scenario analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jawjit, W.; Kroeze, C.; Soontaranun, W.; Hordijk, L.

    2008-01-01

    This study explores possible future trends in the environmental impact of the Kraft pulp industry in Thailand between 2000 and 2020. Scenarios were developed to analyze the effect of different options to reduce the future environmental impact, and the costs associated with the implementation of

  1. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the discoloration between hybrid composite and nano composite before and after the application of tooth bleaching agent, 38% hydrogen peroxide. Methods: Eighteen disk-shaped specimens (5 mm of each of two composite resins, hybrid and nano filler, were prepared. The each group was treated 3 times and the specimens were divided into two groups consisted of 9 specimens for each, and then immersed in black tea solutions for 72 hours. Next, after having staining and bleaching processes, the color of the specimens was measured with a optic spectrophotometer by using photo with type BPY-47 and digital microvolt. The differences of the light intensity among three measurements were then calculated. Afterwards, GLM MANOVA Repeated Measure and parametric analysis (Independent t-test and Paired t-test were then used to analyze the data. Results: After staining process, it is then known that the nano composite had more discoloration and more affected by the black tea solution than the hybrid one. Conclusion: After bleaching, the discoloration was finally removed completely from both hybride and nano filler composite resins and became brighter from the baseline color.Latar belakang: Salah satu problem estetik adalah adanya perubahan warna pada gigi anterior. Peningkatan pemakaian bahan bleaching semakin popular. Banyak dokter gigi mempunyai problem ketika mereka akan melakukan proses bleaching dan ditemukan banyak

  2. Fire effects on wildlife in Central Hardwoods and Appalachian regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Craig A.; Ford, William; Lashley, Marcus A.; Moorman, Christopher; Stambaugh, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Fire is being prescribed and used increasingly to promote ecosystem restoration (e.g., oak woodlands and savannas) and to manage wildlife habitat in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachian regions, USA. However, questions persist as to how fire affects hardwood forest communities and associated wildlife, and how fire should be used to achieve management goals. We provide an up-to-date review of fire effects on various wildlife species and their habitat in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachians. Documented direct effects (i.e., mortality) on wildlife are rare. Indirect effects (i.e., changes in habitat quality) are influenced greatly by light availability, fire frequency, and fire intensity. Unless fire intensity is great enough to kill a portion of the overstory, burning in closed-canopy forests has provided little benefit for most wildlife species in the region because it doesn’t result in enough sunlight penetration to elicit understory response. Canopy reduction through silvicultural treatment has enabled managers to use fire more effectively. Fire intensity must be kept low in hardwoods to limit damage to many species of overstory trees. However, wounding or killing trees with fire benefits many wildlife species by allowing increased sunlight to stimulate understory response, snag and subsequent cavity creation, and additions of large coarse woody debris. In general, a fire-return interval of 2 yr to 7 yr benefits a wide variety of wildlife species by providing a diverse structure in the understory; increasing browse, forage, and soft mast; and creating snags and cavities. Historically, dormant-season fire was most prevalent in these regions, and it still is when most prescribed fire is implemented in hardwood systems as burn-days are relatively few in the growing season of May through August because of shading from leaf cover and high fuel moisture. Late growing-season burning increases the window for burning, and better control on woody composition is

  3. Taxonomic, spatial and temporal patterns of bleaching in anemones inhabited by anemonefishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Frisch, Ashley J; Ford, Benjamin M; Thums, Michele; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Furby, Kathryn A; Berumen, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species) at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%); however, this percentage was much higher (19-100%) during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance. Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked to the ability of host anemones to cope with rising sea temperatures associated with

  4. Taxonomic, spatial and temporal patterns of bleaching in anemones inhabited by anemonefishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul A Hobbs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments. Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%; however, this percentage was much higher (19-100% during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked

  5. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    KAUST Repository

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.

    2013-08-08

    Background:Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms.Methodology/Principal Findings:This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species) at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%); however, this percentage was much higher (19-100%) during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance.Conclusions/Significance:Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked to the ability of host

  6. Three-month evaluation of vital tooth bleaching using light units-a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polydorou, O; Wirsching, M; Wokewitz, M; Hahn, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the color stability of vital bleaching using a halogen unit, laser, or only chemical activation up to three months after treatment. A total of 60 patients were divided into three groups, and their teeth were bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide using three methods: acceleration of the bleaching process with halogen (eight minutes), laser (30 seconds), or chemical activation only. All teeth were bleached a maximum of four times (4 × 15 minutes) until a change of six shade tabs took place. The color was evaluated both visually and with a spectrophotometer before bleaching, immediately after bleaching, and one and three months after bleaching. Directly after bleaching, the use of halogen showed better results than laser (p≤0.05). One and three months after bleaching, no significant difference was found between the tested methods relative to the shade change, independent of the method of shade evaluation (p>0.05). As far as the color stability is concerned, bleaching with halogen resulted in stable color throughout the three months (p>0.05), whereas the other two methods resulted in whiter teeth after one and three months compared with the color directly after bleaching (p≤0.05). Bleaching with laser needed more time than halogen for the desired shade change (p≤0.05). Although directly after treatment bleaching with halogen resulted in better results, one and three months after bleaching the kind of acceleration used in the bleaching process did not have any effect on the esthetic results.

  7. Growth of thinned and unthinned hardwood stands on a good site in northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip M. McDonald; Nicholas R. Vaughn

    2007-01-01

    Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii Pursh), tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Rehd.), and California black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.) are three hardwood species commonly found in the Sierra Nevada of California, an area better known for its mixed-conifer forests. Hardwood stands in this region currently are...

  8. Pallet Recycling and Material Substitution: How Will Hardwood Markets Be Affected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Bush; Philip A. Araman; Vijay S. Reddy

    1997-01-01

    An estimated 4.53 billion board feet of solid hardwood and 1.79 billion board feet of solid softwood were used in the production of pallets and containers in 1995. When compared to estimates for 1992, the use of both softwoods and hardwoods has decreased. Use for pallets and containers, as a percentage of total lumber production, also decreased for both materials...

  9. Consumer ring count and grain texture preferences of selected eastern United States hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman; Matthew Bumgardner; Scott Bowe; David Brinberg

    2008-01-01

    Historically, eastern hardwoods have been a staple of forest products production. However, hardwood producers are now faced with serious challenges from substitutable products, such as imports of foreign species, utilization of foreign species in overseas manufacture (e.g., case goods, etc.), and composite-based materials that are imported or manufactured here in the...

  10. Automatic Color Sorting System for Hardwood Edge-Glued Panel Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Conners; D.Earl Kline; Philip A. Araman

    1996-01-01

    The color sorting of edge-glued panel parts is becoming more important in the manufacture of hardwood products. Consumers, while admiring the natural appearance of hardwoods, do not like excessive color variation across product surfaces. Color uniformity is particularly important today because of the popularity of lightly stained products. Unfortunately, color sorting...

  11. Developing a Multi Sensor Scanning System for Hardwood Inspection and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Conners; D.Earl Kline; Philip A. Araman

    1995-01-01

    For the last few years the authors as part of the Center for Automated Processing of Hardwoods have been attempting to develop a multiple sensor hardwood defect detection system. This development activity has been ongoing for approximately 6 years, a very long time in the commercial development world. This paper will report the progress that has been made and will...

  12. Status of hardwood forest resources in the Appalachian region including estimates of growth and removals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher M. Oswalt; Jeffery A. Turner

    2009-01-01

    The Appalachian Hardwood Region (AHR) is an important wood producing area of the Eastern United States and is near a large portion of the U.S. population that is growing considerably. Combined, these two forces create the need for assessments of the hardwood forest resources in the region. Here we present results from an investigation into the forest resources of the...

  13. Trends in the US hardwood lumber distribution industry: changing products, customers, and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urs Buehlmann; Omar Espinoza; Matthew Bumgardner; Bob. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Efficient and effective supply chains are the backbone of any industry, including the forest products industry. As the US secondary hardwood industry has undergone a profound transformation and large parts of the industry have moved offshore, the supply chain is adapting to these new realities. Remaining and new customers of US hardwood lumber distributors tend to be...

  14. Small Mammal Communities of Mature Pine Hardwood Stands in the Ouachita Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip A. Tappe; Ronald E. Thill; Joseph J. Krystofik; Gary A. Heidt

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted on the Ouachita and Ozark National Forests in Arkansas to evaluate the effects of alternative pine-hardwood reproduction cutting methods on small mammal abundance and diversity. Pretreatment characteristics of small mammal communities on 20 late-rotation mixed pine-hardwood stands in four physiographic zones of the Ouachita Mountain region of...

  15. 40 CFR 63.2264 - Initial compliance demonstration for a hardwood veneer dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hardwood veneer dryer. 63.2264 Section 63.2264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Plywood and Composite Wood Products Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2264 Initial compliance demonstration for a hardwood veneer dryer....

  16. Felling and skidding costs associated with thinning a commercial Appalachian hardwood stand in northern West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel M. Brock; Kenneth D. Jones; Gary W. Miller

    1986-01-01

    Detailed cost information on thinning operations is needed to develop economic guidelines for managing immature central Appalachian hardwood stands. Three thinning treatments were applied in a 50-yr-old mixed-oak, cove hardwood stand in northern West Virginia. A commercial logging contractor using chain saws and a rubber-tired skidder conducted the logging operations....

  17. Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation in vitro and in situ: Absorption and fluorescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvezdanovic, Jelena [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia)], E-mail: jelite74@yahoo.com; Cvetic, Tijana [Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Takovska 43, Belgrade 11000 (Serbia); Veljovic-Jovanovic, Sonja [Center for Multidisciplinary Studies, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava la, Belgrade 11030 (Serbia); Markovic, Dejan [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia)], E-mail: dejan_markovic57@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15

    Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation has been studied by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy in extracts containing mixtures of photosynthetic pigments, in acetone and n-hexane solutions, and in aqueous thylakoid suspensions. Chlorophyll undergoes destruction (bleaching) accompanied by fluorescent transient formation obeying first-order kinetics. The bleaching is governed by UV-photon energy input, as well as by different chlorophyll molecular organizations in solvents of different polarities (in vitro), and in thylakoids (in situ). UV-C-induced bleaching of chlorophylls in thylakoids is probably caused by different mechanisms compared to UV-A- and UV-B-induced bleaching.

  18. Chlorine bleaches - A significant long term source of mercury pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, S. M.; Eshleman, A.

    1975-01-01

    Products of industrial electrolysis of brine - NaOCl-based bleaches and NaOH - yielded 17 to 1290 ppb of Hg upon flameless atomic absorption analysis. Compared with current U.S. rejection value of 5 ppb for potable waters, the above levels seem sufficiently high to be a matter of environmental concern.

  19. Coral Bleaching and Associated Mortality at Mayotte, Western Indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and barrier reefs on the north and east coasts of Mayotte from 1-24 May 2010. Major bleaching was ... island is surrounded by one of the largest coral reef lagoons in the world, .... Marine Pollution Bulletin 48: 327-335. Obura D (2001) Can ...

  20. Bleaching in vital deciduous teeth – a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been growing concern and search for esthetic beauty and harmony over the last few years. This concern does not form part ofadults’ lives only, but also of children’s. Among the substances used for bleaching dental structures, the most outstanding are those whoseactive principle is hydrogen peroxide-based . The present study reports a clinical case of a 4-year-old girl that suffered trauma of tooth 61 with consequent color alteration, but with no alteration in pulp vitality. The main complaint by the patient and her guardians concerned esthetics, therefore external dental bleaching was performed, using Opalescence Xtra® (Ultradent, in two sessions with an interval of one month between them. External in office bleaching was the treatment of choice, due to the tooth vitality, patient’s age and presence of only one darkened tooth. After the bleaching treatments an improvement in the darkening was observed, and both the child and her guardians were satisfied with the esthetic result.

  1. Project Overview: A Reef Manager's Guide to Coral Bleaching ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this report is to provide the latest scientific knowledge and discuss available management options to assist local and regional managers in responding effectively to mass coral bleaching events. Background A Reef Manager’s Guide to Coral Bleaching is the result of a collaborative effort by over 50 scientists and managers to: (1) share the best available scientific information on climate-related coral bleaching; and (2) compile a tool kit of currently available strategies for adaptive management of coral reefs in a changing climate. The result is a compendium of current information, tools, and practical suggestions to aid managers in their efforts to protect reefs in a way that maximizes reef resilience in the face of continuing climate change. The Guide is a joint publication of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, and The World Conservation Union, with author contributions from a variety of international partners from government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and academic institutions. EPA’s Office of Research and Development was a major contributor to the Guide through authorship and participation in the final review and editing process for the entire report. A Reef Manager’s Guide to Coral Bleaching is the result of a collaborative effort by over 50 scientists and managers to: (1) share the best available scientific information on climate-related coral blea

  2. Quantification of cross-bleaching during infrared (IR) light stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzer, Sebastian; Hülle, Daniela; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov;

    2013-01-01

    The cross-bleaching behaviour of automated Risø TL/OSL (DA-12, DA-15, DA-20) luminescence readers is investigated. By design, up to 24 or 48 aliquots can be stored on a carousel in a single measurement chamber. Due to this construction, irradiation or illumination on one sample may affect...... measurements of feldspar or polymineral samples it is important to keep the time constant between the (midpoint of the) irradiation and the subsequent read out to avoid the malign effects of anomalous fading in laboratory constructed dose response curves. This may be achieved by running all measurements...... on subsequent samples. Here we investigate the size of this reduction due to cross-bleaching from the IR diodes and quantify the cross-bleaching for 10 different Risø TL/OSL readers produced between 1994 and 2011. We find that cross-bleaching from the IR diodes is worse than from the blue diodes. Using the “run...

  3. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Abi Rached DANTAS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home. Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15: C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE, luminosity (ΔL, green-red axis (Δa, and blue-yellow axis (Δb. The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.

  4. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity – case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe CARTAGENA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  5. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dario Acuña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada, green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n=5: purple corn (P, purple corn + bleaching (PB, green tea (T, green tea + bleaching (TB, distilled water (W, and distilled water + bleaching (WB. In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p3.3.

  6. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity - case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, Andrés Felipe; Parreiras, Sibelli Olivieri; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2015-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF) and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS) in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  7. Clinical trial evaluating color change and tooth sensitivity throughout and following in-office bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the color alteration and sensitivity of teeth throughout and following in-office bleaching. Twenty-two volunteers participated in this clinical trial of bleaching treatment (35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel and placebo) applied on maxillary incisors and canines. According to a split-mouth design, the volunteers' maxillary hemi-arches received either the bleaching or placebo agent, applied four times, at 1-week intervals. Color alteration and tooth sensitivity were assessed throughout and following bleaching. Statistical calculations were performed using gamma distribution and repeated-measures ANOVA. There was a statistically significant difference between teeth submitted to a bleaching agent and placebo (P < .001). At the end of the first, second, third, and fourth sessions, the bleached teeth presented color scores statistically lower than those observed immediately before bleaching. There was no difference in the color scale scores of the bleached teeth between bleaching sessions. The sensitivity data test showed a significant difference among treatments (P < .0001). Color alteration and dental sensitivity were altered by the bleaching agent.

  8. Disease incidence is related to bleaching extent in reef-building corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Marilyn E; McManus, John W

    2009-10-01

    Recent outbreaks of coral bleaching and disease have contributed to substantial declines in the abundance of reef-building coral. Significant attention has been paid to both phenomena in order to determine their effect on reef trajectories. Although each is positively correlated with high temperatures, few studies have explored the potential links between bleaching and disease. A longitudinal study of corals in the Florida Keys was therefore conducted during the 2005 Caribbean bleaching event to quantify bleaching extent and disease incidence in corals, and to determine whether they were related or if they acted as discrete phenomena. These data indicated that overall, a positive correlation exists between bleaching extent and disease incidence. However, the specific interactions between these two phenomena varied among disease bleaching combinations. Montastraea faveolata colonies with greater bleaching intensities later developed white plague (WP) infections. Meanwhile, Siderastrea siderea colonies with dark spot disease (DS) bleached more extensively than apparently healthy colonies. Finally, bleaching and black band disease (BB) co-occurred on Colpophyllia natans throughout the bleaching event. WP, BB, and bleaching are each independently capable of changing the structure of coral populations through loss of living tissue, and DS is an important indicator of reef health. Understanding the dynamics of how these mortality sources interact is critical to understanding mortality patterns and predicting how reef communities will respond to future events.

  9. High spatial variability in coral bleaching around Moorea (French Polynesia): patterns across locations and water depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Lucie; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Schrimm, Muriel; Lenihan, Hunter Stanton

    2007-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events are one of the main threats to coral reefs. A severe bleaching event impacted Moorea, French Polynesia, between March and July 2002, causing 55+/-14% of colonies to suffer bleaching around the island. However, bleaching varied significantly across coral genera, locations, and as a function of water depth, with a bleaching level as high as 72% at some stations. Corals in deeper water bleached at a higher rate than those in shallow water, and the north coast was more impacted than the west coast. The relatively small scale of variability in bleaching responses probably resulted from the interaction between extrinsic factors, including hydrodynamic condition, and intrinsic factors, such as differential adaptation of the coral/algal association.

  10. Susceptibility to Coffee Staining during Enamel Remineralization Following the In-Office Bleaching Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Aline Akemi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess in situ the enamel mineralization level and susceptibility to coffee staining after in-office bleaching. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six human dental fragments assembled into intraoral devices were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and treated as follows: (group 1) no contact...... with coffee; (group 2) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 7 days, starting 1 week after bleaching; and (group 3) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 14 days, starting immediately after bleaching. Enamel mineralization and color were assessed before bleaching (T1......), immediately after bleaching (T2), and after 7 (T3) and 14 days (T4). The CIE whiteness index (W*) and closeness to white (ΔW*) following bleaching and/or immersion in coffee were calculated. Data were analyzed with Friedman and Wilcoxon tests or Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α = 0.05). RESULTS...

  11. Monomer release from nanofilled and microhybrid dental composites after bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching on elution of monomers from nanofilled and microhybrid composites.80 samples (5mm diameter and 3mm thickness of each composite were prepared. After curing, half of them were randomly polished. Each group was divided into 8 subgroups and immersed in water or 10%, 20% and 30% H2O2 for 3 or 8 hours. Eluted Bis-GMA (Bis-phenol A Glycidyl Dimethacrylate, TEGDMA (Triethyleneglycol Dimethacrylate, UDMA (Urethane Dimethacrylate and BisEMA (Bis-phenol A ethoxylate Dimethacrylate were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and the results were analyzed by univariate ANOVA and t-test (P<0.05.Bleach significantly increased the overall release of monomers (P<0.001; TEGDMA was released more than Bis-GMA (P<0.001. Supreme released more TEGDMA compared to Z250 (P<0.001. Bleaching increased the release of this monomer (P<0.001. Increasing both the concentration of H2O2, and the immersion time, increased the release of TEGDMA (P<0.001. Polishing had no effect on release of this monomer (P=0.952. Supreme released more Bis-GMA than Z250 (P=0.000. The more concentrated H2O2 caused more elution of Bis-GMA (P= 0.003; while the effect of immersion time was not significant (P=0.824. Polishing increased the release of Bis-GMA (P=0.001. Neither the type of composite nor Bleaching had any effect on release of UDMA (P=0.972 and (P=0.811 respectively. Immersion duration increased the release of UDMA (P=0.002, as well as polishing (P=0.024.Bleaching increased the release of monomers. Nanofilled composites released more monomer than the microfilled.

  12. Tropical cyclone cooling combats region-wide coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Adam D; Puotinen, Marji

    2014-05-01

    Coral bleaching has become more frequent and widespread as a result of rising sea surface temperature (SST). During a regional scale SST anomaly, reef exposure to thermal stress is patchy in part due to physical factors that reduce SST to provide thermal refuge. Tropical cyclones (TCs - hurricanes, typhoons) can induce temperature drops at spatial scales comparable to that of the SST anomaly itself. Such cyclone cooling can mitigate bleaching across broad areas when well-timed and appropriately located, yet the spatial and temporal prevalence of this phenomenon has not been quantified. Here, satellite SST and historical TC data are used to reconstruct cool wakes (n=46) across the Caribbean during two active TC seasons (2005 and 2010) where high thermal stress was widespread. Upon comparison of these datasets with thermal stress data from Coral Reef Watch and published accounts of bleaching, it is evident that TC cooling reduced thermal stress at a region-wide scale. The results show that during a mass bleaching event, TC cooling reduced thermal stress below critical levels to potentially mitigate bleaching at some reefs, and interrupted natural warming cycles to slow the build-up of thermal stress at others. Furthermore, reconstructed TC wave damage zones suggest that it was rare for more reef area to be damaged by waves than was cooled (only 12% of TCs). Extending the time series back to 1985 (n = 314), we estimate that for the recent period of enhanced TC activity (1995-2010), the annual probability that cooling and thermal stress co-occur is as high as 31% at some reefs. Quantifying such probabilities across the other tropical regions where both coral reefs and TCs exist is vital for improving our understanding of how reef exposure to rising SSTs may vary, and contributes to a basis for targeting reef conservation.

  13. The cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching can turn some coral species winners into losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, Andréa G; Warner, Mark E; Levas, Stephen J; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Schoepf, Verena; McGinley, Michael; Baumann, Justin; Matsui, Yohei

    2014-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching events caused by elevated seawater temperatures result in extensive coral loss throughout the tropics, and are projected to increase in frequency and severity. If bleaching becomes an annual event later in this century, more than 90% of coral reefs worldwide may be at risk of long-term degradation. While corals can recover from single isolated bleaching and can acclimate to recurring bleaching events that are separated by multiple years, it is currently unknown if and how they will survive and possibly acclimatize to annual coral bleaching. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that annual coral bleaching can dramatically alter thermal tolerance in Caribbean corals. We found that high coral energy reserves and changes in the dominant algal endosymbiont type (Symbiodinium spp.) facilitated rapid acclimation in Porites divaricata, whereas low energy reserves and a lack of algal phenotypic plasticity significantly increased susceptibility in Porites astreoides to bleaching the following year. Phenotypic plasticity in the dominant endosymbiont type of Orbicella faveolata did not prevent repeat bleaching, but may have facilitated rapid recovery. Thus, coral holobiont response to an isolated single bleaching event is not an accurate predictor of its response to bleaching the following year. Rather, the cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching can turn some coral species 'winners' into 'losers', and can also facilitate acclimation and turn some coral species 'losers' into 'winners'. Overall, these findings indicate that cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching could result in some species becoming increasingly susceptible to bleaching and face a long-term decline, while phenotypically plastic coral species will acclimatize and persist. Thus, annual coral bleaching and recovery could contribute to the selective loss of coral diversity as well as the overall decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean.

  14. Cogeneration - a wishful fallacy; Kraft-Waerme-Kopplung - ein frommer Trugschluss.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelmowski, Hubert [Mitteldeutsche Gasversorgung GmbH, Markkleeberg (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Hazardous comparisons and assumptions are being used in public campaigns aimed at selling cogeneration as a universal remedy for greater energy efficiency and climate protection. Example calculations and arguments to this end originate in particular from the Bundesverband Kraft-Waermekopplung e.V. (BKWK - German Cogeneration Association) in Berlin and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Waerme und Heizkraftwirtschaft e.V. (AGFW - Working Group for Heat and Cogeneration) in Frankfurt on the Main in their ''Branchenreport 2007''. This article undertakes a detailed analysis of these representations. It shows that under the line the advantage of cogeneration over the separate generation of electricity and heat does not come to much. It therefore appears advisable to rethink the campaigns for cogeneration being waged in politics and industry ahead of the next energy and climate packages.

  15. Effects of Kraft Mill effluent on the sexuality of fishes: An environmental early warning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.P.; Bortone, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Arrhenoid or masculinized female fish species of the live-bearing family, Poeciliidae, have been observed for over thirteen years in specific southern streams which receive waste effluents from pulping mills. The complex mixture of organic compounds in kraft mill effluent (KME) has inhibited specific identification of causal agent(s). However, microbially degraded phytosterols (e.g. sitosterol or stigmastanol) in experimental exposures induce the same intersexual states that characterize affected female poeciliids sampled from KME streams. KME-polluted streams often exhibit a drastic reduction of fish species diversity and degrees of physiological stress, all of which suggests reduced reproduction in surviving forms. A potential ontogenetic or developmental response is demonstrated in American eels captured in one of these streams as well. The authors examine available information, including laboratory and experimental field exposures, and suggest directions for additional research as well as the need for environmental concern.

  16. Process for purification of waste water produced by a Kraft process pulp and paper mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, M. F. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The water from paper and pulp wastes obtained from a mill using the Kraft process is purified by precipitating lignins and lignin derivatives from the waste stream with quaternary ammonium compounds, removing other impurities by activated carbon produced from the cellulosic components of the water, and then separating the water from the precipitate and solids. The activated carbon also acts as an aid to the separation of the water and solids. If recovery of lignins is also desired, then the precipitate containing the lignins and quaternary ammonium compounds is dissolved in methanol. Upon acidification, the lignin is precipitated from the solution. The methanol and quaternary ammonium compound are recovered for reuse from the remainder.

  17. Molecular Characteristics of Kraft-AQ Pulping Lignin Fractionated by Sequential Organic Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Kraft-AQ pulping lignin was sequentially fractionated by organic solvent extractions and the molecular properties of each fraction were characterized by chemical degradation, GPC, UV, FT-IR, 13C-NMR and thermal analysis. The average molecular weight and polydispersity of each lignin fraction increased with its hydrogen-bonding capacity (Hildebrand solubility parameter. In addition, the ratio of the non-condensed guaiacyl/syringyl units and the content of β-O-4 linkages increased with the increment of the lignin fractions extracted successively with hexane, diethylether, methylene chloride, methanol, and dioxane. Furthermore, the presence of the condensation reaction products was contributed to the higher thermal stability of the larger molecules.

  18. THE SHEAR-THINNING PHENOMENON OF BAGASSE KRAFT BLACK LIQUOR FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RendangYang; KefuChen; JunXu; HengZhang; QifengChen; JinWang

    2004-01-01

    The flow curvesshear-rate rangeby using theof bagasse Kraft black liquor over aof 10-1 s- 1-103s- 1 were investigatedRheometric RFSII rheometerExperimental results show that Bagasse black liquorsare non-Newtonian fluids instead of Newtonian fluidsat higher solids contents, and the viscosities of blackliquor would decrease about 2-3 orders of magnitudewith an increase in the shear rates. The apparentviscosity and flow behavior of bagasse black liquorare also affected by its solids content, and the highersolids content the more shear-thinning bagasse blackliquor fluid is. In addition, the power-law equationwas utilized to fit these flow curves at differentconditions. Finally, the significances ofshear-thinning properties of bagasse black liquor inthe chemical recovery system, such as frictioncalculation of pipe and design optimization of thewhole recovery system, were presented.

  19. Application of ozonation process in industrial wastewaters: textile, kraft E1 and whey effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assalin, M R; Almeida, E S; Rosa, M A; Moraes, S G; Duran, N

    2004-08-01

    A large variety of organic and inorganic compounds can be found in wastewater from industrial processes. In this work, Advanced Oxidative Processes (AOPs) have been applied for the control of water pollution and the ozonation of different effluents was investigated. Wastewater from textile, kraft E1 and cheese manufacturing processes were chosen as examples of industrial effluents. The efficiency of substrate mineralization has been comparatively analyzed by the decrease in total organic carbon (TOC), color, and toxicity. The results revealed that the ozonation process can be a method for decolorization of effluent, but it is not effective for TOC reduction. The whey effluent was the most recalcitrant wastewater for ozone treatment which produced no TOC removal.

  20. Molecular characteristics of Kraft-AQ pulping lignin fractionated by sequential organic solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Runcang

    2010-08-16

    Kraft-AQ pulping lignin was sequentially fractionated by organic solvent extractions and the molecular properties of each fraction were characterized by chemical degradation, GPC, UV, FT-IR, (13)C-NMR and thermal analysis. The average molecular weight and polydispersity of each lignin fraction increased with its hydrogen-bonding capacity (Hildebrand solubility parameter). In addition, the ratio of the non-condensed guaiacyl/syringyl units and the content of β-O-4 linkages increased with the increment of the lignin fractions extracted successively with hexane, diethylether, methylene chloride, methanol, and dioxane. Furthermore, the presence of the condensation reaction products was contributed to the higher thermal stability of the larger molecules.

  1. INFLUENCIA DE LA TECNOLOGIA ANAEROBICA EN LA BIODEGRADACION DE PRECURSORES DE COMPUESTOS CON ACTIVIDAD HORMONAL, CONTENIDOS EN EFLUENTES DE LA INDUSTRIA DE CELULOSA KRAFT.

    OpenAIRE

    Gladys Cecilia Vidal Saez; Maria Angelica Mondaca Jara; Roxana Albertina Arias Astete; Veronica Maritza Bahamondes Aravena; David Bazaes Santamaria; Marisol Belmonte Soto; Soledad Chamorro Rodriguez; Paula Daniela Claret Gatica; Mayra Andrea Jarpa Lopez; Ariel Alejandro Lestrade Gonzalez; Elizabeth Oñate Cea; Claudio Andrez Parra Riquelme; Francisco Javier Reyes Torres; Elizabeth Carolina Rios Gutierrez; Cristina Alejandra Villamar Ayala

    2004-01-01

    INFLUENCE OF ANAEROBIC TECHNOLOGY ON BIODEGRADATION OF COMPOUND PRECURSORS WITH HORMONAL ACTIVITY CONTAINED IN EFFLUENTS OF THE KRAFT CELLULOSE INDUSTRY Chile produces an annual average of 2 million tons of Kraft cellulose for which pine and eucalyptus are used as raw material. New investments indicate the possibility of increasing the cellulose production in 50% in the next decade. These kinds of industries consume great amounts of water and chemical reactants and generate active organ...

  2. The effects of heartwood and sapwood on kraft pulp properties of Pinus nigra J.F.Arnold and Abies bornmuelleriana Mattf.

    OpenAIRE

    Ataç, Yasin; EROĞLU, Hüdaverdi

    2013-01-01

    The effects of heartwood and sapwood on kraft pulp properties of Pinus nigra J.F.Arnold. and Abies bornmuelleriana Mattf. were investigated. The differences in terms of chemical composition and fiber properties between the heartwood and sapwood of these species were also examined. Heartwood had more holocellulose and extractive compared to sapwood. Moreover, heartwood fiber length was shorter than that of sapwood. Kraft cookings of heartwood and sapwood each species were separately done under...

  3. Oil and gas activities in northern Norway. Summary; KonKraft rapport 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    KonKraft report 6 deals with oil and gas operations on the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS) from Nordland county and northwards. It aims to contribute to a broad factual base for decision processes related to opening new exploration areas in these waters. The Norwegian petroleum sector employs about 250 000 people directly and indirectly. It accounts for a third of government revenues, and 90 per cent of its profits accrue to the state. NOK 119 billion of the central government budget in 2009 comes directly from oil and gas revenues. These funds finance roads, nursery schools, hospitals and the Norwegian welfare state. In addition, they safeguard future pensions. This industry is at a crossroads today. Oil production has dropped by 30 per cent since 2000. Recent forecasts from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate show that it may be reduced by 50 per cent from its peak by 2013. Overall oil and gas output is expected to begin falling from the middle of the next decade. To slow this decline in output and revenues, the oil companies need access to new and attractive exploration acreage. Half the production expected by the government in 2030 relates to resources which have yet to be proven. Opening further areas of the NCS to petroleum activities would contribute to maintaining substantial investment and revenues for the community, and to continuing the development of industry in the northernmost parts of the country. The report reviews unopened areas along the Norwegian coast from the Helgeland region and north-eastwards to the Russian border. Nordland VI and VII plus Troms II are regarded by the petroleum industry as the most promising regions for big discoveries which could slow the production decline. The KonKraft 2 report concerning production development on the NCS estimates remaining resources in these three areas at 3.4 billion barrels of oil equivalent (boe). (Author)

  4. Micro power/heat cogeneration incorporating a stirling engine; microKraft-Waerme-Kopplung mit Stirlingmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luft, S. [Solo Kleinmotoren GmbH, Sindelfingen (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    The Stirling-engine for CHP-purpose developed by SOLO is a trend-setting technology. It represents the most suspicious perspective apart from the fuel-cell technology in order to become suitable to the requirements of the future power supply in the focus of the sustainability and the decentralized energy supply. The charm of the Stirling technology is based on the external combustion: a so far not known variability with the primary energy choice as well as a life span substantially extending, wear-free operation are possible thereby. The external combustion reduces also the maintenance and the emissions in a measure not known with conventional engine technologies. The development steps are finished. The result is the world-wide first concept for the commercial, stationary application of decentralized micro-CHP on Stirling technology basis, which goes into series. (orig.) [German] Das von SOLO entwickelte STIRLING-Motorenkonzept zur Kraft-Waerme-Kopplung ist eine Technologie, die neben der Brennstoffzellen-Technologie die vielversprechende Perspektive darstellt, um den Anforderungen der zukuenftigen Energieversorgung im Fokus der Nachhaltigkeit und der dezentralen Energiebereitstellung gerecht zu werden. Der Charme der Stirlingtechnologie liegt in der aeusseren Verbrennung. Eine bisher nicht gekannte Variabilitaet bei der Primaerenergiewahl und ein die Lebensdauer erheblich verlaengernder, verschleissfreier Betrieb werden dadurch ermoeglicht. Die externe Verbrennung verringert auch die Wartungsaufwendungen und reduziert die Emissionen in einem bei konventionellen Motorentechnologien nicht gekannten Mass. Die Entwicklungsschritte sind abgeschlossen und das Ergebnis ist das weltweit erste Konzept zur kommerziellen, stationaeren Anwendung dezentraler Kraft-Waerme-Kopplung, auf Stirling-Technologie-Basis, das in Serie geht. (orig.)

  5. Characterization of solid wastes from kraft pulp industry for ceramic materials development purposes; Caracterizacao de residuos solidos da industria de celulose tipo kraft visando sua aplicacao no desenvolvimento de materiais ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, L.R.; Francisco, M.A.C.O.; Sagrillo, V.P.D.; Louzada, D.M.; Entringer, J.M.S. [Instituto Federal do Espirito Santo (IFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The Kraft pulp industry generates a large amount of solid wastes. Due this large quantity, the target of this study is characterize inorganic solid wastes, dregs, grits and lime mud, from the step of reagents recovery of Kraft process, aiming evaluate the potentiality of their use as alternative raw material on development of ceramic materials. Initially, the wastes were dried and ground, then they were subjected to the following characterization techniques: pH analysis, particle size analysis, X ray fluorescence, X ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. According to the results, it may be concluded that these wastes could be used as raw material in production of red ceramic and luting materials. (author)

  6. Coral diseases and bleaching on Colombian Caribbean coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Navas-Camacho

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998 the National Monitoring System for the Coral Reefs of Colombia (SIMAC has monitored the occurrence of coral bleaching and diseases in some Colombian coral reefs (permanent stations at San Andres Island, Rosario Islands, Tayrona, San Bernardo Islands and Urabá. The main purpose is to evaluate their health status and to understand the factors that have been contributing to their decline. To estimate these occurrences, annual surveys in 126 permanent belt transects (10x2m with different depth intervals (3-6 meters, 9-12 meters and 15-18 meters are performed at all reef sites. Data from the 1998-2004 period, revealed that San Andrés Island had many colonies with diseases (38.9 colonies/m2, and Urabá had high numbers with bleaching (54.4 colonies/m2. Of the seven reported coral diseases studied, Dark Spots Disease (DSD, and White Plague Disease (WPD were noteworthy because they occurred in all Caribbean monitored sites, and because of their high interannual infection incidence. Thirty five species of scleractinian corals were affected by at least one disease and a high incidence of coral diseases on the main reef builders is documented. Bleaching was present in 34 species. During the whole monitoring period, Agaricia agaricites and Siderastrea siderea were the species most severely affected by DSD and bleaching, respectively. Diseases on species such as Agaricia fragilis, A.grahamae, A. humilis, Diploria clivosa, Eusmilia fastigiata, Millepora complanata, and Mycetophyllia aliciae are recorded for first time in Colombia. We present bleaching and disease incidences, kinds of diseases, coral species affected, reef localities studied, depth intervals of surveys, and temporal (years variation for each geographic area. This variation makes difficult to clearly determine defined patterns or general trends for monitored reefs. This is the first long-term study of coral diseases and bleaching in the Southwestern Caribbean, and one of the few

  7. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    KAUST Repository

    Furby, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-04

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (<20 % on average). We resurveyed the reefs 7 months later to estimate subsequent mortality. Mortality was highly variable among taxa, with some taxa showing evidence of full recovery and some (e. g., acroporids) apparently suffering nearly complete mortality. The unequal mortality among families resulted in significant change in community composition following the bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  8. Influence of post-bleaching time intervals on dentin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that bond strength of resin to tooth structure can be reduced when the bonding procedure is carried out immediately after the bleaching treatment. This study evaluated the effect of bleaching of non-vital teeth bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resin/bovine dentin interface and the influence of delaying the bonding procedures for different time intervals following internal bleaching. According to a randomized block design, composite resin cylinders (Z100/Single bond - 3M) were bonded to the flattened dentin surface of two hundred and fifty-six teeth which had previously been subjected to four different treatments: SPH - sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide; SPW - sodium perborate + distilled water; CP - 37% carbamide peroxide; and CON - distilled water (control), each one followed by storage in artificial saliva for 0 (baseline), 7, 14, and 21 days after bleaching (n = 16). The bleaching agents in the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days, over 4 weeks. The SBS test of the blocks was done using a universal testing machine. The ANOVA showed that there was no significant interaction between time and bleaching agents, and that the factor time was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). For the factor bleaching treatment, the Student's t-test showed that [CON = CP] > [SPW = SPH]. The bleaching of non-vital teeth affected the resin/dentin SBS values when sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide or water was used, independently of the elapsed time following the bleaching treatment.

  9. Comparing the Effect of Different Bleaching Regims of Carbamide Peroxide on Microhardness of Z250 Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Esmaeili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleaching products with oxidizing mechanism can exert side effects on the restorative materials existing in the oral cavity. Since bleaching agents are applied in different concentrations, the present study aimed to compare the effect of different bleaching regims of carbamide peroxide on microhardness of Z250 microhybride composite. Methods: In this in vitro study , 32 specimens of micro hybride composite (Z250 were made which were randomly divided into 4 subgroups (n=8: G1: bleached with10% carbamide peroxide 4 hours a day for 2 weeks G2: bleached with 16%carbamide peroxide 3 hours a day for 2 weeks G3: bleached with 22%carbamide peroxide 1hour a day for 2 weeks G4: the control subgroup stored in distilled water at 37◦c for 2 weeks. Microhardness of specimens was measured before and after bleaching using Vickers hardness testing machine. Moreover, the study data were analyzed statistically applying Anova and t-test (&alpha= 0.05. Results: This study findings revealed that using bleaching agent significantly decreased the  microhardness of composite resin in the bleaching groups compared to the control group, though the concentration of carbamide peroxide produced no significant effect on the microhardness value. (p>0.13 Conclusion: Bleaching therapy can cause a reduction in microhardness of Z250 composite and different concentrations of carbamide peroxide can reduce microhardness of Z250 to the same value.

  10. Nonvital tooth bleaching: a review of the literature and clinical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Buono, Laura; Grande, Nicola M; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2008-04-01

    Tooth discoloration varies in etiology, appearance, localization, severity, and adhesion to tooth structure. It can be defined as being extrinsic or intrinsic on the basis of localization and etiology. In this review of the literature, various causes of tooth discoloration, different bleaching materials, and their applications to endodontically treated teeth have been described. In the walking bleach technique the root filling should be completed first, and a cervical seal must be established. The bleaching agent should be changed every 3-7 days. The thermocatalytic technique involves placement of a bleaching agent in the pulp chamber followed by heat application. At the end of each visit the bleaching agent is left in the tooth so that it can function as a walking bleach until the next visit. External bleaching of endodontically treated teeth with an in-office technique requires a high concentration gel. It might be a supplement to the walking bleach technique, if the results are not satisfactory after 3-4 visits. These treatments require a bonded temporary filling or a bonded resin composite to seal the access cavity. There is a deficiency of evidence-based science in the literature that addresses the prognosis of bleached nonvital teeth. Therefore, it is important to always be aware of the possible complications and risks that are associated with the different bleaching techniques.

  11. Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, T D; Fine, M; Roff, G; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-01-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when the endosymbiosis between corals and their symbionts disintegrates during stress. Mass coral bleaching events have increased over the past 20 years and are directly correlated with periods of warm sea temperatures. However, some hypotheses have suggested that reef-building corals bleach due to infection by bacterial pathogens. The 'Bacterial Bleaching' hypothesis is based on laboratory studies of the Mediterranean invading coral, Oculina patagonica, and has further generated conclusions such as the coral probiotic hypothesis and coral hologenome theory of evolution. We aimed to investigate the natural microbial ecology of O. patagonica during the annual bleaching using fluorescence in situ hybridization to map bacterial populations within the coral tissue layers, and found that the coral bleaches on the temperate rocky reefs of the Israeli coastline without the presence of Vibrio shiloi or bacterial penetration of its tissue layers. Bacterial communities were found associated with the endolithic layer of bleached coral regions, and a community dominance shift from an apparent cyanobacterial-dominated endolithic layer to an algal-dominated layer was found in bleached coral samples. While bacterial communities certainly play important roles in coral stasis and health, we suggest environmental stressors, such as those documented with reef-building corals, are the primary triggers leading to bleaching of O. patagonica and suggest that bacterial involvement in patterns of bleaching is that of opportunistic colonization.

  12. Response of coral assemblages to thermal stress: are bleaching intensity and spatial patterns consistent between events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Lucie; Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Adjeroud, Mehdi

    2013-06-01

    Mass bleaching events resulting in coral mortality are among the greatest threats to coral reefs, and are projected to increase in frequency and intensity with global warming. Achieving a better understanding of the consistency of the response of coral assemblages to thermal stress, both spatially and temporally, is essential to determine which reefs are more able to tolerate climate change. We compared variations in spatial and taxonomic patterns between two bleaching events at the scale of an island (Moorea Island, French Polynesia). Despite similar thermal stress and light conditions, bleaching intensity was significantly lower in 2007 (approximately 37 % of colonies showed signs of bleaching) than in 2002, when 55 % of the colonies bleached. Variations in the spatial patterns of bleaching intensity were consistent between the two events. Among nine sampling stations at three locations and three depths, the stations at which the bleaching response was lowest in 2002 were those that showed the lowest levels of bleaching in 2007. The taxonomic patterns of susceptibility to bleaching were also consistent between the two events. These findings have important implications for conservation because they indicate that corals are capable of acclimatization and/or adaptation and that, even at small spatial scales, some areas are consistently more susceptible to bleaching than others.

  13. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Loke Ming; Toh, Tai Chong; Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  14. Study of melanin bleaching after immunohistochemistry of melanin-containing tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hongwu; Wu, Wenqiao

    2015-04-01

    Melanin may interfere with immunohistochemical staining. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) bleaching, potassium permanganate bleaching, and potassium dichromate bleaching on melanin, tissue antigen, and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using melanin-containing and melanin-free tissue samples. Our results demonstrated that all 3 bleaching methods efficiently bleached melanin and partially destroyed tissue antigen. In addition, potassium permanganate bleaching and potassium dichromate bleaching clearly destroyed DAB, whereas TCCA bleaching had no significant effect on DAB. Therefore, neither potassium permanganate nor potassium dichromate is an ideal solution, whereas TCCA might be an ideal solution for melanin bleaching after the immunohistochemical staining of melanin-containing tissues. After immunostaining followed by TCCA bleaching, the melanin could be completely removed in all 120 malignant melanoma tissue sections. Compared with the control, the DAB intensity was clear, and the tissue structure and cellular nuclei were well maintained. It is worth noting that TCCA should be freshly prepared before each experiment, and used within 2 hours of its preparation. In addition, sections should not be incubated with TCCA for over 30 minutes.

  15. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loke Ming Chou

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached. The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  16. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furby, K. A.; Bouwmeester, J.; Berumen, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (reefs 7 months later to estimate subsequent mortality. Mortality was highly variable among taxa, with some taxa showing evidence of full recovery and some (e.g., acroporids) apparently suffering nearly complete mortality. The unequal mortality among families resulted in significant change in community composition following the bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea.

  17. Effect of desensitizer application on shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth sensitivity is common after vital tooth bleaching. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a desensitizing agent on shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel; and determine whether a delay of one or two weeks in bonding procedure is sufficient subsequent to bleaching/desensitizer regimen. Materials and Methods: Buccal enamel surfaces of ninety-six human sound molars were prepared and divided into eight groups. The surfaces of specimens in Group 1 as negative control group were bonded by composite resin using the single bond adhesive. Specimens in Groups 2-4 were bleached with an at-home bleaching agent (Daywhite ACP. Relief ACP desensitizing gel alone was applied in Group 5. In Groups 6-8, specimens were bleached same as in Group 2 and relief ACP desensitizing gel was applied same as inGroup 5 subsequent to each bleaching session. Composite cylinders were bonded after 24 h, 7 days and 14 days in Groups 2-4, respectively, and also in Groups 6-8, respectively. The shear bond strengths of the cylinders were tested and data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. Results: The results showed that bleaching and bleaching/desensitizer regimens significantly reduced the bond strength of composite resin to enamel. However, desensitizer alone did not reduce bond strength. No statistically significant differences were found between bleaching and bleaching/desensitizer regarding bond strength. Conclusion: Bleaching or bleaching/desensitizer treatment significantly decreases bond strength of composite resin to enamel. In both regimens, adhesive bonding is recommended after two weeks.

  18. Avian response to bottomland hardwood reforestation: the first 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, D.J.; Wilson, R.R.; Henne-Kerr, J.L.; Grosshuesch, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Bttomland hardwood forests were planted on agricultural fields in Mississippi and Louisiana using either predominantly Quercus species (oaks) or Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood). We assessed avian colonization of these reforested sites between 2 and 10 years after planting. Rapid vertical growth of cottonwoods (circa 2 - 3 m / yr) resulted in sites with forest structure that supported greater species richness of breeding birds, increased Shannon diversity indices, and supported greater territory densities than on sites planted with slower-growing oak species. Grassland birds (Spiza americana [Dickcissel], and Sturnella magna [Eastern Meadowlark]) were indicative of species breeding on oak-dominated reforestation # 10 years old. Agelaius phoeniceus (Red-winged Blackbird) and Colinus virginianus (Northern Bobwhite) characterized cottonwood reforestation # 4 years old, whereas 14 species of shrub-scrub birds (e.g., Passerina cyanea [Indigo Bunting]) and early-successional forest birds (e.g., Vireo gilvus [Warbling Vireo]) typified cottonwood reforestation 5 to 9 years after planting. Rates of daily nest survival did not differ between reforestation strategies. Nest parasitism increased markedly in older cottonwood stands, but was overwhelmed by predation as a cause of nest failure. Based on Partners in Flight prioritization scores and territory densities, the value of cottonwood reforestation for avian conservation was significantly greater than that of oak reforestation during their first 10 years. Because of benefits conferred on breeding birds, we recommend reforestation of bottomland hardwoods include a high proportion of fast-growing, early successional species such as cottonwood.

  19. Biomass models to estimate carbon stocks for hardwood tree species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Peinado, R.; Montero, G.; Rio, M. del

    2012-11-01

    To estimate forest carbon pools from forest inventories it is necessary to have biomass models or biomass expansion factors. In this study, tree biomass models were developed for the main hardwood forest species in Spain: Alnus glutinosa, Castanea sativa, Ceratonia siliqua, Eucalyptus globulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus angustifolia, Olea europaea var. sylvestris, Populus x euramericana, Quercus canariensis, Quercus faginea, Quercus ilex, Quercus pyrenaica and Quercus suber. Different tree biomass components were considered: stem with bark, branches of different sizes, above and belowground biomass. For each species, a system of equations was fitted using seemingly unrelated regression, fulfilling the additivity property between biomass components. Diameter and total height were explored as independent variables. All models included tree diameter whereas for the majority of species, total height was only considered in the stem biomass models and in some of the branch models. The comparison of the new biomass models with previous models fitted separately for each tree component indicated an improvement in the accuracy of the models. A mean reduction of 20% in the root mean square error and a mean increase in the model efficiency of 7% in comparison with recently published models. So, the fitted models allow estimating more accurately the biomass stock in hardwood species from the Spanish National Forest Inventory data. (Author) 45 refs.

  20. Results of a workshop concerning ecological zonation in bottomland hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelle, James E.; Auble, Gregor T.; Hamilton, David B.; Johnson, Richard L.; Segelquist, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has regulatory responsibilities concerning the discharge of dredged or fill material into the Nation's waters. In addition to its advisory role in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' permit program, EPA has a number of specific authorities, including formulation of the Section 404(b)(1) Guidelines, use of Section 404(c) to prohibit disposal at particular sites, and enforcement actions for unauthorized discharges. A number of recent court cases focus on the geographic scope of Section 404 jurisdiction in potential bottomland hardwood (BLH) wetlands and the nature of landclearing activities in these areas that require a permit under Section 404. Accordingly, EPA needs to establish the scientific basis for implementing its responsibilities under Section 404 in bottomland hardwoods. EPA is approaching this task through a series of workshops designed to provide current scientific information on bottomland hardwoods and to organize that information in a manner pertinent to key questions, including the following. What are the characteristics of bottomland hardwoods (in terms of hydrology, soils, vegetation, fish, wildlife, agricultural potential, and the like) and how can the functions (e.g., flood storage, water quality maintenance, detrital export) that they perform best be quantified? How do perturbations like landclearing, levee construction, and drainage impact the functions that bottomland hardwoods perform and how can these effects best be quantified? And finally, how significant are the impacts and how is their significance likely to change under various management scenarios? The first workshop in this series was held December 3-7, 1984, in St. Francisville, Louisiana. The workshop was attended by over 40 scientists and regulators (see ACKNOWLEDGMENTS section) and facilitated by the editors of this report under an Interagency Agreement between EPA and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife

  1. Inter-laboratory comparisons of hexenuronic acid measurements in kraft eucalyptus pulps using a UV-Vis spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; H.F Zhou; Chai X.S.; Donna Johannes; Richard Pope; Cristina Valls; M. Blanca Roncero

    2014-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison of a UV-Vis spectroscopic method (TAPPI T 282 om-13 “Hexeneuronic acid content of chemical pulp”) for hexeneuronic acid measurements was conducted using three eucalyptus kraft pulps. The pulp samples were produced in a laboratory at kappa numbers of approximately 14, 20, and 35. The hexeneuronic acid contents of the three pulps were...

  2. KINETICS OF DELIGNIFICATION AND CARBOHYDRATE DEGRADATION DURING OXYGEN BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.LNguyen

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate degradation during oxygen bleaching isassociated with cleavage reactions. It is apparent thatthe loss of the cellulose DPis strongly affected by(degree ofpolymisation) the extent of thedelignification. A strong linear correlation can beestablished between the DP of cellulose chains andthe residual lignin in the pulp. The Nuclear Growthconcept and Percolation Theory for heterogenoussystem can be combined to formulate kinetic modelsfor both the delignification and the degradation ofcarbohydrate. The models prediction is statisticallyrobust and can be applied to different pulps atdifferent bleachin~ conditions.

  3. A Preliminary Assessment of Coral Bleaching in Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The 1997-1998 El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) caused elevated sea temperatures that resulted in global coral bleaching. Coral reefs constitute an important biological resource in terms of their complex biodiversity and are the basis for tropical reef fisheries and marine ecotourism. They represent one of Mozambique's main coastal assets and its coastal communities and growing tourism industry rely mainly on reef-based resources. Mozambican artisanal fisheries are largely centred on reefs ...

  4. Microscopic oxygen imaging based on fluorescein bleaching efficiency measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beutler, Martin; Heisterkamp, Ines M.; Piltz, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Photobleaching of the fluorophore fluorescein in an aqueous solution is dependent on the oxygen concentration. Therefore, the time-dependent bleaching behavior can be used to measure of dissolved oxygen concentrations. The method can be combined with epi-fluorescence microscopy. The molecular sta...... concentrations. The method was demonstrated on nitrifying biofilms growing on snail and mussel shells, showing clear effects of metabolic activity on oxygen concentrations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  5. KRAFT PULPING CHARACTERISTICS OF THREE MOROCCAN EUCALYPTI. PART 1. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF WOODS AND PULPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El Moussaouiti,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Two eucalyptus hybrids (EGC 39, EGC 241, resulting from crosses between Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus camaldulensis, were investigated to see if they could produce kraft papermaking fibers with low lignin and adequate physical properties. The two hybrids were harvested at an age of 8 years along with 6-8 year old Eucalyptus camaldulensis (Rostrata. All three eucalypti were grown in the area of Gharb in the North-West of Morocco. The tracheids in the two hybrids had a very high Runkel ratio (2 x cell wall thickness/lumen diameter and produced kraft paper sheets with low tensile strength due to a low degree of fiber collapse thus a low relative bonded area. These fibers could be used to increase the stiffness of a papermaking furnish. The lignin in the EGC 39 chips was more reactive in kraft pulping as compared to the other two eucalypti. Methoxyl analyses and nitrobenzene oxidation (NBO of the in-situ lignin (wood meals were performed, and it was concluded that the syringyl content of the EGC 39 lignin was less than or equal to those in the other two eucalypti. Differences in the guaiacyl fraction of the three samples will be discussed in Part 2 of this series.

  6. Fracture resistance of bleached teeth restored with different procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to internal bleaching and restored with different non-metallic post. Eighty mandibular incisors were endodontically treated and randomly divided in 10 groups (n = 8: G1- restored with composite resin (CR, G2- CR + fiber-reinforced composite post (FRC, Everstick post, Sticktech cemented with resin cement self-etch adhesive (RCS, Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray, G3- CR + FRC + self-adhesive resin cement (SRC, Breeze, Pentral Clinical, G4- CR+ glass fiber post (GF, Exacto Post, Angelus + RCS, G5- CR + GF + SRC. The G6 to G10 were bleached with hydrogen peroxide (HP and restored with the same restorative procedures used for G1 to G5, respectively. After 7 days storage in artificial saliva, the specimens were submitted to the compressive strength test (N at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed and the failure pattern was identified as either reparable (failure showed until 2 mm below the cement-enamel junction or irreparable (the failure showed <2 mm or more below the cement-enamel. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. No significant difference (p < 0.05 was found among G1 to G10. The results suggest that intracoronal bleaching did not significantly weaken the teeth and the failure patterns were predominately reparable for all groups. The non-metallic posts in these teeth did not improve fracture resistance.

  7. Assessment of the process of cottonseed oil bleaching in hexane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megahed, Ola A.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been initiated to assess the feasibility of bleaching cottonseed oil in miscella as a processing step next to alkali refining in miscella. Alkali refining of cottonseed oil in miscella has several advantages over conventional refining technologies with respect to oil quality, oil losses and process cost. Therefore, the process efficiency of the bleaching of cottonseed oil in presence of hexane (at a volumetric ratio of 1:1, has been studied and compared to that without solvent. The process efficiency has been evaluated according to the decolourization capacity, the oil losses on spent earth, the filtration rate of the oil from the clay and the acidity of the bleached oil as well as its peroxide content. The bleaching in presence of hexane was carried out at 25ºC whereas that by conventional bleaching at 110ºC. Different clay loads were used in each of the two bleaching techniques and the colour indices of the oils before and after bleaching determined in each case. The results were used to predict Freundlich adsorption equations for the oil pigments in both cases. These equations were then used to predict the colour of the oils obtained by bleaching of refined oils of different grades. The results have shown that oil decolourization is more efficient in presence of solvent when the starting oil is of an acceptable grade and the reverse is true for low grade oils. Also, the possibility of oil oxidation during bleaching is less in presence of solvent. Moreover, the bleaching in miscella has proved two other additional advantages over conventional bleaching. The filtration of oil from clay is much faster in miscella bleaching and the oil losses on spent earth is lower. This will be reflected on the overall process economy.Este trabajo ha sido iniciado para evaluar la viabilidad de la decoloración del aceite de semilla de algodón en miscela como un paso de procesado próximo a la refinación alcalina en miscela. La refinaci

  8. The recovery of oil from spent bleaching earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bassuoni, A.A.; Sherief, H.M.; Tayeb, A.M.; Ahmed, K.K. [Minia Univ., Minia (Egypt). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    Four solvent based extraction methods to recover oil from spent bleached earth were presented. Spent bleaching earth is a solid waste that is generated during the processing of vegetable oils. It is removed from the oil with filters and contains approximately 25-29 per cent oil by weight. At the onset of the study, the oil entrained with the spent bleaching earth filtration was determined to be 25 per cent. Four solvents, N-hexane, carbon tetra chloride, benzene and 1,2 dichloroethane were used in this study. The per cent recovery of oil was calculated by measuring the concentration of oil by spectrophotometer. The effect of temperature on the recovery of oil and different solid:liquid ratios was also studied for the four solvents. The following four methods were used for the recovery of oil were solvent extraction, extraction with 1 per cent sodium carbonate solution, extraction with 4.5 per cent sodium dodecyl sulphite solution and boiling with 12 per cent sodium hydroxide solution. All methods gave satisfactory results indicating that the earth could be reused. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Peroxide dental bleaching via laser microchannels and tooth color measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrey; Skrypnik, Alexei; Feldchtein, Felix; Pushkareva, Alexandra; Shatilova, Ksenia; Cernavin, Igor; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use microchannels drilled by an Er:YAG laser into a human tooth through the enamel into the dentin for direct injection of hydrogen peroxide (HP) to produce a minimally invasive, rapid, tooth bleaching effect. The experiments were conducted in vitro. Five microchannels with a diameter of ˜200 μm and a depth of ˜2 mm were drilled through the palatal side of a human tooth crown using the microbeam of an Er:YAG-laser with a wavelength of 2.94 μm. After injection of an aqueous solution of 31%-HP through the microchannels, the tooth color was evaluated using a VITA shade guide and International Commission on Illumination L*ab color parameters. A tooth model used for the evaluation of the distribution of HP concentration was created and the amount of HP which can be injected into tooth dentin to bleach it safely was estimated. Injection of 1.5±0.1 mm3 of 31%-HP into the tooth led to noticeable bleaching within 3 h and significant improvement of tooth color within 24 h.

  10. Symbiophagy as a cellular mechanism for coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Craig A; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Martinez, Jon; Kushmaro, Ariel; Woodley, Cheryl M; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is a major contributor to the global declines of coral reefs. This phenomenon is characterized by the loss of symbiotic algae, their pigments or both. Despite wide scientific interest, the mechanisms by which bleaching occurs are still poorly understood. Here we report that the removal of the symbiont during light and temperature stress is achieved using the host's cellular autophagic-associated machinery. Host cellular and subcellular morphologies showed increased vacuolization and appearance of autophagic membranes surrounding a variety of organelles and surrounding the symbiotic algae. Markers of autophagy (Rab 7 and LAS) corroborate these observations. Results showed that during stress the symbiont vacuolar membrane is transformed from a conduit of nutrient exchange to a digestive organelle resulting in the consumption of the symbiont, a process we term symbiophagy. We posit that during a stress event, the mechanism maintaining symbiosis is destabilized and symbiophagy is activated, ultimately resulting in the phenomenon of bleaching. Symbiophagy may have evolved from a more general primordial innate intracellular protective pathway termed xenophagy.

  11. ALKALINE PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF HOT WATER TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Mustajoki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities for chemical consumption reduction in P-P-Paa-P bleaching (P alkaline peroxide stage, Paa peracetic stage of hot water treated straw and the effect of the wheat straw variability on the process. Papermaking fibre production from wheat straw using such a process could be implemented on a small scale if chemical consumption was low enough to eliminate the need for chemical recovery. The pulp properties obtained with this process are equal to or even superior to the properties of wheat straw soda pulp. The possibility of enhancing the first peroxide stage with oxygen and pressure was studied. The possibility for substitution of sodium hydroxide partially with sodium carbonate was also investigated. The objective was to achieve International Standardization Organization (ISO brightness of 75%, with minimal sodium hydroxide consumption, whilst maintaining the pulp properties. The optimization of the peroxide bleaching is challenging if the final brightness target cannot be reduced. Results indicate that up to 25% of the sodium hydroxide could be substituted with sodium carbonate without losing brightness or affecting pulp properties. Another possibility is a mild alkali treatment between the hot water treatment and the bleaching sequence.

  12. Etiology and prevention of external cervical root resorption associated to teeth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mendes da SILVA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Esthetic dentistry has been prioritizedand the desire for whiter teeth has been increasingly present in dental offices, since whiter teeth tend to indicate health, beauty, youth and a more attractive smile. Teeth bleaching is a conservative method widely used to restore the original color of darkened teeth. However, possible relations with the external cervical root resorption have concerned many researchers and clinicians. Literature review: There are many mechanisms that can activate the external cervical root resorption, such as: chemical and physical action of the bleaching materials used, morphology of the cementoenamel junction associated to the immune system, material concentration, traumas and bleaching technique used. Conclusion: Therefore, considering many factors that are still not conclusive, preventing deleterious effects on teeth and support structures, care must be taken when choosing bleaching agent and bleaching technique, as well as when selecting each case, beyond a proper restoration after teeth bleaching.

  13. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Added, N. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nemitala@dfn.if.usp.br; Rizzutto, M.A. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curado, J.F. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Francci, C. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Markarian, R. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mori, M. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a {sup 35}Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  14. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZATION OF FLAX SEED OIL BLEACHING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Ondrejovič

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Flax seed is an important source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids essential for human physiology. For low oxidation stability, specific taste and concomitant color compounds this oil is poorly applicable as nutraceutical additive. The aim of this study was optimization of flax seed oil bleaching. The optimal conditions for the bleaching process were determined using response surface methodology. A central composite design was used to investigate the effects of three independent variables, namely solid to liquid ratio, temperature and time, to output parameters of the bleaching process such as crude oil color expressed as optical density at 490 nm, acid and peroxide value. Calculated optimal conditions for the bleaching, expressed by the optical density of the oil were as follows: temperature 50°C, bleaching time 77 minutes and solid-liquid ratio 56 g of bleaching agent to 1 liter of oil.

  15. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  16. Assessment of enamel roughness of bovine teeth bleached with and without laser activation

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Canzi Almada de Paula XAVIER; Rodrigo Mario Pontoni MIRANDA; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Maria da Graça Kfouri LOPES

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, due to increased demand of patients anddentists for aesthetic treatments, bleaching procedures have becomeroutine in dental treatment. The development of new techniques andmaterials, such as laser-activated bleaching, has gained popularity.However, due to the small number of publications in this area, theiraggressiveness to the enamel is still not known. Objective: To determine the roughness of the enamel surface of bovine teeth bleached with and without laser activat...

  17. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR) might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 ...

  18. Efficacy and cytotoxicity of a bleaching gel after short application times on dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; da Silveira Vargas, Fernanda; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate and correlate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of a 35 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gel after different application times on dental enamel. Enamel/dentin disks in artificial pulp chambers were placed in wells containing culture medium. The following groups were formed: G1, control (no bleaching); G2 and G3, three or one 15-min bleaching applications, respectively; and G4 and G5, three or one 5-min bleaching applications, respectively. Extracts (culture medium with bleaching gel components) were applied for 60 min on cultured odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells. Cell metabolism (methyl tetrazolium assay) (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5 %) and cell morphology (scanning electron microscopy) were analyzed immediately after the bleaching procedures and the trans-enamel and trans-dentinal HP diffusion quantified (one-way analysis of variance/Tukey's test; α = 5 %). The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was evaluated 24 h after the contact time of the extracts with the cells (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5 %). Tooth color was analyzed before and 24 h after bleaching using a spectrophotometer according to the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* system (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 0.05). Significant difference (p 0.05). The lowest amount of HP diffusion was observed in G5 (p 0.05). HP diffusion through dental tissues and its cytotoxic effects were proportional to the contact time of the bleaching gel with enamel. However, shorter bleaching times reduced bleaching efficacy. Shortening the in-office tooth bleaching time could be an alternative to minimize the cytotoxic effects of this clinical procedure to pulp tissue. However, the reduced time of bleaching agent application on enamel may not provide adequate esthetic outcome.

  19. Durability of bleaching results achieved with 15% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Reus, Monika; Rosenberger, Albert; Attin, Thomas; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the durability of bleaching results achieved with (1) 15% carbamide peroxide home bleaching and (2) 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching. A total of 231 extracted anterior teeth were randomly divided into three groups (n = 77 in each group) with comparable mean baseline L*-values (68.24 ± 0.8): a non-bleached control group A, a 15% carbamide peroxide group B (5 bleaching intervals of 8 hours), and a 38% hydrogen peroxide group C (3 intervals of 15 minutes). Durability of bleaching was assessed by comparing CIE-L*a*b* data after intervals of 2, 4, 12, and 26 weeks from baseline. Both bleaching regimes initially produced a highly significant increase in lightness parameter L*, with no significant difference between the respective bleaching regimes (B: 68.23 / 72.48; C: 68.32 / 73.25). Six months after starting the trial, L*-values for group B yielded no significant differences compared to baseline (69.55), whereas L*-values for group C were still significantly raised (69.91), despite a highly significant decrease when compared to initial bleaching results. In both treatment groups, there was a lasting response to bleaching in terms of CIE-a* and -b* value decreases. Results for both home- and in-practice regimes were found to be similar for about 12 weeks. However, in-office results were longer lasting, despite the shorter treatment intervals. Summarized bleaching effects, in terms of delta E values, revealed no significant differences between treatment groups and the control group after 6 months, indicating an abatement of the bleaching results achieved.

  20. An In Vitro Evaluation of Human Enamel Surfaces Subjected to Erosive Challenge After Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Carvalho Vasconcelos, Maria; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa; de França, Adílis Kalina Alexandria; de Medeiros, Urubatan Vieira; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Queiroz, Celso Silva

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether tooth enamel bleached with hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) is more susceptible to erosion when compared with unbleached tooth enamel; and whether the presence of calcium (Ca) in the bleaching gel influenced this process. Enamel blocks were prepared from human molars, and submitted to surface microhardness analysis (baseline). Blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four treatment groups (n = 20): G1 and G2-bleached with 7.5% H2 O2 , with and without Ca, respectively; G3 and G4-bleached with 35% H2 O2 , with and without Ca, respectively. After bleaching, these groups were submitted to an erosive challenge with 1% citric acid. G5 and G6 (n = 20, each) were the negative (without bleaching) and positive controls (without bleaching, but with erosion), respectively. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL), the 3D non-contact profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed. G2 showed the highest %SHL after bleaching. G1 presented the lowest %SHL in comparison with G2, G3, G4, and G6 after erosion (p < 0.05), which was confirmed only by the SEM analysis. It is suggested that low concentration of H2 O2 with calcium can be recommended for at-home bleaching agents, which may avoid the mineral loss of bleached enamel after an erosive challenge. Low concentration of H2 02 with calcium can be recommended for at-home bleaching agents, which may avoid the mineral loss of bleached enamel after an erosive challenge. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:128-136, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Human Pulpal Reaction to the Modified McInnes Bleaching Technique,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    Modified McInnes Bleaching Technique is specifically recommended for the treatment of teeth exhibiting endemic dental fluorosis because of its superficial...SUMARY The Modified Mclnnes Bleaching Technique has been recommended for removing the stain of endemic dental fluorosis . This study was designed to...stain from teeth. Ariz Dent J 1966; 12:13-15. 3. Bailey RW, Christen AC. Bleaching of vital teeth stained with endemic dental fluorosis . Oral Surg 1968

  2. Bleached phase holograms exposed on Agfa-Gevaert 10E75 NAH plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, K.

    1991-02-01

    An experimental study has been made of the diffraction efficiency, scattering and stability against printout effect of bleached, photographically recorded two- beam interference gratings using Agfa-Gevaert 10E75 NAH plates. The efficiency is increased by using bleaching processes that convert the silver image into a dielectric image. Plots of the diffraction efficiency and scattering against exposure, and variation of the maximum diffraction efficiency as a function of departure from the Bragg angle, and exposure to white light, for various bleaching processes, are given. A maximum diffraction efficiency of approximately 54% has been achieved by using a potassium iodide and iodine bleach process.

  3. A Study for Tooth Bleaching via Carbamide Peroxide-Loaded Hollow Calcium Phosphate Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Qin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate if a prolonged bleaching effect of carbamide peroxide-loaded hollow calcium phosphate spheres (HCPS can be achieved. HCPS was synthesized via a hydrothermal reaction method. Carbamide peroxide (CP was-loaded into HCPS by mixing with distilled water as solvent. We developed two bleaching gels containing CP-loaded HCPS: one gel with low HP concentration as at-home bleaching gel, and one with high HP concentration as in-office gel. Their bleaching effects on stained human permanent posterior teeth were investigated by measuring the color difference before and after bleaching. The effect of gels on rhodamine B degradation was also studied. To investigate the potential effect of remineralization of using HCPS, bleached teeth were soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS containing calcium and magnesium ions. Both bleaching gels had a prolonged whitening effect, and showed a strong ability to degrade rhodamine B. After soaking in PBS for 3 days, remineralization was observed at the sites where HCPS attached to the teeth surface. CP-loaded HCPS could prolong the HP release behavior and improve the bleaching effect. HCPS was effective in increasing the whitening effect of carbamide peroxide and improving remineralization after bleaching process.

  4. EFFECT OF LAST STAGE BLEACHING WITH PERACETIC ACID ON BRIGHTNESS DEVELOPMENT AND PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise P. Barros

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of last stage bleaching with peracetic acid is the main subject of this paper. Proper conditions were established to apply peracetic acid as the last bleaching stage of the D(EpD/Paa, DHT(EpD/Paa, A/D(EpD/Paa, DHT/Q(POPaa and Z/ED/Paa sequences. In addition, the impact of last stage bleaching with Paa on pulp refinability and strength properties was determined. Peracetic acid was consumed relatively fast when applied as the last stage of ECF bleaching sequences. A reaction time of 120 min at 75 oC and pH 5.0 is seemingly adequate regardless of the Paa dose, in the range of 1-5 kg/odt pulp and bleaching sequence. The optimum dose of Paa depends upon the sequence under investigation. In general the Paa application as last bleaching stage caused slight decrease in pulp viscosity, kappa number and HexA content but had no significant effect on pulp reversion and L*a*b* coordinates. The refinability and bonding strength properties of the pulps bleached with the sequences DHT(EpDD and DHT(EpD/Paa were quite similar when the pH of the last bleaching stage of both sequences were near 5. These properties improved slightly when Paa bleaching pH was raised to 8.5.

  5. Bleached Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals catabolize δ13C-enriched lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, Andréa G.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.

    2011-09-01

    Corals rely on stored energy reserves (i.e., lipids, carbohydrates, and protein) to survive bleaching events. To better understand the physiological implications of coral bleaching on lipid catabolism and/or synthesis, we measured the δ13C of coral total lipids (δ13CTL) in experimentally bleached (treatment) and non-bleached (control) Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals immediately after bleaching and after 1.5 and 4 months of recovery on the reef. Overall δ13CTL values in treatment corals were significantly lower than in control corals because of a 1.9 and 3.4‰ decrease in δ13CTL immediately after bleaching in P. compressa and M. capitata, respectively. The decrease in δ13CTL coincided with decreases in total lipid concentration, indicating that corals catabolized δ13C-enriched lipids. Since storage lipids are primarily depleted during bleaching, we hypothesize that they are isotopically enriched relative to other lipid classes. This work further helps clarify our understanding of changes to coral metabolism and biogeochemistry when bleached and helps elucidate how lipid classes may influence recovery from bleaching and ultimately coral survival.

  6. Changes in Caribbean coral disease prevalence after the 2005 bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cróquer, Aldo; Weil, Ernesto

    2009-11-16

    Bleaching events and disease epizootics have increased during the past decades, suggesting a positive link between these 2 causes in producing coral mortality. However, studies to test this hypothesis, integrating a broad range of hierarchical spatial scales from habitats to distant localities, have not been conducted in the Caribbean. In this study, we examined links between bleaching intensity and disease prevalence collected from 6 countries, 2 reef sites for each country, and 3 habitats within each reef site (N = 6 x 2 x 3 = 36 site-habitat combinations) during the peak of bleaching in 2005 and a year after, in 2006. Patterns of disease prevalence and bleaching were significantly correlated (Rho = 0.58, p = 0.04). Higher variability in disease prevalence after bleaching occurred among habitats at each particular reef site, with a significant increase in prevalence recorded in 4 of the 10 site-habitats where bleaching was intense and a non-significant increase in disease prevalence in 18 out of the 26 site-habitats where bleaching was low to moderate. A significant linear correlation was found (r = 0.89, p = 0.008) between bleaching and the prevalence of 2 virulent diseases (yellow band disease and white plague) affecting the Montastraea species complex. Results of this study suggest that if bleaching events become more intense and frequent, disease-related mortality of Caribbean coral reef builders could increase, with uncertain effects on coral reef resilience.

  7. Annual coral bleaching and the long-term recovery capacity of coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Grottoli, Andréa G; Levas, Stephen J; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Baumann, Justin H; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E

    2015-11-22

    Mass bleaching events are predicted to occur annually later this century. Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether corals will be able to recover between annual bleaching events. Using a combined tank and field experiment, we simulated annual bleaching by exposing three Caribbean coral species (Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides and Orbicella faveolata) to elevated temperatures for 2.5 weeks in 2 consecutive years. The impact of annual bleaching stress on chlorophyll a, energy reserves, calcification, and tissue C and N isotopes was assessed immediately after the second bleaching and after both short- and long-term recovery on the reef (1.5 and 11 months, respectively). While P. divaricata and O. faveolata were able to recover from repeat bleaching within 1 year, P. astreoides experienced cumulative damage that prevented full recovery within this time frame, suggesting that repeat bleaching had diminished its recovery capacity. Specifically, P. astreoides was not able to recover protein and carbohydrate concentrations. As energy reserves promote bleaching resistance, failure to recover from annual bleaching within 1 year will likely result in the future demise of heat-sensitive coral species.

  8. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Magalhães Vaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG (n=7; at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH (n = 10, and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO (n=12. Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+, blood vessels (CD31+, and macrophages (CD68+. Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p0.05. No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels.

  9. Effect of bleaching whey on sensory and functional properties of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, S; Campbell, R; Wojciechowski, K L; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2012-06-01

    Whey is a highly functional food that has found widespread use in a variety of food and beverage applications. A large amount of the whey proteins produced in the United States is derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Color from annatto is undesirable in whey and must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare 2 commercially approved bleaching agents, benzoyl peroxide (BP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP), and their effects on the flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). Colored and uncolored liquid wheys were bleached with BP or HP, and then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried; WPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored Cheddar whey were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. The WPC80 were then assessed by sensory, instrumental, functionality, color, and proximate analysis techniques. The HP-bleached WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (specifically hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-octen-3-one) and had higher fatty and cardboard flavors compared with the other unbleached and BP-bleached WPC80. The WPC80 bleached with BP had lower norbixin concentrations compared with WPC80 bleached with HP. The WPC powders differed in Hunter color values (L, a, b), with bleached powders being more white, less red, and less yellow than unbleached powders. Bleaching with BP under the conditions used in this study resulted in larger reductions in yellowness of the powders made from whey with annatto color than did bleaching with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that whey bleached with HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10 min of heating at 90°C at pH 4.6 and pH 7 than the no-bleach and BP treatments, regardless of additional color. Overall, HP bleaching caused more lipid oxidation products and subsequent off-flavors compared with BP bleaching. However, heat stability of WPC80 was enhanced by HP bleaching compared with control or BP-bleached

  10. Impacts of the 1998 and 2010 mass coral bleaching events on the Western Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthacheep, Makamas; Yucharoen, Mathinee; Klinthong, Wanlaya; Pengsakun, Sittiporn; Sangmanee, Kanwara; Yeemin, Thamasak

    2013-11-01

    A long-term study of coral reef ecology in the Gulf of Thailand provides a good opportunity to examine the temporal variation on the impact of mass coral bleaching at those reef sites. We compared the bleaching and mortality of corals between the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 at a coral community in the Western Gulf of Thailand. The aim was to identify the coral species which were most likely to suffer from (and to be able to tolerate) changes in seawater temperature. Significant differences in the susceptibility of the coral taxa to bleaching events between the years 1998 and 2010 and among coral species were documented. Bleaching was significantly different between the most dominant corals. Diploastrea heliopora was the most resistant coral to bleaching in both years. Some coral species showed more resistance to bleaching in 2010. The coral mortality following the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 varied significantly between the years and the coral taxa. Mortality of some dominant coral taxa was also lower in 2010. Seven coral species, i.e. Astreopora myriophthalma, Pachyseris rugosa, Turbinaria mesenterina, Goniastrea pectinata, Favia pallida, F. maritima, Favites halicora, Platygyra daedalea and Galaxea fascicularis, were tolerant to the coral bleaching events. An ecosystem-based approach to managing coral reefs in the Gulf of Thailand is needed to identify appropriate marine protected area networks and to strengthen marine and coastal resource policies in order to build coral reef resilience.

  11. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppo, Daniela Piai; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: dpgroppo@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source ({sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed. (author)

  12. Use of the LM-OSL technique for the detection of partial bleaching in quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, N.A.; Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.;

    2000-01-01

    is known as linear modulation OSL (LM-OSL). In controlled laboratory conditions, this technique has been employed to study the ease-of-bleaching of the trapped charge in quartz by comparing the OSL curves of quartz aliquots which have been either: (1) fully bleached, followed by a laboratory dose of beta...... -irradiation, or (2) partially bleached, followed by the laboratory beta -dose. The ratio of the OSL signals due to the beta -dose from the partly and fully bleached aliquots is illustrated to be a potential indicator of the degree of optical resetting of the OSL signal in dating material. The key parameter...

  13. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL and Optibond Solo Plus (SP, respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10 with 10% CP (CP and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF or were left unbleached (control. Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (∝TBS testing. The enamel ∝TBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached were higher (p FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP. The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar ∝TBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  14. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  15. Carbon Storage of bottomland hardwood afforestation in the Lower Mississippi Valley, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David T. Shoch; Gary Kaster; Aaron Hohl; Ray Souter

    2009-01-01

    The emerging carbon market is an increasingly important source of finance for bottomland hardwood afforestation in the Lower Mississippi River Valley (LMV). Notwithstanding, there is a scarcity of empirical...

  16. 78 FR 36791 - Hardwood Plywood From China; Institution of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ..., including but not limited to veneers, particleboard, and medium-density fiberboard (``MDF''). All hardwood..., but are not limited to, paper, aluminum, high pressure laminate (``HPL''), MDF, medium density overlay...

  17. Survey of understory plant diversity in mature bottomland hardwood tracts in the Mississippi Delta

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This research was designed to collect data on the understory plant composition of remnant bottomland hardwood forest tracts on accessible public lands in the LMAV...

  18. Sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocellulose (SPORL) for robust enzymatic saccharification of hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. S. Wang; X. J. Pan; Junyong Zhu; Roland Gleisner; D. Rockwood

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocellulose (SPORL) for robust bioconversion of hardwoods. With only about 4% sodium bisulfite charge on aspen and 30-min pretreatment at temperature 180[...

  19. Power consumption and lumber yields for reduced-kerf circular saws cutting hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald G. Cuppett

    1982-01-01

    Two 50-inch diameter headsaws were used for sawing (a) hardwood cants into boards, and (b) hardwood bolts into pallet parts. One saw had a 9x10 gage plate with 114-inch kerf teeth, and the other had a 7x8 gage plate with 9/32-inch kerf teeth. Power consumption for the two saws was determined with a watt-hour meter, measuring power used for paired cuts in 6-inch thick...

  20. Vegetation classification in southern pine mixed hardwood forests using airborne scanning laser point data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGaughey, Robert J. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station; Reutebuch, Stephen E. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station

    2012-10-15

    Forests of the southeastern United States are dominated by a relatively small number of conifer species. However, many of these forests also have a hardwood component composed of a wide variety of species that are found in all canopy positions. The presence or absence of hardwood species and their position in the canopy often dictates management activities such as thinning or prescribed burning. In addition, the characteristics of the under- and mid-story layers, often dominated by hardwood species, are key factors when assessing suitable habitat for threatened and endangered species such as the Red Cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) (RCW), making information describing the hardwood component important to forest managers. General classification of cover types using LIDAR data has been reported (Song et al. 2002, Brennan and Webster 2006) but most efforts focusing on the identification of individual species or species groups rely on some type of imagery to provide more complete spectral information for the study area. Brandtberg (2007) found that use of intensity data significantly improved LIDAR detection and classification of three leaf-off deciduous eastern species: oaks (Quercus spp.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.). Our primary objective was to determine the proportion of hardwood species present in the canopy using only the LIDAR point data and derived products. However, the presence of several hardwood species that retain their foliage through the winter months complicated our analyses. We present two classification approaches. The first identifies areas containing hardwood and softwood (conifer) species (H/S) and the second identifies vegetation with foliage absent or present (FA/FP) at the time of the LIDAR data acquisition. The classification results were used to develop predictor variables for forest inventory models. The ability to incorporate the proportion of hardwood and softwood was important to the

  1. Development of an upland hardwood demonstration forest on the Mary Olive Thomas Demonstration Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth D. Hunt; John S. Kush; Rebecca J. Barlow

    2016-01-01

    Landowners have experienced a dizzying array of timber prices over the past several years. At one time, hardwood pulpwood brought very little per ton and today it brings as much or more than pine pulpwood. In some markets in the Southeast today, oak sawtimber is bringing more than pine poles. Many landowners, who previously said they wanted their hardwood stands left...

  2. IMPACT OF APPLYING BCTMP TO WOOD-FREE LWC ON ITS PERFORMANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KaitangHu; YonghaoNi; XuejunZou; YajunZhou

    2004-01-01

    Substituting bleached CTMP (BCTMP) for chemicalpulps, such as bleached hardwood kraft pulp in manypaper grades is in rising demand for reducing costand improving product performance. In this paper weinvestigated the effect of substituting aspen BCTMPfor hardwood krat~ pulp (varying from 10% to 30%)on product performance of light weight coated paper.The results show that the tensile index increases andother strength properties are essentially unchanged asthe substitution level increases. With the increasedBCTMP substitution level, the surface roughness ofbase sheets increases slightly, while coating coverageof base sheets is not affected significantly. Theincreased BCTMP substitution results in an increasein porosity of the base sheets, but does not change theaverage pore diameter. Increasing BCTMPsubstitution level leads to a slight decrease in glossand an increase in surface roughness of the coatedpaper, however the latter can be compensated by ahigher nip load calendering.

  3. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIROLO, Rodrigo; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CORRER, Gisele Maria; GONZAGA, Carla Castiglia; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max) and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO) before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD) at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E) and lightness (∆L) variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001). All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L). The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively). Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching. PMID:25075672

  4. Efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique with carbamide peroxides modified by CPP-ACP and its effect on the microhardness of bleached enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, B C D; Borges, J S; de Melo, C D; Pinheiro, I V A; Santos, A J S Dos; Braz, R; Montes, M A J R

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate in vitro the efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique using 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide modified by casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and its influence on the microhardness of bleached enamel. A total of 40 bovine incisors were divided into four groups (n=10) according to the bleaching agent used: 10% carbamide peroxide only; a blend of 10% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste; 16% carbamide peroxide only; and a blend of 16% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste. During the 14-day bleaching regimen, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. The Vickers microhardness and color of the teeth were assessed at baseline (T0) and immediately after the bleaching regimen (T14) using a microhardness tester and a spectrophotometer, respectively. The degree of color change was determined by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclariage (CIE) L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) and Vita shade guide parameters. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and the Tukey test (pmicrohardness values at T14 compared with T0, whereas the samples that were bleached with peroxide only did not show any differences in their microhardness values. All of the bleaching agents were effective at whitening the teeth and did not show a statistically significant difference using the CIEL*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) or the Vita shade guide parameters. The use of a CPP-ACP paste with carbamide peroxide bleaching agents increased the bleached enamel's microhardness and did not have an influence on whitening efficacy.

  5. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo PIROLO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E and lightness (∆L variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05. Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001. All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L. The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively. Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching.

  6. First year survival of barefoot and containerized hardwood tree seedlings planted in northeast Texas lignite minesoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, J.; Denman, J. [Texas Utilities Mining Company, Mt. Pleasant, TX (United States); Waxler, M.; Huber, D.A. [Weyerhaeuser, Hot Springs, AK (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Successful regeneration of hardwood tree seedlings is critical to the reclamation of quality wildlife habitat and commercial forests on lignite mines in northeast Texas. Because bareroot hardwood seedlings survival rates have often been lower than desired, the survival of containerized and bareroot hardwood tree seedlings was compared. Seven hardwood species, including six species of oaks, were planted in lignite minesoils on sites classified as bottomland, slope and upland. Three species were planted per site. Containerized seedlings were planted during the fall and winter, whereas bareroot seedlings were planted in the winter only. Survival was determined at the end of the first growing season. Results across all sites indicate that winter-planted containerized seedlings (74%) or bareroot seedlings (76%). Within the sites, the only significant difference was on upland sites where survival of winter-planted containerized seedlings (60%) was lower than bareroot seedlings (77%). Survival among species was not significantly different. There was no significant survival benefit from using more expensive containerized hardwood seedlings. The results also question the practice of planting containerized hardwood seedlings during the typical winter planting season for optimum survival.

  7. Caloric values for young sprouts of nine hardwood species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neenan, M. (An Foras Taluntais, Oak Park, Carlow, Ireland); Steinbeck, K.

    1979-09-01

    Caloric content, specific gravity, and ash content of 6- to 15-year-old sprouts of nine hardwood species were determined in midsummer. Energy values for wood, bark, first order branches, twigs, and leaves were determined with an adiabatic bomb calorimeter. The values found for coppice material averaged 4791 cal/g and were comparable to published values for older wood. Intraspecific differences among tissues were greater than the relatively small but significant differences among species. Differences in yield potential are therefore likely to outweigh variations in caloric content among species where total energy production per unit of land area is concerned. Ash content varied from 0.65 percent for wood to 5.88 percent for bark.

  8. Calorific values for young sprouts of nine hardwood species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neenan, M.; Steinbeck, K.

    Calorific content, specific gravity and ash content of 10 to 15 year old sprouts of nine hardwood species were determined in mid-summer. Energy values for wood, bark, first order branches, twigs and leaves were determined with an adiabatic bomb calorimeter. The values found for coppice material averaged 4791 cal/g and were comparable to published values for older wood. Intraspecific differences among tissues were greater than the relatively small but significant differences among species. Differences in yield potential are therefore likely to outweigh variations in calorific content among species where total energy production per unit of land area is concerned. Ash content varied from 0.65% for wood to 5.88% for bark.

  9. COMPRESSION AND SPRINGBACK PROPERTIES OF HARDWOOD AND SOFTWOOD PELLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarnath Dhamodaran,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A multiple linear regression analysis was carried out to predict the length of pellets under compression in the die based on moisture, temperature, pressure, hold time, and their interaction terms. Excellent correlations were obtained in the dependency of the considered parameters on length of compressed material inside the die. Springback characteristics based on axial changes after the compaction process were analyzed. The expansion for hardwood pellets (16.28% was found to be lowest at particle size 0.150 to 0.300 mm with 8% moisture (w.b, 60 °C, 139.3 MPa pressure, and a hold time of 15S. The expansion for softwood pellets (20.56% was lowest with particle size 0.300 to 0.425 mm, at 8% moisture (w.b, 70 °C, 159.2 MPa, and a hold time of 30S.

  10. Kraft lignin/silica-AgNPs as a functional material with antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapiszewski, Łukasz; Rzemieniecki, Tomasz; Krawczyk, Magdalena; Malina, Dagmara; Norman, Małgorzata; Zdarta, Jakub; Majchrzak, Izabela; Dobrowolska, Anna; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2015-10-01

    Advanced functional silica/lignin hybrid materials, modified with nanosilver, were obtained. The commercial silica Syloid 244 was used, modified with N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane to increase its chemical affinity to lignin. Similarly, kraft lignin was oxidized using a solution of sodium periodate to activate appropriate functional groups on its surface. Silver nanoparticles were grafted onto the resulting silica/lignin hybrids. The systems obtained were comprehensively tested using available techniques and methods, including transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. An evaluation was also made of the electrokinetic stability of the systems with and without silver nanoparticles. Conclusions were drawn concerning the chemical nature of the bonds between the precursors and the effectiveness of the method of binding nanosilver to the hybrid materials. The antimicrobial activity of the studied materials was tested against five species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The addition of silver nanoparticles to the silica/lignin hybrids led to inhibition of the growth of the analyzed bacteria. The best results were obtained against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dangerous human pathogen.

  11. Use of Electrochemical Noise to Assess Corrosion in Kraft Continuous Digesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, S.J.

    2004-11-29

    Electrochemical noise (EN) probes were deployed in two continuous kraft digesters at a variety of locations representative of corrosion throughout the vessels. Current and potential noise, the temperature at each probe location, and the value of up to 60 process parameters (flow rates, liquor chemistry, etc.) were monitored continuously during each experiment. The results indicate that changes in furnish composition and process upsets were invariably associated with concurrent substantial changes in EN activity throughout the vessels. Post-test evaluation of the mild steel electrode materials in both vessels confirmed general corrosion of a magnitude consistent with historical trends in the respective vessels as well as values qualitatively (and semi-quantitatively) related to EN current sums for each electrode pair. Stainless steel electrodes representing 309LSi and 312 overlay repairs exhibited zero wastage corrosion--as did the actual overlays--but the EN data indicated periodic redox activity on the stainless steel that varied with time and position within the vessel. Little or no correlation between EN probe activity and other operational variables was observed in either vessel. Additional details for each digester experiment are summarized.

  12. Influence of the demineralisation on the chemical activation of Kraft lignin with orthophosphoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, V; Torné-Fernández, V; Celzard, A; Montané, D

    2007-10-01

    The preparation of activated carbons (ACs) from the thermal decomposition of mixtures of orthophosphoric acid (PA) and either as-received softwood Kraft lignin, KL, or demineralised one, KL(d), has been investigated. Activation with PA has been studied for a PA/lignin ratio of 1 (dry ash-free basis) and 1h carbonisation time at final temperatures of 400, 500 and 600 degrees C. The yield, surface area, porosity, surface chemistry and methylene blue adsorption capacity have been determined. All ACs were found to be essentially microporous, with surface areas higher than 800 m(2)/g and a maximum value of nearly 1200 m(2)/g for the carbon prepared at 600 degrees C from KL. In order to study the influence of temperature on the properties of the ACs prepared from KL and KL(d), the latter precursors were analysed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We have concluded that the very different characteristics of the ACs obtained from KL and KL(d) are due to the presence or not of mineral matter during carbonisation, but mainly to the demineralisation process itself, which produces polymerisation of the raw lignin. Methylene blue adsorption was found to be higher for ACs prepared from KL, mainly because of their higher ash and sulphur contents.

  13. Recovery of kraft lignin from pulping wastewater via emulsion liquid membrane process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Zing-Yi; Harruddin, Norlisa; Othman, Norasikin

    2015-01-01

    Kraft lignin (KL) is a renewable source of many valuable intermediate biochemical products currently derived from petroleum. An excessive of lignin comes from pulping wastewater caused an adverse pollution problems hence affecting human and aquatic life. A comprehensive study pertaining to emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) extraction of lignin from pulping wastewater was presented. ELM formulation contains Aliquat 336 as carrier, kerosene as diluent, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 ) as stripping agent and Span 80 as surfactant. The emulsion stability was investigated at different surfactant concentrations, homogenizer speed and emulsification time. Modifier (2-ethyl-1-hexanol) was added to avoid segregation of third phase while improving the emulsion stability. At optimum conditions, 95% and 56% of lignin were extracted and recovered, respectively at 10 min of extraction time, 0.007 M of Aliquat 336, 0.1 M of NaHCO3 and 1:5 of treat ratio. Additional of modifier was contributed to highest recovery up to 98%. The ELM process was found to be equally feasible and quite effective in the recovery of KL from real pulping wastewater. Therefore, ELM process provides a promising alternative technology to recover KL from pulping wastewater while solving the environmental problems simultaneously. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Environmental benchmarking of energy-related kraft mill modifications using LCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudreault, C.; Wising, U.; Martin, G.; Samson, R.; Stuart, P. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) tools were used to assess energy efficiency modifications at an integrated kraft pulp and paper mill. The tools were used to build a life cycle model of mill processes and products suitable for benchmarking environmental performance. An iterative process was used for all mill processes in the LCA system boundaries. Process options involving the use of waste paper were considered. Forest operations data included processes from planting seedlings to loading logs onto trucks as well as the manufacturing of fuel, chemicals, and amounts electricity needed. The state-specific fuel mix for electricity supply was applied to mill processes. Emission and resources were classified into categories and potential impacts were evaluated. The study showed that on-site mill operations were the main contributors to the ecotoxicity indicator and human health particulates indicator (HHP). Non mill-related activities accounted for most of the environmental impacts from fossil fuel usage. Paper end-of-life was the principal contributor to the eutrophication indicator. The study showed that converting steam production from coal to bark significantly reduced the environmental impacts of the mill. However the integration of a cogeneration plant did not significantly improve energy efficiency. 20 refs., 7 tabs., 11 figs.

  15. Influence of the demineralisation on the chemical activation of Kraft lignin with orthophosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, V. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR CNRS 7555, Nancy-Universite, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)], E-mail: Vanessa.Fierro@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr; Torne-Fernandez, V. [Departament de Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avda dels Paisos Catalans, 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Celzard, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR CNRS 7555, Nancy-Universite, ENSTIB, 27 rue du Merle Blanc, BP 1041, 88051 Epinal Cedex 9 (France); Montane, D. [Departament de Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avda dels Paisos Catalans, 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2007-10-01

    The preparation of activated carbons (ACs) from the thermal decomposition of mixtures of orthophosphoric acid (PA) and either as-received softwood Kraft lignin, KL, or demineralised one, KL{sub d}, has been investigated. Activation with PA has been studied for a PA/lignin ratio of 1 (dry ash-free basis) and 1 h carbonisation time at final temperatures of 400, 500 and 600 deg. C. The yield, surface area, porosity, surface chemistry and methylene blue adsorption capacity have been determined. All ACs were found to be essentially microporous, with surface areas higher than 800 m{sup 2}/g and a maximum value of nearly 1200 m{sup 2}/g for the carbon prepared at 600 deg. C from KL. In order to study the influence of temperature on the properties of the ACs prepared from KL and KL{sub d}, the latter precursors were analysed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We have concluded that the very different characteristics of the ACs obtained from KL and KL{sub d} are due to the presence or not of mineral matter during carbonisation, but mainly to the demineralisation process itself, which produces polymerisation of the raw lignin. Methylene blue adsorption was found to be higher for ACs prepared from KL, mainly because of their higher ash and sulphur contents.

  16. Acid-catalysed xylose dehydration into furfural in the presence of kraft lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamminpää, Kaisa; Ahola, Juha; Tanskanen, Juha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the effects of kraft lignin (Indulin AT) on acid-catalysed xylose dehydration into furfural were studied in formic and sulphuric acids. The study was done using D-optimal design. Three variables in both acids were included in the design: time (20-80 min), temperature (160-180°C) and initial lignin concentration (0-20 g/l). The dependent variables were xylose conversion, furfural yield, furfural selectivity and pH change. The results showed that the xylose conversion and furfural yield decreased in sulphuric acid, while in formic acid the changes were minor. Additionally, it was showed that lignin has an acid-neutralising capacity, and the added lignin increased the pH of reactant solutions in both acids. The pH rise was considerably lower in formic acid than in sulphuric acid. However, the higher pH did not explain all the changes in conversion and yield, and thus lignin evidently inhibits the formation of furfural.

  17. IMPROVEMENT OF PAPER PROPERTIES OF RECYCLED UNBLEACHED SOFTWOOD KRAFT PULPS BY POLY(ALLYLAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Mocchiutti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyelectrolytes containing amine functional groups such as PAH (poly(allylamine hydrochloride can be useful, under certain conditions, for improving paper strength. In this work, the charge density of PAH was determined at different pH and ionic strengths; PAH adsorption onto the cellulosic fibers was characterized, and the effects of low PAH dosage on the papermaking properties were evaluated. It was found that the ionization of PAH is complete in acid media, but it is partial and depends on the ionic strength in neutral media. The adsorption isotherms of PAH on a recycled pulp from kraft liner allowed us to determine the amount needed to saturate the adsorption capacity of the fibers. For the three ionic strengths analyzed, the swelling of the fibers decreased when PAH was added in an amount corresponding to saturation (0.23% PAH on dried pulp. Nevertheless, the swelling was recovered when the amount of PAH was the double the saturation level (0.46% PAH on dried pulp. At these levels of addition, the papermaking properties were clearly improved, especially compressive strengths SCT (short compressive test and CMT (concora medium test. The Page equation of tensile strength showed that PAH improved the shear bond strength, while the relative bonding area slightly decreased.

  18. Changes in coral-associated microbial communities during a bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, David; Iida, Yuki; Uthicke, Sven; Smith-Keune, Carolyn

    2008-04-01

    Environmental stressors such as increased sea surface temperatures are well-known for contributing to coral bleaching; however, the effect of increased temperatures and subsequent bleaching on coral-associated microbial communities is poorly understood. Colonies of the hard coral Acropora millepora were tagged on a reef flat off Magnetic Island (Great Barrier Reef) and surveyed over 2.5 years, which included a severe bleaching event in January/February 2002. Daily average water temperatures exceeded the previous 10-year average by more than 1 degrees C for extended periods with field-based visual surveys recording all tagged colonies displaying signs of bleaching. During the bleaching period, direct counts of coral zooxanthellae densities decreased by approximately 64%, before recovery to pre-bleaching levels after the thermal stress event. A subset of three tagged coral colonies were sampled through the bleaching event and changes in the microbial community elucidated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis demonstrated conserved bacterial banding profiles between the three coral colonies, confirming previous studies highlighting specific microbial associations. As coral colonies bleached, the microbial community shifted and redundancy analysis (RDA) of DGGE banding patterns revealed a correlation of increasing temperature with the appearance of Vibrio-affiliated sequences. Interestingly, this shift to a Vibrio-dominated community commenced prior to visual signs of bleaching. Clone libraries hybridized with Vibrio-specific oligonucleotide probes confirmed an increase in the fraction of Vibrio-affiliated clones during the bleaching period. Post bleaching, the coral microbial associations again shifted, returning to a profile similar to the fingerprints prior to bleaching. This provided further evidence for corals selecting and shaping their microbial partners. For non-bleached samples, a close association with Spongiobacter-related sequences were

  19. Effect of pH values of two bleaching gels on enamel microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Natalia Costa; da Costa Soares, Manuella Uilmann Silva; Nery, Marcela Maria; Sales, Wagno Silva; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth Martinez

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH and the effect of remineralizing gels after bleaching in different time intervals. Sixty bovine incisors were divided into 2 groups (n = 30). Group 1 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) acid gel and Group 2 was bleached with a 35% HP neutral gel. Each group was then divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) according to the post-bleaching treatment used: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel, or application of a gel consisting of fluoride, potassium nitrate, and nanostructured calcium phosphate. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva, and enamel microhardness was evaluated at 24 hours and 15 days postbleaching. Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by means of 2-way ANOVA, with repeated measurements and Bonferroni's post-hoc test. Twenty-four hours after bleaching, no significant differences were found between the bleaching gels. At 15 days postbleaching, Group 2 samples demonstrated a significant reduction in microhardness. No significant differences were found between the remineralizing gels, though all of the postbleaching treatments after the use of 35% neutral gel were able to re-establish baseline microhardness. It was concluded that neutral bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness 15 days after bleaching and that the use of remineralizing gels did not significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel. However, in clinical situations, the acquired enamel pellicle protects tooth surfaces, and postbleaching, decalcified enamel would undergo recalcification. This study indicates that it is important to consider the bleaching agent's pH and composition when treating patients with reduced salivary secretion.

  20. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Guest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; p<0.001. Bleaching was much less severe at locations that bleached during 1998, that had greater historical temperature variability and lower rates of warming. Remarkably, Acropora and Pocillopora, taxa that are typically highly susceptible, although among the most susceptible in Pulau Weh (Sumatra, Indonesia where respectively, 94% and 87% of colonies died, were among the least susceptible in Singapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments.