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Sample records for blast resistance gene

  1. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  2. Relationship Between Resistance Gene Analogue and Blast Resistance in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-min; FAN Cheng-ming; YANG Yan; HE Yue-qiu

    2009-01-01

    DNA fragments of 43 rice varieties were amplified with 11 pairs of primers designed based on resistance gene analogue (RGA) of plants, and the blast resistance of the varieties was identified by inoculation with 33 isolates of Magnaporthe grisea collected from Yunnan Province, China. Clustering results revealed a significant correlation between the blast resistance and DNA bands with a correlation coefficient of 0.6117 (α=0.01), indicating that the resistance analysis based on RGA-PCR clustering analysis coincided with that based on inoculation. The correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.1701 to 0.535, however, depended on the primers. Five pairs of primers, S1/AS3, S1 INV/S2 INV, XLRR For/XLRR Rev, Pto-Kin1 IN/Pto-Kin2 IN, and NLRR For/NLRR Rev might be applied for blast resistance identification in consideration of their band numbers and polymorphisms, and their correlation coefficients with blast resistance were 0.5305, 0.4898, 0.4059, 0.3719 and 0.3524, respectively. Besides, indica and japonica rice except two highly susceptible varieties, CO39 and Lijiangxintuanheigu, could be well classified by the 11 pairs of primers.

  3. Tagging Blast Resistance Gene Pi 1 in Rice (Oryza sativa) Using Candidate Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ai-hong; WU Jian-li; XU Xin-ping; Menchu BERNADO; DAI Zheng-yuan; ZHUANG Jie-yun; CHEN Zong-xiang; ZHENG Kang-le; LI Bao-jian; Hei LEUNG; ZHANG Hong-xi; PAN Xue-biao

    2004-01-01

    An F3 population derived from C101LAC/CO39 containing 90 lines was analyzed for blast resistance with 48 candidate genes developed from resistance gene analogs (RGA) and suppression subtractive library. Genetic analysis confirmed that blast resistance of the population was controlled by a single gene Pi 1. One of the candidate genes, R10 was identified as associated with the blast resistance gene on the long arm of chromosome 11 and mapped using a DH population derived from Azucena/IR64.A pair of PCR based primers was designed based on the sequence of R10 for marker-aided selection of the blast resistance gene.The recombination frequency between Pi 1 and the marker was estimated as 1.28%. It suggested that strategy of employing candidate genes is useful for gene identification and mapping. A new RFLP marker and the corresponding PCR marker for tagging of Pi 1 were provided.

  4. Analysis of rice blast resistance genes by QTL mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jichen; WANG Jiulin; LING Zhongzhuan; ZHU Lihuang

    2004-01-01

    Resistance to rice blast pathogen mostly shows a quantitative trait controlled by several minor genes. Its complexity and the mutable characteristic of rice blast isolates both hinder the development of the blast resistance research. The article here tried to explore the resistance gene distribution on rice chromosomes and the way of function. Totally 124 QTLs have been identified against 20 isolates using Cartographer software with a ZYQ8/JX17 DH population, which separately are at 100 loci of 72 marker intervals on 12 rice chromosomes. Of them, 16 QTLs were determined by the isolate HB-97-36-1. 82 QTLs (66.13%) are from the resistant parent alleles, ZYQ8, while 42 QTLs (33.87%) are from the susceptible parent alleles, JX17. In comparison of their positions on chromosome, most QTLs are clustered together and distributed nearby the major genes especially the regions on chromosomes 1, 2, 8, 10 and 12. Each QTL could account for the resistance variation between 3.52%-68.64%. And, a positional QTL might display the resistance to several different isolates with different contributions.

  5. Study on allelism between blast resistance gene Pi-zh(t) in indica variety Zhaiyeqing 8(ZYQS) and known blast resistance gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEICailin; WANGJiulin; MAOShihong; ZHULihuang; LINGZhongzhuan

    1997-01-01

    One blast resistance gene Pi-zh(t) from indica-variety ZYQ8 was identified using molecular markers in 1992. Studies on the allelism between gene Pi-zh(t) and known blast resis tance genes was presented in this paper.

  6. DNA tagging of blast resistant gene(s in three Brazilian rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Sandhu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast is the most important fungal disease of rice and is caused by Pyricularia oryzae Sacc. (Telomorph Magnoporthe grisea Barr.. Seven randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers OPA5, OPG17, OPG18, OPG19, OPF9, OPF17 and OPF19 showed very clear polymorphism in resistant cultivar lines which differed from susceptible lines. By comparing different susceptible lines, nine DNA amplifications of seven primers (OPA5(1000, OPA5(1200, OPG17(700, OPG18(850, OPG19(500, OPG19(600, OPF9(600, OPF17(1200 and OPF19(600 were identified as dominant markers for the blast resistant gene in resistant cultivar lines. These loci facilitate the indirect scoring of blast resistant and blast susceptible genotypes. The codomine RAPDs markers will facilitate marker-assisted selection of the blast resistant gene in two blast resistant genotypes of rice (Labelle and Line 11 and will be useful in rice breeding programs.

  7. Pyramiding blast, bacterial blight and brown planthopper resistance genes in rice restorer lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Zhi-juan; Yang Shu-dong; ZENG Yu-xiang; LIANG Yan; YANG Chang-deng; QIAN Qian

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast, bacterial blight (BB) and brown planthopper (BPH) are the three main pests of rice. This study investigated pyr-amiding genes resistant to blast, BB and BPH to develop restorer lines. Ten new lines with blast, BB and/or BPH resistance genes were developed using marker-assisted selection (MAS) technique and agronomic trait selection (ATS) method. Only HR13 with resistance genes to blast, BB and BPH was obtained. In addition to blast and BB resistance, four lines (HR39, HR41, HR42, HR43) demonstrated moderate resistance to BPH, but MAS for BPH resistance genes were not conducted in developing these four lines. These data suggested that there were unknown elite BPH resistance genes in the Zhongzu 14 donor parent. A more effective defense was demonstrated in the lines withPi1 andPi2 genes although the weather in 2012 was favorable to disease incidence. Blast resistance of the lines with a single resistance gene,Pita, was easily inlfuenced by the weather. Overal, the information obtained through pyramiding multiple resistance genes on developing the restorer lines is helpful for rice resistance breeding.

  8. Characterization and Fine Mapping of a Blast Resistant Gene Pi-jnw1 from the japonica Rice Landrace Jiangnanwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruisen; Fang, Nengyan; Guan, Changhong; He, Wanwan; Bao, Yongmei; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is a destructive disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, and it has a large impact on rice production worldwide. Compared with leaf blast resistance, our understanding of panicle blast resistance is limited. The japonica landrace Jiangnanwan from Taihu Lake region in China shows highly resistance to panicle and leaf blast. In this study, three generations (F2:5, F2:6, F2:7) consisting of 221 RILs (recombination inbreeding lines), developed from the cross of Jiangnanwan and Suyunuo, a susceptible-blast japonica variety, were evaluated for panicle blast resistance in the fields and leaf blast resistance in greenhouse in Nanjing in 2013, 2014 and 2015. A blast resistance gene Pi-jnw1 referring to panicle blast resistance and leaf blast resistance was identified in the three generations and located in the region of RM27273 and RM27381 in chromosome 11. The RIL18 line harboring Pi-jnw1 was selected to be backcrossed with Suyunuo to develop BC2F2 populations. According to the genotyping of 1,150 BC2F2 individuals and panicle blast and leaf blast resistance evaluation of 47 recombinants between RM27150 and RM27381, Pi-jnw1 was finally mapped to the 282 kb region between markers W28 and BS39. This study revealed that Jiangnanwan harboring a panicle blast and leaf blast resistance gene Pi-jnw1 could be a genetic source for breeding new rice cultivars with panicle blast resistance. PMID:28036378

  9. Characterization and Fine Mapping of a Blast Resistant Gene Pi-jnw1 from the japonica Rice Landrace Jiangnanwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruisen; Fang, Nengyan; Guan, Changhong; He, Wanwan; Bao, Yongmei; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is a destructive disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, and it has a large impact on rice production worldwide. Compared with leaf blast resistance, our understanding of panicle blast resistance is limited. The japonica landrace Jiangnanwan from Taihu Lake region in China shows highly resistance to panicle and leaf blast. In this study, three generations (F2:5, F2:6, F2:7) consisting of 221 RILs (recombination inbreeding lines), developed from the cross of Jiangnanwan and Suyunuo, a susceptible-blast japonica variety, were evaluated for panicle blast resistance in the fields and leaf blast resistance in greenhouse in Nanjing in 2013, 2014 and 2015. A blast resistance gene Pi-jnw1 referring to panicle blast resistance and leaf blast resistance was identified in the three generations and located in the region of RM27273 and RM27381 in chromosome 11. The RIL18 line harboring Pi-jnw1 was selected to be backcrossed with Suyunuo to develop BC2F2 populations. According to the genotyping of 1,150 BC2F2 individuals and panicle blast and leaf blast resistance evaluation of 47 recombinants between RM27150 and RM27381, Pi-jnw1 was finally mapped to the 282 kb region between markers W28 and BS39. This study revealed that Jiangnanwan harboring a panicle blast and leaf blast resistance gene Pi-jnw1 could be a genetic source for breeding new rice cultivars with panicle blast resistance.

  10. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes.

  11. Nucleotide Base Variation of Blast Disease Resistance Gene Pi33 in Rice Selected Broad Genetic Background

    OpenAIRE

    DWINITA WIKAN UTAMI; KALIA BARNITA; SITI YURIAH; IDA HANARIDA

    2011-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops for human beings, thus increasing productivity are continually persecuted. Blast disease can reduce the rate of productivity of rice cultivation. Therefore, the program of blast disease-resistant varieties needs to do effectively. One of broad-spectrum blast disease-resistant gene is Pi33. This study was aimed to identify the variation in the sequence of nucleotide bases of Pi33 gene in five interspesific lines which derived from Bio46 (IR64/Oryza rufip...

  12. Gene interactions and genetics of blast resistance and yield attributes in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Divya; A. Biswas; S. Robin; R. Rabindran; A. John Joel

    2014-08-01

    Blast disease caused by the pathogen Pyricularia oryzae is a serious threat to rice production. Six generations viz., P1, P2, F1, F2, B1 and B2 of a cross between blast susceptible high-yielding rice cultivar ADT 43 and resistant near isogenic line (NIL) CT13432-3R, carrying four blast resistance genes Pi1, Pi2, Pi33 and Pi54 in combination were used to study the nature and magnitude of gene action for disease resistance and yield attributes. The epistatic interaction model was found adequate to explain the gene action in most of the traits. The interaction was complementary for number of productive tillers, economic yield, lesion number, infected leaf area and potential disease incidence but duplicate epistasis was observed for the remaining traits. Among the genotypes tested under epiphytotic conditions, gene pyramided lines were highly resistant to blast compared to individuals with single genes indicating that the nonallelic genes have a complementary effect when present together. The information on genetics of various contributing traits of resistance will further aid plant breeders in choosing appropriate breeding strategy for blast resistance and yield enhancement in rice.

  13. Identification of a RAPD marker linked to a blast resistance gene in Oryza sativa L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUJun; ZHUANGJieyun; LINHongxuan; ZHENGKangle

    1994-01-01

    Marker-aided selection has received more attention in recent years. This relies on the exploitation of close linkage between molecular markers and target gene(s). We report here a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAID) marker tightly linked to the blast resistance gene Pi-11(t) derived from Hongjiaozhan, which confers the resistante to race ZBI of Pyricularia oryzae Car.

  14. The wheat durable, multipathogen resistance gene Lr34 confers partial blast resistance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krattinger, Simon G; Sucher, Justine; Selter, Liselotte L; Chauhan, Harsh; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Mingzhi; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mieulet, Delphine; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Weidenbach, Denise; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2016-05-01

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers durable and partial field resistance against the obligate biotrophic, pathogenic rust fungi and powdery mildew in adult wheat plants. The resistant Lr34 allele evolved after wheat domestication through two gain-of-function mutations in an ATP-binding cassette transporter gene. An Lr34-like fungal disease resistance with a similar broad-spectrum specificity and durability has not been described in other cereals. Here, we transformed the resistant Lr34 allele into the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Transgenic rice plants expressing Lr34 showed increased resistance against multiple isolates of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Host cell invasion during the biotrophic growth phase of rice blast was delayed in Lr34-expressing rice plants, resulting in smaller necrotic lesions on leaves. Lines with Lr34 also developed a typical, senescence-based leaf tip necrosis (LTN) phenotype. Development of LTN during early seedling growth had a negative impact on formation of axillary shoots and spikelets in some transgenic lines. One transgenic line developed LTN only at adult plant stage which was correlated with lower Lr34 expression levels at seedling stage. This line showed normal tiller formation and more importantly, disease resistance in this particular line was not compromised. Interestingly, Lr34 in rice is effective against a hemibiotrophic pathogen with a lifestyle and infection strategy that is different from obligate biotrophic rusts and mildew fungi. Lr34 might therefore be used as a source in rice breeding to improve broad-spectrum disease resistance against the most devastating fungal disease of rice.

  15. Analysis of rice blast resistance genes from domesticated and weedy species of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blast disease of rice caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is the most serious crop disease worldwide. The fungus is known to be highly adaptive to host environments and resistance (R) genes often do not last for an extended period of time after their deployment. In the USA, a dozen genetically diverse blas...

  16. Nucleotide Base Variation of Blast Disease Resistance Gene Pi33 in Rice Selected Broad Genetic Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DWINITA WIKAN UTAMI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most important crops for human beings, thus increasing productivity are continually persecuted. Blast disease can reduce the rate of productivity of rice cultivation. Therefore, the program of blast disease-resistant varieties needs to do effectively. One of broad-spectrum blast disease-resistant gene is Pi33. This study was aimed to identify the variation in the sequence of nucleotide bases of Pi33 gene in five interspesific lines which derived from Bio46 (IR64/Oryza rufipogon and CT13432 crossing. DNA of five rice lines were amplified using the spesific primer for Pi33, G1010. Amplification results purified through Exonuclease 1 and Shrimp Alkaline Phosphatase protocols. Labelling using fluorescent dyes done before sequencing nucleotide base using CEQ8000 instrument. The results showed that lines number 28 showed introgesion of the three control parent genome (subspecies of Indica, subspecies of Japonica, and O. rufipogon while the Lines number 79, 136, and 143 were identical to Indica genome. Strain number 195 was identical to Japonica genome. These broad genetic background lines promise as durable performance to attack the expansion of the dynamic nature of the pathogen to blast. The result of ortholog sequence analysis found conserved nucleotide base sequence (CAGCAGCC which involved in heterotrimeric G-protein group. This protein has role as plant receptor for recognizing pathogen elicitor in interaction of rice and blast pathogen.

  17. Analysis of Resistant Spectrum to Rice Blast in Transgenic Rice Lines Introduced Lysozyme Gene from T4 Phage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ming-hui; LI Cheng-yun; LI Jin-bin; TAN Xue-lin; TIAN Wen-zhong; TANG Zuo-shun

    2003-01-01

    The receptor cultivar Nan29 and thirty-six T5 rice lines derived from ten T0 generation transgen-ic plants harboring lysozyme gene were challenged in the greenhouse by inoculating 63 isolates belonging to 48races of Magnaporthe grisea from Yunnan Province. The transgenic rice lines exhibited resistance to morethan 72% of isolates inoculated in this experiment, and 38.1% (24 isolates) of them could infect the receptorcultivar Nan29. The results indicated that the transgenic rice lines possessed wide-spectrum resistance againstvarious rice blast races and the resistant spectrum of rice lines were different although some lines derived fromsame T0 plant. The transgenic rice lines exhibited also high resistance to leaf and neck blast in the disease fieldevaluation, but not all of resistant lines against leaf blast were resistant to neck blast.

  18. Tagging microsatellite marker to a blast resistance gene in the irrigated rice cultivar Cica-8

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    Thiago Martins Pinheiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The rice cultivar Cica-8 exhibit differential reaction to several pathotypes of Magnaporthe oryzae. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the number of alleles involved in the expression of resistance to leaf blast and identify microsatellite markers linked to these alleles. A cross between cultivar Metica-1 and Cica-8 susceptible and resistant, respectively, to pathotype IB-1 (Py1049 was made to obtain F1, F2, BC1:1 and BC1:2 progenies. Greenhouse tests for leaf blast reaction showed that resistance is controlled by a monogenic dominant gene. For testing microsatellite markers, DNA of both resistant and susceptible parents and F1 and F2 populations was extracted. As expected for single dominant gene the F2 populations segregated at a ratio of 3:1. Of the 11 microsatellite markers tested, one marker RM 7102 was found to be closely linked to the resistant allele at a distance of 2.7 cM, in the cultivar Cica-8 to pathotype IB-1.

  19. Development of Gene-Pyramid Lines of the Elite Restorer Line, RPHR-1005 Possessing Durable Bacterial Blight and Blast Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash Kumar, V; Balachiranjeevi, C H; Bhaskar Naik, S; Rambabu, R; Rekha, G; Harika, G; Hajira, S K; Pranathi, K; Anila, M; Kousik, M; Vijay Kumar, S; Yugander, A; Aruna, J; Dilip Kumar, T; Vijaya Sudhakara Rao, K; Hari Prasad, A S; Madhav, M S; Laha, G S; Balachandran, S M; Prasad, M S; Viraktamath, B C; Ravindra Babu, V; Sundaram, R M

    2016-01-01

    RPHR-1005, the stable restorer line of the popular medium slender (MS) grain type rice hybrid, DRRH-3 was improved in this study for resistance against bacterial blight (BB) and blast diseases through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). In this study, four major resistance genes (i.e., Xa21 and Xa33 for BB resistance and Pi2 and Pi54 for blast resistance) have been transferred to RPHR-1005 using RPBio Patho-1 (possessing Xa21 + Pi2), RPBio Patho-2 (possessing Xa21 + Pi54) and FBR1-15EM (possessing Xa33) as the donors. Foreground selection was carried out using PCR-based molecular markers specific for the target resistance genes and the major fertility restorer genes, Rf3 and Rf4, while background selection was carried out using a set of parental polymorphic rice SSR markers and backcrossing was continued uptoBC2 generation. At BC2F2, plants possessing the gene combination- Xa21 + Pi2, Xa21 + Pi54 and Xa33 in homozygous condition and with >92% recovery of the recurrent parent genome (RPG) were identified and intercrossed to combine all the four resistance genes. Twenty-two homozygous, pyramid lines of RPHR-1005 comprising of three single-gene containing lines, six 2-gene containing lines, eight 3-gene containing lines, and five 4-gene containing lines were identified among the double intercross lines at F3 generation (DICF3). They were then evaluated for their resistance against BB and blast, fertility restoration ability and for key agro-morphological traits. While single gene containing lines were resistant to either BB or blast, the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene pyramid lines showed good level of resistance against both and/or either of the two diseases. Most of the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene containing pyramid lines showed yield levels and other key agro-morphological and grain quality traits comparable to the original recurrent parent and showed complete fertility restoration ability, with a few showing higher yield as compared to RPHR-1005. Further, the

  20. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level.

  1. Marker-assisted selection for the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ar in a backcross population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Garcês de Araújo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A doubled-haploid (DH population, obtained by anther culture of F1 plants from a cross between a highlysusceptible rice cultivar Lijiangxintuanheigu and the resistant somaclone (SC09, of the cultivar Araguaia, was used to identifyRAPD markers linked to the blast resistance gene Pi-ar. The 86 DH plants, inoculated with the race IB-9 of Magnaportheoryzae, segregated in 1:1 ratio of resistant and susceptible plants. Of the 67 primers used 31 produced DNA profiles thatdifferentiated resistant and susceptible bulks as well as the parental cultivars. The resistance gene was found linked to theprimer OPS162072 (‘AGGGGGTTCC’ at a distance of 3.6 cM. The selection efficiency of this primer was assessed in a BC3 F1population derived from another cross between a susceptible cultivar IAC 201 and SC09. The marker OPS16 showedefficiency of 86.9%, when six resistant and two susceptible plants were considered as negatives in RAPD analysis.

  2. Natural variation of rice blast resistant gene Pi-ta in Oryza species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice is a putative NBS type cytoplasmic receptor conferring resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae in a gene-for-gene manner. A Functional Nucleotide Polymorphism (FNP) change resulting in an amino acid substitution of Alanine to Serine at position 918 (nucleotide G to T at posi...

  3. OsWRKY22, a monocot WRKY gene, plays a role in the resistance response to blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruscato, Pamela; Nepusz, Tamás; Mizzi, Luca; Del Corvo, Marcello; Morandini, Piero; Fumasoni, Irene; Michel, Corinne; Paccanaro, Alberto; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Morel, Jean-Benoît; Piffanelli, Pietro; Faivre-Rampant, Odile

    2012-10-01

    With the aim of identifying novel regulators of host and nonhost resistance to fungi in rice, we carried out a systematic mutant screen of mutagenized lines. Two mutant wrky22 knockout lines revealed clear-cut enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Magnaporthe oryzae strains and altered cellular responses to nonhost Magnaporthe grisea and Blumeria graminis fungi. In addition, the analysis of the pathogen responses of 24 overexpressor OsWRKY22 lines revealed enhanced resistance phenotypes on infection with virulent M. oryzae strain, confirming that OsWRKY22 is involved in rice resistance to blast. Bioinformatic analyses determined that the OsWRKY22 gene belongs to a well-defined cluster of monocot-specific WRKYs. The co-regulatory analysis revealed no significant co-regulation of OsWRKY22 with a representative panel of OsWRKYs, supporting its unique role in a series of transcriptional responses. In contrast, inquiring a subset of biotic stress-related Affymetrix data, a large number of resistance and defence-related genes were found to be putatively co-expressed with OsWRKY22. Taken together, all gathered experimental evidence places the monocot-specific OsWRKY22 gene at the convergence point of signal transduction circuits in response to both host and nonhost fungi encountering rice plants.

  4. Molecular evolution of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in invasive weedy rice in the USA.

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    Seonghee Lee

    Full Text Available The Pi-ta gene in rice has been effectively used to control rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae worldwide. Despite a number of studies that reported the Pi-ta gene in domesticated rice and wild species, little is known about how the Pi-ta gene has evolved in US weedy rice, a major weed of rice. To investigate the genome organization of the Pi-ta gene in weedy rice and its relationship to gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US, we analyzed nucleotide sequence variation at the Pi-ta gene and its surrounding 2 Mb region in 156 weedy, domesticated and wild rice relatives. We found that the region at and around the Pi-ta gene shows very low genetic diversity in US weedy rice. The patterns of molecular diversity in weeds are more similar to cultivated rice (indica and aus, which have never been cultivated in the US, rather than the wild rice species, Oryza rufipogon. In addition, the resistant Pi-ta allele (Pi-ta found in the majority of US weedy rice belongs to the weedy group strawhull awnless (SH, suggesting a single source of origin for Pi-ta. Weeds with Pi-ta were resistant to two M. oryzae races, IC17 and IB49, except for three accessions, suggesting that component(s required for the Pi-ta mediated resistance may be missing in these accessions. Signatures of flanking sequences of the Pi-ta gene and SSR markers on chromosome 12 suggest that the susceptible pi-ta allele (pi-ta, not Pi-ta, has been introgressed from cultivated to weedy rice by out-crossing.

  5. Molecular evolution of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in invasive weedy rice in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonghee; Jia, Yulin; Jia, Melissa; Gealy, David R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Caicedo, Ana L

    2011-01-01

    The Pi-ta gene in rice has been effectively used to control rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae worldwide. Despite a number of studies that reported the Pi-ta gene in domesticated rice and wild species, little is known about how the Pi-ta gene has evolved in US weedy rice, a major weed of rice. To investigate the genome organization of the Pi-ta gene in weedy rice and its relationship to gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US, we analyzed nucleotide sequence variation at the Pi-ta gene and its surrounding 2 Mb region in 156 weedy, domesticated and wild rice relatives. We found that the region at and around the Pi-ta gene shows very low genetic diversity in US weedy rice. The patterns of molecular diversity in weeds are more similar to cultivated rice (indica and aus), which have never been cultivated in the US, rather than the wild rice species, Oryza rufipogon. In addition, the resistant Pi-ta allele (Pi-ta) found in the majority of US weedy rice belongs to the weedy group strawhull awnless (SH), suggesting a single source of origin for Pi-ta. Weeds with Pi-ta were resistant to two M. oryzae races, IC17 and IB49, except for three accessions, suggesting that component(s) required for the Pi-ta mediated resistance may be missing in these accessions. Signatures of flanking sequences of the Pi-ta gene and SSR markers on chromosome 12 suggest that the susceptible pi-ta allele (pi-ta), not Pi-ta, has been introgressed from cultivated to weedy rice by out-crossing.

  6. Characterization of rice blast resistance genes in rice germplasm with monogenic lines and pathogenicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance (R) genes have been effectively deployed in preventing rice crop losses due to the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In the present study, we studied the interaction between 24 monogenic lines carrying at least one major R gene, Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pi...

  7. Design of Blast Resistant Structure

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    C. K. Gautam

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available A shock blast resistant structure designed, developed and experimentally evaluated by the authors is described. We structure, capable of with standing dynamic loading (12 psi and a static pressure of 1.5 m earth cover due to blast or any other explosion, also gives protection against radiation, chemical and thermal hazards. Some results and details of analysis and experimentation are presented.

  8. Evaluation and Genetic Analysis of Five Parental Varieties Resistant to Rice Blast Pathogen in Heilongjiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhong-chen; Liu Hong-liang; Gao Hong-xiu; Liu Hai-ying; Jin Zheng-xun

    2012-01-01

    Five F2 segregation populations, derived from crosses between the susceptible japonica cultivars (cvs.) Kongyul31 and donor cvs. Aichi Asahi (AA), BL1, Digu, Pai-kan-tao (PKT) and Oryzica Llanos 5 (ORL5), were used to evaluate their natural resistance to blast in cold region. The field test of their blast resistance was conducted in 858 Farm, which showed that Aichi Asahi, BL 1 and Digu were highly resistant to either leaf blast or neck blast and could be used to develop molecular breeding by design, and genetic analysis indicated that the field resistance of Aichi Asahi, BLland Digu to leaf blast and neck blast was controlled by a single dominant gene, and the leaf blast and neck blast resistance in the donor cv. Pai-kan-tao was inherited as a single recessive gene, the neck blast resistance of the donor cv. Oryzica Llanos 5 was controlled by a single recessive gene while its leaf blast resistance was not controlled by this gene. These results suggested that five parental varieties positively contributed to resistance to either leaf blast or neck blast and could be used to expand the genetic germplasms resistant to blast in cold region using molecular assisted selection.

  9. Avoidance of Linkage Drag Between Blast Resistance Gene and the QTL Conditioning Spikelet Fertility Based on Genotype Selection Against Heading Date in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen-qiang; FAN Ye-yang; CHEN Jie; SHI Yong-feng; WU Jian-li

    2009-01-01

    Previous study showed that a linkage drag between a blast resistance gene Pi25(t) and QTLs conditioning spikelet fertility (qSF-6) and number of filled grains per panicle (qNFGP-6) was detected on the short arm of chromosome 6. A larger population was used for further verification, and the results confirmed the linkage drag between the blast resistance gene and QTL conditioning spikelet fertility, other than QTL conditioning number of filled grains per panicle. Breakdown or avoidance of the linkage drag could be achieved by selection against the genotype background of a heading-date gene (qHD-7) that resided in the region between RM2 and RM214 on chromosome 7. For further validation, two lines with almost identical genotypes on all chromosomal regions except the Pi25(t) region on chromosome 6 were chosen to develop a new population. The results showed that qSF-6 could be further subdivided into qSF-6-1 and qSF-6-2. When the genotype of the region between RM2 and RM214 was from rice variety Zhong 156, the linkage drag between Pi25(t) and qSF-6-2 was detected and the allele of qSF-6-2 from rice variety Gumei 2 reduced the spikelet fertility. When the genotype of the region between RM2 and RM214 was from Gumei 2, no linkage drag was detected. This indicates that the linkage drag between the blast resistance gene and the QTL conditioning spikelet fertility could be broken down or avoided under a certain background genotype selection against heading-date and provides a marker aided solution for high level of blast resistance and yield breeding in rice and other crops as well.

  10. Enhanced Rice Blast Resistance by CRISPR/Cas9-Targeted Mutagenesis of the ERF Transcription Factor Gene OsERF922.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Wang

    Full Text Available Rice blast is one of the most destructive diseases affecting rice worldwide. The adoption of host resistance has proven to be the most economical and effective approach to control rice blast. In recent years, sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs have been demonstrated to be powerful tools for the improvement of crops via gene-specific genome editing, and CRISPR/Cas9 is thought to be the most effective SSN. Here, we report the improvement of rice blast resistance by engineering a CRISPR/Cas9 SSN (C-ERF922 targeting the OsERF922 gene in rice. Twenty-one C-ERF922-induced mutant plants (42.0% were identified from 50 T0 transgenic plants. Sanger sequencing revealed that these plants harbored various insertion or deletion (InDel mutations at the target site. We showed that all of the C-ERF922-induced allele mutations were transmitted to subsequent generations. Mutant plants harboring the desired gene modification but not containing the transferred DNA were obtained by segregation in the T1 and T2 generations. Six T2 homozygous mutant lines were further examined for a blast resistance phenotype and agronomic traits, such as plant height, flag leaf length and width, number of productive panicles, panicle length, number of grains per panicle, seed setting percentage and thousand seed weight. The results revealed that the number of blast lesions formed following pathogen infection was significantly decreased in all 6 mutant lines compared with wild-type plants at both the seedling and tillering stages. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between any of the 6 T2 mutant lines and the wild-type plants with regard to the agronomic traits tested. We also simultaneously targeted multiple sites within OsERF922 by using Cas9/Multi-target-sgRNAs (C-ERF922S1S2 and C-ERF922S1S2S3 to obtain plants harboring mutations at two or three sites. Our results indicate that gene modification via CRISPR/Cas9 is a useful approach for enhancing blast resistance in

  11. Aspects of blast resistant masonry design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Blast resistant design should be examined for building code incorporation, due to the potential of explosions occurring in an industrial society. Specifically, public and commercial structures of concrete masonry construction need additional building code criteria, since these buildings have high density populations to protect. Presently, blast resistant design is accomplished by using government published manuals, but these do not address industry standard construction. A design air blast load of 4.54 kg (10 lbs) of TNT, located 0.91 m (3 ft) above ground surface and 30.48 m (100 ft) from a structure should be considered standard criteria. This loading would be sufficient to protect against blast, resist progressive failure, and yet not be an economic impediment. Design details and adequate inspection must be observed to ensure blast resistant integrity. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Development and Identification of Novel Rice Blast Resistant Sources and Their Characterization Using Molecular Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S J S RAMA DEVI; M. S. MADHAV; Kuldeep SINGH; B UMAKANTH; B VISHALAKSHI; P RENUKA; K. VIJAY SUDHAKAR; M. S. PRASAD3; B. C. VIRAKTAMATH; V. RAVINDRA BABU

    2015-01-01

    To develop and characterize introgression lines for leaf and neck blast resistance, 326 introgression lines were developed using various accessions of six different AA genome wild species in the genetic background of elite Indian varieties like PR114 and Pusa 44 and were screened for blast resistance. Stringent phenotyping coupled with genotyping using gene based markers led to the identification of four resistant introgression lines, which showed promising resistance and do not possess any of the tested genes. Furthermore, multi-location screening confirmed the field resistance of the four introgression lines to both leaf and neck blast. Molecular characterization of these introgression lines using genome-wide simple sequence repeat markers revealed the presence of small percentage of wildOryza genome introgrssion. So these lines can be used for mapping and identification of novel leaf and neck blast resistance genes. Thus, these four introgression lines can be considered as new genetic resources for blast resistance.

  13. 分子标记选择水稻抗稻瘟病基因Pi40和Pib聚合体%Selecting the Pyramids of Blast Resistance Genes Pi40 and Pib in Rice Assisted by Molecular Marker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金明; 林秀云; 刘晓梅; 孙强; 李鹏志; 张三元

    2012-01-01

    Pyramiding resistance genes have been suggested as one of the most effective methods for preventing breakdown of major gene conferring resistance to blast within a very short period. The PCR markers of the blast re-sistence gene Pi40 and Pib were used to identify the genes in F2 plants of combination among the rice lines containing Pi40 and Pib respectively. The results indicated that all the plants containing any one gene,two genes of Pi40 and Pib showed resistane to blast,while the plants lacking the resistance gene were susceptible to blast. The tightly-linked markers of the resistance genes were powerful tools for the identification of Pi40 and Pib in breeding program. 28 plants pyramiding two genes of Pi40 and Pib were selected from 50 plants of the F2 population. They can be used as parents to breed rice for blast resistance.%培育多个抗病基因聚合的水稻品种是提高其抗病广谱性和持久性的有效途径之一.利用水稻抗稻瘟病基因Pi40、Pib的特异PCR标记,对含有Pi40、Pib的水稻品系复合杂交F250个植株进行检测,从中选择到Pi40、Pib双基因聚合的抗病植株28个,为持久、广谱抗病水稻育种奠定了基础.

  14. Establishment and Application of a Set of Material System for Studying the Resistance to Blast in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-fang; LUO Wen-yong; XIAO Xin; MAO Xing-xue; LIU Yan-zhuo

    2003-01-01

    The study used Waixuan35, a blast resistant rice material adopted widely previously in South China, Yuexiangzhan, a rice variety with the largest planting area in Guangdong Province at present and with the characteristics of horizontal blast resistance and high harvest index, and Qisizhan, the earliest good eating quality variety in Guangdong Province as parent materials, and created an important material systems for studying agricultural characters such as rice blast resistance genes, their resistance mechanisms and quality by hybridization offspring single grain transfer method and DNA hybridization method, namely recombination inbred line RIL, extend recombination inbred line ERIL and transferred-mutant recombination inbred line TRIL assemblages. In RIL assemblage, various materials of resistance gene combinations for identifying rice blast pathogen strains had been identified from the material system, providing direct material evidence for gene to gene theory. Using the same control and same method, in ERIL assemblage, it was proved that there were several main resistance genes and several minor resistance genes in horizontal resistant Yuexiangzhan,providing preliminary evidences for multigene control in horizontal resistance. A set of stable material assemblage for studying future horizontal resistance had been created. A mutation material of Yuexiangzhan from horizontal resistance to vertical resistance was obtained by wild rice external DNA electric stimulation introduction, and variation in mutation assemblage was certified by SSLP. These studies and materials provided important new materials for studying rice blast resistance mechanisms, gene cloning, resistance genes especially horizontal resistance.

  15. Resistance to rice blast(Pyricularia oryzae) caused by the expression of trichosanthin gene in transgenic rice plants transferred through agrobacterium method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The gene of trichosanthin has been transferred into rice plants through agrobacterium method.The single copy insertion and the expression of foreign gene have been proved in regenerated plants.In antifungal assay the degrees of rice blast (Pyricularia oryzae) infection of the transgenic plants expressing trichosanthin and expressing GUS gene as control have been evaluated.The differences such as the time of disease symptom observed,the number of infected plants and damaged leaves,the growth of infected plants of the two transgenic plants after being inoculated by rice blast (Pyricularia oryzae) are significant.The transgenic plants with trichosanthin gene grew faster than the plants with GUS gene,even when humidity environment was removed.The results show that the transgenic plants that expressed trichosanthin are able to delay the infection of rice blast compared with the plants as control.In addition,no damage caused by the expression of trichosanthin gene in transgenic plants has been observed.

  16. Integrating Gene Ontology and Blast to predict gene functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-gang; MO Zhi-hong

    2007-01-01

    A GoBlast system was built to predict gene function by integrating Blast search and Gene Ontology (GO) annotations together. The operation system was based on Debian Linux 3.1, with Apache as the web server and Mysql database as the data storage system. FASTA files with GO annotations were taken as the sequence source for blast alignment, which were formatted by wu-formatdb program. The GoBlast system includes three Bioperl modules in Perl: a data input module, a data process module and a data output module. A GoBlast query starts with an amino acid or nucleotide sequence. It ends with an output in an html page, presenting high scoring gene products which are of a high homology to the queried sequence and listing associated GO terms beside respective gene poducts. A simple click on a GO term leads to the detailed explanation of the specific gene function. This avails gene function prediction by Blast. GoBlast can be a very useful tool for functional genome research and is available for free at http://bioq.org/goblast.

  17. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  18. Design and Analysis of Single Plate Blast Resistant Door

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh S. Aitavade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Blast Resistant Doors are used to withstand high intensity impulsive blast loads. They are designed to prevent the impact of the blast from travelling from one side to the other side of the door. Taking into account the limitations and the growing need of efficient blast resistant doors, a design was developed using ASTM A36 as the material of construction instead of concrete. Analytical calculations for the actual pressure-impulse loading condition were done as per the UFC 3-340-02, and the results of analytical calculations were compared with results of the simulation of the numerical model for the given boundary conditions.

  19. MutMap-Gap: whole-genome resequencing of mutant F2 progeny bulk combined with de novo assembly of gap regions identifies the rice blast resistance gene Pii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroki; Uemura, Aiko; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Tamiru, Muluneh; Abe, Akira; Mitsuoka, Chikako; Utsushi, Hiroe; Natsume, Satoshi; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Hideo; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Yoshida, Kentaro; Cano, Liliana M; Kamoun, Sophien; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2013-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing allows the identification of mutations responsible for mutant phenotypes by whole-genome resequencing and alignment to a reference genome. However, when the resequenced cultivar/line displays significant structural variation from the reference genome, mutations in the genome regions missing from the reference (gaps) cannot be identified by simple alignment. Here we report on a method called 'MutMap-Gap', which involves delineating a candidate region harboring a mutation of interest using the recently reported MutMap method, followed by de novo assembly, alignment, and identification of the mutation within genome gaps. We applied MutMap-Gap to isolate the blast resistant gene Pii from the rice cv Hitomebore using mutant lines that have lost Pii function. MutMap-Gap should prove useful for cloning genes that exhibit significant structural variations such as disease resistance genes of the nucleotide-binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class.

  20. New technique for identifying varieties resistance to rice blast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUPeiliang

    1994-01-01

    After 8 yrs lab experiments and field tests, an advanced technique for identifying varieties resistance to rice blast was developed by a research group in Plant Protection Institute, Zhejiang Academy of AgricuLltural Sciences. With this technique, the inoculum was prepared on a maizc-rice-straw-agar media which was suitable for sporulation of most rice blast pathogen isolates.

  1. Development of transgenic finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.) resistant to leaf blast disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ignacimuthu; S Antony Ceasar

    2012-03-01

    Finger millet plants conferring resistance to leaf blast disease have been developed by inserting a rice chitinase (chi11) gene through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Plasmid pHyg-Chi.11 harbouring the rice chitinase gene under the control of maize ubiquitin promoter was introduced into finger millet using Agrobacterium strain LBA4404 (pSB1). Transformed plants were selected and regenerated on hygromycin-supplemented medium. Transient expression of transgene was confirmed by GUS histochemical staining. The incorporation of rice chitinase gene in R0 and R1 progenies was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Expression of chitinase gene in finger millet was confirmed by Western blot analysis with a barley chitinase antibody. A leaf blast assay was also performed by challenging the transgenic plants with spores of Pyricularia grisea. The frequency of transient expression was 16.3% to 19.3%. Stable frequency was 3.5% to 3.9%. Southern blot analysis confirmed the integration of 3.1 kb chitinase gene. Western blot analysis detected the presence of 35 kDa chitinase enzyme. Chitinase activity ranged from 19.4 to 24.8. In segregation analysis, the transgenic R1 lines produced three resistant and one sensitive for hygromycin, confirming the normal Mendelian pattern of transgene segregation. Transgenic plants showed high level of resistance to leaf blast disease compared to control plants. This is the first study reporting the introduction of rice chitinase gene into finger millet for leaf blast resistance.

  2. Molecular Breeding Strategy and Challenges toward Improvement of Blast Disease Resistance in Rice Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh eAshkani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a staple and most important security food crop consumed by almost half of the world’s population. More rice production is needed due to the rapid population growth in the world. Rice blast caused by the fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive diseases of this crop in different part of the world. Breakdown of blast resistance is the major cause of yield instability in several rice growing areas. There is a need to develop strategies providing long-lasting disease resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, giving protection for a long time over a broad geographic area, promising for sustainable rice production in the future. So far, molecular breeding approaches involving DNA markers, such as QTL mapping, marker-aided selection, gene pyramiding, allele mining and genetic transformation have been used to develop new resistant rice cultivars. Such techniques now are used as a low-cost, high-throughput alternative to conventional methods allowing rapid introgression of disease resistance genes into susceptible varieties as well as the incorporation of multiple genes into individual lines for more durable blast resistance. The paper briefly reviewed the progress of studies on this aspect to provide the interest information for rice disease resistance breeding. This review includes examples of how advanced molecular method have been used in breeding programs for improve blast resistance. New information and knowledge gained from previous research on the recent strategy and challenges toward improvement of blast disease such as pyramiding disease resistance gene for creating new rice varieties with high resistance against multiple diseases will undoubtedly provide new insights into the rice disease control.

  3. Molecular Breeding Strategy and Challenges Towards Improvement of Blast Disease Resistance in Rice Crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Rafii, Mohd Y; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Miah, Gous; Sahebi, Mahbod; Azizi, Parisa; Tanweer, Fatah A; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Nasehi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a staple and most important security food crop consumed by almost half of the world's population. More rice production is needed due to the rapid population growth in the world. Rice blast caused by the fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive diseases of this crop in different part of the world. Breakdown of blast resistance is the major cause of yield instability in several rice growing areas. There is a need to develop strategies providing long-lasting disease resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, giving protection for a long time over a broad geographic area, promising for sustainable rice production in the future. So far, molecular breeding approaches involving DNA markers, such as QTL mapping, marker-aided selection, gene pyramiding, allele mining and genetic transformation have been used to develop new resistant rice cultivars. Such techniques now are used as a low-cost, high-throughput alternative to conventional methods allowing rapid introgression of disease resistance genes into susceptible varieties as well as the incorporation of multiple genes into individual lines for more durable blast resistance. The paper briefly reviewed the progress of studies on this aspect to provide the interest information for rice disease resistance breeding. This review includes examples of how advanced molecular method have been used in breeding programs for improving blast resistance. New information and knowledge gained from previous research on the recent strategy and challenges towards improvement of blast disease such as pyramiding disease resistance gene for creating new rice varieties with high resistance against multiple diseases will undoubtedly provide new insights into the rice disease control.

  4. Study on Blast Pressure Resistance of Foamed Concrete Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Ahmad Zaidi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Great demand exist for more efficient design to protect personals and critical components against explosion or blast wave, generated both accidentally and deliberately, in various blast scenarios in both civilian and military activities. Concrete is a common material used in protective design of structures. Recently, the demands on producing the lighter concrete material have become interest in concrete research. Foamed concrete is a possible alternative of lightweight concrete for producing intermediate strength capabilities with excellent thermal insulation, freeze-thaw resistance, high-impact resistance and good shock absorption. This paper explores the role and development of Blast Pressure Resistant Materials (BPRM’s on foamed concrete. The explosive tests were conducted to determine the blast mitigating properties. The results show that when the foamed concrete density is increases the blast energy absorption capability will be decreases due to reduce of cavity volume. This is suggested that cavity plays an important role to dissipate and absorb the shock energy of the blast.

  5. Distribution of two blast resistance genes Pib and Pita in major rice cultivars in Heilongjiang Province in China%黑龙江省种植品种中稻瘟病抗性基因Pib和Pita的分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华招; 刘延; 刘化龙; 徐正进; 陈温福

    2011-01-01

    利用源于Pib Pita基因本身的特异性分子标记,检测了2009年黑龙江省种植面积0.67万hm2以上的36份水稻品种的Pita和Pib抗性基因型.结果表明,垦稻13、垦稻14、龙粳22、松粳9等4份材料含有Pib基因,而不含有Pita;东428、龙稻5、龙粳18、龙粳28、绥粳4、绥粳9等6份材料含有Pita基因,而不含有Pib基因.同时用黑龙江省稻瘟病优势混合菌接种鉴定,结果表明Pib、Pita在黑龙江有较高利用价值.该结论有助于舍Pib、Pita基因的品种合理布局及利用,为抗病基因聚合育种打下了基础.%The two major blast resistance genes, Pib and Pita, showed good resistance spectrum to rice blast in many rice growing areas of China, and have been utilized in rice breeding and production. However, the distribution of these two genes in rice of Heilongjiang Province had not been well investigated, resulting in the blindness of their utilization in rice breeding. In this study, the existences of the two genes in 36 rice cultivars/lines were rapidly determined using the dominant DNA marker of Pita/pita and Pib/pib alleles. The Pib gene was found in four cultivars, i.e. Kendao13, Kendao14,Longjing22, Songjing9. The Pita gene was found in other six cultivars i.e. Dongnong428, Longdao5,Longjing18, Longjing28, Suijing4 and Suijing9. These results were useful for rational utilization and layout of the rice cultivars with the Pita and Pib genes in cold region, and for incorporating and stacking these genes into elite present leading cultivars/lines by marker assisted selection in rice breeding.

  6. Molecular progress on the mapping and cloning of functional genes for blast disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.): current status and future considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkani, S; Rafii, M Y; Shabanimofrad, M; Ghasemzadeh, A; Ravanfar, S A; Latif, M A

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast disease, which is caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is a recurring problem in all rice-growing regions of the world. The use of resistance (R) genes in rice improvement breeding programmes has been considered to be one of the best options for crop protection and blast management. Alternatively, quantitative resistance conferred by quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is also a valuable resource for the improvement of rice disease resistance. In the past, intensive efforts have been made to identify major R-genes as well as QTLs for blast disease using molecular techniques. A review of bibliographic references shows over 100 blast resistance genes and a larger number of QTLs (∼500) that were mapped to the rice genome. Of the blast resistance genes, identified in different genotypes of rice, ∼22 have been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. In this review, we have summarized the reported rice blast resistance genes and QTLs for utilization in future molecular breeding programmes to introgress high-degree resistance or to pyramid R-genes in commercial cultivars that are susceptible to M. oryzae. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the significant studies in order to update our understanding of the molecular progress on rice and M. oryzae. This information will assist rice breeders to improve the resistance to rice blast using marker-assisted selection which continues to be a priority for rice-breeding programmes.

  7. Blast-Resistance Inheritance of Space-Induced Rice Lines and Their Genomic Polymorphism by Microsatellite Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Wu-ming; YANG Qi-yun; CHEN Zhi-qiang; WANG Hui; GUO Tao; LIU Yong-zhu; ZHU Xiao-yuan

    2009-01-01

    To understand the resistance inheritance basis of space-induced rice lines to blast,and to probe mutants'genomic DNA polymorphism compared with ground control by microsatellite markers,three space-induced lines were crossed with a highly susceptible variety LTH,and their F1 and F2 populations were inoculated by two representative blast isolates with broad pathogenicity to analyze their resistance inheritance basis.Meanwhile three mutant lines and the ground control were analyzed by 225 rice SSR(simple sequence repeat)primer pairs selected throughout the 12 chromosomes of whole rice genome,to scan the mutagenesis in genome of the mutant lines.The results indicated the blast-resistant genes harbored in these mutant lines were dominant.It was demonstrated that the resistance of mutant H1 to isolate GD0193 and GD3286 was controlled by a single gene,respectively;while mutants H2 and H3 were controlled by two pairs of major genes against isolate GD3286 and H2 showed complicated genetic mechanism to isolate GD0193.H3's resistance to isolate GD0193 was verified to be controlled by a single gene.According to the results of SSR analysis,three mutant lines showed different mutant rates as compared with the ground control,and the mutant rates also varied.Resistance genes can be induced from rice by space mutation,and different genomic variations were detected in blast-resistant lines.

  8. Promising blast resistance entries from 20th-23rd IRBN in Hangzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUPeiliang; YUANXiaoping; ZHAOXinhua; SHENYing

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation for blast resistances of rice entries of 20th to 23rd International Rice Blast Nursery (IRBN) was conducted at CNRRI during 1990-1993. The resistance to seedling blast (SB)was evaluated in a greenhouse at 3-4 leaf stage with artificial inoculation while resistance to leaf blast (LB) and neck blast (NB) were evaluated in the natural field as instructed by the International Network of Genetic Evaluation for Rice (INGER). Materials with high level of blast resistante and good agronomic traits were selected andre-evaluated in suoceeding years.

  9. Inheritance patterns and identification of microsatellite markers linked to the rice blast resistance in BC2F1 population of rice breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gous Miah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The BC2F1 population was derived from a cross between rice variety, MR219 (susceptible to blast and Pongsu Seribu 1 (resistant to blast. The objectives of this research were to know the inheritance pattern of blast resistance and to identify the linked markers associated with blast resistance in BC2F1 population. Sixteen microsatellite markers were found as polymorphic between the parents related to blast resistant genes (Pi-genes. Among the selected blast resistant linked markers, two markers RM6836 and RM8225 showed expected testcross ratio (1:1 for single-gene model in the BC2F1 population with the association between resistant and susceptible progeny. A total of 333-BC2F1 plants were challenged with the most virulent pathotype P7.2 of Magnaporthe oryzae. Chi-square (χ2 analysis for phenotypic segregation in single-gene model showed goodness of fit (P = 0.4463 to the expected segregation ratio (1:1. In marker segregation analysis, two polymorphic markers (RM6836 and RM8225 clearly showed goodness of fit to the expected segregation testcross ratio (1:1 for the single-gene model. The marker RM8225 and RM6836 showed significant R2 values higher than 10 for the trait of the blast lesions degree (BLD. The positions of RM6836 and RM8225 markers on rice chromosome 6 and the distance between these two markers is 0.2 cM. We conclude that single dominant gene control the blast resistance in Pongsu Seribu 1 located on chromosome 6, which is linked to RM8225 and RM6836 microsatellite markers. This information could be useful in marker-assisted selection for blast resistance in rice breeding involving Pongsu Seribu 1.

  10. TNO-PML developments of blast resistant doors and walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkel, A.G.; Luyten, J.M.; Galle, L.F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will address the ongoing developments on blast resistant light or moderate weight steel structures at the Prins Maurits Laboratory of the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO-PML) for the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN) and other parties. Five structural products wi

  11. Breeding of R8012, a Rice Restorer Line Resistant to Blast and Bacterial Blight Through Marker-Assisted Selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Xiao-deng; ZHOU Hai-peng; CHAI Rong-yao; ZHUANG Jie-yun; CHENG Shi-hua; CAO Li-yong

    2012-01-01

    Genetic improvement Is one of the most effective strategies to prevent rlce from blast and bacterial blight (BB)diseases,the two most prevalent diseases jeopardizing rice production.Rice hybrids with dural resistance to blast and BB are needed for sustainable production of food.An incomplete diallels design resulted in 25 crosses between five blast and five BB resistant germplasrn accesslons.Only one pair of parents,DH146 × TM487,showed polymorphism for all the markers to Identify one blast resistance gene P125 and three BB resistance genes,Xa21,xa13 and xa5,thus it was used in the marker-assisted selection (MAS).F2 individuals of DH148 × TM487 were genotyped using flanking markers of RM3330and sequence tagged site (STS) marker SAT for P125.The resistant F2 plants with P125 were used for pyramiding BB resistance genes Xa21,xa13 and xa5 identified by the markers pTA248,RM264 and RM153,respectively In subsequent generations.Finally,after selection for agronomic traits and restoration ability among 12 pyramided lines,we acquired an elite restorer line,R8012 including all four target genes (P125+Xa21+xa13+xa5).Hybrid Zhong 9A/R8012 derived from the selected line showed stronger resistance to blast and BB,and higher grain yield than the commercial checks uniformally in experimental plots,2007 state-wide yield trial and 2008 nation-wide yield trial.This study provides a paradigmatic example to show that MAS is a practically feasible tool in effectively pyramiding multiple resistance genes.The resultant restoring line and its hybrid would play an important role in securing rice production in China.

  12. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore;

    2012-01-01

    ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laborato......ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic...... laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data.MethodsWe developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired...... antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de...

  13. 稻瘟病抗病基因Pita和Pib在中国水稻地方品种中的分布%Distribution of Two Blast Resistant Genes Pita and Pib in Landrace Rice in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨杰; 杨金欢; 王军; 范方军; 朱金燕; 曹卿; 田胜尼; 仲维功

    2011-01-01

    主效抗稻瘟病基因Pita和Pib在我国很多稻区表现高水平的稻瘟病抗性,被广泛应用于我国的水稻育种和生产.但这2个基因在国内品种资源中的分布及利用情况缺乏详细的资料,致使育种利用上存在着盲目性.本研究利用Pita和Pib基因的功能标记,检测和分析了我国115份水稻地方品种的Pita和Pib基因型.结果表明,Pita在我国浙江、福建、广东、广西、贵州、四川、安徽、江西、河南、河北、吉林均有分布,在江苏、上海、山东、湖南、湖北、辽宁没有发现;而只有来自四川的地方品种桂东籼和来自河南的德国稻携带Pib,其他省均未发现.在江苏的主要推广粳稻品种中,晚粳品种几乎都携带这两个基因,部分迟熟中粳携带这两个基因,中熟中粳多数不携带.%The two major blast resistance genes, Pita and Pib, showed broad resistance spectrum to Magna-porthe grisea isolates in many rice planting areas of China and has been utilized in rice breeding and commercial production. However,the distribution of this two genes in present rice germplasms has not been well investigated,resulting in the blindness of their utilization in rice breeding. In the present study, the existence of the two genes in 115 landrace rice germlpasms and 19 rice leading cultivars were rapidly determined using the functional markers of Pita/pita and Pib/pib alleles. The results showed that 20 landrace accessions harbored Pita resistant allele and only 2 landrace accessions harbored Pib resistant allele. The Pita resistant allele distribute widely in china including Zhejiang Province, Fujian Province, Guangdong Province, Cuangxi Province, Sichuan Province, Guizhou Province , Anhui Province, Jiangxi Province, Henan Province, Hebei Province, Jilin Province, but not found in Jiangsu Province, Shandong Province, Hunan Province, Hubei Province and Shanghai City. Only two landrace harbored the Pib resistant allele. However, 11

  14. Population structure analysis and association mapping of blast resistance in indica rice (Oryza sativa L.) landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y Y; He, J B; Li, A H; Fang, N Y; He, W W; Dang, L L; Zeng, G Y; Huang, J; Bao, Y M; Zhang, H S

    2016-08-12

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. To understand the genetic diversity of indica landrace accessions and identify simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers that are associated with blast resistance, a population of 276 indica landraces from across the world was constructed. This population was then used to evaluate the blast-resistance phenotype through artificial inoculation under controlled conditions in 2012 and 2013. The genetic diversity and association of the population with resistance were analyzed by examining the phenotype for 160 SSR markers distributed on 12 rice chromosomes. The 276 accessions were classified into seven groups using model- and distance-based cluster analyses. Associations between SSR markers and blast resistance showed that 26 SSR markers were significantly associated with blast resistance in 2012 and 2013 (P rice blast-resistance-breeding programs.

  15. Studies on durable resistance of rice to blast in different latitudes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUErming; PENGShaoqiu; HUANGFeiyuan; XIAOFanghua

    1996-01-01

    It has been an important problem on resistant breeding that cultivar's resistance of rice to blast disease eaused by Magnaporthe grisea(Hebert)Barr. is easily broken down. In order to find out resources with durable, resistance to blast, the study was carried put during 1990-1994.

  16. Pyramiding the Blast Resistant Gene Pi9 and the Brown Planthopper Gene Bph18(t) to Develop Restorer Lines in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)%聚合抗稻瘟病基因Pi9和抗褐飞虱基因Bp h18(t)选育水稻恢复系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马文清; 裴庆利; 梁云涛; 刘丕庆; 赵开军; 王春连; 林纬; 杨培忠; 于洁

    2014-01-01

    水稻(Oryza sativa L.)作为粮食作物,在全世界粮食生产中具有极其重要的地位。稻瘟病、褐飞虱等病虫害的发生严重危害着水稻的安全生产,培育并利用水稻抗性品种能经济有效地预防水稻病虫害的发生,因此,培育抗性品种在水稻安全生产中尤为重要。本研究以具有抗稻瘟病基因Pi9的抗病品系75-1-127为抗病亲本,以携带有抗褐飞虱基因Bph18(t)的水稻材料C4064为抗虫亲本,以性状优良的恢复系测679作为轮回亲本,进行杂交、回交和自交,并辅以田间多代选择。在分离群体中,使用与Pi9紧密连锁的SCAR标记pB8跟踪目标基因Pi9,利用与Bph18(t)紧密连锁的标记KC16跟踪目标基因Bph18(t)。通过分子标记辅助选择、农艺性状评价和抗病抗虫鉴定,选育出聚合了Pi9和Bph18(t)基因、对稻瘟病和褐飞虱的抗性水平接近抗病亲本或抗虫亲本的恢复系。%Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a cereal crop, plays an ultimately important role in the global food production. The occurrence of the rice disease and pest such as the rice blast (RB) and the brown planthopper (BPH) can seve-rely damage the safe production of rice, and the development and application of the resistant varieties can prevent the occurrence of the rice disease and pest economically and effectively, so the development of the resistant variety is crucial in the safe production of rice. In this study, we used the disease resistant line 75-1-127 carrying rice blast resistant gene Pi9 as the disease-resistant parent, the BPH-resistant line C4064 harboring brown planthopper resistant gene Bph18(t) as the BPH-resistant parent, and the elite restoring line Ce679 as recurrent parents, to hy-bridize, backcross, selfcross and field select for multiple generations. The Pi9-linked SCAR marker pB8 was used to select Pi9, and the Bph18(t)-linked marker KC16 was used to select Bph18(t) in the segregating populations. By

  17. Detecting Sequence Homology at the Gene Cluster Level with MultiGeneBlast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Nowick, Katja

    2013-01-01

    The genes encoding many biomolecular systems and pathways are genomically organized in operons or gene clusters. With MultiGeneBlast, we provide a user-friendly and effective tool to perform homology searches with operons or gene clusters as basic units, instead of single genes. The contextualizatio

  18. Blast-Resistant Improvement of Sandwich Armor Structure with Aluminum Foam Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich armor structures with aluminum foam can be utilized to protect a military vehicle from harmful blast load such as a landmine explosion. In this paper, a system-level dynamic finite element model is developed to simulate the blast event and to evaluate the blast-resistant performance of the sandwich armor structure. It is found that a sandwich armor structure with only aluminum foam is capable of mitigating crew injuries under a moderate blast load. However, a severe blast load causes force enhancement and results in much worse crew injury. An isolating layer between the aluminum foam and the vehicle floor is introduced to remediate this drawback. The results show that the blast-resistant capability of the innovative sandwich armor structure with the isolating layer increases remarkably.

  19. Chloroplast-Expressed MSI-99 in Tobacco Improves Disease Resistance and Displays Inhibitory Effect against Rice Blast Fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Peng Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast is a major destructive fungal disease that poses a serious threat to rice production and the improvement of blast resistance is critical to rice breeding. The antimicrobial peptide MSI-99 has been suggested as an antimicrobial peptide conferring resistance to bacterial and fungal diseases. Here, a vector harboring the MSI-99 gene was constructed and introduced into the tobacco chloroplast genome via particle bombardment. Transformed plants were obtained and verified to be homoplastomic by PCR and Southern hybridization. In planta assays demonstrated that the transgenic tobacco plants displayed an enhanced resistance to the fungal disease. The evaluation of the antimicrobial activity revealed that the crude protein extracts from the transgenic plants manifested an antimicrobial activity against E. coli, even after incubation at 120 °C for 20 min, indicating significant heat stability of MSI-99. More importantly, the MSI-99-containing protein extracts were firstly proved in vitro and in vivo to display significant suppressive effects on two rice blast isolates. These findings provide a strong basis for the development of new biopesticides to combat rice blast.

  20. 稻瘟病抗病基因Pi15的精细定位%Fine Mapping of the Blast Resistance Gene Pil5, Linked to Pii, on Rice Chromosome 9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘庆华; 胡珍娣; 谷坂隆俊; 王玲

    2003-01-01

    The gene Pi15for resistance of rice to Magnaporthe grisea was previously identified as beinglinked to the gene Pii However, there is a debate on the chromosomal position of the Pii gene, becauseit was originally mapped on chromosome 6, but recent work showed it might be located on chromosome 9.To determine the chromosomal location of the Pi15gene, a linkage analysis using molecular markers wasperformed in a F2 mapping population consisting of 15 resistant and 141 susceptible plants through bulked-segregant analysis (BSA) in combination with recessive-class analysis (RCA). Out of 20 microsatellitemarkers mapped on chromosomes 6 and 9 tested, only one marker, RM316 on chromosome 9, was foundto have a linkage with the Pi15gene with a recombination frequency of (19.1 ± 3.7)%. To confirm thisfinding, four sequence-tagged site (STS) markers mapped on chromosome 9 were tested. The resultssuggested that marker G103 was linked to the Pi15 gene with a recombination frequency of (5.7 ± 2.1)%. Tofind marker(s) more closely linked to the Pi15 gene, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysiswas performed. Out of 1 000 primers tested, three RAPD markers, BAPi15486, BAPi15782 and BAPi15844 werefound to tightly flank the Pi15gene with recombination frequencies of 0.35%, 0.35% and 1.1%, respectively.These three RAPD markers should be viewed as the starting points for marker-aided gene pyramiding andcloning. A new gene cluster of rice blast resistance on chromosome 9 was also discussed.%稻瘟病抗病基因Pi15曾被作者鉴定为与已知抗病基因Pii具有连锁关系,但是,Pii基因究竟位于染色体6还是9上存在争议.为了确定Pi15基因的染色体位置,利用分子标记在由15个抗病个体和141个感病个体组成的F2群体中,通过混合群体分离法(BSA)与隐性群体分析法(RCA)相结合的手段,对目标基因进行了连锁分析.首先,从染色体6和9分别选择10个微卫星标记进行了分析,结果表明,只有位于染色体9

  1. Overexpression of phosphomimic mutated OsWRKY53 leads to enhanced blast resistance in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Chujo

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades have been shown to play pivotal roles in the regulation of plant defense responses. We previously reported that OsWRKY53-overexpressing rice plants showed enhanced resistance to the rice blast fungus. In this study, we identified OsWRKY53 as a substrate of OsMPK3/OsMPK6, components of a fungal PAMP-responsive MAPK cascade in rice, and analyzed the effect of OsWRKY53 phosphorylation on the regulation of basal defense responses to a virulence race of rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae strain Ina86-137. An in vitro phosphorylation assay revealed that the OsMPK3/OsMPK6 activated by OsMKK4 phosphorylated OsWRKY53 recombinant protein at its multiple clustered serine-proline residues (SP cluster. When OsWRKY53 was coexpressed with a constitutively active mutant of OsMKK4 in a transient reporter gene assay, the enhanced transactivation activity of OsWRKY53 was found to be dependent on phosphorylation of the SP cluster. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing a phospho-mimic mutant of OsWRKY53 (OsWRKY53SD showed further-enhanced disease resistance to the blast fungus compared to native OsWRKY53-overexpressing rice plants, and a substantial number of defense-related genes, including pathogenesis-related protein genes, were more upregulated in the OsWRKY53SD-overexpressing plants compared to the OsWRKY53-overexpressing plants. These results strongly suggest that the OsMKK4-OsMPK3/OsMPK6 cascade regulates transactivation activity of OsWRKY53, and overexpression of the phospho-mimic mutant of OsWRKY53 results in a major change to the rice transcriptome at steady state that leads to activation of a defense response against the blast fungus in rice plants.

  2. Development of Light Weight Structures to Provide Blast-Resistant Designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CRAWFORD John E

    2006-01-01

    In the past,blast-resistant designs for structures were often constructed with massive type structural systems,which relied more on brute strength than on finesse to achieve the required blast resistance.However,structures composed of COLD-FORMED steel components,such as sheet metal and metal studs,have shown great promise in providing blast resistance with the added benefits of Iow cost and ease of construction.Some examples of using such structures to provide containment for package handling facilities (PHF) are described in the paper for situations where blast containment is needed,such as a potential package bomb being discovered during the package vetting process.Results from tests and analytic data are used to illustrate aspects of design peculiar to such types of applications.Designs for specific capacities of PHF are described.

  3. A review of microsatellite markers and their applications in rice breeding programs to improve blast disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Islam, Kh Nurul; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2013-11-14

    Over the last few decades, the use of molecular markers has played an increasing role in rice breeding and genetics. Of the different types of molecular markers, microsatellites have been utilized most extensively, because they can be readily amplified by PCR and the large amount of allelic variation at each locus. Microsatellites are also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), and they are typically composed of 1-6 nucleotide repeats. These markers are abundant, distributed throughout the genome and are highly polymorphic compared with other genetic markers, as well as being species-specific and co-dominant. For these reasons, they have become increasingly important genetic markers in rice breeding programs. The evolution of new biotypes of pests and diseases as well as the pressures of climate change pose serious challenges to rice breeders, who would like to increase rice production by introducing resistance to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent advances in rice genomics have now made it possible to identify and map a number of genes through linkage to existing DNA markers. Among the more noteworthy examples of genes that have been tightly linked to molecular markers in rice are those that confer resistance or tolerance to blast. Therefore, in combination with conventional breeding approaches, marker-assisted selection (MAS) can be used to monitor the presence or lack of these genes in breeding populations. For example, marker-assisted backcross breeding has been used to integrate important genes with significant biological effects into a number of commonly grown rice varieties. The use of cost-effective, finely mapped microsatellite markers and MAS strategies should provide opportunities for breeders to develop high-yield, blast resistance rice cultivars. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the linkage of microsatellite markers to rice blast resistance genes, as well as to explore the use of MAS in rice breeding

  4. A Review of Microsatellite Markers and Their Applications in Rice Breeding Programs to Improve Blast Disease Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Latif

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, the use of molecular markers has played an increasing role in rice breeding and genetics. Of the different types of molecular markers, microsatellites have been utilized most extensively, because they can be readily amplified by PCR and the large amount of allelic variation at each locus. Microsatellites are also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR, and they are typically composed of 1–6 nucleotide repeats. These markers are abundant, distributed throughout the genome and are highly polymorphic compared with other genetic markers, as well as being species-specific and co-dominant. For these reasons, they have become increasingly important genetic markers in rice breeding programs. The evolution of new biotypes of pests and diseases as well as the pressures of climate change pose serious challenges to rice breeders, who would like to increase rice production by introducing resistance to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent advances in rice genomics have now made it possible to identify and map a number of genes through linkage to existing DNA markers. Among the more noteworthy examples of genes that have been tightly linked to molecular markers in rice are those that confer resistance or tolerance to blast. Therefore, in combination with conventional breeding approaches, marker-assisted selection (MAS can be used to monitor the presence or lack of these genes in breeding populations. For example, marker-assisted backcross breeding has been used to integrate important genes with significant biological effects into a number of commonly grown rice varieties. The use of cost-effective, finely mapped microsatellite markers and MAS strategies should provide opportunities for breeders to develop high-yield, blast resistance rice cultivars. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the linkage of microsatellite markers to rice blast resistance genes, as well as to explore the use of MAS

  5. Marker-assisted improvement of the elite restorer line of rice, RPHR-1005 for resistance against bacterial blight and blast diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. ABHILASH KUMAR; C. H. BALACHIRANJEEVI; S. BHASKAR NAIK; R. RAMBABU; G. REKHA; G. HARIKA; S. K. HAJIRA; K. PRANATHI; S. VIJAY; M. ANILA; H. K. MAHADEVASWAMY; M. KOUSIK; A. YUGANDER; J. ARUNA; A. S. HARI PRASAD; M. S. MADHAV; G. S. LAHA; S. M. BALACHANDRAN; M. S. PRASAD; V. RAVINDRA BABU; R. M. SUNDARAM

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to improve the RPHR-1005, a stable restorer line of the popular medium slender grain type rice hybrid, DRRH-3 for bacterial blight (BB) and blast resistance through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). Twomajor BB resistance genes, Xa21 and Xa33 and a major blast resistance gene, Pi2 were transferred to RPHR-1005 as two individual crosses. Foreground selection for Xa21, Xa33, Pi2, Rf3 and Rf4 was done by using gene-specific functional markers, while 59 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers polymorphic between the donors and recipient parents were used to select the best plant possessing target resistance genes at each backcross generation. Backcrossing was continued till BC₂F₂ and a promising homozygous backcross derived line possessing Xa21 + Pi2 and another possessing Xa33 were intercrossed to stack the target resistance genes into the genetic background of RPHR-1005. At ICF4, 10 promising lines possessing three resistance genes in homozygous condition along with fine-grain type, complete fertility restoration, better panicle exertion and taller plant type (compared to RPHR-1005) were identified.

  6. Obtaining transgenic rice resistant to rice fungal blast disease by controlled cell death strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Shengji; GU Hongya; QU Lijia; CHEN Zhangliang

    2003-01-01

    The strategy of the two-component system, composed of Barnase and Barstar which encode RNase and a specific inhibitor to the RNase respectively, is adopted to obtain transgenic rice resistant to rice fungal blast disease. In this study, two chimeric promoters, induced by rice blast fungus pathogen (Magnaporthe grisea), are fused with Barnase respectively to construct two plant expression vectors, pWBNBS and pPBNBS together with the Barstar driven by CaMV 35S promoter. The resistance of the transgenic rice lines to rice blast fungus disease and rice blight disease are evaluated. The results show that (1) the expression of Barnase is induced in rice leaves when inoculated with the spores of Magnaporthe grisea; (2) the induced expression level of Barnase surpasses the level of Barstar, which elicits a similar hypersensitive response (HR) in the leaves, and the transgenic plant shows high resistance to the rice fungal blast disease; and (3) transgenic rice plants also show obvious resistance to rice bacterial blight disease. Taken together, these results suggest that the transgenic rice plants harboring this two-component system acquire relatively broad spectrum resistance against pathogens, especially high resistance to rice fungal pathogen.

  7. Isolation and manipulation of quantitative trait loci for disease resistance in rice using a candidate gene approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ke-Ming; Qiu, De-Yun; Shen, Xiang-Ling; Li, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and fungal blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea result in heavy production losses in rice, a main staple food for approximately 50% of the world's population. Application of host resistance to these pathogens is the most economical and environment-friendly approach to solve this problem. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling quantitative resistance are valuable sources for broad-spectrum and durable disease resistance. Although large numbers of QTLs for bacterial blight and blast resistance have been identified, these sources have not been used effectively in rice improvement because of the complex genetic control of quantitative resistance and because the genes underlying resistance QTLs are unknown. To isolate disease resistance QTLs, we established a candidate gene strategy that integrates linkage map, expression profile, and functional complementation analyses. This strategy has proven to be applicable for identifying the genes underlying minor resistance QTLs in rice-Xoo and rice-M. grisea systems and it may also help to shed light on disease resistance QTLs of other cereals. Our results also suggest that a single minor QTL can be used in rice improvement by modulating the expression of the gene underlying the QTL. Pyramiding two or three minor QTL genes, whose expression can be managed and that function in different defense signal transduction pathways, may allow the breeding of rice cultivars that are highly resistant to bacterial blight and blast.

  8. Improving Blast Resistance of a Thermo-Sensitive Genic Male Sterile Rice Line GD-8S by Molecular Marker-Assisted Selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wu-ge; LIU Yi-bai; JIN Su-juan; ZHU Xiao-yuan; WANG Feng; LI Jin-hua; LIU Zhen-rong; LIAO Yi-long; ZHU Man-shan; HUANG Hui-jun

    2008-01-01

    The broad-spectrum blast resistance gene Pi-1, from donor line BL122, was introduced into a thermo-sensitive genic male sterile rice line GD-8S, which possessed good grain quality but high susceptibility to rice blast, by using backcross breeding and molecular marker-assisted selection. Five elite improved male sterile lines, RGD8S-1, RGD8S-2, RGD8S-3, RGD8S-4 and RGD8S-5, were selected based on the results of molecular marker analysis, spikelet sterility, recovery rate of genetic background and agronomic traits. Thirty-three representative blast isolates collected from Guangdong Province,China were used to inoculate the improved lines and the original line GD-8S artificially. The resistance frequencies of the improved lines ranged from 76.47% to 100%, much higher than that of the original line GD-8S (9.09%). On the agronomic characters, there were no significant differences between the improved lines and GD-8S except for flag leaf length and panicle number per plant. The improved lines could be used for breeding hybrid rice with high blast resistance.

  9. Obesity genes and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review The exploding prevalence of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) linked to obesity has become an alarming public health concern. Worldwide, approximately 171 million people suffer from obesity-induced diabetes and public health authorities expect this situation to deteriorate rapidly. An interesting clinical population of ‘metabolically healthy but obese’ (MHO) cases is relatively protected from T2D and its associated cardiovascular risk. The molecular basis for this protection is not well understood but is likely to involve reduced inflammatory responses. The inflammatory cells and pathways that respond to overnutrition are the primary subject matter for this review. Recent findings The chance discovery of a genetic mutation in the Brd2 gene, which is located in the class II major histocompatibility complex and makes mice enormously fat but protects them from diabetes, offers revolutionary new insights into the cellular mechanisms that link obesity to insulin resistance and T2D. These Brd2-hypomorphic mice have reduced inflammation in fat that is normally associated with insulin resistance, and resemble MHO patients, suggesting novel therapeutic pathways for obese patients at risk for T2D. Summary Deeper understanding of the functional links between genes that control inflammatory responses to diet-induced obesity is crucial to the development of therapies for obese, insulin-resistant patients. PMID:20585247

  10. The evolution of resistance gene in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Haiyan; LIU Xuemin; LI Lijun; LIU Li

    2007-01-01

    Resistance genes enable plants to fight against plant pathogens. Plant resistance genes (R gene) are organized complexly in genome. Some resistance gene sequence data enable an insight into R gene structure and gene evolution. Some sites like Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) are of specific interest since homologous recombination can happen. Crossing over, transposon insertion and excision and mutation can produce new specificity. Three models explaining R gene evolution were discussed. More information needed for dissection of R gene evolution though some step can be inferred from genetic and sequence analysis.

  11. A set of vectors for introduction of antibiotic resistance genes by in vitro Cre-mediated recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Vassetzky Yegor S; Dmitriev Petr V

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Introduction of new antibiotic resistance genes in the plasmids of interest is a frequent task in molecular cloning practice. Classical approaches involving digestion with restriction endonucleases and ligation are time-consuming. Findings We have created a set of insertion vectors (pINS) carrying genes that provide resistance to various antibiotics (puromycin, blasticidin and G418) and containing a loxP site. Each vector (pINS-Puro, pINS-Blast or pINS-Neo) contains either...

  12. Aspergillus flavus Blast2GO gene ontology database: elevated growth temperature alters amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The availability of a representative gene ontology (GO) database is a prerequisite for a successful functional genomics study. Using online Blast2GO resources we constructed a GO database of Aspergillus flavus. Of the predicted total 13,485 A. flavus genes 8,987 were annotated with GO terms. The mea...

  13. 云南野生稻抗稻瘟病Pi-ta基因的检测及分析%Identification and Analysis on the Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pi-ta in Wild Rice from Yunnan,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国珍; 蒋春苗; 刘吉新; 陈于敏; 余腾琼; 程在全

    2014-01-01

    A total of 1 6 accessions of wild rice from different regions of Yunnan Province were used for PCR amplifica-tion with Pi-ta gene specific primers.The amplified PCR products were cloned into Topo cloning vector,and se-quenced.Among 1 6 accessions,the identical sequence fragment to the resitance Pi-ta gene was amplified separately from 7 accessions.The Pi-ta allele in one accession of Oryza rufipogon with purple stem from Jinghong contains an i-dentical DNA sequence in the coding region to the original Pi-ta resistance gene.It suggested that Yunnan might be one of the origins of the Pi-ta gene.%以16个不同来源的云南野生稻作为供试材料,用抗稻瘟病 Pi-ta 基因特异引物(KG2/KG4)进行 PCR 扩增,并对PCR 产物进行克隆、测序及分析。结果表明,16个野生稻中7个品种持有抗稻瘟病 Pi-ta 基因,其中,来自云南景洪的紫秆普通野生稻中 Pi-ta 基因的编码区与原始型的抗稻瘟病 Pi-ta 基因的 DNA 序列完全相同。可见,云南可能是抗稻瘟病基因Pi-ta 的起源地之一。

  14. Transgenic Cotton and Disease Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJASEKARAN; Kanniah

    2008-01-01

    Success in conventional breeding for resistance to mycotoxin-producing or other phytopathogenic fungi is dependent on the availability of resistance gene(s) in the germplasm.Even when it is available,breeding for disease-resistant crops is very time consuming,especially in perennial crops such as

  15. Acquired antibiotic resistance genes: an overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek, Angela H.A.M. van; Dik eMevius; Beatriz eGuerra; Peter eMullany; Adam Paul Roberts; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance mechanisms with special attentions to the antibiotic resistance genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons and integrons, which are associated with antibiotic resistance genes, and involved in the dispersal of anti...

  16. Histochemical aspects of wheat resistance to leaf blast mediated by silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Luís da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Blast, caused by Pyricularia oryzae, has become a significant disease threat to wheat (Triticum aestivum L. in Brazil. This study aimed to investigate at the histochemical level if silicon (Si could enhance the production of flavonoids in the leaves of wheat plants in response to P. oryzae infection. Plants from the Aliança cultivar, which are susceptible to blast, were grown in hydroponic cultures containing 0 (-Si or 2 mM of Si (+Si and inoculated by spraying a conidial suspension of P. oryzae (1 × 105 conidia mL−1 on all adaxial leaf surfaces of plants at 60 days after emergence (growth stage 65. The fourth and fifth leaves of each plant were used to evaluate blast severity at 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 h after inoculation (hai. At 96 hai, leaves were collected from plants to determine the foliar Si concentration. For cytological observations, leaf samples were randomly collected from the fourth and fifth leaves of each plant at 72 hai. The foliar Si concentration was higher in +Si plants (36 g kg−1 in comparison to -Si plants (2.6 g kg−1. This increased Si concentration was correlated with reduced fungal growth inside the epidermal cells and the development of blast symptoms on leaves. Strong fluorescence, which is an indication of the presence of flavonoids, was detected in the leaf cells of +Si plants using Neu’s and Wilson's reagents. A novel item of evidence is that, at the histochemical level, Si is involved in the potentiation of the biosynthetic pathway of flavonoids that increases wheat resistance to blast.

  17. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using GeneScan and BLAST

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew M. Lynn; Chakresh Kumar Jain; K. Kosalai; Pranjan Barman; Nupur Thakur; Harish Batra; Alok Bhattacharya

    2001-04-01

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated annotation of genome DNA sequences.

  18. Gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory-Smith, Carol; Zapiola, Maria

    2008-04-01

    Gene flow from transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops can result in the adventitious presence of the transgene, which may negatively impact markets. Gene flow can also produce glyphosate-resistant plants that may interfere with weed management systems. The objective of this article is to review the gene flow literature as it pertains to glyphosate-resistant crops. Gene flow is a natural phenomenon not unique to transgenic crops and can occur via pollen, seed and, in some cases, vegetative propagules. Gene flow via pollen can occur in all crops, even those that are considered to be self-pollinated, because all have low levels of outcrossing. Gene flow via seed or vegetative propagules occurs when they are moved naturally or by humans during crop production and commercialization. There are many factors that influence gene flow; therefore, it is difficult to prevent or predict. Gene flow via pollen and seed from glyphosate-resistant canola and creeping bentgrass fields has been documented. The adventitious presence of the transgene responsible for glyphosate resistance has been found in commercial seed lots of canola, corn and soybeans. In general, the glyphosate-resistant trait is not considered to provide an ecological advantage. However, regulators should consider the examples of gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops when formulating rules for the release of crops with traits that could negatively impact the environment or human health.

  19. Transgenic Cotton and Disease Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJASEKARAN Kanniah

    2008-01-01

    @@ Success in conventional breeding for resistance to mycotoxin-producing or other phytopathogenic fungi is dependent on the availability of resistance gene(s) in the germplasm.Even when it is available,breeding for disease-resistant crops is very time consuming,especially in perennial crops such as tree nut crops,and does not lend itself ready to combat the evolution of new virulent fungal races.

  20. Analysis of SSH library of rice variety Aganni reveals candidate gall midge resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Dhanasekar; Singh, Y Tunginba; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, J S

    2016-03-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae, is a serious insect pest causing extensive yield loss. Interaction between the gall midge and rice genotypes is known to be on a gene-for-gene basis. Here, we report molecular basis of HR- (hypersensitive reaction-negative) type of resistance in Aganni (an indica rice variety possessing gall midge resistance gene Gm8) through the construction and analysis of a suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. In all, 2,800 positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The high-quality ESTs were assembled into 448 non-redundant gene sequences. Homology search with the NCBI databases, using BlastX and BlastN, revealed that 73% of the clones showed homology to genes with known function and majority of ESTs belonged to the gene ontology category 'biological process'. Validation of 27 putative candidate gall midge resistance genes through real-time PCR, following gall midge infestation, in contrasting parents and their derived pre-NILs (near isogenic lines) revealed induction of specific genes related to defense and metabolism. Interestingly, four genes, belonging to families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR), heat shock protein (HSP), pathogenesis related protein (PR), and NAC domain-containing protein, implicated in conferring HR+ type of resistance, were found to be up-regulated in Aganni. Two of the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-scavenging-enzyme-coding genes Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1, 2 (OsAPx1 and OsAPx2) were found up-regulated in Aganni in incompatible interaction possibly suppressing HR. We suggest that Aganni has a deviant form of inducible, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance but without HR.

  1. Comportamento de somaclones de arroz derivados de híbridos da geração F1 para resistência à brusone Performance of rice somaclones derived from F1 hybrids to blast resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Garcês de Araújo

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available A indução de variabilidade genética em relação à resistência à brusone, utilizando cultura de tecidos como material, constitui uma das alternativas para a obtenção de novas fontes de genes de resistência. O objetivo deste estudo foi aumentar a freqüência de variantes usando como explante panículas imaturas da geração F1 de cruzamentos envolvendo fontes altamente suscetíveis e moderadamente resistentes à brusone como parentais. Somaclones de arroz derivados de plantas F1 dos cruzamentos Bluebelle/Araguaia e Maratelli/Basmati-370 foram avaliados, nas gerações avançadas, quanto à resistência à brusone e a algumas características agronômicas. Nos testes de inoculações em casa de vegetação, todos os somaclones, de ambos os cruzamentos, na geração R4, apresentaram alto grau de resistência aos patótipos IB-1 e IB-9. Alguns dos somaclones mantiveram-se resistentes na geração R5, em avaliações realizadas com alta pressão de brusone. No campo, os somaclones R5 e R6 mostraram alta freqüência de variação quanto à resistência à doença, altura da planta, produtividade, peso e tipo de grãos. Dois somaclones derivados do cruzamento Bluebelle/Araguaia e 31 somaclones derivados do cruzamento Maratelli/Basmati-370 foram identificados como novas fontes de resistência à brusone, e podem ser utilizados no programa de melhoramento de arroz irrigado.The induction of genetic variability, in relation to blast resistance, using tissue culture as a tool, constitutes one of the alternatives for obtaining novel resistance gene sources. The objective of this study was to increase the frequency of variants using immature panicles as explant from the F1 plants of crosses involving susceptible and moderately blast resistant sources as parents. Somaclones of rice derived from F1 plants of the crosses Bluebelle/Araguaia and Maratelli/Basmati-370 were assessed in advanced generations for blast resistance and some agronomic

  2. Enhancing disease resistances of Super Hybrid Rice with four antifungal genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A plant expression vector harboring four antifungal genes was delivered into the embryogenic calli of ‘9311’, an indica restorer line of Super Hybrid Rice, via modified biolistic particle bombardment. Southern blot analysis indicated that in the regenerated hygromycin-resistant plants, all the four anti-fungal genes, including RCH10, RAC22, β-Glu and B-RIP, were integrated into the genome of ‘9311’, co-transmitted altogether with the marker gene hpt in a Mendelian pattern. Some transgenic R1 and R2 progenies, with all transgenes displaying a normal expression level in the Northern blot analysis, showed high resistance to Magnaporthe grisea when tested in the typical blast nurseries located in Yanxi and Sanya respectively. Furthermore, transgenic F1 plants, resulting from a cross of R2 homo-zygous lines with high resistance to rice blast with the non-transgenic male sterile line Peiai 64S, showed not only high resistance to M. grisea but also enhanced resistance to rice false smut (a disease caused by Ustilaginoidea virens) and rice kernel smut (another disease caused by Tilletia barclayana).

  3. GeneCAT--novel webtools that combine BLAST and co-expression analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutwil, Marek; Obro, Jens; Willats, William G T

    2008-01-01

    The gene co-expression analysis toolbox (GeneCAT) introduces several novel microarray data analyzing tools. First, the multigene co-expression analysis, combined with co-expressed gene networks, provides a more powerful data mining technique than standard, single-gene co-expression analysis. Second......, the high-throughput Map-O-Matic tool matches co-expression pattern of multiple query genes to genes present in user-defined subdatabases, and can therefore be used for gene mapping in forward genetic screens. Third, Rosetta combines co-expression analysis with BLAST and can be used to find 'true' gene...... orthologs in the plant model organisms Arabidopsis thaliana and Hordeum vulgare (Barley). GeneCAT is equipped with expression data for the model plant A. thaliana, and first to introduce co-expression mining tools for the monocot Barley. GeneCAT is available at http://genecat.mpg.de....

  4. Isolation and Manipulation of Quantitative Tra it Loci for DIsease Resistance in Rice Using a Candid ate Gene Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Ming Hu; De-Yun Qiu; Xiang-Ling Shen; Xiang-Hua Li; Shi-Ping Wang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv.oryzae and fungal blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea result in heavy production losses in rice,a main staple food for approximately 50%of the world's population.Application of host resistance to these pathogens iS the most economical and environment-friendly approach to solve this problem.Quantitative trait loci(QTLs)controlling quantitative resistance are valuable sources for broad.spectrum and durable disease resistance.Although large numbers of QTLs for bacteriaI blight and blast resistance have been identified.these sources have not been used effectively in rice improvement because of the complex genetic controI of quantitative resistance and because the genes underlying resistance QTLs are unknown.To isolate disease resistance QTLs,we established a candidate gene strategy that integrates linkage map,expression profile,and functionaI complementation analyses.This strategy has proven to be applicable for identifying the genes underlying minor resistance QTLs in rice-Xoo and rice-M grisea systems and it may also help to shed light on disease resistance QTLs of other cereals.Our results also suggest that a single minor QTL can be used in rice improvement by modulating the expression of the gene underlying the QTL.Pyramiding two or three minor QTL genes,whose expression can be managed and that function in different defense signaI transduction pathways,may allow the breeding of rice cultivars that are highly resistant to bacteriaI blight and blast.

  5. ROLE OF UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE DEFORMATION VELOCITY IN THE ANALYSIS OF BLAST-RESISTANT STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓兵; 方秦

    2002-01-01

    The structural deformation velocity plays a significant role in the dynamic calculation of underground blast-resistant structures. The motion differentiating equation of a structure system taking into account the role of deformation velocity of the structure will truthfully describe the actual situation of structural vibration. With the one-dimensional plane wave theory, the expression of load on the structural periphery is developed, and the generalized variation principle for the dynamic analysis of underground arched-bar structures is given. At the same time, the results of the numerical calculation are compared.

  6. Benchmarking of methods for identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacterial whole genome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Philip T. L. C.; Zankari, Ea; Aarestrup, Frank Møller;

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) may be an alternative to phenotypic susceptibility testing for surveillance and clinical diagnosis. However, current bioinformatics methods may be associated with false positives and negatives. In this study, a novel mapping method was developed and benchmarked...... to two different methods in current use for identification of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial WGS data. A novel method, KmerResistance, which examines the co-occurrence of k-mers between the WGS data and a database of resistance genes, was developed. The performance of this method was compared...... with two previously described methods; ResFinder and SRST2, which use an assembly/BLAST method and BWA, respectively, using two datasets with a total of 339 isolates, covering five species, originating from the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust and Danish pig farms. The predicted resistance...

  7. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sekhwal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs, as resistance (R gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens’ resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed.

  8. Differential display of vincristine-resistance-related genes in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Wang; Bo-Rong Pan; Jian-Ping Jin; Dai-Ming Fan; Mei Lan; Yong-Quan Shi; Ju Lu; Yue-Xia Zhong; Han-Ping Wu; Hui-Hong Zai; Jie Ding; Kai-Cun Wu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and clone the vincristine-resistine-relatedgenes in gastric cancer SGC7901 cell line and to clarify themultidrug-resistant molecular mechanism of gastric cancercells.METHODS: The modified differential-display polymerasechain reaction (DD-PCR) was used to examine thedifferences in the mRNA composition of Vincristine-resistantgastric cancer SGC 7901 cells (SGC7901/VCR), induced byvincristine sulfate versus SGC7901cells. The differentiallyexpressed cDNA fragments were confirmed byreverseNorthern analysis, sequencing, BLAST analysis andNorthern bolt analysis.RESULTS: DD-PCR identified that 54 cDNA fragments werepreferentially expressed in SGC 7901/VCR cells. When thesecDNA fragments were analyzed by reverseNorthern blot, 20were reproducibly expressed at a high level in SGC7901/VCR. Sequencing and BLAST analysis revealed that sevenof the genes were known genes: ADP-ribosylation factor 4,cytochrorne oxidase subunit Ⅱ, Ss-A/Ro ribonucleoprteinautoantigen 60kd subunit, ribosomal protein S13, galaectin-8 gene, oligophrenin 1 mRNA, and ribosomal protein L23mRNA; and thirteen of the genes were unknown genes. Thelength and abundance of the four unknown genes mRNAwere further confirmed by Northern blot analysis.CONCLUSION: The twenty differential known and unknowngenes may be related to the vincristine-resistant mechanismin human gastric cancer SGC7901 cell line.

  9. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek, Angela H.A.M. van; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants betw...

  10. Acquired antibiotic resistance genes:an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, A.H. van; Mevius, D.; Guerra, B.; Mullany, P.; Robberts, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance,

  11. Acquired antibiotic resistance genes: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.; Mevius, D.J.; Guerra, B.; Mullany, P.; Roberts, A.P.; Aarts, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance,

  12. Molecular marker assisted gene stacking for biotic and abiotic stress resistance genes in an elite rice cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gitishree; Rao, G J N

    2015-01-01

    Severe yield loss due to various biotic stresses like bacterial blight (BB), gall midge (insect) and Blast (disease) and abiotic stresses like submergence and salinity are a serious constraint to the rice productivity throughout the world. The most effective and reliable method of management of the stresses is the enhancement of host resistance, through an economical and environmentally friendly approach. Through the application of marker assisted selection (MAS) technique, the present study reports a successful pyramidization of genes/QTLs to confer resistance/tolerance to blast (Pi2, Pi9), gall Midge (Gm1, Gm4), submergence (Sub1), and salinity (Saltol) in a released rice variety CRMAS2621-7-1 as Improved Lalat which had already incorporated with three BB resistance genes xa5, xa13, and Xa21 to supplement the Xa4 gene present in Improved Lalat. The molecular analysis revealed clear polymorphism between the donor and recipient parents for all the markers that are tagged to the target traits. The conventional backcross breeding approach was followed till BC3F1 generation and starting from BC1F1 onwards, marker assisted selection was employed at each step to monitor the transfer of the target alleles with molecular markers. The different BC3F1s having the target genes/QTLs were inter crossed to generate hybrids with all 10 stress resistance/tolerance genes/QTLs into a single plant/line. Homozygous plants for resistance/tolerance genes in different combinations were recovered. The BC3F3 lines were characterized for their agronomic and quality traits and promising progeny lines were selected. The SSR based background selection was done. Most of the gene pyramid lines showed a high degree of similarity to the recurrent parent for both morphological, grain quality traits and in SSR based background selection. Out of all the gene pyramids tested, two lines had all the 10 resistance/tolerance genes and showed adequate levels of resistance/tolerance against the five target

  13. Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Metal Resistance Genes in Plasmid Metagenomes from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Dong eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes and metal resistance genes (23 out of a total 23 types on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs than the activated sludge and the digested sludge metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in wastewater treatment plants could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  14. Metagenomic profiling of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in a tannery wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wang

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are often used to prevent sickness and improve production in animal agriculture, and the residues in animal bodies may enter tannery wastewater during leather production. This study aimed to use Illumina high-throughput sequencing to investigate the occurrence, diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of a full-scale tannery wastewater treatment plant (WWTP. Metagenomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated in the WWTP, but the relative abundance of archaea in anaerobic sludge was higher than in aerobic sludge. Sequencing reads from aerobic and anaerobic sludge revealed differences in the abundance of functional genes between both microbial communities. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified in both communities. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB further revealed that aerobic and anaerobic sludge contained various ARGs with high abundance, among which sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 had the highest abundance, occupying over 20% of the total ARGs reads. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet were highly rich in the anaerobic sludge, among which tet33 had the highest abundance, but was absent in aerobic sludge. Over 70 types of insertion sequences were detected in each sludge sample, and class 1 integrase genes were prevalent in the WWTP. The results highlighted prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in tannery WWTPs, which may deserve more public health concerns.

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis and the Expression of Disease-Resistant Genes in Oryza meyeriana under Native Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    Full Text Available Oryza meyeriana (O. meyeriana, with a GG genome type (2n = 24, accumulated plentiful excellent characteristics with respect to resistance to many diseases such as rice shade and blast, even immunity to bacterial blight. It is very important to know if the diseases-resistant genes exist and express in this wild rice under native conditions. However, limited genomic or transcriptomic data of O. meyeriana are currently available. In this study, we present the first comprehensive characterization of the O. meyeriana transcriptome using RNA-seq and obtained 185,323 contigs with an average length of 1,692 bp and an N50 of 2,391 bp. Through differential expression analysis, it was found that there were most tissue-specifically expressed genes in roots, and next to stems and leaves. By similarity search against protein databases, 146,450 had at least a significant alignment to existed gene models. Comparison with the Oryza sativa (japonica-type Nipponbare and indica-type 93-11 genomes revealed that 13% of the O. meyeriana contigs had not been detected in O. sativa. Many diseases-resistant genes, such as bacterial blight resistant, blast resistant, rust resistant, fusarium resistant, cyst nematode resistant and downy mildew gene, were mined from the transcriptomic database. There are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes (Xa1 and Xa26 differentially or specifically expressed in O. meyeriana. The 4 Xa1 contigs were all only expressed in root, while three of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression level in leaves, two of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression profile in stems and one of Xa26 contigs was expressed dominantly in roots. The transcriptomic database of O. meyeriana has been constructed and many diseases-resistant genes were found to express under native condition, which provides a foundation for future discovery of a number of novel genes and provides a basis for studying the molecular mechanisms associated with disease

  16. Identification of rice blast fungal elicitor-responsive genes by differential display analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C Y; Lee, S H; Park, H C; Bae, C G; Cheong, Y H; Choi, Y J; Han, C; Lee, S Y; Lim, C O; Cho, M J

    2000-04-01

    In order to study molecular interactions that occur between rice and rice blast fungus upon infection, we isolated fungal elicitor-responsive genes from rice (Oryza sativa cv. Milyang 117) suspension-cultured cells treated with fungal elicitor prepared from the rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe grisea) employing a method that combined mRNA differential display and cDNA library screening. Data base searches with the isolated cDNA clones revealed that the OsERG1 and OsERG2 cDNAs share significant similarities with the mammalian Ca2+-dependent lipid binding (C2) domains. The OsCPX1 cDNA is highly homologous to peroxidases. The OsHin1 cDNA exhibits homology to the tobacco hin1 gene, whose expression is induced by avirulent pathogens. The OsLPL1 and OsMEK1 cDNAs share homologies with lysophospholipases and serine/threonine mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinases, respectively. The OsWRKY1 and OsEREBP1 cDNAs are homologous to transcription factors, such as the WRKY protein family and the AP2/EREBP family, respectively. Transcripts of the OsERG1, OsHin1, and OsMEK1 genes were specifically elevated only in response to the avirulent race KJ301 of the rice blast fungus. Our study yielded a number of elicitor-responsive genes that will not only provide molecular probes, but also contribute to our understanding of host defense mechanisms against the rice blast fungus.

  17. Expressional and Biochemical Characterization of Rice Disease Resistance Gene Xa3/Xa26 Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songjie Xu; Yinglong Cao; Xianghua Li; Shiping Wang

    2007-01-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) Xa3/Xa26 gene, conferring race-specific resistance to bacterial blight disease and encoding a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinase-like protein, belongs to a multigene family consisting of tandem clustered homologous genes, colocalizing with several uncharacterized genes for resistance to bacterial blight or fungal blast. To provide more information on the expressional and biochemical characteristics of the Xa3/Xa26 family, we analyzed the family members. Four Xa3/Xa26 family members in the indica rice variety Teqing, which carries a bacterial blight resistance gene with a chromosomal location tightly linked to Xa3/Xa26, and five Xa3/Xa26 family members in the japonica rice variety Nipponbare, which carries at least one uncharacterized blast resistance gene, were constitutively expressed in leaf tissue. The result suggests that some of the family members may be candidates of these uncharacterized resistance genes. At least five putative N-glycosylation sites in the LRR domain of XA3/XA26 protein are not glycosylated. The XA3/XA26 and its family members MRKa and MRKc all possess the consensus sequences of paired cysteines, which putatively function in dimerization of the receptor proteins for signal transduction, immediately before the first LRR and immediately after the last LRR. However, no homo-dimer between the XA3/XA26 molecules or hetero-dimer between XA3/XA26 and MRKa or MRKc were formed, indicating that XA3/XA26 protein might function either as a monomer or a hetero-dimer formed with other protein outside of the XA3/XA26 family. These results provide valuable information for further extensive investigation into this multiple protein family.

  18. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  19. Rmg8, a New Gene for Resistance to Triticum Isolates of Pyricularia oryzae in Hexaploid Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh, Vu Lan; Anh, Nguyen Tuan; Tagle, Analiza Grubanzo; Vy, Trinh Thi Phuong; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Takumi, Shigeo; Chuma, Izumi; Tosa, Yukio

    2015-12-01

    Blast, caused by Pyricularia oryzae, is one of the major diseases of wheat in South America. We identified a new gene for resistance to Triticum isolates of P. oryzae in common wheat 'S-615', and designated it "resistance to Magnaporthe grisea 8" (Rmg8). Rmg8 was assigned to chromosome 2B through molecular mapping with simple-sequence repeat markers. To identify an avirulence gene corresponding to Rmg8, Triticum isolate Br48 (avirulent on S-615) was crossed with 200R29 (virulent on S-615), an F1 progeny derived from a cross between an Eleusine isolate (MZ5-1-6) and Br48. Segregation analysis of their progeny revealed that avirulence of Br48 on S-615 was conditioned by a single gene, which was designated AVR-Rmg8. AVR-Rmg8 was closely linked to AVR-Rmg7, which corresponded to Rmg7 located on chromosome 2A of tetraploid wheat.

  20. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is ...

  1. Sequence analysis and expression pattern of MGTA1 gene in rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiao-yu; LIU Xiao-hong; LU Jian-ping; LIN Fu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    MGTA1, a putative fungal Zn(Ⅱ)2Cys6 transcriptional activator-encoding gene, was isolated from rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, which is homologous to CLTA1 from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum with 51% identity at protein level.MGTA1 cassette contains a 2370 bp open reading frame, consisting of 6 exons, coding a 790 amino acid peptide. MGTA1 gene exists as a single copy in genomes of 7 strains of M. grisea, and is expressed in tip hyphae, conidia, and mature appressoria of strain Guy 11.

  2. Variantes somaclonais da cultivar de arroz Bluebelle resistentes à brusone Blast resistant somaclonal variants of rice cultivar Bluebelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Garcês de Araújo

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available A brusone, causada por Pyricularia grisea, constitui fator limitante da produtividade do arroz irrigado, principalmente no Estado do Tocantins. A detecção de variabilidade genética quanto à resistência à brusone em cultivares suscetíveis, como a Bluebelle, considerada uma das cultivares-padrões quanto à qualidade dos grãos, foi o principal objetivo deste trabalho. O procedimento adotado incluiu a indução de calos provenientes de panículas imaturas, regeneração, avaliação e seleção das plantas R2 resistentes à doença. O mesmo procedimento foi utilizado para nova indução de calos e regeneração de plantas a partir de três plantas R2 selecionadas. Foi realizada a avaliação e a seleção de plantas resistentes nas gerações R2 e R4 em viveiro de brusone. Nos testes realizados em casa de vegetação com três isolados coletados da cultivar Metica1, pertencentes aos patótipos IB41 e IB45 de P. grisea, todos os 47 somaclones R6 foram resistentes. Por outro lado, os somaclones apresentaram reações diferenciais frente a cinco isolados provenientes de somaclones da cultivar Bluebelle, e resistência a um isolado proveniente da cultivar Bluebelle, enquanto a cultivar Bluebelle foi suscetível a todos os isolados. Estes resultados indicaram variação genética no que diz respeito à resistência à brusone, na segunda fase de indução de calos e na regeneração de plantas. Dos 47 somaclones R6, 22 apresentaram alto grau de resistência vertical nos testes conduzidos nos viveiros de brusone em quatro locais, e poderão ser utilizados como novas fontes de resistência.Rice blast, caused by Pyricularia grisea, is the major yield constraint in irrigated rice mainly in the State of Tocantins. The detection of genetic variability for blast resistance in susceptible cultivars such as Bluebelle, considered as a standard for superior grain quality, was the main objective of the present investigation. The adopted procedure included

  3. Antibiotic resistance genes in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiang Su

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance and its spread in bacteria are topics of great importance in global research. In this paper, we review recent progress in understanding sources, dissemination, distribution and discovery of novel antibiotics resistance genes (ARGs in the environment. Bacteria exhibiting intrinsic resistance and antibiotic resistant bacteria in feces from humans and animals are the major sources of ARGs occurring in the environment. A variety of novel ARGs have been discovered using functional metagenomics. Recently, the long-term overuse of antibotics in drug therapy and animal husbandry has led to an increase in diversity and abundance of ARGs, causing the environmental dissemination of ARGs in aquatic water, sewage treatmentplants, rivers, sediment and soil. Future research should focus on dissemination mechanisms of ARGs, the discovery of novel ARGs and their resistant mechanisms, and the establishment of environmental risk assessment systems for ARGs.

  4. Multiple translocation of the AVR-Pita effector gene among chromosomes of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and related species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Chuma

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease, a devastating problem worldwide. This fungus has caused breakdown of resistance conferred by newly developed commercial cultivars. To address how the rice blast fungus adapts itself to new resistance genes so quickly, we examined chromosomal locations of AVR-Pita, a subtelomeric gene family corresponding to the Pita resistance gene, in various isolates of M. oryzae (including wheat and millet pathogens and its related species. We found that AVR-Pita (AVR-Pita1 and AVR-Pita2 is highly variable in its genome location, occurring in chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and supernumerary chromosomes, particularly in rice-infecting isolates. When expressed in M. oryzae, most of the AVR-Pita homologs could elicit Pita-mediated resistance, even those from non-rice isolates. AVR-Pita was flanked by a retrotransposon, which presumably contributed to its multiple translocation across the genome. On the other hand, family member AVR-Pita3, which lacks avirulence activity, was stably located on chromosome 7 in a vast majority of isolates. These results suggest that the diversification in genome location of AVR-Pita in the rice isolates is a consequence of recognition by Pita in rice. We propose a model that the multiple translocation of AVR-Pita may be associated with its frequent loss and recovery mediated by its transfer among individuals in asexual populations. This model implies that the high mobility of AVR-Pita is a key mechanism accounting for the rapid adaptation toward Pita. Dynamic adaptation of some fungal plant pathogens may be achieved by deletion and recovery of avirulence genes using a population as a unit of adaptation.

  5. Influence of Gas Composition on the Resisting Ability of Gunning Material for Blast Furnace to Carbon Monoxide Corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lihong; LIU Liu; GUO Yanling; CAO Feng; MENG Qingmin; LONG Shigang

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the resisting ability of gunning material for blast furnace to carbon monoxide corrosion under the mixed gas condition through inletting hydrogen into pure CO.A standard for testing the resisting ability of refractory to Co corrosion with mixed gas instead of pure CO has also been discussed. The results show:the addition of hydrogen accelerates the CO corrosion on gunning material;the same results has been reached with the CO,200 hours to test the resisting ability of refractory to carbon monoxide corrosion.

  6. Modern elite rice varieties of the 'Green Revolution' have retained a large introgression from wild rice around the Pi33 rice blast resistance locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballini, Elsa; Berruyer, Romain; Morel, Jean-Benoît; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Nottéghem, Jean-Loup; Tharreau, Didier

    2007-01-01

    During the breeding process of cultivated crops, resistance genes to pests and diseases are commonly introgressed from wild species. The size of these introgressions is predicted by theoretical models but has rarely been measured in cultivated varieties. By combining resistance tests with isogenic strains, genotyping and sequencing of different rice accessions, it was shown that, in the elite rice variety IR64, the resistance conferring allele of the rice blast resistance gene Pi33 was introgressed from the wild rice Oryza rufipogon (accession IRGC101508). Further characterization of this introgression revealed a large introgression at this locus in IR64 and the related variety IR36. The introgressed fragment represents approximately half of the short arm of rice chromosome 8. This is the first report of a large introgression in a cultivated variety of rice. Such a large introgression is likely to have been maintained during backcrossing only if a selection pressure was exerted on this genomic region. The possible traits that were selected are discussed.

  7. Characterization of Wheat Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Markers Associated with the H11 Hessian Fly Resistance Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dhia Bouktila; Maha Mezghani; Mohamed Marrakchi; Hanem Makni

    2006-01-01

    In Tunisia, the Hessian fly Mayetiola destructor Say is a major pest of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.)and bread wheat (T. aestivum L.). Genetic resistance is the most efficient and economical method of control of this pest. To date, 31 resistance genes, designated H1-H31, have been identified in wheat. These genes condition resistance to the insect genes responsible for virulence. Using wheat cultivars differing for the presence of an individual Hessian fly resistance gene and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis,we have identified a polymorphic 386-bp DNA marker (Xgmib1-1A.1) associated with the H11 Hessian fly resistance gene. Blast analysis showed a high identity with a short region in the wild wheat (T. monococcum)genome, adjacent to the leaf rust resistance Lr10 gene. A genetic linkage was reported between this gene (Lr10) and Hessian fly response in wheat. These data were used for screening Hessian fly resistance in Tunisian wheat germplasm. Xgmib1-1A.1-like fragments were detected in four Tunisian durum and bread wheat varieties. Using these varieties in Hessian fly breeding programs in Tunisia would be of benefit in reducing the damage caused by this fly.

  8. Enhancing rice resistance to fungal pathogens by transformation with cell wall degrading enzyme genes from Trichoderma atroviride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Mei (刘梅); SUN Zong-xiu (孙宗修); ZHU Jie (朱洁); XU Tong (徐同); HARMAN Gary E.; LORITO Matteo

    2004-01-01

    Three genes encoding for fungal cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs), ech42, nag70 and gluc78 from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride were inserted into the binary vector pCAMBIA1305.2 singly and in all possible combinations and transformed to rice plants. More than 1800 independently regenerated plantlets in seven different populations (for each of the three genes and each of the four gene combinations) were obtained. The ech42 gene encoding for an endochitinase increased resistance to sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani, while the exochitinase-encoding gene, nag70, had lesser effect. The expression level of endochitinase but exochitinase was correlated with disease resistance. Nevertheless, exochitinase enhanced the effect of endochitinase on disease resistance when the two genes co-expressed in transgenics. Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea was found in all kinds of regenerated plants including that with single gluc78. A few lines expressing either ech42 or nag70 gene were immune to the disease. Transgenic plants are being tested to further evaluate disease resistance at field level. This is the first report of multiple of expression of genes encoding CWDEs from Trichoderma atroviride that result in resistance to blast and sheath blight in rice.

  9. A set of vectors for introduction of antibiotic resistance genes by in vitro Cre-mediated recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassetzky Yegor S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introduction of new antibiotic resistance genes in the plasmids of interest is a frequent task in molecular cloning practice. Classical approaches involving digestion with restriction endonucleases and ligation are time-consuming. Findings We have created a set of insertion vectors (pINS carrying genes that provide resistance to various antibiotics (puromycin, blasticidin and G418 and containing a loxP site. Each vector (pINS-Puro, pINS-Blast or pINS-Neo contains either a chloramphenicol or a kanamycin resistance gene and is unable to replicate in most E. coli strains as it contains a conditional R6Kγ replication origin. Introduction of the antibiotic resistance genes into the vector of interest is achieved by Cre-mediated recombination between the replication-incompetent pINS and a replication-competent target vector. The recombination mix is then transformed into E. coli and selected by the resistance marker (kanamycin or chloramphenicol present in pINS, which allows to recover the recombinant plasmids with 100% efficiency. Conclusion Here we propose a simple strategy that allows to introduce various antibiotic-resistance genes into any plasmid containing a replication origin, an ampicillin resistance gene and a loxP site.

  10. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Andrew J.; William, H. Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K. Peter; Kelly, James D.; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co–4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co–4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co–4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK–4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co–4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases. PMID:26431031

  11. Tailor-made TALEN system for highly efficient targeted gene replacement in the rice blast fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazoe, Takayuki; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Kennosuke; Yamato, Tohru; Ohsato, Shuichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Arie, Tsutomu; Kuwata, Shigeru

    2015-07-01

    Genetic manipulation is key to unraveling gene functions and creating genetically modified strains of microbial organisms. Recently, engineered nucleases that can generate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at a specific site in the desired locus within genome are utilized in a rapidly developing genome editing technology via DSBs repair. However, the use of engineered nucleases in filamentous fungi has not been validated. In this study, we demonstrated that tailor-made transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) system, Platinum-Fungal TALENs (PtFg TALENs), could improve the efficiency of homologous recombination-mediated targeted gene replacement by up to 100% in the rice blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae. This high-efficiency PtFg TALEN has great potential for basic and applied biological applications in filamentous fungi.

  12. Organization of a resistance gene cluster linked to rhizomania resistance in sugar beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic resistance to rhizomania has been in use for over 40 years. Characterization of the molecular basis for susceptibility and resistance has proved challenging. Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NB-LRR) genes have been implicated in numerous gene-for-gene resistance interaction...

  13. Cell-specific modulation of drug resistance in acute myeloid leukemic blasts by diphtheria fusion toxin, DT388-GMCSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, A E; Hall, P D; McLain, C; Safa, A R; Tagge, E P; Kreitman, R J

    1998-01-01

    Radiochemotherapy-resistant blasts commonly cause treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and their resistance is due, in part, to overexpression of multidrug resistance (mdr) proteins. We reasoned that targeted delivery of protein synthesis inactivating toxins to leukemic blasts would reduce the cellular concentrations of relatively short half-life resistance proteins and sensitize the cells to cytotoxic drugs. To test this hypothesis, we employed human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor fused to truncated diphtheria toxin (DT388-GMCSF). The human AML cell line HL60 and its vincristine-resistant sublines, HL60Vinc and HL60VCR, were incubated in vitro for 24 h with varying concentrations of toxin. Doxorubicin was added for an additional 24 h, and cell cytotoxicity was assayed by thymidine incorporation and colony formation in semisolid medium. DT388-GMCSF sensitized HL60Vinc and HL60VCR but not HL60 to doxorubicin. Combination indices for three log cell kill varied from 0.2 to 0.3. In contrast, pretreatment with doxorubicin followed by toxins failed to show synergy. At least in the case of the vincristine-resistant cell lines, modulation of drug resistance correlated with reduction in membrane P-glycoprotein concentrations based on immunoblots with C219 antibody, flow cytometry with MRK16 antibody, and cell uptake of doxorubicin. These observations suggest clinical trials of combination therapy may be warranted in patients with refractory AML. Further, targeted toxins may represent a novel class of cell-specific modulators of drug resistance for a number of malignancies.

  14. Evaluation of Blast-Resistant Performance Predicted by Damaged Plasticity Model for Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAN Yi; FANG Qin; CHEN Li; ZHANG Yadong

    2008-01-01

    In order to evaluate the capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) structures subjected to blast Ioadings, the damaged plasticity model for concrete was used in the analysis of the dynamic responses of blast-loaded RC structures, and all three failure modes were numerically simulated by the finite element software ABAQUS.Simulation results agree with the experimental observations.It is demonstrated that the damaged plasticity model for concrete in the finite element software ABAQUS can predict dynamic responses and typical flexure, flexure-shear and direct shear failure modes of the blast-loaded RC structures.

  15. Genetic characteristics of vancomycin resistance gene cluster in Enterococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunhui, Chen; Xiaogang, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci has become an important nosocomial pathogen since it is discovered in late 1980s. The products, encoded by vancomycin resistant gene cluster in enterococci, catalyze the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors with low affinity with glycopeptide antibiotics including vancomycin and teicoplanin and lead to resistance. These vancomycin resistant gene clusters are classified into nine types according to their gene sequences and organization, or D-Ala:D-Lac (VanA, VanB, VanD and VanM) and D-Ala:D-Ser (VanC, VanE, VanG, VanL and VanN) ligase gene clusters based on the differences of their encoded ligases. Moreover, these gene clusters are characterized by their different resistance levels and infection models. In this review, we summarize the classification, gene organization and infection model of vancomycin resistant gene cluster in Enterococcus spp.

  16. Major gene for field stem rust resistance co-locates with resistance gene Sr12 in "Thatcher" wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effecting stem rust resistance genes. "Thatcher" wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was ...

  17. Cultivation of Hard-To-Culture Subsurface Mercury-Resistant Bacteria and Discovery of New merA Gene Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Zawadsky, C.; Binnerup, Svend Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Mercury-resistant bacteria may be important players in mercury biogeochemistry. To assess the potential for mercury reduction by two subsurface microbial communities, resistant subpopulations and their merA genes were characterized by a combined molecular and cultivation-dependent approach...... was increased up to 2,800 times and numbers of mCFU were similar to the total number of mercury-resistant bacteria in the soils. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of DNA extracted from membranes suggested stimulation of growth of hard-to-culture bacteria during the preincubation. A total of 25...... of the sequences did not result in a match in the BLAST search. The results illustrate the power of integrating advanced cultivation methodology with molecular techniques for the characterization of the diversity of mercury-resistant populations and assessing the potential for mercury reduction in contaminated...

  18. Research Progress of Induced Resistance against Rice Blast and Its Resistance Mechanisms%诱导水稻抗瘟性及诱抗机理研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡能; 涂国全; 黄林

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast is the most harmful rice disease among three major rice diseases. Induced resistance against rice blast will play an important role in the control of rice blast for its following characteristics:persistence, broad spectrum, safety, systemic,etc. Recent researches on induced resistance against rice blast, the biotic and abiotic induced resistance elicitors, and resistance mechanisms were introduced in this paper. Existing problems about the research and its development direction about induced resistance against rice blast in the future were also discussed.%稻瘟病是危害水稻三大病害之首,水稻稻瘟病诱导抗病性具有持久性、广谱性、安全性、系统性等而对未来水稻稻瘟病的防治发挥巨大的作用。综述近年来国内外水稻诱导抗瘟性的研究进展,对生物及非生物诱导因子和诱导机理的三个方面进行了介绍,并提出对现在一些研究不足以及未来的发展方向。

  19. Analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae genome reveals a fungal effector, which is able to induce resistance response in transgenic rice line containing resistance gene, Pi54

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soham Ray

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most important diseases of rice. Pi54, a rice gene that imparts resistance to M. oryzae isolates prevalent in India, was already cloned but its avirulent counterpart in the pathogen was not known.. After decoding the whole genome of an avirulent isolate of M. oryzae, we predicted 11440 protein coding genes and then identified four candidate effector proteins which are exclusively expressed in the infectious structure, appresoria. In silico protein modeling followed by interaction analysis between Pi54 protein model and selected four candidate effector proteins models revealed that Mo-01947_9 protein model encoded by a gene located at chromosome 4 of M. oryzae, interacted best at the Leucine Rich Repeat domain of Pi54 protein model. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis showed that Mo-01947_9 protein physically interacts with Pi54 protein. Nicotiana benthamiana leaf infiltration assay confirmed induction of hypersensitive response in the presence of Pi54 gene in a heterologous system. Genetic complementation test also proved that Mo-01947_9 protein induces avirulence response in the pathogen in the presence of Pi54 gene. Here, we report identification and cloning of a new fungal effector gene which interacts with resistance gene Pi54 gene in rice.

  20. Analysis of plasmid genes by phylogenetic profiling and visualization of homology relationships using Blast2Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazzicalupo Marco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic methods are well-established bioinformatic tools for sequence analysis, allowing to describe the non-independencies of sequences because of their common ancestor. However, the evolutionary profiles of bacterial genes are often complicated by hidden paralogy and extensive and/or (multiple horizontal gene transfer (HGT events which make bifurcating trees often inappropriate. In this context, plasmid sequences are paradigms of network-like relationships characterizing the evolution of prokaryotes. Actually, they can be transferred among different organisms allowing the dissemination of novel functions, thus playing a pivotal role in prokaryotic evolution. However, the study of their evolutionary dynamics is complicated by the absence of universally shared genes, a prerequisite for phylogenetic analyses. Results To overcome such limitations we developed a bioinformatic package, named Blast2Network (B2N, allowing the automatic phylogenetic profiling and the visualization of homology relationships in a large number of plasmid sequences. The software was applied to the study of 47 completely sequenced plasmids coming from Escherichia, Salmonella and Shigella spps. Conclusion The tools implemented by B2N allow to describe and visualize in a new way some of the evolutionary features of plasmid molecules of Enterobacteriaceae; in particular it helped to shed some light on the complex history of Escherichia, Salmonella and Shigella plasmids and to focus on possible roles of unannotated proteins. The proposed methodology is general enough to be used for comparative genomic analyses of bacteria.

  1. Detection of the common resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria using gene chip technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Ting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To design a resistance gene detection chip that could, in parallel, detect common clinical drug resistance genes of Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Seventy clinically significant Gram-negative bacilli (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii were collected. According to the known resistance gene sequences, we designed and synthesized primers and probes, which were used to prepare resistance gene detection chips, and finally we hybridized and scanned the gene detection chips. Results: The results between the gene chip and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were compared. The rate was consistently 100% in the eight kinds of resistance genes tested (TEM, SHV, CTX-M, DHA, CIT, VIM, KPC, OXA-23. One strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa had the IMP, but it was not found by gene chip. Conclusion: The design of Gram-negative bacteria-resistant gene detection chip had better application value.

  2. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  3. Antibiotic resistance gene discovery in food-producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Heather K

    2014-06-01

    Numerous environmental reservoirs contribute to the widespread antibiotic resistance problem in human pathogens. One environmental reservoir of particular importance is the intestinal bacteria of food-producing animals. In this review I examine recent discoveries of antibiotic resistance genes in agricultural animals. Two types of antibiotic resistance gene discoveries will be discussed: the use of classic microbiological and molecular techniques, such as culturing and PCR, to identify known genes not previously reported in animals; and the application of high-throughput technologies, such as metagenomics, to identify novel genes and gene transfer mechanisms. These discoveries confirm that antibiotics should be limited to prudent uses.

  4. Identification of genes contributing to quantitative disease resistance in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of quantitative disease resistance during a plant’s life, little is known about the molecular basis of this type of host-pathogen interaction, because most of the genes underlying resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are unknown. To identify genes contributing to resistance QTLs in rice, we analyzed the colocalization of a set of characterized rice defense-responsive genes and resistance QTLs against different pathogens. We also examined the expression patterns of these genes in response to pathogen infection in the parents of the mapping populations, based on the strategy of validation and functional analysis of the QTLs. The results suggest that defense-responsive genes are important resources of resistance QTLs in rice. OsWRKY45-1 is the gene contributing to a major resistance QTL.NRR,OsGH3-1,and OsGLP members on chromosome 8 contribute alone or collectively to different minor resistance QTLs. These genes function in a basal resistance pathway or in major disease resistance gene-mediated race-specific pathways.

  5. Horizontal gene transfer—emerging multidrug resistance in hospital bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SenkaDZIDIC; VladimirBEDEKOVIC

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and spectrum of antibiotic resistant infections have increased worldwide during the past few decades. This increase has been attributed to a combination of microbial characteristics, the selective pressure of antimicrobial use, and social and technical changes that enhance the transmission of resistant organisms. The resistance is acquired by mutational changer or by the acquisition of resistance-encoding genetic material which is transfered from another bacteria. The spread of antibiotic resistance genes may be causally related to the overuse of antibiotics in human health care and in animal feeds, increased use of invasive devices and procedures, a greater number of susceptible hosts, and lapses in infection control practices leading to increased transmission of resistant organisms. The resistance gene sequences are integrated by recombination into several classes of naturally occurring gene expression cassettes and disseminated within the microbial population by horizontal gene transfer mechanisms: transformation, conjugation or transduction. In the hospital, widespread use of antimicrobials in the intensive care units (ICU) and for immunocompromised patients has resulted in the selection of multidrug-resistant organisms. Methicilin-resistant Staphylococci, vancomycin resistant Enterococci and extended-spectrum betalactamase(ESBL) producing Gram negative bacilli are identified as major phoblem in nosocomial infections. Recent surveillance studies have demonstrated trend towares more seriously ill patients suffering from multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections. Emergence of multiresistant bacteria and spread of resistance genes should enforce the aplication of strict prevention strategies, including changes in antibiotic treatment regimens, hygiene measures, infection prevention and control of horizontal nosocomial transmission of organisms.

  6. Evaluation of RNA extraction methods in rice and their application in expression analysis of resistance genes against Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Azizi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of RNA of high quality and integrity is essential for gene expression studies and all downstream RNA-based techniques. The leaves of 16 merit Malaysian rice varieties were used to isolate total RNA using five different methods. The quantity, quality and integrity of extracted RNA were confirmed using three different means. The ratios of A260/280 ranged from 2.12 to 2.20. Electrophoresis (1.5% agarose gel was performed, illustrating intact and sharp bands representing the 28S, 18S, 5.8S and 5S ribosomal subunits of RNA, presenting intact RNA. RNA quality was verified using semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (sqPCR. The objective of this study was to identify different genes involved in the resistance of rice plants using high-quality RNA extracted 31 h after inoculation of Magnaporthe oryzae pathotype P7.2. The expression levels of eight blast resistance genes, Pikh, Pib, Pita, Pi21, Pi9, Os11gRGA8, OsWRKY22 and OsWRKY45, were evaluated by real-time PCR (RT-PCR. Real-time PCR was performed to identify candidate genes using RNA extracted by the TRIzol method, which showed the highest score compared with other methods in terms of RNA quantity, purity and integrity. In addition, the results of real-time PCR confirmed that the up-regulation of seven blast resistance genes may confer stronger resistance for the MR 276 variety against M. oryzae pathotype P7.2.

  7. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia;

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated...

  8. Occurrence of integrons and resistance genes among sulphonamide-resistant Shigella spp. from Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peirano, G.; Agersø, Yvonne; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the occurrence of class 1 and 2 integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes among sulphonamide-resistant Shigella strains isolated in Brazil during 1999-2003. Methods: Sixty-two Shigella (Shigella flexneri, n = 47 and Shigella sonnei, n = 15) were tested against 21....... Conclusions: The detection of class 1 and 2 integrons and additional antimicrobial resistance genes allowed us to identify the most frequent antimicrobial resistance patterns of Shigella spp. isolated in Brazil....

  9. The tomato I-3 gene: a novel gene for resistance to Fusarium wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lim, Ginny T T; Jones, David A

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance proteins provide race-specific immunity through the recognition of pathogen effectors. The resistance genes I, I-2 and I-3 have been incorporated into cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) from wild tomato species to confer resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) races 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Although the Fol effectors corresponding to these resistance genes have all been identified, only the I-2 resistance gene has been isolated from tomato. To isolate the I-3 resistance gene, we employed a map-based cloning approach and used transgenic complementation to test candidate genes for resistance to Fol race 3. Here, we describe the fine mapping and sequencing of genes at the I-3 locus, which revealed a family of S-receptor-like kinase (SRLK) genes. Transgenic tomato lines were generated with three of these SRLK genes and one was found to confer Avr3-dependent resistance to Fol race 3, confirming it to be I-3. The finding that I-3 encodes an SRLK reveals a new pathway for Fol resistance and a new class of resistance genes, of which Pi-d2 from rice is also a member. The identification of I-3 also allows the investigation of the complex effector-resistance protein interaction involving Avr1-mediated suppression of I-2- and I-3-dependent resistance in tomato.

  10. Blast fungus-induction and developmental and tissuespecific expression of a rice P450 CYP72A gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yaling; LI Qun; HE Zuhua

    2004-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 gene superfamily is widely involved in diverse processes of plant development and environmental responses including defense response to pathogens. We previously isolated a rice cDNA fragment in a DD-PCR screening for blast fungus-induced genes. In the current study, we isolated a CYP72A gene cluster consisting of 7 P450 CYP72A genes (CYP72A17~23) with the conserved cDNA sequence through the public rice genome data. There are total 14 putative CYP72A members in the rice genome, with high diversity at N-terminal sequences while high homology at C-terminal sequences of those 14 putative proteins. We analyzed expression profiles of the cloned 7 CYP72A genes during pathogen infection and development. The results showed that expression of CYP72A18, 19, 22 and 23 was differentially regulated in the incompatible and compatible interactions between rice and blast fungus. Except CYP72A20, a pseudogene, other 6 CYP72A genes also exhibited temporal and spatial expression patterns, respectively. These findings provide fundamental data for rice P450 gene function analysis.

  11. The Vf gene for scrab resistance in apple is linked to sub-lethal genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Z.S.; Weg, van de W.E.

    2006-01-01

    V f is the most widely used resistance gene in the breeding for scab resistant apple cultivars. Distorted segregation ratios for V f -resistance have frequently been reported. Here we revealed that sub-lethal genes caused the distorted segregation. The inheritance of V f was examined in six progenie

  12. Resistance of Concrete Masonry Walls With Membrane Catcher Systems Subjected to Blast Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    effectiveness of systems comprised of polymers, composites, geotextiles , and thin steel and aluminum sheets has been researched extensively over the past...secondary debris resulting from blast pressure, and the effectiveness of systems comprising polymers, composites, geotextiles , and thin steel and aluminum...wall structure undergoes large transient displacements. Initially, relatively stiff composite laminates and geotextiles were investigated, including

  13. Constraint-based Hybrid Cellular Automaton Topology Optimization for Advanced Lightweight Blast Resistant Structure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    the desired model. 20 5. References 1. Goetz, J. C.; Tan, H.; Renaud, J. E.; Tovar , A. Structural Topology Optimization for Blast Mitigation...Stander, N. A Topology Optimization Tool for LS-DYNA Users: LS- OPT/Topology. The 7th European LS-DYNA Conference, 2009. 10. Tovar , A.; Patel, N

  14. Sponge microbiota are a reservoir of functional antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Versluis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wide application of antibiotics has contributed to the evolution of multi-drug resistant human pathogens, resulting in poorer treatment outcomes for infections. In the marine environment, seawater samples have been investigated as a resistance reservoir; however, no studies have methodically examined sponges as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance. Sponges could be important in this respect because they often contain diverse microbial communities that have the capacity to produce bioactive metabolites. Here, we applied functional metagenomics to study the presence and diversity of functional resistance genes in the sponges Aplysina aerophoba, Petrosia ficiformis and Corticium candelabrum. We obtained 37 insert sequences facilitating resistance to D-cycloserine (n=6, gentamicin (n=1, amikacin (n=7, trimethoprim (n=17, chloramphenicol (n=1, rifampicin (n=2 and ampicillin (n=3. Fifteen of 37 inserts harboured resistance genes that shared <90% amino acid identity with known gene products, whereas on 13 inserts no resistance gene could be identified with high confidence, in which case we predicted resistance to be mainly mediated by antibiotic efflux. One marine-specific ampicillin-resistance-conferring β-lactamase was identified in the genus Pseudovibrio with 41% global amino acid identity to the closest β-lactamase with demonstrated functionality, and subsequently classified into a new family termed PSV. Taken together, our results show that sponge microbiota host diverse and novel resistance genes that may be harnessed by phylogenetically distinct bacteria.

  15. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  16. Associations between Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes, Antimicrobial Resistance Genes, and Virulence Genes of Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Healthy Grow-Finish Pigs ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli often carries linked antimicrobial resistance genes on transmissible genetic elements. Through coselection, antimicrobial use may select for unrelated but linked resistance or virulence genes. This study used unconditional statistical associations to investigate the relationships between antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and antimicrobial resistance genes in 151 E. coli isolates from healthy pigs. Phenotypic resistance to each drug was significantly associated with phenotyp...

  17. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  18. Computational gene network study on antibiotic resistance genes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, P; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-05-01

    Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major threats for emerging nosocomial infections in hospital environment. Multidrug-resistance in A. baumannii may be due to the implementation of multi-combination resistance mechanisms such as β-lactamase synthesis, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs) changes, alteration in porin proteins and in efflux pumps against various existing classes of antibiotics. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes are involved in MDR. These resistance genes are transferred through plasmids, which are responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. In addition, these resistance genes may also have a tendency to interact with each other or with their gene products. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of these interactions in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Hence, our study focuses on protein and gene network analysis on various resistance genes, to elucidate the role of the interacting proteins and to study their functional contribution towards antibiotic resistance. From the search tool for the retrieval of interacting gene/protein (STRING), a total of 168 functional partners for 15 resistance genes were extracted based on the confidence scoring system. The network study was then followed up with functional clustering of associated partners using molecular complex detection (MCODE). Later, we selected eight efficient clusters based on score. Interestingly, the associated protein we identified from the network possessed greater functional similarity with known resistance genes. This network-based approach on resistance genes of A. baumannii could help in identifying new genes/proteins and provide clues on their association in antibiotic resistance.

  19. Exploiting natural variation to identify insect-resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekgaarden, Colette; Snoeren, Tjeerd A L; Dicke, Marcel; Vosman, Ben

    2011-10-01

    Herbivorous insects are widespread and often serious constraints to crop production. The use of insect-resistant crops is a very effective way to control insect pests in agriculture, and the development of such crops can be greatly enhanced by knowledge on plant resistance mechanisms and the genes involved. Plants have evolved diverse ways to cope with insect attack that has resulted in natural variation for resistance towards herbivorous insects. Studying the molecular genetics and transcriptional background of this variation has facilitated the identification of resistance genes and processes that lead to resistance against insects. With the development of new technologies, molecular studies are not restricted to model plants anymore. This review addresses the need to exploit natural variation in resistance towards insects to increase our knowledge on resistance mechanisms and the genes involved. We will discuss how this knowledge can be exploited in breeding programmes to provide sustainable crop protection against insect pests. Additionally, we discuss the current status of genetic research on insect-resistance genes. We conclude that insect-resistance mechanisms are still unclear at the molecular level and that exploiting natural variation with novel technologies will contribute greatly to the development of insect-resistant crop varieties.

  20. Combination Patterns of Major R Genes Determine the Level of Resistance to the M. oryzae in Rice (Oryza sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunyu Wu

    Full Text Available Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is the most devastating disease of rice and poses a serious threat to world food security. In this study, the distribution and effectiveness of 18 R genes in 277 accessions were investigated based on pathogenicity assays and molecular markers. The results showed that most of the accessions exhibited some degree of resistance (resistance frequency, RF >50%. Accordingly, most of the accessions were observed to harbor two or more R genes, and the number of R genes harbored in accessions was significantly positively correlated with RF. Some R genes were demonstrated to be specifically distributed in the genomes of rice sub-species, such as Pigm, Pi9, Pi5 and Pi1, which were only detected in indica-type accessions, and Pik and Piz, which were just harbored in japonica-type accessions. By analyzing the relationship between R genes and RF using a multiple stepwise regression model, the R genes Pid3, Pi5, Pi9, Pi54, Pigm and Pit were found to show the main effects against M. oryzae in indica-type accessions, while Pita, Pb1, Pik, Pizt and Pia were indicated to exhibit the main effects against M. oryzae in japonica-type accessions. Principal component analysis (PCA and cluster analysis revealed that combination patterns of major R genes were the main factors determining the resistance of rice varieties to M. oryzae, such as 'Pi9+Pi54', 'Pid3+Pigm', 'Pi5+Pid3+Pigm', 'Pi5+Pi54+Pid3+Pigm', 'Pi5+Pid3' and 'Pi5+Pit+Pid3' in indica-type accessions and 'Pik+Pib', 'Pik+Pita', 'Pik+Pb1', 'Pizt+Pia' and 'Pizt+Pita' in japonica-type accessions, which were able to confer effective resistance against M. oryzae. The above results provide good theoretical support for the rational utilization of combinations of major R genes in developing rice cultivars with broad-spectrum resistance.

  1. Adenovirus-mediated human β-nerve growth factor gene transfer has a protective effect on cochlear spiral ganglion after blast exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether adenovirus-mediated human β-nerve growth factor (Ad-hNGFβ) gene has any protective effect on blast hearing impairment. Methods:Deafness was induced by blast exposure (172. 0 dB) in 30 healthy guinea pigs. On day 7 of blast exposure, Ad-hNGFβ was infused into the perilymphatic space of 20 animals as the study group (hNGFβ group), and artificial perilymph fluid (APF) was infused into the perilymphatic space of the other 10 animals as the control group. At weeks 1, 4 and 8 after blast exposure, the animals were sacrificed and the cochleae were removed for immunohis-tochemical and HE stainings. Results: Expression of Ad-hNGFβ protein was detected in each turn of the cochlea at the 1st week, with almost equal intensity in all turns. At the 4th week, the reactive intensity of the expression of Ad-hNGFβ protein decreased. At the 8th week, no expression was detectable. The results of HE staining showed that the amount of spiral ganglions in hNGFβ group was significantly greater than that of the control group at week 4 (F<0. 01). Conclusion: Ad-hNGFβ can be expressed at a high level and for a relatively long period in the blast impaired cochlea, suggesting that Ad-hNGFβ has a protective effect on cochlear spiral ganglion cells after blast exposure and the efficient gene transfer into cochlea had been achieved without toxicity.

  2. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  3. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  4. Mapping of the apple scab-resistance gene Vb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdin, N; Tartarini, S; Broggini, G A L; Gennari, F; Sansavini, S; Gessler, C; Patocchi, A

    2006-10-01

    Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is the major production constraint in temperate zones with humid springs. Normally, its control relies on frequent and regular fungicide applications. Because this control strategy has come under increasing criticism, major efforts are being directed toward the breeding of scab-resistant apple cultivars. Modern apple breeding programs include the use of molecular markers, making it possible to combine several different scab-resistance genes in 1 apple cultivar (pyramiding) and to speed up the breeding process. The apple scab-resistance gene Vb is derived from the Siberian crab apple 'Hansen's baccata #2', and is 1 of the 6 "historical" major apple scab-resistance genes (Vf, Va, Vr, Vbj, Vm, and Vb). Molecular markers have been published for all these genes, except Vr. In testcross experiments conducted in the 1960s, it was reported that Vb segregated independently from 3 other major resistance genes, including Vf. Recently, however, Vb and Vf have both been mapped on linkage group 1, a result that contrasts with the findings from former testcross experiments. In this study, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to identify the precise position of Vb in a cross of 'Golden Delicious' (vbvb) and 'Hansen's baccata #2' (Vbvb). A genome scanning approach, a fast method already used to map apple scab-resistance genes Vr2 and Vm, was used, and the Vb locus was identified on linkage group 12, between the SSR markers Hi02d05 and Hi07f01. This finding confirms the independent segregation of Vb from Vf. With the identification of SSR markers linked to Vb, another major apple scab-resistance gene has become available; breeders can use it to develop durable resistant cultivars with several different resistance genes.

  5. Studies on the corrosion resistance of reinforced steel in concrete with ground granulated blast-furnace slag--An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ha-Won; Saraswathy, Velu

    2006-11-16

    The partial replacement of clinker, the main constituent of ordinary Portland cement by pozzolanic or latent hydraulic industrial by-products such as ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), effectively lowers the cost of cement by saving energy in the production process. It also reduces CO2 emissions from the cement plant and offers a low priced solution to the environmental problem of depositing industrial wastes. The utilization of GGBFS as partial replacement of Portland cement takes advantage of economic, technical and environmental benefits of this material. Recently offshore, coastal and marine concrete structures were constructed using GGBFS concrete because high volume of GGBFS can contribute to the reduction of chloride ingress. In this paper, the influence of using GGBFS in reinforced concrete structures from the durability aspects such as chloride ingress and corrosion resistance, long term durability, microstructure and porosity of GGBFS concrete has been reviewed and discussed.

  6. Differential Expression of Salinity Resistance Gene on Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Salinity resistance and differential gene expression associated with salinity in cotton germplasm were studied,because of the large scale area of salinity in China,and its significant negative effects on

  7. Genes for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic in tropical pumpkin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachner, Martin; Paris, Harry S; Lelley, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Four cultigens of Cucurbita moschata resistant to zucchini yellow mosaic virus were crossed with the susceptible 'Waltham Butternut' and with each other in order to clarify the mode of inheritance of resistance and relationships among the genes involved. Five loci were segregating, with genes for resistance Zym-0 and Zym-4 carried by 'Nigerian Local' and one of them also carried by 'Nicklow's Delight,' Zym-1 carried by 'Menina,' and zym-6 carried by 'Soler.' A recessive gene carried by 'Waltham Butternut,' zym-5, is complementary with the dominant Zym-4 of 'Nigerian Local,' that is, the resistance conferred by Zym-4 is only expressed in zym-5/zym-5 individuals. Gene zym-6 appears to be linked to either Zym-0 or Zym-4, and it is also possible that Zym-1 is linked to one of them as well.

  8. Apple contains receptor-like genes homologous to the Cladosporium fulvum resistance gene family of tomato with a cluster of genes cosegregating with Vf apple scab resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatzer, B A; Patocchi, A; Gianfranceschi, L; Tartarini, S; Zhang, H B; Gessler, C; Sansavini, S

    2001-04-01

    Scab caused by the fungal pathogen Venturia inaequalis is the most common disease of cultivated apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.). Monogenic resistance against scab is found in some small-fruited wild Malus species and has been used in apple breeding for scab resistance. Vf resistance of Malus floribunda 821 is the most widely used scab resistance source. Because breeding a high-quality cultivar in perennial fruit trees takes dozens of years, cloning disease resistance genes and using them in the transformation of high-quality apple varieties would be advantageous. We report the identification of a cluster of receptor-like genes with homology to the Cladosporium fulvum (Cf) resistance gene family of tomato on bacterial artificial chromosome clones derived from the Vf scab resistance locus. Three members of the cluster were sequenced completely. Similar to the Cf gene family of tomato, the deduced amino acid sequences coded by these genes contain an extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain and a transmembrane domain. The transcription of three members of the cluster was determined by reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction to be constitutive, and the transcription and translation start of one member was verified by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. We discuss the parallels between Cf resistance of tomato and Vf resistance of apple and the possibility that one of the members of the gene cluster is the Vf gene. Cf homologs from other regions of the apple genome also were identified and are likely to present other scab resistance genes.

  9. Occurrence and reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seveno, N.; Kallifidas, D.; Smalla, K.; Elsas, van J.D.; Collard, J.M.; Karagouni, A.; Wellington, E.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes have become highly mobile since the development of antibiotic chemotherapy. A considerable body of evidence exists proving the link between antibiotic use and the significant increase in drug-resistant human bacterial pathogens. The application of molecular detection and

  10. Pediatric fecal microbiota harbor diverse and novel antibiotic resistance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimée M Moore

    Full Text Available Emerging antibiotic resistance threatens human health. Gut microbes are an epidemiologically important reservoir of resistance genes (resistome, yet prior studies indicate that the true diversity of gut-associated resistomes has been underestimated. To deeply characterize the pediatric gut-associated resistome, we created metagenomic recombinant libraries in an Escherichia coli host using fecal DNA from 22 healthy infants and children (most without recent antibiotic exposure, and performed functional selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from eight drug classes. Resistance-conferring DNA fragments were sequenced (Illumina HiSeq 2000, and reads assembled and annotated with the PARFuMS computational pipeline. Resistance to 14 of the 18 antibiotics was found in stools of infants and children. Recovered genes included chloramphenicol acetyltransferases, drug-resistant dihydrofolate reductases, rRNA methyltransferases, transcriptional regulators, multidrug efflux pumps, and every major class of beta-lactamase, aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, and tetracycline resistance protein. Many resistance-conferring sequences were mobilizable; some had low identity to any known organism, emphasizing cryptic organisms as potentially important resistance reservoirs. We functionally confirmed three novel resistance genes, including a 16S rRNA methylase conferring aminoglycoside resistance, and two tetracycline-resistance proteins nearly identical to a bifidobacterial MFS transporter (B. longum s. longum JDM301. We provide the first report to our knowledge of resistance to folate-synthesis inhibitors conferred by a predicted Nudix hydrolase (part of the folate synthesis pathway. This functional metagenomic survey of gut-associated resistomes, the largest of its kind to date, demonstrates that fecal resistomes of healthy children are far more diverse than previously suspected, that clinically relevant resistance genes are present even without recent selective

  11. A Rice Gene Homologous to Arabidopsis AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE1 Participates in Disease Resistance Response against Infection with Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga Young Jung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ALD1 (ABERRANT GROWTH AND DEATH2 [AGD2]-LIKE DEFENSE1 is one of the key defense regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. In these model plants, ALD1 is responsible for triggering basal defense response and systemic resistance against bacterial infection. As well ALD1 is involved in the production of pipecolic acid and an unidentified compound(s for systemic resistance and priming syndrome, respectively. These previous studies proposed that ALD1 is a potential candidate for developing genetically modified (GM plants that may be resistant to pathogen infection. Here we introduce a role of ALD1-LIKE gene of Oryza sativa, named as OsALD1, during plant immunity. OsALD1 mRNA was strongly transcribed in the infected leaves of rice plants by Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus. OsALD1 proteins predominantly localized at the chloroplast in the plant cells. GM rice plants over-expressing OsALD1 were resistant to the fungal infection. The stable expression of OsALD1 also triggered strong mRNA expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN1 genes in the leaves of rice plants during infection. Taken together, we conclude that OsALD1 plays a role in disease resistance response of rice against the infection with rice blast fungus.

  12. A Rice Gene Homologous to Arabidopsis AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE1 Participates in Disease Resistance Response against Infection with Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ga Young; Park, Ju Yeon; Choi, Hyo Ju; Yoo, Sung-Je; Park, Jung-Kwon; Jung, Ho Won

    2016-08-01

    ALD1 (ABERRANT GROWTH AND DEATH2 [AGD2]-LIKE DEFENSE1) is one of the key defense regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. In these model plants, ALD1 is responsible for triggering basal defense response and systemic resistance against bacterial infection. As well ALD1 is involved in the production of pipecolic acid and an unidentified compound(s) for systemic resistance and priming syndrome, respectively. These previous studies proposed that ALD1 is a potential candidate for developing genetically modified (GM) plants that may be resistant to pathogen infection. Here we introduce a role of ALD1-LIKE gene of Oryza sativa, named as OsALD1, during plant immunity. OsALD1 mRNA was strongly transcribed in the infected leaves of rice plants by Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus. OsALD1 proteins predominantly localized at the chloroplast in the plant cells. GM rice plants over-expressing OsALD1 were resistant to the fungal infection. The stable expression of OsALD1 also triggered strong mRNA expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN1 genes in the leaves of rice plants during infection. Taken together, we conclude that OsALD1 plays a role in disease resistance response of rice against the infection with rice blast fungus.

  13. Resistance to leaf rust in coffee carrying S H3 gene and others S H genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Hiroshi Sera

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the resistance to rust in coffee carrying S H3 gene and other S H genes. Twenty one CIFC’s coffee trees with several resistance genes S H were evaluated in field conditions. All the evaluated coffees carrying Sh3 gene presented resistance to the rust. It was possible that rust races with the virulence gene v3 in the Paraná State didn’t exist. The S H3 gene in combination with genes S H5, S H6, S H7, S H8, S H9 and S H? would be very important to obtain cultivars with more durable resistance to the rust.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência à ferrugem em cafeeiros portadores do gene S H3 e outros genes S H em Londrina, Paraná, Brasil. Foram avaliados vinte e um cafeeiros do CIFC com diferentes genes S H de resistência em condição de alta incidência natural em campo. Todos os cafeeiros avaliados portadores do gene S H3 apresentaram resistência à ferrugem. É possível que não existam raças de ferrugem com o gene de virulência v3 no Paraná. Plantas portadoras do gene S H3 em combinação com os genes S H5, S H6, S H7, S H8, S H9 e S H? seria muito importante para obter cultivares com resistência mais durável à ferrugem.

  14. A high-resolution linkage map of the citrus tristeza virus resistance gene region in Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, D Q; Federici, C T; Roose, M L

    1998-10-01

    Resistance to citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was evaluated in 554 progeny of 10 populations derived from Poncirus trifoliata. A dominant gene (Ctv) controlled CTV resistance in P. trifoliata. Twenty-one dominant PCR-based DNA markers were identified as linked to Ctv by bulked segregant analysis. Of the 11 closest markers to Ctv, only 2 segregated in all populations. Ten of these markers were cloned and sequenced, and codominant RFLP markers were developed. Seven RFLP markers were then evaluated in 10 populations. Marker orders were consistent in all linkage maps based on data of single populations or on combined data of populations with similar segregation patterns. In a consensus map, the six closest marker loci spanned 5.3 cM of the Ctv region. Z16 cosegregated with Ctv. C19 and AD08 flanked Ctv at distances of 0.5 and 0.8 cM, respectively. These 3 markers were present as single copies in the Poncirus genome, and could be used directly for bacterial artificial chromosome library screening to initiate a walk toward Ctv. BLAST searches of the GenBank database revealed high sequence similarities between 2 markers and known plant disease resistance genes, indicating that a resistance gene cluster exists in the Ctv region in P. trifoliata.

  15. Ultraviolet reduction of erythromycin and tetracycline resistant heterotrophic bacteria and their resistance genes in municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance in wastewater is becoming a major public health concern, but poorly understood about impact of disinfection on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. The UV disinfection of antibiotic resistant heterotrophic bacteria and their relevant genes in the wastewater of a municipal wastewater treatment plant has been evaluated. Two commonly used antibiotics, erythromycin and tetracycline were selected because of their wide occurrences in regard to the antibiotic resistance problem. After UV treatment at a fluence of 5mJcm(-2), the log reductions of heterotrophic bacteria resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline in the wastewater were found to be 1.4±0.1 and 1.1±0.1, respectively. The proportion of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (5%) was nearly double of that before UV disinfection (3%). Tetracycline-resistant bacteria exhibited more tolerance to UV irradiation compared to the erythromycin-resistant bacteria (pUV treatment at a fluence of 5mJcm(-2) removed the total erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistance genes by 3.0±0.1 log and 1.9±0.1 log, respectively. UV treatment was effective in reducing antibiotic resistance in the wastewater.

  16. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huddleston JR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer R HuddlestonBiology Department, Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, USAAbstract: Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed.Keywords: gut microbiome, conjugation, natural transformation, transduction

  17. Using Network Extracted Ontologies to Identify Novel Genes with Roles in Appressorium Development in the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Ames

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease, the most important infection of rice worldwide. Half the world’s population depends on rice for its primary caloric intake and, as such, rice blast poses a serious threat to food security. The stages of M. oryzae infection are well defined, with the formation of an appressorium, a cell type that allows penetration of the plant cuticle, particularly well studied. However, many of the key pathways and genes involved in this disease stage are yet to be identified. In this study, I have used network-extracted ontologies (NeXOs, hierarchical structures inferred from RNA-Seq data, to identify pathways involved in appressorium development, which in turn highlights novel genes with potential roles in this process. This study illustrates the use of NeXOs for pathway identification from large-scale genomics data and also identifies novel genes with potential roles in disease. The methods presented here will be useful to study disease processes in other pathogenic species and these data represent predictions of novel targets for intervention in M. oryzae.

  18. Scab resistance in 'Geneva' apple is conditioned by a resistance gene cluster with complex genetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaanse, Héloïse; Bassett, Heather C M; Kirk, Christopher; Gardiner, Susan E; Deng, Cecilia; Groenworld, Remmelt; Chagné, David; Bus, Vincent G M

    2016-02-01

    Apple scab, caused by the fungal pathogen Venturia inaequalis, is one of the most severe diseases of apple worldwide. It is the most studied plant-pathogen interaction involving a woody species using modern genetic, genomic, proteomic and bioinformatic approaches in both species. Although 'Geneva' apple was recognized long ago as a potential source of resistance to scab, this resistance has not been characterized previously. Differential interactions between various monoconidial isolates of V. inaequalis and six segregating F1 and F2 populations indicate the presence of at least five loci governing the resistance in 'Geneva'. The 17 chromosomes of apple were screened using genotyping-by-sequencing, as well as single marker mapping, to position loci controlling the V. inaequalis resistance on linkage group 4. Next, we fine mapped a 5-cM region containing five loci conferring both dominant and recessive scab resistance to the distal end of the linkage group. This region corresponds to 2.2 Mbp (from 20.3 to 22.5 Mbp) on the physical map of 'Golden Delicious' containing nine candidate nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) resistance genes. This study increases our understanding of the complex genetic basis of apple scab resistance conferred by 'Geneva', as well as the gene-for-gene (GfG) relationships between the effector genes in the pathogen and resistance genes in the host.

  19. Current progress on genetic interactions of rice with rice blast and sheath blight fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulin JIA; Guangjie LIU; Stefano COSTANZO; Seonghee LEE; Yuntao DAI

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genetic interactions between rice and its pathogenic fungi Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani should lead to a better understanding of molecular mechanisms of host resistance, and the improvement of strategies to manage rice blast and sheath blight diseases. Currently, dozens office resistance (R) genes against specific races of the blast fungus have been described. Among them, ten were molecularly characterized and some were widely used for breeding for genetic resistance. The Pi-ta gene was one of the best characterized rice R genes. Following the elucidation of its molecular structure, interaction, distribution, and evolution, user friendly DNA markers were developed from portions of the cloned genes to facilitate the incorporations of the Pi-ta mediated resistance into improved rice varieties using marker assisted selection (MAS). However, rice blast is still a major threat for stable rice production because of race change mutations occurring in rice fields, which often overcome added resistance based on single R genes, and these virulent races of M. oryzae pose a continued challenge for blast control. For sheath blight, progress has been made on the exploration of novel sources of resistance from wild rice relatives and indica rice cultivars. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL), named qSB9-2, was recently verified in several mapping populations with different phenotyping methods, including greenhouse methods. The ability to identify qSB9-2 using greenhouse methods should accelerate the efforts on the qSB9-2 fine mapping and positional cloning.

  20. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara

    2004-01-01

    in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim...

  1. A Nomadic Subtelomeric Disease Resistance Gene Cluster in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The B4 resistance (R)-gene cluster, located in subtelomeric region of chromosome 4, is one of the largest clusters known in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Pv). We sequenced 650 kb spanning this locus and annotated 97 genes, 26 of which correspond to Coiled-coil-Nucleotide-Binding-Site-Leucine-Rich...

  2. Identifying resistance gene analogs associated with resistances to different pathogens in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Camilo E; Acosta, Iván F; Jara, Carlos; Pedraza, Fabio; Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Gallego, Gerardo; Beebe, Steve; Tohme, Joe

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT A polymerase chain reaction approach using degenerate primers that targeted the conserved domains of cloned plant disease resistance genes (R genes) was used to isolate a set of 15 resistance gene analogs (RGAs) from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Eight different classes of RGAs were obtained from nucleotide binding site (NBS)-based primers and seven from not previously described Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor-like (TIR)-based primers. Putative amino acid sequences of RGAs were significantly similar to R genes and contained additional conserved motifs. The NBS-type RGAs were classified in two subgroups according to the expected final residue in the kinase-2 motif. Eleven RGAs were mapped at 19 loci on eight linkage groups of the common bean genetic map constructed at Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical. Genetic linkage was shown for eight RGAs with partial resistance to anthracnose, angular leaf spot (ALS) and Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). RGA1 and RGA2 were associated with resistance loci to anthracnose and BGYMV and were part of two clusters of R genes previously described. A new major cluster was detected by RGA7 and explained up to 63.9% of resistance to ALS and has a putative contribution to anthracnose resistance. These results show the usefulness of RGAs as candidate genes to detect and eventually isolate numerous R genes in common bean.

  3. Deinococcus geothermalis: the pool of extreme radiation resistance genes shrinks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira S Makarova

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR, ultraviolet light (UV and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and

  4. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Kira S. [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Omelchenko, Marina [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Gaidamakova, Elena [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Matrosova, Vera [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Vasilenko, Alexander [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Zhai, Min [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kim, Edwin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Samual [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lai, Barry [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ravel, Bruce [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wolf, Yuri [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Sorokin, Alexei [Genetique Microbienne; Gerasimova, Anna [Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Mosco; Gelfand, Mikhail [Moscow State University; Fredrickson, James K [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Koonin, Eugene [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Daly, Michael [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS)

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  5. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  6. Multiple Dissipative Devices for Blast-Resisting Cable-Supported Glazing Façades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Amadio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the structural response of a high-level air blast loaded cable-supported façade. Since the glass panels and the cables present a typical brittle behavior and are subjected to elevated tensile stresses when a high-level explosion occurs, multiple dissipative devices are simultaneously introduced in the conventional glazing system to mitigate the maximum effects of the design blast wave. Dynamic analyses are performed using a sophisticated FE-model to describe accurately the response of the façade equipped by dissipative devices. Based on numerical results of previous contributions, viscoelastic spider connectors (VESCs are introduced in the points of connection between glass panels and pretensioned cables, to replace “rigid” spider connectors commonly used in practice. At the same time, rigid-plastic frictional devices (RPDs are installed at the top of the bearing cables to mitigate furthermore the bracing system. As a result, due to the combined use of VESCs and RPDs opportunely calibrated, the maximum tensile stresses in the glass panels and in the cables appear strongly reduced. In addition, the proposed devices do not trouble the aesthetics of such transparent structural systems. At last, simple design rules are presented to predict the response of cable-supported façades subjected to high-level dynamic loads and to preliminary estimate the mechanical parameters of combined VESCs and RPDs.

  7. Design of Cellular Composite Sandwich Panels for Maximum Blast Resistance Via Energy Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Jennifer Righman; Su, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for optimizing the energy absorption under blast loads of cellular composite sandwich panels. A combination of dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) and simplified analytical modeling techniques are used. The analytical modeling calculates both the loading effects and structural response resulting from user-input charge sizes and standoff distances and offers the advantage of expediting iterative design processes. The FEA and the analytical model results are compared and contrasted then used to compare the energy response of various cellular composite sandwich panels under blast loads, where various core shapes and dimensions are the focus. As a result, it is concluded that the optimum shape consists of vertically-oriented webs while the optimum dimensions can be generally described as those which cause the most inelasticity without failure of the webs. These dimensions are also specifically quantified for select situations. This guidance is employed, along with the analytical method developed by the authors and considerations of the influences of material properties, to suggest a general design procedure that is a simple yet sufficiently accurate method for design. The suggested design approach is also demonstrated through a design example.

  8. Graus de resistência à brusone e produtividade de cultivares melhoradas de arroz de terras altas Degree of blast resistance and grain yield of improved upland rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sitarama Prabhu

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o nível de resistência à brusone nas folhas e panículas e seu efeito sobre a produtividade de 12 cultivares de arroz, em experimento de campo, durante três anos consecutivos. O grau de resistência das cultivares à brusone nas folhas e panículas foi determinado utilizando-se o critério de área sob curva de progresso e severidade de brusone nas panículas dez dias antes de colheita, respectivamente. As cultivares Progresso, Cuiabana, Caiapó, Carajás e Araguaia, em ordem decrescente, foram as mais resistentes à brusone nas folhas. As cultivares Carajás e Progresso apresentaram severidades da brusone, nas panículas, menores do que as demais cultivares em dois anos. A produtividade das cultivares nos três anos de avaliações, que variou de 83 kg/ha na IAC 201 a 3.617 kg/ha na Rio Paraguai, é explicada principalmente pela severidade da brusone nas panículas, já que as correlações foram negativas e significativas. As raças de Pyricularia grisea, IB-9, IB-41, IB-13 e IC-27, provenientes de 13 cultivares, apresentaram interações diferenciais. Os resultados permitiram concluir que o grau de resistência de algumas cultivares é inadequado e necessita de outras medidas de controle.The aim of this work was to study the levels of leaf and panicle blast resistance and their effect on grain yield of 12 rice cultivars, in a field experiment, during consecutive three years. The degree of leaf blast and panicle blast resistance was determined by the assessment criteria of area under disease progress curve and disease severity ten days before the harvest, respectively. The cultivars Progresso, Cuiabana, Caiapó, Carajás and Araguaia were superior in descending order for leaf blast resistance. For panicle blast, Carajás and Progresso, exhibited lower disease severities than the rest of the cultivars in the first two years. The grain yields during three years ranged from 83 kg/ha for IAC 201 to 3

  9. Partial Sequencing of 16S rRNA Gene of Selected Staphylococcus aureus Isolates and its Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsi Dewantari Kusumaningrum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The choice of primer used in 16S rRNA sequencing for identification of Staphylococcus species found in food is important. This study aimed to characterize Staphylococcus aureus isolates by partial sequencing based on 16S rRNA gene employing primers 16sF, 63F or 1387R. The isolates were isolated from milk, egg dishes and chicken dishes and selected based on the presence of sea gene that responsible for formation of enterotoxin-A. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates towards six antibiotics was also tested. The use of 16sF resulted generally in higher identity percentage and query coverage compared to the sequencing by 63F or 1387R. BLAST results of all isolates, sequenced by 16sF, showed 99% homology to complete genome of four S. aureus strains, with different characteristics on enterotoxin production and antibiotic resistance. Considering that all isolates were carrying sea gene, indicated by the occurence of 120 bp amplicon after PCR amplification using primer SEA1/SEA2,  the isolates were most in agreeing to S. aureus subsp. aureus ST288. This study indicated that 4 out of 8 selected isolates were resistant towards streptomycin. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing using 16sF is useful for identification of S. aureus. However, additional analysis such as PCR employing specific gene target, should give a valuable supplementary information, when specific characteristic is expected.

  10. Development of blast resistant somaclones of the upland rice cultivar araguaia Desenvolvimento de somaclones da cultivar araguaia resistentes à brusone em arroz de sequeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEILA GARCÊS DE ARAÚJO

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The degree of blast resistance of upland rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivar Araguaia has decreased over time causing significant yield losses. The major objective of this study was to obtain blast (Pyricularia grisea resistant somaclones, adapting greenhouse and field selection procedures. Rice blast resistance and agronomic traits were assessed in R2 to R6 generations derived from regenerant plants (R1 from immature panicles of Araguaia. The evaluation and selection procedures include testing of early segregating populations and fixed lines in the advanced generations, under natural field conditions, and artificial inoculations in the greenhouse, with prevalent races IB-1 and IB-9 of P. grisea. Somaclones with both vertical resistance and slow blasting resistance were obtained. Twenty of 31 somaclones developed with a high degree of vertical resistance and fan shaped plant type maintained resistance in field and blast nursery tests in the R6 generation. Greenhouse selection with two specific physiologic races yielded 44 somaclones with slow blasting resistance, similar plant type and yield potential as that of Araguaia.O grau de resistência à brusone da cultivar de arroz (Oryza sativa Araguaia tem decrescido ao longo dos anos, resultando em prejuízos significativos na produtividade. O objetivo principal deste estudo foi obter somaclones resistentes à brusone (Pyricularia grisea, adaptando os métodos de seleção em casa de vegetação e de campo. Foram avaliadas plantas regeneradas (R1 de panículas imaturas da cultivar Araguaia nas gerações R2 a R6 para resistência à brusone e características agronômicas. O método de avaliação e seleção de plantas envolveu avaliações de populações segregantes e linhagens fixadas, em condições naturais de infecção no campo, e infecções artificiais em casa de vegetação com duas raças prevalecentes de P. grisea IB-1 e IB-9. Foram obtidos somaclones com resistência vertical e progresso

  11. Genetic analysis of resistance gene analogues from a sugarcane cultivar resistant to red rot disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the important approaches for disease control in sugarcane is to develop a disease resistant variety; this may be accomplished through identification of resistance genes in sugarcane. In this study, PCR primers targeting the conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) class and kinas...

  12. Mapping of QTL for resistance to powdery mildew and resistance gene analogues in perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, B; Jensen, L B; Asp, T;

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to map resistance gene analogues (RGA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for powdery mildew resistance in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). The mapping population consisted of 184 F2 genotypes produced from a cross between one genotype of a synthetic perennial...

  13. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi-jia; SongYun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Htl, Htnl and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhml and Rhm2,maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdml, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsml, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2. 1 of tomato, and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i. e. , chromosomesl, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3. 25) except for genes Rhml, Rhm2, Mdml and Wsml which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  14. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertinellys TEIXEIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC, aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD, and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH, is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137 were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, mainly from discharges (96/137. The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively. Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49, followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49. The aac(6´-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  15. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are considered as candidates for increased insect resistance in transgenic plants. Insect adaptation to PI ingestion might, however, compromise the benefits received by transgenic expression of PIs. In this study, the maize proteinase inhibitor (MPI), an inhibitor of insect serine proteinases, and the potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) were fused into a single open reading frame and introduced into rice plants. The two PIs were linked using either the processing site of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1B precursor protein or the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Expression of each fusion gene was driven by the wound- and pathogen-inducible mpi promoter. The mpi-pci fusion gene was stably inherited for at least three generations with no penalty on plant phenotype. An important reduction in larval weight of Chilo suppressalis fed on mpi-pci rice, compared with larvae fed on wild-type plants, was observed. Expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene confers resistance to C. suppressalis (striped stem borer), one of the most important insect pest of rice. The mpi-pci expression systems described may represent a suitable strategy for insect pest control, better than strategies based on the use of single PI genes, by preventing insect adaptive responses. The rice plants expressing the mpi-pci fusion gene also showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the rice blast disease. Our results illustrate the usefulness of the inducible expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene for dual resistance against insects and pathogens in rice plants.

  16. Identification of putative candidate genes for red rot resistance in sugarcane (Saccharum species hybrid) using LD-based association mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram K; Banerjee, Nandita; Khan, M S; Yadav, Sonia; Kumar, Sanjeev; Duttamajumder, S K; Lal, Ram Ji; Patel, Jinesh D; Guo, H; Zhang, Dong; Paterson, Andrew H

    2016-06-01

    Red rot is a serious disease of sugarcane caused by the fungus Colletotrichum falcatum that has a colossal damage potential. The fungus, prevalent mainly in the Indian sub-continent, keeps on producing new pathogenic strains leading to breakdown of resistance in newly released varieties and hence the deployment of linked markers for marker-assisted selection for resistance to this disease can fine tune the breeding programme. This study based on a panel of 119 sugarcane genotypes fingerprinted for 944 SSR alleles was undertaken with an aim to identify marker-trait associations (MTAs) for resistance to red rot. Mixed linear model containing population structure and kinship as co-factor detected four MTAs that were able to explain 10-16 % of the trait variation, individually. Among the four MTAs, EST sequences diagnostic of three could be BLAST searched to the sorghum genome with significant sequence homology. Several genes encoding important plant defence related proteins, viz., cytochrome P450, Glycerol-3-phosphate transporter-1, MAP Kinase-4, Serine/threonine-protein kinase, Ring finger domain protein and others were localized to the vicinity of these MTAs. These positional candidate genes are worth of further investigation and possibly these could contribute directly to red rot resistance, and may find a potential application in marker-assisted sugarcane breeding.

  17. Rapid Detection of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance: Preliminary Evaluation of PCR Assays Targeting Tetracycline Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    significant homologies over a wide range of species. The sequence of the Campylobacter jejuni tet(O) gene, used in this study as the core sequence...protection protein tet(O): M18896*, Campylobacter jejuni tet(O) gene; AY190525, Campylobacter jejuni plasmid pCjA13 tetracycline resistance protein tet(O

  18. Tagging and mapping of a rice gall midge resistance gene, Gm8, and development of SCARs for use in marker-aided selection and gene pyramiding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A; Ariyadasa, R; Kumar, A; Srivastava, M N; Mohan, M; Nair, S

    2004-11-01

    Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs), we have tagged and mapped Gm8, a gene conferring resistance to the rice gall midge (Orseolia oryzae), a major insect pest of rice, onto rice chromosome 8. Using AFLPs, two fragments, AR257 and AS168, were identified that were linked to the resistant and susceptible phenotypes, respectively. Another resistant phenotype-specific marker, AP19(587), was also identified using RAPDs. SCAR primers based on the sequence of the fragments AR257 and AS168 failed to reveal polymorphism between the resistant and the susceptible parents. However, PCR using primers based on the regions flanking AR257 revealed polymorphism that was phenotype-specific. In contrast, PCR carried out using primers flanking the susceptible phenotype-associated fragment AS168 produced a monomorphic fragment. Restriction digestion of these monomorphic fragments revealed polymorphism between the susceptible and resistant parents. Nucleotide BLAST searches revealed that the three fragments show strong homology to rice PAC and BAC clones that formed a contig representing the short arm of chromosome 8. PCR amplification using the above-mentioned primers on a larger population, derived from a cross between two indica rice varieties, Jhitpiti (resistant parent) and TN1 (susceptible parent), showed that there is a tight linkage between the markers and the Gm8 locus. These markers, therefore, have potential for use in marker-aided selection and pyramiding of Gm8 along with other previously tagged gall midge resistance genes [ Gm2, Gm4(t), and Gm7].

  19. Differential Expression of Salinity Resistance Gene on Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Wu-wei; YU Shu-xun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Salinity resistance and differential gene expression associated with salinity in cotton germplasm were studied,because of the large scale area of salinity in China,and its significant negative effects on the cotton production.The salinityresisted genes and their differential expression were studied under the stress of NaCI on cotton.There were found,under the NaCI stress,1644 genes differentially expressed from the salinity-sensitive cotton and only 817 genes differentially expressed from the salinityresisted cotton.

  20. Performance of resistance gene pyramids to races of rice bacterial blight in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGKangle; ZHUANGJieyun; WANGHanrong

    1998-01-01

    The effect of gene pyramiding on resistance to bacterial blight (BB) in rice was evahlated among the IR24-based near isogenic lines conraining single resistance gene and gene pyramids containing two, three or lour resistancegenes (see table).

  1. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Hashimoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant’s resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species.

  2. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Neriya, Yutaro; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant’s resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species. PMID:27833593

  3. Resistance identification of bivalent fungi-resistant genes transformed soybean to Phytophthora sojae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Soybean is one of the most important sources of edible oil and proteins in the world. However, it suffers from many kinds of fungal diseases which is a major limiting factor in soybean production. The fungal disease can be effectively controlled by breeding plant cultivars with genetic transformation. In this study, the resistance to Phytophthora sojae of five bivalent transgenic soybean line swas identified using the hypocotyls inoculation technique. The lines were the T2 of the transgenic soybean which were transformed with kidney bean chitinase gene and barley ribosome inactivating protein gene, and were positive by Southern Blot analysis. The resistance difference was studied through comparing the death percentage of transgenic soybean with the control. The results showed that four lines were more resistant to P. sojae, whereas other one had no significant difference in comparison with the control. These transgenic soybean lines with enhanced resistance to P. sojae will be useful in soybean resistance breeding.

  4. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelowo, Olawale O.; Fagade, Obasola E.; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Methodology: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using...... the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. Results: A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resistance was: tetracycline 81%, sulphamethoxazole 67%, streptomycin 56%, trimethoprim 47 %, ciprofloxacin 42......%, ampicillin 36%, spectinomycin 28%, nalidixic acid 25%, chloramphenicol 22%, neomycin 14%, gentamicin 8%, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, colistin, florfenicol and apramycin 0%. Resistance genes found among the isolates include bla-TEM (85%), sul2 (67%), sul3 (17%), aadA (65%), strA (70%), str...

  5. Prevalence of Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Aliakbarzade, Katayun; Farajnia, Safar; Karimi Nik, Ashraf; Zarei, Farzaneh; Tanomand, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major causes of nosocomial infections and is resistant to most available antibiotics. Aminoglycosides remain as drugs of choice for treatment of Acinetobacter infections yet resistance to aminoglycosides has increased in the recent years. Objectives: The present study investigated the prevalence of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in A. baumannii strains isolated from patients of Tabriz city, northwest of Iran. Materials and Met...

  6. Rice transformation with cell wall degrading enzyme genes from Trichoderma atroviride and its effect on plant growth and resistance to fungal pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mei; Sun Zong-Xiu; Zhu Jie; Xu Tong; Gary E Harman; Matteo Lorito; Sheri Woo

    2004-01-01

    @@ Three genes encoding for fungal cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE), ech42, nag70 and gluc78from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride were inserted into the binary vector pCAMBIA1305. 2 singly and in all possible combinations. The coding sequences were placed downstream of the rice actin promoter and all vectors were used to transform rice plants. A total of more than 1,800 independently regenerated plantlets in seven different populations (for each of the three genes and each of the four gene combinations) were obtained. Expression in plant was obtained for all the fungal genes used singly or in combinations. The ech42 gene encoding for an endochitinase increased resistance to sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani, while the exochitinase-encoding gene, nag70, had a lesser effect. The expression level of endochitinase but not of the exochitinase was correlated with disease resistance. Nevertheless, exochitinase enhanced the positive effect of endochitinase on disease resistance when two genes were co-expressed in transgenic rice. Improved resistance to Magnaporthe grisea was found in all types of regenerated plants, including those with the gluc78 gene alone, while a few lines expressing either ech42 or nag70 appeared to be immune to this pathogen. Transgenic plants expressing the gluc78 gene alone were stunted and only few of them survived, even though they showed resistance to M. grisea. However, combination with either one of the two other genes ( ech42, nag70 ) as included in the same T-DNA region, reduced the negative effect of gluc78 on plant growth. This is the first report of single or multiple of expression of transgens encoding CWDEs that results in resistance to blast and sheath blight in rice.

  7. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in 'Thatcher' Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Colin W; Kolmer, James A; McCartney, Curt A; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. 'Thatcher' wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in 'Thatcher' and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for 'Thatcher'-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34.

  8. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in 'Thatcher' Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin W Hiebert

    Full Text Available Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt, is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. 'Thatcher' wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in 'Thatcher' and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for 'Thatcher'-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34.

  9. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in ‘Thatcher’ Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Colin W.; Kolmer, James A.; McCartney, Curt A.; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N.; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. ‘Thatcher’ wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in ‘Thatcher’ and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for ‘Thatcher’-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  10. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management.

  11. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  12. Multiple herbicide resistance in Lolium multiflorum and identification of conserved regulatory elements of herbicide resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of L. multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them a reliable marker. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of Lolium multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O.sativa and A.thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward towards a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management.

  13. Analysis of Romanian Bacteroides isolates for antibiotic resistance levels and the corresponding antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Edit; Eitel, Zsuzsa; Molnár, Szabolcs; Szász, Izabella Éva; Bilca, Doina; Sóki, József

    2015-02-01

    As part of an ESCMID Study Group on Anaerobic Infections (ESGAI) project, a study was conducted to measure the antibiotic susceptibilities and corresponding gene contents of 53 Bacteroides fragilis group strains isolated in Romania. The antibiotic resistance data was comparable with the data found for other East-European countries. Here, no resistant isolate was found for imipenem, metronidazole and tigecycline. An increasing role of the cepA, cfxA and cfiA genes was observed in their corresponding antibiotic resistances. Moreover, no isolate was found that harbored the cfiA gene with a possible activating IS element. Clindamycin resistance was low, similarly to that the rate for the ermF gene. However, we did find some isolates with nimB, ermB, msrSA, linA, satG, tetX, tetM and bexA genes. This study was the first to provide antibiotic resistance data for clinical Bacteroides strains from Romania.

  14. NBS-LRR resistance gene homologues in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Twenty three DNA fragments with a size of about 520 bp have been cloned from rice genome by PCR amplification using primers designed according to the conserved region of most plant resistance (R) genes which have Nucleotide Binding Site (NBS) and Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) domains. Homologous comparison showed that these fragments contained typical motifs of the NBS-LRR resistance gene class, kinase 1a, kinase 2a, kinase 3a and domain 2. Thus they were named R gene homologous sequences (RS). These RS were divided into 4 groups by clustering analysis and mapped onto chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11, respectively, by genetic mapping. Ten RS were located in the chromosomal intervals where known R genes had been mapped. Further RFLP analysis of an RS, RS13, near the bacterial blight resistance gene Xa4 locus on chromosome 11 among near isogenic lines and pyramiding lines of Xa4 showed that RS13 was possibly amplified from the gene family of Xa4.

  15. Relationship between antifungal resistance of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans and mutations in ERG11 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Li-juan; WAN Zhe; WANG Xiao-hong; LI Ruo-yu; LIU Wei

    2010-01-01

    Background The cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase(Erg11p) encoded by ERG11 gene is the primary target for azole antifungals.Changes in azole affinity of this enzyme caused by amino acid substitutions have been reported as a mechanism of azole antifungal resistance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between amino acid substitutions in Erg11p from fluconazole resistant Candida albicans (C.albicans)isolates and their cross-resistance to azoles.Methods Mutations in ERG11 gene were screened in 10 clinical isolates of fluconazole resistant C.albicans strains.DNA sequence of ERG11 was determined by PCR based DNA sequencing.Results In the 10 isolates,19 types of amino acid substitutions were found,of which 10 substitutions (F72S, F103L, F145I, F198L, G206D, G227D, N349S, F416S, F422L and T482A) have not been reported previously. Mutations in ERG11 gene were detected in 9 isolates of fluconazole resistant C. albicans, but were not detected in 1 isolate. Conclusions Although no definite correlation was found between the type of amino acid substitutions in Erg11p and the phenotype of cross-resistance to azoles, the substitutions F72S, F145I and G227D in our study may be highly associated with resistance to azoles because of their special location in Erg11p.

  16. Weldability Evaluation of a Cu-Bearing High-Strength Blast-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jeremy L.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Lippold, John C.

    2011-12-01

    BlastAlloy160 (BA-160) steel, with a nominal composition of Fe-0.05C-3.65Cu-6.5Ni-1.84Cr-0.6Mo-0.1V (wt pct), is strengthened by Cu-rich precipitates and M2C carbides. This alloy was subjected to several weldability tests to assess its susceptibility to certain weld cracking mechanisms. Hot ductility testing revealed a liquation cracking temperature range (LCTR) of 148 K (-125 °C), which suggested moderate susceptibility to heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking. The enrichment of Ni and Cu was measured along the prior austenite grain boundaries in the simulated partially melted zone (PMZ) and was consistent with similar enrichment at interdendritic boundaries of the simulated fusion zone (FZ). Good wetting and penetration of liquid films along the austenite grain boundaries of the PMZ was also observed. Associated with that finding were thermodynamic calculations indicating a completely austenitic (face-centered cubic) microstructure at elevated temperatures. In testing to determine reheat cracking susceptibility, ductility values of 41 to 78 pct RA were established for the 723 K to 973 K (450 °C to 700 °C) temperature range. The good ductility values precluded susceptibility to reheat cracking according to the test criterion. Dilatometric measurements and thermodynamic calculations revealed the formation of austenite in the reheat cracking temperature range, which was attributed to the high Ni content of the BA-160 alloy.

  17. Somaclones da cultivar de arroz aromático Basmati-370 resistentes à brusone Blast resistant somaclones of aromatic rice cultivar Basmati-370

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Garcês de Araújo

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A cultivar de arroz aromático Basmati-370 é uma das preferidas no mercado mundial. Possui aroma agradável, grão extra-fino, e característica de alongamento após o cozimento; porém, é suscetível a alguns patótipos de Pyricularia grisea no Brasil. O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar o grau de resistência à brusone, e algumas características agronômicas nas gerações avançadas de seus somaclones. Foram estudadas gerações R5 a R9, no campo, em viveiro de brusone e em casa de vegetação. Não foram observadas variações significativas na qualidade de grãos e outras características agronômicas. Entretanto, alguns somaclones apresentaram alto grau de resistência à brusone. Foram registrados no Banco Ativo de Germoplasma da Embrapa-Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Arroz e Feijão 19 somaclones como novas fontes de arroz aromático. Dois somaclones, SCBAS04 e SBAS16, exibiram alto grau de resistência à brusone, e foram superiores à cultivar Basmati-370 quanto ao aroma.Basmati-370 is one of the most preferred aromatic fine quality rice in the world market. It has a pleasant aroma, extra fine grain and a characteristic elongation after cooking, but it is susceptible to some pathotypes of Pyricularia grisea in Brazil. The objective of the present investigation was to assess the degree of blast resistance and some agronomic characteristics in the advanced generations of its somaclones. The evaluations were carried out in R5 to R9 generations, in field trials, in rice blast nursery and greenhouse. Significant variations in grain quality and other agronomic characteristics were not observed. However, some of the somaclones showed higher degree of blast resistance. Nineteen somaclones were registered in the Active Germplasm Bank of Embrapa-Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Arroz e Feijão as new aromatic rice sources. Two somaclones, SCBAS04 and SBAS16, exhibited a high degree of partial resistance to blast, and were found to be

  18. Evaluating antibiotic resistance genes in soils with applied manures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are commonly used in livestock production to promote growth and combat disease. Recent studies have shown the potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to the environment following application of livestock manures. In this study, concentrations of bacteria with ARG in soi...

  19. Preliminary Studies on Differential Expression of Auditory Functional Genes in the Brain After Repeated Blast Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, MD Abstract—The mechanisms of central auditory processing involved in auditory/ vestibular ...trans- ducers in auditory neurons [22–23,45–48]. The frontal cor- tex and midbrain of blast-exposed mice showed significant increase in the expression of...auditory neurons [26]. Other types of molecules involved in calcium regula- tion, such as calreticulin and calmodulin-dependent pro- tein kinase expression

  20. Resistance gene identification from Larimichthys crocea with machine learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yinyin; Liao, Zhijun; Ju, Ying; Liu, Juan; Mao, Yong; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-12-01

    The research on resistance genes (R-gene) plays a vital role in bioinformatics as it has the capability of coping with adverse changes in the external environment, which can form the corresponding resistance protein by transcription and translation. It is meaningful to identify and predict R-gene of Larimichthys crocea (L.Crocea). It is friendly for breeding and the marine environment as well. Large amounts of L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms have been explored by biological methods. However, much about them is still unclear. In order to break the limited understanding of the L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms and to detect new R-gene and R-gene-like genes, this paper came up with a more useful combination prediction method, which is to extract and classify the feature of available genomic data by machine learning. The effectiveness of feature extraction and classification methods to identify potential novel R-gene was evaluated, and different statistical analyzes were utilized to explore the reliability of prediction method, which can help us further understand the immune mechanisms of L.Crocea against pathogens. In this paper, a webserver called LCRG-Pred is available at http://server.malab.cn/rg_lc/.

  1. Putative resistance genes in the CitEST database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Guidetti-Gonzalez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease resistance in plants is usually associated with the activation of a wide variety of defense responses to prevent pathogen replication and/or movement. The ability of the host plant to recognize the pathogen and to activate defense responses is regulated by direct or indirect interaction between the products of plant resistance (R and pathogen avirulence (Avr genes. Attempted infection of plants by avirulent pathogens elicits a battery of defenses often followed by the collapse of the challenged host cells. Localized host cell death may help to prevent the pathogen from spreading to uninfected tissues, known as hypersensitive response (HR. When either the plant or the pathogen lacks its cognate gene, activation of the plant’s defense responses fails to occur or is delayed and does not prevent pathogen colonization. In the CitEST database, we identified 1,300 reads related to R genes in Citrus which have been reported in other plant species. These reads were translated in silico, and alignments of their amino acid sequences revealed the presence of characteristic domains and motifs that are specific to R gene classes. The description of the reads identified suggests that they function as resistance genes in citrus.

  2. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions. PMID:27938628

  3. Resistance characteristics of the ball packed-bed regenerator of the new-type swirl flow hot blast stove

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A renovation project of miniaturization and high efficiency is provided for the hot blast stove .The experimental data tested feasibility of the new-type swirl flow hot blast stove. The normal and hot state experiments have been done through changing the angle of gas entering into the regenerator. Factors influencing pressure drop have been studied and analyzed. The experimental results can be formulated in the form of the Ergun equation. The regression equation is obtained. And two modified coefficients are offered to the regenerator pressure drop of the new-type swirl flow hot blast stove.

  4. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, M Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta; Alba, Patricia; Agerso, Yvonne; Cavaco, Lina; Butaye, Patrick; Porrero, M Concepción; Battisti, Antonio; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Fetsch, Alexandra; Guerra, Beatriz

    2016-08-15

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC) 398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus collection [n=554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n=456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic compounds), cadD (cadmium), copB (copper) and czrC (zinc/cadmium) resistance genes, respectively. In contrast, among the LA-MRSA non-CC398 isolates (n=86), 1.2%, 18.6% and 16.3% were positive for the cadD, copB and czrC genes, respectively, and none were positive for arsA. Of the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates, 72% carried one metal-resistance gene, and the remaining harboured two or more in different combinations. Differences between LA-MRSA CC398 and non-CC398 were statistically significant for arsA and czrC. The czrC gene was almost exclusively found (98%) in the presence of SCCmec V in both CC398 and non-CC398 LA-MRSA isolates from different sources. Regarding the LA-MSSA isolates (n=12), some (n=4) were also positive for metal-resistance genes. This study shows that genes potentially conferring metal-resistance are frequently present in LA-MRSA.

  5. Distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance in Vibrio harveyi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; Mendez, D.; Anto, C.

    environments for understanding the distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance. The putative genes targeted for PCR detection included four reversible toxin (Rtx)/hemolysin genes, a gene encoding homologue of Vibrio cholerae...

  6. Functional study of the novel multidrug resistance gene HA117 and its comparison to multidrug resistance gene 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tingfu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The novel gene HA117 is a multidrug resistance (MDR gene expressed by all-trans retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 cells. In the present study, we compared the multidrug resistance of the HA117 with that of the classical multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1 in breast cancer cell line 4T1. Methods Transduction of the breast cancer cell line 4T1 with adenoviral vectors encoding the HA117 gene and the green fluorescence protein gene (GFP (Ad-GFP-HA117, the MDR1 and GFP (Ad-GFP-MDR1 or GFP (Ad-GFP was respectively carried out. The transduction efficiency and the multiplicity of infection (MOI were detected by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The transcription of HA117 gene and MDR1 gene were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Western blotting analysis was used to detect the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp but the expression of HA117 could not be analyzed as it is a novel gene and its antibody has not yet been synthesized. The drug-excretion activity of HA117 and MDR1 were determined by daunorubicin (DNR efflux assay. The drug sensitivities of 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 to chemotherapeutic agents were detected by Methyl-Thiazolyl-Tetrazolium (MTT assay. Results The transducted efficiency of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 were 75%-80% when MOI was equal to 50. The transduction of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 could increase the expression of HA117 and MDR1. The drug resistance index to Adriamycin (ADM, vincristine (VCR, paclitaxel (Taxol and bleomycin (BLM increased to19.8050, 9.0663, 9.7245, 3.5650 respectively for 4T1/HA117 and 24.2236, 11.0480, 11.3741, 0.9630 respectively for 4T1/MDR1 as compared to the control cells. There were no significant differences in drug sensitivity between 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 for the P-gp substrates (ADM, VCR and Taxol (P Conclusions These results confirm that HA117 is a strong MDR gene in both HL-60 and 4T1 cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the MDR

  7. Identification of Differentially-Expressed Genes in Response to Mycosphaerella fijiensis in the Resistant Musa Accession 'Calcutta-4' Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Timm, Eduardo; Hidalgo Pardo, Lisette; Pacheco Coello, Ricardo; Chávez Navarrete, Tatiana; Navarrete Villegas, Oscar; Santos Ordóñez, Efrén

    2016-01-01

    Bananas and plantains are considered an important crop around the world. Banana production is affected by several constraints, of which Black Sigatoka Disease, caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, is considered one of the most important diseases in banana plantations. The banana accession 'Calcutta-4' has a natural resistance to Black Sigatoka; however, the fruit is not valuable for commercialization. Gene identification and expression studies in 'Calcutta-4' might reveal possible gene candidates for resistant to the disease and elucidate mechanisms for resistance. A subtracted cDNA library was generated from leaves after 6, 9 and 12 days inoculated with M. fijiensis conidia on greenhouse banana plants of the accession 'Calcutta-4'. Bioinformatic analysis revealed 99 good quality sequences. Blast2go analysis revealed that 31% of the sequences could not be categorized and, according to the Biological Process Category, 32 and 28 ESTs are related to general metabolic and cellular processes, respectively; while 10 ESTs response to stimulus. Seven sequences were redundant and one was similar to genes that may be involved in pathogen resistance including the putative disease resistance protein RGA1. Genes encoding zinc finger domains were identified and may play an important role in pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of downstream genes. Expression analysis of four selected genes was performed using RT-qPCR during the early stage of the disease development at 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post inoculation showing a peak of up regulation at 9 or 12 days post inoculation. Three of the four genes showed an up-regulation of expression in 'Calcutta-4' when compared to 'Williams' after inoculation with M. fijiensis, suggesting a fine regulation of specific gene candidates that may lead to a resistance response. The genes identified in early responses in a plant-pathogen interaction may be relevant for the resistance response of 'Calcutta-4' to Black Sigatoka

  8. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyuha Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr effectors by resistance (R genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1 R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  9. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  10. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  11. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the "perfect microbial storm". Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  12. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick I. Mackie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  13. Physiological Macro-lesions Enhanced Resistance to Blast (Magnaporthe grisea) in Rice Near-isogenic Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shi-wen; LU Ji-ying; LUO Kun; ZHANG Xiu-fu; QIAN Qian

    2005-01-01

    Roll-leaf-1 (rl-1) and spot-leaf-1 (spl-1) were two near-isogenic lines, which were obtained after 3 to 4 backcrosses withearly season indica rice Zhefu 802 as recurrent parent. Henna macro-lesions, referred as physiological or morphological markers,began to appear on leaves at 4.5- to 6.0-leaf stage. The rice seedlings were inoculated at 3.5-, 5.0- and 7.0-leaf stages with highpathogenic races Zhong A1 and Zhong B1 of Magnaporthe grisea, respectively. The resistance of rl-1, spl-1 and Zhefu 802 againstblast was significantly different. The seedlings of Zhefu 802 at 3.5- to 7.0-leaf stage were susceptible to races Zhong A1 and ZhongB1 of M. grisea, whereas those of rl-1 and spl-1 at 3.5-, 5.0- and 7.0-leaf stages were susceptible, moderately resistant andresistant, respectively. These results suggested that the enhanced resistance of ri-1 and spl-1 related to the appearance of theirmorphological marker lesions. The experiment provided a basis for studying lesion mimic and hypersensitive response inassociation with disease resistance.

  14. Retinoic acid therapy resistance progresses from unilineage to bilineage in HL-60 leukemic blasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly A Jensen

    Full Text Available Emergent resistance can be progressive and driven by global signaling aberrations. All-trans retinoic acid (RA is the standard therapeutic agent for acute promyelocytic leukemia, but 10-20% of patients are not responsive, and initially responsive patients relapse and develop retinoic acid resistance. The patient-derived, lineage-bipotent acute myeloblastic leukemia (FAB M2 HL-60 cell line is a potent tool for characterizing differentiation-induction therapy responsiveness and resistance in t(15;17-negative cells. Wild-type (WT HL-60 cells undergo RA-induced granulocytic differentiation, or monocytic differentiation in response to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (D3. Two sequentially emergent RA-resistant HL-60 cell lines, R38+ and R38-, distinguishable by RA-inducible CD38 expression, do not arrest in G1/G0 and fail to upregulate CD11b and the myeloid-associated signaling factors Vav1, c-Cbl, Lyn, Fgr, and c-Raf after RA treatment. Here, we show that the R38+ and R38- HL-60 cell lines display a progressive reduced response to D3-induced differentiation therapy. Exploiting the biphasic dynamic of induced HL-60 differentiation, we examined if resistance-related defects occurred during the first 24 h (the early or "precommitment" phase or subsequently (the late or "lineage-commitment" phase. HL-60 were treated with RA or D3 for 24 h, washed and retreated with either the same, different, or no differentiation agent. Using flow cytometry, D3 was able to induce CD38, CD11b and CD14 expression, and G1/G0 arrest when present during the lineage-commitment stage in R38+ cells, and to a lesser degree in R38- cells. Clustering analysis of cytometry and quantified Western blot data indicated that WT, R38+ and R38- HL-60 cells exhibited decreasing correlation between phenotypic markers and signaling factor expression. Thus differentiation induction therapy resistance can develop in stages, with initial partial RA resistance and moderate vitamin D3 responsiveness

  15. Retinoic acid therapy resistance progresses from unilineage to bilineage in HL-60 leukemic blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Holly A; Bunaciu, Rodica P; Ibabao, Christopher N; Myers, Rebecca; Varner, Jeffrey D; Yen, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Emergent resistance can be progressive and driven by global signaling aberrations. All-trans retinoic acid (RA) is the standard therapeutic agent for acute promyelocytic leukemia, but 10-20% of patients are not responsive, and initially responsive patients relapse and develop retinoic acid resistance. The patient-derived, lineage-bipotent acute myeloblastic leukemia (FAB M2) HL-60 cell line is a potent tool for characterizing differentiation-induction therapy responsiveness and resistance in t(15;17)-negative cells. Wild-type (WT) HL-60 cells undergo RA-induced granulocytic differentiation, or monocytic differentiation in response to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (D3). Two sequentially emergent RA-resistant HL-60 cell lines, R38+ and R38-, distinguishable by RA-inducible CD38 expression, do not arrest in G1/G0 and fail to upregulate CD11b and the myeloid-associated signaling factors Vav1, c-Cbl, Lyn, Fgr, and c-Raf after RA treatment. Here, we show that the R38+ and R38- HL-60 cell lines display a progressive reduced response to D3-induced differentiation therapy. Exploiting the biphasic dynamic of induced HL-60 differentiation, we examined if resistance-related defects occurred during the first 24 h (the early or "precommitment" phase) or subsequently (the late or "lineage-commitment" phase). HL-60 were treated with RA or D3 for 24 h, washed and retreated with either the same, different, or no differentiation agent. Using flow cytometry, D3 was able to induce CD38, CD11b and CD14 expression, and G1/G0 arrest when present during the lineage-commitment stage in R38+ cells, and to a lesser degree in R38- cells. Clustering analysis of cytometry and quantified Western blot data indicated that WT, R38+ and R38- HL-60 cells exhibited decreasing correlation between phenotypic markers and signaling factor expression. Thus differentiation induction therapy resistance can develop in stages, with initial partial RA resistance and moderate vitamin D3 responsiveness (unilineage

  16. Demystifying blast effects on buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, A.; Carson, D.; Stevens, T. [Halsall Associates Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presented methods of designing the structures of building structures in such a way that the effects of blast loads can be mitigated. The methods were designed to provide strength and ductility so that kinetic energy delivered by the blast is resisted by strain energy. Fundamental aspects of blast effects were examined, and the design of flexural members subject to blast loading were discussed. An equivalent static load procedure based on the equivalency of kinetic and strain energies was also presented along with a threat independent approach which included principles to prevent progressive collapse, ductile columns, and the addition of upward resistance to floors. Measures to mitigate damage caused by shattered glass and other cladding elements during blasts were also discussed.

  17. Evaluating the mobility potential of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes without metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pärnänen, Katariina; Karkman, Antti; Tamminen, Manu; Lyra, Christina; Hultman, Jenni; Paulin, Lars; Virta, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are ubiquitous in the environment. However, only a fraction of them are mobile and able to spread to pathogenic bacteria. Until now, studying the mobility of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes has been challenging due to inadequate sensitivity and difficulties in contig assembly of metagenome based methods. We developed a new cost and labor efficient method based on Inverse PCR and long read sequencing for studying mobility potential of environmental resistance genes. We applied Inverse PCR on sediment samples and identified 79 different MGE clusters associated with the studied resistance genes, including novel mobile genetic elements, co-selected resistance genes and a new putative antibiotic resistance gene. The results show that the method can be used in antibiotic resistance early warning systems. In comparison to metagenomics, Inverse PCR was markedly more sensitive and provided more data on resistance gene mobility and co-selected resistances. PMID:27767072

  18. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance and characterization of resistant genes and integrons in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao-Chang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Rui-Quan; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are still widely applied in animal husbandry to prevent diseases and used as feed additives to promote animal growth. This could result in antibiotic resistance to bacteria and antibiotic residues in animals. In this paper, Enterobacteriaceae isolated from four integrated fish farms in Zhongshan, South China were tested for antibiotic resistance, tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and class 1 integrons. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were carried out to test antibiotic susceptibility and resistance genes, respectively. Relatively high antibiotic resistance frequencies were found, especially for ampicillin (80%), tetracycline (52%), and trimethoprim (50%). Out of 203 Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 98.5% were resistant to one or more antibiotics tested. Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) was found highest in animal manures with a MAR index of 0.56. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet(A), tet(C)) and sulfonamide resistance genes (sul2) were detected in more than 50% of the isolates. The intI1 gene was found in 170 isolates (83.7%). Both classic and non-classic class 1 integrons were found. Four genes, aadA5, aadA22, dfr2, and dfrA17, were detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report for molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms in China and the first time that gene cassette array dfrA17-aadA5 has been detected in such fish farms. Results of this study indicated that fish farms may be a reservoir of highly diverse and abundant antibiotic resistant genes and gene cassettes. Integrons may play a key role in multiple antibiotic resistances posing potential health risks to the general public and aquaculture.

  19. Effect of blasting treatment and Fn coating on MG63 adhesion and differentiation on titanium: a gene expression study using real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegueroles, M; Aguirre, A; Engel, E; Pavon, G; Gil, F J; Planell, J A; Migonney, V; Aparicio, C

    2011-03-01

    Biomaterial surface properties, via alterations in the adsorbed protein layer, and the presence of specific functional groups can influence integrin binding specificity, thereby modulating cell adhesion and differentiation processes. The adsorption of fibronectin, a protein directly involved in osteoblast adhesion to the extracellular matrix, has been related to different physical and chemical properties of biomaterial surfaces. This study used blasting particles of different sizes and chemical compositions to evaluate the response of MG63 osteoblast-like cells on smooth and blasted titanium surfaces, with and without fibronectin coatings, by means of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. This response included (a) expression of the α(5), α(v) and α(3) integrin subunits, which can bind to fibronectin through the RGD binding site, and (b) expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OC) as cell-differentiation markers. ALP activity and synthesis of OC were also tested. Cells on SiC-blasted Ti surfaces expressed higher amounts of the α(5) mRNA gene than cells on Al(2)O(3)-blasted Ti surfaces. This may be related to the fact that SiC-blasted surfaces adsorbed higher amounts of fibronectin due to their higher surface free energy and therefore provided a higher number of specific cell-binding sites. Fn-coated Ti surfaces decreased α(5) mRNA gene expression, by favoring the formation of other integrins involved in adhesion over α(5)β(1). The changes in α(5) mRNA expression induced by the presence of fibronectin coatings may moreover influence the osteoblast differentiation pathway, as fibronectin coatings on Ti surfaces also decreased both ALP mRNA expression and ALP activity after 14 and 21 days of cell culture.

  20. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li-jia; Song Yun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Ht1, Htn1 and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhm1 and Rhm2, maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdm1, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm1, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2.1 of tomato,and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes1, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3.25) except for genes Rhm1, Rhm2, Mdm1 and Wsm1 which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  1. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  2. Entomic Resistance Genes for Genetic Engineering in Agricultural Furtherance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering for insect pest’s management in crop plants offers the potential of a user-friendly, environmentfriendly and consumer-friendly method of crop protection to meet the demands of sustainable agriculture. Food and energy insecurities are currently two foremost problems being faced worldwide. Losses due to pests and diseases have been estimated to be around 37% of the agricultural production worldwide, with 13% due to insects. Engineering insect resistance in transgenic plants has been achieved through the use of insect control protein genes of Bacillus thuringiensis. Till now, researchers have focused on the introduction of genes for expression of modified Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins. Successful results on the control of Bt-susceptible pests have been achieved in the laboratory and finally in the field and now commercialized Bt transgenic crops are used worldwide. Other alternative methods exploit plant-derived insect control genes with promising results. Today insect-resistance transgenes, whether of plant, bacterial or other origin, can be introduced in to plants to increase the level of insect resistance so as to contribute to sustainable agricultural practices.

  3. Resistance of Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Transgenic Rice to Bacterial Blight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WU Chao; LIU Mei; LIU Xu-ri; Hu Guo-cheng; SI Hua-min; SUN Zong-xiu; LIU Wen-zhen; Fu Ya-ping

    2011-01-01

    Antimierobial peptide is a polypeptide with antimicrobial activity.Antimicrobial peptide genes Np3 and Np5 from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus Chinensis) were integrated into Oryza sativa L.subsp.japonica cv.Aichi ashahi by Agrobacterium mediated transformation system.PCR analysis showed that the positive ratios of Np3 and Np5 were 36% and 45% in T0 generation,respectively.RT-PCR analysis showed that the antimicrobial peptide genes were expressed in T1 generation,and there was no obvious difference in agronomic traits between transgenic plants and non-transgenic plants.Four Np3 and Np5 transgenic lines in T1 generation were inoculated with ×anthomonas oryzae pv.oryzae strain CR4,and all the four transgenic lines had significantly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by the strain CR4.The Np5 transgenic lines also showed higher resistance to bacterial blight caused by strains JS97-2,Zhe 173 and OS-225.It is suggested that transgenic lines with Np5 gene might possess broad spectrum resistance to rice bacterial blight.

  4. Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Related to Resistance in Spinosad- and Neonicotinoid-Resistant Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højland, Dorte H.

    2017-01-01

    Background The housefly is a global pest that has developed resistance to most insecticides applied against it. Resistance of the spinosad-resistant strain 791spin and the neonicotinoid-resistant 766b strain is believed to be due to metabolism. We investigate differentially expressed genes in these two resistant strains related to metabolism in comparison with an insecticide-susceptible reference strain. Results Genes involved in metabolism of xenobiotics were primarily up-regulated in resistant flies with some differences between resistant strains. The cyp4g98 and cyp6g4 genes proved interesting in terms of neonicotinoid resistance, while cyp4d9 was overexpressed in 791spin compared to spinosad-susceptible strains. GSTs, ESTs and UGTs were mostly overexpressed, but not to the same degree as P450s. We present a comprehensive and comparative picture of gene expression in three housefly strains differing significantly in their response to insecticides. High differential expression of P450s and genes coding for cuticle protein indicates a combination of factors involved in metabolic neonicotinoid and spinosad resistance. Conclusion Resistance in these strains is apparently not linked to the alteration of a single gene but is composed of several changes including differential expression of genes encoding metabolic detoxification enzymes. PMID:28125739

  5. Advances in Localization and Molecular Markers of Wheat Leaf Rust Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wen-xiang; LIU Da-qun

    2004-01-01

    Genetic resistance is the most economical method of reducing yield losses caused by wheat leaf rust. To identify the leaf rust resistance genes in commonly used parental germplasm and released cultivars become very important for utilizing the genetic resistance tc wheat leaf rust fully. Up to date, about 90 leaf rust resistance genes have been found,of which 51 genes have been located and mapped to special chromosomes, and 56 genes have been designated officially according to the standards set forth in the Catalogue of Gene Symbols for wheat. Twenty-four wheat leaf rust resistance genes have been developed for their molecular markers. It is very important to isolate, characterize, and map leaf rust resistance genes due to the resistance losses of the genes caused by the pathogen continuously.

  6. The Optimization and Design of a Fully Austenitic, Gamma-Prime Strengthened TRIP Steel for Blast and Fragment Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengrenovich, Nicholas J.

    Current analysis into the property requirements of materials designed for blast and fragment protection has led to the need for high tensile uniform ductility to withstand the pressure wave and high shear localization resistance to withstand fragment penetration. Additionally, it has been shown that steels with retained austenite are able to outperform standard martensitic steels when subjected to fragment simulating projectiles (FSP) in ballistic experiments. Using a systems based, computational materials design approach, a series of prototype precipitation strengthened, fully austenitic steels have been designed to obtain superior performance in blast and fragment protection. The most recent design, TRIP-180, explores optimized transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) to counteract strain softening and thus significantly increase uniform plastic deformation in both tension and shear at high strength (1241 MPa / 180 ksi). The transformation hardening delays the onset of localization, which in tension delays necking, and in shear delays plugging. Through precipitation heat treatment, the matrix composition can be varied to optimize the austenite stability, quantified by the Ms sigma temperature. Baseline data quantifying the martensitic transformation in shear was obtained through a series of quasi-static torsion experiments performed on TRIP-180. Analysis of the postmortem microstructures allowed for calibration of M_s. sigma(sh) temperatures with the transformation product morphologiesin the stress-assisted regime, where the plate martensite forms at the same locations as when quenching, and strain-induced regime, where the finely dispersed martensite forms at the intersections of shear bands. Dynamic testing (E = 104/s) identified the optimal austenite stability ( T -- Ms sigma(sh) = 60°C ) required to delay the shear localization instability at higher ultimate shear stress levels (1420 MPa) and larger plastic strains (0.103) than an existing Navy standard

  7. Functional analysis of a wheat pleiotropic drug resistance gene involved in Fusarium head blight resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gui-ping; KONG Ling-rang; HOU Wen-qian; ZHANG Lei; WU Hong-yan; ZHAO Lan-fei; DU Xu-ye; MA Xin; LI An-fei; WANG Hong-wei

    2016-01-01

    The pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) sub-family of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter had been reported to participate in diverse biological processes of plant. In this study, we cloned three novelPDR genes in Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistant wheat cultivar Ning 7840, which were located on wheat chromosomes 6A, 6B and 6D. In phylogeny, these genes were members of cluster I together with AePDR7 andBdPDR7. Subcelular localization analysis showed thatTaPDR7 was expressed on the plasmalemma. The quantitative real time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis showed that this gene and its probable orthologues in chromosomes 6B and 6D were both up-regulated sharply at 48 h after infected byFusarium graminearum and trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) in spike. When knocking down the transcripts of alTaPDR7 members by barely stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) system, it could promote the F. graminearum hyphae growth and made larger pathogen inoculation points in Ning 7840, which suggested that TaPDR7 might play an important role in response toF. graminearum. Although salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and abscisic acid (ABA) had been reported to possibly regulate wheat FHB resistance, here, we found that the three members ofTaPDR7 were negatively regulated by these three hormones but positively regulated by indoleacetic acid (IAA).

  8. The Identification of Novel Diagnostic Marker Genes for the Detection of Beer Spoiling Pediococcus damnosus Strains Using the BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Jürgen; Geissler, Andreas J; Schmid, Jonas; Zehe, Anja; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-01

    As the number of bacterial genomes increases dramatically, the demand for easy to use tools with transparent functionality and comprehensible output for applied comparative genomics grows as well. We present BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr (BADGE), a tool for the rapid prediction of diagnostic marker genes (DMGs) for the differentiation of bacterial groups (e.g. pathogenic / nonpathogenic). DMG identification settings can be modified easily and installing and running BADGE does not require specific bioinformatics skills. During the BADGE run the user is informed step by step about the DMG finding process, thus making it easy to evaluate the impact of chosen settings and options. On the basis of an example with relevance for beer brewing, being one of the oldest biotechnological processes known, we show a straightforward procedure, from phenotyping, genome sequencing, assembly and annotation, up to a discriminant marker gene PCR assay, making comparative genomics a means to an end. The value and the functionality of BADGE were thoroughly examined, resulting in the successful identification and validation of an outstanding novel DMG (fabZ) for the discrimination of harmless and harmful contaminations of Pediococcus damnosus, which can be applied for spoilage risk determination in breweries. Concomitantly, we present and compare five complete P. damnosus genomes sequenced in this study, finding that the ability to produce the unwanted, spoilage associated off-flavor diacetyl is a plasmid encoded trait in this important beer spoiling species.

  9. The Identification of Novel Diagnostic Marker Genes for the Detection of Beer Spoiling Pediococcus damnosus Strains Using the BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Behr

    Full Text Available As the number of bacterial genomes increases dramatically, the demand for easy to use tools with transparent functionality and comprehensible output for applied comparative genomics grows as well. We present BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr (BADGE, a tool for the rapid prediction of diagnostic marker genes (DMGs for the differentiation of bacterial groups (e.g. pathogenic / nonpathogenic. DMG identification settings can be modified easily and installing and running BADGE does not require specific bioinformatics skills. During the BADGE run the user is informed step by step about the DMG finding process, thus making it easy to evaluate the impact of chosen settings and options. On the basis of an example with relevance for beer brewing, being one of the oldest biotechnological processes known, we show a straightforward procedure, from phenotyping, genome sequencing, assembly and annotation, up to a discriminant marker gene PCR assay, making comparative genomics a means to an end. The value and the functionality of BADGE were thoroughly examined, resulting in the successful identification and validation of an outstanding novel DMG (fabZ for the discrimination of harmless and harmful contaminations of Pediococcus damnosus, which can be applied for spoilage risk determination in breweries. Concomitantly, we present and compare five complete P. damnosus genomes sequenced in this study, finding that the ability to produce the unwanted, spoilage associated off-flavor diacetyl is a plasmid encoded trait in this important beer spoiling species.

  10. A nanoplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of vancomycin and bifunctional aminoglycoside resistance genes in Enterococcus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Manickam

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococci have emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections in many parts of the world over the last decade. The most common enterococci strains present in clinical isolates are E. faecalis and E. faecium which have acquired resistant to either gentamicin or vancomycin. The conventional culture test takes 2–5 days to yield complete information of the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Hence our present study was focused on developing a nanoplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of vancomycin and bifunctional aminoglycoside resistant enterococci (V-BiA-RE. This assay simultaneously detects 8 genes namely 16S rRNA of Enterococcus genus, ddl of E. faecalis and E. faecium, aacA-aphD that encodes high level gentamicin resistance (HLGR, multilevel vancomycin resistant genotypes such as vanA, vanB, vanC and vanD and one internal control gene. Results Unique and specific primer pairs were designed to amplify the 8 genes. The specificity of the primers was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the nanoplex PCR products and BLAST analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of V-BiA-RE nanoplex PCR assay was evaluated against the conventional culture method. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was found to be 1 ng at the DNA level while the analytical specificity was evaluated with 43 reference enterococci and non-enterococcal strains and was found to be 100%. The diagnostic accuracy was determined using 159 clinical specimens, which showed that 97% of the clinical isolates belonged to E. faecalis, of which 26% showed the HLGR genotype, but none were vancomycin resistant. The presence of an internal control in the V-BiA-RE nanoplex PCR assay helped us to rule out false negative cases. Conclusion The nanoplex PCR assay is robust and can give results within 4 hours about the 8 genes that are essential for the identification of the most common Enterococcus spp. and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern. The PCR assay

  11. A Novel Phytophthora sojae Resistance Rps12 Gene Mapped to a Genomic Region That Contains Several Rps Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Dipak K.; Abeysekara, Nilwala S.; Cianzio, Silvia R.; Robertson, Alison E.

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdemann, which causes Phytophthora root rot, is a widespread pathogen that limits soybean production worldwide. Development of Phytophthora resistant cultivars carrying Phytophthora resistance Rps genes is a cost-effective approach in controlling this disease. For this mapping study of a novel Rps gene, 290 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (F7 families) were developed by crossing the P. sojae resistant cultivar PI399036 with the P. sojae susceptible AR2 line, and were phenotyped for responses to a mixture of three P. sojae isolates that overcome most of the known Rps genes. Of these 290 RILs, 130 were homozygous resistant, 12 heterzygous and segregating for Phytophthora resistance, and 148 were recessive homozygous and susceptible. From this population, 59 RILs homozygous for Phytophthora sojae resistance and 61 susceptible to a mixture of P. sojae isolates R17 and Val12-11 or P7074 that overcome resistance encoded by known Rps genes mapped to Chromosome 18 were selected for mapping novel Rps gene. A single gene accounted for the 1:1 segregation of resistance and susceptibility among the RILs. The gene encoding the Phytophthora resistance mapped to a 5.8 cM interval between the SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_18_1840 and Sat_064 located in the lower arm of Chromosome 18. The gene is mapped 2.2 cM proximal to the NBSRps4/6-like sequence that was reported to co-segregate with the Phytophthora resistance genes Rps4 and Rps6. The gene is mapped to a highly recombinogenic, gene-rich genomic region carrying several nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-like genes. We named this novel gene as Rps12, which is expected to be an invaluable resource in breeding soybeans for Phytophthora resistance. PMID:28081566

  12. pncA Gene Mutations Associated with Pyrazinamide Resistance in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa and Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allana, Salim; Shashkina, Elena; Mathema, Barun; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Shah, N Sarita; Kempker, Russell R; Blumberg, Henry M; Moodley, Pravi; Mlisana, Koleka; Brust, James C M; Gandhi, Neel R

    2017-03-01

    Although pyrazinamide is commonly used for tuberculosis treatment, drug-susceptibility testing is not routinely available. We found polymorphisms in the pncA gene for 70% of multidrug-resistant and 96% of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa and Georgia. Assessment of pyrazinamide susceptibility may be prudent before using it in regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  13. A review of the influence of treatment strategies on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virender K; Johnson, Natalie; Cizmas, Leslie; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the aquatic environment have become an emerging contaminant issue, which has implications for human and ecological health. This review begins with an introduction to the occurrence of ARB and ARG in different environmental systems such as natural environments and drinking water resources. For example, ARG or ARB with resistance to ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, quinolone, vancomycin, or tetracycline (e.g., tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(G), tet(O), tet(M), tet(W), sul I, and sul II) have been detected in the environment. The development of resistance may be intrinsic, may be acquired through spontaneous mutations (de novo), or may occur due to horizontal gene transfer from donor bacteria, phages, or free DNA to recipient bacteria. An overview is also provided of the current knowledge regarding inactivation of ARB and ARG, and the mechanism of the effects of different disinfection processes in water and wastewater (chlorination, UV irradiation, Fenton reaction, ozonation, and photocatalytic oxidation). The effects of constructed wetlands and nanotechnology on ARB and ARG are also summarized.

  14. Study on Insect-resistant Transgenic Cotton Harbouring Double-gene and Its Resistance to Insect Pests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fu-guang; CUI Jin-jie; LIU Chuan-liang; WU Zhi-xia; LI Feng-lian; ZHOU Yong; LI Xiu-lan; GUO San-dui; CUI Hong-zhi

    2001-01-01

    By using the method of pollen tube pathway, the synthesized GFM CryIA gene and modified CpTI gene were transfered into the elite cotton( Gossypium hirsutun L. ) varieties(lines). Through the field and lab identifications, the insect-resistant transgenic plants were obtained. PCR analysis indicated that both the synthesized GFM CryIA gene and modified CpTI gene presented positive reaction. In R1 the boliworm resistance of each transformant was different, and the insect-resistance of R3 of ZGK9708 was stable.

  15. Evolution by Pervasive Gene Fusion in Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Synthesizing Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla Coleman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic (tree-based approaches to understanding evolutionary history are unable to incorporate convergent evolutionary events where two genes merge into one. In this study, as exemplars of what can be achieved when a tree is not assumed a priori, we have analysed the evolutionary histories of polyketide synthase genes and antibiotic resistance genes and have shown that their history is replete with convergent events as well as divergent events. We demonstrate that the overall histories of these genes more closely resembles the remodelling that might be seen with the children’s toy Lego, than the standard model of the phylogenetic tree. This work demonstrates further that genes can act as public goods, available for re-use and incorporation into other genetic goods.

  16. Identification of aminoglycoside resistance genes by Triplex PCR in Enterococcus spp. isolated from ICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnejad, Reza; Sajjadi, Nikta; Masoumi Zavaryani, Sara; Piranfar, Vahhab; Hajihosseini, Maryam; Roshanfekr, Maliheh

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of antibiotic-resistant enterococci is an important part of patient treatment. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the resistance patterns and simultaneously identify and characterise the resistance genes in Enterococcus spp. using a triplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. In all, 150 consecutive Enterococcus spp were collected from several hospitals in Tehran (Iran) from January to December 2015. The Enterococcus species were identified by standard phenotypic/biochemical tests and PCR. The antimicrobial resistance patterns were determined using a disk diffusion method. The triplex PCR method was designed to identify gentamicin and other aminoglycoside resistance genes. Among the 150 Enterococcus specimens, 87 cases (58%) were Enterococcus faecalis, and 63 cases (42%) were Enterococcus faecium. The highest frequency of resistance was observed for tetracycline while the lowest was found for vancomycin. Among the identified samples, 56.9% contained the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia gene, 22.2% contained the aph(3')-IIIa gene, and 38.8% contained the ant(4')-?a gene. Eight percent of the isolates contained the three aminoglycoside resistance genes. Data analysis showed that there was a significant correlation between the phenotypic gentamicin resistance and the presence of the aminoglycoside resistance genes (18.9%, p Enterococcus strains had increased aminoglycoside resistance. The direct correlation between resistance genes, such as the aminoglycoside resistance factor, and phenotypic resistance was not significant (p > 0.05).

  17. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zijian; Lai, Wei; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistantNeisseria gonorrhoeaeis currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance inNeisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation inpenA(A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutatedpenAgene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutatedftsXincreased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, whilepilM,pilN, andpilQwere downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance ofNeisseria gonorrhoeaeto ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry.

  18. Human Multidrug Resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Marcella; Scapoli, Luca; Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Carbonara, Paolo; Girardi, Ambra; Mattei, Gabriella; Rodia, Maria Teresa; Solmi, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    Background: For the first time we tested an association between the human multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) polymorphisms (SNPs) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Several MDR1 polymorphisms are associated with pathologies in which they modify the drug susceptibility and pharmacokinetics. Materials and Methods: We genotyped three MDR1 polymorphisms of 48 IPF patients and 100 control subjects with Italian origins. Results: No evidence of association was detected. Conclusion: There are 50 known MDR1 SNPs, and their role is explored in terms of the effectiveness of drug therapy. We consider our small-scale preliminary study as a starting point for further research. PMID:25767528

  19. Distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistant genes and bacteria across agricultural and non-agricultural metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Lisa M; Miller, Daniel N; Wienhold, Brian J

    2012-01-01

    There is concern that antibiotic resistance can potentially be transferred from animals to humans through the food chain. The relationship between specific antibiotic resistant bacteria and the genes they carry remains to be described. Few details are known about the ecology of antibiotic resistant genes and bacteria in food production systems, or how antibiotic resistance genes in food animals compare to antibiotic resistance genes in other ecosystems. Here we report the distribution of antibiotic resistant genes in publicly available agricultural and non-agricultural metagenomic samples and identify which bacteria are likely to be carrying those genes. Antibiotic resistance, as coded for in the genes used in this study, is a process that was associated with all natural, agricultural, and human-impacted ecosystems examined, with between 0.7 to 4.4% of all classified genes in each habitat coding for resistance to antibiotic and toxic compounds (RATC). Agricultural, human, and coastal-marine metagenomes have characteristic distributions of antibiotic resistance genes, and different bacteria that carry the genes. There is a larger percentage of the total genome associated with antibiotic resistance in gastrointestinal-associated and agricultural metagenomes compared to marine and Antarctic samples. Since antibiotic resistance genes are a natural part of both human-impacted and pristine habitats, presence of these resistance genes in any specific habitat is therefore not sufficient to indicate or determine impact of anthropogenic antibiotic use. We recommend that baseline studies and control samples be taken in order to determine natural background levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or antibiotic resistance genes when investigating the impacts of veterinary use of antibiotics on human health. We raise questions regarding whether the underlying biology of each type of bacteria contributes to the likelihood of transfer via the food chain.

  20. Analysis of insecticide resistance-related genes of the Carmine spider mite Tetranychus cinnabarinus based on a de novo assembled transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng Xu

    Full Text Available The carmine spider mite (CSM, Tetranychus cinnabarinus, is an important pest mite in agriculture, because it can develop insecticide resistance easily. To gain valuable gene information and molecular basis for the future insecticide resistance study of CSM, the first transcriptome analysis of CSM was conducted. A total of 45,016 contigs and 25,519 unigenes were generated from the de novo transcriptome assembly, and 15,167 unigenes were annotated via BLAST querying against current databases, including nr, SwissProt, the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG and Gene Ontology (GO. Aligning the transcript to Tetranychus urticae genome, the 19255 (75.45% of the transcripts had significant (e-value <10-5 matches to T. urticae DNA genome, 19111 sequences matched to T. urticae proteome with an average protein length coverage of 42.55%. Core Eukaryotic Genes Mapping Approach (CEGMA analysis identified 435 core eukaryotic genes (CEGs in the CSM dataset corresponding to 95% coverage. Ten gene categories that relate to insecticide resistance in arthropod were generated from CSM transcriptome, including 53 P450-, 22 GSTs-, 23 CarEs-, 1 AChE-, 7 GluCls-, 9 nAChRs-, 8 GABA receptor-, 1 sodium channel-, 6 ATPase- and 12 Cyt b genes. We developed significant molecular resources for T. cinnabarinus putatively involved in insecticide resistance. The transcriptome assembly analysis will significantly facilitate our study on the mechanism of adapting environmental stress (including insecticide in CSM at the molecular level, and will be very important for developing new control strategies against this pest mite.

  1. Development of resistant tomato population with bacterial canker resistance genes from interspecific hybrids by the support of embryo rescue

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin KABAŞ; Esin ARI; Sinan ZENGİN; Hülya İLBİ; AYSAN, Yeşim; Asu OĞUZ

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial canker is one of the most important diseases causing economic yield loss in tomato production areas in the world. The best way to control for this disease is to use resistant varieties. However, there are few studies on variety breeding studies of this disease compared with other disease resistant breeding studies. In this study we aimed to improve inbred lines carrying bacterial canker resistance genes to use in the breeding of resistant varieties. Susceptible inbred line AK1 (S. e...

  2. Ultraviolet disinfection of antibiotic resistant bacteria and their antibiotic resistance genes in water and wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Chad W; Pruden, Amy

    2012-12-18

    Disinfection of wastewater treatment plant effluent may be an important barrier for limiting the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARBs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). While ideally disinfection should destroy ARGs, to prevent horizontal gene transfer to downstream bacteria, little is known about the effect of conventional water disinfection technologies on ARGs. This study examined the potential of UV disinfection to damage four ARGs, mec(A), van(A), tet(A), and amp(C), both in extracellular form and present within a host ARBs: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), Escherichia coli SMS-3-5, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 01, respectively. An extended amplicon-length quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to enhance capture of ARG damage events and also to normalize to an equivalent length of target DNA (∼1000 bp) for comparison. It was found that the two Gram-positive ARBs (MRSA and VRE) were more resistant to UV disinfection than the two Gram-negative ARBs (E. coli and P. aeruginosa). The two Gram-positive organisms also possessed smaller total genome sizes, which could also have reduced their susceptibility to UV because of fewer potential pyrimidine dimer targets. An effect of cell type on damage to ARGs was only observed in VRE and P. aeruginosa, the latter potentially because of extracellular polymeric substances. In general, damage of ARGs required much greater UV doses (200-400 mJ/cm² for 3- to 4-log reduction) than ARB inactivation (10-20 mJ/cm² for 4- to 5-log reduction). The proportion of amplifiable ARGs following UV treatment exhibited a strong negative correlation with the number of adjacent thymines (Pearson r 0.85; p disinfection technologies should be explored.

  3. Detection of antibiotic resistance and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the Pearl rivers in South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Ran [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guangguo.ying@gmail.co [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Su Haochang [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhou Hongwei [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, 1838 North Guangzhou Street, Baiyun District, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Sidhu, Jatinder P.S. [CSIRO Land and Water, Queensland Bioscience Precinct, 306 Carmody Road, St Lucia QLD 4067 (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigated antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae family isolates from the Pearl rivers. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates were tested for susceptibility to seven antibiotics ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, tetracycline and trimethoprim. In Liuxi reservoir, with an exception to ampicillin resistant strains (11%) no other antibiotic resistance bacterial strains were detected. However, multiple drug resistance in bacterial isolates from the other sites of Pearl rivers was observed which is possibly due to sewage discharge and input from other anthropogenic sources along the rivers. Four tetracycline resistance genes tet A, tet B, tet C and tet D were detected in the isolates from the rivers. The genes tet A and tet B were widely detected with the detection frequencies of 43% and 40% respectively. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin resistant enteric bacteria were also isolated from the pig and duck manures which suggest a wider distribution of human specific drugs in the environment. This investigation provided a baseline data on antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in the Pearl rivers delta. - High rates of antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae from river water are attributed to wastewater contamination.

  4. The tetracycline resistance determinant Tet 39 and the sulphonamide resistance gene sulII are common among resistant Acinetobacter spp. isolated from integrated fish farms in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Petersen, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the genetic basis for tetracycline and sulphonamide resistance and the prevalence of class I and II integrons in oxytetracycline-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from integrated fish farms in Thailand. Methods: A total of 222 isolates were screened for tetracycline resistance...... genes [tet(A), tet(B), tet(H), tet(M) and tet(39)] and class II integrons by PCR. One hundred and thirty-four of these isolates were also sulphonamide resistant and these isolates were screened for sulphonamide resistance genes (sulII and sulIII) as well as class I integrons. Plasmid extraction...

  5. De novo characterization of the Dialeurodes citri transcriptome: mining genes involved in stress resistance and simple sequence repeats (SSRs) discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E-H; Wei, D-D; Shen, G-M; Yuan, G-R; Bai, P-P; Wang, J-J

    2014-02-01

    The citrus whitefly, Dialeurodes citri (Ashmead), is one of the three economically important whitefly species that infest citrus plants around the world; however, limited genetic research has been focused on D. citri, partly because of lack of genomic resources. In this study, we performed de novo assembly of a transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). In total, 36,766 unigenes with a mean length of 497 bp were identified. Of these unigenes, we identified 17,788 matched known proteins in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database, as determined by Blast search, with 5731, 4850 and 14,441 unigenes assigned to clusters of orthologous groups (COG), gene ontology (GO), and SwissProt, respectively. In total, 7507 unigenes were assigned to 308 known pathways. In-depth analysis of the data showed that 117 unigenes were identified as potentially involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and 67 heat shock protein (Hsp) genes were associated with environmental stress. In addition, these enzymes were searched against the GO and COG database, and the results showed that the three major detoxification enzymes and Hsps were classified into 18 and 3, 6, and 8 annotations, respectively. In addition, 149 simple sequence repeats were detected. The results facilitate the investigation of molecular resistance mechanisms to insecticides and environmental stress, and contribute to molecular marker development. The findings greatly improve our genetic understanding of D. citri, and lay the foundation for future functional genomics studies on this species.

  6. Inheritance of Resistance to SMV3 and Identification of RAPD Marker Linked to the Resistant Gene in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Cui-ming; CHANG Ru-zhen; QIU Li-juan

    2002-01-01

    One SMV resistant soybean line (95-5383) was crossed with four susceptible soybean varieties/line ( HB1, Tiefeng21, Amsoy, Williams) and one resistant introduced line PI486355. Their F1 and F2individuals were identified for SMV resistance by inoculation with SMV3. The results showed that in the four crosses of resistant × susceptible, F1 were susceptible and the ratio of F2 populations was 1 resistant : 3susceptible (mosaic and necrosis), indicating that 95-5383 carries one recessive gene that confer resistance to SMV3. There is segregation of susceptibility in F2 progenies from the cross of 95-5383 × PI486355, indicating that the SMV3 resistant gene in 95-5383 is located at different locus from PI486355. By bulked segregating analysis (BSA) in F2 populations of 95-5383 × HB1, one codominant RAPD marker OPN11980/1070 closely linked to SMV3 resistance gene amplified with RAPD primer OPN11 was identified. The DNA fragment OPN11980 was amplified in resistant parent 95-5383 and resistant bulk, and OPN111070 was amplified in susceptible parent HB1 and susceptible bulk. OPN11980/1070 was amplified in F1. Identification of the markers in F2 plants showed that the codominant marker OPN11980/1070 is closely linked to the SMV resistance locus in95-5383, with genetic distance of 2.1cM.

  7. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven...... sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several...... antibiotic resistance genes were shared by the patients; interestingly, most were reported previously in food animals and healthy humans. Four antibiotic resistance genes were found in the healthy subject. One gene (aph3-III) was identified in the patients and the healthy subject and was related...

  8. Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Berglund

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intI1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.8 × 10(4 copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant isolates identifies genes associated with colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y K; Lee, J-Y; Ko, K S

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is concerning, as colistin is often regarded as the last option for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii infections. Using mRNA sequencing, we compared whole transcriptomes of colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant A. baumannii strains, with the aim of identifying genes involved in colistin resistance. A clinical colistin-susceptible strain (06AC-179) and a colistin-resistant strain (07AC-052) were analysed in this study. In addition, a colistin-resistant mutant (06AC-179-R1) derived from 06AC-179 was also included in this study. High throughput mRNA sequencing was performed with an Illumina HiSeq TM 2000. In total, six genes were identified as associated with colistin resistance in A. baumannii. These six genes encode PmrAB two-component regulatory enzymes, PmrC (a lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase), a glycosyltransferase, a poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase, and a putative membrane protein. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry revealed that all three colistin-resistant strains used in this study had modified lipid A structure by addition of phosphoethanolamine. As genes found in our results are all associated with either lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis or electrostatic changes in the bacterial cell membrane, lipopolysaccharide modification might be one of the principal modes of acquisition of colistin resistance in some A. baumannii strains.

  10. Mapping of Wbph6(t)—a new gene resistant to whitebacked planthopper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Whitebacked planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera Horvath) is one of the most destructive insects for rice. The utilization of WBPH resistance genes is always an efficient solution to this problem. Besides five WBPH resistance genes registered, Wbph1, Wbph2, Wbph3, wbph4, and Wbph5, classical segregation analysis and allelism test showed that several rice landraces from Yunan Province, China, carried a new dominant resistance gene Wbph6(t). We herein reported the mapping of Wbph6(t) by using DNA markers.

  11. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance and Resistance Genes in Aerobic Bacteria Isolated from Pork at Slaughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Ye, Lei

    2016-01-01

    oxytoca, Serratia marcescens, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Myroides phaeus; tet(L) in M. caseolyticus; sul1 in Vibrio cincinnatiensis; sul2 in Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and V. cincinnatiensis; and the class 1 integron and gene cassette aadA2 in V. cincinnatiensis. Approximately 6...... resistance genes were found in new carriers: bla TEM in Lactococcus garvieae, Myroides odoratimimus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Staphylococcus sciuri, Raoultella terrigena, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Acinetobacter ursingii, Sphingobacterium sp., and Oceanobacillus sp.; bla CMY-2 in Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella...

  13. Blast resistant vehicle seat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripley, Edward B

    2013-02-12

    Disclosed are various seats for vehicles particularly military vehicles that are susceptible to attack by road-bed explosive devices such as land mines or improvised explosive devices. The seats often have rigid seat shells and may include rigid bracing for rigidly securing the seat to the chassis of the vehicle. Typically embodiments include channels and particulate media such as sand disposed in the channels. A gas distribution system is generally employed to pump a gas through the channels and in some embodiments the gas is provided at a pressure sufficient to fluidize the particulate media when an occupant is sitting on the seat.

  14. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human’s health in the 21st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6′)-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought. PMID:28094345

  15. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  16. Gene quantification by the NanoGene assay is resistant to inhibition by humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gha-Young; Wang, Xiaofang; Ahn, Hosang; Son, Ahjeong

    2011-10-15

    NanoGene assay is a magnetic bead and quantum dot nanoparticles based gene quantification assay. It relies on a set of probe and signaling probe DNAs to capture the target DNA via hybridization. We have demonstrated the inhibition resistance of the NanoGene assay using humic acids laden genomic DNA (gDNA). At 1 μg of humic acid per mL, quantitiative PCR (qPCR) was inhibited to 0% of its quantification capability whereas NanoGene assay was able to maintain more than 60% of its quantification capability. To further increase the inhibition resistance of NanoGene assay at high concentration of humic acids, we have identified the specific mechanisms that are responsible for the inhibition. We examined five potential mechanisms with which the humic acids can partially inhibit our NanoGene assay. The mechanisms examined were (1) adsorption of humic acids on the particle surface; (2) particle aggregation induced by humic acids; (3) fluorescence quenching of quantum dots by humic acids during hybridization; (4) humic acids mimicking of target DNA; and (5) nonspecific binding between humic acids and target gDNA. The investigation showed that no adsorption of humic acids onto the particles' surface was observed for the humic acids' concentration. Particle aggregation and fluorescence quenching were also negligible. Humic acids also did not mimic the target gDNA except 1000 μg of humic acids per mL and hence should not contribute to the partial inhibition. Four of the above mechanisms were not related to the inhibition effect of humic acids particularly at the environmentally relevant concentrations (captured by the probe and signaling DNA.

  17. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria And Their Associated Resistance Genes in a Conventional Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.

    2013-12-01

    With water scarcity as a pressing issue in Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries, the treatment and reuse of municipal wastewater is increasingly being used as an alternative water source to supplement country water needs. Standards are in place to ensure a safe treated wastewater quality, however they do not regulate pathogenic bacteria and emerging contaminants. Information is lacking on the levels of risk to public health associated with these factors, the efficiency of conventional treatment strategies in removing them, and on wastewater treatment in Saudi Arabia in general. In this study, a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Saudi Arabia is investigated to assess the efficiency of conventional treatment in meeting regulations and removing pathogens and emerging contaminants. The study found pathogenic bacterial genera, antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotic resistant bacteria, many of which were multi-resistant in plant discharges. It was found that although the treatments are able to meet traditional quality guidelines, there remains a risk from the discussed contaminants with wastewater reuse. A deeper understanding of this risk, and suggestions for more thorough guidelines and monitoring are needed.

  18. Identification of candidate genes for Fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage by differential expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Motoki; Fujimoto, Ryo; Ying, Hua; Pu, Zi-jing; Ebe, Yusuke; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Saeki, Natsumi; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kaji, Makoto; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans is an important disease of Brassica worldwide. To identify a resistance (R) gene against Fusarium yellows in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa var. pekinensis), we analyzed differential expression at the whole genome level between resistant and susceptible inbred lines using RNA sequencing. Four hundred and eighteen genes were significantly differentially expressed, and these were enriched for genes involved in response to stress or stimulus. Seven dominant DNA markers at putative R-genes were identified. Presence and absence of the sequence of the putative R-genes, Bra012688 and Bra012689, correlated with the resistance of six inbred lines and susceptibility of four inbred lines, respectively. In F(2) populations derived from crosses between resistant and susceptible inbred lines, presence of Bra012688 and Bra012689 cosegregated with resistance, suggesting that Bra012688 and Bra012689 are good candidates for fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage.

  19. Transfer of Lysozyme Gene into indica Parents of Hybrid Rice by Backcrossing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Zi-li; WANG Zi-xuan; QIN Jing-ping; JIANG Jian-xiong; TAN Yan-ning; ZHOU Qing-ming

    2006-01-01

    Alysozyme gene resistant to rice blast was transferred from the donor transgenic japonica rice Zhonghua 9 (D2-1-2) into a sterile line Pei'ai 64S(PA 64S) and restorer line 9311 of the two-line hybrid rice Liangyoupeijiu, and the restorer line Minghui 63 (MH63) of three-line hybrid rice Shanyou 63 by successive backcrossing. The PCR analysis confirmed that foreign lysozyme gene was B2F2 9311, B2F2 MH63 and B1F2 PA64S, indicating that the foreign gene was stably inherited over successive generations as a dominant single copy gene. The resistance against rice blast in backcross or selfed generations and corresponding testcross combinations were investigated in 2003 and 2004. The results showed that the resistance of the transgenic rice to blast had a greater improvement than that of the corresponding recurrent parents or the corresponding check hybrid combinations. The resistance of the advanced backcross and selfed generations to rice blast is much stronger than that of the early generations. The study confirmed thattransferring the lysozyme gene into hybrid parents by backcrossing was a simple and effective approach to develop new hybrid rice resistant to rice blast.

  20. Identification of I-7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cendales, Yvonne; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Baker, Barbara; Mcgrath, Des J; Jones, David A

    2016-04-01

    The tomato I-3 and I-7 genes confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) race 3 and were introgressed into the cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, from the wild relative Solanum pennellii. I-3 has been identified previously on chromosome 7 and encodes an S-receptor-like kinase, but little is known about I-7. Molecular markers have been developed for the marker-assisted breeding of I-3, but none are available for I-7. We used an RNA-seq and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis approach to map I-7 to a small introgression of S. pennellii DNA (c. 210 kb) on chromosome 8, and identified I-7 as a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein (LRR-RLP), thereby expanding the repertoire of resistance protein classes conferring resistance to Fol. Using an eds1 mutant of tomato, we showed that I-7, like many other LRR-RLPs conferring pathogen resistance in tomato, is EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1) dependent. Using transgenic tomato plants carrying only the I-7 gene for Fol resistance, we found that I-7 also confers resistance to Fol races 1 and 2. Given that Fol race 1 carries Avr1, resistance to Fol race 1 indicates that I-7-mediated resistance, unlike I-2- or I-3-mediated resistance, is not suppressed by Avr1. This suggests that Avr1 is not a general suppressor of Fol resistance in tomato, leading us to hypothesize that Avr1 may be acting against an EDS1-independent pathway for resistance activation. The identification of I-7 has allowed us to develop molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding of both genes currently known to confer Fol race 3 resistance (I-3 and I-7). Given that I-7-mediated resistance is not suppressed by Avr1, I-7 may be a useful addition to I-3 in the tomato breeder's toolbox.

  1. Fine Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of Resistance Gene RSC3Q to Soybean mosaic virus in Qihuang 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng gui-jie; Yang Yong-qing; Ma Ying; Yang Xiao-feng; Chen Shan-yu; Ren Rui; Wang Da-gang; Yang Zhong-lu; ZhI hai-jian

    2014-01-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) disease is one of the most destructive viral diseases in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). SMV strain SC3 is the major prevalent strain in huang-huai and Yangtze valleys, China. The soybean cultivar Qihuang 1 is of a rich resistance spectrum and has a wide range of application in breeding programs in China. In this study, F1, F2 and F2:3 from Qihuang 1×nannong 1138-2 were used to study inheritance and linkage mapping of the SC3 resistance gene in Qihuang 1. The secondary F2 population and near isogenic lines (nILs) derived from residual heterozygous lines (RhLs) of Qihuang 1×nannong 1138-2 were separatively used in the ifne mapping and candidate gene analysis of the resistance gene. Results indicated that a single dominant gene (designated RSC3Q) controls resistance, which was located on chromosome 13. Two genomic-simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers BARCSOYSSR_13_1114 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1136 were found lfanking the two sides of the RSC3Q. The interval between the two markers was 651 kb. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the candidate genes showed that ifve genes (Glyma13g25730, 25750, 25950, 25970 and 26000) were likely involved in soybean SMV resistance. These results would have utility in cloning of RSC3Q resistance candidate gene and marker-assisted selection (MaS) in resistance breeding to SMV.

  2. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  3. Functional metagenomic analysis reveals rivers are a reservoir for diverse antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, G C A; Zhang, L; Hawkey, P M; Gaze, W H; Wellington, E M

    2014-07-16

    The environment harbours a significant diversity of uncultured bacteria and a potential source of novel and extant resistance genes which may recombine with clinically important bacteria disseminated into environmental reservoirs. There is evidence that pollution can select for resistance due to the aggregation of adaptive genes on mobile elements. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluent disposal to a river by using culture independent methods to study diversity of resistance genes downstream of the WWTP in comparison to upstream. Metagenomic libraries were constructed in Escherichia coli and screened for phenotypic resistance to amikacin, gentamicin, neomycin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Resistance genes were identified by using transposon mutagenesis. A significant increase downstream of the WWTP was observed in the number of phenotypic resistant clones recovered in metagenomic libraries. Common β-lactamases such as blaTEM were recovered as well as a diverse range of acetyltransferases and unusual transporter genes, with evidence for newly emerging resistance mechanisms. The similarities of the predicted proteins to known sequences suggested origins of genes from a very diverse range of bacteria. The study suggests that waste water disposal increases the reservoir of resistance mechanisms in the environment either by addition of resistance genes or by input of agents selective for resistant phenotypes.

  4. Cloning and characterization of gene-resistant analogs (RGAs) involved in rust (Puccinia psidii) resistance in Eucalyptus grandis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcelo Luiz Laia; Acelino Couto Alfenas; Sergio Hermnio Brommonschenkel; Shinitiro Oda; Eduardo Jose de Melo; Inae Marie de Arau jo Silva; Janana Fernandes Goncalves; Ariadne Marques

    2015-01-01

    Disease-resistant genes play an important role in defending against a variety of pathogens and insect pests in plants. Most of the disease-resistant genes encode pro-teins with conserved leucine rich repeat and nucleotide binding site domains. In this study, we cloned and char-acterized gene-resistant analogs (RGAs) from Eucalyptus grandis using degenerate PCR, with primers specifically targeting these two domains. The amplified fragments were cloned into the pGEM-T vector and transformed into Escherichia coli. Among the 90 clones obtained, 13 were sequenced and compared with each other and with previ-ously identified gene-resistant diseases. A BLASTX search in GenBank revealed high similarities among the con-served domains of these cloned genes with RGA genes. Some clones, however, showed no significant similarity with DNA sequences in GenBank. Southern blotting ana-lysis identified several polymorphic RFLP loci between distinct genotypes. However, none of them co-segregated with the Puccinia psidii Winter resistance gene 1 (Ppr1) in a population study.

  5. No fitness cost of glyphosate resistance endowed by massive EPSPS gene amplification in Amaranthus palmeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Goh, Sou S; Gaines, Todd A; Han, Heping; Busi, Roberto; Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-04-01

    Amplification of the EPSPS gene has been previously identified as the glyphosate resistance mechanism in many populations of Amaranthus palmeri, a major weed pest in US agriculture. Here, we evaluate the effects of EPSPS gene amplification on both the level of glyphosate resistance and fitness cost of resistance. A. palmeri individuals resistant to glyphosate by expressing a wide range of EPSPS gene copy numbers were evaluated under competitive conditions in the presence or absence of glyphosate. Survival rates to glyphosate and fitness traits of plants under intra-specific competition were assessed. Plants with higher amplification of the EPSPS gene (53-fold) showed high levels of glyphosate resistance, whereas less amplification of the EPSPS gene (21-fold) endowed a lower level of glyphosate resistance. Without glyphosate but under competitive conditions, plants exhibiting up to 76-fold EPSPS gene amplification exhibited similar height, and biomass allocation to vegetative and reproductive organs, compared to glyphosate susceptible A. palmeri plants with no amplification of the EPSPS gene. Both the additive effects of EPSPS gene amplification on the level of glyphosate resistance and the lack of associated fitness costs are key factors contributing to EPSPS gene amplification as a widespread and important glyphosate resistance mechanism likely to become much more evident in weed plant species.

  6. Tagging and Utilization Bruchid Resistance Gene Using PCR Markers in Mungbean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xu-zhen; WANG Su-hua; WU Shao-yu; ZHOU Ji-hong; WANG Shu-min; Charles Y Yang

    2005-01-01

    Sixteen mungbean lines were analyzed using 56 random primers. Different DNA bands were detected between Bruchid resistant lines and susceptible lines. According to the cluster results, the 16 lines can be divided into four groups,including brucid resistant wild types, resistant cultivated lines, resistant progenies and a mixed group. BSA method was used to identify DNA markers that related with bruchid resistant gene by using resistant line and susceptible line and their F2 progeny. One codominant marker was identified, which generated a fragment of 1.79 kb in resistant lines and 1.03kb in susceptible lines. Finally, this codominant marker was considered to be tightly linked with bruchid resistant gene and could be useful in resistant germplasm identification and marker-assisted selection.

  7. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  8. Sequence and gene expression of chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt in the association of in vitro drugs resistance of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Patrick G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance (CQR transporter protein (PfCRT is known to be the important key of CQR. Recent studies have definitively demonstrated a link between mutations in the gene pfcrt and resistance to chloroquine in P. falciparum. Although these mutations are predictive of chloroquine resistance, they are not quantitatively predictive of the degree of resistance. Methods In this study, a total of 95 recently adapted P. falciparum isolates from Thailand were included in the analysis. Parasites were characterized for their drug susceptibility phenotypes and genotypes with respect to pfcrt. From the original 95 isolates, 20 were selected for complete pfcrt sequence analysis. Results Almost all of the parasites characterized carried the previously reported mutations K76T, A220S, Q271E, N326S, I356T and R371I. On complete sequencing, isolates were identified with novel mutations at K76A and E198K. There was a suggestion that parasites carrying E198K were less resistant than those that did not. In addition, pfcrt and pfmdr1 gene expression were investigated by real-time PCR. No relationship between the expression level of either of these genes and response to drug was observed. Conclusion Data from the present study suggest that other genes must contribute to the degree of resistance once the resistance phenotype is established through mutations in pfcrt.

  9. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  10. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, D.; Andrea, D' M.M.; Ramiro Garcia, J.; Leimena, M.M.; Hugenholtz, F.; Zhang, J.; Öztürk, B.; Nylund, L.; Sipkema, D.; Schaik, van W.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Smidt, H.; Passel, van M.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing

  11. Mapping of two new brown planthopper resistance genes from wild rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A brown planthopper (BPH) resistance line, B5, derived its resistance genes from the wild rice Oryza officinalis Wall exwatt, was hybridized with Taichung Native 1, a cultivar highly susceptible to BPH. A mapping population composed of randomly selected 167 F2 individuals was used for determining the BPH resistance genes by the restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP). Bulked segregant analysis was conducted to identify RFLP makers linked to the BPH resistance genes in B5. The results indicat-ed that the markers linked to BPH resistance are located at two genomic regions on the long arm of chromosome 3 and the short arm of chromosome 4, respectively. The existence of the two loci was further assessed by the quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. We located the two loci at a 3.2 cM interval between G1318 and R1925 on chromosome 3 and a 1.2 cM interval between C820 and S11182 on chromosome 4. Comparison with the BPH genes that have been reported indicated that the BPH resistance genes in B5 are novel. These two genes may be useful BPH resistance resource for rice breeding. Furthermore, the mapping of the two genes is useful for cloning the BPH resistance genes.

  12. Risk assessment for Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance on dual-gene versus single-gene corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kristine T; Caprio, Michael A; Allen, K Clint; Musser, Fred R

    2013-02-01

    Recent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) decisions regarding resistance management in Bt-cropping systems have prompted concern in some experts that dual-gene Bt-corn (CrylA.105 and Cry2Ab2 toxins) may result in more rapid selection for resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) than single-gene Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-corn (CrylAb toxin). The concern is that Bt-toxin longevity could be significantly reduced with recent adoption of a natural refuge for dual-gene Bt-cotton (CrylAc and Cry2Ab2 toxins) and concurrent reduction in dual-gene corn refuge from 50 to 20%. A population genetics framework that simulates complex landscapes was applied to risk assessment. Expert opinions on effectiveness of several transgenic corn and cotton varieties were captured and used to assign probabilities to different scenarios in the assessment. At least 350 replicate simulations with randomly drawn parameters were completed for each of four risk assessments. Resistance evolved within 30 yr in 22.5% of simulations with single-gene corn and cotton with no volunteer corn. When volunteer corn was added to this assessment, risk of resistance evolving within 30 yr declined to 13.8%. When dual-gene Bt-cotton planted with a natural refuge and single-gene corn planted with a 50% structured refuge was simulated, simultaneous resistance to both toxins never occurred within 30 yr, but in 38.5% of simulations, resistance evolved to toxin present in single-gene Bt-corn (CrylAb). When both corn and cotton were simulated as dual-gene products, cotton with a natural refuge and corn with a 20% refuge, 3% of simulations evolved resistance to both toxins simultaneously within 30 yr, while 10.4% of simulations evolved resistance to CrylAb/c toxin.

  13. Identification of Specific RAPD Markers Linked to Anthracnose Resistant Gene in Native Wild Grapes of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xi-ping; WANG Yue-jin; ZHOU Peng; ZHENG Xue-qin

    2001-01-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was employed to detect molecular markers linked to anthracnose ( Spheceloma ampelinum de Bary) resistant gene in the native wild grapes ( Vitis L. ) of China. RAPD marker OPJ13-300 was linked to anthracnose resistant gene using 90-3 cross F1 V. quinquangularis Rehd (shang-24) × V. vinifera (Longyan). The marker was verified in 90-3 cross F1, Chinese wild grapes and V. riparia and European grape cuitivars. This work has provided a solid basis for molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS) to disease resistance and cloning of disease resistant genes.

  14. RICE BLAST CONTROL WITH RELEASE OF RESISTANT VARIETIES Борьба с пирикуляриозом риса путем создания устойчивых сортов

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelenskiy G. L.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among fungus diseases of rice, blast is the most harm-ful. The disease is caused by Pyricularia oryzae Cav. Rice is sensitive to blast at all fazes of vegetation. In Russia, the purposeful breeding of rice varieties re-sistant to this disease began in 1982. Over the past period, the rice varieties which are genetically protect-ed from blast and not requiring crop protection have been created

  15. Linkage analysis of genes for resistance to downy mildew (Bremia lactucae) in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, S H; Michelmore, R W

    1985-08-01

    The genetics of specific resistance was studied in F2 populations which segregated for either one or two resistance genes. The resistance factors 1, 11 and 14 which had not previously been characterized genetically segregated as single dominant genes (Dm). Resistance was determined by three linkage groups; R 1/14, 2, 3, and 6 in the first, R 5/8, and 10 in the second and R 4, 7 and 11 in the third. Cultivars of lettuce commonly used in the differential series to detect virulence to R3 and R10, were demonstrated to carry two tightly linked resistance genes. Implications of this linkage arrangement to the manipulation and characterization of these resistance genes are discussed.

  16. Genes for resistance to stripe rust on chromosome 2B and their application in wheat breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peigao Luo; Xueyun Hu; Huaiyu Zhang; Zhenglong Ren

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust,caused by Puccinia striiformis f.sp.tritici,is one of the most damaging diseases of wheat worldwide.Growing resistant cultivars is the most economic and environmental friendly way to control the disease.There are many resistance genes to stripe rust located on wheat chromosome 2B.Here,we propose a strategy to construct the recombinant wheat chromosome 2B with multiple resistances to stripe rust by making crosses between wheat lines or cultivars carrying Yr genes and using marker-assisted selection,based on the reported information about resistance spectrum,chromosomal location,and linked markers of the genes.Pyramiding the resistance genes on 2B would afford a valuable strategy to control the disease by cultivating varieties with durable resistance.The possibility,efficiency,and prospect of the suggested strategy are reviewed in the paper.

  17. Candidate genes for cross-resistance against DNA-damaging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Nessling, Michelle; Will, Rainer D

    2002-01-01

    Drug resistance of tumor cells leads to major drawbacks in the treatment of cancer. To identify candidate genes for drug resistance, we compared the expression patterns of the drug-sensitive human malignant melanoma cell line MeWo and three derived sublines with acquired resistance to the DNA-dam...

  18. Recent Advances in Cloning and Characterization of Disease Resistance Genes in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Ying Dai; Xiong-Lun Liu; Ying-Hui Xiao; Guo-Liang Wang

    2007-01-01

    Rice diseases caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses are one of the major constraints for sustainable rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. The use of resistant cultivars is considered the most economical and effective method to control rice diseases. In the last decade, a dozen resistance genes against the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea and the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae have been cloned. Approximately half of them encode nuclear binding site (NBS) and leucine rich repeat (LRR)-containing proteins, the most common type of cloned plant resistance genes. Interestingly, four of them encode novel proteins which have not been identified in other plant species, suggesting that unique mechanisms might be involved in rice defense responses. This review summarizes the recent advances in cloning and characterization of disease resistance genes in rice and presents future perspectives for in-depth molecular analysis of the function and evolution of rice resistance genes and their interaction with avirulence genes in pathogens.

  19. Identification of the tetracycline resistance gene, tet(M), in Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Sasaki, Y; Ogikubo, Y; Noguchi, N; Sasatsu, M; Takahashi, T

    2001-05-01

    This is the first report to demonstrate the presence of tet(M) in naturally occurring isolates of tetracycline-resistant Erysipelothrix rbusiopathiae, which causes swine erysipelas. The tet(M) gene was isolated from E. rhusiopathiae strain KY5-42. The nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequence were 99% identical to the tet(M) gene from Enterococcus faecalis. The gene was necessary and sufficient for the expression of tetracycline resistance in Escherichia coli. The presence of the tet(M) gene in the 114 tetracycline-resistant E. rhusiopathiae isolates from diseased pigs was detected by the polymerase chain reaction assay. The specific amplified DNA fragment was obtained from all 114 tetracycline-resistant strains. It was suggested that the tet(M) gene was widely present in the field isolates of E. rhusiopathiae resistant to tetracycline.

  20. Antibiotic resistance genes detected in the marine sponge Petromica citrina from Brazilian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinella Silva Laport

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Although antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose a significant threat to human health, the environmental reservoirs of the resistance determinants are still poorly understood. This study reports the detection of resistance genes (ermB, mecA, mupA, qnrA, qnrB and tetL to antibiotics among certain culturable and unculturable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Petromica citrina. The antimicrobial activities elicited by P. citrina and its associated bacteria are also described. The results indicate that the marine environment could play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of resistance genes among bacteria.

  1. The allelic relationship of genes giving resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus in blackgram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, R P; Singh, D P

    1986-09-01

    The allelic relationship of resistance genes for MYMV was studied in blackgram (V. mungo (L.) Hepper). The resistant donors to MYMV - 'Pant U84' and 'UPU 2', and their F1, F2 and F3 generations - were inoculated artificially using an insect vector, whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Genn.). The two recessive genes previously reported for resistance were found to be the same in both donors.

  2. Resistance to Sulfonamides and Dissemination of sul Genes Among Salmonella spp. Isolated from Food in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mąka, Łukasz; Maćkiw, Elżbieta; Ścieżyńska, Halina; Modzelewska, Magdalena; Popowska, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella spp., is an emerging problem of food safety. Antimicrobial use can result in selection of resistant organisms. The food chain is considered a route of transmission of resistant pathogens to humans. In many European countries, sulfonamides are one of the most commonly used antimicrobials. The aim of our investigation was to assess the prevalence of sul genes and plasmid occurrence among sulfonamide-resistant Salmonella spp. Eighty-four sulfonamide-resistant isolates were collected in 2008 and 2013 from retail products in Poland. Minimal inhibitory concentration of all of these isolates was ≥1024 μg/mL. Resistant isolates were tested for the presence of sul1, sul2, sul3, and int1 genes by using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. In total, 44.0% (37/84) isolates carried the sul1 gene, 46.4% (39/84) were sul2 positive, while the sul3 gene was not detected in any of the sulfonamide-resistant isolates tested. It was found that 3.6% (3/84) of resistant Salmonella spp. contained sul1, sul2, and intI genes. All 33 intI-positive isolates carried the sul1 gene. Eleven of the sulfonamide-resistant isolates were negative for all the sul genes. Most of the sulfonamide-resistant Salmonella spp. harbored plasmids; only in eight isolates were no plasmids detected. Generally, the size of the plasmids ranged from approximately 2 kb to ≥90 kb. Our results revealed a relatively a high prevalence of sulfonamides-resistant Salmonella spp. isolated from retail food. Additionally, we have detected a high dissemination of plasmids and class 1 integrons that may enhance the spread of resistance genes in the food chain.

  3. Identification of genes required for nonhost resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae reveals novel signaling components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonhost resistance is a generalized, durable, broad-spectrum resistance exhibited by plant species to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. Although nonhost resistance is an attractive breeding strategy, the molecular basis of this form of resistance remains unclear for many plant-microbe pathosystems, including interactions with the bacterial pathogen of rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS and an assay to detect the hypersensitive response (HR were used to screen for genes required for nonhost resistance to Xoo in N. benthamiana. When infiltrated with Xoo strain YN-1, N. benthamiana plants exhibited a strong necrosis within 24 h and produced a large amount of H(2O(2 in the infiltrated area. Expression of HR- and defense-related genes was induced, whereas bacterial numbers dramatically decreased during necrosis. VIGS of 45 ACE (Avr/Cf-elicited genes revealed identified seven genes required for nonhost resistance to Xoo in N. benthamiana. The seven genes encoded a calreticulin protein (ACE35, an ERF transcriptional factor (ACE43, a novel Solanaceous protein (ACE80, a hydrolase (ACE117, a peroxidase (ACE175 and two proteins with unknown function (ACE95 and ACE112. The results indicate that oxidative burst and calcium-dependent signaling pathways play an important role in nonhost resistance to Xoo. VIGS analysis further revealed that ACE35, ACE80, ACE95 and ACE175, but not the other three ACE genes, interfered with the Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: N. benthamiana plants inoculated with Xoo respond by rapidly eliciting an HR and nonhost resistance. The oxidative burst and other signaling pathways are pivotal in Xoo-N. benthamiana nonhost resistance, and genes involved in this response partially overlap with those involved in Cf/Avr4-dependent HR. The seven genes required for N. benthamiana-mediated resistance to Xoo provide a basis for further dissecting

  4. Isolation and characterization of NBS-LRR- resistance gene candidates in turmeric (Curcuma longa cv. surama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R K; Mohanty, S; Subudhi, E; Nayak, S

    2010-09-08

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), an important asexually reproducing spice crop of the family Zingiberaceae is highly susceptible to bacterial and fungal pathogens. The identification of resistance gene analogs holds great promise for development of resistant turmeric cultivars. Degenerate primers designed based on known resistance genes (R-genes) were used in combinations to elucidate resistance gene analogs from Curcuma longa cultivar surama. The three primers resulted in amplicons with expected sizes of 450-600 bp. The nucleotide sequence of these amplicons was obtained through sequencing; their predicted amino acid sequences compared to each other and to the amino acid sequences of known R-genes revealed significant sequence similarity. The finding of conserved domains, viz., kinase-1a, kinase-2 and hydrophobic motif, provided evidence that the sequences belong to the NBS-LRR class gene family. The presence of tryptophan as the last residue of kinase-2 motif further qualified them to be in the non-TIR-NBS-LRR subfamily of resistance genes. A cluster analysis based on the neighbor-joining method was carried out using Curcuma NBS analogs together with several resistance gene analogs and known R-genes, which classified them into two distinct subclasses, corresponding to clades N3 and N4 of non-TIR-NBS sequences described in plants. The NBS analogs that we isolated can be used as guidelines to eventually isolate numerous R-genes in turmeric.

  5. RNAi validation of resistance genes and their interactions in the highly DDT-resistant 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellatly, Kyle J; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Doherty, Jeffery J; Sun, Weilin; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Clark, J Marshall

    2015-06-01

    4,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been re-recommended by the World Health Organization for malaria mosquito control. Previous DDT use has resulted in resistance, and with continued use resistance will increase in terms of level and extent. Drosophila melanogaster is a model dipteran that has many available genetic tools, numerous studies done on insecticide resistance mechanisms, and is related to malaria mosquitoes allowing for extrapolation. The 91-R strain of D. melanogaster is highly resistant to DDT (>1500-fold), however, there is no mechanistic scheme that accounts for this level of resistance. Recently, reduced penetration, increased detoxification, and direct excretion have been identified as resistance mechanisms in the 91-R strain. Their interactions, however, remain unclear. Use of UAS-RNAi transgenic lines of D. melanogaster allowed for the targeted knockdown of genes putatively involved in DDT resistance and has validated the role of several cuticular proteins (Cyp4g1 and Lcp1), cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cyp6g1 and Cyp12d1), and ATP binding cassette transporters (Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1) involved in DDT resistance. Further, increased sensitivity to DDT in the 91-R strain after intra-abdominal dsRNA injection for Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1 was determined by a DDT contact bioassay, directly implicating these genes in DDT efflux and resistance.

  6. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Hansen, Martin Asser; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Permpikul, Chairat; Rongrungruang, Yong; Tribuddharat, Chanwit

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven inpatients at Siriraj Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) and were compared with a sample from a healthy volunteer. Plasmids from the gut microbiomes extracted from the stool samples were subjected to high-throughput DNA sequencing (GS Junior). Newbler-assembled DNA reads were categorised into known and unknown sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several antibiotic resistance genes were shared by the patients; interestingly, most were reported previously in food animals and healthy humans. Four antibiotic resistance genes were found in the healthy subject. One gene (aph3-III) was identified in the patients and the healthy subject and was related to that in cattle. Uncommon genes of hospital origin such as blaTEM-124-like and fosA, which confer resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactams and fosfomycin, respectively, were identified. The resistance genes did not match the patients' drug treatments. In conclusion, several plasmid types were identified in the gut microbiome; however, it was difficult to link these to the antibiotic resistance genes identified. That the antibiotic resistance genes came from hospital and community environments is worrying.

  7. Data mining and influential analysis of gene expression data for plant resistance gene identification in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Avilés,Francisco; Romeo,José S; López-Kleine, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular mechanisms of plant-pathogen interactions have been studied thoroughly but much about them is still unknown. A better understanding of these mechanisms and the detection of new resistance genes can improve crop production and food supply. Extracting this knowledge from available genomic data is a challenging task. Results Here, we evaluate the usefulness of clustering, data-mining and regression to identify potential new resistance genes. Three types of analyses were cond...

  8. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and resistance genes in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from humans in the community, broilers and pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Agersø, Yvonne; Gerner-Smidt, P.;

    2000-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolated from humans in the community (98 and 65 isolates), broilers (126 and 122), and pigs (102 and 88) during 1998 were tested for susceptibility to 12 different antimicrobial agents and for the presence of selected genes encoding resistance using PCR...... of the 38 human fecal samples examined using selective enrichment. All vancomycin resistant isolates contained the vanA gene, all chloramphenicol resistant isolates the catpIP501 gene, and all five gentamicin resistant isolates the aac6-aph2 gene. Sixty-one (85%) of 72 erythromycin resistant E. faecalis...... examined and 57 (90%) of 63 erythromycin resistant E. faecium isolates examined contained ermB. Forty (91%) of the kanamycin resistant E. faecalis and 18 (72%) of the kanamycin resistant E. faecium isolates contained aphA3. The tet(M) gene was found in 95% of the tetracycline resistant E. faecalis and E...

  9. Pollen-mediated gene flow from glyphosate-resistant common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis Sauer): consequences for the dispersal of resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Debalin; Tyre, Andrew J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Gaines, Todd A.; Irmak, Suat; Knezevic, Stevan Z.; Lindquist, John L.; Jhala, Amit J.

    2017-01-01

    Gene flow is an important component in evolutionary biology; however, the role of gene flow in dispersal of herbicide-resistant alleles among weed populations is poorly understood. Field experiments were conducted at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) from glyphosate-resistant (GR) to -susceptible (GS) common waterhemp using a concentric donor-receptor design. More than 130,000 common waterhemp plants were screened and 26,199 plants were confirmed resistant to glyphosate. Frequency of gene flow from all distances, directions, and years was estimated with a double exponential decay model using Generalized Nonlinear Model (package gnm) in R. PMGF declined by 50% at pollen source, whereas 90% reduction was found at 88 m (maximum) depending on the direction of the pollen-receptor blocks. Amplification of the target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), was identified as the mechanism of glyphosate resistance in parent biotype. The EPSPS gene amplification was heritable in common waterhemp and can be transferred via PMGF, and also correlated with glyphosate resistance in pseudo-F2 progeny. This is the first report of PMGF in GR common waterhemp and the results are critical in explaining the rapid dispersal of GR common waterhemp in Midwestern United States. PMID:28327669

  10. Molecular Identification and Quantification of Tetracycline and Erythromycin Resistance Genes in Spanish and Italian Retail Cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Flórez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large antibiotic resistance gene pools in the microbiota of foods may ultimately pose a risk for human health. This study reports the identification and quantification of tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant populations, resistance genes, and gene diversity in traditional Spanish and Italian cheeses, via culturing, conventional PCR, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. The numbers of resistant bacteria varied widely among the antibiotics and the different cheese varieties; in some cheeses, all the bacterial populations seemed to be resistant. Up to eight antibiotic resistance genes were sought by gene-specific PCR, six with respect to tetracycline, that is, tet(K, tet(L, tet(M, tet(O, tet(S, and tet(W, and two with respect to erythromycin, that is, erm(B and erm(F. The most common resistance genes in the analysed cheeses were tet(S, tet(W, tet(M, and erm(B. The copy numbers of these genes, as quantified by qPCR, ranged widely between cheeses (from 4.94 to 10.18log⁡10/g. DGGE analysis revealed distinct banding profiles and two polymorphic nucleotide positions for tet(W-carrying cheeses, though the similarity of the sequences suggests this tet(W to have a monophyletic origin. Traditional cheeses would therefore appear to act as reservoirs for large numbers of many types of antibiotic resistance determinants.

  11. Genes Expressed Differentially in Hessian Fly Larvae Feeding in Resistant and Susceptible Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shun Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a destructive pest of wheat worldwide and mainly controlled by deploying resistant cultivars. In this study, we investigated the genes that were expressed differentially between larvae in resistant plants and those in susceptible plants through RNA sequencing on the Illumina platform. Informative genes were 11,832, 14,861, 15,708, and 15,071 for the comparisons between larvae in resistant versus susceptible plants for 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 days, respectively, after larvae had reached the feeding site. The transcript abundance corresponding to 5401, 6902, 8457, and 5202 of the informative genes exhibited significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 in the respective paired comparisons. Overall, genes involved in nutrient metabolism, RNA and protein synthesis exhibited lower transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants, indicating that resistant plants inhibited nutrient metabolism and protein production in larvae. Interestingly, the numbers of cytochrome P450 genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants were comparable to, or higher than those with lower transcript abundance, indicating that toxic chemicals from resistant plants may have played important roles in Hessian fly larval death. Our study also identified several families of genes encoding secreted salivary gland proteins (SSGPs that were expressed at early stage of 1st instar larvae and with more genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants. Those SSGPs are candidate effectors with important roles in plant manipulation.

  12. Pyrosequencing of antibiotic-contaminated river sediments reveals high levels of resistance and gene transfer elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Kristiansson

    Full Text Available The high and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics has accelerated the development of antibiotic resistance, creating a major challenge for the sustainable treatment of infections world-wide. Bacterial communities often respond to antibiotic selection pressure by acquiring resistance genes, i.e. mobile genetic elements that can be shared horizontally between species. Environmental microbial communities maintain diverse collections of resistance genes, which can be mobilized into pathogenic bacteria. Recently, exceptional environmental releases of antibiotics have been documented, but the effects on the promotion of resistance genes and the potential for horizontal gene transfer have yet received limited attention. In this study, we have used culture-independent shotgun metagenomics to investigate microbial communities in river sediments exposed to waste water from the production of antibiotics in India. Our analysis identified very high levels of several classes of resistance genes as well as elements for horizontal gene transfer, including integrons, transposons and plasmids. In addition, two abundant previously uncharacterized resistance plasmids were identified. The results suggest that antibiotic contamination plays a role in the promotion of resistance genes and their mobilization from environmental microbes to other species and eventually to human pathogens. The entire life-cycle of antibiotic substances, both before, under and after usage, should therefore be considered to fully evaluate their role in the promotion of resistance.

  13. Delineation of a scab resistance gene cluster on linkage group 2 of apple

    OpenAIRE

    Bus, V.G.M.; De Weg, Van, W.E.; Durel, C.E.; Gessler, C.; Parisi, L.; Rikkerink, E.H.A.; Gardiner, S.E.; Meulenbroek, E.J.; Calenge, F.; Patocchi, A.; Laurens, F.N.D.

    2004-01-01

    With the advent of genetic maps for apple that carry common transferable markers, it is possible to investigate genomic relationships between genes present in different accessions. Co-dominant markers, such as microsatellites, are particularly useful for this purpose. In recent years, genetic markers have been developed for a number of resistance genes for apple scab (Venturia inaequalis). In this paper, we present the discovery of a new scab resistance gene (Vh8) that maps to linkage group 2...

  14. Characterization of integrons and resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolated from meat and dairy products in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2014-10-17

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of illness and death, especially in developing countries. The problem is exacerbated if bacteria attain multidrug resistance. Little is currently known about the extent of antibiotic resistance in foodborne pathogens and the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in Africa. Therefore, the current study was carried out to characterize, at the molecular level, the mechanism of multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Forty-seven out of 69 isolates (68.1%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The incidence of multidrug-resistant isolates was higher in meat products (37, 69.8%) than in dairy products (10, 62.5%). The multidrug-resistant serovars included, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (24 isolates, 34.8%), S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, (15 isolates, 21.8%), S. enterica serovar Infantis (7 isolates, 10.1%) and S. enterica non-typable serovar (1 isolate, 1.4%). The highest resistance was to ampicillin (95.7%), then to kanamycin (93.6%), spectinomycin (93.6%), streptomycin (91.5%) and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (91.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes and 39.1% and 8.7% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. β-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 75.4% of isolates and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 27.5% of isolates. Finally, the florphenicol resistance gene, floR, was identified in 18.8% of isolates. PCR screening identified S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in both meat and dairy products. This is the first study to report many of these resistance genes in dairy products. This study highlights the high incidence of multidrug-resistant S. enterica in

  15. Fluoroquinolone resistance in atypical pneumococci and oral streptococci: evidence of horizontal gene transfer of fluoroquinolone resistance determinants from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Margaret; Chau, Shirley S L; Chi, Fang; Tang, Julian; Chan, Paul K

    2007-08-01

    Atypical strains, presumed to be pneumococcus, with ciprofloxacin MICs of > or =4.0 microg/ml and unique sequence variations within the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the gyrase and topoisomerase genes in comparison with the Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 strain, were examined. These strains were reidentified using phenotypic methods, including detection of optochin susceptibility, bile solubility, and agglutination by serotype-specific antisera, and genotypic methods, including detection of pneumolysin and autolysin genes by PCR, 16S rRNA sequencing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The analysis based on concatenated sequences of the six MLST loci distinguished the "atypical" strains from pneumococci, and these strains clustered closely with S. mitis. However, all these strains and five of nine strains from the viridans streptococcal group possessed one to three gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes whose QRDR sequences clustered with those of S. pneumoniae, providing evidence of horizontal transfer of the QRDRs of the gyrase and topoisomerase genes from pneumococci into viridans streptococci. These genes also conferred fluoroquinolone resistance to viridans streptococci. In addition, the fluoroquinolone resistance determinants of 32 well-characterized Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis strains from bacteremic patients were also compared. These strains have unique amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC that were distinguishable from those in fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci and the "atypical" isolates. Both recombinational events and de novo mutations play an important role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance.

  16. Tetracycline and Phenicol Resistance Genes and Mechanisms: Importance for Agriculture, the Environment, and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Marilyn C; Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Recent reports have speculated on the future impact that antibiotic-resistant bacteria will have on food production, human health, and global economics. This review examines microbial resistance to tetracyclines and phenicols, antibiotics that are widely used in global food production. The mechanisms of resistance, mode of spread between agriculturally and human-impacted environments and ecosystems, distribution among bacteria, and the genes most likely to be associated with agricultural and environmental settings are included. Forty-six different tetracycline resistance () genes have been identified in 126 genera, with (M) having the broadest taxonomic distribution among all bacteria and (B) having the broadest coverage among the Gram-negative genera. Phenicol resistance genes are organized into 37 groups and have been identified in 70 bacterial genera. The review provides the latest information on tetracycline and phenicol resistance genes, including their association with mobile genetic elements in bacteria of environmental, medical, and veterinary relevance. Knowing what specific antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) are found in specific bacterial species and/or genera is critical when using a selective suite of ARGs for detection or surveillance studies. As detection methods move to molecular techniques, our knowledge about which type of bacteria carry which resistance gene(s) will become more important to ensure that the whole spectrum of bacteria are included in future surveillance studies. This review provides information needed to integrate the biology, taxonomy, and ecology of tetracycline- and phenicol-resistant bacteria and their resistance genes so that informative surveillance strategies can be developed and the correct genes selected.

  17. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Disease Resistance Gene Analogues from Three Wild Rice Species in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ji-mei; CHENG Zai-quan; YANG Ming-zhi; WU Cheng-jun; WANG Ling-xian; SUN Yi-ding; HUANG Xing-qi

    2003-01-01

    Two sets of degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed according to amino acid conservedregions of reported plant disease resistance genes which encode proteins that contain nucleotide-binding site andleucine-rich repeats(NBS-LRR), and the plant disease resistance genes which encode serine/threonine proteinkinase(STK). By polymerase chain reaction(PCR), disease resistance gene analogues have been amplified fromthree wild rice species in Yunnan Province, China. The DNA fragments from amplification have been clonedinto the pGEM-T vector respectively. Sequencing of the DNA fragments indicated that 7 classes, 2 classes and6 classes NBS-LRR disease resistance gene analogues from Oryza rufipogon Griff. , Oryza officinalis Wall. ,and Oryza meyeriana Baill. were obtained respectively. The two representative fragments of TO12 from Ory-za officinalis Wall. and TR19 from Oryza rufipogon Griff. belong to the same class and homology of theirsequences are 100%. The result shows that the sequences of the same class disease resistance gene analogueshave no difference among different species of wild rice. 5 classes STK disease resistance gene analogues werealso obtained among which 4 classes from Oryza rufipogon Griff. , 1 class from Oryza officinalis Wall. Bycomparison analysis of amino acid sequences, we found that the obtained disease resistance gene analogues havevery iow identity(low to 25%) with the reported disease resistance gene L6, N, Bs2, Prf, Pto, Lr10 and Xa21etc. The finding suggests that the obtained disease resistance gene analogues are analogues of putative diseaseresistance genes that have not been isolated so far.

  18. Detection of drug-resistance genes using single bronchoscopy biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussardi-Regnier, Aurelie; Millot, Jean-Marc; Gorisse, Marie-Claude; Delvincourt, Chantal; Prevost, Alain

    2007-09-01

    Expression of three major resistance genes MDR1, MRP1 and LRP was investigated in small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and metastasis. Single biopsies of bronchoscopy from 73 patients were performed to investigate expression of these three resistance genes by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Relations between gene expression and patient age, smoking status, histology, and chemotherapy were evaluated. A more frequent expression of MDR1 (77 versus 66%), MRP1 (91 versus 72%) and LRP (77 versus 63%) genes was detected in the malignant biopsies than in the non-malignant, respectively. In the metastasis biopsies, expression of these genes was markedly increased. No significant difference was observed between specimens before and after chemotherapy. Biopsies from progressing cancer showed higher MDR1, MRP1 and LRP gene expression. In conclusion, these data reveal a major role of MRP1 in intrinsic resistance and the high gene expression of MDR1 and MRP1 in relapsed diseases.

  19. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    to the sul1 and qacE Delta 1 genes characteristic of integrons. The first integron encoded the ant (3 ")-Ia gene that specified resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The second contained the pse-l beta-lactamase gene. All the multiresistant strains contained both integrons. The presence of these two...

  20. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1998-01-01

    to the sul1 and qacE Delta 1 genes characteristic of integrons. The first integron encoded the ant (3")-Ia gene that specified resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The second contained the pse-1 beta-lactamase gene. All the multiresistant strains contained both integrons. The presence of these two...

  1. Molecular evolution of Cladosporium fulvum disease resistance genes in wild tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, M.

    2004-01-01

    Cladosporium fulvumis a biotrophic fungal leaf pathogen of tomato. Numerous C. fulvum resistance genes ( Cf genes) are present in wild tomato. In this thesis, a molecular study on the evolution of Cf genes is presented. Cf-9 originates from the wild tomato species Lycopersico

  2. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  3. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  4. The LBP Gene and Its Association with Resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila in Tilapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Hong Fu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to pathogens is important for the sustainability and profitability of food fish production. In immune-related genes, the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP gene is an important mediator of the inflammatory reaction. We analyzed the cDNA and genomic structure of the LBP gene in tilapia. The full-length cDNA (1901 bp of the gene contained a 1416 bp open reading frame, encoding 471 amino acid residues. Its genomic sequence was 5577 bp, comprising 15 exons and 14 introns. Under normal conditions, the gene was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues. The highest expression was detected in intestine and kidney. We examined the responses of the gene to challenges with two bacterial pathogens Streptcoccus agalactiae and Aeromonas hydrophila. The gene was significantly upregulated in kidney and spleen post-infection with S. agalactiae and A. hydrophila, respectively. However, the expression profiles of the gene after the challenge with the two pathogens were different. Furthermore, we identified three SNPs in the gene. There were significant associations (p < 0.05 of two of the three SNPs with the resistance to A. hydrophila, but not with the resistance to S. agalactiae or growth performance. These results suggest that the LBP gene is involved in the acute-phase immunologic response to the bacterial infections, and the responses to the two bacterial pathogens are different. The two SNPs associated with the resistance to A. hydrophila may be useful in the selection of tilapia resistant to A. hydrophila.

  5. 梯度铝泡沫夹层结构抗爆性能仿真与优化%Simulation and optimization for blast-resistant performances of a graded aluminum foam sandwich structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    亓昌; 杨丽君; 杨姝

    2013-01-01

    Blast-resistant performances of a sandwich structure consisting of aluminum alloy front panel,graded aluminum foam core,and armor steel back panel were investigated using the dynamic explicit finite element method.Areal specific energy absorption (ASEA) and the maximum back panel deformation (MaxD) were taken as performance indexes.The effects of relative density arrangement of graded aluminum foam core on the blast-resistant behavior of the sandwich structure were analyzed.The performance of a uniform-density aluminum foam sandwich panel (UAFSP) was also examined for the comparison purpose.Meanwhile,the response surface model (RSM) for blast-resistant performance prediction was established based on radial basis functions (RBF).Muhiobjective design optimization (MDO) was performed for the sandwich structure based on RSM.The results showed that the density rank of aluminum foam core has great influence on the blast-resistant behavior of the sandwich structure,and the graded aluminum foam sandwich panel is superior to the UAF panel; MDO of the graded aluminum foam sandwich structure can further improve its blast-resistant performance.%采用动力显式有限元方法,以面比吸能和背板最大变形量为评价指标,研究了铝合金面板一梯度铝泡沫芯体—装甲钢背板夹层结构的抗爆性能.分析了芯体密度梯度排布对结构抗爆性能的影响,并与均匀密度铝泡沫夹层板进行了对比.同时,基于径向基函数建立了夹层结构抗爆性能预测响应面模型,在此基础上对夹层结构进行了多目标优化设计.结果表明,铝泡沫芯体相对密度排布顺序对夹层结构抗爆性影响明显;具有最佳芯体密度梯度排布的铝泡沫夹层结构的抗爆性能明显优于等质量的均匀密度铝泡沫夹层结构;多目标优化可进一步提高梯度铝泡沫夹层结构的综合抗爆性能.

  6. sugE: A gene involved in tributyltin (TBT) resistance of Aeromonas molluscorum Av27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Micaelo, Nuno; Félix, Vitor; Song, Jun-Young; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Satoru; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of bacterial resistance to tributyltin (TBT) is still unclear. The results herein presented contribute to clarify that mechanism in the TBT-resistant bacterium Aeromonas molluscorum Av27. We have identified and cloned a new gene that is involved in TBT resistance in this strain. The gene is highly homologous (84%) to the Aeromonas hydrophila-sugE gene belonging to the small multidrug resistance gene family (SMR), which includes genes involved in the transport of lipophilic drugs. In Av27, expression of the Av27-sugE was observed at the early logarithmic growth phase in the presence of a high TBT concentration (500 μM), thus suggesting the contribution of this gene for TBT resistance. E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to ethidium bromide (EtBr), chloramphenicol (CP) and tetracycline (TE), besides TBT. According to the Moriguchi logP (miLogP) values, EtBr, CP and TE have similar properties and are substrates for the sugE-efflux system. Despite the different miLogP of TBT, E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to this compound. So it seems that TBT is also a substrate for the SugE protein. The modelling studies performed also support this hypothesis. The data herein presented clearly indicate that sugE is involved in TBT resistance of this bacterium.

  7. Carbapenemase Genes among Multidrug Resistant Gram Negative Clinical Isolates from a Tertiary Hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha F. Mushi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR is rapidly growing across antibiotic classes, with increased detection of isolates resistant to carbapenems. Data on the prevalence of carbapenem resistance in developing countries is limited; therefore, in this study, we determined the prevalence of carbapenemase genes among multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria (MDR-GNB isolated from clinical specimens in a tertiary hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania. A total of 227 MDR-GNB isolates were analyzed for carbapenem resistance genes. For each isolate, five different PCR assays were performed, allowing for the detection of the major carbapenemase genes, including those encoding the VIM-, IMP-, and NDM-type metallo-beta-lactamases, the class A KPC-type carbapenemases, and the class D OXA-48 enzyme. Of 227 isolates, 80 (35% were positive for one or more carbapenemase gene. IMP-types were the most predominant gene followed by VIM, in 49 (21.59% and 28 (12% isolates, respectively. Carbapenemase genes were most detected in K. pneumoniae 24 (11%, followed by P. aeruginosa 23 (10%, and E. coli with 19 isolates (8%. We have demonstrated for the first time a high prevalence of MDR-GNB clinical isolates having carbapenem resistance genes in Tanzania. We recommend routine testing for carbapenem resistance among the MDR-GNB particularly in systemic infections.

  8. eIF4E Resistance: Natural Variation Should Guide Gene Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastet, Anna; Robaglia, Christophe; Gallois, Jean-Luc

    2017-02-28

    eIF4E translation initiation factors have emerged as major susceptibility factors for RNA viruses. Natural eIF4E-based resistance alleles are found in many species and are mostly variants that maintain the translation function of the protein. eIF4E genes represent major targets for engineering viral resistance, and gene-editing technologies can be used to make up for the lack of natural resistance alleles in some crops, often by knocking out eIF4E susceptibility factors. However, we report here how redundancy among eIF4E genes can restrict the efficient use of knockout alleles in breeding. We therefore discuss how gene-editing technologies can be used to design de novo functional alleles, using knowledge about the natural evolution of eIF4E genes in different species, to drive resistance to viruses without affecting plant physiology.

  9. Fate and transport of tylosin-resistant bacteria and macrolide resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby, Elizabeth M; Moorman, Thomas B; Soupir, Michelle L

    2016-04-15

    Application of manure from swine treated with antibiotics introduces antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to soil with the potential for further movement in drainage water, which may contribute to the increase in antibiotic resistance in non-agricultural settings. We compared losses of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus and macrolide-resistance (erm and msrA) genes in water draining from plots with or without swine manure application under chisel plow and no till conditions. Concentrations of ermB, ermC and ermF were all >10(9)copies g(-1) in manure from tylosin-treated swine, and application of this manure resulted in short-term increases in the abundance of these genes in soil. Abundances of ermB, ermC and ermF in manured soil returned to levels identified in non-manured control plots by the spring following manure application. Tillage practices yielded no significant differences (p>0.10) in enterococci or erm gene concentrations in drainage water and were therefore combined for further analysis. While enterococci and tylosin-resistant enterococci concentrations in drainage water showed no effects of manure application, ermB and ermF concentrations in drainage water from manured plots were significantly higher (p<0.01) than concentrations coming from non-manured plots. ErmB and ermF were detected in 78% and 44%, respectively, of water samples draining from plots receiving manure. Although ermC had the highest concentrations of the three genes in drainage water, there was no effect of manure application on ermC abundance. MsrA was not detected in manure, soil or water. This study is the first to report significant increases in abundance of resistance genes in waters draining from agricultural land due to manure application.

  10. Discovery of clubroot-resistant genes in Brassica napus by transcriptome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S W; Liu, T; Gao, Y; Zhang, C; Peng, S D; Bai, M B; Li, S J; Xu, L; Zhou, X Y; Lin, L B

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot significantly affects plants of the Brassicaceae family and is one of the main diseases causing serious losses in B. napus yield. Few studies have investigated the clubroot-resistance mechanism in B. napus. Identification of clubroot-resistant genes may be used in clubroot-resistant breeding, as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind B. napus clubroot-resistance. We used three B. napus transcriptome samples to construct a transcriptome sequencing library by using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. In total, 171 million high-quality reads were obtained, containing 96,149 unigenes of N50-value. We aligned the obtained unigenes with the Nr, Swiss-Prot, clusters of orthologous groups, and gene ontology databases and annotated their functions. In the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes database, 25,033 unigenes (26.04%) were assigned to 124 pathways. Many genes, including broad-spectrum disease-resistance genes, specific clubroot-resistant genes, and genes related to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) signal transduction, cytokinin synthesis, and myrosinase synthesis in the Huashuang 3 variety of B. napus were found to be related to clubroot-resistance. The effective clubroot-resistance observed in this variety may be due to the induced increased expression of these disease-resistant genes and strong inhibition of the IAA signal transduction, cytokinin synthesis, and myrosinase synthesis. The homology observed between unigenes 0048482, 0061770 and the Crr1 gene shared 94% nucleotide similarity. Furthermore, unigene 0061770 could have originated from an inversion of the Crr1 5'-end sequence.

  11. Detection of resistance genes and evaluation of water quality at zoo lakes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Silva de Faria

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The investigation of the presence of antibiotic-resistance genes in aquatic environments is important to identify possible reservoirs of resistant microorganisms that could be a threat to human and animal health. The aims of this study were to analyze the presence of genes conferring resistance to antimicrobials in the aquatic environment and to assess the quality of water in zoo lakes. Results showed a pattern of genes conferring resistance to multiple antibiotics and turbidity, which was expected to be due to the presence of contaminants. The most frequent genes were sul I and sul II (sulfonamides, which were present in all the lakes, followed by genes encoding β-lactamases such as blaPSE I (77.8% and ampC (66.7%. However, tet(K, tet(M, and ermC genes were not detected. There was a positive correlation between the number of Enterobacteriaceae and resistance genes. In conclusion, the source of contamination of all lakes was probably the neighboring urban sewage or wastewater that increased the frequency of the total coliforms and resistance genes, which in turn posed a threat to the conservation of the animal life inhabiting the zoo.

  12. Postulation of Leaf Rust Resistance Genes in Seven Chinese Spring Wheat Cultivars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Li-hong; ZHANG Na; HU Ya-ya; WEI Xue-jun; YANG Wen-xiang; LIU Da-qun

    2013-01-01

    To detect the leaf rust resistance genes in the 7 Chinese spring wheat clultivars Shenmian 99025, Shenmia 99042, Shenmian 85, Shenmian 91, Shenmian 96, Shenmian 1167 and Shenmian 962, Thatcher, Thatcher backgrounded near-isogenic lines and 15 pathotypes of P. triticina were used for gene postulate at the seedling stage, and 9 of the 15 pathotypes were used in the field tests. Molecular markers closely linked to, or co-segregated with resistance genes Lr1, Lr9, Lr10, Lr19, Lr20, Lr21, Lr24, Lr26, Lr28, Lr29, Lr32, Lr34, Lr35, Lr37, Lr38, and Lr47 were screened to assist detection of the resistance genes. As results, 4 known resistance genes, including Lr1, Lr9, Lr26, and Lr34, and other unknown resistance genes were postulated singly or in combination in the tested cultivars. Shenmian 85, Shenmian 91, Shenmian 96, Shenmian 962, Shenmian 1167, and Shenmian 99042 are potentially useful for wheat production and breeding programs. The result suggested that combining gene postulation, molecular markers and pedigrees is effective and more accuracy method to know the resistance genes in cultivars.

  13. Real-time PCR based analysis of metal resistance genes in metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain J007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-07-01

    A uranium (U)-resistant and -accumulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain was characterized to assess the response of toxic metals toward its growth and expression of metal resistance determinants. The bacterium showed MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of 6, 3, and 2 mM for Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively; with resistance phenotype conferred by periplasmic Cu sequestering copA and RND type heavy metal efflux czcA genes. Real-time PCR-based expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of both these genes upon exposure to low concentrations of metals for short duration, whereas the global stress response gene sodA encoding superoxide dismutase enzyme was upregulated only at higher metal concentrations or longer exposure time. It could also be inferred that copA and czcA are involved in providing resistance only at low metal concentrations, whereas involvement of "global stress response" phenomenon (expression of sodA) at higher metal concentration or increased exposure was evident. This study provides significant understanding of the adaptive response of bacteria surviving in metal and radionuclide contaminated environments along with the development of real-time PCR-based quantification method of using metal resistance genes as biomarker for monitoring relevant bacteria in such habitats.

  14. Molecular insights of co-trimoxazole resistance genes in Haemophilus influenzae isolated in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Zain, Z; Kamsani, N H; Ahmad, N

    2013-12-01

    In the last few decades, co-trimoxazole (SXT), an antibacterial combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, has been used for treatment of upper respiratory tract infection due to Haemophilus influenzae. The usage of this antibiotic has become less important due to emergence of SXT-resistant strains worldwide. Most reports associate SXT resistance to the presence of variants of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) dfrA genes which are responsible for trimethoprim resistance; while the sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistance are due to sulfonamide (SUL) genes sul1 and sul2 and/or mutation in the chromosomal (folP) gene encoding dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS). This study aims to detect and analyse the genes that are involved in SXT resistance in H. influenzae strains that were isolated in Malaysia. Primers targeting for variants of dfrA, fol and sul genes were used to amplify the genes in nine SXT-resistant strains. The products of amplification were sequenced and multiple alignments of the assembled sequences of the local strains were compared to the sequences of other H. influenzae strains in the Genbank. Of the five variants of the dhfA genes, dfrA1 was detected in three out of the nine strains. In contrast to intermediate strains, at least one variant of folP genes was detected in the resistant strains. Multiple nucleotide alignment of this gene revealed that strain H152 was genetically different from the others due to a 15-bp nucleotide insert in folP gene. The sequence of the insert was similar to the insert in folP of H. influenzae strain A12, a strain isolated in United Kingdom. None of the strains had sul1 gene but sul2 gene was detected in four strains. Preliminary study on the limited number of samples shows that the TMP resistance was attributed to mainly to dfrA1 and the SMX was due to folP genes. Presence of sul2 in addition to folP in seven strains apparently had increased their level of resistance. A strain that lacked sul1 or sul2 gene, its resistance

  15. The Solanum demissumR8 late blight resistance gene is an Sw-5 homologue that has been deployed worldwide in late blight resistant varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Jack H.; Arkel, van Gert; Bergervoet-van Deelen, Marjan; Jo, Kwang Ryong; Jacobsen, Evert; Visser, Richard G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The potato late blight resistance geneR8has been cloned.R8is found in five late blight resistant varieties deployed in three different continents. R8 recognises Avr8 and is homologous to the NB-LRR protein Sw-5 from tomato.Abstract: The broad spectrum late blight resistance gene R8 from Solanum

  16. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rubio

    Full Text Available RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925, which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  17. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka) Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Manuel; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Olivares, Pedro Manuel; Castro de Moura, Manuel; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease)/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925), which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene) or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein) PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  18. Transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes via phage-related mobile elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Calero-Cáceres, William; Muniesa, Maite

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major concern for society because it threatens the effective prevention of infectious diseases. While some bacterial strains display intrinsic resistance, others achieve antibiotic resistance by mutation, by the recombination of foreign DNA into the chromosome or by horizontal gene acquisition. In many cases, these three mechanisms operate together. Several mobile genetic elements (MGEs) have been reported to mobilize different types of resistance genes and despite sharing common features, they are often considered and studied separately. Bacteriophages and phage-related particles have recently been highlighted as MGEs that transfer antibiotic resistance. This review focuses on phages, phage-related elements and on composite MGEs (phages-MGEs) involved in antibiotic resistance mobility. We review common features of these elements, rather than differences, and provide a broad overview of the antibiotic resistance transfer mechanisms observed in nature, which is a necessary first step to controlling them.

  19. Emergence of macrolide resistance gene mph(B) in Streptococcus uberis and cooperative effects with rdmC-like gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achard, Adeline; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Pichereau, Vianney; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2008-08-01

    Streptococcus uberis UCN60 was resistant to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml) but susceptible to erythromycin (MIC = 0.06 microg/ml), azithromycin (MIC = 0.12 microg/ml), josamycin (MIC = 0.25 microg/ml), and tylosin (MIC = 0.5 microg/ml). A 2.5-kb HindIII fragment was cloned from S. uberis UCN60 DNA on plasmid pUC18 and introduced into Escherichia coli AG100A, where it conferred resistance to spiramycin by inactivation. The sequence analysis of the fragment showed the presence of an rdmC-like gene that putatively encoded a protein belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase family and of the first 196 nucleotides of the mph(B) gene putatively encoding a phosphotransferase known to inactivate 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides in E. coli. The entire mph(B) gene was then identified in S. uberis UCN60. The two genes were expressed alone or in combination in E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Analysis of MICs revealed that rdmC-like alone did not confer resistance to erythromycin, tylosin, and josamycin in those three hosts. It conferred resistance to spiramycin in E. coli and E. faecalis but not in S. aureus. mph(B) conferred resistance in E. coli to erythromycin, tylosin, josamycin, and spiramycin but only low levels of resistance in E. faecalis and S. aureus to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml). The combination of mph(B) and rdmC-like genes resulted in a resistance to spiramycin and tylosin in the three hosts that significantly exceeded the mere addition of the resistance levels conferred by each resistance mechanism alone.

  20. Bacteriophages Isolated from Chicken Meat and the Horizontal Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Amira; Awaiwanont, Nattakarn; Sofka, Dmitrij; Smulders, Frans J M; Paulsen, Peter; Szostak, Michael P; Humphrey, Tom; Hilbert, Friederike

    2015-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in microbes poses a global and increasing threat to public health. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes was thought to be due largely to conjugative plasmids or transposons, with only a minor part being played by transduction through bacteriophages. However, whole-genome sequencing has recently shown that the latter mechanism could be highly important in the exchange of antimicrobial resistance genes between microorganisms and environments. The transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes by phages could underlie the origin of resistant bacteria found in food. We show that chicken meat carries a number of phages capable of transferring antimicrobial resistance. Of 243 phages randomly isolated from chicken meat, about a quarter (24.7%) were able to transduce resistance to one or more of the five antimicrobials tested into Escherichia coli ATCC 13706 (DSM 12242). Resistance to kanamycin was transduced the most often, followed by that to chloramphenicol, with four phages transducing tetracycline resistance and three transducing ampicillin resistance. Phages able to transduce antimicrobial resistance were isolated from 44% of the samples of chicken meat that we tested. The statistically significant (P = 0.01) relationship between the presence of phages transducing kanamycin resistance and E. coli isolates resistant to this antibiotic suggests that transduction may be an important mechanism for transferring kanamycin resistance to E. coli. It appears that the transduction of resistance to certain antimicrobials, e.g., kanamycin, not only is widely distributed in E. coli isolates found on meat but also could represent a major mechanism for resistance transfer. The result is of high importance for animal and human health.

  1. Bacteriophages Isolated from Chicken Meat and the Horizontal Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Amira; Awaiwanont, Nattakarn; Sofka, Dmitrij; Smulders, Frans J. M.; Paulsen, Peter; Szostak, Michael P.; Humphrey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in microbes poses a global and increasing threat to public health. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes was thought to be due largely to conjugative plasmids or transposons, with only a minor part being played by transduction through bacteriophages. However, whole-genome sequencing has recently shown that the latter mechanism could be highly important in the exchange of antimicrobial resistance genes between microorganisms and environments. The transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes by phages could underlie the origin of resistant bacteria found in food. We show that chicken meat carries a number of phages capable of transferring antimicrobial resistance. Of 243 phages randomly isolated from chicken meat, about a quarter (24.7%) were able to transduce resistance to one or more of the five antimicrobials tested into Escherichia coli ATCC 13706 (DSM 12242). Resistance to kanamycin was transduced the most often, followed by that to chloramphenicol, with four phages transducing tetracycline resistance and three transducing ampicillin resistance. Phages able to transduce antimicrobial resistance were isolated from 44% of the samples of chicken meat that we tested. The statistically significant (P = 0.01) relationship between the presence of phages transducing kanamycin resistance and E. coli isolates resistant to this antibiotic suggests that transduction may be an important mechanism for transferring kanamycin resistance to E. coli. It appears that the transduction of resistance to certain antimicrobials, e.g., kanamycin, not only is widely distributed in E. coli isolates found on meat but also could represent a major mechanism for resistance transfer. The result is of high importance for animal and human health. PMID:25934615

  2. Tagging the gene Wbph2 in ARC 10239 resistant to the whitebacked planthopper Sogatella furcifera by using RFLP markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Gene tagging is the base of marker-assisted breeding for insect resistance in rice. Five genes (Wbph1, Wbph2, Wbph3, Wbph4, and Wbph5) were identified to be responsible for the resistance to the whitebacked planthopper. The gene Wbph2 in ARC 10239 was clarified as a dominant resistant gene to S.furcifera. In present study, ARC 10239 and susceptible Minghui 63 were selected as parents to make a cross for gene tagging.

  3. Identification and mapping of two powdery mildew resistance genes in Triticum boeoticum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhuneja, Parveen; Kumar, Krishan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Hurni, Severine; Keller, Beat; Dhaliwal, Harcharan S; Singh, Kuldeep

    2012-04-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), is one of the important foliar diseases of wheat that can cause serious yield losses. Breeding for cultivars with diverse resources of resistance is the most promising approach for combating this disease. The diploid A genome progenitor species of wheat are an important resource for new variability for disease resistance genes. An accession of Triticum boeoticum (A(b)A(b)) showed resistance against a number of Bgt isolates, when tested using detached leaf segments. Inheritance studies in a recombinant inbred line population (RIL), developed from crosses of PM resistant T. boeoticum acc. pau5088 with a PM susceptible T. monococcum acc. pau14087, indicated the presence of two powdery mildew resistance genes in T. boeoticum acc. pau5088. Analysis of powdery mildew infection and molecular marker data of the RIL population revealed that both powdery mildew resistance genes are located on the long arm of chromosome 7A. Mapping was conducted using an integrated linkage map of 7A consisting of SSR, RFLP, STS, and DArT markers. These powdery mildew resistance genes are tentatively designated as PmTb7A.1 and PmTb7A.2. The PmTb7A.2 is closely linked to STS markers MAG2185 and MAG1759 derived from RFLP probes which are linked to powdery mildew resistance gene Pm1. This indicated that PmTb7A.2 might be allelic to Pm1. The PmTb7A.1, flanked by a DArT marker wPt4553 and an SSR marker Xcfa2019 in a 4.3 cM interval, maps proximal to PmT7A.2. PmTb7A.1 is putatively a new powdery mildew resistance gene. The powdery mildew resistance genes from T. boeoticum are currently being transferred to cultivated wheat background through marker-assisted backcrossing, using T. durum as bridging species.

  4. Characterization of genes encoding for acquired bacitracin resistance in Clostridium perfringens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Charlebois

    Full Text Available Phenotypic bacitracin resistance has been reported in Clostridium perfringens. However, the genes responsible for the resistance have not yet been characterized. Ninety-nine C. perfringens isolates recovered from broilers and turkeys were tested for phenotypic bacitracin resistance. Bacitracin MIC(90 (>256 µg/ml was identical for both turkey and chicken isolates; whereas MIC(50 was higher in turkey isolates (6 µg/ml than in chicken isolates (3 µg/ml. Twenty-four of the 99 isolates showed high-level bacitracin resistance (MIC breakpoint >256 µg/ml and the genes encoding for this resistance were characterized in C. perfringens c1261_A strain using primer walking. Sequence analysis and percentages of amino acid identity revealed putative genes encoding for both an ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase in C. perfringens c1261_A strain. These two mechanisms were shown to be both encoded by the putative bcrABD operon under the control of a regulatory gene, bcrR. Efflux pump inhibitor thioridazine was shown to increase significantly the susceptibility of strain c1261_A to bacitracin. Upstream and downstream from the bcr cluster was an IS1216-like element, which may play a role in the dissemination of this resistance determinant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with prior double digestion with I-CeuI/MluI enzymes followed by hybridization analyses revealed that the bacitracin resistance genes bcrABDR were located on the chromosome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene cluster is expressed under bacitracin stress. Microarray analysis revealed the presence of these genes in all bacitracin resistant strains. This study reports the discovery of genes encoding for a putative ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase associated with high-level bacitracin resistance in C. perfringens isolates from turkeys and broiler chickens.

  5. Dissection of Two Complex Clusters of Resistance Genes in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Marilena; McHale, Leah K; Kozik, Alex; Reyes-Chin Wo, Sebastian; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-07-01

    Of the over 50 phenotypic resistance genes mapped in lettuce, 25 colocalize to three major resistance clusters (MRC) on chromosomes 1, 2, and 4. Similarly, the majority of candidate resistance genes encoding nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR) proteins genetically colocalize with phenotypic resistance loci. MRC1 and MRC4 span over 66 and 63 Mb containing 84 and 21 NLR-encoding genes, respectively, as well as 765 and 627 genes that are not related to NLR genes. Forward and reverse genetic approaches were applied to dissect MRC1 and MRC4. Transgenic lines exhibiting silencing were selected using silencing of β-glucuronidase as a reporter. Silencing of two of five NLR-encoding gene families resulted in abrogation of nine of 14 tested resistance phenotypes mapping to these two regions. At MRC1, members of the coiled coil-NLR-encoding RGC1 gene family were implicated in host and nonhost resistance through requirement for Dm5/8- and Dm45-mediated resistance to downy mildew caused by Bremia lactucae as well as the hypersensitive response to effectors AvrB, AvrRpm1, and AvrRpt2 of the nonpathogen Pseudomonas syringae. At MRC4, RGC12 family members, which encode toll interleukin receptor-NLR proteins, were implicated in Dm4-, Dm7-, Dm11-, and Dm44-mediated resistance to B. lactucae. Lesions were identified in the sequence of a candidate gene within dm7 loss-of-resistance mutant lines, confirming that RGC12G confers Dm7.

  6. Long distance pollen-mediated flow of herbicide resistance genes in Lolium rigidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto; Yu, Qin; Barrett-Lennard, Robert; Powles, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Gene flow promotes genetic exchange among plant populations mediating evolutionary dynamics; yet, the importance of gene flow at distance via pollen movement is poorly understood. A field experiment at the landscape level was conducted with Lolium rigidum herbicide-susceptible individuals (population VLR1) placed into an otherwise Lolium-free bushland environment at increasing distances from adjacent large commercial crop fields infested with herbicide-resistant L. rigidum. Herbicide resistance was used as a marker to quantify the distance and the rate of pollen-mediated gene flow. About 21,245 seeds were produced on the isolated, susceptible mother plants of which 3,303 seedlings were tested for herbicide resistance and 664 seedlings were found to be resistant. Pollen-mediated gene flow occurred at 3,000 m (maximum tested distance). Both Mendelian and molecular analyses (sequencing and CAPS markers) confirmed the introgression of herbicide resistance genes. This is the first documented case of long-distance gene flow in L. rigidum. The results are important for future modeling simulations of herbicide resistance evolution and subsequent mobility. The adoption of integrated agronomic strategies, the control of potential receptor plants on fields' margins and conservative use of herbicides can be realistic options to minimize herbicide resistance spread.

  7. High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance and Distribution of Aminoglycoside Resistant Genes among Clinical Isolates of Enterococcus Species in Chennai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elango Padmasini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are nosocomial pathogen with multiple-drug resistance by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Aminoglycosides along with cell wall inhibitors are given clinically for treating enterococcal infections. 178 enterococcal isolates were analyzed in this study. E. faecalis is identified to be the predominant Enterococcus species, along with E. faecium, E. avium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. dispar and E. gallinarum. High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR by MIC for gentamicin (GM, streptomycin (SM and both (GM + SM antibiotics was found to be 42.7%, 29.8%, and 21.9%, respectively. Detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes (AME in enterococci was identified by multiplex PCR for aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia; aph(2′′-Ib; aph(2′′-Ic; aph(2′′-Id and aph(3′-IIIa genes. 38.2% isolates carried aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia gene and 40.4% isolates carried aph(3′-IIIa gene. aph(2′′-Ib; aph(2′′-Ic; aph(2′′-Id were not detected among our study isolates. aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia and aph(3′-IIIa genes were also observed in HLAR E. durans, E. avium, E. hirae, and E. gallinarum isolates. This indicates that high level aminoglycoside resistance genes are widely disseminated among isolates of enterococci from Chennai.

  8. High level aminoglycoside resistance and distribution of aminoglycoside resistant genes among clinical isolates of Enterococcus species in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmasini, Elango; Padmaraj, R; Ramesh, S Srivani

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are nosocomial pathogen with multiple-drug resistance by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Aminoglycosides along with cell wall inhibitors are given clinically for treating enterococcal infections. 178 enterococcal isolates were analyzed in this study. E. faecalis is identified to be the predominant Enterococcus species, along with E. faecium, E. avium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. dispar and E. gallinarum. High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) by MIC for gentamicin (GM), streptomycin (SM) and both (GM + SM) antibiotics was found to be 42.7%, 29.8%, and 21.9%, respectively. Detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes (AME) in enterococci was identified by multiplex PCR for aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia; aph(2'')-Ib; aph(2'')-Ic; aph(2'')-Id and aph(3')-IIIa genes. 38.2% isolates carried aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia gene and 40.4% isolates carried aph(3')-IIIa gene. aph(2'')-Ib; aph(2'')-Ic; aph(2'')-Id were not detected among our study isolates. aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia and aph(3')-IIIa genes were also observed in HLAR E. durans, E. avium, E. hirae, and E. gallinarum isolates. This indicates that high level aminoglycoside resistance genes are widely disseminated among isolates of enterococci from Chennai.

  9. Overexpression of multiple detoxification genes in deltamethrin resistant Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén, is one of the major rice pests in Asia and has developed resistance to multiple classes of insecticides. Understanding resistance mechanisms is essential to the management of this pest. Biochemical and molecular assays were performed in this study to systematically characterize deltamethrin resistance mechanisms with laboratory-selected resistant and susceptible strains of SBPH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Deltamethrin resistant strains of SBPH (JH-del were derived from a field population by continuously selections (up to 30 generations in the laboratory, while a susceptible strain (JHS was obtained from the same population by removing insecticide pressure for 30 generations. The role of detoxification enzymes in the resistance was investigated using synergism and enzyme activity assays with strains of different resistant levels. Furthermore, 71 cytochrome P450, 93 esterases and 12 glutathione-S-transferases cDNAs were cloned based on transcriptome data of a field collected population. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR screening analysis of 176 identified detoxification genes demonstrated that multiple P450 and esterase genes were overexpressed (>2-fold in JH-del strains (G4 and G30 when compared to that in JHS, and the results of quantitative PCR coincided with the semi-quantitative RT-PCR results. Target mutation at IIS3-IIS6 regions encoded by the voltage-gated sodium channel gene was ruled out for conferring the observed resistance. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: As the first attempt to discover genes potentially involved in SBPH pyrethroid resistance, this study putatively identified several candidate genes of detoxification enzymes that were significantly overexpressed in the resistant strain, which matched the synergism and enzyme activity testing. The biochemical and molecular evidences suggest that the high level pyrethroid resistance in L. striatellus could be due to

  10. Differential expression of putative drug resistance genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Escalante, Laura; Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Bermúdez de León, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Understanding drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires an integrated analysis of strain lineages, mutations and gene expression. Previously, we reported the differential expression of esxG, esxH, infA, groES, rpmI, rpsA and lipF genes in a sensitive M. tuberculosis strain and in a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate. Here, we have evaluated the expression of these genes in 24 clinical isolates that belong to different lineages and have different drug resistance profiles. In vitro, growth kinetics analysis showed no difference in the growth of the clinical isolates, and thus drug resistance occurred without a fitness cost. However, a quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis of gene expression revealed high variability among the clinical isolates, including those with similar drug resistance profiles. Due to the complexity of gene regulation pathways and the wide diversity of M. tuberculosis lineages, the use of gene expression as a molecular signature for drug resistance is not straightforward. Therefore, we recommend that the expression of M. tuberculosis genes be performed individually, and baseline expression levels should be verified among several different clinical isolates, before any further applications of these findings.

  11. Paradoxical DNA repair and peroxide resistance gene conservation in Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032.

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    Jason Gioia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus spores are notoriously resistant to unfavorable conditions such as UV radiation, gamma-radiation, H2O2, desiccation, chemical disinfection, or starvation. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 survives standard decontamination procedures of the Jet Propulsion Lab spacecraft assembly facility, and both spores and vegetative cells of this strain exhibit elevated resistance to UV radiation and H2O2 compared to other Bacillus species. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was sequenced and annotated. Lists of genes relevant to DNA repair and the oxidative stress response were generated and compared to B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. Differences in conservation of genes, gene order, and protein sequences are highlighted because they potentially explain the extreme resistance phenotype of B. pumilus. The B. pumilus genome includes genes not found in B. subtilis or B. licheniformis and conserved genes with sequence divergence, but paradoxically lacks several genes that function in UV or H2O2 resistance in other Bacillus species. SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies several candidate genes for further research into UV and H2O2 resistance. These findings will help explain the resistance of B. pumilus and are applicable to understanding sterilization survival strategies of microbes.

  12. Class 1 integrase, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Nicoletta; Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered hot spots for multiplication and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. In this study, we determined the presence of class 1 integron integrase and genes conferring resistance to tetracyclines and sulfonamides in the genomes of culturable bacteria isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and the river that receives the treated wastewater. Moreover, using PCR-based metagenomic approach, we quantified intI1, tet and sul genes. Wastewater treatment caused the decrease in the total number of culturable heterotrophs and bacteria resistant to tetracycline and sulfonamides, along with the decrease in the number of intI1, sul and tet gene copies per ml, with significant reduction of tet(B). On the other hand, the treatment process increased both the frequency of tetracycline- and sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and intI1-positive strains, and the relative abundance of all quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and intI1 gene; in the case of tet(A) and sul2 significantly. The discharge of treated wastewater increased the number of intI1, tet and sul genes in the receiving river water both in terms of copy number per ml and relative abundance. Hence, despite the reduction of the number of ARGs and ARBs, wastewater treatment selects for bacteria with ARGs in effluent.

  13. Analysis of differentially expressed genes related to resistance in spinosad- and neonicotinoid-resistant Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castberg, Dorte Heidi Højland; Kristensen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background The housefly is a global pest that has developed resistance to most insecticides applied against it. Resistance of the spinosad-resistant strain 791spin and the neonicotinoid-resistant 766b strain is believed to be due to metabolism. We investigate differentially expressed genes in the...

  14. First report of a resistance-breaking strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus infecting tomatoes with the Sw-5 tospovirus-resistance gene in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) with the Sw-5 resistance gene in tomato is highly effective. However, in certain regions of the world where resistant tomatoes have been continually planted, resistance-breaking strains of TSWV have emerged. In spring 2016 resistant tomatoes were obse...

  15. Escherichia coli of poultry food origin as reservoir of sulphonamide resistance genes and integrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufi, Leila; Sáenz, Yolanda; Vinué, Laura; Abbassi, Mohamed Salah; Ruiz, Elena; Zarazaga, Myriam; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hammami, Salah; Torres, Carmen

    2011-01-05

    The antimicrobial resistance phenotype and genotype, the flanking regions of sulphonamide resistance genes and the integrons were analyzed in 166 Escherichia coli isolates recovered from poultry meat in Tunisia. High percentages of resistance were detected to ampicillin, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, sulphonamide and tetracycline (66-95%), and lower percentages to gentamicin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and cefoxitin (1-4%). The bla(TEM), tet(A)/tet(B), aph(3')-Ia, aac(6')-Ib-cr, aac(3)-II and cmlA genes were identified in 92, 82, 29, 2, 2 and 7 isolates, respectively. Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons were detected in 52% of E. coli isolates and five different gene cassette arrangements were identified in the variable regions of class 1 integrons, which included antimicrobial resistance determinants. Sixty-eight isolates contained the sul1 gene and 37 of them presented this gene into a class 1 integron structure. The sul3 gene was detected associated with non-classic class 1 integrons in 4 out of 46 sul3-positive isolates. The sul2 gene was detected in 66 isolates, 51 of them were linked to strA/B genes in seven different genetic structures. Seventy-three-per-cent of integron-positive isolates presented resistance to at least five different antimicrobial families versus 38.7% of integron-negative isolates. Our study highlights the role of commensal E. coli isolates from poultry meat as an important reservoir for sulphonamide resistance genes and integrons carrying antimicrobial resistance genes.

  16. Insights into novel antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes from soil metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alinne P Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a major worldwide problem has arisen with regard to infectious diseases caused by resistant bacteria. Resistant pathogens are related to high mortality and also to enormous healthcare costs. In this field, cultured microorganisms have been commonly focused in attempts to isolate antibiotic resistance genes or to identify antimicrobial compounds. Although this strategy has been successful in many cases, most of the microbial diversity and related antimicrobial molecules have been completely lost. As an alternative, metagenomics has been used as a reliable approach to reveal the prospective reservoir of antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes in the uncultured microbial community that inhabits a number of environments. In this context, this review will focus on resistance genes as well as on novel antibiotics revealed by a metagenomics approach from the soil environment. Biotechnology prospects are also discussed, opening new frontiers for antibiotic development.

  17. Comparative metagenomics reveals a diverse range of antimicrobial resistance genes in effluents entering a river catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Will; Verner-Jeffreys, David W; Baker-Austin, Craig; Ryan, Jim J; Maskell, Duncan J; Pearce, Gareth P

    2016-01-01

    The aquatic environment has been implicated as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In order to identify sources that are contributing to these gene reservoirs, it is crucial to assess effluents that are entering the aquatic environment. Here we describe a metagenomic assessment for two types of effluent entering a river catchment. We investigated the diversity and abundance of resistance genes, mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and pathogenic bacteria. Findings were normalised to a background sample of river source water. Our results show that effluent contributed an array of genes to the river catchment, the most abundant being tetracycline resistance genes tetC and tetW from farm effluents and the sulfonamide resistance gene sul2 from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. In nine separate samples taken across 3 years, we found 53 different genes conferring resistance to seven classes of antimicrobial. Compared to the background sample taken up river from effluent entry, the average abundance of genes was three times greater in the farm effluent and two times greater in the WWTP effluent. We conclude that effluents disperse ARGs, MGEs and pathogenic bacteria within a river catchment, thereby contributing to environmental reservoirs of ARGs.

  18. Identification of differentially expressed genes related to aphid resistance in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Danna; Liu, Min; Hu, Qijing; He, Min; Qi, Xiaohua; Xu, Qiang; Zhou, Fucai; Chen, Xuehao

    2015-05-11

    Cucumber, a very important vegetable crop worldwide, is easily damaged by pests. Aphids (Aphis gossypii Glover) are among the most serious pests in cucumber production and often cause severe loss of yield and make fruit quality get worse. Identifying genes that render cucumbers resistant to aphid-induced damage and breeding aphid-resistant cucumber varieties have become the most promising control strategies. In this study, a Illumina Genome Analyzer platform was applied to monitor changes in gene expression in the whole genome of the cucumber cultivar 'EP6392' which is resistant to aphids. Nine DGE libraries were constructed from infected and uninfected leaves. In total, 49 differentially expressed genes related to cucumber aphid resistance were screened during the treatment period. These genes are mainly associated with signal transduction, plant-pathogen interactions, flavonoid biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism and sugar metabolism pathways. Eight of the 49 genes may be associated with aphid resistance. Finally, expression of 9 randomly selected genes was evaluated by qRT-PCR to verify the results for the tag-mapped genes. With the exception of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase homolog 6, the expression of the chosen genes was in agreement with the results of the tag-sequencing analysis patterns.

  19. Tetracycline resistance genes persist in soil amended with cattle feces independently from chlortetracycline selection pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyselkova, Martina; Kotrbova, Lucie; Bhumibhamon, Gamonsiri; Chronakova, Alica; Jirout, Jiri; Vrchotova, Nadezda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottova, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic residues and antibiotic resistance genes originating from animal waste represent environmental pollutants with possible human health consequences. In this study, we addressed the question whether chlortetracycline (CTC) residues in soils can act as selective pressure enhancing the persist

  20. Narrow grass hedges reduce tylosin and associated antimicrobial resistance genes in agricultural runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural runoff from areas receiving livestock manure can potentially contaminate surface water with antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of narrow grass hedges (NGHs) on reducing the transport of antimicrobial...

  1. Candidate genes revealed by a genome scan for mosquito resistance to a bacterial insecticide: sequence and gene expression variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jean-Philippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome scans are becoming an increasingly popular approach to study the genetic basis of adaptation and speciation, but on their own, they are often helpless at identifying the specific gene(s or mutation(s targeted by selection. This shortcoming is hopefully bound to disappear in the near future, thanks to the wealth of new genomic resources that are currently being developed for many species. In this article, we provide a foretaste of this exciting new era by conducting a genome scan in the mosquito Aedes aegypti with the aim to look for candidate genes involved in resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti insecticidal toxins. Results The genome of a Bti-resistant and a Bti-susceptible strains was surveyed using about 500 MITE-based molecular markers, and the loci showing the highest inter-strain genetic differentiation were sequenced and mapped on the Aedes aegypti genome sequence. Several good candidate genes for Bti-resistance were identified in the vicinity of these highly differentiated markers. Two of them, coding for a cadherin and a leucine aminopeptidase, were further examined at the sequence and gene expression levels. In the resistant strain, the cadherin gene displayed patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms consistent with the action of positive selection (e.g. an excess of high compared to intermediate frequency mutations, as well as a significant under-expression compared to the susceptible strain. Conclusion Both sequence and gene expression analyses agree to suggest a role for positive selection in the evolution of this cadherin gene in the resistant strain. However, it is unlikely that resistance to Bti is conferred by this gene alone, and further investigation will be needed to characterize other genes significantly associated with Bti resistance in Ae. aegypti. Beyond these results, this article illustrates how genome scans can build on the body of new genomic information (here, full

  2. Sponge Microbiota are a Reservoir of Functional Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versluis, Dennis; de Evgrafov, Mari Cristina Rodriguez; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2016-01-01

    -resistance-conferring β-lactamase was identified in the genus Pseudovibrio with 41% global amino acid identity to the closest β-lactamase with demonstrated functionality, and subsequently classified into a new family termed PSV. Taken together, our results show that sponge microbiota host diverse and novel resistance...

  3. Consolidating and Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Gene Data Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xavier, Basil Britto; Das, Anupam J.; Cochrane, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The unrestricted use of antibiotics has resulted in rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance (AR) and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and their application in understanding MDR pathogen dynamics, it has become...

  4. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailong Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP sludge.

  5. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant–pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future.

  6. Co-occurrence of antibiotic drugs, resistant bacteria and resistance genes in runoff from cattle feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural uses of antibiotics raises concerns about the development of antibiotic resistance in food animals, and the potential to transmit resistance to human clinical settings via fecal contamination of surface and ground water. Although there is broad agreement that agricultural resistance can...

  7. Antibiotic resistance profiles among mesophilic aerobic bacteria in Nigerian chicken litter and associated antibiotic resistance genes1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olonitola, Olayeni Stephen; Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Pruden, Amy

    2015-05-01

    The effect of global antibiotic use practices in livestock on the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens is poorly understood. There is a paucity of data among African nations, which suffer from high rates of antibiotic resistant infections among the human population. Escherichia (29.5%), Staphylococcus (15.8%), and Proteus (15.79%) were the dominant bacterial genera isolated from chicken litter from four different farms in Zaria, Nigeria, all of which contain human pathogenic members. Escherichia isolates were uniformly susceptible to augmentin and cefuroxime, but resistant to sulfamethoxazole (54.5%), ampicillin (22.7%), ciprofloxacin (18.2%), cephalothin (13.6%) and gentamicin (13.6%). Staphylococcus isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, but resistant to tetracycline (86.7%), erythromycin (80%), clindamycin (60%), and penicillin (33.3%). Many of the isolates (65.4%) were resistant to multiple antibiotics, with a multiple antibiotic resistance index (MARI) ≥ 0.2. sul1, sul2, and vanA were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates. Chicken litter associated with antibiotic use and farming practices in Nigeria could be a public health concern given that the antibiotic resistant patterns among genera containing pathogens indicate the potential for antibiotic treatment failure. However, the MARI values were generally lower than reported for Escherichia coli from intensive poultry operations in industrial nations.

  8. Development of resistant tomato population with bacterial canker resistance genes from interspecific hybrids by the support of embryo rescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin KABAŞ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial canker is one of the most important diseases causing economic yield loss in tomato production areas in the world. The best way to control for this disease is to use resistant varieties. However, there are few studies on variety breeding studies of this disease compared with other disease resistant breeding studies. In this study we aimed to improve inbred lines carrying bacterial canker resistance genes to use in the breeding of resistant varieties. Susceptible inbred line AK1 (S. esculentum and resistant LA2157 (S. peruvianum were crossed. Embryo rescue and ovule culture techniques were applied in 30 fruits to get F1 hybrids. Rescued embryos and immature ovules were cultured in petri dishes containing solidified MS medium without hormone. 30 healty embryos were excised and cultured from 30 fruits 27-61 day old (1 embryo fruit-1 in embryo rescue method. The two surviving plants from acclimatization were transferred to the greenhouse to get their BC1 progenies. Resistance tests were performed according to the stem inoculation method in the BC1 and BC2 progenies. The mixture of 14 aggressive Turkish Cmm strains were used to confirm the resistance. The plants were valued by 0-4 scale. Plants with 0 and 1 scale values were used to obtain next progenies. A total of 80 BC3 resistant progenies were transferred to our variety breeding programme.

  9. Killing two birds with one stone: Natural rice rhizospheric microbes reduce arsenic uptake and blast infections in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalam Laksmanan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Our recent work has shown that a rice thizospheric natural isolate, a Pantoea sp (hereafter EA106 attenuates Arsenic (As uptake in rice. In parallel, yet another natural rice rhizospheric isolate a Pseudomonas chlororaphis (hereafter EA105, was shown to inhibit rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Considering the above, we envisaged to evaluate the importance of mixed stress regime in rice plants subjected to both As toxicity and blast infections. Plants subjected to As regime showed increased susceptibility to blast infections compared to As-untreated plants. Rice blast pathogen M. oryzae showed significant resistance against As toxicity compared to other non-host fungal pathogens. Interestingly, plants treated with EA106 showed reduced susceptibility against blast infections in plants pre-treated with As. This data also corresponded with lower As uptake in plants primed with EA106. In addition, we also evaluated the expression of defense related genes in host plants subjected to As treatment. The data showed that plants primed with EA106 upregulated defense-related genes with or without As treatment. The data shows the first evidence of how rice plants cope with mixed stress regimes. Our work highlights the importance of natural association of plant microbiome which determines the efficacy of benign microbes to promote the development of beneficial traits in plants.

  10. Regulatory network analysis of microRNAs and genes in imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ismael; Gharbi, Hanen; Hassine, Islem Ben; Bouguerra, Ghada; Douzi, Kais; Teber, Mouheb; Abbes, Salem; Menif, Samia

    2016-09-16

    Targeted therapy in the form of selective breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR/ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (imatinib mesylate) has successfully been introduced in the treatment of the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, acquired resistance against imatinib mesylate (IM) has been reported in nearly half of patients and has been recognized as major issue in clinical practice. Multiple resistance genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) are thought to be involved in the IM resistance process. These resistance genes and miRNAs tend to interact with each other through a regulatory network. Therefore, it is crucial to study the impact of these interactions in the IM resistance process. The present study focused on miRNA and gene network analysis in order to elucidate the role of interacting elements and to understand their functional contribution in therapeutic failure. Unlike previous studies which were centered only on genes or miRNAs, the prime focus of the present study was on relationships. To this end, three regulatory networks including differentially expressed, related, and global networks were constructed and analyzed in search of similarities and differences. Regulatory associations between miRNAs and their target genes, transcription factors and miRNAs, as well as miRNAs and their host genes were also macroscopically investigated. Certain key pathways in the three networks, especially in the differentially expressed network, were featured. The differentially expressed network emerged as a fault map of IM-resistant CML. Theoretically, the IM resistance process could be prevented by correcting the included errors. The present network-based approach to study resistance miRNAs and genes might help in understanding the molecular mechanisms of IM resistance in CML as well as in the improvement of CML therapy.

  11. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the early response to Magnaporthe oryzae in durable resistant vs susceptible rice (Oryza sativa L. genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bagnaresi

    Full Text Available Durable resistance to blast, the most significant fungal disease of rice, represents an agronomically relevant character. Gigante Vercelli (GV and Vialone Nano (VN are two old temperate japonica Italian rice cultivars with contrasting response to blast infection: GV displays durable and broad resistance while VN is highly susceptible. RNA-seq was used to dissect the early molecular processes deployed during the resistance response of GV at 24 h after blast inoculation. Differential gene expression analysis identified 1,070 and 1,484 modulated genes, of which 726 and 699 were up regulated in response to infection in GV and VN, respectively. Gene ontology (GO enrichment analyses revealed a set of GO terms enriched in both varieties but, despite this commonality, the gene sets contributing to common GO enriched terms were dissimilar. The expression patterns of genes grouped in GV-specific enriched GO terms were examined in detail including at the transcript isoform level. GV exhibited a dramatic up-regulation of genes encoding diterpene phytoalexin biosynthetic enzymes, flavin-containing monooxygenase, class I chitinase and glycosyl hydrolase 17. The sensitivity and high dynamic range of RNA-seq allowed the identification of genes critically involved in conferring GV resistance during the early steps of defence perception-signalling. These included chitin oligosaccharides sensing factors, wall associated kinases, MAPK cascades and WRKY transcription factors. Candidate genes with expression patterns consistent with a potential role as GV-specific functional resistance (R gene(s were also identified. This first application of RNA-seq to dissect durable blast resistance supports a crucial role of the prompt induction of a battery of responses including defence-related genes as well as members of gene families involved in signalling and pathogen-related gene expression regulation.

  12. ABCB1 gene polymorphisms is not associated with drug-resistant epilepsy in Romanian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butila Anamaria Todoran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: P-glycoprotein (P-gp, a drug efflux transporter, encoded by the gene MDR1 ABCB1 multidrug resistant, reduces the penetration through the brain by the AEDs. Overexpression of Pgp in blood-brain barrier in epileptic patients play an important rol in pharmacoresistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible association between C1236T and G2677T ABCB1 gene polymorphisms and drug-resistant epilepsy in Romanian children.

  13. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Xia, Qiong; Kou, Hongping; Wang, Dan; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chunming; Xing, Shaochen; Liu, Bao

    2011-10-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions, but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen. It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question. We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied. Surprisingly, induced expression of Pib by M. grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation, and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wild-type plants. Accordingly, the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5'-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type. In contrast, the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5'-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene, ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance. Taken together, our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M. grisea infection, and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  14. Multiple drug resistance protein (MDR-1, multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP and lung resistance protein (LRP gene expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Elvis Terci Valera

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Despite the advances in the cure rate for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, approximately 25% of affected children suffer relapses. Expression of genes for the multiple drug resistance protein (MDR-1, multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP, and lung resistance protein (LRP may confer the phenotype of resistance to the treatment of neoplasias. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the expression of the MDR-1, MRP and LRP genes in children with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia via the semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and to determine the correlation between expression and event-free survival and clinical and laboratory variables. DESIGN: A retrospective clinical study. SETTING: Laboratory of Pediatric Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Bone marrow aspirates from 30 children with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were assessed for the expression of messenger RNA for the MDR-1, MRP and LRP genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: In the three groups studied, only the increased expression of LRP was related to worsened event-free survival (p = 0.005. The presence of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA was correlated with increased LRP expression (p = 0.009 and increased risk of relapse or death (p = 0.05. The relative risk of relapse or death was six times higher among children with high LRP expression upon diagnosis (p = 0.05, as confirmed by multivariate analysis of the three genes studied (p = 0.035. DISCUSSION: Cell resistance to drugs is a determinant of the response to chemotherapy and its detection via RT-PCR may be of clinical importance. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the expression of genes for resistance to antineoplastic drugs in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia upon diagnosis, and particularly the expression of the LRP gene, may be of clinical relevance, and should be the

  15. Cloning of a novel phosphateserine aminotransferase gene from a Triticum aestivum-Elytrigia elongatum alien substitution line with resistance to powdery mildew

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Daoyi; WANG Honggang

    2005-01-01

    Shannong 551, a T. aestivum-E. elongatum alien substitution line with resistance to powdery mildew, was inoculated with pathogenic spores of powdery mildew. The leaf samples were prepared 48 h after inoculation for scanning electron microscopy. The result showed that germination of spores and growth of young mycelia on leaves of Shannong 551 were suppressed at the early stage of infection. At the same time, RNAs were prepared from the leaves for the cloning of WRP1 and RPW2 by cDNA RDA and RACE technology. BLAST analysis of the sequences indicated that both WRP1 and RPW2 were novel genes. WRP1 contains no complete ORF. RPW2 contains the conserved structure domain of aminotransferase, and its DNA sequence shares high homology with genes of phosphateserine aminotransferase in many organisms. Therefore, it is speculated as a novel phosphateserine aminotransferase gene. The results of Northern blot suggested that expression of RPW2 occurred at the early stage of infection by powdery mildew. Southern blot using the probe of RPW2, in which there was strong hybridizing signals in both genome of Shannong 551 and E. elongatum, but not in those of Jinan 13 and Lumai No.5, indicated that RPW2 derived from the genome of E. elongatum.

  16. Isolation and Characterisation of PRSV-P Resistance Genes in Carica and Vasconcellea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Razean Haireen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Papaya (Carica papaya L. is one of the major tropical fruit crops worldwide, but it is limited throughout its range by papaya ringspot virus type P (PRSV-P. Previous genetic studies identified a functional PRSV-P resistance marker in a mapping population of F2 plants of Vasconcellea pubescens (resistant to PRSV-P × Vasconcellea parviflora (susceptible to PRSV-P and showed that the marker exhibited homology to a serine threonine protein kinase (STK gene. Full length cDNAs of putative PRSV-P resistance genes designated CP_STK from C. papaya and VP_STK1 and VP_STK2 from V. pubescens were cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE. Due to a frame-shift mutation, the two homologous sequences are transcribed and edited differently such that the gene product in V. pubescens is two separate transcripts, whereas in C. papaya they are fused into a single message. A peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS2 present in VP_STK2 but absent in the other transcripts may be the functional source of PRSV resistance in V. pubescens. The STK gene from V. pubescens may have been derived from an alternative splicing to confer resistance. The putative resistance gene, VP_STK2, that was identified in this study is a potential new source of PRSV-P resistance for papaya genotypes.

  17. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of environmental samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Colomer-Lluch

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem resulting from the pressure of antibiotic usage, greater mobility of the population, and industrialization. Many antibiotic resistance genes are believed to have originated in microorganisms in the environment, and to have been transferred to other bacteria through mobile genetic elements. Among others, β-lactam antibiotics show clinical efficacy and low toxicity, and they are thus widely used as antimicrobials. Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is conferred by β-lactamase genes and penicillin-binding proteins, which are chromosomal- or plasmid-encoded, although there is little information available on the contribution of other mobile genetic elements, such as phages. This study is focused on three genes that confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, namely two β-lactamase genes (blaTEM and blaCTX-M9 and one encoding a penicillin-binding protein (mecA in bacteriophage DNA isolated from environmental water samples. The three genes were quantified in the DNA isolated from bacteriophages collected from 30 urban sewage and river water samples, using quantitative PCR amplification. All three genes were detected in the DNA of phages from all the samples tested, in some cases reaching 104 gene copies (GC of blaTEM or 102 GC of blaCTX-M and mecA. These values are consistent with the amount of fecal pollution in the sample, except for mecA, which showed a higher number of copies in river water samples than in urban sewage. The bla genes from phage DNA were transferred by electroporation to sensitive host bacteria, which became resistant to ampicillin. blaTEM and blaCTX were detected in the DNA of the resistant clones after transfection. This study indicates that phages are reservoirs of resistance genes in the environment.

  18. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-03-03

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem resulting from the pressure of antibiotic usage, greater mobility of the population, and industrialization. Many antibiotic resistance genes are believed to have originated in microorganisms in the environment, and to have been transferred to other bacteria through mobile genetic elements. Among others, β-lactam antibiotics show clinical efficacy and low toxicity, and they are thus widely used as antimicrobials. Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is conferred by β-lactamase genes and penicillin-binding proteins, which are chromosomal- or plasmid-encoded, although there is little information available on the contribution of other mobile genetic elements, such as phages. This study is focused on three genes that confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, namely two β-lactamase genes (blaTEM and blaCTX-M9) and one encoding a penicillin-binding protein (mecA) in bacteriophage DNA isolated from environmental water samples. The three genes were quantified in the DNA isolated from bacteriophages collected from 30 urban sewage and river water samples, using quantitative PCR amplification. All three genes were detected in the DNA of phages from all the samples tested, in some cases reaching 104 gene copies (GC) of blaTEM or 102 GC of blaCTX-M and mecA. These values are consistent with the amount of fecal pollution in the sample, except for mecA, which showed a higher number of copies in river water samples than in urban sewage. The bla genes from phage DNA were transferred by electroporation to sensitive host bacteria, which became resistant to ampicillin. blaTEM and blaCTX were detected in the DNA of the resistant clones after transfection. This study indicates that phages are reservoirs of resistance genes in the environment.

  19. DbMDR: a relational database for multidrug resistance genes as potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanchita; Mishra, Manoj; Sen, Naresh; Parihar, Rashi; Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Khan, Feroz; Sharma, Ashok

    2011-10-01

    DbMDR is non-redundant reference database of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes and their orthologs acting as potential drug targets. Drug resistance is a common phenomenon of pathogens, creating a serious problem of inactivation of drugs and antibiotics resulting in occurrence of diseases. Apart from other factors, the MDR genes present in pathogens are shown to be responsible for multidrug resistance. Much of the unorganized information on MDR genes is scattered across the literature and other web resources. Thus, consolidation of such knowledge about MDR genes into one database will make the drug discovery research more efficient. Mining of text for MDR genes has resulted into a large number of publications but in scattered and unorganized form. This information was compiled into a database, which enables a user not only to look at a particular MDR gene but also to find out putative homologs based on sequence similarity, conserved domains, and motifs in proteins encoded by MDR genes more efficiently. At present, DbMDR database contains 2843 MDR genes characterized experimentally as well as functionally annotated with cross-referencing search support. The DbMDR database (http://203.190.147.116/dbmdr/) is a comprehensive resource for comparative study focused on MDR genes and metabolic pathway efflux pumps and intended to provide a platform for researchers for further research in drug resistance.

  20. Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Needham, Charles E

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this text is to document many of the lessons that have been learned during the author’s more than forty years in the field of blast and shock. The writing therefore takes on an historical perspective, in some sense, because it follows the author’s experience. The book deals with blast waves propagating in fluids or materials that can be treated as fluids. It begins by distinguishing between blast waves and the more general category of shock waves. It then examines several ways of generating blast waves, considering the propagation of blast waves in one, two and three dimensions as well as through the real atmosphere. One section treats the propagation of shocks in layered gases in a more detailed manner. The book also details the interaction of shock waves with structures in particular reflections, progressing from simple to complex geometries, including planar structures, two-dimensional structures such as ramps or wedges, reflections from heights of burst, and three-dimensional st...

  1. Use of the lambda Red recombinase system to produce recombinant prophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jofre Juan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Red recombinase system of bacteriophage lambda has been used to inactivate chromosomal genes in E. coli K-12 through homologous recombination using linear PCR products. The aim of this study was to induce mutations in the genome of some temperate Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages. When phage genes are in the prophage state, they behave like chromosomal genes. This enables marker genes, such as antibiotic resistance genes, to be incorporated into the stx gene. Once the phages' lytic cycle is activated, recombinant Shiga toxin converting phages are produced. These phages can transfer the marker genes to the bacteria that they infect and convert. As the Red system's effectiveness decreased when used for our purposes, we had to introduce significant variations to the original method. These modifications included: confirming the stability of the target stx gene increasing the number of cells to be transformed and using a three-step PCR method to produce the amplimer containing the antibiotic resistance gene. Results Seven phages carrying two different antibiotic resistance genes were derived from phages that are directly involved in the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-producing strains, using this modified protocol. Conclusion This approach facilitates exploration of the transduction processes and is a valuable tool for studying phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  2. A thiostrepton resistance gene and its mutants serve as selectable markers in Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Furukawa, Megumi; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshiro, Takashi; Suzuki, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Effective utilization of microbes often requires complex genetic modification using multiple antibiotic resistance markers. Because a few markers have been used in Geobacillus spp., the present study was designed to identify a new marker for these thermophiles. We explored antibiotic resistance genes functional in Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 and identified a thiostrepton resistance gene (tsr) effective at 50 °C. The tsr gene was further used to generate the mutant tsr(H258Y) functional at 55 °C. Higher functional temperature of the mutant was attributable to the increase in thermostability of the gene product because recombinant protein produced from tsr(H258Y) was more thermostable than that from tsr. In fact, the tsr(H258Y) gene served as a selectable marker for plasmid transformation of G. kaustophilus. This new marker could facilitate complex genetic modification of G. kaustophilus and potentially other Geobacillus spp.

  3. The MCP-8 gene and its possible association with resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae in tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Gui Hong; Wan, Zi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Liu, Feng; Liu, Xiao Jun; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-09-01

    Mast cell proteases play an important role in the regulation of the immune response. We identified the cDNA of the mast cell protease 8 (MCP-8) gene and analyzed its genomic structure in tilapia. The ORF of the MCP-8 was 768 bp, encoding 255 amino acids. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the MCP-8 gene was expressed predominantly in spleen, moderately in liver, blood, brain, gill, intestine, skin, and weakly expressed in kidney, muscle and eye. After a challenge with Streptococcus agalactiae, the gene was induced significantly (p 0.05). These results suggest that the MCP-8 gene play an important role in the resistance to S. agalactiae in tilapia. The SNP markers in the MCP-8 gene associated with the resistance to the bacterial pathogen may facilitate selection of tilapia resistant to the bacterial disease.

  4. RNA interference of effector gene 16D10 leads to broad meloidogyne resistance in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are a significant problem in potato (Solanum tuberosum) production. There is no known Meloidogyne resistance gene in cultivated potato, even though sources of resistance were identified in wild potato species. The objective of this study was to generate stable ...

  5. Suppression of plant resistance gene-based immunity by a fungal effector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houterman, P.M.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of plants consists of two layers. The first layer, called basal resistance, governs recognition of conserved microbial molecules and fends off most attempted invasions. The second layer is based on Resistance (R) genes that mediate recognition of effectors, proteins secreted

  6. Interrogating the plasmidome to determine antibiotic resistance gene mobility within the swine fecal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of antibiotics in animal production has been highlighted as a key contributor to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems. Gram negative bacteria, such as the Enterobacteriaceae, are important facilitators for resistance gene dissemination in the environment and i...

  7. Isolation and genetic mapping of NBS-LRR disease resistance gene analogs in watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixty-six watermelon disease resistance gene analogs (WRGA) were isolated from genotypes possessing disease resistance to fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum races 0, 1, and 2, zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus watermelon strain, cucumber mosaic virus, and watermelon mosaic virus. Deg...

  8. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  9. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: species distribution, fluconazole resistance and drug efflux pump gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie-Yu; Liu, Jin-Hui; Liu, Fa-Di; Xia, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Zhi-Qin; Zhu, Na; Yan-Yan; Ying, Ying; Huang, Xiao-Tian

    2014-10-01

    The increasing incidence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and the emergence of fluconazole resistance are an indisputable fact. However, little information is available regarding the correlation between fluconazole resistance in vaginal Candida albicans and the expression of drug efflux pump genes. In this study, we investigated the species distribution, fluconazole susceptibility profiles and the mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in Candida strains. In total, 785 clinical Candida isolates were collected from patients with VVC. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species(n = 529) followed by C. glabrata (n = 164) and C. krusei (n = 57). Of all Candida isolates, 4.7% were resistant to fluconazole. We randomly selected 18 fluconazole resistant isolates of C. albicans to evaluate the expression of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1 and FLU1 genes. Compared with fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans isolates, CDR1 gene expression displayed 3.16-fold relative increase, which was statistically significant. CDR2, MDR1 and FLU1 overexpression was observed in several fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates, but statistical significance was not achieved. These results demonstrate a high frequency of non-albicans species (32.6%); however, C. albicans is the most common Candida species implicated in vaginitis, and this strain displays considerable fluconazole resistance. Meanwhile, our study further indicates that fluconazole resistance in C. albicans may correlate with CDR1 gene overexpression.

  10. Fine genetic mapping of target leaf spot resistance gene cca-3 in cucumber, Cucumis sativus L

    Science.gov (United States)

    The target leaf spot (TLS) is a very important fungal disease in cucumber. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of a recessively inherited resistance gene, cca-2 against TLS with 1,083 F2 plants derived from the resistant cucumber inbred line D31 and the susceptible line D5. Initial mapp...

  11. Frequency of Aminoglycoside-Resistance Genes in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolates from Hospitalized Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdiyoun, Seyed Mohsen; Kazemian, Hossein; Ahanjan, Mohammad; Houri, Hamidreza; Goudarzi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causative agents in community- and hospital-acquired infections. Aminoglycosides are powerful bactericidal drugs that are often used in combination with beta-lactams or glycopeptides to treat staphylococcal infections. Objectives The main objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in hospitalized patients in Sari and Tehran, Iran. Methods In this study, 174 MRSA strains isolated from different clinical samples, such as blood, sputum, tracheal exudates, bronchus, pleura, urine, wounds, and catheters, were collected from hospitalized patients in Tehran and Sari during 2014. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed against nine antibiotics with the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. The MRSA strains were examined with oxacillin and cefoxitin disks. MRSA was then validated by detection of the mecA gene. PCR was used to evaluate the prevalence of the aminoglycoside-resistance genes aac (6’)-Ie/aph (2”), aph (3’)-IIIa, and ant (4’) among the MRSA isolates. Results The results of drug susceptibility testing showed that the highest rate of resistance was against erythromycin in Tehran (84.4%) and gentamicin (71.7%) in Sari. All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, and all strains harbored the mecA gene. The aac (6’)-Ie/aph (2”), aph (3’)-IIIa, and ant (4’)-Ia genes were detected among 134 (77%), 119 (68.4%), and 122 (70.1%) of the isolates, respectively. Conclusions The present study showed a high prevalence of aminoglycoside-resistance genes among MRSA isolates in two cities in Iran.

  12. Metagenomic Evidence of the Prevalence and Distribution Patterns of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Dairy Agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta, Dipti W; Dou, Zhengxia; Kumar, Sanjay; Indugu, Nagaraju; Toth, John Daniel; Vecchiarelli, Bonnie; Bhukya, Bhima

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AR) is a global problem with serious implications for public health. AR genes are frequently detected on animal farms, but little is known about their origin and distribution patterns. We hypothesized that AR genes can transfer from animal feces to the environment through manure, and to this end, we characterized and compared the resistomes (collections of AR genes) of animal feces, manure, and soil samples collected from five dairy farms using a metagenomics approach. Resistomes constituted only up to 1% of the total gene content, but were variable by sector and also farm. Broadly, the identified AR genes were associated with 18 antibiotic resistances classes across all samples; however, the most abundant genes were classified under multidrug transporters (44.75%), followed by resistance to vancomycin (12.48%), tetracycline (10.52%), bacitracin (10.43%), beta-lactam resistance (7.12%), and MLS efflux pump (6.86%) antimicrobials. The AR gene profiles were variable between farms. Farm 09 was categorized as a high risk farm, as a greater proportion of AR genes were common to at least three sectors, suggesting possible horizontal transfer of AR genes. Taxonomic characterization of AR genes revealed that a majority of AR genes were associated with the phylum Proteobacteria. Nonetheless, there were several members of Bacteroidetes, particularly Bacteroides genus and several lineages from Firmicutes that carried similar AR genes in different sectors, suggesting a strong potential for horizontal transfer of AR genes between unrelated bacterial hosts in different sectors of the farms. Further studies are required to affirm the horizontal gene transfer mechanisms between microbiomes of different sectors in animal agroecosystems.

  13. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  14. Dissecting the organ specificity of insecticide resistance candidate genes in Anopheles gambiae: known and novel candidate genes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The elevated expression of enzymes with insecticide metabolism activity can lead to high levels of insecticide resistance in the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. In this study, adult female mosquitoes from an insecticide susceptible and resistant strain were dissected into four different body parts. RNA from each of these samples was used in microarray analysis to determine the enrichment patterns of the key detoxification gene families within the mosquito and to identify additio...

  15. Confirmation of root-knot nematode resistant gene Rmi1 using SSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musarrat Ramzan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Root Knot Nematode (RKN is a serious economic threat to various cultivated crops worldwide. It is a devastating pest of soybean and responsible to cause severe yield loss in Pakistan. The cultivation of resistant soybean varieties against this pest is the sustainable strategy to manage the heavy loss and increase yield. There is an utmost need to identify RKN resistant varieties of soybean against cultivated in Pakistan. The presented study is an attempt to identify and confirm the presence of resistant gene Rmi1 in soybean. Method: Molecular studies have been done using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR marker system to identify resistant soybean varieties against Root Knot Nematode (RKN using fifteen (15 indigenous cultivars and four (4 US cultivars. DNA was isolated, purified, quantified and then used to employ various SSR markers. The amplified product is observed using gel documentation system after electrophoresis. Results: Diagnostic SSR markers Satt-358 and Satt-492 have shown the presence of Rmi1 gene in all resistance carrying genotypes. Satt-358 amplified the fragment of 200 bp and Satt-492 generated 232 bp bands in all resistant genotypes. This study confirmed the Rmi gene locus (G248A-1 in all internationally confirmed resistant including six (6 native varieties. Conclusion: These investigations have identified six (6 resistant cultivars revealing the effective and informative sources that can be utilized in breeding programs for the selection of RKN resistance soybean genotypes in Pakistan.

  16. Streptomycin use in apple orchards did not increase abundance of mobile resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Brion; Holliger, Eduard; Walsh, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Streptomycin is used as a first-line defense and tetracycline as a second-line defense, in the fight against fire blight disease in apple and pear orchards. We have performed the first study to quantitatively analyze the influence of streptomycin use in agriculture on the abundance of streptomycin and tetracycline resistance genes in apple orchards. Flowers, leaves, and soil were collected from three orchard sites in 2010, 2011, and 2012. Gene abundance distribution was analyzed using two-way anova and principal component analysis to investigate relationships between gene abundance data over time and treatment. The mobile antibiotic resistance genes, strA, strB, tetB, tetM, tetW, and the insertion sequence IS1133, were detected prior to streptomycin treatment in almost all samples, indicating the natural presence of these resistance genes in nature. Statistically significant increases in the resistance gene abundances were occasional, inconsistent, and not reproducible from one year to the next. We conclude that the application of streptomycin in these orchards was not associated with sustained increases in streptomycin or tetracycline resistance gene abundances.

  17. Occurrence and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Underlying Two Swine Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Krapac, I.J.; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N.; Mackie, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR typing methods to assess the presence of tetracycline resistance determinants conferring ribosomal protection in waste lagoons and in groundwater underlying two swine farms. All eight classes of genes encoding this mechanism of resistance [tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tetB(P), tet(S), tet(T), and otrA] were found in total DNA extracted from water of two lagoons. These determinants were found to be seeping into the underlying groundwater and could be detected as far as 250 m downstream from the lagoons. The identities and origin of these genes in groundwater were confirmed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses. Tetracycline-resistant bacterial isolates from groundwater harbored the tet(M) gene, which was not predominant in the environmental samples and was identical to tet(M) from the lagoons. The presence of this gene in some typical soil inhabitants suggests that the vector of antibiotic resistance gene dissemination is not limited to strains of gastrointestinal origin carrying the gene but can be mobilized into the indigenous soil microbiota. This study demonstrated that tet genes occur in the environment as a direct result of agriculture and suggested that groundwater may be a potential source of antibiotic resistance in the food chain.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Correlations with Microbial Community and Metal Resistance Genes in Full-Scale Biogas Reactors As Revealed by Metagenomic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Li, Bing; Li, Li-Guan

    2017-01-01

    Digested residues from biogas plants are often used as biofertilizers for agricultural crops cultivation. The antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in digested residues pose a high risk to public health due to their potential spread to the disease-causing microorganisms and thus reduce the susceptib...

  19. Dynamic evolution of resistance gene analogs in the orthologous genomic regions of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 in Triticum dicoccoides and Aegilops tauschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat is one of the most important staple grain crops in the world. Powdery mildew disease caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici can result in significant losses in both grain yield and quality in wheat. In this study, the wheat powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 locus located on the short ...

  20. Breeding and Characterization of a New Rice Restorer Line Containing Bt Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Fang-yuan; LU Xian-jun; HE Shu-lin; CHEN Xiao-juan; LU Dai-hua; SUN Shu-xia; LI Zhi-hua; LIU Guang-chun; ZHANG Yi-zheng; REN Guang-jun

    2009-01-01

    Bt5198, a new rice restorer line containing Bt gene, was developed from the cross and backcross of the elite restorer line Chenghui 177 with Bt Minghui 63, a transgenic Bt restorer line. The inbred lines were evaluated using PCR amplification, test paper evaluation, insect resistance evaluation in both the laboratory and paddy fields, nursery evaluation of rice blast resistance and pedigree selection of agronomic traits. Larval mortalities on Bt5198 and Bt Minghui 63 were 100% when rice culms were inoculated with the eggs of the striped stem borer (SSB) in the laboratory. Bt5198 was highly resistant against SSB and the yellow stem borer (YSB) under field conditions. The F1 hybrids derived from Bt5198 and four cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) lines were also highly resistant to SSB and YSB and had a significant heterosis. Two-year evaluation of rice blast resistance confirmed that the resistance levels of Bt5198 to leaf blast and neck blast were similar to those of Chenghui 177 and significantly better than those of Bt Minghui 63. Seed germination ability and pollen yield of Bt5198 were similar with Chenghui 177, suggesting that the introduction of the Bt gene into the new restorer line had no significant effects on seed vitality or the yield of seed production. To identify the presence of the Bt gene, it was effective to combine test paper examination with the evaluation of insect-resistance, both in the laboratory and under field conditions.

  1. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata introgression line in wheat and its genetic association with leaf rust resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PUNEET INDER TOOR; SATINDER KAUR; MITALY BANSAL; BHARAT YADAV; PARVEEN CHHUNEJA

    2016-12-01

    A pair of stripe rust and leaf rust resistance genes was introgressed from Aegilops caudata, a nonprogenitor diploid species with the CC genome, to cultivated wheat. Inheritance and genetic mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in backcrossrecombinant inbred line (BC-RIL) population derived from the cross of a wheat–Ae. caudata introgression line (IL) T291-2(pau16060) with wheat cv. PBW343 is reported here. Segregation of BC-RILs for stripe rust resistance depicted a single major gene conditioning adult plant resistance (APR) with stripe rust reaction varying from TR-20MS in resistant RILs signifying the presence of some minor genes as well. Genetic association with leaf rust resistance revealed that two genes are located at a recombination distance of 13%. IL T291-2 had earlier been reported to carry introgressions on wheat chromosomes 2D, 3D, 4D, 5D, 6D and 7D. Genetic mapping indicated the introgression of stripe rust resistance gene on wheat chromosome 5DS in the region carrying leaf rust resistance gene LrAc, but as an independent introgression. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers designed from the survey sequence data of 5DS enriched the target region harbouring stripe and leaf rust resistance genes. Stripe rust resistance locus, temporarily designated as YrAc, mapped at the distal most end of 5DS linked with a group of four colocated SSRs and two resistance gene analogue (RGA)-STS markers at a distanceof 5.3 cM. LrAc mapped at a distance of 9.0 cM from the YrAc and at 2.8 cM from RGA-STS marker Ta5DS_2737450, YrAc and LrAc appear to be the candidate genes for marker-assisted enrichment of the wheat gene pool for rust resistance.

  2. Gene chip array for differentiation of mycobacterial species and detection of drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-chun; LIU Xiao-qing; XIE Xiu-li; XU Ying-chun; ZHAO Zhi-xian

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene chip array can differentiate isolated mycobacterial strains using vadous mycobacterium specific probes simultaneously.Gene chip array can evaluate drug resistance to isoniazid and rifampin of tuberculosis strains by detecting drug resistance related gene mutation.This technique has great potential for clinical application.We performed a retrospective study to investigate the capability of gene chip array in the rapid differentiation of species and detection of drug resistance in mycobacterium,and to evaluate its clinical efficacy.Methods We selected 39 patients (54 clinical mycobacterium isolates),used gene chip array to identify the species of these isolates and detect drug resistance to isoniazid and rifampin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.Meanwhile,these patients' clinical data were analyzed retrospectively.Results Among these 39 patients whose mycopacterium culture were positive,32 patients' isolates were identified as Mycobacterium tubercu/osis, all of them were clinical infection. Seven patients' isolates were identified as non-tuberculosis mycobacterium.Analyzed with their clinical data,only two patients were considered as clinical infection,both of them were diagnosed as hematogenous disseminated Mycobacterium introcellulare infection.The other five patients' isolates were of no clinical significance; their clinical samples were all respiratory specimens.Clinical manifestations of tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections were similar.Isoniazid resistance was detected in two tuberculosis patients,while rifampin resistance was detected in one tuberculosis patient; there was another patient whose Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolate was resistant to both isoniazid and rifampin (belongs to multidrug resistance tuberculosis).The fact that this patient did not respond to routine anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy also confirmed this result.Conclusions Gene chip array may be a simple,rapid,and reliable method for the

  3. Efflux pump gene expression in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guilian; Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Qian; Jiang, Yi; Wei, Jianhao; Zhao, Li-li; Zhao, Xiuqin; Lu, Jianxin; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) are the two most effective drugs in tuberculosis therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these two drugs is essential to quickly diagnose multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis. Nine clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to only INH and RIF and 10 clinical pan-sensitive isolates were included to evaluate the expression of 20 putative drug efflux pump genes and sequence mutations in rpoB (RIF), katG (INH), the inhA promoter (INH), and oxyR-ahpC (INH). Nine and three MDR isolates were induced to overexpress efflux pump genes by INH and RIF, respectively. Eight and two efflux pump genes were induced to overexpress by INH and RIF in MDR isolates, respectively. drrA, drrB, efpA, jefA (Rv2459), mmr, Rv0849, Rv1634, and Rv1250 were overexpressed under INH or RIF stress. Most efflux pump genes were overexpressed under INH stress in a MDR isolates that carried the wild-type katG, inhA, and oxyR-ahpC associated with INH resistance than in those that carried mutations. The expression levels of 11 genes (efpA, Rv0849, Rv1250, P55 (Rv1410c), Rv1634, Rv2994, stp, Rv2459, pstB, drrA, and drrB) without drug inducement were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in nine MDR isolates than in 10 pan-sensitive isolates. In conclusion, efflux pumps may play an important role in INH acquired resistance in MDR M. tuberculosis, especially in those strains having no mutations in genes associated with INH resistance; basal expression levels of some efflux pump genes are higher in MDR isolates than in pan-sensitive isolates and the basal expressional differences may be helpful to diagnose and treat resistant tuberculosis.

  4. Efflux pump gene expression in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilian Li

    Full Text Available Isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF are the two most effective drugs in tuberculosis therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these two drugs is essential to quickly diagnose multidrug-resistant (MDR tuberculosis and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis. Nine clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to only INH and RIF and 10 clinical pan-sensitive isolates were included to evaluate the expression of 20 putative drug efflux pump genes and sequence mutations in rpoB (RIF, katG (INH, the inhA promoter (INH, and oxyR-ahpC (INH. Nine and three MDR isolates were induced to overexpress efflux pump genes by INH and RIF, respectively. Eight and two efflux pump genes were induced to overexpress by INH and RIF in MDR isolates, respectively. drrA, drrB, efpA, jefA (Rv2459, mmr, Rv0849, Rv1634, and Rv1250 were overexpressed under INH or RIF stress. Most efflux pump genes were overexpressed under INH stress in a MDR isolates that carried the wild-type katG, inhA, and oxyR-ahpC associated with INH resistance than in those that carried mutations. The expression levels of 11 genes (efpA, Rv0849, Rv1250, P55 (Rv1410c, Rv1634, Rv2994, stp, Rv2459, pstB, drrA, and drrB without drug inducement were significantly higher (P < 0.05 in nine MDR isolates than in 10 pan-sensitive isolates. In conclusion, efflux pumps may play an important role in INH acquired resistance in MDR M. tuberculosis, especially in those strains having no mutations in genes associated with INH resistance; basal expression levels of some efflux pump genes are higher in MDR isolates than in pan-sensitive isolates and the basal expressional differences may be helpful to diagnose and treat resistant tuberculosis.

  5. Do phosphine resistance genes influence movement and dispersal under starvation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramandeep; Ebert, Paul R; Walter, Gimme H; Swain, Anthony J; Schlipalius, David I

    2013-10-01

    Phosphine resistance alleles might be expected to negatively affect energy demanding activities such as walking and flying, because of the inverse relationship between phosphine resistance and respiration. We used an activity monitoring system to quantify walking of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) and a flight chamber to estimate their propensity for flight initiation. No significant difference in the duration of walking was observed between the strongly resistant, weakly resistant, and susceptible strains of R. dominica we tested, and females walked significantly more than males regardless of genotype. The walking activity monitor revealed no pattern of movement across the day and no particular time of peak activity despite reports of peak activity of R. dominica and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) under field conditions during dawn and dusk. Flight initiation was significantly higher for all strains at 28 degrees C and 55% relative humidity than at 25, 30, 32, and 35 degrees C in the first 24 h of placing beetles in the flight chamber. Food deprivation and genotype had no significant effect on flight initiation. Our results suggest that known resistance alleles in R. dominica do not affect insect mobility and should therefore not inhibit the dispersal of resistant insects in the field.

  6. Transfer of tetracycline resistance genes with aggregation substance in food-borne Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong-Mi; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2015-04-01

    Enterococcus faecalis has the ability to conjugate with the aid of aggregation substance (AS) and inducible sex pheromones to exchange genetic elements in food matrix. To evaluate the food safety condition and the transferable factor, 250 tetracycline-resistant food-borne E. faecalis were collected in Korea. Among the isolates, a majority of tetracycline-resistant isolates (49.6 %) harbored both the tet(M) and tet(L) genes together, followed by tet(M) (19.6 %), and tet(L) (6.8 %) alone. Also, we found the combination of tet(L)/tet(M)/tet(O) or tet(M)/tet(O). We identified two tet(S) genes including the isolate carrying tet(M) + tet(S) genes. Additionally, most E. faecalis were positive for cpd and ccf (both 96.8 %) followed by cob (57.2 %). Through mating experiments, we confirmed E. faecalis possessing the Int-Tn gene and/or any AS gene successfully transferred tet genes to JH2-2 E. faecalis, whereas neither E. faecalis carrying AS genes nor the Int-Tn gene showed the conjugation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results supported a distinct pattern, implying transfer of genetic information. Our study revealed a high occurrence of tetracycline resistance genes in E. faecalis from various foods. The widespread dissemination of tetracycline resistance genes would be promoted to transfer tetracycline resistance genes by pheromone-mediated conjugation systems.

  7. Drug-resistant genes carried by Acinetobacter baumanii isolated from patients with lower respiratory tract infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Ning; ZHANG Wei; LI Jia-shu; YU Qin; WAN Huan-ying; MU Lan; ZHONG Xiao-ning; WEI Li-ping; MA Jian-jun; WANG Qiu-yue; HU Ke; LI De-zhi; TIAN Gui-zhen; CAI Shao-xi; WANG Rui-qin; HE Bei; WANG Si-qin; WANG Zhan-wei; ZHAO Su-rui; GAO Zhan-cheng; CHEN Ji-chao; CHEN Yu-sheng; GENG Rong; HU Ying-hui; YANG Jing-ping; DU Juan; HU Cheng-ping

    2010-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumanii (A. baumanii) remains an important microbial pathogen resulting in nosocomial acquired infections with significant morbidity and mortality. The mechanism by which nosocomial bacteria, like A.baumanii, attain multidrug resistance to antibiotics is of considerable interest. The aim in this study was to investigate the spread status of antibiotic resistance genes, such as multiple β-lactamase genes and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes, from A. baumanii strains isolated from patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs).Methods Two thousand six hundred and ninety-eight sputum or the bronchoalveolar lavage samples from inpatients with LRTIs were collected in 21 hospitals in the mainland of China from November 2007 to February 2009. All samples were routinely inoculated. The isolated bacterial strains and their susceptibility were analyzed via VITEK-2 expert system.Several kinds of antibiotic resistant genes were further differentiated via polymerase chain reaction and sequencing methods.Results Totally, 39 A. baumanii strains were isolated from 2698 sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage samples. There was not only a high resistant rate of the isolated A. baumanii strains to ampicillin and first- and second-generation cephalosporins (94.87%, 100% and 97.44%, respectively), but also to the third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone at 92.31%, ceftazidine at 51.28%) and imipenem (43.59%) as well. The lowest antibiotic resistance rate of 20.51% was found to amikacin. The OXA-23 gene was identified in 17 strains of A. baumanii, and the AmpC gene in 23 strains. The TEM-1 gene was carried in 15 strains. PER-1 and SHV-2 genes were detected in two different strains.Aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene aac-3-la was found in 23 strains, and the aac-6'-lb gene in 19 strains, aac-3-la and aac-6'-lb genes hibernated in three A. baumanii strains that showed no drug-resistant phenotype.Conclusions A. baumaniican carry multiple drug-resistant

  8. Functional metagenomics reveals previously unrecognized diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in gulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Camillo Martiny

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife may facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR between human-dominated habitats and the surrounding environment. Here, we use functional metagenomics to survey the diversity and genomic context of AR genes in gulls. Using this approach, we found a variety of AR genes not previously detected in gulls and wildlife, including class A and C beta-lactamases as well as six tetracycline resistance gene types. An analysis of the flanking sequences indicates that most of these genes are present in Enterobacteraceae and various gram positive bacteria. In addition to finding known gene types, we detected thirty-one previously undescribed AR genes. These undescribed genes include one most similar to an uncharacterized gene in Verrucomicrobium and another to a putative DNA repair protein in Lactobacillus. Overall, the study more than doubled the number of clinically relevant AR gene types known to be carried by gulls or by wildlife in general. Together with the propensity of gulls to visit human-dominated habitats, this high diversity of AR gene types suggests that gulls could facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  9. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND... Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  10. Association between antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in Escherichia coli obtained from blood and faeces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Skjøt, Line; Sandvang, Dorthe; Frimodt-Møller, Niels;

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates obtained from faeces (n = 85) and blood (n = 123) were susceptibility tested against 17 antimicrobial agents and the presence of 9 virulence genes was determined by PCR. Positive associations between several antimicrobial resistances and 2 VF genes (iutA and traT) were...

  11. Characterization of R genes involved in resistance to Cherry leaf roll virus in paradox hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    A single dominant ‘R’ gene (clrvR), in black walnuts (Juglans hindsii) or ‘paradox’ hybrids (J. hindsii x J. regia) confers resistance to Cherry leaf roll virus (CLRV), the causal agent of blackline disease. The identification and cloning of the ‘R’ gene is expected to aid the walnut breeding progra...

  12. Genetic mapping and characterization of two novel Phytophthora resistance genes from soybean landrace PI567139B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot (PRR) disease, caused by P. sojae, is a widespread soybean disease resulting in an annual yield loss of $1~2 billion worldwide. To control the disease, breeders primarily employ race-specific resistant genes which are named Rps genes which have been identified to be lo...

  13. [Effects of Thermophilic Composting on Antibiotic Resistance Genes (ARGs) of Swine Manure Source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ning-guo; Huang, Nan; Wang, Wei-wei; Yu, Man; Chen, Xiao-yang; Yao, Yan-lai; Wang, Wei-ping; Hong, Chun-lai

    2016-05-15

    To investigate the effects of thermophilic composting process on antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of swine manure source at a field scale, the abundance of four erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and ermF), three β-lactam resistance genes (blaTEM, blaCTX and blaSHV) and two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS) were quantified by quantitative PCR ( qPCR) during the composting process. The results suggested that the erm genes' copy numbers were significantly higher than those of the bla and qnr genes in the early stage of composting (P composting process, bla and qnr genes were at low levels, while erm genes were still at high levels. Even through ermF was proliferated comparing with the initial copies. These results indicated that thermophilic composting process could not effectively remove all ARGs. For some ARGs, compost may be a good bioreactor resulting in their proliferation. Application of composting products on farmland may cause transference of ARGs.

  14. Rapid cloning of disease-resistance genes in plants using mutagenesis and sequence capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic solutions to protect crops against pests and pathogens are preferable to agrichemicals 1. Wild crop relatives carry immense diversity of disease resistance (R) genes that could enable more sustainable disease control. However, recruiting R genes for crop improvement typically involves long b...

  15. Antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial resistance genes in marine bacteria from salmon aquaculture and non-aquaculture sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Q A; Cabello, Felipe C; L'abée-Lund, Trine M; Tomova, Alexandra; Godfrey, Henry P; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Sørum, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AR) detected by disc diffusion and antimicrobial resistance genes detected by DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction with amplicon sequencing were studied in 124 marine bacterial isolates from a Chilean salmon aquaculture site and 76 from a site without aquaculture 8 km distant. Resistance to one or more antimicrobials was present in 81% of the isolates regardless of site. Resistance to tetracycline was most commonly encoded by tetA and tetG; to trimethoprim, by dfrA1, dfrA5 and dfrA12; to sulfamethizole, by sul1 and sul2; to amoxicillin, by blaTEM ; and to streptomycin, by strA-strB. Integron integrase intl1 was detected in 14 sul1-positive isolates, associated with aad9 gene cassettes in two from the aquaculture site. intl2 Integrase was only detected in three dfrA1-positive isolates from the aquaculture site and was not associated with gene cassettes in any. Of nine isolates tested for conjugation, two from the aquaculture site transferred AR determinants to Escherichia coli. High levels of AR in marine sediments from aquaculture and non-aquaculture sites suggest that dispersion of the large amounts of antimicrobials used in Chilean salmon aquaculture has created selective pressure in areas of the marine environment far removed from the initial site of use of these agents.

  16. Molecular markers linked to the apple scab resistance gene Vbj derived from Malus baccata jackii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygax, M; Gianfranceschi, L; Liebhard, R; Kellerhals, M; Gessler, C; Patocchi, A

    2004-11-01

    Breeding for scab-resistant apple cultivars by pyramiding several resistance genes in the same genetic background is a promising way to control apple scab caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis. To achieve this goal, DNA markers linked to the genes of interest are required in order to select seedlings with the desired resistance allele combinations. For several apple scab resistance genes, molecular markers are already available; but until now, none existed for the apple scab resistance gene Vbj originating from the crab apple Malus baccata jackii. Using bulk segregant analysis, three RAPD markers linked to Vbj were first identified. These markers were transformed into more reliable sequence-characterised amplified region (SCAR) markers that proved to be co-dominant. In addition, three SSR markers and one SCAR were identified by comparing homologous linkage groups of existing genetic maps. Discarding plants showing genotype-phenotype incongruence (GPI plants) plants, a linkage map was calculated. Vbj mapped between the markers CH05e03 (SSR) and T6-SCAR, at 0.6 cM from CH05e03 and at 3.9 cM from T6-SCAR. Without the removal of the GPI plants, Vbj was placed 15 cM away from the closest markers. Problems and pitfalls due to GPI plants and the consequences for mapping the resistance gene accurately are discussed. Finally, the usefulness of co-dominant markers for pedigree analysis is also demonstrated.

  17. Role of embCAB gene mutations in ethambutol resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadaun, G P S; Das, Ram; Upadhyay, Prashant; Chauhan, D S; Sharma, V D; Katoch, V M

    2009-05-01

    In the present study, ethambutol (EMB) resistance-associated mutations were characterised in the embCAB genes of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) collected in India. Thirty MTB isolates were tested for their susceptibility to first-line antitubercular drugs using the Löwenstein-Jensen proportion method, and EMB minimum inhibitory concentrations of MTB isolates were determined by the resazurin microtitre assay. Sequencing of various regions of the embCAB genes was performed to identify EMB resistance-associated mutations. Mutations of embB306 were detected in 15 of 23 EMB-resistant MTB isolates. Three EMB-resistant isolates had mutations at codon 270 of the embC gene, two of which also harboured embB306 mutations. No mutation was identified in the embA gene. All seven EMB-sensitive MTB isolates had the wild-type embCAB sequence. In summary, embB306 mutations were associated with EMB resistance, and mutation at codon 270 of the embC gene may contribute to high-level EMB resistance in some MTB isolates.

  18. Functional Characterization of Mi, a Root-knot Nematode Resistance Gene from Tomato( Lycopersicon esculentum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Gang Chen; Li-Ying Zhang; Jun-Hong Zhang; Wei Zhang; Xue Wang; Bo Ouyang; Han-Xia Li; Zhi-Biao Ye

    2006-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) cause major economic damage to numerous crop species around the world. Plant resistance is the most important attribute that is able to suppress invasion by the rootknot nematodes. In the present study, a candidate root-knot nematode resistance gene (Mi) was isolated from the resistant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) line RN-1. Expression profiling analysis revealed that this gene was expressed specifically in the roots, stems, and leaves, but not in the flowers or fruits.To verify the real function of this candidate gene, both sense and inteference RNA (RNAi) vectors were constructed. We obtained 31 transgenic plants with between one and seven copies of T-DNA inserts of sense Mi from two nematode-susceptible tomato cultivars as assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)and Southern blotting analysis. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that expression levels of the Mi gene varied in different transgenic plants. Nematode assays showed that the resistance to root-knot nematodes was significantly improved in some transgenic lines compared with untransformed susceptible controls and that the resistance was heritable in selfed progeny. Loss of function via RNAi further confirmed the role of the Mi gene and the original resistant lines became susceptible to root-knot nematodes.

  19. Introgression of a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops caudata to bread wheat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amandeep Kaur Riar; Satinder Kaur; H. S. Dhaliwal; Kuldeep Singh; Parveen Chhuneja

    2012-08-01

    Rusts are the most important biotic constraints limiting wheat productivity worldwide. Deployment of cultivars with broad spectrum rust resistance is the only environmentally viable option to combat these diseases. Identification and introgression of novel sources of resistance is a continuous process to combat the ever evolving pathogens. The germplasm of nonprogenitor Aegilops species with substantial amount of variability has been exploited to a limited extent. In the present investigation introgression, inheritance and molecular mapping of a leaf rust resistance gene of Ae. caudata (CC) acc. pau3556 in cultivated wheat were undertaken. An F2 population derived from the cross of Triticum aestivum cv.WL711 – Ae. caudata introgression line T291-2 with wheat cultivar PBW343 segregated for a single dominant leaf rust resistance gene at the seedling and adult plant stages. Progeny testing in F3 confirmed the introgression of a single gene for leaf rust resistance. Bulked segregant analysis using polymorphic D-genome-specific SSR markers and the cosegregation of the 5DS anchored markers (Xcfd18, Xcfd78, Xfd81 and Xcfd189) with the rust resistance in the F2 population mapped the leaf rust resistance gene (LrAC) on the short arm of wheat chromosome 5D. Genetic complementation and the linked molecular markers revealed that LrAC is a novel homoeoallele of an orthologue Lr57 already introgressed from the 5M chromosome of Ae. geniculata on 5DS of wheat.

  20. Resistance to Asian soybean rust in soybean lines with the pyramided three Rpp genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Yamanaka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the influence of genetic background on the resistance level of a soybean line carrying Rpp2, Rpp4, and Rpp5 was evaluated by backcrossing it with a susceptible variety. It was also evaluated eight lines which carry these Rpp genes against five Asian soybean rust (ASR isolates, in order to determine the likely range of resistance against ASR isolates differing in pathogenicity. The results indicated that a high level of resistance against various ASR isolates could be retained in lines carrying the three Rpp genes in susceptible genetic backgrounds, although minor influences of plant genetic background and ASR pathogenicity to the ASR resistance could occur. Thus, lines with the pyramided three Rpp genes should be effective against a complex pathogen population consisting of diverse Phakopsora pachyrhizi isolates.

  1. Colistin-resistant Escherichia coli clinical isolate harbouring the mcr-1 gene in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Paredes, D; Barba, P; Zurita, J

    2016-10-01

    Colistin resistance mediated by the mcr-1 gene has been reported worldwide, but to date not from the Andean region, South America. We report the first clinical isolate of Escherichia coli harbouring the mcr-1 gene in Ecuador. The strain was isolated from peritoneal fluid from a 14-year-old male with acute appendicitis, and subjected to molecular analysis. The minimum inhibitory concentration of colistin for the strain was 8 mg/ml and it was susceptible to carbapenems but resistant to tigecycline. The strain harboured mcr-1 and bla CTX-M-55 genes and was of sequence type 609. The recognition of an apparently commensal strain of E. coli harbouring mcr-1 serves as an alert to the presence in the region of this recently described resistance mechanism to one of the last line of drugs available for the treatment of multi-resistant Gram-negative infections.

  2. Analysis of drought resistance HVA1 gene under drought stress in different Poa pratensis cultivars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yanhua; CHEN Yajun; SHEN Fengjuan; SUN Xiaoyan

    2007-01-01

    Total RNA from leaves of Poa pratensis cultivars under drought stress was extracted for reversing transcription to cDNA and then cDNA as template for PCR reaction by designing primer of cds of Hordeum valgare HVA1 drought resistance gene from GenBank. The amplified products were positive recon identified by using procedures of recovery, connection, transformation and enzyme separation. The length of cloned gene sequence was 324 bp, identity reached 79.27% with Barley HVA1 gene that meaned the cloned gene sequence was the partial HVA1 gene of Poa pratensis.

  3. Bacteriophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes in fecal waste from cattle, pigs, and poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Imamovic, Lejla; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the occurrence of bacteriophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes in animal environments. bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M) (clusters 1 and 9), and mecA were quantified by quantitative PCR in 71 phage DNA samples from pigs, poultry, and cattle fecal wastes. Densities of 3 to 4 log(10) gene copies (GC) of bla(TEM), 2 to 3 log(10) GC of bla(CTX-M), and 1 to 3 log(10) GC of mecA per milliliter or gram of sample were detected, suggesting that bacteriophages can be environmental vectors for the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. The Order Bacillales Hosts Functional Homologs of the Worrisome cfr Antibiotic Resistance Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lykke H.; Planellas, Mercè H.; Long, Katherine S.

    2012-01-01

    The cfr gene encodes the Cfr methyltransferase that methylates a single adenine in the peptidyl transferase region of bacterial ribosomes. The methylation provides resistance to several classes of antibiotics that include drugs of clinical and veterinary importance. This paper describes a first...... coli, and MICs for selected antibiotics indicate that the cfr-like genes confer resistance to PhLOPSa (phenicol, lincosamide, oxazolidinone, pleuromutilin, and streptogramin A) antibiotics in the same way as the cfr gene. In addition, modification at A2503 on 23S rRNA was confirmed by primer extension...

  5. Identification and characterization of potential NBS-encoding resistance genes and induction kinetics of a putative candidate gene associated with downy mildew resistance in Cucumis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Hongjian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the variation and mutation of the races of Pseudoperonospora cubensis, downy mildew has in recent years become the most devastating leaf disease of cucumber worldwide. Novel resistance to downy mildew has been identified in the wild Cucumis species, C. hystrix Chakr. After the successful hybridization between C. hystrix and cultivated cucumber (C. sativus L., an introgression line (IL5211S was identified as highly resistant to downy mildew. Nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR genes are the largest class of disease resistance genes cloned from plant with highly conserved domains, which can be used to facilitate the isolation of candidate genes associated with downy mildew resistance in IL5211S. Results Degenerate primers that were designed based on the conserved motifs in the NBS domain of resistance (R proteins were used to isolate NBS-type sequences from IL5211S. A total of 28 sequences were identified and named as cucumber (C. sativus = CS resistance gene analogs as CSRGAs. Polygenetic analyses separated these sequences into four different classes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis showed that these CSRGAs expressed at different levels in leaves, roots, and stems. In addition, introgression from C. hystrix induced expression of the partial CSRGAs in cultivated cucumber, especially CSRGA23, increased four-fold when compared to the backcross parent CC3. Furthermore, the expression of CSRGA23 under P. cubensis infection and abiotic stresses was also analyzed at different time points. Results showed that the P. cubensis treatment and four tested abiotic stimuli, MeJA, SA, ABA, and H2O2, triggered a significant induction of CSRGA23 within 72 h of inoculation. The results indicate that CSRGA23 may play a critical role in protecting cucumber against P. cubensis through a signaling the pathway triggered by these molecules. Conclusions Four classes of NBS-type RGAs were

  6. Suppression of plant resistance gene-based immunity by a fungal effector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra M Houterman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system of plants consists of two layers. The first layer, called basal resistance, governs recognition of conserved microbial molecules and fends off most attempted invasions. The second layer is based on Resistance (R genes that mediate recognition of effectors, proteins secreted by pathogens to suppress or evade basal resistance. Here, we show that a plant-pathogenic fungus secretes an effector that can both trigger and suppress R gene-based immunity. This effector, Avr1, is secreted by the xylem-invading fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol and triggers disease resistance when the host plant, tomato, carries a matching R gene (I or I-1. At the same time, Avr1 suppresses the protective effect of two other R genes, I-2 and I-3. Based on these observations, we tentatively reconstruct the evolutionary arms race that has taken place between tomato R genes and effectors of Fol. This molecular analysis has revealed a hitherto unpredicted strategy for durable disease control based on resistance gene combinations.

  7. Allele mining in barley genetic resources reveals genes of race-nonspecific powdery mildew resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eSpies

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Race-nonspecific, or quantitative, pathogen resistance is of high importance to plant breeders due to its expected durability. However, it is usually controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL and therefore difficult to handle in practice. Knowing the genes that underlie race-nonspecific resistance would allow its exploitation in a more targeted manner. Here, we performed an association-genetic study in a customized worlwide collection of spring barley accessions for candidate genes of race-nonspecific resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh and combined data with results from QTL-mapping- as well as functional-genomics approaches. This led to the idenfication of 11 associated genes with converging evidence for an important role in race-nonspecific resistance in the presence of the Mlo-gene for basal susceptibility. Outstanding in this respect was the gene encoding the transcription factor WRKY2. The results suggest that unlocking plant genetic resources and integrating functional-genomic with genetic approaches accelerates the discovery of genes underlying race-nonspecific resistance in barley and other crop plants.

  8. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0582 TITLE: ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...ETS gene fusion status associated with clinical outcomes following radiation therapy , by analyzing both the collected biomarker and clinical data...denotes absence of an ERG fusion). ETS gene fusions status did not predict outcomes following radiation therapy , as demonstrated by Kaplan Meier

  9. Distribution of the multidrug resistance gene cfr in Staphylococcus species isolates from swine farms in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Wanjiang; Wang, Juan; Wu, Congming; Shen, Zhangqi; Fu, Xiao; Yan, Yang; Zhang, Qijing; Schwarz, Stefan; Shen, Jianzhong

    2012-03-01

    A total of 149 porcine Staphylococcus isolates with florfenicol MICs of ≥ 16 μg/ml were screened for the presence of the multiresistance gene cfr, its location on plasmids, and its genetic environment. In total, 125 isolates carried either cfr (16 isolates), fexA (92 isolates), or both genes (17 isolates). The 33 cfr-carrying staphylococci, which included isolates of the species Staphylococcus cohnii, S. arlettae, and S. saprophyticus in which the cfr gene has not been described before, exhibited a wide variety of SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. In 18 cases, the cfr gene was located on plasmids. Four different types of cfr-carrying plasmids--pSS-01 (n = 2; 40 kb), pSS-02 (n = 3; 35.4 kb), pSS-03 (n = 10; 7.1 kb), and pBS-01 (n = 3; 16.4 kb)--were differentiated on the basis of their sizes, restriction patterns, and additional resistance genes. Sequence analysis revealed that in plasmid pSS-01, the cfr gene was flanked in the upstream part by a complete aacA-aphD-carrying Tn4001-like transposon and in the downstream part by a complete fexA-carrying transposon Tn558. In plasmid pSS-02, an insertion sequence IS21-558 and the cfr gene were integrated into transposon Tn558 and thereby truncated the tnpA and tnpB genes. The smallest cfr-carrying plasmid pSS-03 carried the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene erm(C). Plasmid pBS-01, previously described in Bacillus spp., harbored a Tn917-like transposon, including the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene erm(B) in the cfr downstream region. Plasmids, which in part carry additional resistance genes, seem to play an important role in the dissemination of the gene cfr among porcine staphylococci.

  10. Gene expression modulation and the molecular mechanisms involved in Nelfinavir resistance in Leishmania donovani axenic amastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pranav; Lodge, Robert; Raymond, Frédéric; Ritt, Jean-François; Jalaguier, Pascal; Corbeil, Jacques; Ouellette, Marc; Tremblay, Michel J

    2013-08-01

    Drug resistance is a major public health challenge in leishmaniasis chemotherapy, particularly in the case of emerging Leishmania/HIV-1 co-infections. We have delineated the mechanism of cell death induced by the HIV-1 protease inhibitor, Nelfinavir, in the Leishmania parasite. In order to further study Nelfinavir-Leishmania interactions, we selected Nelfinavir-resistant axenic amastigotes in vitro and characterized them. RNA expression profiling analyses and comparative genomic hybridizations of closely related Leishmania species were used as a screening tool to compare Nelfinavir-resistant and -sensitive parasites in order to identify candidate genes involved in drug resistance. Microarray analyses of Nelfinavir-resistant and -sensitive Leishmania amastigotes suggest that parasites regulate mRNA levels either by modulating gene copy numbers through chromosome aneuploidy, or gene deletion/duplication by homologous recombination. Interestingly, supernumerary chromosomes 6 and 11 in the resistant parasites lead to upregulation of the ABC class of transporters. Transporter assays using radiolabelled Nelfinavir suggest a greater drug accumulation in the resistant parasites and in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, high-resolution electron microscopy and measurements of intracellular polyphosphate levels showed an increased number of cytoplasmic vesicular compartments known as acidocalcisomes in Nelfinavir-resistant parasites. Together these results suggest that Nelfinavir is rapidly and dramatically sequestered in drug-induced intracellular vesicles.

  11. Two genes conferring resistance to Pythium stalk rot in maize inbred line Qi319.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Feng-Jing; Xiao, Ming-Gang; Duan, Can-Xing; Li, Hong-Jie; Zhu, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Bao-Tao; Sun, Su-Li; Wu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Stalk rots are destructive diseases in maize around the world, and are most often caused by the pathogen Pythium, Fusarium and other fungi. The most efficient management for controlling stalk rots is to breed resistant cultivars. Pythium stalk rot can cause serious yield loss on maize, and to find the resistance genes from the existing germplasm is the basis to develop Pythium-resistance hybrid lines. In this study, we investigated the genetic resistance to Pythium stalk rot in inbred line Qi319 using F2 and F2:3 population, and found that the resistance to Pythium inflatum in Qi319 was conferred by two independently inherited dominant genes, RpiQI319-1 and RpiQI319-2. Linkage analysis uncovered that the RpiQI319-1 co-segregated with markers bnlg1203, and bnlg2057 on chromosome 1, and that the RpiQI319-2 locus co-segregated with markers umc2069 and bnlg1716 on chromosome 10. The RpiQI319-1 locus was further mapped into a ~500-kb interval flanked by markers SSRZ33 and SSRZ47. These results will facilitate marker-assisted selection of Pythium stalk rot-resistant cultivars in maize breeding. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the resistance to P. inflatum in the inbred line Qi319, and is also the first description of two independently inherited dominant genes conferring the resistance of Pythium stalk rot in maize.

  12. Arsenic Resistance and Prevalence of Arsenic Resistance Genes in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Isolated from Retail Meats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed K. Fakhr

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies that investigate arsenic resistance in the foodborne bacterium Campylobacter are limited. A total of 552 Campylobacter isolates (281 Campylobacter jejuni and 271 Campylobacter coli isolated from retail meat samples were subjected to arsenic resistance profiling using the following arsenic compounds: arsanilic acid (4–2,048 μg/mL, roxarsone (4–2048 μg/mL, arsenate (16–8,192 μg/mL and arsenite (4–2,048 μg/mL. A total of 223 of these isolates (114 Campylobacter jejuni and 109 Campylobacter coli were further analyzed for the presence of five arsenic resistance genes (arsP, arsR, arsC, acr3, and arsB by PCR. Most of the 552 Campylobacter isolates were able to survive at higher concentrations of arsanilic acid (512–2,048 μg/mL, roxarsone (512–2,048 μg/mL, and arsenate (128–1,024 μg/mL, but at lower concentrations for arsenite (4–16 μg/mL. Ninety seven percent of the isolates tested by PCR showed the presence of arsP and arsR genes. While 95% of the Campylobacter coli isolates contained a larger arsenic resistance operon that has all of the four genes (arsP, arsR, arsC and acr3, 85% of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates carried the short operon (arsP, and arsR. The presence of arsC and acr3 did not significantly increase arsenic resistance with the exception of conferring resistance to higher concentrations of arsenate to some Campylobacter isolates. arsB was prevalent in 98% of the tested Campylobacter jejuni isolates, regardless of the presence or absence of arsC and acr3, but was completely absent in Campylobacter coli. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine arsenic resistance and the prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in such a large number of Campylobacter isolates.

  13. Arsenic Resistance and Prevalence of Arsenic Resistance Genes in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Isolated from Retail Meats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormohamed, Aneesa; Fakhr, Mohamed K.

    2013-01-01

    Studies that investigate arsenic resistance in the foodborne bacterium Campylobacter are limited. A total of 552 Campylobacter isolates (281 Campylobacter jejuni and 271 Campylobacter coli) isolated from retail meat samples were subjected to arsenic resistance profiling using the following arsenic compounds: arsanilic acid (4–2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (4–2048 μg/mL), arsenate (16–8,192 μg/mL) and arsenite (4–2,048 μg/mL). A total of 223 of these isolates (114 Campylobacter jejuni and 109 Campylobacter coli) were further analyzed for the presence of five arsenic resistance genes (arsP, arsR, arsC, acr3, and arsB) by PCR. Most of the 552 Campylobacter isolates were able to survive at higher concentrations of arsanilic acid (512–2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (512–2,048 μg/mL), and arsenate (128–1,024 μg/mL), but at lower concentrations for arsenite (4–16 μg/mL). Ninety seven percent of the isolates tested by PCR showed the presence of arsP and arsR genes. While 95% of the Campylobacter coli isolates contained a larger arsenic resistance operon that has all of the four genes (arsP, arsR, arsC and acr3), 85% of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates carried the short operon (arsP, and arsR). The presence of arsC and acr3 did not significantly increase arsenic resistance with the exception of conferring resistance to higher concentrations of arsenate to some Campylobacter isolates. arsB was prevalent in 98% of the tested Campylobacter jejuni isolates, regardless of the presence or absence of arsC and acr3, but was completely absent in Campylobacter coli. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine arsenic resistance and the prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in such a large number of Campylobacter isolates. PMID:23965921

  14. Arsenic resistance and prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from retail meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormohamed, Aneesa; Fakhr, Mohamed K

    2013-08-07

    Studies that investigate arsenic resistance in the foodborne bacterium Campylobacter are limited. A total of 552 Campylobacter isolates (281 Campylobacter jejuni and 271 Campylobacter coli) isolated from retail meat samples were subjected to arsenic resistance profiling using the following arsenic compounds: arsanilic acid (4-2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (4-2048 μg/mL), arsenate (16-8,192 μg/mL) and arsenite (4-2,048 μg/mL). A total of 223 of these isolates (114 Campylobacter jejuni and 109 Campylobacter coli) were further analyzed for the presence of five arsenic resistance genes (arsP, arsR, arsC, acr3, and arsB) by PCR. Most of the 552 Campylobacter isolates were able to survive at higher concentrations of arsanilic acid (512-2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (512-2,048 μg/mL), and arsenate (128-1,024 μg/mL), but at lower concentrations for arsenite (4-16 μg/mL). Ninety seven percent of the isolates tested by PCR showed the presence of arsP and arsR genes. While 95% of the Campylobacter coli isolates contained a larger arsenic resistance operon that has all of the four genes (arsP, arsR, arsC and acr3), 85% of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates carried the short operon (arsP, and arsR). The presence of arsC and acr3 did not significantly increase arsenic resistance with the exception of conferring resistance to higher concentrations of arsenate to some Campylobacter isolates. arsB was prevalent in 98% of the tested Campylobacter jejuni isolates, regardless of the presence or absence of arsC and acr3, but was completely absent in Campylobacter coli. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine arsenic resistance and the prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in such a large number of Campylobacter isolates.

  15. Relationship between antimicrobial resistance and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-feng; JIANG Jian-ping; MI Zu-huang

    2005-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the main gram-negative bacilli in clinical practice. Nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii is very difficult to treat. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance characteristics and four resistant gene expressions of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes including N-acetyltransferases and O-phosphotransferases in Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods Bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed by PhoenixTM system in 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of seven aminoglycosides including gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin, netilmicin, neomycin and streptomycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were detected by agar dilution. Four aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by DNA sequencer.Results The resistance rates of 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii against cefotaxime, levofloxacin, piperacillin, aztreonam, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol were more than 50%. Imipenem and meropenem showed high antibacterial activities with resistance rates of 3.2% and 4.1%. MIC50 and MIC90 of gentamicin, amikacin, streptomycin and kanamycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii were all more than 1024 mg/L, and the resistance rates were 100%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. But their resistance rates to tobramycin, netilmicin and neomycin were 86.7%, 93.3% and 46.7%, respectively. Three modifying enzyme genes, including aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes, were found in 15 strains, but aphA6 had not been detected. Their positive rates were 93.3%, 20.0% and 20.0%, respectively. These three genes existed simultaneously in No.19 strain. Nucleotide sequences of aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes shared 100%, 97.9% and 99.7% identities with GenBank genes (AY307113, S68058 and AY

  16. Daphnia as a refuge for an antibiotic resistance gene in an experimental freshwater community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Ester M; Di Cesare, Andrea; Stenzel, Birgit; Fontaneto, Diego; Corno, Gianluca

    2016-11-15

    Mechanisms that enable the maintenance of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment are still greatly unknown. Here we show that the tetracycline resistance gene tet(A) is largely removed from the pelagic aquatic bacterial community through filter feeding by Daphnia obtusa while it becomes detectable within the microbiome of the daphniids themselves, where it was not present prior to the experiment. We moreover show that a multitude of Daphnia-associated bacterial taxa are potential carriers of tet(A) and postulated that the biofilm-like structures, where bacteria grow in, may enable horizontal transfer of such genes. This experiment highlights the need to take ecological interactions and a broad range of niches into consideration when studying and discussing the fate of antibiotic resistance genes in nature.

  17. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Final report, May 1, 1988--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and to clone and characterize disease resistance genes by transposon tagging. The majority of studies were conducted with the Ac/Ds System. Researchers made and tested several constructs as well as utilized constructions shown to be functional in other plant species. Researchers demonstrated movement of Ac and DS in lettuce; however, they transposed at much lower frequencies in lettuce than in other plant species. Therefore, further manipulation of the system, particularly for flower specific expression of transposase, is required before a routine transposon system is available for lettuce. Populations of lettuce were generated and screened to test for the stability of resistance genes and several spontaneous mutations were isolated. Researchers also identified a resistance gene mutant in plants transformed with a Ds element and chimeric transposase gene. This is currently being characterized in detail.

  18. The genetics of resistance to powdery mildew in cultivated oats (Avena sativa L.): current status of major genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsam, Sai L K; Mohler, Volker; Zeller, Friedrich J

    2014-05-01

    The genetics of resistance to powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. avenae of four cultivated oats was studied using monosomic analysis. Cultivar 'Bruno' carries a gene (Pm6) that shows a recessive mode of inheritance and is located on chromosome 10D. Cultivar 'Jumbo' possesses a dominant resistance gene (Pm1) on chromosome 1C. In cultivar 'Rollo', in addition to the gene Pm3 on chromosome 17A, a second dominant resistance gene (Pm8) was identified and assigned to chromosome 4C. In breeding line APR 122, resistance was conditioned by a dominant resistance gene (Pm7) that was allocated to chromosome 13A. Genetic maps established for resistance genes Pm1, Pm6 and Pm7 employing amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers indicated that these genes are independent of each other, supporting the results from monosomic analysis.

  19. Duplication and amplification of antibiotic resistance genes enable increased resistance in isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    During normal bacterial DNA replication, gene duplication and amplification (GDA) events occur randomly at a low frequency in the genome throughout a population. In the absence of selection, GDA events that increase the number of copies of a bacterial gene (or a set of genes) are lost. Antibiotic ...

  20. Fine mapping of the Ht2 (Helminthosporium turcicum resistance 2) gene in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Fine mapping of Helminthosporium turcicum resistance gene Ht2 is extremely valuable for map-based cloning of the Ht2 gene, gaining a better knowledge of the distribution of resistance genes in maize genome and marker-assisted selection in maize breeding. An F2 mapping population was developed from a cross between a resistant inbred line 77Ht2 and a susceptible inbred line Huobai. With the aid of RFLP marker analyses, the Ht2 gene was mapped between the RFLP markers UMC89 and BNL2.369 on chromosome 8, with a genetic distance of 0.9 cM to BNL2.369. There was a linkage between SSR markers UMC1202, BNLG1152, UMC1149 and the Ht2 gene by SSR assay. Among the SSR markers, the genetic distance between UMC1149 and the Ht2 gene was 7.2 cM. By bulked segregant analysis 7 RAPD-amplified products which were probably linked to the Ht2 gene were selected after screening 450 RAPD primers and converted the single-copy ones into SCAR markers. Linkage analysis showed that the genetic distance between the SCAR marker SD-06633 and the Ht2 gene was 0.4 cM. From these results, a part of linkage map around the Ht2 gene was constructed.

  1. Detection of the satA gene and transferability of virginiamycin resistance in Enterococcus faecium from food-animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerum, A M; Jensen, L B; Aarestrup, F M

    1998-11-01

    The satA gene encoding streptogramin A resistance was detected in virginiamycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates from pigs and broilers. The satA gene was present in 22 of 89 (25%) virginiamycin-resistant E. faecium isolates. It was shown that the satA gene and other gene(s) encoding streptogramin resistance could be transferred between isogenic E. faecium strains at frequencies ranging from 2.3 x 10(-4) to 2.2 x 10(-3) transconjugants per donor.

  2. Who Possesses Drug Resistance Genes in the Aquatic Environment? : Sulfamethoxazole (SMX Resistance Genes among the Bacterial Community in Water Environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eSuzuki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in colony forming bacterial assemblages and natural bacterial assemblages. Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination revealed that sulfamethoxazole (SMX is a major contaminant in aquatic environments of Metro-Manila, which would have been derived from human and animal use, and subsequently decreased through the process of outflow from source to the sea. The SMX-resistant bacterial rate evaluated by the colony forming unit showed 10 to 86 % of the total colony numbers showed higher rates from freshwater sites compared to marine sites. When sul genes were quantified by qPCR, colony-forming bacteria conveyed sul1 and sul2 genes in freshwater and seawater (10-5-10-2 copy/16S but not sul3. Among the natural bacterial assemblage, all sul1, sul2 and sul3 were detected (10-5-10-3 copy/16S, whereas all sul genes were at an almost non-detectable level in the freshwater assemblage. This study suggests that sul1 and sul2 are main sul genes in culturable bacteria, whereas sul3 is conveyed by non-culturable bacteria in the sea. As a result marine bacteria possess sul1, sul2 and sul3 genes in the marine environment.

  3. High-throughput quantification of antibiotic resistance genes from an urban wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkman, Antti; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance among bacteria is a growing problem worldwide, and wastewater treatment plants have been considered as one of the major contributors to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance to the environment. There is a lack of comprehensive quantitative molecular data on extensive numbers of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in different seasons with a sampling strategy that would cover both incoming and outgoing water together with the excess sludge that is removed from the process. In order to fill that gap we present a highly parallel quantitative analysis of ARGs and horizontal gene transfer potential over four seasons at an urban wastewater treatment plant using a high-throughput qPCR array. All analysed transposases and two-thirds of primer sets targeting ARGs were detected in the wastewater. The relative abundance of most of the genes was highest in influent and lower in effluent water and sludge. The resistance profiles of the samples cluster by sample location with a shift from raw influent through the final effluents and dried sludge to the sediments. Wastewater discharge enriched only a few genes, namely Tn25 type transposase gene and clinical class 1 integrons, in the sediment near the discharge pipe, but those enriched genes may indicate a potential for horizontal gene transfer.

  4. RETROVIRAL MEDIATED EFFICIENT TRANSFER ANDEXPRESSION OF MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE GENE TO HUMAN LEUKEMIC CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human multidrug resistance (MDR) gene MDR1 in leukemic cells. Methods: Human myeloid cells, K562 and NB4, were infected by MDR retrovirus from the producer PA317/HaMDR, and the resistant cells were selected with cytotoxic drug. The transfer and expression of MDR1 gene was analyzed by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry (FCM) and semisolid colonies cultivation. Results: The resistant cells, K562/MDR and NB4/MDR, in which integration of the exogenous MDR1 gene was confirmed by PCR analysis, displayed a typical MDR phenotype. The expression of MDR1 transgene was detected on truncated as well as full-length transcripts. Moreover, the resistant cells were P-glycoprotein postiive at 78.0% to 98.7% analyzed with FCM. The transduction efficieny in K562 cells was studied on suspension cultures and single-cell colonies. The transduction was more efficient in coculture system (67.9%~ 72.5%) than in supernatant system (33.1%~ 46.8%), while growth factors may improve the efficiency. Conclusion: Retrovirus could allow a functional transfer and expression of MDR1 gene in human leukemia cells, and MDR1 might act as a dominant selectable gene for coexpression with the genes of interest in gene therapy.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Major and Minor Gene(s) Resistant to Stripe Rust in Important Resource Wheat Line Jinghe891-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shi-chang; ZHANG Jing-yuan; ZHAO Wen-sheng; WU Li-ren; ZHANG Ji-xin; YUAN Zhen-dong

    2002-01-01

    Inheritance of line Jinghe891-1 resistant to pathotype of Puccinia striiformis in two patterns of temperature (Normal: day 18℃/night 10℃, High: day 24℃/night 15℃ )was studied in this paper. The results showed that there were at least two pairs of dominant major genes and one pair of recessive minor genes in Jinghe 891-1. The two pairs of major genes that conferred resistance to CY31 were allelic or linked closely with resistance gene in Jubilejna Ⅱ , Kangyin655 and T. spelta Album. They were novel resistance genes and were inherited in a repeated or independent mode. The minor genes, which could modify the major genes,were sensitive to temperature and conferred resistance to all pathotypes of Puccinia striiformis in China. It is recommended that this line can be used as an important resource stock.

  6. Serine/threonine kinase gene Stpk-V, a key member of powdery mildew resistance gene Pm21, confers powdery mildew resistance in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Aizhong; Xing, Liping; Wang, Xiaoyun; Yang, Xueming; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yulei; Qian, Chen; Ni, Jinlong; Chen, Yaping; Liu, Dajun; Wang, Xiue; Chen, Peidu

    2011-05-10

    Powdery mildew resistance gene Pm21, located on the chromosome 6V short arm of Haynaldia villosa and transferred to wheat as a 6VS·6AL translocation (T6VS·6AL), confers durable and broad-spectrum resistance to wheat powdery mildew. Pm21 has become a key gene resource for powdery mildew resistance breeding all over the world. In China, 12 wheat varieties containing Pm21 have been planted on more than 3.4 million hectares since 2002. Pm21 has been intractable to molecular genetic mapping because the 6VS does not pair and recombine with the 6AS. Moreover, all known accessions of H. villosa are immune to powdery mildew fungus. Pm21 is still defined by cytogenetics as a locus. In the present study, a putative serine and threonine protein kinase gene Stpk-V was cloned and characterized with an integrative strategy of molecular and cytogenetic techniques. Stpk-V is located on the Pm21 locus. The results of a single cell transient expression assay showed that Stpk-V could decrease the haustorium index dramatically. After the Stpk-V was transformed into a susceptible wheat variety Yangmai158, the characterized transgenic plants showed high and broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance similar to T6VS·6AL. Silencing of the Stpk-V by virus-induced gene silencing in both T6VS·6AL and H. villosa resulted in their increased susceptibility. Stpk-V could be induced by Bgt and exogenous H(2)O(2), but it also mediated the increase of endogenous H(2)O(2), leading to cell death and plant resistance when the plant was attacked by Bgt.

  7. Composting swine slurry to reduce indicators and antibiotic resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the last twenty years there have been considerable increases in the incidence of human infections with bacteria that are resistant to commonly used antibiotics. This has precipitated concerns about the use of antibiotics in livestock production. Composting of swine manure has several advantages...

  8. Molecular tagging of a novel rust resistance gene R(12) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, L; Hulke, B S; Gulya, T J; Markell, S G; Qi, L L

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower production in North America has recently suffered economic losses in yield and seed quality from sunflower rust (Puccinia helianthi Schwein.) because of the increasing incidence and lack of resistance to new rust races. RHA 464, a newly released sunflower male fertility restorer line, is resistant to both of the most predominant and most virulent rust races identified in the Northern Great Plains of the USA. The gene conditioning rust resistance in RHA 464 originated from wild Helianthus annuus L., but has not been molecularly marked or determined to be independent from other rust loci. The objectives of this study are to identify molecular markers linked to the rust resistance gene and to investigate the allelism of this gene with the unmapped rust resistance genes present in HA-R6, HA-R8 and RHA 397. Virulence phenotypes of seedlings for the F(2) population and F(2:3) families suggested that a single dominant gene confers rust resistance in RHA 464, and this gene was designated as R(12). Bulked segregant analysis identified ten markers polymorphic between resistant and susceptible bulks. In subsequent genetic mapping, the ten markers covered 33.4 cM of genetic distance on linkage group 11 of sunflower. A co-dominant marker CRT275-11 is the closest marker distal to R(12) with a genetic distance of 1.0 cM, while ZVG53, a dominant marker linked in the repulsion phase, is proximal to R(12) with a genetic distance of 9.6 cM. The allelism test demonstrated that R(12) is not allelic to the rust resistance genes in HA-R6, HA-R8 and RHA 397, and it is also not linked to any previously mapped rust resistance genes. Discovery of the R(12) novel rust resistance locus in sunflower and associated markers will potentially support the molecular marker-assisted introgression and pyramiding of R(12) into sunflower breeding lines.

  9. dfrA25, a novel trimethoprim resistance gene from Salmonella Agona isolated from a human urine sample in Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Peirano, Gisele; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To describe a novel trimethoprim resistance gene, designated dfrA25, which was detected as a gene cassette within a class 1 integron in Salmonella Agona. Methods: The gene was cloned into Escherichia coli MT102 and resistance to 10 different antimicrobial drugs was measured. A phyloge...

  10. Characterization of resistance gene analogues (RGAs) in Apple (Malus 6domestica Borkh.) and their evolutionary history of the Rosaceae family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family of resistance gene analogues (RGAs) with a nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain accounts for the largest number of disease resistance genes and is one of the largest gene families in plants. We have identified 868 RGAs in the genome of the apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) cultivar ‘Golden...

  11. Blast from the Past: Reassessing Forgotten Translation Inhibitors, Antibiotic Selectivity, and Resistance Mechanisms to Aid Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenz, Stefan; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-01-07

    Protein synthesis is a major target within the bacterial cell for antibiotics. Investigations into ribosome-targeting antibiotics have provided much needed functional and structural insight into their mechanism of action. However, the increasing prevalence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria has limited the utility of our current arsenal of clinically relevant antibiotics, highlighting the need for the development of new classes. Recent structural studies have characterized a number of antibiotics discovered decades ago that have unique chemical scaffolds and/or utilize novel modes of action to interact with the ribosome and inhibit translation. Additionally, structures of eukaryotic cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomes have provided further structural insight into the basis for specificity and toxicity of antibiotics. Together with our increased understanding of bacterial resistance mechanisms, revisiting our treasure trove of "forgotten" antibiotics could pave the way for the next generation of antimicrobial agents.

  12. Coral thermal tolerance: tuning gene expression to resist thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Bellantuono

    Full Text Available The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs

  13. Characterization of SCCmec types, antibiotic resistance, and toxin gene profiles of Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczuka, Ewa; Grabska, Katarzyna; Trawczyński, Krzysztof; Bosacka, Karolina; Kaznowski, Adam

    2013-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes serious nosocomial and community acquired infections. Resistance to methicillin is mediated by the mecA gene, which is inserted in a mobile genetic element called staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We determined the SCCmec types, the occurrence of genes encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin (tst), exfoliative toxin (eta, etb), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) as well as antibiotic susceptibility of these isolates. Among 65 hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) strains, SCCmec types II, III and IV were identified. Type III SCCmec was the most prevalent (62%), followed by mec types II (24%) and IV (14%). Four community acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strains carried SCCmec type IV and were pvl-positive. The most prevalent gene among HA-MRSA was pvl. The toxic shock syndrome toxin and exfoliative toxin genes were found only in hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The results of this study demonstrate that the SCCmec type III is predominant among strains recovered from hospitalized patients with infections and that these strains were resistant to many antibiotics used in the treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  14. Screening for metronidazole-resistance associated gene fragments of H pylori by suppression subtractive hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Qing Li; Ning Dai; Jie Yan; Yong-Liang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To screen for metronidazole (MTZ)-resistance associated gene fragments of H pylori by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH).METHODS:Five MTZ-resistant (tester,T) and 1 MTZ-susceptible (driver,D) clinical H pylori isolates were selected. Genomic DMAs were prepared and submitted to Rsa I digestion. Then two different adaptors were ligated respectively to the 5'-end of two aliquots of the tester DNA fragments and SSH was made between the tester and driver DNAs. The specific inserts of tester strains were screened and MTZ-resistance related gene fragments were identified by dot blotting.RESULTS:Among the randomly selected 120 subtractive colonies,37 DNA fragments had a different number of DNA copies (≥2 times) in resistant and susceptible strains and 17 of them had a significantly different number of DNA copies (≥3 times). Among the sequences obtained from the 17 DNA fragments,new sequences were found in 10 DNA fragments and duplicated sequences in 7 DNA fragments,representing respectively the sequences of depeptide ABC transporter periplasmic dipeptide-binding protein (dppA),permease protein (dppB),ribosomal protein S4 (rps4),ribonuclease in (rnc),protease (pqqE),diaminopimelate epimerase (dapF),acetatekinase (ackA),H pylori plasmid pHPSl and H pylori gene 1334.CONCLUSION:Gene fragments specific to MTZ-resistant H pylori strains can be screened by SSH and may be associated with MTZ-resistant H pylori.

  15. Identification of virus and nematode resistance genes in the Chilota Potato Genebank of the Universidad Austral de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon López

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato Genebank of the Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh is an important gene bank in Chile. The accessions collected all over the country possess high genetic diversity, present interesting agronomic and cooking traits, and show resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. A particularly interesting subgroup of the gene bank includes the accessions collected in the South of Chile, the Chilota Potato Genebank. The focus of this study is the identification of virus and nematode resistant genes in potatoes (Solatium tuberosum L., using the RYSC3 and YES3-3B molecular markers. The Potato virus Y(PVY resistance genes Ry adg and Ry sto were identified. Furthermore, the CP60 marker was used to assess the Rx resistance gene that confers resistance to Potato virus X (PVX. In addition, the HC and GRO1-4 markers were utilized to identify the GpaVvrn_QTL and Gro1-4, resistance genes of Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis, respectively. Both G. pallida and G. rostochiensis are Potato Cyst Nematodes (PCN. The plant material used in this study included leaves from 271 accessions of the gene bank. These samples were collected in the field where natural pathogen pressure of potential viruses and diseases exists. ELISA assays were run for field detection of PVY and PVX. However, there have been no previous reports of nematode presence in the plant material. The results herein presented indicate presence of virus and nematode resistance genes in accessions of the Chilota Potato Genebank. In terms of virus resistance, 99 accessions out of the 271 tested possess the Ry adg resistance gene and 17 accessions of these 271 tested have the Ry sto resistance gene. Also, 10 accessions showed positive amplification of the Rxl resistant gene marker. As to nematode resistance, 99 accessions have possible resistance to G. pallida and 54 accessions show potential resistance to G. rostochiensis as detected using the available molecular markers.

  16. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genetic data will most likely require complete or nearly complete genomes. Current approaches to this are laborious and/or costly. Emerging technologies such as nanopore based single DNA strand sensing could perhaps provide a solution in the future....

  17. Evaluation of effluxpumps gene expression in resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in an Iranian referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Pourakbari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections and has an intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Among all the resistance-nodulation-division (RND pumps of P. aeruginosa, MexAB-OprM is the first efflux pump found to target multiple classes of antibiotics. This study was aimed to evaluate the expression level of genes expressing MexAB-OprM in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.Materials and Methods: In this study, 45 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from patients admitted to Children's Medical Center Hospital, an Iranian referral hospital. Disk diffusion and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC methods were used for determination of the patterns of resistance to antibiotics. Real-time PCR was used to investigate the expression level of genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump.Results: Among 45 resistant PA isolates, the frequency of genes overexpression was as follows: MexA (n=25, 55.5%, MexB (n=24, 53.3% and OprM (n=16, 35.5%. In addition, in 28 strains (62% overexpression was observed in one of the studied three genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump.Conclusion: In our study 28 isolates (62% had increased expression level of efflux pumps genes, MexAB-OprM. Although the efflux pumps play important roles in increasing the resistance towards different antibiotics but the role of other agents and mechanisms in evolution of resistance should not be ignored. Since the concomitant overproduction of other Mex efflux systems might have additive effects on antibiotic resistance, the co-expressing of a multicomponent efflux pump is recommended. On the other hand, the concomitant overproduction of two Mex pumps might have additive effects on resistance to antibiotic. Therefore co-expressing of Mex efflux systems is recommended. 

  18. Horizontal Transfer of Plasmid-Mediated Cephalosporin Resistance Genes in the Intestine of Houseflies (Musca domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Akira; Usui, Masaru; Okubo, Torahiko; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Houseflies are a mechanical vector for various types of bacteria, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB). If the intestine of houseflies is a suitable site for the transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), houseflies could also serve as a biological vector for ARB. To clarify whether cephalosporin resistance genes are transferred efficiently in the housefly intestine, we compared with conjugation experiments in vivo (in the intestine) and in vitro by using Escherichia coli with eight combinations of four donor and two recipient strains harboring plasmid-mediated cephalosporin resistance genes and chromosomal-encoded rifampicin resistance genes, respectively. In the in vivo conjugation experiment, houseflies ingested donor strains for 6 hr and then recipient strains for 3 hr, and 24 hr later, the houseflies were surface sterilized and analyzed. In vitro conjugation experiments were conducted using the broth-mating method. In 3/8 combinations, the in vitro transfer frequency (Transconjugants/Donor) was ≥1.3 × 10(-4); the in vivo transfer rates of cephalosporin resistance genes ranged from 2.0 × 10(-4) to 5.7 × 10(-5). Moreover, cephalosporin resistance genes were transferred to other species of enteric bacteria of houseflies such as Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescens. These results suggest that houseflies are not only a mechanical vector for ARB but also a biological vector for the occurrence of new ARB through the horizontal transfer of ARGs in their intestine.

  19. Molecular diversity at the major cluster of disease resistance genes in cultivated and wild Lactuca spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, D; Woo, S S; Arroyo-Garcia, R; Ochoa, O; Nguyen, D; Korol, A; Nevo, E; Michelmore, R

    1999-08-01

    Diversity was analyzed in wild and cultivated Lactuca germplasm using molecular markers derived from resistance genes of the NBS-LRR type. Three molecular markers, one microsatellite marker and two SCAR markers that amplified LRR-encoding regions, were developed from sequences of resistance gene homologs at the main resistance gene cluster in lettuce. Variation for these markers were assessed in germplasm including accessions of cultivated lettuce, Lactuca sativa L. and three wild Lactuca spp., L. serriola L., L. saligna and L. virosa L. Diversity was also studied within and between natural populations of L. serriola from Israel and California; the former is close to the center of diversity for Lactuca spp. while the latter is an area of more recent colonization. Large numbers of haplotypes were detected indicating the presence of numerous resistance genes in wild species. The diversity in haplotypes provided evidence for gene duplication and unequal crossing-over during the evolution of this cluster of resistance genes. However, there was no evidence for duplications and deletions within the LRR-encoding regions studied. The three markers were highly correlated with resistance phenotypes in L. sativa. They were able to discriminate between accessions that had previously been shown to be resistant to all known isolates of Bremia lactucae. Therefore, these markers will be highly informative for the establishment of core collections and marker-aided selection. A hierarchical analysis of the population structure of L. serriola showed that countries, as well as locations, were significantly differentiated. These differences may reflect local founder effects and/or divergent selection.

  20. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  1. Aegilops-Secale amphiploids: chromosome categorisation, pollen viability and identification of fungal disease resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Błaszczyk, L; Wiśniewska, H; Apolinarska, B

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential breeding value of goatgrass-rye amphiploids, which we are using as a "bridge" in a transfer of Aegilops chromatin (containing, e.g. leaf rust resistance genes) into triticale. We analysed the chromosomal constitution (by genomic in situ hybridisation, GISH), fertility (by pollen viability tests) and the presence of leaf rust and eyespot resistance genes (by molecular and endopeptidase assays) in a collection of 6× and 4× amphiploids originating from crosses between five Aegilops species and Secale cereale. In the five hexaploid amphiploids Aegilops kotschyi × Secale cereale (genome UUSSRR), Ae. variabilis × S. cereale (UUSSRR), Ae. biuncialis × S. cereale (UUMMRR; two lines) and Ae. ovata × S. cereale (UUMMRR), 28 Aegilops chromosomes were recognised, while in the Ae. tauschii × S. cereale amphiploid (4×; DDRR), only 14 such chromosomes were identified. In the materials, the number of rye chromosomes varied from 14 to 16. In one line of Ae. ovata × S. cereale, the U-R translocation was found. Pollen viability varied from 24.4 to 75.4%. The leaf rust resistance genes Lr22, Lr39 and Lr41 were identified in Ae. tauschii and the 4× amphiploid Ae. tauschii × S. cereale. For the first time, the leaf rust resistance gene Lr37 was found in Ae. kotschyi, Ae. ovata, Ae. biuncialis and amphiploids derived from those parental species. No eyespot resistance gene Pch1 was found in the amphiploids.

  2. Molecular typing, pathogenicity factor genes and antimicrobial susceptibility of vancomycin resistant enterococci in Belgrade, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Milica; Milošević, Branko; Tošić, Tanja; Stevanović, Goran; Mioljević, Vesna; Inđić, Nikola; Velebit, Branko; Zervos, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    In this study the distribution of species and antimicrobial resistance among vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) recovered from clinical specimens obtained from five hospitals in Belgrade was analyzed. Strains were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to investigate the presence of vanA and vanB genes and pathogenicity factor genes. Identification of 194 VRE isolates revealed 154 Enterococcus faecium, 21 Enterococcus faecalis, 10 Enterococcus raffinosus and 9 Enterococcus gallinarum. This study revealed existence of 8 major clones of VRE. PCR determined vanA gene to be present in all of the VRE studied. Esp and hyl genes were present in 29.22% and 27.92% of E. faecium, respectively, and in 76.19% and 0 of E. faecalis, respectively. Esp and hyl genes were not found more frequently in members of predominant clones of E. faecium than in single isolates; nor was their presence connected to invasiveness.

  3. Rifampicin resistance phenotyping of Brucella melitensis by rpoB gene analysis in clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayan, M; Yumuk, Z; Dündar, D; Bilenoglu, O; Erdenlig, S; Yaşar, E; Willke, A

    2008-08-01

    R Rifampicin resistance of Brucella melitensis by rpoB gene analysis has not yet been performed in Turkey, where brucellosis is endemic. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of E-test and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of the B. melitensis rpoB gene, for the detection of mutations conferring rifampicin resistance, by sequencing 21 human B. melitensis strains from the Southeast and Marmara regions of Turkey. On CLSI slow-growing bacteria standards, all isolates were sensitive to rifampicin except for 6 which showed intermediate resistance to rifampicin. MIC(50) and MIC(90)values were 1 microg/ml and 1.5 microg/ml respectively (range 0.50 -1.5 microg/ml). The rifampicin-resistant phenotype was investigated at Cd 154 (GTT/TTT), Cd 526 (GAC/TAC, GAC/AAC, GAC/GGC), Cd 536 (CAC/CTC, CAC/TAC), Cd 539 (CGC/AGC), Cd 541 (TCG/TTG) and Cd 574 (CCG/CTG) of the rpoB gene in B. melitensis 16M and B115 strains, and in clinical isolates. No missense mutations were found in any of the B. melitensis isolates, which indicates that all isolates were rifampicin-susceptible. In conclusion, SNP analysis was useful as a molecular tool for rifampin resistance testing. Although resistance to rifampicin was not detected in our strains of B. melitensis; the presence of strains with intermediate resistance to rifampicin indicates that susceptibility testing should be performed periodically.

  4. Molecular typing, antibiotic resistance, virulence gene and biofilm formation of different Salmonella enterica serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Yousra; Mehr, Ines; Ouzari, Hadda; Khessairi, Amel; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica isolates representing commonly isolated serotypes in Tunisia were analyzed using genotyping and phenotyping methods. ERIC and ITS-PCR applied to 48 Salmonella spp. isolates revealed the presence of 12 and 10 different profiles, respectively. The distribution of profiles among serotypes demonstrated the presence of strains showing an identical fingerprinting pattern. All Salmonella strains used in this study were positive for the sdiA gene. Three Salmonella isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Enteritidis and Amsterdam were negative for the invA gene. The spvC gene was detected in thirteen isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Gallinarum and Montevideo. Antibiotic resistance was frequent among the recovered Salmonella isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Zanzibar and Derby. The majority of these isolates exhibited resistance to at least two antibiotic families. Four multidrug-resistant isolates were recovered from food animals and poultry products. These isolates exhibited not only resistance to tetracycline, sulphonamides, and ampicillin, but also have shown resistance to fluoroquinolones. Common resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin in two S. Anatum and S. Zanzibar strains isolated from raw meat and poultry was also obtained. Furthermore, wastewater and human isolates exhibited frequent resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. Of all isolates, 33.5% were able to form biofilm.

  5. Resistance of renal cell carcinoma to sorafenib is mediated by potentially reversible gene expression.

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    Liang Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Resistance to antiangiogenic therapy is an important clinical problem. We examined whether resistance occurs at least in part via reversible, physiologic changes in the tumor, or results solely from stable genetic changes in resistant tumor cells. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Mice bearing two human RCC xenografts were treated with sorafenib until they acquired resistance. Resistant 786-O cells were harvested and reimplanted into naïve mice. Mice bearing resistant A498 cells were subjected to a 1 week treatment break. Sorafenib was then again administered to both sets of mice. Tumor growth patterns, gene expression, viability, blood vessel density, and perfusion were serially assessed in treated vs control mice. RESULTS: Despite prior resistance, reimplanted 786-O tumors maintained their ability to stabilize on sorafenib in sequential reimplantation steps. A transcriptome profile of the tumors revealed that the gene expression profile of tumors upon reimplantation reapproximated that of the untreated tumors and was distinct from tumors exhibiting resistance to sorafenib. In A498 tumors, revascularization was noted with resistance and cessation of sorafenib therapy and tumor perfusion was reduced and tumor cell necrosis enhanced with re-exposure to sorafenib. CONCLUSIONS: In two RCC cell lines, resistance to sorafenib appears to be reversible. These results support the hypothesis that resistance to VEGF pathway therapy is not solely the result of a permanent genetic change in the tumor or selection of resistant clones, but rather is due to a great extent to reversible changes that likely occur in the tumor and/or its microenvironment.

  6. Erythromycin-resistant genes in group A β-haemolytic Streptococci in Chengdu, Southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The management of Group A β-haemolytic Streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes or GAS infection include the use of penicillins, cephalosporins or macrolides for treatment. A general increase in macrolides resistance in GAS has been observed in recent years. Differences in rates of resistance to these agents have existed according to geographical location and investigators. Aims: To investigate the antibiotic pattern and erythromycin-resistant genes of GAS isolates associated with acute tonsillitis and scarlet fever in Chengdu, southwestern China. Settings and Design: To assess the macrolide resistance, phenotype, and genotypic characterization of GAS isolated from throat swabs of children suffering from different acute tonsillitis or scarlet fever between 2004 and 2011 in the city of Chengdu, located in the southwestern region of China. Materials and Methods: Minimal inhibitory concentration with seven antibiotics was performed on 127 GAS isolates. Resistance phenotypes of erythromycin-resistant GAS isolates were determined by the double-disk test. Their macrolide-resistant genes (mefA, ermB and ermTR were amplified by PCR. Results: A total of 98.4% (125/127 of the isolates exhibited resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G and cefotaxime. Moreover, 113 ermB-positive isolates demonstrating the cMLS phenotype of erythromycin resistance were predominant (90.4% and these isolates showed high-level resistance to both erythromycin and clindamycin (MIC 90 > 256 μg/ml; 12 (9.6% isolates demonstrating the MLS phenotype of erythromycin resistance carried the mefA gene, which showed low-level resistance to both erythromycin (MIC 90 = 8 μg/ml and clindamycin (MIC 90 = 0.5 μg/ml; and none of the isolates exhibited the M phenotype. Conclusions: The main phenotype is cMLS, and the ermB gene code is the main resistance mechanism against macrolides in GAS. Penicillin is the most beneficial

  7. Developing transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) with insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance by fusion gene transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN He; LANG Zhi-hong; LU Wei; ZHANG Jie; HE Kang-lai; ZHU Li; LIN Min; HUANG Da-fang

    2015-01-01

    Using linker peptide LP4/2A for multiple gene transformation is considered to be an effective method to stack or pyramid several traits in plants. Bacil us thuringiensis (Bt) cry gene and epsps (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) gene are two important genes for culturing pest-resistant and glyphosate-tolerant crops. We used linker peptide LP4/2A to connect the Bt cry1Ah gene with the 2mG2-epsps gene and combined the wide-used manA gene as a selective marker to construct one coordinated expression vector cal ed p2EPUHLAGN. The expression vector was transferred into maize by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, and 60 plants were obtained, 40%of which were positive transformants. Molecular detection demonstrated that the two genes in the fusion vector were expressed simultaneously and spliced correctly in translation processing;meanwhile bioassay detection proved the transgenic maize had preferable pest resistance and glyphosate tolerance. Therefore, linker peptide LP4/2A provided a simple and reliable strategy for producing gene stacking in maize and the result showed that the fusion gene transformation system of LP4/2A was feasible in monocot plants.

  8. Quantitative resistance affects the speed of frequency increase but not the diversity of the virulence alleles overcoming a major resistance gene to Leptosphaeria maculans in oilseed rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delourme, R; Bousset, L; Ermel, M; Duffé, P; Besnard, A L; Marquer, B; Fudal, I; Linglin, J; Chadœuf, J; Brun, H

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative resistance mediated by multiple genetic factors has been shown to increase the potential for durability of major resistance genes. This was demonstrated in the Leptosphaeria maculans/Brassica napus pathosystem in a 5year recurrent selection field experiment on lines harboring the qualitative resistance gene Rlm6 combined or not with quantitative resistance. The quantitative resistance limited the size of the virulent isolate population. In this study we continued this recurrent selection experiment in the same way to examine whether the pathogen population could adapt and render the major gene ineffective in the longer term. The cultivars Eurol, with a susceptible background, and Darmor, with quantitative resistance, were used. We confirmed that the combination of qualitative and quantitative resistance is an effective approach for controlling the pathogen epidemics over time. This combination did not prevent isolates virulent against the major gene from amplifying in the long term but the quantitative resistance significantly delayed for 5years the loss of effectiveness of the qualitative resistance and disease severity was maintained at a low level on the genotype with both types of resistance after the fungus population had adapted to the major gene. We also showed that diversity of AvrLm6 virulence alleles was comparable in isolates recovered after the recurrent selection on lines carrying either the major gene alone or in combination with quantitative resistance: a single repeat-induced point mutation and deletion events were observed in both situations. Breeding varieties which combine qualitative and quantitative resistance can effectively contribute to disease control by increasing the potential for durability of major resistance genes.

  9. Impact of major gene resistance management for sunflower on fitness of Plasmopara halstedii (downy mildew populations

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    Tourvieille de Labrouhe Denis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in virulence of Plasmopara halstedii populations under different major gene (Pl management strategies were studied over 5 years continuous cropping of one sunflower hybrid under netting cages. Strategies were monoculture of forms of the hybrid with 1 gene or with combinations of 2 genes, alternation of different genes, and mixtures of several different forms of the hybrid. Monoculture with single resistance genes led to loss of efficient resistance after 3 years, with high levels of disease and increased variability of the pathogen, whatever the Pl gene used. Combinations of genes, alternation and mixtures gave longer term control of downy mildew. In particular, combinations of resistance genes coming from both female and male parents of the hybrid (such that even impurities had a resistance gene gave the best control and least variation in pathogen virulence. Results are discussed with the object of durable control of downy mildew by all methods available.

  10. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences

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    Boulund Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. Results In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. Conclusions The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  11. Expression of antibiotic resistance genes in the integrated cassettes of integrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, C M; Hall, R M

    1995-01-01

    Plasmids containing cloned integron fragments which differ only with respect to either the sequence of the promoter(s) or the number and order of inserted cassettes were used to examine the expression of resistance genes encoded in integron-associated gene cassettes. All transcripts detected commenced at the common promoter P(ant), and alterations in the sequence of P(ant) affected the level of resistance expressed by cassette genes. When both P(ant) and the secondary promoter P2 were present, transcription from both promoters was detected. When more than one cassette was present, the position of the cassette in the array influenced the level of antibiotic resistance expressed by the cassette gene. In all cases, the resistance level was highest when the gene was in the first cassette, i.e., closest to P(ant), and was reduced to different extents by the presence of individual upstream cassettes. In Northern (RNA) blots, multiple discrete transcripts originating at P(ant) were detected, and only the longer transcripts contained the distal genes. Together, these data suggest that premature transcription termination occurs within the cassettes. The most abundant transcripts appeared to contain one or more complete cassettes, and is possible that the 59-base elements found at the end of the cassettes (3' to the coding region) not only function as recombination sites but may also function as transcription terminators. PMID:7695299

  12. Resistance gene expression determines the in vitro chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

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    Amer Khalid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NSCLC exhibits considerable heterogeneity in its sensitivity to chemotherapy and similar heterogeneity is noted in vitro in a variety of model systems. This study has tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of the observed in vitro chemosensitivity of NSCLC lies within the known resistance mechanisms inherent to these patients' tumors. Methods The chemosensitivity of a series of 49 NSCLC tumors was assessed using the ATP-based tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA and compared with quantitative expression of resistance genes measured by RT-PCR in a Taqman Array™ following extraction of RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue. Results There was considerable heterogeneity between tumors within the ATP-TCA, and while this showed no direct correlation with individual gene expression, there was strong correlation of multi-gene signatures for many of the single agents and combinations tested. For instance, docetaxel activity showed some dependence on the expression of drug pumps, while cisplatin activity showed some dependence on DNA repair enzyme expression. Activity of both drugs was influenced more strongly still by the expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes by the tumor for both docetaxel and cisplatin. The doublet combinations of cisplatin with gemcitabine and cisplatin with docetaxel showed gene expression signatures incorporating resistance mechanisms for both agents. Conclusion Genes predicted to be involved in known mechanisms drug sensitivity and resistance correlate well with in vitro chemosensitivity and may allow the definition of predictive signatures to guide individualized chemotherapy in lung cancer.

  13. Breeding and Identification of Insect-Resistant Rice by Transferring Two Insecticidal Genes, sbk and sck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi-jun; LI Cong; LIU Shao-kui; LAI Dong; QI Qing-ming; LU Chuan-gen

    2013-01-01

    The plasmid of pCDMARUBA-Hyg,which contained two insect-resistance genes,sbk (modified from Cry1A(c)) and sck (modified from CpTI),was transformed into an Agrobacterium EHA105 for infection of the calli of a super japonica rice Nanjing 45.Primarily,using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection with the primers of sbk and sck genes,42 positive transgenic plants that were marker-free and contained the two target genes were selected from 97 regenerated plants.Results of southern-blotting indicated that 23,11,5,2 and 1 plants had one,two,three,four and five copies of the transformed genes,respectively.Analysis of reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Bt gene testing paper showed that 28 T3 generation plants derived from four transgenic plants having a single copy were insect-resistant.Feeding experiment with rice stem borer revealed that the insect resistance was greatly increased wi