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Sample records for blanket type fusion

  1. Fusion fuel blanket technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; Gierszewski, P.

    1987-05-01

    The fusion blanket surrounds the burning hydrogen core of a fusion reactor. It is in this blanket that most of the energy released by the nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium is converted into useful product, and where tritium fuel is produced to enable further operation of the reactor. As fusion research turns from present short-pulse physics experiments to long-burn engineering tests in the 1990's, energy removal and tritium production capabilities become important. This technology will involve new materials, conditions and processes with applications both to fusion and beyond. In this paper, we introduce features of proposed blanket designs and update and status of international research. In focusing on the Canadian blanket technology program, we discuss the aqueous lithium salt blanket concept, and the in-reactor tritium recovery test program

  2. Fusion blanket inherent safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Jung, J.; Cheng, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Fusion has significant potential safety advantages. There is a strong incentive for designing fusion plants to ensure that inherent safety will be achieved. Accordingly, both the Tokamak Power Systems Studies and MINIMARS have identified inherent safety as a design goal. A necessary condition is for the blanket to maintain its configuration and integrity under all credible accident conditions. A main problem is caused by afterheat removal in an accident condition. In this regard, it is highly desirable to achieve the required level of protection of the plant capital investment and limitation of radioactivity release by systems that rely only on inherent properties of matter (e.g., thermal conductivity, specific heat, etc.) and without the use of active safety equipment. This paper assesses the conditions under which inherent safety is feasible. Three types of accident conditions are evaluated for two blankets. The blankets evaluated are a self cooled vanadium/lithium blanket and a self-cooled vanadium/Flibe blanket. The accident conditions evaluated are: (1) loss-of-flow accident; (2) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA); and (3) partial loss-of-coolant accident

  3. Status of fusion reactor blanket design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1986-02-01

    The recent Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS), which was a comprehensive evaluation of fusion reactor blanket design and the status of blanket technology, serves as an excellent basis for further development of blanket technology. This study provided an evaluation of over 130 blanket concepts for the reference case of electric power producing, DT fueled reactors in both Tokamak and Tandem Mirror (TMR) configurations. Based on a specific set of reactor operating parameters, the current understanding of materials and blanket technology, and a uniform evaluation methodology developed as part of the study, a limited number of concepts were identified that offer the greatest potential for making fusion an attractive energy source

  4. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietert, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    The heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary packed-particle beds have recently become of interest in connection with conceptual designs of fusion reactor blankets. A detailed literature survey has shown that the processes taking place in such beds are not fully understood despite their widespread use in the chemical industry and other engineering disciplines for more than five decades. In this study, two experimental investigations were pursued. In the first, a heat-transfer loop was constructed through which glass microspheres were allowed to flow by rgravity at controlled rates through an electrically heated stainless steel tubular test section. In the second, an annular packed bed was constructed in which heat was applied through the outer wall by electric heating of a stainless steel tube. Cooling occurred at the inner wall of the annular bed by flowing air through the central tube. A second air stream was allowed to flow through the voids of the packed bed. An error-minimization technique was utilized in order to obtain the two-dimensional one-parameter effective conductivity for the bed by comparing the experimental and theoretically predicted temperature profiles. Experiments were conducted for various modified Reynolds numbers less than ten.

  5. Fusion blanket design and optimization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In fusion reactors, the blanket design and its characteristics have a major impact on the reactor performance, size, and economics. The selection and arrangement of the blanket materials, dimensions of the different blanket zones, and different requirements of the selected materials for a satisfactory performance are the main parameters, which define the blanket performance. These parameters translate to a large number of variables and design constraints, which need to be simultaneously considered in the blanket design process. This represents a major design challenge because of the lack of a comprehensive design tool capable of considering all these variables to define the optimum blanket design and satisfying all the design constraints for the adopted figure of merit and the blanket design criteria. The blanket design techniques of the First Wall/Blanket/Shield Design and Optimization System (BSDOS) have been developed to overcome this difficulty and to provide the state-of-the-art techniques and tools for performing blanket design and analysis. This report describes some of the BSDOS techniques and demonstrates its use. In addition, the use of the optimization technique of the BSDOS can result in a significant blanket performance enhancement and cost saving for the reactor design under consideration. In this report, examples are presented, which utilize an earlier version of the ITER solid breeder blanket design and a high power density self-cooled lithium blanket design for demonstrating some of the BSDOS blanket design techniques

  6. Blanket materials for DT fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the critical materials issues that must be considered in the development of a tritium breeding blanket for a tokamak fusion reactor that operates on the D-T-Li fuel cycle. The primary requirements of the blanket system are identified and the important criteria that must be considered in the development of blanket technology are summarized. The candidate materials are listed for the different blanket components, e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and neutron multiplier. Three blanket concepts that appear to offer the most potential are: (1) liquid-metal breeder/coolant, (2) liquid-metal breeder/separate coolant, and (3) solid breeder/separate coolant. The major uncertainties associated with each of the design concepts are discussed and the key materials R and D requirements for each concept are identified

  7. Fusion blankets for high efficiency power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Usher, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    Definitions are given of 10 generic blanket types and the specific blanket chosen to be analyzed in detail from each of the 10 types. Dimensions, compositions, energy depositions and breeding ratios (where applicable) are presented for each of the 10 designs. Ultimately, based largely on neutronics and thermal hyraulics results, breeding an nonbreeding blanket options are selected for further design analysis and integration with a suitable power conversion subsystem

  8. Environmental considerations for alternative fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Young, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Comparisons of alternative fusion reactor blanket/coolant systems suggest that environmental considerations will enter strongly into selection of design and materials. Liquid blankets and coolants tend to maximize transport of radioactive corrosion products. Liquid lithium interacts strongly with tritium, minimizing permeation and escape of gaseous tritium in accidents. However, liquid lithium coolants tend to create large tritium inventories and have a large fire potential compared to flibe and solid blankets. Helium coolants minimize radiation transport, but do not have ability to bind the tritium in case of accidental releases. (auth)

  9. Review of blanket designs for advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihli, T.; Giancarli, L.; Konishi, S.; Sagara, A.; Wu, Y.; Malang, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dominating fraction of the power generated by fusion in the reactor is captured by neutron moderation in the blanket surrounding the plasma. From this, the efficiency of the fusion plant is predominated by the technologies applied to make electricity or hydrogen from the neutrons. Next to the blanket technology itself, also the compatibility with advanced power conversion systems and the coolant cycles have to be considered in detail. Furthermore, the different blanket concepts have to be compared in the fields of (i) overall system and development costs and (ii) risks including all related subsystems outside the reactor like tritium extraction, heat exchangers and power conversion, (iii) technical feasibility, (iv) reliability, (v) ease of manufacture, (vi) maintainability, (vii) compatibility with advanced reactor layouts (integration, neutron wall and surface heat loads) and (viii) safety. As fusion reactor power stations will have to compete with other types of central power stations, a too conservative approach will likely be not attractive enough in terms of cost of electricity to boost fusion technology. On the other side a too risky approach relying on tremendous budgets to solve severe technical issues might guide into a long unsuccessful scientific route. The blanket concepts mainly addressed in this paper are advanced ceramic breeder concepts, dual coolant blankets as well as self cooled liquid metal and FliBe blankets. The important questions that will be addressed by the current paper are (i) can we draw a bottom line under the conceptual design and system descriptions of different concepts reviewed in this paper and conclude on the most promising concept(s) and (ii) what are the common issues to be solved independently from individual design and layout proposals to define a feasible route towards advanced fusion reactors. (orig.)

  10. Optimization of beryllium for fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The primary function of beryllium in a fusion reactor blanket is neutron multiplication to enhance tritium breeding. However, because heat, tritium and helium will be generated in and/or transported through beryllium and because the beryllium is in contact with other blanket materials, the thermal, mechanical, tritium/helium and compatibility properties of beryllium are important in blanket design. In particular, tritium retention during normal operation and release during overheating events are safety concerns. Accommodating beryllium thermal expansion and helium-induced swelling are important issues in ensuring adequate lifetime of the structural components adjacent to the beryllium. Likewise, chemical/metallurgical interactions between beryllium and structural components need to be considered in lifetime analysis. Under accident conditions the chemical interaction between beryllium and coolant and breeding materials may also become important. The performance of beryllium in fusion blanket applications depends on fabrication variables and operational parameters. First the properties database is reviewed to determine the state of knowledge of beryllium performance as a function of these variables. Several design calculations are then performed to indicate ranges of fabrication and operation variables that lead to optimum beryllium performance. Finally, areas for database expansion and improvement are highlighted based on the properties survey and the design sensitivity studies

  11. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.H. de.

    1980-03-01

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author) [pt

  12. Stress analysis of blanket vessel for JAERI experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, K.; Minato, A.

    1979-01-01

    A blanket structure of JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) consists of about 2,300 blanket cells with round cornered rectangular cross sections (twelve slightly different shapes) and is placed in a vacuum vessel. Each blanket vessel is a double-walled thin-shell structure made of Type 316 stainless steel with a spherical domed surface at the plasma side. Ribs for coolant channel are provided between inner and outer walls. The blanket cell contains Li 2 O pebbles and blocks for tritium breeding and stainless steel blocks for neutron reflection. A coolant is helium gas at 10 kgf/cm 2 (0.98 MPa) and its inlet and outlet temperatures are 300 0 C and 500 0 C. The maxima of heat flux and nuclear heating rate at the first wall are 12 W/cm 2 and 2 W/cc. A design philosophy of the blanket structure is based on high tritium breeding ratio and more effective shielding performance. The thin-shell vessel with a rectangular cross section satisfies the design philosophy. We have designed the blanket structure so that the adjacent vessels are mutually supporting in order to decrease the large deformation and stress due to internal pressure in case of the thin-shell vessel. (orig.)

  13. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-1 through 4 and PULSAR 1 and 2. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. Also, the requirements of engineering and physics systems for a pulsed reactor were evaluated by the PULSAR design studies. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies

  14. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-I through IV. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies. ARIES-1 investigated the use of SiC composite as the structural material to increase the blanket temperature and reduce the blanket activation. Li 2 ZrO 3 was used as the breeding material due to its high temperature stability and good tritium recovery characteristics. The ARIES-IV is a modification of ARIES-1. The plasma was in the second stability regime. Li 2 O was used as the breeding material to remove Zr. A gaseous divertor was used to replace the conventional divertor so that high Z divertor target is not required. The physics of ARIES-II was the same as ARIES-IV. The engineering design of the ARIES-II was based on a self-cooled lithium blanket with a V-alloy as the structural material. Even though it was assumed that the plasma was in the second stability regime, the plasma beta was still rather low (3.4%). The ARIES-III is an advanced fuel (D- 3 He) tokamak reactor. The reactor design assumed major advancement on the physics, with a plasma beta of 23.9%. A conventional structural material is acceptable due to the low neutron wall loading. From the radiation damage point of view, the first wall can last the life of the reactor, which is expected to be a major advantage from the engineering design and waste disposal point of view

  15. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered to be of long range interest for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. The present paper discusses the various possibilities of D-D fusion reactor blanket designs mainly from the standpoint of the nuclear characteristics. Neutronic and photonic calculations are based on presently available data to provide a basis of the optimal blanket design in D-D fusion reactors. It is found that it appears desirable to design a blanket with blanket/shield (BS) concept in D-D fusion reactors. The BS concept is designed to obtain reasonable shielding characteristics for superconducting magnet (SCM) by using shielding materials in the compact blanket. This concept will open the possibility of compact radiation shield design based on assured technology, and offer the advantage from the system economics point of view. (auth.)

  16. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1984-02-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matricies. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  17. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matrices. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  18. A review of fusion breeder blanket technology, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.P.; Selander, W.N.; Townes, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of fusion breeder blanket technology. It reviews the role of the breeder blanket, the current understanding of the scientific and engineering bases of liquid metal and solid breeder blankets and the programs now underway internationally to resolve the uncertainities in current knowledge. In view of existing national expertise and experience, a solid breeder R and D program for Canada is recommended

  19. Minimum thickness blanket-shield for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karni, Y.; Greenspan, E.

    1989-01-01

    A lower bound on the minimum thickness fusion reactor blankets can be designed to have, if they are to breed 1.267 tritons per fusion neutron, is identified by performing a systematic nucleonic optimization of over a dozen different blanket concepts which use either Be, Li 17 Pb 83 , W or Zr for neutron multiplication. It is found that Be offers minimum thickness blankets; that the blanket and shield (B/S) thickness of Li 17 Pb 83 based blankets which are supplemented by Li 2 O and/or TiH 2 are comparable to the thickness of Be based B/S; that of the Be based blankets, the aqueous self-cooled one offers one of the most compact B/S; and that a number of blanket concepts might enable the design of B/S which is approximately 12 cm and 39 cm thinner than the B/S thickness of, respectively, conventional self-cooled Li 17 Pb 83 and Li blankets. Aqueous self-cooled tungsten blankets could be useful for experimental fusion devices provided they are designed to be heterogeneous. (orig.)

  20. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wolfer, W.; Fulton, F.J.; Lee, J.D.; Maninger, R.C.; Moir, R.W.; Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  1. Progress in neutronic analysis of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervaise, F.; Giancarli, L.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1984-01-01

    The commercial use of the D-T fusion will not be possible unless the necessary tritium can be produced. The number of produced tritium nuclei has to be higher than the number of fusions. For that, we surround the plasma with a lithium-containing blanket. The fusion neutrons which are injected into this blanket are captured after slowing down by the 6 Li and then produce tritium. A detailed study of the neutronic properties and of the calculation process results in the conclusion that the tritium production will be difficult but possible in a commercial D-T fusion reactor. (author)

  2. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented

  3. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented.

  4. Fusion blankets for high-efficiency power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperatures (500 0 C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO 2 interior (cooled by argon) utilizing Li 2 O for tritium breeding. In this design, approximately 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum argon temperature is 2230 0 C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case

  5. Blanket options for high-efficiency fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperatures (500 0 C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO 2 interior (cooled by argon) utilizing Li 2 O for tritium breeding. In this design, approximately 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum argon temperature is 2230 0 C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case

  6. Fusion blanket for high-efficiency power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.L.; Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Taussig, R.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperature (500 0 C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO 2 interior (cooled by Ar) utilizing Li 2 O for tritium breeding. In this design, approx. 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum Ar temperature is 2230 0 C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case

  7. Fusion blankets for high-efficiency power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperatures (500 deg C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project 'two-zone' blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO 2 interior (cooled by argon) utilizing Li 2 O for tritium breeding. In this design, approximately 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum argon temperature is 2230 deg C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case. (author)

  8. Cassette blanket and vacuum building: key elements in fusion reactor maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The integration of two concepts important to fusion power reactors is discussed. The first concept is the vacuum building which improves upon the current fusion reactor designs. The second concept, the use of the cassette blanket within the vacuum building environment, introduces four major improvements in blanket design: cassette blanket module, zoning concept, rectangular blanket concept, and internal tritium recovery

  9. Fusion blanket high-temperature heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Deep penetration of 14 MeV neutrons makes two-temperature region blankets feasible. A relatively low-temperature (approx. 300 0 C) metallic structure is the vacuum/coolant pressure boundary, while the interior of the blanket, which is a simple packed bed of nonstructural material, operates at very high temperatures (>1000 0 C). The water-cooled shell structure is thermally insulated from the steam-cooled interior. High-temperature steam can dramatically increase the efficiency of electric power generation, as well as produce hydrogen and oxygen-based synthetic fuels at high-efficiency

  10. Aqueous self-cooled blanket concepts for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varsamis, G.; Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Deutsch, L.; Gierszewski, P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel aqueous self-cooled blanket (ASCB) concept has been proposed. The water coolant also serves as the tritium breeding medium by dissolving small amounts of lithium compound in the water. The tritium recovery requirements of the ASCB concept may be facilitated by the novel in-situ radiolytic tritium separation technique in development at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. In this separation process deuterium gas is bubbled through the blanket coolant. Due to radiation induced processes, the equilibrium constant favors tritium migration to the deuterium gas stream. It is expected that the inherent simplicity of this design will result in a highly reliable, safe and economically attractive breeding blanket for fusion reactors. The available base of relevant information accumulated through water-cooled fission reactor programs should greatly facilitate the R and D effort required to validate the proposed blanket concept. Tests for tritium separation and corrosion compatibility show encouraging results for the feasibility of this concept

  11. Physical Investigation for Neutron Consumption and Multiplication in Blanket Module of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq Siddique, M.; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactor can be the first milestone of fusion technology and achievable in near future. It can provide operational experience for tritium recycling for pure fusion reactor and be used for incineration of high-level long-lived waste isotopes from existing fission power reactors. Hybrid reactor for waste transmutation (Hyb-WT) was designed and optimized to assess its otential for waste transmutation. ITER will be the first large scaled experimental tokamak facility for the testing of test blanket modules (TBM) which will layout the foundation for DEMO fusion power plants. Similarly hybrid test blanket module (HTBM) will be the foundation for rationality of fusion fission hybrid reactors. Designing and testing of hybrid blankets will lead to another prospect of nuclear technology. This study is initiated with a preliminary design concept of a hybrid test blanket module (HTBM) which would be tested in ITER. The neutrons generated in D-T fusion plasma are of high energy, 14.1 MeV which could be multiplied significantly through inelastic scattering along with fission in HTBM. In current study the detailed neutronic analysis is performed for the blanket module which involves the neutron growth and loss distribution within blanket module with the choice of different fuel and coolant materials. TRU transmutation and tritium breeding performance of HTBM is analyzed under ITER irradiation environment for five different fuel types and with Li and LiPb coolants. Simple box geometry with plate type TRU fuel is adopted so that it can be modelled with heterogeneous material geometry in MCNPX. Waste transmutation ratio (WTR) of TRUs and tritium breeding ration (TBR) is computed to quantify the HTBM performance. Neutron balance is computed in detail to analyze the performance parameters of HTBM. Neutron spectrum and fission to capture ratio in TRU fuel types is also calculated for detailed analysis of HTBM

  12. Direct Lit Electrolysis In A Metallic Lithium Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Babineau, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Vaquer, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-13

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed.  The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fission/fusion reactors is critical in order to maintained low concentrations.  This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket, extraction is complicated at the required low levels. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering the hydrogen and deuterium thru an electrolysis step at high temperatures. 

  13. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Luke [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-30

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium-based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  14. Neutronics design aspects of reference ARIES-I fusion blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.

    1990-12-01

    A SiC composite blanket concept was recently conceived for a deuterium-tritium burning, 1000 MW(e) tokamak fusion reactor design, ARIES-I. SiC composite structural material was chosen due to its very low activation features. High blanket nuclear performance and thermal efficiency, adequate tritium breeding, and a low level of activation are important design requirements for the ARIES-I reactor. The major approaches, other than using SiC as structural material, in meeting these design requirements, are to employ beryllium, the only low activation neutron multiplying material, and isotopically tailored Li 2 ZrO 3 , a tritium breeding material stable at high temperature, as blanket materials. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Luke

    2016-01-01

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium-based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  16. Impact of Blanket Configuration on the Design of a Fusion-Driven Transmutation Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Guen Hong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A configuration of a fusion-driven transmutation reactor with a low aspect ratio tokamak-type neutron source was determined in a self-consistent manner by using coupled analysis of tokamak systems and neutron transport. We investigated the impact of blanket configuration on the characteristics of a fusion-driven transmutation reactor. It was shown that by merging the TRU burning blanket and tritium breeding blanket, which uses PbLi as the tritium breeding material and as coolant, effective transmutation is possible. The TRU transmutation capability can be improved with a reduced blanket thickness, and fast fluence at the first wall can be reduced.  Article History: Received: July 10th 2017; Received: Dec 17th 2017; Accepted: February 2nd 2018; Available online How to Cite This Article: Hong, B.G. (2018 Impact of Blanket Configuration on the Design of a Fusion-Driven Transmutation Reactor. International Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 7(1, 65-70. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.7.1.65-70

  17. Current status of fusion reactor blanket thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veleckis, E.; Yonco, R.M.; Maroni, V.A.

    1979-04-01

    Recent studies of liquid lithium have concentrated on its sorption characteristics for hydrogen isotopes and its interaction with common impurity elements. Hydrogen isotope sorption data (P-C-T relations, activity coefficients, Sieverts' constants, plateau pressures, isotope effects, free energies of formation, phase boundaries etc.) are presented in a tabular form that can be conveniently used to extract thermodynamic information for the α-phase of the Li-LiH, Li-LiD, and Li-LiT systems and to construct complete phase diagrams. Recent solubility data for Li 3 N, Li 2 O, and Li 2 C 2 in liquid lithium are discussed with emphasis on the prospects for removing these species by cold-trapping methods. Current studies on the sorption of hydrogen in solid lithium alloys (e.g., Li--Al and Li--Pb), made using a new technique (the hydrogen titration method), have shown that these alloys should lead to smaller blanket-tritium inventories than are attainable with liquid lithium and that the P-C-T relationships for hydrogen in Li--M alloys can be estimated from lithium activity data for these alloys

  18. Fusion technology development: first wall/blanket system and component testing in existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.S.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Judd, J.L.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Millsap, D.A.; Scott, A.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1980-12-01

    A novel concept to produce a reasonable simulation of a fusion first wall/blanket test environment employing an existing nuclear facility, the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is presented. Preliminary results show that an asymmetric, nuclear test environment with surface and volumetric heating rates similar to those expected in a fusion first wall/blanket or divertor chamber surface appears feasible. The proposed concept takes advantage of nuclear reactions within the annulus of an existing test space (15 cm in diameter and approximately 100 cm high) to provide an energy flux to the surface of a test module. The principal reaction considered involves 3 He in the annulus as follows: n + 3 He → p + t + 0.75 MeV. Bulk heating in the test module is accomplished by neutron thermalization, gamma heating, and absorption reactions involving 6 Li in the blanket breeding region. The concept can be extended to modified core configurations that will accommodate test modules of different sizes and types. It makes possible development testing of first wall/blanket systems and other fusion components on a scale and in ways not otherwise available until actual high-power fusion reactors are built

  19. Study on fission blanket fuel cycling of a fusion-fission hybrid energy generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on neutron physics characteristics of a light water cooled fission blanket for a new type subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor aiming at electric power generation with low technical limits of fission fuel. The major objective is to study the fission fuel cycling performance in the blanket, which may possess significant impacts on the feasibility of the new concept of fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a high energy gain (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The COUPLE2 code developed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University is employed to simulate the neutronic behaviour in the blanket. COUPLE2 combines the particle transport code MCNPX with the fuel depletion code ORIGEN2. The code calculation results show that soft neutron spectrum can yield M > 20 while maintaining TBR >1.15 and the conversion ratio of fissile materials CR > 1 in a reasonably long refuelling cycle (>five years). The preliminary results also indicate that it is rather promising to design a high-performance light water cooled fission blanket of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation by directly loading natural or depleted uranium if an ITER-scale tokamak fusion neutron source is achievable.

  20. New concepts for controlled fusion reactor blanket design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Avci, H.; El-Maghrabi, M.

    1975-01-01

    Several new concepts for fusion reactor blanket design based on the idea of shifting, or tailoring, the neutron spectrum incident on the first structural wall are presented. The spectral shifter is a nonstructural element which can be made of graphite, silicon carbide, or three dimensionally woven carbon fibers (and containing other materials as appropriate) placed between the neutron source and the first structural wall. The softened neutron spectrum incident on the structural components leads to lower gas production and atom displacement rates than in more standard fusion blanket designs. In turn, this results in longer anticipated lifetimes for the structural materials and can significantly reduce radioactivity and afterheat levels. In addition, the neutron spectrum in the first structural wall can be made to approach the flux shape in fast breeder reactors. Such spectral softening means that existing radiation facilities may be more profitably used to provide relevant materials radiation damage data for the structural materials in these fusion blanket designs. This general class of blanket concepts are referred to as internal spectral shifter and energy converter, or ISSEC concepts. These specific design concepts fall into three main categories: ISSEC/EB concepts based on utilizing existing designs which breed tritium behind the first structural wall; ISSEC/IB concepts based on breeding tritium inside the first vacuum wall; and ISSEC/Bu concepts based on using boron, carbon, and perhaps, beryllium to obtain an energy multiplier and converter design that does not attempt to breed tritium or utilize lithium. The detailed analyses relate specifically to the nuclear performance of ISSEC systems and to a discussion of materials radiation damage problems in the structural material.(U.S.)

  1. Phase-IIC experiments of the JAERI/USDOE collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio

    1992-12-01

    Neutronics experiments on two types of heterogeneous blankets have been performed as the Phase-IIC experiment of JAERI/USDOE collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics. The experimental system was used in the same geometry as the previous Phase-IIA series which was a closed geometry using neutron source enclosure of lithium carbonate. The heterogeneous blankets selected here are the beryllium edge-on and the water coolant channel assemblies. In the former the beryllium and lithium-oxide layers are piled up alternately in the front part of test blanket. In the latter, the three simulated water cooling channels are settled in the Li 2 O blanket. These are producing steep gradient of neutron flux around material boundary. The calculation accuracy and measurement method for these features is a key of interest in the experiments. The measurements were performed for tritium production rate and the other nuclear parameters as well as the previous experiments. This report describes the experimental detail and the results enough to use for the benchmark data for testing the data and method of design calculation of fusion reactors. (author)

  2. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B. William [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chiu, Ing L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  3. Design and R and D activities on ceramic breeder blanket for fusion experimental reactors in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, T.; Takatsu, H.; Sato, S.; Nakahira, M.; Furuya, K.; Hashimoto, T.; Kawamura, H.; Kuroda, T.; Tsunematsu, T.; Seki, M.

    1995-01-01

    Design and R and D activities on ceramic breeder blanket of a fusion experimental reactor have been progressed in JAERI. A layered pebble bed type ceramic breeder blanket with water cooling is a prime candidate concept. Design activities have been concentrated on improvement of the design by conducting detailed analyses and also by fabrication procedure consideration based on the current technologies. A wide variety of R and Ds have also been conducted in accordance with the design activities. Development of fabrication technology of the blanket box structure and its mechanical testing, elementary testing on thermal performances of the pebble bed, and engineering-oriented material tests of breeder and beryllium pebbles are the main achievements during the last two years. (orig.)

  4. Uncertainties in liquid-metal fusion blanket design windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, J.K.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium- and lead-lithium (17Li-83Pb)-cooled fusion blankets offer the promise of excellent neutronic performance, high fusion to electrical energy conversion efficiency, and design simplicity. However, interactive effects such as magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) pressure drop, flow distribution, heat transfer, corrosion, and stress appear to have large enough uncertainties to make the presence of a useful design window questionable, especially in large tokamak reactors. The work reported here attempts to: (a) define limits for the design windows for lithium and lead-lithium as breeders and coolants with stainless steel, ferritic steel, and refractory alloy structural materials in various tokamak fusion reactors and (b) quantify the impact of uncertainties in these limits on the design window. Steady-state MHD pressure drop and heat transfer models are developed and used to quantify the effects of varying several tokamak reactor and blanket design parameters and materials properties. Uncertainties in the present pressure drop equations and calculation methods are also considered. Calculations are used to evaluate the impact of the coolant inlet temperature on the thermal cycle efficiency

  5. Methodology for accident analyses of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled pebble bed blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotov, Dobromir, E-mail: dobromir.panayotov@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona E-08019 (Spain); Grief, Andrew [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Merrill, Brad J.; Humrickhouse, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael; Murgatroyd, Julian T.; Owen, Simon [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Poitevin, Yves [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona E-08019 (Spain); Peers, Karen; Lyons, Alex; Heaton, Adam; Scott, Richard [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Test Blanket Systems (TBS) DEMO breeding blankets (BB) safety demonstration. • Comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena. • Development of accident analysis specifications (AAS) via the use of phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRT). • PIRT application to identify required physical models for BB accidents analysis, code assessment and selection. • Development of MELCOR and RELAP5 codes TBS models. • Qualification of the models via comparison with finite element calculations, code-tocode comparisons, and sensitivity studies. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. The methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCPB TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic research in fusion blanket engineering and metallurgical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhiro, A.

    1991-11-01

    A review of recent research activities in liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics (LM-MHDs) is presented in this article. Two major reserach areas are discussed. The first topic involves the thermomechanical design issues in a proposed tokamak fusion reactor. The primary concerns are in the magneto-thermal-hydraulic performance of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The second topic involves the application of MHD in material processing in the metallurgical and semiconductor industries. The two representative applications are electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of continuously cast steel and the Czochralski (CZ) method of crystal growth in the presence of a magnetic field. (author) 24 figs., 10 tabs., 136 refs

  7. Neutronics design of fusion reactors and application of blanket neutronics experiment to the design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi

    1976-10-01

    A conceptual design of a commercial fusion power reactor and a preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor are under way. Based on the experience of the neutronics of the two reactors, the status of neutronics design and problems in the neutronics calculation are described. A series of blanket neutronics experiments has been carried out to examine validity of the nuclear data and calculation methods used in neutronics design of the fusion reactors. The measured fission-rate distributions in the four types of spherical blanket assemblies consisting of lithium and/or graphite and/or natural uranium are analyzed. The effects of uncertainty of the nuclear data, processing procedure of the multi-group cross sections, and approximations in neutron transport calculations upon the calculated fission-rates are investigated. The discrepancy between the calculated and measured values of fission-rates is caused mainly by neglecting the anisotropy of secondary neutrons from inelastic and (n,2n) reactions in the multi-group cross section calculation. The results of the analysis are applied to the neutronics design of the fusion reactors to evaluate the effect of the results upon the blanket nuclear characteristics. In consequence, the substitution of the reflector material, graphite by stainless steel is recommended. It is also pointed out that the present shielding design for the superconducting magnets may be insufficient and increased attenuation may be necessary. (auth.)

  8. NOEL-A no-leak fusion blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, W.S.; Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.; Horn, F.; Makowitz, H.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal analysis and tests of a non-leak fusion blanket concept (NOEL-No External Leak) are presented. The NOEL blanket module operates with a material A that is present in both its solid and liquid phases. The solid phase zone of material A is maintained as a thick lining on the inside of blanket module shells (which are made of stainless steel, aluminum or any other structural metal and serve as the first wall) by cooling tubes embedded in the solid zone. These metal tubes carry a liquid or gas coolant B at a temperature below the melting point of A. Most of the 14 MeV neutron energy is deposited as heat in the module interior, and the temperature increase from the shell to the interior due to heat flow is sufficient to keep the interior liquid. Pressure on the liquid A interior is maintained at a higher level than the pressure on B, so that B can not leak out if failures occur in the coolant tubes embedded in the frozen layer

  9. NOEL: a no-leak fusion blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Yu, W.S.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Makowitz, H.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis and tests of a no-leak fusion blanket concept (NOEL-NO External Leak) are described. Coolant cannot leak into the plasma chamber even if large through-cracks develop in the first wall. Blanket modules contain a two-phase material, A, that is solid (several cm thick) on the inside of the module shell, and liquid in the interior. The solid layer is maintained by imbedded tubes carrying a coolant, B, below the freezing point of A. Most of the 14-MeV neutron energy is deposited as heat in the module interior. The thermal energy flow from the module interior to the shell keeps the interior liquid. Pressure on the liquid A interior is greater than the pressure on B, so that B cannot leak out if failures occur in coolant tubes. Liquid A cannot leak into the plasma chamber through first wall cracks because of the intervening frozen layer. The thermal hydraulics and neutronics of NOEL blankets have been investigated for various metallic (e.g., Li, Pb 2 , LiPb, Pb) and fused salt choices for material A

  10. Fusion Blanket Coolant Section Criteria, Methodology, and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMuth, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meier, W. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jolodosky, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frantoni, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reyes, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-02

    The focus of this LDRD was to explore potential Li alloys that would meet the tritium breeding and blanket cooling requirements but with reduced chemical reactivity, while maintaining the other attractive features of pure Li breeder/coolant. In other fusion approaches (magnetic fusion energy or MFE), 17Li- 83Pb alloy is used leveraging Pb’s ability to maintain high TBR while lowering the levels of lithium in the system. Unfortunately this alloy has a number of potential draw-backs. Due to the high Pb content, this alloy suffers from very high average density, low tritium solubility, low system energy, and produces undesirable activation products in particular polonium. The criteria considered in the selection of a tritium breeding alloy are described in the following section.

  11. Neutronic Parametric Study on a Conceptual Design for a Transmutation Fusion Blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq Siddique, M.; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Fusion energy may be the one of options of future energy. In all over the world, researchers are putting their efforts for its commercial and economical availability. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors have been studied for various applications in China. First milestone of fusion energy is expected to be the fusion fission hybrid reactors. In fusion-fission hybrid reactor the blanket design is of second prime importance after fusion source. In this study conceptual design of a fusion blanket is initiated for calculation of tritium production, transmutation of minor actinides (MA) and fission products (FP) and energy multiplication calculations

  12. The current status of fusion reactor blanket thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veleckis, E.; Yonco, R.M.; Maroni, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The available thermodynamic information is reviewed for three categories of materials that meet essential criteria for use as breeding blankets in D-T fuelled fusion reactors: liquid lithium, solid lithium alloys, and lithium-containing ceramics. The leading candidate, liquid lithium, which also has potential for use as a coolant, has been studied more extensively than have the solid alloys or ceramics. Recent studies of liquid lithium have concentrated on its sorption characteristics for hydrogen isotopes and its interaction with common impurity elements. Hydrogen isotope sorption data (P-C-T relations, activity coefficients, Sieverts' constants, plateau pressures, isotope effects, free energies of formation, phase boundaries, etc.) are presented in a tabular form that can be conveniently used to extract thermodynamic information for the α-phases of the Li-LiH, Li-LiD and Li-LiT systems and to construct complete phase diagrams. Recent solubility data for Li 3 N, Li 2 O, and Li 2 C 2 in liquid lithium are discussed with emphasis on the prospects for removing these species by cold-trapping methods. Current studies on the sorption of hydrogen in solid lithium alloys (e.g. Li-Al and Li-Pb), made using a new technique (the hydrogen titration method), have shown that these alloys should lead to smaller blanket-tritium inventories than are attainable with liquid lithium and that the P-C-T relationships for hydrogen in Li-M alloys can be estimated from lithium activity data for these alloys. There is essentially no refined thermodynamic information on the prospective ceramic blanket materials. The kinetics of tritium release from these materials is briefly discussed. Research areas are pointed out where additional thermodynamic information is needed for all three material categories. (author)

  13. JAERI/U.S. collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Mori, Takamasa; Kosako, Kazuaki; Oyama, Yukio; Nakamura, Tomoo

    1989-10-01

    Phase IIa and IIb experiments of JAERI/U.S. Collaborative Program on Fusion Blanket Neutronics have been performed using the FNS facility at JAERI. The phase IIa experimental systems consist of the Li 2 O test region, the rotating neutron target and the Li 2 CO 3 container. In phase IIb, a beryllium layer is added to the inner wall to investigate a multiplier effect. Measured parameters are source characteristics by a foil activation method and spectrum measurements using both NE-213 and proton recoil counters. The measurements inside the Li 2 O region included tritium production rates, reaction rate by foil activation and neutron spectrum measurements. Analysis for these parameters was performed by using two dimensional discrete ordinate codes DOT3.5 and DOT-DD, and a Monte Carlo code MORSE-DD. The nuclear data used were based on JENDL3/PR1 and PR2. ENDF/B-IV, V and the FNS file were used as activation cross sections. The configurations analysed for the test region were a reference, a beryllium front and a beryllium sandwiched systems in phase IIa, and a reference and a beryllium front with first wall systems in phase IIb. This document describes the results of analysis and comparison between the calculations and the measurements. The prediction accuracy of key parameters in a fusion reactor blanket are examined. The tritium production rates can be well predicted in the reference systems but are fairly underestimated in the system with a beryllium multiplier. Details of experiments and the experimental techniques are described separately in the another report. (author)

  14. Self-shielding characteristics of aqueous self-cooled blankets for next generation fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    The present study examines self-shielding characteristics for two aqueous self-cooled tritium producing driver blankets for next generation fusion devices. The aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept (ASCB) is a very simple blanket concept that relies on just structural material and coolant. Lithium compounds are dissolved in water to provide for tritium production. An ASCB driver blanket would provide a low technology and low temperature environment for blanket test modules in a next generation fusion reactor. The primary functions of such a blanket would be shielding, energy removal and tritium production. One driver blanket considered in this study concept relates to the one proposed for the Next European Torus (NET), while the second concept is indicative for the inboard shield design for the Engineering Test Reactor proposed by the USA (TIBER II/ETR). The driver blanket for NET is based on stainless steel for the structural material and aqueous solution, while the inboard shielding blanket for TIBER II/ETR is based on a tungsten/aqueous solution combination. The purpose of this study is to investigate self-shielding and heterogeneity effects in aqueous self-cooled blankets. It is found that no significant gains in tritium breeding can be achieved in the stainless steel blanket if spatial and energy self-shielding effects are considered, and the heterogeneity effects are also insignificant. The tungsten blanket shows a 5 percent increase in tritium production in the shielding blanket when energy and spatial self-shielding effects are accounted for. However, the tungsten blanket shows a drastic increase in the tritium breeding ratio due to heterogeneity effects. (author) 17 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Conceptual design and neutronics analyses of a fusion reactor blanket simulation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, D.E.; Ott, K.O.; Terry, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    A new conceptual design of a fusion reactor blanket simulation facility has been developed. This design follows the principles that have been successfully employed in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF), where experiments have resulted in the discovery of substantial deficiencies in neutronics predictions. With this design, discrepancies between calculation and experimental data can be nearly fully attributed to calculation methods because design deficiencies that could affect results are insignificant. The conceptual design of this FBBF analog, the Fusion Reactor Blanket Facility, is presented

  16. Chemical processing of liquid lithium fusion reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, J R; Calaway, W F; Yonco, R M; Hines, J B; Maroni, V A

    1979-01-01

    A 50-gallon-capacity lithium loop constructed mostly from 304L stainless steel has been operated for over 6000 hours at temperatures in the range from 360 to 480/sup 0/C. This facility, the Lithium Processing Test Loop (LPTL), is being used to develop processing and monitoring technology for liquid lithium fusion reactor blankets. Results of tests of a molten-salt extraction method for removing impurities from liquid lithium have yielded remarkably good distribution coefficients for several of the more common nonmetallic elements found in lithium systems. In particular, the equilibrium volumetric distribution coefficients, D/sub v/ (concentration per unit volume of impurity in salt/concentration per unit volume of impurity in lithium), for hydrogen, deuterium, nitrogen and carbon are approx. 3, approx. 4, > 10, approx. 2, respectively. Other studies conducted with a smaller loop system, the Lithium Mini-Test Loop (LMTL), have shown that zirconium getter-trapping can be effectively used to remove selected impurities from flowing lithium.

  17. Effect of graphite reflector on activation of fusion breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young-Ouk; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The graphite reflector concept has been applied in the design of the Korea HCCR TBM for ITER and this concept is also a candidate design option for Korea Demo. • In the graphite reflector, C-14, B-11 and Be-10 are produced after an irradiation. Impurities in both case of beryllium and graphite is dominant in the shutdown dose after an irradiation. • Based on the evaluation, the graphite reflector is a good alternative of the beryllium multiplier in the view of induced activity and shutdown dose. But C-14 produced in the graphite reflector should be considered carefully in the view of radwaste management. - Abstract: Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. In this paper, activity analysis was performed and the effect of graphite reflector in the view of activation was compared to the beryllium multiplier. As a result, it is expected that using the graphite reflector instead of the beryllium multiplier decreases total activity very effectively. But the graphite reflector produces C-14 about 17.2 times than the beryllium multiplier. Therefore, C-14 produced in the graphite reflector is expected as a significant nuclide in the view of radwaste management.

  18. Chemical processing of liquid lithium fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, J.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Yonco, R.M.; Hines, J.B.; Maroni, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    A 50-gallon-capacity lithium loop constructed mostly from 304L stainless steel has been operated for over 6000 hours at temperatures in the range from 360 to 480 0 C. This facility, the Lithium Processing Test Loop (LPTL), is being used to develop processing and monitoring technology for liquid lithium fusion reactor blankets. Results of tests of a molten-salt extraction method for removing impurities from liquid lithium have yielded remarkably good distribution coefficients for several of the more common nonmetallic elements found in lithium systems. In particular, the equilibrium volumetric distribution coefficients, D/sub v/ (concentration per unit volume of impurity in salt/concentration per unit volume of impurity in lithium), for hydrogen, deuterium, nitrogen and carbon are approx. 3, approx. 4, > 10, approx. 2, respectively. Other studies conducted with a smaller loop system, the Lithium Mini-Test Loop (LMTL), have shown that zirconium getter-trapping can be effectively used to remove selected impurities from flowing lithium

  19. Evaluation of alternative methods of simulating asymmetric bulk heating in fusion reactor blanket/shield components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Wadkins, R.P.; Wessol, D.E.

    1981-10-01

    As a part of Phase O, Test Program Element-II of the Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program, a study was conducted by EG and G Idaho, Inc., to identify, characterize, and recommend alternative approaches for simulating fusion bulk heating in blanket/shield components. This is the report on that effort. Since the usefulness of any simulation approach depends upon the particular experiment considered, classes of problem types (thermal-hydraulic, thermomechanical, etc.) and material types (structure, solid breeder, etc.) are developed. The evaluation of the various simulation approaches is performed for the various significant combinations of problem class and material class. The simulation approaches considered are discrete-source heating, direct resistance, electromagnetic induction, microwave heating, and nuclear heating. From the evaluations performed for each experiment type, discrete - source heating emerges as a good approach for bulk heating simulation in thermal - hydraulics experiments, and nuclear heating appears to be a good approach in experiments addressing thermomechanics and combined thermal-hydraulic/thermomechanics

  20. Facilities, testing program and modeling needs for studying liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flows in fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bühler, L., E-mail: leo.buehler@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mistrangelo, C.; Konys, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bhattacharyay, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Huang, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology (INEST), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) (China); Obukhov, D. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA) (Russian Federation); Smolentsev, S. [University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) (United States); Utili, M. [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, Camugnano 40032 (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    Since many years, liquid metal flows for applications in fusion blankets have been investigated worldwide. A review is given about modeling requirements and existing experimental facilities for investigations of liquid metal related issues in blankets with the focus on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Most of the performed theoretical and experimental works were dedicated to fundamental aspects of MHD flows under very strong magnetic fields as they may occur in generic elements of fusion blankets like pipes, ducts, bends, expansions and contractions. Those experiments are required to progressively validate numerical tools with the purpose of obtaining codes capable to predict MHD flows at fusion relevant parameters in complex blanket geometries, taking into account electrical and thermal coupling between fluid and structural materials. Scaled mock-up experiments support the theoretical activities and help deriving engineering correlations for cases which cannot be calculated with required accuracy up to now.

  1. Size limitations for microwave cavity to simulate heating of blanket material in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, D.

    1987-01-01

    The power profile in the blanket material of a nuclear fusion reactor can be simulated by using microwaves at 200 MHz. Using these microwaves, ceramic breeder materials can be thermally tested to determine their acceptability as blanket materials without entering a nuclear fusion environment. A resonating cavity design is employed which can achieve uniform cross sectional heating in the plane transverse to the neutron flux. As the sample size increases in height and width, higher order modes, above the dominant mode, are propagated and destroy the approximation to the heating produced in a fusion reactor. The limits at which these modes develop are determined in the paper

  2. Conceptual design of blanket structures for fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    Conceptual design study for in-vessel components including tritium breeding blanket of FER has been carried out. The objective of this study is to obtain the engineering and technological data for selecting the reactor concept and for its construction by investigating fully and broadly. The design work covers in-vessel components (such as tritium breeding blanket, first wall, shield, divertor and blanket test module), remote handling system and tritium system. The designs of those components and systems are accomplished in consideration of their accomodation to whole reactor system and problems for furthur study are clarified. (author)

  3. Thermal and structural design aspects of high-temperature blankets for fusion synfuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Reich, M.

    1981-01-01

    The most promising process, high temperature electrolysis (HTE) of steam at temperatures of greater than or equal to 1000 0 C is examined. In HTE, a large fraction (up to approx. 50%) of the energy input to split water to hydrogen and oxygen comes from thermal energy. For the projected operating conditions achieved by high temperature fusion blankets, overall efficiencies for hydrogen production should be on the order of 60%. The design, thermal-hydraulics, and materials for such blankets are discussed

  4. Comparative analysis of a fusion reactor blanket in cylindrical and toroidal geometry using Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapin, D.L.

    1976-03-01

    Differences in neutron fluxes and nuclear reaction rates in a noncircular fusion reactor blanket when analyzed in cylindrical and toroidal geometry are studied using Monte Carlo. The investigation consists of three phases--a one-dimensional calculation using a circular approximation to a hexagonal shaped blanket; a two-dimensional calculation of a hexagonal blanket in an infinite cylinder; and a three-dimensional calculation of the blanket in tori of aspect ratios 3 and 5. The total blanket reaction rate in the two-dimensional model is found to be in good agreement with the circular model. The toroidal calculations reveal large variations in reaction rates at different blanket locations as compared to the hexagonal cylinder model, although the total reaction rate is nearly the same for both models. It is shown that the local perturbations in the toroidal blanket are due mainly to volumetric effects, and can be predicted by modifying the results of the infinite cylinder calculation by simple volume factors dependent on the blanket location and the torus major radius

  5. Interactions of D-T neutrons in graphite and lithium blankets of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofek, R.

    1986-05-01

    The present study deals with integral experiment and calculation of neutron energy spectra in bulks of graphite which is used as a reflector in blankets of fusion reactors, and lithium, the material of the blanket on which lithium is bred due to neutron interactions. The collimated beam configuration enables - due to the almost monoenergeticity and unidirectionality of the neutrons impinging on the target - to identify fine details in the measured spectra, and also facilitates the absolute normalization of the spectra. The measured and calculated spectra are generally in a good agreement and in a very good agreement at mesh points close to the system axis. A few conclusions may be drawn: a) the collimated beam source configuration is a sensitive tool for measuring neutron energy spectra with a high resolution, b) the method of unfolding proton-recoil spectra measured with a NE-213 scintillator should be improved, c) MCNP and DOT 4.2 may be used as complementary codes for neutron transport calculations of fusion blankets and deep-penetration problems, d) the updating of the cross-section libraries and checking by integral experiments is highly important for the design of fusion blankets. The present study may be regarded as an important course in the research and development of tools for the design of fusion blankets

  6. Status of fusion reactor blanket evaluation studies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Chevereau, G.; Gervaise, F.; Proust, E.

    1985-03-01

    In the frame of recent CEA studies aiming at the evaluation and at the comparison of various candidate blanket concepts in moderate power conditions (Psub(n) approximately 2 MW/m 2 ), the present work examines the neutronic and thermomechanical performances of a water cooled Li 17 Pb 83 tubular blanket and those of a helium cooled canister blanket taking advantage of the excellent breeding capability of composite Beryllium/LiAlO 2 (85/15%) breeder elements. The purpose of the following discussion is to justify the impetus for these reference concepts and to summarize the state of their evaluation studies updated by the continuous assimilation of calculations and experiments in progress

  7. Limiter and first wall of the fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, I.; Skladnov, K.; Kolganov, V.

    1994-01-01

    Previous designing of the first wall and limiter has allowed to determine their possible embodiment depending on the parameters and operation conditions of the blanket. As a rule limiter is a separate structure located on the plasma facing surface of the blanket assembly. Possible versions of the limiter/FW which may be considered: (1) limiters with mechanical attachment of the protective part; (2) limiters with the attachment with brazing; (3) limiters with common/separate cooling system; (4) limiter as a substitute of the FW. Generally the FW/limiter structure includes protective shield and its cooling system which consist of protective coating, heat accumulator, conductive layer and attachment locks

  8. A D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using compact fusion advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Shimohiro, D.; Yamamoto, Y.; Toku, H. (Inst. of Atomic Energy, Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan)); Inui, Y.; Ishikawa, M.; Umoto, J.; Miki, N. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Fukuyama, A. (Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama Univ. (Japan)); Mitarai, O. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kumamoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan)); Okamoto, M.; Sekimoto, H.; Fujii, Y.; Kim, Hu; Watanabe, K.; Ishii, T. (Research Lab. for Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Meguro (Japan)); Takagi, T. (Inst. of Fluid Science, Univ. Tohoku, Sendai (Japan)); Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I. (National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Miyazaki, K.; Saitoh, M. (Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)); Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Hoffman, M.A. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)); Campbell, R.B. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-12-01

    Recent progress of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket concept using CFAR (Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine) cycle is presented. High enthalpy extraction in excess of 50% was found achievable by a nonequilibrium disk-type MHD generator for gas stagnation temperatures of 3000 K superheated by synchrotron radiation, leading to a 40% overall plant efficiency with recuperative heat cycle and advanced thermoelectric converters. The stored magnetic energy of a 10 T MHD three-pairs Helmholtz-type magnet was estimated to be about 600 MJ per MHD generator. A mixture of mercury and lithium liquid flow was examined and found applicable to reduce the mercury inventory. The tritium permeation loss inherent in the relatively high temperature CFAR cycle, neutronics relating to tritium breeding and streaming through the waveguide and the MHD generator duct are discussed. Results of a 2000 h high temperature (600-700deg C) mercury corrosion test of Type 304 stainless steel, a TZM alloy and four kinds of ceramic rods in refluxing mercury with 0.004 mol fraction of potassium admixture have shown no noticeable corrosion except for Type 304 stainless steel. (orig.).

  9. Thermostructural design of the first wall/blanket for the TITAN-RFP fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orient, G.E.; Blanchard, J.P.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The mass power density, which is defined as the average power per unit mass within the magnet boundary, is a rough and general measure of economic competitiveness. Conn et al. (1985) have identified a target value of 100 kW(e)/tonne as a reasonable threshold for 'compact' commercial fusion systems. In pursuit of this goal, Hagenson et al. (1984) and Najmabadi et al. (1987) have pointed out the inherent characteristics of the RFP toroidal confinement concept which allow it to exceed this target value. It is inevitable that the compactness of the fusion power core will introduce a unique set of design issues. The special design concerns stem from high thermal surface fluxes, high bulk energy deposition by neutrons, and a relatively short blanket structural lifetime. In the TITAN-RFP, study Najmabadi et al. (1987) investigate a number of blanket (B) and first wall (FW) options suitable for high power density fusion reactors. Final choices were made for two designs: A high pressure aqueous blanket and a vanadium/lithium self-cooled blanket. The first design utilizes a pressurized aqueous loop containing a lithium compound dissolved in water, while the second design is based upon a self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket. In this paper, we consider the beginning-of-life (BOL) thermostructural design and analysis of only the second concept. (orig./GL)

  10. Recent progress in DEMO fusion core engineering: Improved segmentation, maintenance and blanket concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihli, T. [Association FZK-Euratom, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 36 40, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: thomas.ihli@iket.fzk.de; Boccaccini, L.V.; Janeschitz, G.; Koehly, C. [Association FZK-Euratom, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 36 40, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Maisonnier, D. [EFDA Garching (Germany); Nagy, D. [Association EURATOM/HAS, KFKI-Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary); Polixa, C.; Rey, J. [Association FZK-Euratom, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 36 40, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sardain, P. [EFDA Garching (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    After finalization of the European Power Plant Conceptual Study [D. Maisonnier, et al., A conceptual study of commercial fusion power plants, Final Report of the European Fusion Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS), EFDA-RP-RE-5.0, 2005 ] a new European effort was started to develop an optimized power core for a He-cooled DEMO device. The candidate breeder blanket concepts considered are the HCPB (helium cooled ceramic breeder) concept, the HCLL (helium cooled lithium lead) concept and the DCLL (dual coolant) concept. One basic segmentation and maintenance configuration involving so-called 'multi-module segments' (MMS) was identified to be particularly promising. In this paper, an overview on the concept is given and key design features are described. In addition, the design adjustment of the HCPB blanket and some new proposals in the DCLL blanket design are briefly discussed.

  11. Neutron transport-burnup code MCORGS and its application in fusion fission hybrid blanket conceptual research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xue-Ming; Peng, Xian-Jue

    2016-09-01

    Fusion science and technology has made progress in the last decades. However, commercialization of fusion reactors still faces challenges relating to higher fusion energy gain, irradiation-resistant material, and tritium self-sufficiency. Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactors (FFHR) can be introduced to accelerate the early application of fusion energy. Traditionally, FFHRs have been classified as either breeders or transmuters. Both need partition of plutonium from spent fuel, which will pose nuclear proliferation risks. A conceptual design of a Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactor for Energy (FFHR-E), which can make full use of natural uranium with lower nuclear proliferation risk, is presented. The fusion core parameters are similar to those of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. An alloy of natural uranium and zirconium is adopted in the fission blanket, which is cooled by light water. In order to model blanket burnup problems, a linkage code MCORGS, which couples MCNP4B and ORIGEN-S, is developed and validated through several typical benchmarks. The average blanket energy Multiplication and Tritium Breeding Ratio can be maintained at 10 and 1.15 respectively over tens of years of continuous irradiation. If simple reprocessing without separation of plutonium from uranium is adopted every few years, FFHR-E can achieve better neutronic performance. MCORGS has also been used to analyze the ultra-deep burnup model of Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) from LLNL, and a new blanket design that uses Pb instead of Be as the neutron multiplier is proposed. In addition, MCORGS has been used to simulate the fluid transmuter model of the In-Zinerater from Sandia. A brief comparison of LIFE, In-Zinerater, and FFHR-E will be given.

  12. Enhanced fuel production in thorium fusion hybrid blankets utilizing uranium multipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitulski, R.H.; Chapin, D.L.; Klevans, E.

    1979-01-01

    The multiplication of 14 MeV D-T fusion neutrons via (n,2n), (n,3n), and fission reactions by 238 U is well known and established. This study consistently evaluates the effectiveness of a depleted (tails) UO 2 multiplier on increasing the production of 233 U and tritium in a thorium/lithium fusion--fission hybrid blanket. Nuclear performance is evaluated as a function of exposure and zone thickness

  13. Development of the breeding blanket and shield model for the fusion power reactors system SYCOMORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li-Puma, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.lipuma@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: Jean-Charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martin, Brunella, E-mail: brunella.martin@gmail.com [Incka, 19-21 Rue du 8 mai 1945, F-94110 Arcueil (France)

    2014-10-15

    SYCOMORE, a fusion reactor system code based on a modular approach is under development at CEA. Within this framework, this paper describes the relevant sub-modules which have been implemented to model the main outputs of the breeding blanket and shield block of the system code: tritium breeding ratio, peak energy deposition in toroidal field coils, reactor layout and power deposition, blanket pressure drops and materials inventory. Blanket and shield requirements are calculated by several sub-modules: the blanket assembly and layout sub-module, the neutronic sub-module, the blanket design sub-module (thermal hydraulic and thermo-mechanic pre-design tool). A power flow module has also been developed which is directly linked to the blanket thermo-dynamic performances, which is not described in this paper. For the blanket assembly and layout and the blanket module design sub-modules, explicit analytic models have been developed and implemented; for the neutronic sub-module neural networks that replicate the results of appropriate simplified 1D and 2D neutronic simulations have been built. Presently, relevant model for the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead is available. Sub-modules have been built in a way that they can run separately or coupled into the breeding blanket and shield module in order to be integrated in SYCOMORE. In the paper, the objective and main input/output parameters of each sub-module are reported and relevant models discussed. The application to previous studied reactor models (PPCS model AB, DEMO-HCLL 2006–2007 studies) is also presented.

  14. Nuclear-thermal-coupled optimization code for the fusion breeding blanket conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jia, E-mail: lijia@ustc.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China); Jiang, Kecheng; Zhang, Xiaokang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); Nie, Xingchen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China); Zhu, Qinjun; Liu, Songlin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A nuclear-thermal-coupled predesign code has been developed for optimizing the radial build arrangement of fusion breeding blanket. • Coupling module aims at speeding up the efficiency of design progress by coupling the neutronics calculation code with the thermal-hydraulic analysis code. • Radial build optimization algorithm aims at optimal arrangement of breeding blanket considering one or multiple specified objectives subject to the design criteria such as material temperature limit and available TBR. - Abstract: Fusion breeding blanket as one of the key in-vessel components performs the functions of breeding the tritium, removing the nuclear heat and heat flux from plasma chamber as well as acting as part of shielding system. The radial build design which determines the arrangement of function zones and material properties on the radial direction is the basis of the detailed design of fusion breeding blanket. For facilitating the radial build design, this study aims for developing a pre-design code to optimize the radial build of blanket with considering the performance of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic simultaneously. Two main features of this code are: (1) Coupling of the neutronics analysis with the thermal-hydraulic analysis to speed up the analysis progress; (2) preliminary optimization algorithm using one or multiple specified objectives subject to the design criteria in the form of constrains imposed on design variables and performance parameters within the possible engineering ranges. This pre-design code has been applied to the conceptual design of water-cooled ceramic breeding blanket in project of China fusion engineering testing reactor (CFETR).

  15. First-wall and blanket engineering development for magnetic-fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.; Herman, H.; Maroni, V.; Turner, L.; Clemmer, R.; Finn, P.; Johnson, C.; Abdou, M.

    1981-01-01

    A number of programs in the USA concerned with materials and engineering development of the first wall and breeder blanket systems for magnetic-fusion power reactors are described. Argonne National Laboratory has the lead or coordinating role, with many major elements of the research and engineering tests carried out by a number of organizations including industry and other national laboratories

  16. Blanket handling concepts for future fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.; Gottfried, R.; Maisonnier, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the frame of the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) launched by the European Commission, two main blanket handling concepts have been investigated with respect to engineering feasibility and the impact on the plant availability and on cost: the large module handling concept (LMHC) and the large sector handling concept (LSHC). The LMHC has been considered as the reference handling concept while the LSHC has been considered as an attractive alternative to the LMHC due to its potential of smaller replacement times and hence increasing the plant availability. Although no principle feasibility issue has been identified, a number of engineering issues have been highlighted for the LSHC that would require considerable efforts for their resolution. Since its availability of about 77% based on a replacement time for all the internals of about 4.2 months is slightly lower than for the LMHC, the LMHC remains the reference blanket replacement concept for a conceptual reactor

  17. Progress in fusion reactors blanket analysis and evaluation at CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, E.; Gervaise, F.; Carre, F.; Chevereau, G.; Doutriaux, D.

    1986-09-01

    In the frame of the recent CEA studies aiming at the development, evaluation and comparison of solid breeder blanket concepts in view of their adaptation to NET, the evaluation of specific questions related to the first wall design, the present paper examines first the performances of a helium cooled toroidal blanket design for NET, based on innovative Beryllium/Ceramics breeder rod elements. Neutronic and thermo-mechanical optimisation converges on a concept featured by a breeding capability in excess of 1.2, a reasonnable pumping power of 1% and a narrow breeder temperature range (470+-30 deg C of the breeder), the latter being largely independent of the power level. This design proves naturally adapted to ceramic breeder assigned to very strict working conditions, and provides for any change in the thermal and heat transfer characteristics over the blanket lifetime. The final section of the paper is devoted to the evaluation of the heat load poloidal distribution and to the irradiation effects on first wall structural materials

  18. Corrosion characteristics of an aqueous self-cooled fusion blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, W.F.; Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Deutsch, L.; Jackson, D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel aqueous self-cooled blanket concept (ASCB) has recently been proposed. This blanket concept, as applied to a MARS-like tandem mirror reactor, consists of disks of spiraling tubes of Zircaloy-4 housed in a structural container of vanadium alloy (V-15 Ti-5 Cr). The Zircaloy tubes are cooled by a mixture of light and heavy water with 9 g of LiOH per 100 cm 3 of water dissolved in the coolant. A major issue for the feasibility of the integrated blanket coil concept is the chemical compatibility of the coolant and Zircaloy. Initial corrosion tests have been undertaken in order to resolve this question. Results clearly show that successful alloy heats can be prepared, for which corrosion problems will probably not be the limiting factor of the ASCB design concept. As is quite well known from fission engineering studies, small variations in the alloy compositions or in the metallurgical structure may, however, be able to cause significant alterations in the oxidation or corrosion rates. Further tests will be necessary to resolve the remaining uncertainties and to determine the behavior of successful alloy heats in the presence of trace impurities in order to address the sensitivity to localized corrosion phenomena such as pitting, stress corrosion cracking, and intergranular attack

  19. Conceptual design and neutronics analyses of a fusion reactor blanket simulation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    A new conceptual design of a fusion reactor blanket simulation facility was developed. This design follows the principles that have been successfully employed in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBR), because experiments conducted in it have resulted in the discovery of deficiencies in neutronics prediction methods. With this design, discrepancies between calculation and experimental data can be fully attributed to calculation methods because design deficiencies that could affect results are insignificant. Inelastic scattering cross sections are identified as a major source of these discrepancies. The conceptual design of this FBBR analog, the fusion reactor blanket facility (FRBF), is presented. Essential features are a cylindrical geometry and a distributed, cosine-shaped line source of 14-MeV neutrons. This source can be created by sweeping a deuteron beam over an elongated titanium-tritide target. To demonstrate that the design of the FRBF will not contribute significant deviations in experimental results, neutronics analyses were performed: results of comparisons of 2-dimensional to 1-dimensional predictions are reported for two blanket compositions. Expected deviations from 1-D predictions which are due to source anisotropy and blanket asymmetry are minimal. Thus, design of the FRBF allows simple and straightforward interpretation of the experimental results, without a need for coarse 3-D calculations

  20. Neutronics analysis of water-cooled energy production blanket for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jieqiong; Wang Minghuang; Chen Zhong; Qiu Yuefeng; Liu Jinchao; Bai Yunqing; Chen Hongli; Hu Yanglin

    2010-01-01

    Neutronics calculations were performed to analyse the parameters of blanket energy multiplication factor (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor for energy production named FDS (Fusion-Driven hybrid System)-EM (Energy Multiplier) blanket. The most significant and main goal of the FDS-EM blanket is to achieve the energy gain of about 1 GWe with self-sustaining tritium, i.e. the M factor is expected to be ∼90. Four different fission materials were taken into account to evaluate M in subcritical blanket: (i) depleted uranium, (ii) natural uranium, (iii) enriched uranium, and (iv) Nuclear Waste (transuranic from 33 000 MWD/MTU PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and depleted uranium) oxide. These calculations and analyses were performed using nuclear data library HENDL (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) and a home-developed code VisualBUS. The results showed that the performance of the blanket loaded with Nuclear Waste was most attractive and it could be promising to effectively obtain tritium self-sufficiency and a high-energy multiplication.

  1. Liquid immersion blanket design for use in a compact modular fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Hartwig, Zachary; Olynyk, Geoffrey; Sierchio, Jennifer; Whyte, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    Traditional tritium breeding blankets in fusion reactor designs include a large amount of structural material. This results in complex engineering requirements, complicated sector maintenance, and marginal tritium breeding ratios (TBR). We present a conceptual design of a fully liquid blanket. To maximize tritium breeding volume, the vacuum vessel is completely immersed in a continuously recycled FLiBe blanket, with the exception of small support posts. FLiBe has a wide liquid temperature window (459 C to 1430 C), low electrical conductivity to minimize MHD effects, similar thermal/fluid characteristics to water, and is chemically inert. While tritium breeding with FLiBe in traditional blankets is poor, we use MCNP neutronics analysis to show that the immersion blanket design coupled with a beryllium neutron multiplier results in TBR > 1. FLiBe is shown to be a sufficient radiation shield for the toroidal field magnets and can be used as a coolant for the vacuum vessel and divertor, allowing for a simplified single-phase, low-pressure, single-fluid cooling scheme. When coupled with a high-field compact reactor design, the immersion blanket eliminates the need for complex sector maintenance, allows the vacuum vessel to be a replaceable component, and reduces financial cost.

  2. Thermal-hydraulic design and analysis of helium cooled solid breeder blanket for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hongli; Ye Miuyou; Li Min; Lv Zkongliang; Zhou Guangming; Liu Qiaiiwen; Wang Shuai

    2014-01-01

    To bridge the gap between ITER and DEMO and to realize the fusion energy in China, a fusion device Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) was proposed and being designed aiming at 50-200 MW fusion power, 30-50% duty time factor, and tritium self-sustained. Three kinds of tritium breeding blanket concepts, including helium-cooled solid blanket, water-cooled solid blanket and liquid metal-cooled liquid blanket, have been considered for CFETR. Compared to ITER test blanket module, the blanket design for CFETR is facing much more challenges due to the compulsive requirements of tritium self-sufficiency, nuclear heat removal and the space limitation for blanket installation. In this paper, a kind of helium cooled solid tritium breeder blanket was designed for CFETR full superconducting tokamak. The thermal-hydraulic designs were carried out based on the blanket structure design and neutronics calculation. The performance evaluation was conducted using ANSYS, and three-dimensional fluid-solid coupled models were modeled for the accuracy results. The results showed that the FW and BU can satisfy the design requirements. (author)

  3. Development of vanadium base alloys for fusion first-wall/blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Matsui, H.; Votinov, S.; VanWitzenburg, W.

    1994-01-01

    Vanadium alloys have been identified as a leading candidate material for fusion first-wall/blanket applications. Certain vanadium alloys exhibit favorable safety and environmental characteristics, good fabricability, high temperature and heat load capability, good compatibility with liquid metals and resistance to irradiation damage effects. The current focus is on vanadium alloys with (3-5)% Cr and (3-5)% Ti with a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy as the leading candidate. Preliminary results indicate that the crack-growth rates of certain alloys are not highly sensitive to irradiation. Results from the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) which simulates fusion relevant helium/dpa ratios are similar to results from neutron irradiated material. This paper presents an overview of the recent results on the development of vanadium alloys for fusion first wall/blanket applications

  4. Rotating liquid blanket for a toroidal fusion reator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    A novel blanket concept is presented for toroidal geometry in which many of the limitations imposed by a first wall are avoided by not having a first wall in the usual sense. The blanket consists of a rapidly rotating, low-vapor-pressure liquid that has a sharp boundary with the vacuum region. Nozzles inject ja continuous layer of cool liquid on the inner surface. The noncentricity of the plasma is maintained so that the plasma scrape-off region intersects the rotating liqid in a localized region. This noncentricity allows sufficient space so that the scrape-off plasma layer will not bombard the nozzles, whch penetrate through the rotating liquid. This liquid ''first wall'' is bombarded by the plasma, resulting in heat deposition, sputtering, and evaporation during the short time before the exposed liquid is covered by fresh, cool liquid from the nozzles. The advantages of this reactor concept appear to be very high wall loadings (speculated to be over 10 MW/m 2 ) and long component lifetime, both crucial economic factors. The nozzles are designed for easy replacement. The reactor's disatvantage is its enormous potential for plasma contamination by impurities. (orig.)

  5. A passively-safe fusion reactor blanket with helium coolant and steel structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosswait, Kenneth Mitchell [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Helium is attractive for use as a fusion blanket coolant for a number of reasons. It is neutronically and chemically inert, nonmagnetic, and will not change phase during any off-normal or accident condition. A significant disadvantage of helium, however, is its low density and volumetric heat capacity. This disadvantage manifests itself most clearly during undercooling accident conditions such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a loss of flow accident (LOFA). This thesis describes a new helium-cooled tritium breeding blanket concept which performs significantly better during such accidents than current designs. The proposed blanket uses reduced-activation ferritic steel as a structural material and is designed for neutron wall loads exceeding 4 MW/m{sup 2}. The proposed geometry is based on the nested-shell concept developed by Wong, but some novel features are used to reduce the severity of the first wall temperature excursion. These features include the following: (1) A ``beryllium-joint`` concept is introduced, which allows solid beryllium slabs to be used as a thermal conduction path from the first wall to the cooler portions of the blanket. The joint concept allows for significant swelling of the beryllium (10 percent or more) without developing large stresses in the blanket structure. (2) Natural circulation of the coolant in the water-cooled shield is used to maintain shield temperatures below 100 degrees C, thus maintaining a heat sink close to the blanket during the accident. This ensures the long-term passive safety of the blanket.

  6. 233U breeding and neutron multiplying blankets for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.G.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    In this work, along with a previous paper three possible uses of 14-MeV deuterium--tritium fusion neutrons are investigated: energy production, neutron multiplication, and fissile-fuel breeding. The results presented include neutronic studies of fissioning and nonfissioning thorium systems, tritium breeding systems, various fuel options (UO 2 , UC, UC 2 , etc.), and uranium as well as refractory metal first-wall neutron-multiplying regions. A brief energy balance and an estimate of potential revenues for fusion devices are given to help illustrate the potentials of these designs

  7. Technical evaluation of major candidate blanket systems for fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Seki, Masahiro; Minato, Akio

    1987-03-01

    The key functions required for tritium breeding blankets for a fusion power reactor are: (1) self-sufficient tritium breeding, (2) in-situ tritium recovery and low tritium inventory, (3) high temperature cooling giving a high efficiency of electricity generation and (4) thermo-mechanical reliability and simplified remote maintenance to obtain high plant availability. Blanket performance is substantially governed by materials selection. Major options of structure/breeder/coolant/neutron multiplier materials considered for the present design study are PCA/Li 2 O/H 2 O/Be, Mo-alloy/Li 2 O/He/Be, Mo-alloy/LiAlO 2 /He/Be, V-alloy/Li/Li/none, and Mo-alloy/Li/He/none. In addition, remote maintenance of blankets, tritium recovery system, heat transport and energy conversion have been investigated. In this report, technological problems and critical R and D issues for power reactor blanket development are identified and a comparison of major candidate blanket concepts is discussed in terms of the present materials data base, economic performance, prospects for future improvements, and engineering feasibility and difficulties based on the results obtained from individual design studies. (author)

  8. Influence of nuclear data uncertainties on thorium fusion-fission hybrid blanket nucleonic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Mathews, D.R.

    1979-09-01

    The fusion-fission hybrid blanket proposed for the Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor employs thorium metal as the fertile material. Based on the ENDF/B-IV nuclear data, the 233 U and tritium production rate and blanket energy multiplication averaged over the blanket lifetime of about 9 MW-yr/m 2 are 0.76 and 1.12 per D-T neutron and 4.8, respectively. At the time of the blanket discharge, the 233 U enrichment in the thorium metal is about 3%. The thorium cross sections given by the ENDF/B-IV and V were reviewed, and the important partial cross sections such as (n,2n), (n,3n), and (n,γ) were found to be known to +-10 to 20% in the respective energy range of interest. A sensitivity study showed that the 233 U and tritium production rate and blanket energy multiplication are relatively sensitive to the thorium capture and fission cross section uncertainties. In order to predict the above parameters within +-1%, the Th(n,γ) and Th(n,νf) cross sections must be measured within about +-2% in the energy range 3 to 3000 keV and 13.5 to 15 MeV, respectively

  9. Beryllium and lithium resource requirements for solid blanket designs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The lithium and beryllium requirements are analyzed for an economy of 10 6 MW(e) CTR 3 capacity using solid blanket fusion reactors. The total lithium inventory in fusion reactors is only approximately 0.2 percent of projected U. S. resources. The lithium inventory in the fusion reactors is almost entirely 6 Li, which must be extracted from natural lithium. Approximately 5 percent of natural lithium can be extracted as 6 Li. Thus the total feed of natural lithium required is approximately 20 times that actually used in fusion reactors, or approximately 4 percent of U. S. resources. Almost all of this feed is returned to the U. S. resource base after 6 Li is extracted, however. The beryllium requirements are on the order of 10 percent of projected U. S. resources. Further, the present cost of lithium and the cost of beryllium extraction could both be increased tenfold with only minor effects on CTR capital cost. Such an increase should substantially multiply the economically recoverable resources of lithium and beryllium. It is concluded that there are no lithium or beryllium resource limitations preventing large-scale implementation of solid blanket fusion reactors. (U.S.)

  10. Blanket materials for fusion reactors: comparisons of thermochemical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Fischer, A.K.; Tetenbaum, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations have been made to predict the thermochemical performance of the fusion reactor breeder materials, Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 , and Li 4 SiO 4 in the temperature range 900 to 1300 0 K and in the oxygen activity range 10 -25 to 10 -5 . Except for a portion of these ranges, the performance of LiAlO 2 is predicted to be better than that of Li 2 O and Li 4 SiO 4 . The protium purge technique for enhancing tritium release is explored for the Li 2 O system; it appears advantageous at higher temperatures but should be used cautiously at lower temperatures. Oxygen activity is an important variable in these systems and must be considered in executing and interpreting measurements on rates of tritium release, the form of released tritium, diffusion of tritiated species and their identities, retention of tritium in the condensed phase, and solubility of hydrogen isotope gases

  11. Tritium containment and blanket design challenges for a 1 GWe mirror fusion central power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1976-06-01

    Tritium containment and removal problems associated with the blanket and power-systems for a mirror fusion reactor are identified and conceptual process designs are devised to reduce emissions to the environment below 1 Ci/day. The blanket concept development proceeds by starting with this emission goal of 1 Ci/day and working inward to the blanket. At each decision point, worker safety, operational labor costs, and capital cost tradeoffs are contrasted. The conceptual design uses air for the reactor hall with a continuous catalytic oxidizer-molecular sieve adsorber cleanup system to maintain a 40 μCi/m 3 tritium level (5 μCi/m 3 HTO) against 180 Ci/day leakage from reactor components, energy recovery systems, and process piping. This blanket contains submodules with Li 2 Be 2 O 3 --Be for tritium breeding and submodules with Be for mostly energy production. Tritium production in both is handled by separately containing this breeding material and scavenging this container with lithium vapor-doped helium gas stream

  12. Application of the integrated blanket-coil concept (IBC) to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Mohanti, R.; Duggan, W.

    1987-01-01

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component and several unique applications to fusion reactor embodiments are identified. The proposed concept takes advantage of the fact that lithium is a good electrical conductor in addition to being a unique tritium-breeding material capable of energy recovery and transport at high temperatures. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept'' has the potential for: allowing fusion reactor embodiments which are easier to maintain; making fusion reactors more compact with an intrinsic ultra-high mass power density (net kW/sub E//metric tonne); and enhancing the tritium breeding potential for special coil applications such as ohmic heating and bean identation. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls (i.e., a layered combination of a thin wall of structural material, insulator and structural materials) the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are modest and well below design limits. Possible unique applications of the IBC concept have been investigated and include the IBC concept applied to the poloidal field (PF) coils, toroidal field (TF) coils, divertor coils, ohmic heating (OH) coils, and identation coils for bean shaping

  13. Inclusion and difusion studies of D in fusion breeding blanket candidate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.

    2015-07-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) reaction is the most practical fusion reaction on the way to harness fusion energy. As tritium presents trace quantities on Earth [1], tritium fuel is essential to be generated simultaneously with the D-T reaction in a commerical fusion power plant. Tritium can be obtained in the lithium contained breeding blanket as a transmutation product of nuclear reaction 6Li (n, a)T. Li2T iO3 is considered to be one promising candidate solid tritium breeder material, due to its high lithium density, low activation, compatiblity with structure materials and high chemical stability. The tritium generated in Li2T iO3 breeding blanket needs to be collected and recycled back to the fusion reaction. Therefore, the study of the diffusion characteristic of breeder material Li2T iO3 is necessary to determine tritium mobility and tritium extraction efficiency. In order to study tritium release mechanism of Li2T iO3 breeding material in a fusion power plant environment, a fusion like neutron spectrum is essential while it is now not availble in any laboratory. One alternative is using ion accelerator or implantor to get energetic hydrogenic (H,D,T) ions impacting on breeding material, to simulate the tritium distribution situation. Because of the radioactive property of tritium which will complicate processing procedure, another isotope of hydrogen Deuterium is actually used to be studied. The defect structure in Li2T iO3, due to reactor exposure to fusion generated particles and ? ray irradiation, is achieved by energetic Ti ions. SRIM program is implemented to simulate the D ion or Ti ion distributions after bombarding, as well as the defects. X-ray diffraction technique helps to identify phase compositions. Transmission electron microscopy technique is used to observe the microstructures (Author)

  14. A high-temperature fusion blanket design for thermochemical hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Battagalia, J.; Cheng, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a technically viable fusion blanket having the capability to supply high-temperature process heat for the production of hydrogen via a modification of the General Atomic sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting cycle. To avoid the necessity of an expensive catalyst, and to allow the use of higher pressures and thus obtain a more compact, less expensive chemical plant, process heat temperatures above 1000 0 C are preferred. The present blanket supplies 30% of its energy at 1250 0 C by flowing 50 atm helium across nonstress-bearing blocks of silicon carbide. The remaining 70% of the blanket energy is delivered at 700 0 C by a separate helium circuit cooling the Li 17 Pb 83 tritium breeder contained in Nb-1Zr tubes. The design attains a tritium breeding ratio of 1.1, and the two-coolant stream arrangement greatly reduces the tritium activity in the high-temperature loop. The swelling-tolerant pressure-containing Inconel 718 structure is maintained below 500 0 C by careful thermal hydraulics design and coolant channel routing. Only state-of-the-art materials are employed in the mechanical design and special attention has been afforded to the concerns of materials compatibility and irradiation-induced changes in material properties

  15. Present status of irradiation tests on tritium breeding blanket for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futamura, Yoshiaki; Sagawa, Hisashi; Shimakawa, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Kawamura, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    To develop a tritium breeding blanket for a fusion reactor, irradiation tests in fission reactors are indispensable for obtaining data on irradiation effects on materials, and neutronics/thermal characteristics and tritium production/recovery performance of the blanket. Various irradiation tests have been conducted in the world, especially to investigate tritium release characteristics from tritium breeding and neutron multiplier materials, and materials integrity under irradiation. In Japan, VOM experiments at JRR-2 for ceramic breeders and experiments at JMTR for ceramic breeders and beryllium as a neutron multiplier have been performed. Several universities have also investigated ceramic breeders. In the EC, the EXOTIC experiments at HFR in the Netherlands and the SIBELIUS, the LILA, the LISA and the MOZART experiments for ceramic breeders have carried out. In Canada, NRU has been used for the CRITIC experiments. The TRIO experiments at ORR(ORNL), experiments at RTNS-II, FUBR and ATR have been conducted in the USA. The last two are experiments with high neutron fluence aiming at investigating materials integrity under irradiation. The BEATRIX-I and -II experiments have proceeded under international collaboration of Japan, Canada, the EC and the USA. This report shows the present status of these irradiation tests following a review of the blanket design in the ITER CDA(Conceptual Design Activity). (author)

  16. Fusion materials: Technical evaluation of the technology of vandium alloys for use as blanket structural materials in fusion power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-04

    The Committee`s evaluation of vanadium alloys as a structural material for fusion reactors was constrained by limited data and time. The design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is still in the concept stage, so meaningful design requirements were not available. The data on the effect of environment and irradiation on vanadium alloys were sparse, and interpolation of these data were made to select the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. With an aggressive, fully funded program it is possible to qualify a vanadium alloy as the principal structural material for the ITER blanket in the available 5 to 8-year window. However, the data base for V-5Cr-5Ti is United and will require an extensive development and test program. Because of the chemical reactivity of vanadium the alloy will be less tolerant of system failures, accidents, and off-normal events than most other candidate blanket structural materials and will require more careful handling during fabrication of hardware. Because of the cost of the material more stringent requirements on processes, and minimal historical worlding experience, it will cost an order of magnitude to qualify a vanadium alloy for ITER blanket structures than other candidate materials. The use of vanadium is difficult and uncertain; therefore, other options should be explored more thoroughly before a final selection of vanadium is confirmed. The Committee views the risk as being too high to rely solely on vanadium alloys. In viewing the state and nature of the design of the ITER blanket as presented to the Committee, h is obvious that there is a need to move toward integrating fabrication, welding, and materials engineers into the ITER design team. If the vanadium allay option is to be pursued, a large program needs to be started immediately. The commitment of funding and other resources needs to be firm and consistent with a realistic program plan.

  17. Fusion materials: Technical evaluation of the technology of vandium alloys for use as blanket structural materials in fusion power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Committee's evaluation of vanadium alloys as a structural material for fusion reactors was constrained by limited data and time. The design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is still in the concept stage, so meaningful design requirements were not available. The data on the effect of environment and irradiation on vanadium alloys were sparse, and interpolation of these data were made to select the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. With an aggressive, fully funded program it is possible to qualify a vanadium alloy as the principal structural material for the ITER blanket in the available 5 to 8-year window. However, the data base for V-5Cr-5Ti is United and will require an extensive development and test program. Because of the chemical reactivity of vanadium the alloy will be less tolerant of system failures, accidents, and off-normal events than most other candidate blanket structural materials and will require more careful handling during fabrication of hardware. Because of the cost of the material more stringent requirements on processes, and minimal historical worlding experience, it will cost an order of magnitude to qualify a vanadium alloy for ITER blanket structures than other candidate materials. The use of vanadium is difficult and uncertain; therefore, other options should be explored more thoroughly before a final selection of vanadium is confirmed. The Committee views the risk as being too high to rely solely on vanadium alloys. In viewing the state and nature of the design of the ITER blanket as presented to the Committee, h is obvious that there is a need to move toward integrating fabrication, welding, and materials engineers into the ITER design team. If the vanadium allay option is to be pursued, a large program needs to be started immediately. The commitment of funding and other resources needs to be firm and consistent with a realistic program plan

  18. Neutron induced displacement damage in beryllium in the blanket of a (d,t)-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanutz, D.

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is a favoured candidate for a neutron multiplier in solid breeder blankets of fusion reactors. This is mainly due to its low (n, 2n)-reaction threshold and because of its good thermal and mechanical properties. Its behaviour under intense neutron irradiation, however, is a crucial issue for its use in future fusion reactors. Displacement damage in beryllium so far has been calculated both with data related and methodological deficiencies. First of all, there is a need to have accurate cross-section data in order to obtain reliable spectra of primary knock-on atoms (PKA's). Furthermore, there are principal restrictions of the NRT-model in general used to calculate secondary displacements initiated by PKA's. The underlying theory of damage-energy (part of kinetic energy of PKA transferred elastically to matrix atoms) according to Lindhard is strictly valid only for medium and heavy mass ions with moderate energies in targets of the same element. In this work improved damage cross-sections and displacement rates (dpa/s) in beryllium have been calculated based on cross-section data from ENDF/B-VI (with a significantly improved (n, 2n)-evaluation) and on an appropriate treatment of damage-energy that is suitable for fusion relevant damage of light mass materials. ''This work has been performed in the framework of the Nuclear Fusion Project of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and is supported by the European Communities within the European Fusion Technology Program''. (orig.)

  19. Composition Optimization of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloy Blankets for Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolodosky, Alejandra

    The goal of this dissertation is to examine the neutronic properties of a novel type of fusion reactor blanket material in the form of lithium-based ternary alloys. Pure liquid lithium, first proposed as a blanket for fusion reactors, is utilized as both a tritium breeder and a coolant. It has many attractive features such as high heat transfer and low corrosion properties, but most importantly, it has a very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and presents plant safety concerns including degradation of the concrete containment structure. The work of this thesis began as a collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in an effort to develop a lithium-based ternary alloy that can maintain the beneficial properties of lithium while reducing the reactivity concerns. The first studies down-selected alloys based on the analysis and performance of both neutronic and activation characteristics. First, 3-D Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate two main neutronics performance parameters for the blanket: tritium breeding ratio (TBR), and energy multiplication factor (EMF). Alloys with adequate results based on TBR and EMF calculations were considered for activation analysis. Activation simulations were executed with 50 years of irradiation and 300 years of cooling. It was discovered that bismuth is a poor choice due to achieving the highest decay heat, contact dose rates, and accident doses. In addition, it does not meet the waste disposal ratings (WDR). The straightforward approach to obtain Monte Carlo TBR and EMF results required 231 simulations per alloy and became computationally expensive, time consuming, and inefficient. Consequently, alternate methods were pursued. A collision history-based methodology recently developed for the Monte Carlo code Serpent, calculates perturbation effects on practically

  20. Phase IIC experiments of the USDOE/JAERI collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, M.Z.

    1992-12-01

    Effort in Phase IIC of the US/JAERI Collaborative Program on Fusion Neutronics was focused on performing integral experiments and post analyses on blankets that include the actual heterogeneities found in several blanket designs. Two geometrical arrangements were considered for the blanket assembly, namely multi-layers of Li 2 O and beryllium in an edge-on, horizontally alternating configuration for a front depth of 30 cm, followed by the Li 2 O breeding zone (Be edge-on, BEO, experiment), and vertical water coolant channels arrangement (WCC experiment). The objectives are to examine the accuracy of predicting tritium production. In the BEO system, it was shown that, with the zonal method to measure tritium production from natural lithium (Tn), the calculated-to-measured values (C/E) are 0.95-1.05 (JAERI) and 0.98-0.9 (U.S.), which is consistent with the results obtained in other Phases of the Program (Phases IIA and IIb)). In the WCC experiment, there is a noticeable change in C/E values for T 6 near the coolant channels where steep gradients in T 6 production are observed. The C/E values obtained with the Li-foil detectors are on the average closer to unity than those obtained by the Li-glass method. As for T 7 , the values obtained by NE213 method are within ±15% in JAERI's calculations, but larger values (∼20-25%) are obtained in the U.S. calculations due to the differences of cross-sections data files. Around heterogeneities, the prediction accuracy for T 7 is better than for T 6 . (J.P.N.)

  1. Basic principles of lead and lead-bismuth eutectic application in blanket of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Pinaev, S.S.; Muraviev, E.V.; Romanov, P.V.

    2005-01-01

    High magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop is an important issue for liquid metal blanket concepts. To decrease magnetohydrodynamic resistance authors propose to form insulating coatings on internal surface of blanket ducts at any moment of fusion reactor exploitation. It may be achieved easily if lead or lead-bismuth eutectic is used and technology of oxidative potential handling is applied. A number of experiments carried out in NNSTU show the availability of the proposed technology. It bases on formation of the insulating coatings that consist of the oxides of components of the structural materials and of the coolant components. In-situ value of the insulating coatings characteristics ρδ is ∼ 10 -5 Ohm·m 2 for steels and 5,0x10 -6 - 5,0x10 -5 Ohm·m 2 for vanadium alloys. Thermal cycling is possible during exploitation of a blanket. The experimental research of the insulating coatings properties during thermal cycling have shown that the coatings formed into the lead and lead-bismuth coolants save there insulating properties. Experience of many years is an undoubted advantage of the lead-bismuth coolant and less of the lead coolant in comparison with lithium. Russian Federation possesses of experience of exploitation of the research and industrial facilities, of experience of creation of the pumps, steamgenerators and equipment with heavy liquid metal coolants. The unique experience of designing, assembling and exploitation of the fission reactors with lead-bismuth coolant is also available. The problem of technology of lead and lead-bismuth coolants for power high temperature radioactive facilities has been solved. Accidents, emergency situations such as leakage of steamgenerators or depressurization of gas system in facilities with lead and lead-bismuth coolants have been explored and suppressed. (author)

  2. Thermal analysis of a high-temperature falling bed fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaz, J.F.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    A high temperature, falling bed blanket has been designed for a tokamak fusion reactor. The design centers on the use of a gravity flow of 0.5 to 1.5 cm diameter Al 2 O 3 balls as the high temperature heat transfer media. This system has the advantage of being able to produce process heat at temperatures in excess of 1000 0 C while maintaining structural temperatures at approximately 400 0 C. Pumping powers for the system are low. A thermal hydraulic analysis of a representative blanket module has, however, identified several potential problem areas. The most important of these is the fact that unless steps are taken to avoid it, as much as 40% of the total power deposited in the high temperature bed is extracted as low temperature heat through the active cooling of the structural shell of the duct channeling falling ceramic balls. The use of more insulating liner bricks was explored and rejected due to the excessively high temperatures that resulted in these bricks. Velocity partitioning of the falling balls appears to be the most promising method for reducing the loss of energy to the actively cooled structure

  3. Design of the segment structure and coolant ducts for a fusion reactor blanket and shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briaris, D.A.; Stanbridge, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    An outline design and analysis of a support structure for the replaceable first wall of a helium cooled fusion reactor blanket has been undertaken. The proposed structure supports all the segment gravitational loads with maximum deflections limited to < 10 mm, and is itself supported off the outer shield by a simple vee-in-groove arrangement. It is a feature of the design that the coaxial coolant pipes and the segment structure operate at the same temperature, making it possible for them to be integrated, thereby avoiding the necessity for pipe bellows. The requirements of cooling the inner arm of the structure and increasing the major radius of the torus by approximately = 0.5 m, have been identified as problems associated with the 'horseshoe' shaped structure applicable to the reactor with divertor. For a ring structure, i.e. reactor without divertor, these problems do not arise. (author)

  4. Development of an engineering-scale nuclear test of a solid-breeder fusion-blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Bohn, T.S.; Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Scott, A.J.; Watts, K.D.; Welch, E.C.

    1983-08-01

    As part of the Phase I effort on Program Element-II (PE-II) of the Office of Fusion Energy/Argonne National Laboratory First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program, a study has been performed to develop preconceptual hardware designs and preliminary test program descriptions for two fission-reactor-based tests of a water-cooled, solid-breeder fusion reactor blanket concept. First, a list of potentially acceptable reactor facilities is developed, based on a list of required reactor characteristics. From this set of facilities, two facilities are selected for study: the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the Power Burst Facility (PBF). A test which employs a cylindrical unit cell of a solid-breeder fusion reactor blanket, with pressurized-water cooling is designed for each facility. The test design is adjusted to the particular characteristics of each reactor. These two test designs are then compared on the basis of technical issues and cost. Both tests can satisfy the PE-II mission: blanket thermal hydraulic and thermomechanical issues. In addition, both reactors will produce prototypical tritium production rates and profiles and release characteristics with little or no additional modifications

  5. Collection of Summaries of reports on result of research at basic experiment device for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The development of nuclear fusion reactors reached such stage that the generation of fusion power output comparable with the input power into core plasma is possible. At present, the engineering design of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor, ITER, is advanced by the cooperation of Japan, USA, Europe and Russia, aiming at the start of operation at the beginning of 21st century. This meeting for reporting the results has been held every year, and this time, it was held on May 19, 1995 at University of Tokyo with the theme ''The interface properties of fusion reactor materials and the control of particle transport''. About 50 participants from academic, governmental and industrial circles discussed actively on the theme. Three lectures on the topics of fusion reactor engineering and materials and seven lectures on the basic experiment of fusion reactor blanket design related to the next period project were given at the meeting. (K.I.)

  6. Optimization of seed-blanket type fuel assembly for reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelley, Afroza; Shimada, Shoichiro; Kugo, Teruhiko; Okubo, Tsutomu E-mail: okubo@hems.jaeri.go.jp; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2003-10-01

    Parametric studies have been performed for a PWR-type reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) with the seed-blanket type fuel assembles to achieve a high conversion ratio, negative void reactivity coefficient and a high burnup by using MOX fuel. From the viewpoint of reactor safety analysis, the fuel temperature coefficients were also studied. From the result of the burnup calculation, it has been seen that ratio of 40-50% of outer blanket in a seed-blanket assembly gives higher conversion ratio compared to the other combination of seed-blanket assembly. And the recommended number of (seed+blanket) layers is 20, in which the number of seed (S) layers is 15 (S15) and blanket (B) layers is 5 (B5). It was found that the conversion ratio of seed-blanket assembly decreases, when they are arranged looks like a flower shape (Hanagara). By the optimization of different parameters, S15B5 fuel assembly with the height of seed of 1000 mmx2, internal blanket of 150 mm and axial blanket of 400 mmx2 is recommended for a reactor of high conversion ratio. In this assembly, the gap of seed fuel rod is 1.0 mm and blanket fuel rod is 0.4 mm. In S15B5 assembly, the conversion ratio is 1.0 and the burnup is 38.18 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket+outer blanket) region. However, the burnup is 57.45 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket) region. The cycle length of the core is 16.46 effective full power in month (EFPM) by six batches and the enrichment of fissile Pu is 14.64 wt.%. The void coefficient is +21.82 pcm/%void, however, it is expected that the void coefficient will be negative if the radial neutron leakage is taken into account in the calculation. It is also possible to use S15B5 fuel assembly as a high burnup reactor 45 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket+outer blanket) region, however, it is necessary to decrease the height of seed to 500 mmx2 to improve the void coefficient. In this reactor, the conversion ratio is 0.97 and void coefficient is +20.81 pcm/%void. The fuel temperature

  7. Effective Thermal Property Estimation of Unitary Pebble Beds Based on a CFD-DEM Coupled Method for a Fusion Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Chen, Youhua; Huang, Kai; Liu, Songlin

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ceramic pebble beds have been considered in the solid blanket design for fusion reactors. To characterize the fusion solid blanket thermal performance, studies of the effective thermal properties, i.e. the effective thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient, of the pebble beds are necessary. In this paper, a 3D computational fluid dynamics discrete element method (CFD-DEM) coupled numerical model was proposed to simulate heat transfer and thereby estimate the effective thermal properties. The DEM was applied to produce a geometric topology of a prototypical blanket pebble bed by directly simulating the contact state of each individual particle using basic interaction laws. Based on this geometric topology, a CFD model was built to analyze the temperature distribution and obtain the effective thermal properties. The current numerical model was shown to be in good agreement with the existing experimental data for effective thermal conductivity available in the literature. supported by National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2015GB108002, 2014GB122000 and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  8. Phase IIA and IIB experiments of JAERI/U.S.DOE collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio

    1989-12-01

    Phase IIA and IIB experiments on fusion blanket neutronics has been performed on a basis of JAERI/USDOE collaborative program. In the Phase II experimental series, a D-T neutron source and a test blanket were contained by a lithium-carbonate enclosure to adjust the incident neutron spectrum to the test blanket so as to simulate that of a fusion reactor. First two series of the Phase II, IIA and IIB, focused especially on influences of beryllium configurations for neutron multiplying zone to neutronic parameters. Measured parameters were tritium production rate using Li-glass and NE213 scintillators, and Li-metal foil and Lithium-oxide block with liquid scintillation technique; neutron spectrum using NE213 scintillator and proton recoil proportional counter; reaction rate using foil activation technique. These parameters were compared among six different beryllium configurations of the experimental system. Consistency between different techniques for each measured parameter was also tested among different experimental systems and confirmed to be within experimental errors. This report describes, in detail, experimental conditions, assemblies, equipments and neutron source in Part I. The part II compiles all information required for a calculational analysis of this experiment, e.g., dimensions of the target room, target assembly, experimental assembly, their material densities and numerical data of experimental results. This compilation provides benchmark data to test calculation models and computing code systems used for a nuclear design of a fusion reactor. (author)

  9. US blanket technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental research in US programs related to blanket technology is described through brief summaries of the objectives, facilities, recent experimental results and principal investigators for the Blanket Technology Program, TRIO-1 Experiment, TSTA, Fusion Hybrid Program and selected activities in the Fusion Materials and Fusion Safety Programs in neutronics research

  10. Conceptual design of the blanket and superheater in compact fusion advanced Rankine cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Suetomi, Eiichi; Okamoto, Makoto (Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. of Nuclear Reactor); Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi (Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy); Suzuki, Tadashi (National Research Inst. for Metals, Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Lab.); Logan, B.G.; Maninger, C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-05-01

    In reactor concepts using the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine Cycle (CFAR), the mercury works as a coolant and starts to boil in the vicinity of the inlet of the tritium breeding zone, and fully vaporizes at the exist. The vaporized mercury is then superheated in the neutron superheating zone, after which it is subjected to further microwave superheating. Finally it generates electricity directly by a MHD generator. In the preliminary design, the Flibe and beryllium are charged in the tritium breeding zone. Though this design gave marginal results with excellent neutron multiplication ability of the beryllium, the cycle efficiency is still not satisfactory and other blanket concepts need to be studied. In the present design, the lithium-lead eutectic is proposed. Since the Q-value for neutron multiplication reaction of the lead is much more negative than the beryllium, less heat is produced in the tritium breeding zone. This means less mercury is required to cool this zone, and the final temperature of the mercury and the MHD efficiency could be increased. We performed parametric design studies for this concept to increase the plant efficiency under the condition that the tritium breeding ratio satisfies the planned value by utilizing the ANISN neutron transport code. (orig.).

  11. Breeding blanket design for ITER and prototype (DEMO) fusion reactors and breeding materials issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsu, H.; Enoeda, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Current status of the designs of the ITER breeding blanket and DEMO blankets is introduced placing emphasis on the breeding materials selection and related issues. The former design is based on the up-to-date design activities, as of October 1997, being performed jointly by Joint Central Team (JCT) and Home Teams (HT`s), while the latter is based on the DEMO blanket test module designs being proposed by each Party at the TBWG (Test Blanket Working Group) meetings. (J.P.N.)

  12. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for the tritium breeding ratio of a DEMO fusion reactor with a helium cooled pebble bed blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnenmann, Elena; Fischer, Ulrich; Stieglitz, Robert

    2017-09-01

    An uncertainty analysis was performed for the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of a fusion power plant of the European DEMO type using the MCSEN patch to the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The breeding blanket was of the type Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB), currently under development in the European Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) programme for a fusion power demonstration reactor (DEMO). A suitable 3D model of the DEMO reactor with HCPB blanket modules, as routinely used for blanket design calculations, was employed. The nuclear cross-section data were taken from the JEFF-3.2 data library. For the uncertainty analysis, the isotopes H-1, Li-6, Li-7, Be-9, O-16, Si-28, Si-29, Si-30, Cr-52, Fe-54, Fe-56, Ni-58, W-182, W-183, W-184 and W-186 were considered. The covariance data were taken from JEFF-3.2 where available. Otherwise a combination of FENDL-2.1 for Li-7, EFF-3 for Be-9 and JENDL-3.2 for O-16 were compared with data from TENDL-2014. Another comparison was performed with covariance data from JEFF-3.3T1. The analyses show an overall uncertainty of ± 3.2% for the TBR when using JEFF-3.2 covariance data with the mentioned additions. When using TENDL-2014 covariance data as replacement, the uncertainty increases to ± 8.6%. For JEFF-3.3T1 the uncertainty result is ± 5.6%. The uncertainty is dominated by O-16, Li-6 and Li-7 cross-sections.

  13. Functional model and general principles of structural materials selection for fusion tokamak reactor first wall and blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinokurov, V.F.; Glukhikh, V.A.; Gorynin, I.V.; Kazantsev, A.N.; Parshin, A.M.; Saksaganskij, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The functional mathematical model of the most energy-stressed components of the reactor (the first wall and blanket) is developed. This model is the basis for the quantitative estimate of various concepts and design options from promise view points, physical and technological requirements may be formulated in general and limiting properties may be found. In this way the first wall and blanket may be directly introduced within the framework of multi-parametric system analysis and fusion reactor optimization. The concept of base structure is suggested as a generalized representation of ''the first-wall-blanket structure'' and its functions. A set of structural, thermophysical and hydraulic parameters is introduced to describe the base structure. The calculated model is presented, permitting by variation of structural and physical parameters to determine technical and economic reactor parameters as the functions of plasma parameters and structural material properties. The mechanisms of fusion reactor destructive effects on structural materials characteristics are analyzed. Comparative estimates of promising steels and alloys of various classes and modifications are given. The effect of neutron irradiation dose and temperature on strength, plasticity and swelling of materials and their compatibility with gas and liquid metal coolants are shown. Structural, physical and technological methods to improve operating characteristics and to raise radiation material resistance are discussed. (author). 7 refs, 11 figs, 2 tabs

  14. A scoping nucleonics study for fusion high-temperature blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1983-01-01

    A scoping study was performed to explore tritium breeding and energy-temperature splits in various blanket concepts for high-temperature process heat. Temperature limits for the lithium materials necessitate two blanket zones. One delivers heat at moderate temperatures ( 0 C) and breeds tritium. The other is a nonbreeding zone that produces heat at high temperatures. It is found that a system where all blanket modules breed tritium delivers more high-temperature heat than one where only some of the blanket modules produce tritium. Of those considered, a design where the high-temperature zone is placed between two breeding zones produces the highest fraction of high-temperature heat. When liquid lithium, Li 7 Pb 2 and Li 2 O tritium breeding materials are employed with two breeding zones, a tritium breeding ratio of 1.1 can be achieved while delivering 30 to 40% of the blanket heat at high temperature

  15. A preliminary study of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ohnishi, M.; Yamamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Key issues on a D-T Tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket concept using CFAB (Compact Fusion Advanced Brayton) cycle are presented. Although the previously proposed and studied compact fusion advanced Rankine cycle using mercury liquid metal has shown, in general, excellent performance characteristics in extracting energy and electricity with high efficiency by the {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} nonequilibrium MHD disk generator, and in enhancing safety potential, there was a fear about uses of hazardous mercury as primary coolant as well as its limited natural resources. To overcome these disadvantages while retaining the advantage features of a ultra-high temperature coolant inherent in the synchrotron energy-enhanced D-T tokamak reactor, a compact fusion advanced Brayton cycle using helium was reexamined which was once considered relatively not superior in the CFAR study, at the expense of high, but acceptable circulation power, lower heat transfer characteristics, and probably of a little bit reduced safety.

  16. Extensive neutronic sensitivity-uncertainty analysis of a fusion reactor shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogenbirk, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of an extensive neutronic sensitivity-uncertainty study performed for the design of a shielding blanket for a next-step fusion reactor, such as ITER. A code system was used, which was developed at ECN Petten. The uncertainty in an important response parameter, the neutron heating in the inboard superconducting coils, was evaluated. Neutron transport calculations in the 100 neutron group GAM-II structure were performed using the code ANISN. For the sensitivity and uncertainty calculations the code SUSD was used. Uncertainties due to cross-section uncertainties were taken into account as well as uncertainties due to uncertainties in energy and angular distributions of scattered neutrons (SED and SAD uncertainties, respectively). The subject of direct-term uncertainties (i.e. uncertainties due to uncertainties in the kerma factors of the superconducting coils) is briefly touched upon. It is shown that SAD uncertainties, which have been largely neglected until now, contribute significantly to the total uncertainty. Moreover, the contribution of direct-term uncertainties may be large. The total uncertainty in the neutron heating, only due to Fe cross-sections, amounts to approximately 25%, which is rather large. However, uncertainty data are scarce and the data may very well be conservative. It is shown in this paper that with the code system used, sensitivity and uncertainty calculations can be performed in a straightforward way. Therefore, it is suggested that emphasis is now put on the generation of realistic, reliable covariance data for cross-sections as well as for angular and energy distributions. ((orig.))

  17. Characterization of the effects of continuous salt processing on the performance of molten salt fusion breeder blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Davidson, J. W.; Klein, D. E.; Lee, J. D.

    1985-12-01

    Several continuous salt processing options are available for use in molten salt fusion breeder blanket designs: fluorination only, fluorination plus reductive extraction, and fluorination, plus reductive extraction, plus metal transfer. The effects of processing on blanket performance have been assessed for these three levels of processing and various equilibrium uranium concentrations in the salt. A one-dimensional model of the blanket was used in the neutronics analysis, which incorporated transport calculations with time-dependent isotope generation and depletion calculations. The method of salt processing was found to have little affect on the level of radioactivity, toxicity, or the thermal behavior of the salt during operation of the reactor. The processing rates necessary to maintain the desired uranium concentrations in the suppressed-fission environment were quite low, which permitted only long-lived species to be removed from the salt. The effects of the processing therefore became apparent only after the radioactivity due to the short-lived species diminished. The effects of the additional processing (reductive extraction and metal transfer) could be seen after approximately 1 year of decay, but were not significant at times closer to shutdown. The reduced radioactivity and corresponding heat deposition were thus of no consequence in accident or maintenance situations. Net fissile production in the Be/MS blanket concept at a fusion power level of 3000 MW at 70% capacity ranged from 5100 kg/year to 5170 kg/year for uranium concentrations of 0.11% and 1.0%233U in thorium, respectively, with fluorination-only processing. The addition of processing by reductive extraction resulted in 5125 kg/year for the 0.11%233U case and 5225 kg/year for the 1.0%233U case.

  18. Neutronic calculation and cross section sensitivity analysis of the Livermore mirror fusion/fission hybrid reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, L.P.; Price, W.G. Jr.

    1977-08-01

    The neutronic calculation for the Livermore mirror fusion/fission hybrid reactor blanket was performed using the PPPL cross section library. Significant differences were found in the tritium breeding and plutonium production in comparison to the results of the LLL calculation. The cross section sensitivity study for tritium breeding indicates that the response is sensitive to the cross section of 238 U in the neighborhood of 14 MeV and 1 MeV. The response is also sensitive to the cross sections of iron in the vicinity of 14 MeV near the first wall. Neutron transport in the resonance region is not important in this reactor model

  19. Initial progress in the first wall, blanket, and shield Engineering Test Program for magnetically confined fusion-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, H.; Baker, C.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1981-10-01

    The first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program (ETP) progressed from the planning stage into implementation during July, 1981. The program, generic in nature, comprises four Test Program Elements (TPE's), the emphasis of which is on defining the performance parameters for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) and the major fusion device to follow FED. These elements are: (1) nonnuclear thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing of first wall and component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads and heat transient (i.e., plasma disruption) effects; (2) nonnuclear and nuclear testing of FW/B/S components and assemblies with emphasis on bulk (nuclear) heating effects, integrated FW/B/S hydraulics and mechanics, blanket coolant system transients, and nuclear benchmarks; (3) FW/B/S electromagnetic and eddy current effects testing, including pulsed field penetration, torque and force restraint, electromagnetic materials, liquid metal MHD effects and the like; and (4) FW/B/S Assembly, Maintenance and Repair (AMR) studies focusing on generic AMR criteria, with the objective of preparing an AMR designers guidebook; also, development of rapid remote assembly/disassembly joint system technology, leak detection and remote handling methods

  20. Initial progress in the first wall, blanket, and shield Engineering Test Program for magnetically confined fusion-power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, H.; Baker, C.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1981-10-01

    The first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program (ETP) progressed from the planning stage into implementation during July, 1981. The program, generic in nature, comprises four Test Program Elements (TPE's), the emphasis of which is on defining the performance parameters for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) and the major fusion device to follow FED. These elements are: (1) nonnuclear thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing of first wall and component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads and heat transient (i.e., plasma disruption) effects; (2) nonnuclear and nuclear testing of FW/B/S components and assemblies with emphasis on bulk (nuclear) heating effects, integrated FW/B/S hydraulics and mechanics, blanket coolant system transients, and nuclear benchmarks; (3) FW/B/S electromagnetic and eddy current effects testing, including pulsed field penetration, torque and force restraint, electromagnetic materials, liquid metal MHD effects and the like; and (4) FW/B/S Assembly, Maintenance and Repair (AMR) studies focusing on generic AMR criteria, with the objective of preparing an AMR designers guidebook; also, development of rapid remote assembly/disassembly joint system technology, leak detection and remote handling methods.

  1. Swiss fusion blanket experiments: Final report, November 1, 1985-October 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The major thrust of this project related to the effort to transfer the Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) to the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the Swiss Institute of Technology at Lausanne, and to the subsequent support with analytical calculations of a variety of experiments performed with the LBM. 12 refs

  2. Blanket and vacuum vessel design of the next tokamak. (Swimming pool type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, H.; Minato, A.; Kitamura, K.

    1983-01-01

    The structural design study of a reactor module for a swimming pool type reactor (SPTR) was conducted. Since pool water plays the role of radiation shielding in the SPTR, the module does not have a solid shield. It consists of tritium breeding blankets, divertor collector plates and a vacuum vessel. The object of this study is to show the reactor module design which has a simple structure and a sufficient tritium breeding ratio. A large coverage of the plasma chamber surface with tritium breeding blanket is essential in order to obtain a high tritium breeding ratio. A breeding blanket is also placed behind the divertor collector plate, i.e. in the upper and lower region, as well as in the outboard and inboard regions of the module. A concept in which the first wall is an integral part of the blanket is employed to minimize the thickness of structural and cooling material brazed in front of the breeding material (Li 2 O) and to enhance the tritium breeding capability. In order to simplify the module structure the vacuum vessel and breeding blanket is also integrated in the inboard region. One of the features inherent in the swimming pool type reactor is an additional external force on the vacuum vessel, namely hydraulic pressure. A detailed structural analysis of the vacuum vessel is performed. Divertor collector plates are assemblies of co-axial tubes. They minimize the electromagnetic force on the plate induced by the plasma disruption. A thermal and structural analysis and life time estimation of the first wall and divertor collector plates are performed. (author)

  3. Nuclear performance optimization of the Be/Li/Th blanket for the fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Bandini, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    More rigorous nuclear analysis, including treatment of resonance self-shielding effects coupled with an optimization procedure, has resulted in improved performance of the Be/Li/Th blanket. Net U-233 breeding ratio has increased 36% (to 0.84) while at an average U-233/Th ratio of 0.5 a/o average energy multiplication has increased only 12% (to 2.1) compared with earlier results

  4. Study of tritium removal from fusion reactor blankets of molten salt and lithium--aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.B.

    1976-03-01

    The sorption of tritium by molten lithium--bismuth (Li--Bi, approx. 15 at. % lithium) and solid equiatomic lithium--aluminum (Li--Al) was investigated experimentally to evaluate the potential applications of both materials in a controlled thermonuclear reactor. The Li--Bi alloy was proposed to countercurrently extract tritium from a molten salt (Li 2 BeF 4 ) blanket. However, because of the low solubility ( 0 C, the extraction process is not attractive

  5. Nuclear performance optimization of the Be/Li/Th blanket for the fusion breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D.; Bandini, B.R.

    1985-02-26

    More rigorous nuclear analysis, including treatment of resonance self-shielding effects coupled with an optimization procedure, has resulted in improved performance of the Be/Li/Th blanket. Net U-233 breeding ratio has increased 36% (to 0.84) while at an average U-233/Th ratio of 0.5 a/o average energy multiplication has increased only 12% (to 2.1) compared with earlier results.

  6. A new combination of membranes and membrane reactors for improved tritium management in breeder blanket of fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demange, D.; Staemmler, S.; Kind, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tritium used as fuel in future fusion machines will be produced within the breeder blanket. The tritium extraction system recovers the tritium to be routed into the inner-fuel cycle of the machine. Accurate and precise tritium accountancy between both systems is mandatory to ensure a reliable operation. Handling in the blanket huge helium flow rates containing tritium as traces in molecular and oxide forms is challenging both for the process and the accountancy. Alternative tritium processes based on combinations of membranes and membrane reactors are proposed to facilitate the tritium management. The PERMCAT process is based on counter-current isotope swamping in a palladium membrane reactor. It allows recovering tritium efficiently from any chemical species. It produces a pure hydrogen stream enriched in tritium of advantage for integration upstream of the accountancy stage. A pre-separation and pre-concentration stage using new zeolite membranes has been studied to optimize the whole process. Such a combination could improve the tritium processes and facilitate accountancy in DEMO.

  7. Study of tritium removal from fusion reactor blankets of molten salt and lithium--aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.B.

    1976-03-01

    The sorption of tritium by molten lithium--bismuth (Li--Bi, approximately 15 at. percent lithium) and solid equiatomic lithium--aluminum (Li--Al) was investigated experimentally to evaluate the potential applications of both materials in a controlled thermonuclear reactor. The Li--Bi alloy was proposed to countercurrently extract tritium from a molten salt (Li 2 BeF 4 ) blanket. However, because of the low solubility (less than 10 ppb) at temperatures ranging from 500 to 700 0 C, the extraction process is not attractive

  8. Analysis of in-situ tritium recovery from solid fusion-reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Jankus, V.Z.; Rest, J.

    1980-01-01

    The proposed concept for in-situ tritium recovery from the STARFIRE blanket involves circulation of a low pressure (approx. 0.05 MPa) helium through formed channels in the highly porous solid breeding material. Tritium generated within the grains must diffuse to the grain boundaries, migrate through the grain boundaries to the particle surface and then percolate through the packed bed to the helium purge channel. Highly porous α-LiAlO 2 with a bimodal pore distribution is proposed for the breeding material to facilitate the tritium release

  9. Study of tritium removal from fusion reactor blankets of molten salt and lithium--aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, J.B

    1976-03-01

    The sorption of tritium by molten lithium--bismuth (Li--Bi, approx. 15 at. % lithium) and solid equiatomic lithium--aluminum (Li--Al) was investigated experimentally to evaluate the potential applications of both materials in a controlled thermonuclear reactor. The Li--Bi alloy was proposed to countercurrently extract tritium from a molten salt (Li/sub 2/BeF/sub 4/) blanket. However, because of the low solubility (< 10 ppB) at temperature ranging from 500 to 700/sup 0/C, the extraction process is not attractive.

  10. Tritium Breeding Blanket for a Commercial Fusion Power Plant - A System Engineering Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Wayne R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-04-14

    The goal of developing a new source of electric power based on fusion has been pursued for decades. If successful, future fusion power plants will help meet growing world-wide demand for electric power. A key feature and selling point for fusion is that its fuel supply is widely distributed globally and virtually inexhaustible. Current world-wide research on fusion energy is focused on the deuterium-tritium (DT for short) fusion reaction since it will be the easiest to achieve in terms of the conditions (e.g., temperature, density and confinement time of the DT fuel) required to produce net energy. Over the past decades countless studies have examined various concepts for TBBs for both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). At this time, the key organizations involved are government sponsored research organizations world-wide. The near-term focus of the MFE community is on the development of TBB mock-ups to be tested on the ITER tokamak currently under construction in Caderache France. TBB concepts for IFE tend to be different from MFE primarily due to significantly different operating conditions and constraints. This report focuses on longer-term commercial power plants where the key stakeholders include: electric utilities, plant owner and operator, manufacturer, regulators, utility customers, and in-plant subsystems including the heat transfer and conversion systems, fuel processing system, plant safety systems, and the monitoring control systems.

  11. The neutronics studies of a fusion fission hybrid reactor using pressure tube blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Youqi; Zu Tiejun; Wu Hongchun; Cao Liangzhi; Yang Chao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a fusion fission hybrid reactor used for energy producing is proposed based on the situation of nuclear power in China. The pressurized light water is applied as the coolant. The fuel assemblies are loaded in the pressure tubes with a modular type structure. The neutronics analysis is performed to get the suitable design and prove the feasibility. The energy multiplication and tritium self-sustaining are evaluated. The neutron load is also cared. From different candidates, the PWR spent fuel is selected as the feed fuel. The results show that the hybrid reactor can meet the expected reactor core lifetime of 5 years with 1000 MWe power output. Two ways are discussed including burning the discharged PWR spent fuel and burning the reprocessed plutonium. The energy multiplication is big enough and the tritium can be self-sustaining for both of the two ways. The neutron wall load in the operating time is kept smaller than the one of ITER. The way to use the reprocessed plutonium brings low neutron wall load, but also brings additional difficulties in operating the hybrid reactor. The way to use the discharged spent fuel is proposed to be a better choice currently.

  12. An induction-based magnetohydrodynamic 3D code for finite magnetic Reynolds number liquid-metal flows in fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawczynski, Charlie; Smolentsev, Sergey, E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu; Abdou, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A new induction-based magnetohydrodynamic code was developed using a finite difference method. • The code was benchmarked against purely hydrodynamic and MHD flows for low and finite magnetic Reynolds number. • Possible applications of the new code include liquid-metal MHD flows in the breeder blanket during unsteady events in the plasma. - Abstract: Most numerical analysis performed in the past for MHD flows in liquid-metal blankets were based on the assumption of low magnetic Reynolds number and involved numerical codes that utilized electric potential as the main electromagnetic variable. One limitation of this approach is that such codes cannot be applied to truly unsteady processes, for example, MHD flows of liquid-metal breeder/coolant during unsteady events in plasma, such as major plasma disruptions, edge-localized modes and vertical displacements, when changes in plasmas occur at millisecond timescales. Our newly developed code MOONS (Magnetohydrodynamic Object-Oriented Numerical Solver) uses the magnetic field as the main electromagnetic variable to relax the limitations of the low magnetic Reynolds number approximation for more realistic fusion reactor environments. The new code, written in Fortran, implements a 3D finite-difference method and is capable of simulating multi-material domains. The constrained transport method was implemented to evolve the magnetic field in time and assure that the magnetic field remains solenoidal within machine accuracy at every time step. Various verification tests have been performed including purely hydrodynamic flows and MHD flows at low and finite magnetic Reynolds numbers. Test results have demonstrated very good accuracy against known analytic solutions and other numerical data.

  13. Novel blanket design for ICTR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Conn, R.W.; Wolfer, W.G.; Larsen, E.N.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1978-01-01

    A novel blanket design for ICTRs is described. This blanket is used in SOLASE, the conceptual laser fusion reactor of the University of Wisconsin. The blanket to be described offers numerous advantages, including low cost, low weight, low induced radioactivity levels, the potential for hands-on maintenance, modular construction, low pressure, ability to decouple first wall and blanket coolant temperatures, adequate breeding, low tritium inventory and leakage, and sufficiently long life

  14. Oxidation/volatilization rates in air for candidate fusion reactor blanket materials, PCA and HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Kraus, H.G.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Jones, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Large uncertainties exist in the quantity of neutron-induced activation products that can be mobilized in potential fusion accidents. The accidental combination of high temperatures and oxidizing conditions might lead to mobilization of a significant amount of activation products from structural materials. Here, the volatilization of constituents of PCA and HT-9 resulting from oxidation in air was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 600 to 1300 0 C for 1, 5, or 20 hours. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy. Molybdenum and manganese were the radiologically significant primary constituents most volatilized, suggesting that molybdenum and manganese should be minimized in fusion steel compositions. Higher chromium content appears beneficial in reducing hazards from mobile activation products. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the oxide layer on samples

  15. Mechanical properties of materials in fusion reactor first-wall and blanket systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    With respect to the effects of irradiation on mechanical properties, the most significant difference between fast fission and fusion reactor spectra is the relatively large amount of helium produced by (n,..cap alpha..) transmutations in the latter. Relevant information on the effects of large amounts of helium (with concomitant displacement damage) comes from irradiation of alloys containing nickel in mixed spectrum reactors. At helium levels of interest for fusion reactor development, properties are degraded to unacceptable levels above Tm/2. Below this temperature, strength and ductility are retained and fractures remain transgranular. Importantly, the properties remain sensitive to composition and structure. A comparison of the response of bcc refractory alloys to that of stainless steel at equivalent damage levels shows the same general trends in properties with homologous temperature. The refractory alloys do offer potential for higher temperature applications because of their melting temperatures.

  16. Mechanical properties of materials in fusion reactor first-wall and blanket systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    With respect to the effects of irradiation on mechanical properties, the most significant difference between fast fission and fusion reactor spectra is the relatively large amount of helium produced by (n,α) transmutations in the latter. Relevant information on the effects of large amounts of helium (with concomitant displacement damage) comes from irradiation of alloys containing nickel in mixed spectrum reactors. At helium levels of interest for fusion reactor development, properties are degraded to unacceptable levels above Tm/2. Below this temperature, strength and ductility are retained and fractures remain transgranular. Importantly, the properties remain sensitive to composition and structure. A comparison of the response of bcc refractory alloys to that of stainless steel at equivalent damage levels shows the same general trends in properties with homologous temperature. The refractory alloys do offer potential for higher temperature applications because of their melting temperatures

  17. Self-consistent Analysis of a Blanket and Shielding of a Fusion Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk Kwon; Hong, B. G.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. O.

    2008-01-01

    To develop the concept of a DEMO reactor, a tokamak reactor system analysis code has been developed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The system analysis code incorporates prospects of the development of plasma physics and the technologies in a simple mathematical model and it helps to develop the concept of a fusion reactor and to identify the necessary R and D areas for a realization of the concept. In the system code, a plant power balance equation and a plasma power balance equation are solved to find plant parameters which satisfy the plasma physics and technology constraints, simultaneously. The outcome of the system analysis is to identify which areas of plasma physics and technologies and to what extent they should be developed for a realization of given fusion reactor concepts

  18. Some initial considerations on the suitability of Ferritic/ martensitic stainless steels as first wall and blanket materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    The constitution of stainless iron alloys and the characteristic properties of alloys in the main ferritic, martensitic and austenitic groups are discussed. A comparison of published data on the mechanical, thermal and irradiation properties of typical austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels shows that alloys in the latter groups have certain advantages for fusion applications. The ferromagnetism exhibited by martensitic and ferritic alloys has, however, been identified as a potentially serious obstacle to their utilisation in magnetic confinement devices. The paper describes measurements performed in other laboratories on the magnetic properties of two representative martensitic alloys 12Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2Mo. These observations show that a modest bias magnetic field of magnitude 1 - 2 tesla induces a state of magnetic saturation in these materials. They would thus behave as essentially paramagnetic materials having a relative permeability close to unity when saturated by the toroidal field of a tokamak reactor. The results of computations by the General Atomic research group to assess the implications of such magnetic behaviour on reactor design and operation are presented. The results so far indicate that the ferromagnetism of martensitic/ferritic steels would not represent a major obstacle to their utilisation as first wall or blanket materials. (author)

  19. First wall/blanket/shield design and power conversion for the ARIES-IV tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.Z.; Conn, R.W.; Najmabadi, F.

    1994-01-01

    ARIES-IV is a conceptual, D-T burning, steady-state tokamak fusion reactor producing 1000 MWe net. It operates in the second plasma stability regime. The structural material is SiC composite and the primary coolant is helium at 10 MPa base pressure. The coolant flows poloidally in two loops, one inboard and one outboard. The coolant channels are circular tubes that form shells and are placed between two purge plates; the space between two adjacent tubes and the plate is purge gas flow area. The solid breeder is Li 2 O, and Be is used as neutron multiplier to ensure adequate TBR. Beryllium and Li 2 O are placed in between the adjacent tube shells. A computer code was developed to perform and optimize thermal-hydraulic design. Minimization of blanket thickness and the amount of Be, and the maximization of breeder zone thickness were done by iteration with neutronics. The gross thermal efficiency is 49%. The cost of electricity is 68 mills/kWh. The use of low activation SiC composite as the structural material, Li 2 O as the solid breeder, and avoidance of tungsten in the divertor has resulted in a good safety performance, and LSA rating of 1. Overall, SiC/He/Li 2 O ARIES-IV design is expected to have attractive economic and safety advantages

  20. Dual coolant blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Schleisiek, K.

    1994-11-01

    A self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket with helium-cooled first wall ('Dual Coolant Blanket Concept') for a fusion DEMO reactor is described. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. Described are the design of the blankets including the ancillary loop system and the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, compatibility and purification of lead-lithium, tritium control, safety, reliability, and electrically insulating coatings. The remaining open questions and the required R and D programme are identified. (orig.) [de

  1. Thermo-mechanical Modelling of Pebble Beds in Fusion Blankets and its Implementation by a Return-Mapping Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Yixiang; Kamlah, Marc

    2008-01-01

    In this investigation, a thermo-mechanical model of pebble beds is adopted and developed based on experiments by Dr. Reimann at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK). The framework of the present material model is composed of a non-linear elastic law, the Drucker-Prager-Cap theory, and a modified creep law. Furthermore, the volumetric inelastic strain dependent thermal conductivity of beryllium pebble beds is taken into account and full thermo-mechanical coupling is considered. Investigation showed that the Drucker-Prager-Cap model implemented in ABAQUS can not fulfill the requirements of both the prediction of large creep strains and the hardening behaviour caused by creep, which are of importance with respect to the application of pebble beds in fusion blankets. Therefore, UMAT (user defined material's mechanical behaviour) and UMATHT (user defined material's thermal behaviour) routines are used to re-implement the present thermo-mechanical model in ABAQUS. An elastic predictor radial return mapping algorithm is used to solve the non-associated plasticity iteratively, and a proper tangent stiffness matrix is obtained for cost-efficiency in the calculation. An explicit creep mechanism is adopted for the prediction of time-dependent behaviour in order to represent large creep strains in high temperature. Finally, the thermo-mechanical interactions are implemented in a UMATHT routine for the coupled analysis. The oedometric compression tests and creep tests of pebble beds at different temperatures are simulated with the help of the present UMAT and UMATHT routines, and the comparison between the simulation and the experiments is made. (authors)

  2. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume I. Summary, objectives and management. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This document defines a plan for conducting selected aspects of the engineering testing required for magnetic fusion reactor FWBS components and systems. The ultimate product of this program is an established data base that contributes to a functional, reliable, maintainable, economically attractive, and environmentally acceptable commercial fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield system. This program plan updates the initial plan issued in November of 1980 by the DOE/Office of Fusion Energy (unnumbered report). The plan consists of two parts. Part I is a summary of activities, responsibilities and program management including reporting and interfaces with other programs. Part II is a compilation of the Detailed Technical Plans for Phase I (1982 to 1984) developed by the participants during Phase 0 of the program

  3. Thermal analysis of a helium-cooled, tube-bank blanket module for a tandem mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    A blanket module concept for the central cell of a tandem mirror reactor is described which takes advantage of the excellent heat transfer and low pressure drop characteristics of tube banks in cross-flow. The blanket employs solid Li 2 O as the tritium breeding material and helium as the coolant. The lithium oxide is contained in tubes arranged within the submodules as a two-pass, cross-flow heat exchanger. Primarily, the heat transfer and thermal-hydraulic aspects of the blanket design study are described in this paper. In particular, the analytical model used for selection of the best tube-bank design parameters is discussed in some detail

  4. A conceptual composite blanket design for the Tokamak type of thermonuclear reactor incorporating thermoelectric pumping of liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta Gupta, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual liquid lithium blanket design for the tokamak type of thermonuclear reactor put forward is a modification of the initial simple but novel design concept enunciated earlier that exploits the availability of suitably oriented magnetic fields and temperature gradients within the blanket to pump the liquid as has been shown feasible by laboratory model experiments. The modular construction of the blanket cells is retained but the earlier simple back to back double spiralling channel module is replaced by a composite unit of three radially nested layer-structures to optimise heat and tritium extraction from the blanket. The layer-structure at the first wall generates liquid lithium circulation by thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic forces and the segregated double spiralling channels serve as inlet-outlet driving devices. The outermost layer-structure is cooled by helium. Liquid lithium in the intermediate layer-structure is pumped at a very slow rate. The choice of the relative dimensional proportions of the three layer-structure and the channel cross-section, material property and the spiralling contour is of critical importance for the design. This paper presents the design data for a conceptual design of such a blanket with a 5000 MW (th) rating. (author)

  5. Summary report of the IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear data for neutron multiplication in fusion-reactor first-wall and blanket materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pashchenko, A.B.

    1992-09-01

    The present Report contains the Summary of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for Neutron Multiplication in Fusion-Reactor First-Wall and Blanket Materials, which was hosted by the Southwest Institute of Nuclear physics and Chemistry (SWINPC) at Chengdu, China and held from 19-21 November 1990. This AGM was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS), with the cooperation and assistance of local organizers at the SWINPC. The papers which the participants prepared for and presented at the meeting will be published as an INDC report. (author)

  6. Safety and Environment aspects of Tokamak- type Fusion Power Reactor- An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Bharat; Reddy, D. Chenna

    2017-04-01

    Naturally occurring thermonuclear fusion reaction (of light atoms to form a heavier nucleus) in the sun and every star in the universe, releases incredible amounts of energy. Demonstrating the controlled and sustained reaction of deuterium-tritium plasma should enable the development of fusion as an energy source here on Earth. The promising fusion power reactors could be operated on the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle with fuel self-sufficiency. The potential impact of fusion power on the environment and the possible risks associated with operating large-scale fusion power plants is being studied by different countries. The results show that fusion can be a very safe and sustainable energy source. A fusion power plant possesses not only intrinsic advantages with respect to safety compared to other sources of energy, but also a negligible long term impact on the environment provided certain precautions are taken in its design. One of the important considerations is in the selection of low activation structural materials for reactor vessel. Selection of the materials for first wall and breeding blanket components is also important from safety issues. It is possible to fully benefit from the advantages of fusion energy if safety and environmental concerns are taken into account when considering the conceptual studies of a reactor design. The significant safety hazards are due to the tritium inventory and energetic neutron fluence induced activity in the reactor vessel, first wall components, blanket system etc. The potential of release of radioactivity under operational and accident conditions needs attention while designing the fusion reactor. Appropriate safety analysis for the quantification of the risk shall be done following different methods such as FFMEA (Functional Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability). Level of safety and safety classification such as nuclear safety and non-nuclear safety is very important for the FPR (Fusion

  7. Fusion energy for alternate applications: the design of a high temperature falling bed as a long-lived blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.; Stevens, H.C.; Hall, M.M.; Gohar, M.Y.A.; de Paz, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The high temperature falling bed conceptual design work has consisted of a coordinated effort in neutronics, materials science, thermal hydraulics and mechanical design. The neutronics work has been based on a one-dimensional transport analysis and has been used to scope the implication of blanket dimensions, breeding materials, ceramic pebble material and coolant choice on both tritium breeding capabilities and energy deposition into the high temperature region of the blanket. The materials science effort has concentrated on defining the selection of a particular ceramic material. The thermal hydraulic analysis has been concerned with sizing the heat transfer system and defining the temperature gradients in the high temperature blanket. The mechanical design work has evaluated how such a system might be constructed from the point of view of maintainability and structural support

  8. On the use of tin-lithium alloys as breeder material for blankets of fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuetterer, M.A.; Aiello, G.; Barbier, F.; Giancarli, L.; Poitevin, Y.; Sardain, P.; Szczepanski, J.; Li Puma, A.; Ruvutuso, G.; Vella, G.

    2000-01-01

    Tin-lithium alloys have several attractive thermo-physical properties, in particular high thermal conductivity and heat capacity, that make them potentially interesting candidates for use in liquid metal blankets. This paper presents an evaluation of the advantages and drawbacks caused by the substitution of the currently employed alloy lead-lithium (Pb-17Li) by a suitable tin-lithium alloy: (i) for the European water-cooled Pb-17Li (WCLL) blanket concept with reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel as the structural material; (ii) for the European self-cooled TAURO blanket with SiC f /SiC as the structural material. It was found that in none of these blankets Sn-Li alloys would lead to significant advantages, in particular due to the low tritium breeding capability. Only in forced convection cooled divertors with W-alloy structure, Sn-Li alloys would be slightly more favorable. It is concluded that Sn-Li alloys are only advantageous in free surface cooled reactor internals, as this would make maximum use of the principal advantage of Sn-Li, i.e., the low vapor pressure

  9. Fusion gene microarray reveals cancer type-specificity among fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvf, Marthe; Thomassen, Gard O S; Bakken, Anne Cathrine; Celestino, Ricardo; Fioretos, Thoas; Lind, Guro E; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2011-05-01

    Detection of fusion genes for diagnostic purposes and as a guide to treatment is well-established in hematological malignancies, and the prevalence of fusion genes in epithelial cancers is also increasingly appreciated. To study whether established fusion genes are present within additional cancer types, we have used an updated version of our fusion gene microarray in a systematic survey of reported fusion genes in multiple cancer types. We assembled a comprehensive database of published fusion genes, including those reported only in individual studies and samples, and fusion genes resulting from deep sequencing of cancer genomes and transcriptomes. From the total set of 548 fusion genes, we designed 599,839 oligonucleotides, targeting both chimeric transcript junctions as well as sequences internal to each of the fusion gene partners. We investigated the presence of fusion genes in a series of 67 cell lines representing 15 different cancer types. Data from ten leukemia cell lines with known fusion gene status were used to develop an automated scoring algorithm, and in five cell lines the correct fusion gene was the top scoring hit, and one came second. Two additional fusion genes, BCAS4-BCAS3 in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line and CCDC6-RET in the TPC-1 thyroid cancer cell line were validated as true positive fusion transcripts. However, these fusion genes were not new to these cancer types, and none of 548 fusion genes were identified from a novel cancer type. We therefore find it unlikely that the assayed fusion genes are commonly present across multiple cancer types. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Design status and development strategy of China liquid lithium-lead blankets and related material technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; FDS Team

    2007-08-01

    A series of fusion reactors (named FDS series) have been designed and assessed in China, with four types of liquid lithium lead blankets including the RAFM steel-structured He-cooled quasi-static LiPb tritium breeder (SLL) blanket, the RAFM steel-structured He-LiPb dual-cooled (DLL) blanket, the RAFM steel-structured refractory material thermally-insulated high temperature LiPb (HTL) hydrogen production blanket and the RAFM steel or optionally the austenitic stainless steel-structured He-LiPb dual-cooled high level waste transmutation (DWT) blanket. To demonstrate and validate the feasibility of the candidate blankets for fusion energy application, the three-phases-strategy of TBM (test blanket module) development, i.e. material R&D and out-of-pile experimental mockup, EAST-TBM and ITER-TBM have been proposed. A brief overview of the four types of LiPb blanket designs and their goals are given. Material technology requirement and development strategy are also presented in this paper.

  11. A study of 239Pu production rate in a water cooled natural uranium blanket mock-up of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Song; Liu, Rong; Lu, Xinxin; Yang, Yiwei; Xu, Kun; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Tonghua; Jiang, Li; Qin, Jianguo; Jiang, Jieqiong; Han, Zijie; Lai, Caifeng; Wen, Zhongwei

    2016-03-01

    The 239Pu production rate is important data in neutronics design for a natural uranium blanket of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, and the accuracy and reliability should be validated by integral experiments. The distribution of 239Pu production rates in a subcritical natural uranium blanket mock-up was obtained for the first time with a D-T neutron generator by using an activation technique. Natural uranium foils were placed in different spatial locations of the mock-up, the counts of 277.6 keV γ-rays emitted from 239Np generated by 238U capture reaction were measured by an HPGe γ spectrometer, and the self-absorption of natural uranium foils was corrected. The experiment was analyzed using the Super Monte Carlo neutron transport code SuperMC2.0 with recent nuclear data of 238U from the ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0u2, JEFF-3.2 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. Calculation results with the JEFF-3.2 library agree with the experimental ones best, and they agree within the experimental uncertainty in general with the average ratios of calculation results to experimental results (C/E) in the range of 0.93 to 1.01.

  12. Carbon tiles as spectral-shifter for long-life liquid blanket in LHD-type reactor FFHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, A.; Imagawa, S.; Tanaka, T.; Muroga, T.; Kubota, Y.; Dolan, T.; Hashizume, H.; Kunugi, T.; Fukada, S.; Shimizu, A.; Terai, T.; Mitarai, O.

    2006-01-01

    In terms of engineering feasibility for long-life Flibe blanket in LHD-type reactor FFHR, the Spectral-shifter and Tritium breeder Blanket (STB) concept is evaluated by taking neutron irradiation effects into account under system integration such as Flibe cooling and components replacement. FEM calculations for the neutron wall loading of 1.5 MW/m 2 show that the temperature of the STB armor tile can be kept below 2000 K by optimizing the first metal wall thickness. The heat load experiment on the STB armor mockup confirms feasibility of the temperature control and mechanical joining. Degradation of STB armor tiles due to neutron irradiation requires replacement of them every few years by means of remote handling 'screw coasters' using helical winding, where the replaced tiles are low level wastes. Although the STB concept is feasible within nuclear and thermal properties, more detailed structural optimization is needed including the mechanical and chemical properties

  13. Special topics reports for the reference tandem mirror fusion breeder: liquid metal MHD pressure drop effects in the packed bed blanket. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects which result from the use of liquid metal coolants in magnetic fusion reactors include the modification of flow profiles (including the suppression of turbulence) and increases in the primary loop pressure drop and the hydrostatic pressure at the first wall of the blanket. In the reference fission-suppressed tandem mirror fusion breeder design concept, flow profile modification is a relatively minor concern, but the MHD pressure drop in flowing the liquid lithium coolant through an annular packed bed of beryllium/thorium pebbles is directly related to the required first wall structure thickness. As such, it is a major concern which directly impacts fissile breeding efficiency. Consequently, an improved model for the packed bed pressure drop has been developed. By considering spacial averages of electric fields, currents, and fluid flow velocities the general equations have been reduced to simple expressions for the pressure drop. The averaging approach results in expressions for the pressure drop involving a constant which reflects details of the flow around the pebbles. Such details are difficult to assess analytically, and the constant may eventually have to be evaluated by experiment. However, an energy approach has been used in this study to bound the possible values of the constant, and thus the pressure drop. In anticipation that an experimental facility might be established to evaluate the undetermined constant as well as to address other uncertainties, a survey of existing facilities is presented

  14. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  15. TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2011-12-01

    This study focused on creating a new tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel performance model and demonstrating the integration of this model into an existing system of neutronics and heat transfer codes, creating a user-friendly option for including fuel performance analysis within system design optimization and system-level trade-off studies. The end product enables both a deeper understanding and better overall system performance of nuclear energy systems limited or greatly impacted by TRISO fuel performance. A thorium-fueled hybrid fusion-fission Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) blanket design was used for illustrating the application of this new capability and demonstrated both the importance of integrating fuel performance calculations into mainstream design studies and the impact that this new integrated analysis had on system-level design decisions. A new TRISO fuel performance model named TRIUNE was developed and verified and validated during this work with a novel methodology established for simulating the actual lifetime of a TRISO particle during repeated passes through a pebble bed. In addition, integrated self-consistent calculations were performed for neutronics depletion analysis, heat transfer calculations, and then fuel performance modeling for a full parametric study that encompassed over 80 different design options that went through all three phases of analysis. Lastly, side studies were performed that included a comparison of thorium and depleted uranium (DU) LIFE blankets as well as some uncertainty quantification work to help guide future experimental work by assessing what material properties in TRISO fuel performance modeling are most in need of improvement. A recommended thorium-fueled hybrid LIFE engine design was identified with an initial fuel load of 20MT of thorium, 15% TRISO packing within the graphite fuel pebbles, and a 20cm neutron multiplier layer with beryllium pebbles in flibe molten salt coolant. It operated

  16. TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-11-30

    This study focused on creating a new tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel performance model and demonstrating the integration of this model into an existing system of neutronics and heat transfer codes, creating a user-friendly option for including fuel performance analysis within system design optimization and system-level trade-off studies. The end product enables both a deeper understanding and better overall system performance of nuclear energy systems limited or greatly impacted by TRISO fuel performance. A thorium-fueled hybrid fusion-fission Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) blanket design was used for illustrating the application of this new capability and demonstrated both the importance of integrating fuel performance calculations into mainstream design studies and the impact that this new integrated analysis had on system-level design decisions. A new TRISO fuel performance model named TRIUNE was developed and verified and validated during this work with a novel methodology established for simulating the actual lifetime of a TRISO particle during repeated passes through a pebble bed. In addition, integrated self-consistent calculations were performed for neutronics depletion analysis, heat transfer calculations, and then fuel performance modeling for a full parametric study that encompassed over 80 different design options that went through all three phases of analysis. Lastly, side studies were performed that included a comparison of thorium and depleted uranium (DU) LIFE blankets as well as some uncertainty quantification work to help guide future experimental work by assessing what material properties in TRISO fuel performance modeling are most in need of improvement. A recommended thorium-fueled hybrid LIFE engine design was identified with an initial fuel load of 20MT of thorium, 15% TRISO packing within the graphite fuel pebbles, and a 20cm neutron multiplier layer with beryllium pebbles in flibe molten salt coolant. It operated

  17. Flow characteristics analysis of purge gas in unitary pebble beds by CFD simulation coupled with DEM geometry model for fusion blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Youhua [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chen, Lei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Luo, Guangnan [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A unitary pebble bed was built to analyze the flow characteristics of purge gas based on DEM-CFD method. • Flow characteristics between particles were clearly displayed. • Porosity distribution, velocity field distribution, pressure field distribution, pressure drop and the wall effects on velocity distribution were studied. - Abstract: Helium is used as the purge gas to sweep tritium out when it flows through the lithium ceramic and beryllium pebble beds in solid breeder blanket for fusion reactor. The flow characteristics of the purge gas will dominate the tritium sweep capability and tritium recovery system design. In this paper, a computational model for the unitary pebble bed was conducted using DEM-CFD method to study the purge gas flow characteristics in the bed, which include porosity distribution between pebbles, velocity field distribution, pressure field distribution, pressure drop as well as the wall effects on velocity distribution. Pebble bed porosity and velocity distribution with great fluctuations were found in the near-wall region and detailed flow characteristics between pebbles were displayed clearly. The results show that the numerical simulation model has an error with about 11% for estimating pressure drop when compared with the Ergun equation.

  18. Conceptual Design of Main Cooling System for a Fusion Power Reactor with Water Cooled Lithium-Lead Blanket. TW1-TRP-PPCS1, Deliverable 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natalizio, Antonio; Collen, Jan

    2002-06-01

    The HTS (Heat Transfer System) conceptual design developed for the PPCS (Power-Plant Conceptual Study) plant model is compliant with the single failure criterion - i.e., the failure of a single active component (e.g., pump) will not cause the reactor to shutdown. The system effective availability (capacity factor), however, is only marginally better than that of the SEAFP design, as the number of loops could not be decreased further, due to coolant inventory limitations. The PPCS Plant Model A has about 70 % more fusion power than the SEAFP model. Therefore, keeping the same number of loops as in the SEAFP model would have implied a 70 % larger inventory. To improve plant availability and safety, however, the number of blanket and first wall loops have been reduced from eight to six, implying a further increase in loop inventory of about 25 %. For these and other reasons, the coolant inventory, at risk from a loss-of-coolant accident, has increased significantly, relative to the SEAFP design ({approx}130 vs. 50 m{sup 3}). The proposed heat transport system conceptual design meets, or exceeds, all project specifications.

  19. Quantification of design margins and safety factors based on the prediction uncertainty in tritium production rate from fusion integral experiments of the USDOE/JAERI collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Konno, C.; Maekawa, F.; Ikeda, Y.; Kosako, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Mori, T.; Maekawa, H.

    1995-01-01

    Several fusion integral experiments were performed within a collaboration between the USA and Japan on fusion breeder neutronics aimed at verifying the prediction accuracy of key neutronics parameters in a fusion reactor blanket based on current neutron transport codes and basic nuclear databases. The focus has been on the tritium production rate (TRP) as an important design parameter to resolve the issue of tritium self-sufficiency in a fusion reactor. In this paper, the calculational and experimental uncertainties (errors) in local TPR in each experiment performed i were interpolated and propagated to estimate the prediction uncertainty u i in the line-integrated TPR and its standard deviation σ i . The measured data are based on Li-glass and NE213 detectors. From the quantities u i and σ i , normalized density functions (NDFs) were constructed, considering all the experiments and their associated analyses performed independently by the UCLA and JAERI. Several statistical parameters were derived, including the mean prediction uncertainties u and the possible spread ±σ u around them. Design margins and safety factors were derived from these NDFs. Distinction was made between the results obtained by UCLA and JAERI and between calculational results based on the discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods. The prediction uncertainties, their standard deviations and the design margins and safety factors were derived for the line-integrated TPR from Li-6 T 6 , and Li-7 T 7 . These parameters were used to estimate the corresponding uncertainties and safety factor for the line-integrated TPR from natural lithium T n . (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of neutron streaming through injection ports in a tokamak-type fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Takahiro; Seki, Yasushi; Iida, Hiromasa

    1976-03-01

    The effects of neutron streaming through injection ports in the fusion reactor designed in JAERI have been studied, especially those on tritium breeding ratio and the shielding of the superconducting magnet. In placement of the injection ports in the blanket, the tritium breeding ratio decreases by up to 1.3%, and shielding problem of the superconducting magnet is very important. (auth.)

  1. A preliminary study of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using the compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K. [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Ohnishi, M. [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Yamamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Toku, H. [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Kataoka, I. [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Inui, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606 (Japan); Ishikawa, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606 (Japan); Umoto, J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606 (Japan); Fukuyama, A. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700 (Japan); Mitarai, O. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyushu Tokai University, Kumamoto 860 (Japan); Okamoto, M. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152 (Japan); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152 (Japan); Nagatsu, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Preliminary key issues for a synchrotron radiation-enhanced compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle fusion reactor similar to the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle reactor are presented. These include plasma operation windows as a function of the first wall reflectivity and related issues, to estimate an allowance for deterioration of the first wall reflectivity due to dpa effects. It was found theoretically that first wall reflectivities down to 0.8 are still adequate for operation at an energy confinement scaling of 3 times Kaye-Goldston. Measurements of the graphite first wall reflectivities at Nagoya University indicate excellent reflectivities in excess of 90% for CC-312, PCC-2S, and PD-330S in the submillimeter regime, even at high temperatures in excess of 1000K. Some engineering issues inherent to the CFAB cycle are also discussed briefly in comparison with the CFAR cycle which uses hazardous limited-resource materials but is capable of using mercury as coolant for high heat removal. The CFAB cycle using helium coolant is found to achieve higher net plant conversion efficiencies in excess 60% using a non-equilibrium magnetohydrodynamic disk generator in the moderate pressure range, even at the cost of a relatively large pumping power, and at the penalty of high temperature materials, although excellent heat removal characteristics in the moderate pressure range need to be guaranteed in the future. (orig.).

  2. Low cost, high yield IFE reactors: Revisiting Velikhov's vaporizing blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    The performance (efficiency and cost) of IFE reactors using MHD conversion is explored for target blanket shells of various materials vaporized and ionized by high fusion yields (5 to 500 GJ). A magnetized, prestressed reactor chamber concept is modeled together with previously developed models for the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine II (CFARII) MHD Balance-of-Plant (BoP). Using conservative 1-D neutronics models, high fusion yields (20 to 80 GJ) are found necessary to heat Flibe, lithium, and lead-lithium blankets to MHD plasma temperatures, at initial solid thicknesses sufficient to capture most of the fusion yield. Advanced drivers/targets would need to be developed to achieve a ''Bang per Buck'' figure-of-merit approx-gt 20 to 40 joules yield per driver $ for this scheme to be competitive with these blanket materials. Alternatively, more realistic neutronics models and better materials such as lithium hydride may lower the minimum required yields substantially. The very low CFARII BoP costs (contributing only 3 mills/kWehr to CoE) allows this type of reactor, given sufficient advances that non-driver costs dominate, to ultimately produce electricity at a much lower cost than any current nuclear plant

  3. Controlled nuclear fusion apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussard, R.W.; Coppi, B.

    1982-01-01

    A fusion power generating device is disclosed having a relatively small and inexpensive core region which may be contained within an energy absorbing blanket region. The fusion power core region contains apparatus of the toroidal type for confining a high density plasma. The fusion power core is removable from the blanket region and may be disposed and/or recycled for subsequent use within the same blanket region. Thermonuclear ignition of the plasma is obtained by feeding neutral fusible gas into the plasma in a controlled manner such that charged particle heating produced by the fusion reaction is utilized to bootstrap the device to a region of high temperatures and high densities wherein charged particle heating is sufficient to overcome radiation and thermal conductivity losses. The high density plasma produces a large radiation and particle flux on the first wall of the plasma core region thereby necessitating replacement of the core from the blanket region from time to time. A series of potentially disposable and replaceable central core regions are disclosed for a large-scale economical electrical power generating plant

  4. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietert, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    The following five appendices are included: (1) physical properties of materials, (2) thermal entrance length Nusselt number variations, (3) stationary particle bed temperature variations, (4) falling bed experimental data and calculations, and (5) stationary bed experimental data and calculations. (MOW)

  5. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nietert, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    The following five appendices are included: (1) physical properties of materials, (2) thermal entrance length Nusselt number variations, (3) stationary particle bed temperature variations, (4) falling bed experimental data and calculations, and (5) stationary bed experimental data and calculations

  6. Vapor condensation on the surface of a liquid blanket jet in an inertial-confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Inoue, Akira; Fujinuma, Hajime; Tsukui, Jun.

    1991-01-01

    As the fundamental study on lithium jet cooling of an inertial-confinement fusion reactor, the experiment was performed to investigate for the steady condensation of saturated steam on a vertical downward water jet. The experimental parameters were the nozzle diameter of 3 and 5 mm, the jet length of 60∼316 mm, the outlet velocity of 2∼12 m/s, the outlet temperature of 30∼70degC, and the pressure of 0.03∼0.44 MPa, which corresponds to the Reynolds number of 1.35 x 10 4 ∼2.71 x 10 5 and the Prandtl number of 1.0∼5.2. As the Reynolds number or the jet length is increased, the Stanton number decreases and then increases again. As the steam pressure is increased, it increases monotonously. These characteristics of condensation heat transfer have been classical into four regions based on the criteria for jet break-up and surface disturbance, or entrainment. The empirical correlations for the Stanton number have been obtained for these regions, and the validity was confirmed by comparing them with the previous correlations. (author)

  7. Li depletion effects on Li2TiO3 reaction with H2 in thermo-chemical environment relevant to breeding blanket for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvani, Carlo; Casadio, Sergio; Contini, Vittoria; Giorgi, Rossella; Mancini, Maria Rita; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2005-07-01

    This is a report of the Working Group in the Subtask on Solid Breeder Blankets under the Implementing Agreement on a Co-operative Programme on Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors (International Energy Agency (IEA)). This Working Group (Task F and WG-F) was performed from 2000 to 2004 by a collaboration of European Union (EU) and Japan (JA). In this report, lithium depletion effects on the reaction of lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) with hydrogen (H 2 ) in thermo-chemical environment were discussed. The reaction of Li 2 TiO 3 ceramics with H 2 was studied in a thermo-chemical environment simulating (excepting irradiation) that of the hottest pebble-bed zone of breeding-blanket actually designed for fusion power plants. This 'reduction' as performed at 900degC in Ar+0.1%H, purge gas (He+0.1%H 2 being the designed reference') was found to be enhanced by TiO 2 doping of the specimens of simulate 6 Li-burn-up expected to reach 20% at their end-of-life. The reaction rates, however, were so slow to be not significantly extrapolated to the breeder material service time (years). In Ar+3%H 2 , faster reaction rates allowed a better identification of the process evolution (kinetics) by Temperature-Programmed Reduction' (TPR) and 'Oxidation' (TPO), and combined TG-DTA thermal analysis. The reduction of pure Li 4/5 TiO 12/5 spinel phase to Li 4/5 TiO 12/5-y was found to reach in one day the steady state at the O-vacancy concentration y=0.2. Complimentary microscopy (SEM) and spectroscopy (XRD, XPS) techniques were used to characterize the reaction products among which the presence of the orthorhombic Li v TiO 2 (0 ≤ v ≤ 1/2) and Li 2 TiO 3 could be diagnosed. So that the complete spinel reduction to Li 1/2 TiO 2 was obtained according to a scheme involving the Li 1/2 TiO 2 -Li 4/5 TiO 12/5 spinel phase solid solution for which y=3v/(10-5v). The reduction rate of pure meta-titanate to Li 2 TiO 3-x was found much lower (x approx. = 0.01) and even possibly due to the presence

  8. Liquid-metal MHD flow in a duct whose cross section changes from a rectangle to a trapezoid, with applications in fusion blanket designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    This paper treats the liquid-metal MHD flow in a semi-infinite rectangular duct and a semi-infinite trapezoidal duct, which are connected by a finite-length transition duct. There is a strong, transverse, uniform magnetic field. The walls parallel to the magnetic field (sides) remain parallel, while the walls intersecting the magnetic field are twisted in the transition duct to provide the change in cross sectional shape. The left side has a constant height, while the height of the right side increases or decreases in the transition duct. This geometry gives a skewed velocity profile with a high velocity near the left side, provided the right side is relatively thick. All walls are thin and electrically conducting, but the sides are considerably thicker than the other walls. The application is to fusion-reactor blankets in which a high velocity near the first wall (separating the plasma chamber from the coolant) improves the thermal performance. Junctions of different ducts with walls parallel to the magnetic field are treated for the first time. In expansions, contractions and other geometric transition ducts, as well as in straight ducts with axially varying magnetic fields, the fluid flow and electric currents are concentrated in boundary layers adjacent to the sides and in the side. At a junction with a straight duct with a uniform magnetic field, the flow and current must transfer from the boundary layers adn sides to the core regions. These transfers at junctions play a key role in any three-dimensional flow.

  9. Liquid-metal MHD flow in a duct whose cross section changes from a rectangle to a trapezoid, with applications in fusion blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    This paper treats the liquid-metal MHD flow in a semi-infinite rectangular duct and a semi-infinite trapezoidal duct, which are connected by a finite-length transition duct. There is a strong, transverse, uniform magnetic field. The walls parallel to the magnetic field (sides) remain parallel, while the walls intersecting the magnetic field are twisted in the transition duct to provide the change in cross sectional shape. The left side has a constant height, while the height of the right side increases or decreases in the transition duct. This geometry gives a skewed velocity profile with a high velocity near the left side, provided the right side is relatively thick. All walls are thin and electrically conducting, but the sides are considerably thicker than the other walls. The application is to fusion-reactor blankets in which a high velocity near the first wall (separating the plasma chamber from the coolant) improves the thermal performance. Junctions of different ducts with walls parallel to the magnetic field are treated for the first time. In expansions, contractions and other geometric transition ducts, as well as in straight ducts with axially varying magnetic fields, the fluid flow and electric currents are concentrated in boundary layers adjacent to the sides and in the side. At a junction with a straight duct with a uniform magnetic field, the flow and current must transfer from the boundary layers adn sides to the core regions. These transfers at junctions play a key role in any three-dimensional flow

  10. Experimental study of gaseous lithium deuterides and lithium oxides. Implications for the use of lithium and Li2O as breeding materials in fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihle, H.R.; Wu, C.H.; Kudo, H.

    1980-01-01

    In addition to LiH, which has been studied extensively by optical spectroscopy, the existence of a number of other stable lithium hydrides has been predicted theoretically. By analysis of the saturated vapour over dilute solutions of the hydrogen isotopes in lithium, using Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry, all lithium hydrides predicted to be stable were found. Solutions of deuterium in lithium were used predominantly because of practical advantages for mass spectrometric measurements. The heats of dissociation of LiD, Li 2 D, LiD 2 and Li 2 D 2 , and the binding energies of their singly charged positive ions were determined, and the constants of the gas/liquid equilibria were calculated. The existence of these lithium deuterides in the gas phase over solutions of deuterium in lithium leads to enrichment of deuterium in the gas above 1240 K. The enrichment factor, which increases exponentially with temperature and is independent of concentration for low concentrations of deuterium in the liquid, was determined by Rayleigh distillation experiments. It was found that it is thermodynamically possible to separate deuterium from lithium by distillation. One of the alternatives to the use of lithium in (D,T)-fusion reactors as tritium-breeding blanket material is to employ solid lithium oxide. This has a high melting point, a high lithium density and still favourable tritium-breeding properties. Because of its rather high volatility, an experimental study of the vaporization of Li 2 O was undertaken by mass spectrometry. It vaporizes to give lithium and oxygen, and LiO, Li 2 O, Li 3 O and Li 2 O 2 . The molecule Li 3 O was found as a new species. Heats of dissociation, binding energies of the various ions and the constants of the gas/solid equilibria were determined. The effect of using different materials for the Knudsen cells and the relative thermal stabilities of lithium-aluminium oxides were also studied. (author)

  11. Blanket maintenance by remote means using the cassette blanket approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Induced radioactivity in the blanket and other parts of a fusion reactor close to the plasma zone will dictate remote assembly, disassembly, and maintenance procedures. Time will be of the essence in these procedures. They must be practicable and certain. This paper discusses the reduction of a complicated Tokamak reactor to a simpler assembly via the use of a vacuum building in which to house the reactor and the introduction in this new model of cassette blanket modules. The cassettes significantly simplify remote handling

  12. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  13. Packed-fluidized-bed blanket concept for a thorium-fueled commercial tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, J.W.H.; Miller, J.W.; Karbowski, J.S.; Chapin, D.L.; Kelly, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    A preliminary design of a thorium blanket was carried out as a part of the Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR) study. A fixed fuel blanket concept was developed as the reference CTHR blanket with uranium carbide fuel and helium coolant. A fixed fuel blanket was initially evaluated for the thorium blanket study. Subsequently, a new type of hybrid blanket, a packed-fluidized bed (PFB), was conceived. The PFB blanket concept has a number of unique features that may solve some of the problems encountered in the design of tokamak hybrid reactor blankets. This report documents the thorium blanket study and describes the feasibility assessment of the PFB blanket concept

  14. European blanket development for a demo reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.; Anzidei, L.

    1994-01-01

    There are four breeding blanket concepts for a fusion DEMO reactor under development within the framework of the fusion technology programme of the European Union (EU). This paper describes the design of these concepts, the accompanying R + D programme and the status of the development. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab

  15. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  16. Non-LTE, line-blanketed model atmospheres for late O- and early B-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, James A.; Morrison, Nancy D.; Anderson, Lawrence S.

    1992-01-01

    The use of non-LTE line-blanketed model atmospheres to analyze the spectra of hot stars is reported. The stars analyzed are members of clusters and associations, have spectral types in the range O9-B2 and luminosity classes in the range III-IV, have slow to moderate rotation, and are photometrically constant. Sampled line opacities of iron-group elements were incorporated in the radiative transfer solution; solar abundances were assumed. Good to excellent agreement is obtained between the computed profiles and essentially all the line profiles used to fix the model, and reliable stellar parameters are derived. The synthetic M II 5581 equivalent widths agree well with the observed ones at the low end of the temperature range studied, but, above 25,000 K, the synthetic line is generally stronger than the observed line. The behavior of the observed equivalent widths of N II, N III, C II and C III lines as a function of Teff is studied. Most of the lines show much scatter, with no consistent trend that could indicate abundance differences from star to star.

  17. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Research during this report period has covered the following areas: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) MACKLIB-IV, a new library of nuclear response functions, (5) energy storage and power supply requirements for commercial fusion reactors, (6) blanket/shield design evaluation for commercial fusion reactors, and (7) cross section measurements, evaluations, and techniques

  18. The blanket interface to TSTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Grimm, T.L.; Sze, D.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Bartlit, J.R.; Naruse, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements of tritium technology are centered in three main areas, (1) fuel processing, (2) breeder tritium extraction, and (3) tritium containment. The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) now in operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is dedicated to developing and demonstrating the tritium technology for fuel processing and containment. TSTA is the only fusion fuel processing facility that can operate in a continuous closed-loop mode. The tritium throughput of TSTA is 1000 g/d. However, TSTA does not have a blanket interface system. The authors have initiated a study to define a Breeder Blanket Interface (BBIO) for TSTA. The first step of the work is to define the condition of the gaseous tritium stream from the blanket tritium recovery system. This report summarizes this part of the work for one particular blanket concept, i.e., a self-cooled lithium blanket. The total gas throughput, the hydrogen to tritium ratio, the corrosive chemicals, and the radionuclides are defined. Various methods of tritium recovery from liquid lithium were assessed: yttrium gettering, permeation windows, and molten salt extraction. The authors' evaluation concluded that the best method was molten salt extraction

  19. Concept evaluation of nuclear fusion driven symbiotic energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, J.P.; Hoffman, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes systems based on D-T and semi-catalyzed D-D fusion-powered U233 breeders. Two different blanket types were used: metallic thorium pebble-bed blankets with a batch reprocessing mode and a molten salt blanket with on-line continuous or batch reprocessing. All fusion-driven blankets are assumed to have spherical geometries, with a 85% closure. Neutronics depletion calculations were performed with a revised version of the discrete ordinates code XSDRN-PM, using multigroup (100 neutron, 21 gamma-ray groups) coupled cross-section libraries. These neutronics calculations are coupled with a scenario optimization and cost analysis code. Also, the fusion burn was shaped so as to keep the blanket maximum power density below a preset value, and to improve the performance of the fusion-driven systems. The fusion-driven symbiotes are compared with LMFBR-driven energy systems. The nuclear fission breeders that were used as drivers have parameters characteristic of heterogeneous, oxide LMFBRs. They are net plutonium users - the plutonium is obtained from the discharges of LWRs - and U233 is bred in the fission breeder thorium blankets. The analyses of the symbiotic energy systems were performed at equilibrium, at maximum rate of grid expansion, and for a given nuclear power demand

  20. Japanese contributions to the Japan-US workshop on blanket design/technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Seki, Yasushi; Minato, Akio; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mori, Seiji; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Sumita, Kenji.

    1983-02-01

    This report describes Japanese papers presented at the Japan-US Workshop on Blanket Design/Technology which was held at Argonne National Laboratory, November 10 - 11, 1982. Overview of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER), JAERI's activities related to first wall/blanket/shield, summary of FER blanket and its technology development issues and summary of activities at universities on fusion reactor blanket engineering are covered. (author)

  1. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  2. Mechanical and thermal design of hybrid blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design considerations are discussed. This paper is intended as a companion to that of J. D. Lee of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on the nuclear aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design. The major design characteristics of hybrid reactor blankets are discussed with emphasis on the areas of difference between hybrid reactors and standard fusion or fission reactors. Specific examples are used to illustrate the design tradeoffs and choices that must be made in hybrid reactor design. These examples are drawn from the work on the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

  3. Design study on PWR-type reduced-moderation light water core. Investigation of core adopting seed-blanket fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Shoichiro; Kugo, Teruhiko; Okubo, Tsutomu; Iwamura, Takamichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    As a part of the design study on PWR-type Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs), a light water cooled core with the seed-blanket type fuel assemblies has been investigated. An assembly with seed of 13 layers and blanket of 5 layers was selected by optimization calculations. The core was composed with the 163 assemblies. The following results were obtained by burn-up calculations with the MVP-BURN code; The cycle length is 15 months by 3-batch refueling. The discharge burn-up including the inner blanket is about 25 GWd/t. The conversion ratio is about 1.0. The void reactivity coefficient is about-26.1 pcm/%void at BOC and -21.7pcm%void at EOC. About 10% of MA makes conversion ratio decrease about 0.05 to obtain the same burn-up. The void reactivity coefficient increased significantly and it is necessary to reduce it. FP amount corresponding to about 2 % of total plutonium weight makes reactivity decrease about 0.5 %{delta}k/k and void reactivity coefficient increase, however these changes are within the design margins. Capability of multi-recycling of plutonium was confirmed, using discharged plutonium for 4 cycles, if fissile plutonium of 15.5wt% is used. The conversion ratio increases by about 0.026 with recycling. However, void reactivity coefficient increases and some effort to obtain negative void reactivity coefficient is necessary. (author)

  4. Development and trial manufacturing of 1/2-scale partial mock-up of blanket box structure for fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Sato, Satoshi

    1994-07-01

    Conceptual design of breeding blanket has been discussed during the CDA (Conceptual Design Activities) of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). Structural concept of breeding blanket is based on box structure integrated with first wall and shield, which consists of three coolant manifolds for first wall, breeding and shield regions. The first wall must have cooling channels to remove surface heat flux and nuclear heating. The box structure includes plates to form the manifolds and stiffening ribs to withstand enormous electromagnetic load, coolant pressure and blanket internal (purge gas) pressure. A 1/2-scale partial model of the blanket box structure for the outboard side module near midplane is manufactured to estimate the fabrication technology, i.e. diffusion bonding by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) and EBW (Electron Beam Welding) procedure. Fabrication accuracy is a key issue to manufacture first wall panel because bending deformation during HIP may not be small for a large size structure. Data on bending deformation during HIP was obtained by preliminary manufacturing of HIP elements. For the shield structure, it is necessary to reduce the welding strain and residual stress of the weldment to establish the fabrication procedure. Optimal shape of the parts forming the manifolds, welding locations and welding sequence have been investigated. In addition, preliminary EBW tests have been performed in order to select the EBW conditions, and fundamental data on built-up shield have been obtained. Especially, welding deformation by joining the first wall panel to the shield has been measured, and total deformation to build-up shield by EBW has been found to be smaller than 2 mm. Consequently, the feasibility of fabrication technologies has been successfully demonstrated for a 1m-scaled box structure including the first wall with cooling channels by means of HIP, EBW and TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas arc)-welding. (author)

  5. The state of the art report on the fabrication of FW blanket for the fusion reactor and mock-up development in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Whan; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Park, Jeong Yong; Kim, Hyun Gil; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    2004-08-01

    Blanket-shield system in ITER is the component where it directly is faced with high-heat plasma. Function of blanket is to sustain extremely high temperature environment as well as to remove heat flux generated its surface. It mainly consists of plasma facing part, heat sinking part and structural part. Plasma facing part is made of armour materials such as beryllium, tungsten and carbon fiber composite. Heat sinking part is made of copper alloy to maximize heat transfer into flowing coolant inside of blanket. Structural material is used in 316LN stainless steel. As joining such dissimilar materials emerged as an issue, many developed countries have spurred the development of joint technology. This technical report was focused on the activities of EU regarding joining beryllium, copper and stainless steel. EU have adopted to Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) to join beryllium, copper and stainless steel. Although brazing process is not actively investigated compared as HIP, it still investigated in some countries to support HIP. Fabrication of mock-up is accomplished by CEA in France to finish small scale mock-up in 1996, medium and large scale mock-up in 1997. In recent, FRAMATOME in EU has focused on manufacturing prototype used for ITER

  6. Tritium transport analysis for CFETR WCSB blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Pinghui, E-mail: phzhao@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Yang, Wanli; Li, Yuanjie; Ge, Zhihao; Nie, Xingchen; Gao, Zhongping

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A simplified tritium transport model for CFETR WCSB blanket was developed. • Tritium transport process in CFETR WCSB blanket was analyzed. • Sensitivity analyses of tritium transport parameters were carried out. - Abstract: Water Cooled Solid Breeder (WCSB) blanket was put forward as one of the breeding blanket candidate schemes for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). In this study, a simplified tritium transport model was developed. Based on the conceptual engineering design, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of CFETR WCSB blanket, tritium transport process was analyzed. The results show that high tritium concentration and inventory exist in primary water loop and total tritium losses exceed CFETR limits under current conditions. Conducted were sensitivity analyses of influential parameters, including tritium source, temperature, flow-rate capacity and surface condition. Tritium performance of WCSB blanket can be significantly improved under a smaller tritium impinging rate, a larger flow-rate capacity or a better surface condition. This work provides valuable reference for the enhancement of tritium transport behavior in CFETR WCSB blanket.

  7. Breeding blanket for Demo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, E.; Giancarli, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme

  8. Ferritic steels for the first generation of breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diegele, E.

    2009-01-01

    Materials development in nuclear fusion for in-vessel components, i.e. for breeder blankets and divertors, has a history of more than two decades. It is the specific in-service and loading conditions and the consequentially required properties in combination with safety standards and social-economic demands that create a unique set of specifications. Objectives of Fusion for Energy (F4E) include: 1) To provide Europe's contribution to the ITER international fusion energy project; 2) To implement the Broader Approach agreement between Euratom and Japan; 3) To prepare for the construction and demonstration of fusion reactors (DEMO). Consequently, activities in F4E focus on structural materials for the first generations of breeder blankets, i.e. ITER Test Blanket Modules (TBM) and DEMO, whereas a Fusion Materials Topical Group implemented under EFDA coordinates R and D on physically based modelling of irradiation effects and R and D in the longer term (new and /or higher risk materials). The paper focuses on martensitic-ferritic steels and (i) reviews briefly the challenges and the rationales for the decisions taken in the past, (ii) analyses the status of the main activities of development and qualification, (iii) indicates unresolved issues, and (iv) outlines future strategies and needs and their implications. Due to the exposure to intense high energy neutron flux, the main issue for breeder materials is high radiation resistance. The First Wall of a breeder blanket should survive 3-5 full power years or, respectively in terms of irradiation damage, typically 50-70 dpa for DEMO and double figures for a power plant. Even though the objective is to have the materials and key fabrication technologies needed for DEMO fully developed and qualified within the next two decades, a major part of the task has to be completed much earlier. Tritium breeding test blanket modules will be installed in ITER with the objective to test DEMO relevant technologies in fusion

  9. Beryllium research on FFHR molten salt blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.; Sze, D.-K.

    2000-01-01

    Force-free helical reactor, FFHR, is a demo-relevant heliotron-type D-T fusion reactor based on the great amount of R and D results obtained in the LHD project. Since 1993, collaboration works have made great progress in design studies of FFHR with standing on the major advantage of current-less steady operation with no dangerous plasma disruptions. There are two types of reference designs, FFHR-1 and FFHR-2, where molten Flibe (LiF-BeF2) is utilized as tritium breeder and coolant. In this paper, we present the outline of FFHR blanket design and some related R and D topics focusing on Be utilization. Beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier in the design and Be pebbles are placed in the front part of the tritium breeding zone. In a Flibe blanket, HF (TF) generated due to nuclear transmutation will be a problem because of its corrosive property. Though nickel-based alloys are thought to be intact in such a corrosive environment, FFHR blanket design does not adopt the alloys because of their induced radioactivity. The present candidate materials for the structure are low-activated ferritic steel (JLF-1), V-4Cr-4Ti, etc. They are capable to be corroded by HF in the operation condition, and Be is expected to work as a reducing agent in the system as well. Whether Be pebbles placed in a Flibe flow can work well or not is a very important matter. From this point, Be solubility in Flibe, reaction rate of the Redox reaction with TF in the liquid and on the surface of Be pebbles under irradiation, flowing behavior of Flibe through a Be pebble bed, etc. should be investigated. In 1997, in order to establish more practical and new data bases for advanced design works, we started a collaboration work of R and D on blanket engineering, where the Be research above mentioned is included. Preliminary dipping-test of Be sheets and in-situ tritium release experiment from Flibe with Be sheets have got started. (orig.)

  10. Potential use of nuclear pumped lasers as fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Greenspan, E.; Gilligan, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of an energy-storage type nuclear pumped laser (NPL) suitable for laser fusion feedback applications is briefly noted. Then, the use of NPLs in fusion-fission-hybrid systems is presented and analyzed from an energetic point of view. Unique hybrid blanket concepts are proposed that enable approx. 3 fissions in the laser medium per fusion neutron while still providing approx. 2 fissile atoms per fusion neutron. Such designs would enable use of a very low gain fusion device as the driver. (orig.) [de

  11. Neutronics scoping studies for the NET blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daenner, W.

    1984-01-01

    The NET team presently pursues three types of blankets: a water cooled 17LiPb83 blanket and a helium cooled ceramic breeder blanket with either lead or beryllium as a neutron multiplier. For all three types the most important results from neutronics scoping studies are summarized which were directed towards exploiting the respective design concepts for maximum tritium breeding. The values reached are - in the above order - 1.16, 1.03 and 1.13, the latter two assuming LiAlO 2 as the breeding material. In all cases a high 6 Li enrichment and, in case of the Be multiplied blanket, a high proportion of multiplier material is necessary. The beryllium multiplied ceramic breeder blanket design offers the potential for improving the tritium breeding capability by choosing ceramics other than the LiAlO 2 . (author)

  12. Materials for breeding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

    1995-09-01

    There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as Primary Blanket Materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and Secondary Blanket Materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified

  13. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Summaries of research are included for each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) the MACK/MACKLIB system for nuclear response functions, and (5) energy storage and power supply systems for fusion reactors

  14. Development of the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead blanket for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiello, G., E-mail: giacomo.aiello@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Aubert, J.; Jonquères, N. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LPEC, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Morin, A.; Rampal, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The HCLL blanket design has been modified to adapt it to the 2012 EFDA DEMO specifications. • The new design has been developed with the aim to capitalize on TBM experience in ITER. • A new attachment system for the modules has been proposed. - Abstract: The Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) blanket is one of the candidate European blanket concepts selected for the DEMOnstration fusion power plant that should follow ITER. In a fusion power plant, the blanket is one of the key components because of its impact on the plant performance, availability, safety and economics. In 2012, the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) agency issued new specifications for DEMO: this paper describes the work performed to adapt the previous 2007 HCLL-DEMO blanket design to those specifications. A new segmentation has been defined assuming straight surfaces for all blanket modules. Following the Multi Module Segment (MMS) option, all modules are attached to a common back supporting structure which also serves as manifold for Helium and PbLi distribution. A detailed CAD design of the central outboard module has been defined. Thermo-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analyses on of the First Wall and Breeder Zone have been carried out. For the attachment of the modules to the common backplate, a new solution based on the use of Tie Rods, derived from the design of the corresponding HCLL Test Blanket Module for ITER, has been proposed. This paper also identifies the priorities for further development of the HCLL blanket design.

  15. Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraghi, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is proposed that Iran as a world's potential supplier of fossile fuel should participate in fusion research and gain experience in this new field. Fusion, as an ultimate source of energy in future, and the problems concerned with the fusion reactors are reviewed. Furthermore; plasma heating, magnetic and inertial confinement in a fusion reactor are discussed. A brief description of tokamak, theta pinch and magnetic mirror reactors is also included

  16. Conceptual design of Blanket Remote Handling System for CFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jianghua; Song, Yuntao; Pei, Kun; Zhao, Wenlong; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The concept for the blanket maintenance is carried out, including three sub-systems. • The basic maintenance procedure for blanket between VV and hot cell is carried out. • The primary kinematics study is used to verify the feasibility of BRHS. • Virtual reality is adopted as another approach to verify the concept design. - Abstract: The China Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR), which is a new superconducting tokamak device being designed by China, has a mission to achieve a high duty time (0.3–0.5). To accomplish this great mission, the big modular blanket option has been adopted to achieve the high efficiency of the blanket maintenance. Considering this mission and the large and heavy blanket module, a novel conceptual blanket maintenance system for CFETR has been carried out by us over the past year. This paper presents the conceptual design of the Blanket Remote Handling System (BRHS), which mainly comprises the In-Vessel-Maintenance-System (IVMS), Lifting System and Blanket-Tool-Manipulator System (BTMS). The BRHS implements the extraction and replacement between in-vessel (the blanket module operation configuration location) and ex-vessel (inside of the vertical maintenance cask) by the collaboration of these three sub systems. What is more, this paper represents the blanket maintenance procedure between the docking station (between hot cell building and tokamak building) and inside the vacuum vessel, in tokamak building. Virtual reality technology is also used to verify and optimize our concept design.

  17. Workshop on cold-blanket research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    The objective of the workshop was to identify and discuss cold-plasma blanket systems. In order to minimize the bombardment of the walls by hot neutrals the plasma should be impermeable. This requires a density edge-thickness product of nΔ > 10 15 cm -2 . An impermeable cold plasma-gas blanket surrounding a hot plasma core reduces the plasma wall/limiter interaction. Accumulation of impurities in this blanket can be expected. Fuelling from a blanket may be possible as shown by experimental results, though not fully explained by classical transport of neutrals. Refuelling of a reacting plasma had to be ensured by inward diffusion. Experimental studies of a cold impermeable plasma have been done on the tokamak-like Ringboog device. Simulation calculations for the next generation of large tokamaks using a particular transport model, indicate that the plasma edge profile can be controlled to reduce the production of sputtered impurities to an acceptable level. Impurity control requires a small fraction of the radial space to accomodate the cold-plasma layer. The problem of exhaust is, however, more complicated. If the cold-blanket scheme works as predicted in the model calculations, then α-particles generated by fusion will be transported to the cold outside layer. The Communities' experimental programme of research has been discussed in terms of the tokamaks which are available and planned. Two options present themselves for the continuation of cold-blanket research

  18. Studies on Flat Sandwich-type Self-Powered Detectors for Flux Measurements in ITER Test Blanket Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Prasoon; Angelone, Maurizio; Döring, Toralf; Eberhardt, Klaus; Fischer, Ulrich; Klix, Axel; Schwengner, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    Neutron and gamma flux measurements in designated positions in the test blanket modules (TBM) of ITER will be important tasks during ITER's campaigns. As part of the ongoing task on development of nuclear instrumentation for application in European ITER TBMs, experimental investigations on self-powered detectors (SPD) are undertaken. This paper reports the findings of neutron and photon irradiation tests performed with a test SPD in flat sandwich-like geometry. Whereas both neutrons and gammas can be detected with appropriate optimization of geometries, materials and sizes of the components, the present sandwich-like design is more sensitive to gammas than 14 MeV neutrons. Range of SPD current signals achievable under TBM conditions are predicted based on the SPD sensitivities measured in this work.

  19. Studies on Flat Sandwich-type Self-Powered Detectors for Flux Measurements in ITER Test Blanket Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Prasoon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron and gamma flux measurements in designated positions in the test blanket modules (TBM of ITER will be important tasks during ITER’s campaigns. As part of the ongoing task on development of nuclear instrumentation for application in European ITER TBMs, experimental investigations on self-powered detectors (SPD are undertaken. This paper reports the findings of neutron and photon irradiation tests performed with a test SPD in flat sandwich-like geometry. Whereas both neutrons and gammas can be detected with appropriate optimization of geometries, materials and sizes of the components, the present sandwich-like design is more sensitive to gammas than 14 MeV neutrons. Range of SPD current signals achievable under TBM conditions are predicted based on the SPD sensitivities measured in this work.

  20. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  1. Review: BNL Tokamak graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The BNL minimum activity graphite blanket designs are reviewed, and three are discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a 30 cm or thicker graphite screen. Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy, which is then radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma. (Auth.)

  2. Heat transfer problems in gas-cooled solid blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    In all fusion reactors using the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle, a large fraction approximately 80 percent of the fusion energy will be released as approximately 14 MeV neutrons which must be slowed down in a relatively thick blanket surrounding the plasma, thereby, converting their kinetic energy to high temperature heat which can be continuously removed by a coolant stream and converted in part to electricity in a conventional power turbine. Because of the primary goal of achieving minimum radioactivity, to date Brookhaven blanket concepts have been restricted to the use of some form of solid lithium, with inert gas-cooling and in some design cases, water-cooling of the shell structure. Aluminum and graphite have been identified as very promising structural materials for fusion blankets, and conceptual designs based on these materials have been made. Depending on the thermal loading on the ''first'' wall which surrounds the plasma as well as blanket design, heat transfer problems may be noticeably different in gas-cooled solid blankets. Approaches to solution of heat removal problems as well as explanation of: (a) the after-heat problems in blankets; (b) tritium breeding in solids; and (c) materials selection for radiation shields relative to the minimum activity blanket efforts at Brookhaven are discussed

  3. The state of art of the manufacturing technology of FW blanket and the development of mock-up for fusion reactor in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jong Hyuk; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.

    2004-08-01

    In early 1990s, Russia had carried out the performance tests to verify the optimization of Be tile geometry and the bonding integrity of small mock-up using a HHF (High Heat Flux) test and an in-pile test in a research reactor. They had obtained the reliability of the brazing technologies for the Be/Cu bonding. And they had manufactured the near real-size large mock-up (about 0.8 mm in length) to find the bonding integrity by a fast brazing technique. They had a satisfied results from the HHF test for the large mock-up. Additionally, an alternative FW mock-ups, which were manufactured by both casting and fast brazing techniques to reduce the joining parts, showed a good joining performance from the HHF test. Therefore, it was concluded that the fast brazing techniques could be strongly recommended as a one of the preferable joining techniques and be possible to apply to joining for the Be/Cu joining of FW blanket

  4. Mirror reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Barmore, W.L.; Bender, D.J.; Doggett, J.N.; Galloway, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    The general requirements of a breeding blanket for a mirror reactor are described. The following areas are discussed: (1) facility layout and blanket maintenance, (2) heat transfer and thermal conversion system, (3) materials, (4) tritium containment and removal, and (5) nuclear performance

  5. Blanket testing in NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chazalon, M.; Daenner, W.; Libin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The testing stages in NET for the performance assessment of the various breeding blanket concepts developed at the present time in Europe for DEMO (LiPb and ceramic blankets) and the requirements upon NET to perform these tests are reviewed. Typical locations available in NET for blanket testing are the central outboard segments and the horizontal ports of in-vessel sectors. These test positions will be connectable with external test loops. The number of test loops (helium, water, liquid metal) will be such that each major class of blankets can be tested in NET. The test positions, the boundary conditions and the external test loops are identified and the requirements for test blankets are summarized (author). 6

  6. Modelling the power conversion unit of a generic nuclear fusion plant, with a dual coolant blanket and a supercritical CO2 power cycle, by means of RELAP5-3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batet, L.

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the Spanish fusion program TECNO-FUS, a dual coolant blanket design was proposed for DEMO. A generic power conversion system (supercritical recompression CO2 cycle) based on this proposal has been simulated using RELAP5-3D, a multipurpose system thermal-hydraulic code developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (USA). The code allows the dynamic simulation of thermal-hydraulic systems, including the control features. A model has been set up by assembling the available RELAP5-3D components: pipe, branch, pump, compressor, turbine, etc. Thermal fluxes between fluids in heat exchangers are simulated by means of heat structures, which are used as well to simulate the heating from plasma. A number of control features have been designed for the simulated plant, and their parameters have been adjusted. The code is then able to simulate robustly the dynamics of the system with a few boundary conditions. This paper exemplifies the usefulness of the code and model to understand the behavior of the plant and to perform sensitivity analyses of the control parameters or other design features. (Author)

  7. Tritium containment of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Tsukumo, Kiyohiko; Suzuki, Tatsushi

    1979-01-01

    It is well known that tritium is used as the fuel for nuclear fusion reactors. The neutrons produced by the nuclear fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium react with lithium in blankets, and tritium is produced. The blankets reproduce the tritium consumed in the D-T reaction. Tritium circulates through the main cooling system and the fuel supply and evacuation system, and is accumulated. Tritium is a radioactive substance emitting β-ray with 12.6 year half-life, and harmful to human bodies. It is an isotope of hydrogen, and apt to diffuse and leak. Especially at high temperature, it permeates through materials, therefore it is important to evaluate the release of tritium into environment, to treat leaked tritium to reduce its release, and to select the method of containing tritium. The permeability of tritium and its solubility in structural materials are discussed. The typical blanket-cooling systems of nuclear fusion reactors are shown, and the tungsten coating of steam generator tubes and tritium recovery system are adopted for reducing tritium leak. In case of the Tokamak type reactor of JAERI, the tritium recovery system is installed, in which the tritium gas produced in blankets is converted to tritium steam with a Pd-Pt catalytic oxidation tower, and it is dehydrated and eliminated with a molecular sieve tower, then purified and recovered. (Kako, I.)

  8. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The efforts of the Chemical Technology Division in fusion energy include the areas of fuel handling, processing, and containment. Current studies are concerned largely with the development of vacuum pumps for fusion reactors and experiments and with development and evaluation of techniques for recovering tritium from solid or liquid breeding blankets. In addition, a small effort is devoted to support of the ORNL design of a major Tokamak experiment, The Next Step (TNS)

  9. ITER driver blanket, European Community design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simbolotti, G.; Zampaglione, V.; Ferrari, M.; Gallina, M.; Mazzone, G.; Nardi, C.; Petrizzi, L.; Rado, V.; Violante, V.; Daenner, W.; Lorenzetto, P.; Gierszewski, P.; Grattarola, M.; Rosatelli, F.; Secolo, F.; Zacchia, F.; Caira, M.; Sorabella, L.

    1993-01-01

    Depending on the final decision on the operation time of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the Driver Blanket might become a basic component of the machine with the main function of producing a significant fraction (close to 0.8) of the tritium required for the ITER operation, the remaining fraction being available from external supplies. The Driver Blanket is not required to provide reactor relevant performance in terms of tritium self-sufficiency. However, reactor relevant reliability and safety are mandatory requirements for this component in order not to significantly afftect the overall plant availability and to allow the ITER experimental program to be safely and successfully carried out. With the framework of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities (CDA, 1988-1990), a conceptual design of the ITER Driver Blanket has been carried out by ENEA Fusion Dept., in collaboration with ANSALDO S.p.A. and SRS S.r.l., and in close consultation with the NET Team and CFFTP (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project). Such a design has been selected as EC (European Community) reference design for the ITER Driver Blanket. The status of the design at the end of CDA is reported in the present paper. (orig.)

  10. Radiation-induced tensile stresses in fission-blanket components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipp, M.E.

    1981-11-01

    A particle-beam fusion-fission hybrid reactor includes a surrounding blanket for energy production and for breeding fissile fuel. The blanket is subjected to radiation deposition pulses at the operating frequency of the fusion driver. A circulating coolant will remove heat from the blanket region. One-dimensional studies were made to examine possible configurations for the blanket elements. Depleted uranium solid plates, cylinders, and spheres were the initial choices. Depleted uranium solid plates, cylinders, and spheres were the initial choices. Uniform radiation deposition was assumed across the geometry, with the particular concern being the level of tension induced by the deposition pulse. The high tensions that appear in the solid cylindrical and spherical cases could be mitigated by the presence of hollow cores

  11. Applications of the Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.J.; Varsamis, G.; Wrisley, K.; Deutch, L.; Gierszewski, P.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a novel water-cooled blanket concept is examined. This concept, designated the Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket (ASCB), employs water with small amounts of dissolved fertile compounds as both the coolant and the breeding medium. The ASCB concept is reviewed and its application in three different contexts is examined: (1) power reactors; (2) near-term devices such as NET; and (3) fusion-fission hybrids

  12. Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  13. Molten salt cooling/17Li-83Pb breeding blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Cheng, E.T.

    1985-02-01

    A description of a fusion breeding blanket concept using draw salt coolant and static 17 Li- 83 Pb is presented. 17 Li- 83 Pb has high breeding capability and low tritium solubility. Draw salt operates at low pressure and is inert to water. Corrosion, MHD, and tritium containment problems associated with the MARS design are alleviated because of the use of a static LiPb blanket. Blanket tritium recovery is by permeation toward the plasma. A direct contact steam generator is proposed to eliminate some generic problems associated with a tube shell steam generator

  14. Blankets for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Fukumoto, Hideshi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To produce tritium more than consumed, through thermonuclear reaction. Constitution: The energy spectrum of neutron generated by neutron multiplying reaction in a neutron multiplying blanket and moderated neutrons has a large ratio in a low energy section. In the low-energy absorption region of stainless steel which is a material of cooling pipes constituting a neutron multiplying blanket cooling channel, the neutrons are absorbed, lessening the neutron multiplying effect. To prevent this, the neutron multiplying blanket cooling channel is covered with tritium breeding blankets, thereby enabling the production of a substantially great amount of tritium more than the amount of tritium to be consumed by the thermonuclear reaction by preventing neutron absorption by the component materials of the cooling channel, improving the tritium breeding ratio by 20 to 25 %, and increasing the efficiency of use of neutrons for tritium generation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. Conceptual design of the blanket mechanical attachment for the helium-cooled lithium-lead reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, G.; Branas, B.; Lucas, J.; Doncel, J.; Medrano, M.; Garcia, A.; Giancarli, L.; Ibarra, A.; Li Puma, A.; Maisonnier, D.; Sardain, P.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design of a new type of fusion reactor based on the helium-cooled lithium-lead (HCLL) blanket has been performed within the European Power Plant Conceptual Studies. As part of this activity, a new attachment system suitable for the HCLL blanket modules had to be developed. This attachment is composed of two parts. The first one is the connection between module and the first part of a shield, called high temperature shield, which operates at a temperature around 500 deg. C, close to that of the blanket module. This connection must be made at the lateral walls, in order to avoid openings through the first wall and breeding zone thus avoiding complex design and fabrication issues of the module. The second connection is the one between the high temperature shield and a second shield called low temperature shield, which has a temperature during reactor operation around 150 deg. C. The design of this connection is complex because it must allow the large differential thermal expansion (up to 30 mm) between the two components. Design proposals for both connections are presented, together with the results of finite element mechanical analyses which demonstrate the feasibility to support the blanket and shield modules during normal and accidental operation conditions

  16. The evolution of US helium-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R.; Cheng, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews and compares four helium-cooled fusion reactor blanket designs. These designs represent generic configurations of using helium to cool fusion reactor blankets that were studied over the past 20 years in the United States of America (US). These configurations are the pressurized module design, the pressurized tube design, the solid particulate and gas mixture design, and the nested shell design. Among these four designs, the nested shell design, which was invented for the ARIES study, is the simplest in configuration and has the least number of critical issues. Both metallic and ceramic-composite structural materials can be used for this design. It is believed that the nested shell design can be the most suitable blanket configuration for helium-cooled fusion power and experimental reactors. (orig.)

  17. Economic evaluation of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waganer, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The economic impact of employing the highly ranked blankets in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) was evaluated in the context of both a tokamak and a tandem mirror power reactor (TMR). The economic evaluation criterion was determined to be the cost of electricity. The influencing factors that were considered are the direct cost of the blankets and related systems; the annual cost of blanket replacement; and the performance of the blanket, heat transfer, and energy conversion systems. The technical and cost bases for comparison were those of the STARFIRE and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study conceptual design power plants. The economic evaluation results indicated that the nitrate-salt-cooled blanket concept is an economically attractive concept for either reactor type. The water-cooled, solid breeder blanket is attractive for the tokamak and somewhat less attractive for the TMR. The helium-cooled, liquidlithium breeder blanket is the least economically desirable of higher ranked concepts. The remaining self-cooled liquid-metal and the helium-cooled blanket concepts represent moderately attractive concepts from an economic standpoint. These results are not in concert with those found in the other BCSS evaluation areas (engineering feasibility, safety, and research and development (R and D) requirements). The blankets faring well economically had generally lower cost components, lower pumping power requirements, and good power production capability. On the other hand, helium- and lithium-cooled systems were preferred from the standpoints of safety, engineering feasibility, and R and D requirements

  18. Assessment of alkali metal coolants for the ITER blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Reed, C.B.; Mattas, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    The blanket system is one of the most important components of a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The Blanket Comparison and Selection Study, conducted earlier, described the overall comparative performance of different blanket concepts, including liquid metal, molten salt, water, and helium. This paper will discuss the ITER requirements for a self-cooled blanket concept with liquid lithium and for indirectly cooled concepts that use other alkali metals such as NaK. The paper will address the thermodynamics of interactions between the liquid metals (i.e., lithium and NaK) and structural materials (e.g., V-base alloys), together with associated corrosion/compatibility issues. Available experimental data will be used to assess the long-term performance of the first wall in a liquid metal environment

  19. Fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs

  20. Water-cooled blanket concepts for the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, G.D.; Bowers, D.A.; Jung, J.; Misra, B.; Ruester, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The primary goal of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) was to select a limited number of blanket concepts for fusion power reactors, to serve as the focus for the U.S. Department of Energy blanket research and development program. The concepts considered most seriously by the BCSS can be grouped for discussion purposes by coolant: liquid metals and alloys, pressurized water, helium, and nitrate salts. Concepts using pressurized water as the coolant are discussed. Water-cooled concepts using liquid breeders-lithium and 17Li-83Pb (LiPb)-have severe fundamental safety problems. The use of lithium and water in the blanket was considered unacceptable. Initial results of tests at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory using steam injected into molten LiPb indicate that use of LiPb and water together in a blanket is a very serious concern from the safety standpoint. Key issues for water-cooled blankets with solid tritium breeders (Li 2 O, or a ternary oxide such as LiAlO 2 ) were identified and examined: reliability against leaks, control of tritium permeation into the coolant, retention of breeder physical integrity, breeder temperature predictability, determination of allowable temperature limits for breeders, and 6 Li burnup effects (for LiAlO 2 ). The BCSS's final rankings and associated rationale for all water-cooled concepts are examined. Key issues and factors for tokamak and tandem mirror reactor versions of water-cooled solid breeder concepts are discussed. The reference design for the top-ranked concept-LiAlO 2 breeder, ferritic steel structure, and beryllium neutron multiplier-is presented. Finally, some general conclusions for water-cooled blanket concepts are drawn based on the study's results

  1. Conceptual design of an electricity generating tritium breeding blanket sector for INTOR/NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A.

    1984-01-01

    A study is made of a fusion reactor power blanket and its associated equipment with the objective of producing a conceptual design for a blanket sector of INTOR, or one of its national variants (e.g. NET), from which electricity could be generated simultaneously with the breeding of tritium. (author)

  2. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume II. Detailed technical plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The four sections which comprise Part II describe in detail the technical basis for each of the four Program Elements (PE's) of the FWBS Engineering Technology Program (ETP). Each PE is planned to be executed in a number of phases. The purpose of the DTP's is to delineate detailed near-term research, development, and testing required to establish a FWBS engineering data base. Optimum testing strategies and construction of test facilities where needed are identified. The DTP's are based on guidelines given by Argonne National Laboratory which included the basic programmatic goals and the requirements for the types of tests and test conditions

  3. Stellarator-type magnetic system for a research fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotenko, V.G.; Romanov, S.S.; Bjesjedyin, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    To create the plasma confinement region in a research fusion reactor (RFR),the possibility of using a toroidal magnetic field formed in the l=2,m=1 torsatron along with a reversed additional longitudinal magnetic field is shown.The principal difference of RFR from existing designs is greater distance between the plasma confinement region and the 1st wall, r p1 /r w <<1

  4. Nuclear Analyses of Indian LLCB Test Blanket System in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, H. L.; Shaw, A. K.; Danani, C.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh

    2017-04-01

    Heading towards the Nuclear Fusion Reactor Program, India is developing Lead Lithium Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) tritium breeding blanket for its future fusion Reactor. A mock-up of the LLCB blanket is proposed to be tested in ITER equatorial port no.2, to ensure the overall performance of blanket in reactor relevant nuclear fusion environment. Nuclear analyses play an important role in LLCB Test Blanket System design & development. It is required for tritium breeding estimation, thermal-hydraulic design, coolants process design, radioactive waste management, equipment maintenance & replacement strategies and nuclear safety. The nuclear behaviour of LLCB test blanket module in ITER is predicated in terms of nuclear responses such as tritium production, nuclear heating, neutron fluxes and radiation damages. Radiation shielding capability of LLCB TBS inside and outside bio-shield was also assessed to fulfill ITER shielding requirements. In order to supports the rad-waste and safety assessment, nuclear activation analyses were carried out and radioactivity data were generated for LLCB TBS components. Nuclear analyses of LLCB TBS are performed using ITER recommended nuclear analyses codes (i.e. MCNP, EASY), nuclear cross section data libraries (i.e. FENDL 2.1, EAF) and neutronic model (ITER C-lite v.l). The paper describes a comprehensive nuclear performance of LLCB TBS in ITER.

  5. Blast venting through blanket material in the HYLIFE ICF reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.C.; Peterson, P.F.; Schrock, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    This work presents a numerical study of blast venting through various blanket configurations in the HYLIFE ICF reactor design. The study uses TSUNAMI -- a multi-dimensional, high-resolution, shock capturing code -- to predict the momentum exchange and gas dynamics for blast venting in complex geometries. In addition, the study presents conservative predictions of wall loading by gas shock and impulse delivered to the protective liquid blanket. Configurations used in the study include both 2700 MJ and 350 MJ fusion yields per pulse for 5 meter and 3 meter radius reactor chambers. For the former, an annular jet array is used for the blanket geometry, while in the latter, both annular jet array as well as slab geometries are used. Results of the study indicate that blast venting and wall loading may be manageable in the HYLIFE-II design by a judicious choice of blanket configuration

  6. Comparative studies for two different orientations of pebble bed in an HCCB blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paritosh, CHAUDHURI; Chandan, DANANI; E, RAJENDRAKUMAR

    2017-12-01

    The Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) program in ITER is one of the major steps in its fusion reactor program towards DEMO and the future fusion power reactor vision. Research and development (R&D) is focused on two types of breeding blanket concepts: lead–lithium ceramic breeder (LLCB) and helium-cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) blanket systems for the DEMO reactor. As part of the ITER-TBM program, the LLCB concept will be tested in one-half of ITER port no. 2, whose materials and technologies will be tested during ITER operation. The HCCB concept is a variant of the solid breeder blanket, which is presently part of our domestic R&D program for DEMO relevant technology development. In the HCCB concept Li2TiO3 and beryllium are used as the tritium breeder and neutron multiplier, respectively, in the form of a packed bed having edge-on configuration with reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel as the structural material. In this paper two design schemes, mainly two different orientations of pebble beds, are discussed. In the current concept (case-1), the ceramic breeder beds are kept horizontal in the toroidal–radial direction. Due to gravity, the pebbles may settle down at the bottom and create a finite gap between the pebbles and the top cooling plate, which will affect the heat transfer between them. In the alternate design concept (case-2), the pebble bed is vertically (poloidal–radial) orientated where the side plates act as cooling plates instead of top and bottom plates. These two design variants are analyzed analytically and 2D thermal-hydraulic simulation studies are carried out with ANSYS, using the heat loads obtained from neutronic calculations. Based on the analysis the performance is compared and details of the thermal and radiative heat transfer studies are also discussed in this paper.

  7. Low cycle fatigue of the European type 316L reference steel for the NET first wall and blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, B. van der; Hoepen, J. van.

    1992-12-01

    This report gives a comprehensive overview of the experiments performed on Type 316L steel at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation in Petten. It is observed that the effects of neutron irradiation, resulting in 3-4 dpa and 30-40 appm helium are limited. The strain rate dependence of low cycle fatigue endurance is not negligible for material in the three conditions considered: irradiated, as-received and thermal control condition. All fatigue cracks propagated in a ductile manner in the parameter range were investigated. Both fatigue strain rate effects and crack initiation effects should be taken into account for the NET/ITER design. (author). 24 refs., 18 figs., 13 tabs

  8. Study on the temperature control mechanism of the tritium breeding blanket for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changle; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Lei; Yao, Damao; Li, Guoqiang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Songtao; Wan, Yuanxi

    2017-12-01

    The Chinese fusion engineering testing reactor (CFETR) will demonstrate tritium self- sufficiency using a tritium breeding blanket for the tritium fuel cycle. The temperature control mechanism (TCM) involves the tritium production of the breeding blanket and has an impact on tritium self-sufficiency. In this letter, the CFETR tritium target is addressed according to its missions. TCM research on the neutronics and thermal hydraulics issues for the CFETR blanket is presented. The key concerns regarding the blanket design for tritium production under temperature field control are depicted. A systematic theory on the TCM is established based on a multiplier blanket model. In particular, a closed-loop method is developed for the mechanism with universal function solutions, which is employed in the CFETR blanket design activity for tritium production. A tritium accumulation phenomenon is found close to the coolant in the blanket interior, which has a very important impact on current blanket concepts using water coolant inside the blanket. In addition, an optimal tritium breeding ratio (TBR) method based on the TCM is proposed, combined with thermal hydraulics and finite element technology. Meanwhile, the energy gain factor is adopted to estimate neutron heat deposition, which is a key parameter relating to the blanket TBR calculations, considering the structural factors. This work will benefit breeding blanket engineering for the CFETR reactor in the future.

  9. Experimental study on corrosion and precipitation in non-isothermal Pb-17Li system for development of liquid breeder blanket of fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Masatoshi; Ishii, Masaomi; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Muroga, Takeo

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion characteristics of RAFM steel JLF-1 in a non-isothermal Pb-17Li flowing system were investigated by means of the corrosion test using a non-isothermal mixing pot. The corrosion test was performed at 739K with a temperature gradient of 14K for 500 hours. The corrosion tests at a static and a flowing conditions in an isothermal Pb-17Li system were also performed at the same temperature for the same duration with the non-isothermal test. Then, the effect of mass transfer both by the flow and the temperature gradient on the corrosion behaviors was featured by the comparison of these results. The corrosion was caused by the dissolution of Fe and Cr from the steel surface into the flowing Pb-17Li. The specimen surface revealed a fine granular microstructure after the corrosion tests. A large number of pebbleshaped protrusions were observed on the specimen surface. This microstructure was different from the original martensite microstructure of the steel, and might be formed by the influence of the reaction with Li component in the alloy. The formation of the granular microstructure was accelerated by the flow and the temperature gradient. Some pebble-shaped protrusions had gaps at their bases. The removal of these pebble-shaped granules by the flowing Pb-17Li might cause a small-scale corrosion-erosion. The results of metallurgical analysis indicated that a large-scale corrosion-erosion was also caused by their destruction of the corroded layer on the surface. The non-isothermal mixing pot equipped a cold trap by a metal mesh in the low temperature region. The metal elements of Fe and Cr were recovered as they precipitated on the surface of the metal mesh. It was found that a Fe-Cr binary intermetallic compound was formed in the precipitation procedure. The overall mass transfer coefficient for the dissolution type corrosion in the non-isothermal system was much bigger than that in the isothermal system. This model evaluation indicated that the temperature

  10. Potential design modifications for the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) reaction chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.R.; Monsler, M.J.; Powell, E.G.; Walker, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Generation of electric power from inertial confinement fusion requires a reaction chamber. One promising type, the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) chamber, includes a falling array of liquid lithium jets. These jets act as: (1) a renewable first wall and blanket to shield metal components from x-ray and neutron exposure, (2) a tritium breeder to replace tritium burned during the fusion process, and (3) an absorber and transfer medium for fusion energy. Over 90% of the energy produced in the reaction chamber is absorbed in the lithium jet fall. Design aspects are included

  11. High temperature blankets for the production of synthetic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Fillo, J.; Makowitz, H.

    1977-01-01

    The application of very high temperature blankets to improved efficiency of electric power generation and production of H 2 and H 2 based synthetic fuels is described. The blanket modules have a low temperature (300 to 400 0 C) structure (SS, V, Al, etc.) which serves as the vacuum/coolant pressure boundary, and a hot (>1000 0 C) thermally insulated interior. Approximately 50 to 70% of the fusion energy is deposited in the hot interior because of deep penetration by high energy neutrons. Separate coolant circuits are used for the two temperature zones: water for the low temperature structure, and steam or He for the hot interior. Electric generation efficiencies of approximately 60% and H 2 production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70%, depending on design, are projected for fusion reactors using these high temperature blankets

  12. Thermal insulation blanket material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusch, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to provide a tailorable advanced blanket insulation based on a woven design having an integrally woven core structure. A highly pure quartz yarn was selected for weaving and the cells formed were filled with a microquartz felt insulation.

  13. Two Types of Distributed CFAR Detection Based on Weighting Functions in Fusion Center for Weibull Clutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Zaimbashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of distributed constant false alarm rate (CFAR detection using binary and fuzzy weighting functions in fusion center are developed. In the two types of distributed detectors, it was assumed that the clutter parameters at the local sensors are unknown and each local detector performs CFAR processing based on ML and OS CFAR processors before transmitting data to the fusion center. At the fusion center, received data is weighted either by a binary or a fuzzy weighting functions and combined according to deterministic rules, constructing global test statistics. Moreover, for the Weibull clutter, the expression of the weighting functions, based on ML and OS CFAR processors in local detectors, is obtained. In the binary type, we analyzed various distributed detection schemes based on maximum, minimum, and summation rules in fusion center. In the fuzzy type, we consider the various distributed detectors based on algebraic product, algebraic sum, probabilistic OR, and Lukasiewicz t-conorm fuzzy rules in fusion center. The performance of the two types of distributed detectors is analyzed and compared in the homogenous and nonhomogenous situations, multiple targets, or clutter edge. The simulation results indicate the superiority and robust performance of fuzzy type in homogenous and non homogenous situations.

  14. Review of fusion synfuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion

  15. Thermal problems in thermonuclear fusion; Les problemes thermiques dans la fusion thermonucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebut, P.H. [Academie des Sciences, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    This article makes a status of the recent advances in thermonuclear fusion research: deuterium-tritium fusion reaction; production of tritium; energy status of the fusion reaction; the two ways of plasma confinement: inertial and magnetic; Tokamaks; present day situation: JET and ITER; magnetic confinement losses; radiation losses of the plasma; plasma-divertor plates interactions; 14 MeV neutrons and blanket; liquid metal blankets; water-cooled or helium-cooled blankets; other future possible solutions: fluidized beds, fusion reactors and hybrid fusion-fission reactors. (J.S.)

  16. Blanket/first wall challenges and required R&D on the pathway to DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, Mohamed, E-mail: abdou@fusion.ucla.edu; Morley, Neil B.; Smolentsev, Sergey; Ying, Alice; Malang, Siegfried; Rowcliffe, Arthur; Ulrickson, Mike

    2015-11-15

    The breeding blanket with integrated first wall (FW) is the key nuclear component for power extraction, tritium fuel sustainability, and radiation shielding in fusion reactors. The ITER device will address plasma burn physics and plasma support technology, but it does not have a breeding blanket. Current activities to develop “roadmaps” for realizing fusion power recognize the blanket/FW as one of the principal remaining challenges. Therefore, a central element of the current planning activities is focused on the question: what are the research and major facilities required to develop the blanket/FW to a level which enables the design, construction and successful operation of a fusion DEMO? The principal challenges in the development of the blanket/FW are: (1) the Fusion Nuclear Environment – a multiple-field environment (neutrons, heat/particle fluxes, magnetic field, etc.) with high magnitudes and steep gradients and transients; (2) Nuclear Heating in a large volume with sharp gradients – the nuclear heating drives most blanket phenomena, but accurate simulation of this nuclear heating can be done only in a DT-plasma based facility; and (3) Complex Configuration with blanket/first wall/divertor inside the vacuum vessel – the consequence is low fault tolerance and long repair/replacement time. These blanket/FW development challenges result in critical consequences: (a) non-fusion facilities (laboratory experiments) need to be substantial to simulate multiple fields/multiple effects and must be accompanied by extensive modeling; (b) results from non-fusion facilities will be limited and will not fully resolve key technical issues. A DT-plasma based fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) is required to perform “multiple effects” and “integrated” experiments in the fusion nuclear environment; and (c) the Reliability/Availability/Maintainability/Inspectability (RAMI) of fusion nuclear components is a major challenge and is one of the primary reasons

  17. C1-C3 lateral mass fusion for type IIa and type III Hangman′s fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Muthukumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hangman′s fractures, also known as traumatic spondylolisthesis of axis, can be managed either conservatively with immobilization or by surgery. Surgery is usually indicated in cases with instability or failure of conservative treatment. Different surgical approaches, both anterior and posterior, have been described for treating Hangman′s fracture. We report two patients, one with type IIa and another with type III Hangman′s fracture treated with C1-C3 lateral mass fusion and discuss the advantages and limitations of this technique when compared to other techniques for fusion in patients with Hangman′s fracture.

  18. Development of blanket box structure fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohri, K.; Sato, S.; Kawaguchi, I.; Sato, K.; Kuroda, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Sato, S.; Takatsu, H.

    1995-01-01

    Fabrication studies have been performed for the first wall and blanket box structure in the fusion experimental reactor designed in Japan. The hot isostatic pressing technique has been proposed as one of the most promising candidate methods for fabricating the first wall. This paper describes the trial fabrication of a half-scale mock-up for part of an outboard module near the midplane, without the internal structure of a breeding region, to investigate its feasibility and to clarify technological issues associated with the proposed fabrication technologies. (orig.)

  19. ITER solid breeder blanket materials database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dienst, W. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Material- und Festkoerperforschung; Flament, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Commissariat A L`Energie Atomique; Lorenzetto, P. [NET Team, Garching (Germany); Noda, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takai, Ibaraki, (Japan); Roux, N. [CEA Centre d`Etudes et de Recherches Les Materiaux (France). Commissariat a L`Energie Atomique

    1993-11-01

    The databases for solid breeder ceramics (Li{sub 2},O, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2}) and beryllium multiplier material are critically reviewed and evaluated. Emphasis is placed on physical, thermal, mechanical, chemical stability/compatibility, tritium, and radiation stability properties which are needed to assess the performance of these materials in a fusion reactor environment. Correlations are selected for design analysis and compared to the database. Areas for future research and development in blanket materials technology are highlighted and prioritized.

  20. ITER solid breeder blanket materials database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.; Dienst, W.; Noda, K.; Roux, N.

    1993-11-01

    The databases for solid breeder ceramics (Li 2 ,O, Li 4 SiO 4 , Li 2 ZrO 3 and LiAlO 2 ) and beryllium multiplier material are critically reviewed and evaluated. Emphasis is placed on physical, thermal, mechanical, chemical stability/compatibility, tritium, and radiation stability properties which are needed to assess the performance of these materials in a fusion reactor environment. Correlations are selected for design analysis and compared to the database. Areas for future research and development in blanket materials technology are highlighted and prioritized

  1. Updated reference design of a liquid metal cooled tandem mirror fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Garner, J.K.

    1985-09-01

    Detailed studies of key techinical issues for liquid metal cooled fusion breeder (fusion-fission hybrid blankets) have been performed during the period 1983-4. Based upon the results of these studies, the 1982 reference liquid metal cooled tandem mirror fusion breeder blanket design was updated and is described. The updated reference blankets provides increased breeding and lower technological risk in comparison with the original reference blanket. In addition to the blanket design revisions, a plant concept, cost, and fuel cycle economics assessment is provided. The fusion breeder continues to promise an economical source of fissile fuel for the indefinite future

  2. Fusion research principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2013-01-01

    Fusion Research, Volume I: Principles provides a general description of the methods and problems of fusion research. The book contains three main parts: Principles, Experiments, and Technology. The Principles part describes the conditions necessary for a fusion reaction, as well as the fundamentals of plasma confinement, heating, and diagnostics. The Experiments part details about forty plasma confinement schemes and experiments. The last part explores various engineering problems associated with reactor design, vacuum and magnet systems, materials, plasma purity, fueling, blankets, neutronics

  3. Studies on steps affecting tritium residence time in solid blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru

    1987-01-01

    For the self sustaining of CTR fuel cycle, the effective tritium recovery from blankets is essential. This means that not only tritium breeding ratio must be larger than 1.0, but also high recovering speed is required for the short residence time of tritium in blankets. Short residence time means that the tritium inventory in blankets is small. In this paper, the tritium residence time and tritium inventory in a solid blanket are modeled by considering the steps constituting tritium release. Some of these tritium migration processes were experimentally evaluated. The tritium migration steps in a solid blanket using sintered breeding materials consist of diffusion in grains, desorption at grain edges, diffusion and permeation through grain boundaries, desorption at particle edges, diffusion and percolation through interconnected pores to purging stream, and convective mass transfer to stream. Corresponding to these steps, diffusive, soluble, adsorbed and trapped tritium inventories and the tritium in gas phase are conceivable. The code named TTT was made for calculating these tritium inventories and the residence time of tritium. An example of the results of calculation is shown. The blanket is REPUTER-1, which is the conceptual design of a commercial reversed field pinch fusion reactor studied at the University of Tokyo. The experimental studies on the migration steps of tritium are reported. (Kako, I.)

  4. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS, then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb, promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC and low density lipoprotein (LDL levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes.

  5. Toroidal coil for torus type nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Daisaburo; Jinbo, Kensaku.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To facilitate clamping operation in the joint section of a toroidal coil in the nuclear fusion device even if the device has a narrow central space. Structure: A clamp bolt for joining upper and lower coil conductors comprises a first bolt, which is provided in one end portion with a thread for fitting a clamp nut, has a hollow intermediate portion and is provided at the other end with an opening of a smaller diameter than that of the hollow intermediate portion and also with an inner receiving surface, and a second bolt, which is provided in one end portion with a thread for fitting a clamp nut and in the other end portion with a raised portion and is adapted to be inserted on the raised portion side into the hollow intermediate portion of the first bolt such that it is extendable in the axial direction. When inserting this clamp bolt into a see-through hole in the conductor joint section its length is reduced, and at the time of clamping it is extended with the raised portion of the second bolt locked by the receiving surface of the first bolt. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Experimental studies on tungsten-armour impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Satoshi; Nakao, Makoto; Verzilov, Yury; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Kondo, Keitaro; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-07-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armour impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed using DT neutrons at the Fusion Neutron Source facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are made of a set of layers consisting of 0-25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li2TiO3 and 100-200 mm thick beryllium with a cross-section of 660 × 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li2CO3 are embedded in the Li2TiO3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5 mm, 12.6 mm and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armours, the sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2.1%, 2.5% and 6.1% relative to the case without the armour, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. In the case of the mockups with the tungsten armour, calculation results for the sum of the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 4% and 19% in the experiments without and with a neutron reflector, respectively.

  7. Experimental studies on tungsten-armour impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Nakao, Makoto; Verzilov, Yury; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Kondo, Keitaro; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armour impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed using DT neutrons at the Fusion Neutron Source facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are made of a set of layers consisting of 0-25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li 2 TiO 3 and 100-200 mm thick beryllium with a cross-section of 660 x 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li 2 CO 3 are embedded in the Li 2 TiO 3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5 mm, 12.6 mm and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armours, the sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2.1%, 2.5% and 6.1% relative to the case without the armour, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. In the case of the mockups with the tungsten armour, calculation results for the sum of the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 4% and 19% in the experiments without and with a neutron reflector, respectively

  8. Liquid lithium blanket processing studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.B.; Clinton, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of tritium on yttrium from flowing molten lithium and the subsequent release of tritium from yttrium for regeneration of the metal sorbent were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of such a tritium-recovery process for a fusion reactor blanket of liquid lithium. In initial experiments with the forced convection loop, yttrium samples were contacted with lithium at 300 0 C. A mass transfer coefficient of 2.5 x 10 - cm/sec, which is more than an order of magnitude less than the value measured in earlier static experiments, was determined for the flowing lithium system. Rates of tritium release from yttrium samples were measured to evaluate possible thermal regeneration of the sorbent. Values for diffusion coefficients at 505, 800, and 900 0 C were estimated to be 1.1 x 10 -13 , 4.9 x 10 -12 , and 9.3 x 10 -10 cm 2 /sec, respectively. Tritium release from yttrium was investigated at higher temperatures and with hydrogen added to the argon sweep gas to provide a reducing atmosphere

  9. Fusion Breeder Program interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.

    1982-01-01

    This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83

  10. Present status of fusion reactor materials, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Ryukichi; Shiraishi, Kensuke; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Murakami, Yoshio; Takamura, Saburo

    1982-01-01

    Recently, the design of fusion reactors such as Intor has been carried out, and various properties that fusion reactor materials should have been clarified. In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the research and development of materials aiming at a tokamak type experimental fusion reactor are in progress. In this paper, the problems, the present status of research and development and the future plan about the surface materials and structural materials for the first wall, blanket materials and magnet materials are explained. The construction of the critical plasma testing facility JT-60 developed by JAERI has progressed smoothly, and the operation is expected in 1985. The research changes from that of plasma physics to that of reactor technology. In tokamak type fusion reactors, high temperature D-T plasma is contained with strong magnetic field in vacuum vessels, and the neutrons produced by nuclear reaction, charged particles diffusing from plasma and neutral particles by charge exchange strike the first wall. The PCA by improving 316 stainless steel is used as the structural material, and TiC coating techniques are developed. As the blanket material, Li 2 O is studied, and superconducting magnets are developed. (Koko, I.)

  11. Characterization for fusion first-wall damage studies of using tailored D-T neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, R.; Emigh, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    The approximation required to apply the Bullough-Haynes results to the present calculations is somewhat crude and may imply that the details of the results contain considerable error. However, when the results for each neutron source are viewed in a relative context, several valid and important observations can be made. The almost identical swelling results obtained for the intense neutron source (INS) with a standard blanket and the fusion first wall are most striking. A further comparison with a fusion reactor shows that even the spatial and energy distributions of the neutron flux are similar. In both the INS with blanket and at the first wall of a fusion reactor, there is a radial source flux component of 14-MeV neutrons and a more or less isotropic flux component of low energy (< 14-MeV) neutrons. One must therefore conclude that from the point-of-view of neutron radiation damage, the INS with a blanket, unlike all other types of neutron sources, is not a simulation environment. It is, in fact, a small scale fusion device, and data obtained from INS irradiation experiments would represent fusion reactor results. Such data could then be used to develop correlative procedures for applying data obtained from other simulation sources to fusion reactor conditions

  12. Blanket for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Maki, Koichi.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a blanket of a thermonuclear device which produces tritium fuels consumed in plasmas while converting neutrons generated in the plasmas into heat energy. That is, zirconium is coated to at least one of neutron breeder pebbles and breeder pebbles, to suppress reaction between them by being in direct contact with each other at a high temperature. Further, fins are attached to a cooling pipe at a pitch smaller than the diameter of both of the pebbles, to prevent direct contact at whole surface of the pebbles and the cooling pipe, which would lower a temperature excessively. The length of the fin is controlled to control the thickness of a helium gas gap. With such constitution, direct contact of neutron breeder pebbles and the breeder pebble which are to be filled and mixed, and tend to react at a high temperature, can be prevented. The temperature of the breeding blanket is reliably prevented from lowering below a tritium emitting temperature. The structure is simplified and the production is facilitated. (I.S.)

  13. Overview of design and R and D of test blankets in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoeda, Mikio; Akiba, Masato; Tanaka, Satoru; Shimizu, Akihiko; Hasegawa, Akira; Konishi, Satoshi; Kimura, Akihiko; Kohyama, Akira; Sagara, Akio; Muroga, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    Japan is performing design and technology developments for the purpose of module testing and contribution to the module development and testing under the framework of Test Blanket Working Group (TBWG) with involvements of all of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and universities and National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). As the primary blanket option, solid breeder test blanket modules (TBMs) with reduced activation ferritic steel structure is being developed and proposed to be delivered on the first day of ITER operation, mainly by JAERI. As for the advanced blanket options, mainly universities and NIFS have been performing R and D of key technologies and design concept development of solid breeder blanket test article made of SiC composite contained inside the ferritic steel box, liquid LiPb breeder blanket TBM cooled by helium and its dual-coolant option, liquid Li self-cooled blanket TBM and molten salt self-cooled TBM. In all necessary fields of the development of the primary blanket option, the element technology development phase has been almost completed and is now stepping further to the engineering test phase. The development of advanced test blankets is also showing steady progress to overcome key issues toward module testing

  14. An Analysis of Ripple and Error Fields Induced by a Blanket in the CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guanying; Liu, Xufeng; Liu, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    The Chinese Fusion Engineering Tokamak Reactor (CFETR) is an important intermediate device between ITER and DEMO. The Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) blanket whose structural material is mainly made of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel, is one of the candidate conceptual blanket design. An analysis of ripple and error field induced by RAFM steel in WCCB is evaluated with the method of static magnetic analysis in the ANSYS code. Significant additional magnetic field is produced by blanket and it leads to an increased ripple field. Maximum ripple along the separatrix line reaches 0.53% which is higher than 0.5% of the acceptable design value. Simultaneously, one blanket module is taken out for heating purpose and the resulting error field is calculated to be seriously against the requirement. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China (No. 2013GB108004)

  15. The European fusion file project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.

    1989-01-01

    The European Fusion File (EFF) is a nuclear data file for application in fusion-reactor blanket design calculations, in particular for neutron and photon transport calculations of the Next European Torus (NET). This paper presents the main objectives of the programme for the period 1989 to 1991

  16. Tritium-assisted fusion breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1983-08-01

    This report undertakes a preliminary assessment of the prospects of tritium-assisted D-D fuel cycle fusion breeders. Two well documented fusion power reactor designs - the STARFIRE (D-T fuel cycle) and the WILDCAT (Cat-D fuel cycle) tokamaks - are converted into fusion breeders by replacing the fusion electric blankets with 233 U producing fission suppressed blankets; changing the Cat-D fuel cycle mode of operation by one of the several tritium-assisted D-D-based modes of operation considered; adjusting the reactor power level; and modifying the resulting plant cost to account for the design changes. Three sources of tritium are considered for assisting the D-D fuel cycle: tritium produced in the blankets from lithium or from 3 He and tritium produced in the client fission reactors. The D-D-based fusion breeders using tritium assistance are found to be the most promising economically, especially the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium mode of operation in which the 3 He exhausted from the plasma is converted, by neutron capture in the blanket, into tritium which is in turn fed back to the plasma. The number of fission reactors of equal thermal power supported by Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium fusion breeders is about 50% higher than that of D-T fusion breeders, and the profitability is found to be slightly lower than that of the D-T fusion breeders

  17. Updated neutronics analyses of a water cooled ceramic breeder blanket for the CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaokang, ZHANG; Songlin, LIU; Xia, LI; Qingjun, ZHU; Jia, LI

    2017-11-01

    The water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) blanket employing pressurized water as a coolant is one of the breeding blanket candidates for the China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Some updating of neutronics analyses was needed, because there were changes in the neutronics performance of the blanket as several significant modifications and improvements have been adopted for the WCCB blanket, including the optimization of radial build-up and customized structure for each blanket module. A 22.5 degree toroidal symmetrical torus sector 3D neutronics model containing the updated design of the WCCB blanket modules was developed for the neutronics analyses. The tritium breeding capability, nuclear heating power, radiation damage, and decay heat were calculated by the MCNP and FISPACT code. The results show that the packing factor and 6Li enrichment of the breeder should both be no less than 0.8 to ensure tritium self-sufficiency. The nuclear heating power of the blanket under 200 MW fusion power reaches 201.23 MW. The displacement per atom per full power year (FPY) of the plasma-facing component and first wall reach 0.90 and 2.60, respectively. The peak H production rate reaches 150.79 appm/FPY and the peak He production reaches 29.09 appm/FPY in blanket module #3. The total decay heat of the blanket modules is 2.64 MW at 1 s after shutdown and the average decay heat density can reach 11.09 kW m-3 at that time. The decay heat density of the blanket modules slowly decreases to lower than 10 W m-3 in more than ten years.

  18. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies

  19. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  20. First wall and blanket module safety enhancement by material selection and design decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    A thermal/mechanical study has been performed which illustrates the behavior of a fusion reactor first wall and blanket module during a loss of coolant flow event. The relative safety advantages of various material and design options were determined. A generalized first wall-blanket concept was developed to provide the flexibility to vary the structural material (stainless steel vs titanium), coolant (helium vs water), and breeder material (liquid lithium vs solid lithium aluminate). In addition, independent vs common first wall-blanket cooling and coupled adjacent module cooling design options were included in the study. The comparative analyses were performed using a modified thermal analysis code to handle phase change problems.

  1. Thermo-mechanical characterization of ceramic pebbles for breeding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Frano, Rosa, E-mail: rosa.lofrano@ing.unipi.it; Aquaro, Donato; Scaletti, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental activities to characterize the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. • Compression tests of pebbles. • Experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of pebbles bed at different temperatures. • Experimental test with/without compression load. - Abstract: An open issue for fusion power reactor is to design a suitable breeding blanket capable to produce the necessary quantity of the tritium and to transfer the energy of the nuclear fusion reaction to the coolant. The envisaged solution called Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeding blanket foresees the use of lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) or lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) pebble beds. The thermal mechanical properties of the candidate pebble bed materials are presently extensively investigated because they are critical for the feasibility and performances of the numerous conceptual designs which use a solid breeder. This study is aimed at the investigation of mechanical properties of the lithium orthosilicate and at the characterization of the main chemical, physical and thermo-mechanical properties taking into account the production technology. In doing that at the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI) of the University of Pisa adequate experiments were carried out. The obtained results may contribute to characterize the material of the pebbles and to optimize the design of the envisaged fusion breeding blankets.

  2. Conceptual design of the cryogenic system for the helical-type fusion power plant FFHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, S.; Sagara, A.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Motojima, O.

    2007-01-01

    The force-free helical-type fusion reactor, FFHR, is proposed on the basis of the engineering achievements and confinement properties of the experimental fusion device of LHD. The outputs of the thermal power and electric power are optimized to 3 and 1 GW, respectively. Total weight of the superconducting (SC) coils and their supporting structures of the FFHR are estimated to be 18,000 t. An equivalent refrigeration capacity of 98 kW is necessary for coping with different plant loads. Mass-flow rate of the main circulation compressors is 9.5 kg/s and their power consumption is 29 MW. The FFHR is used for the co-generation system of electricity and hydrogen. The pressurized hydrogen of 100 t per day can be produced, when the stem electrolyzer of 150 MW class is applied. Electric power consumption of the hydrogen liquefaction with 100 t per day is estimated to be 26 MW

  3. Behavior of Type 316 stainless steel under simulated fusion reactor irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiffen, F.W.; Maziasz, P.J.; Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1978-05-01

    Fusion reactor irradiation response in alloys containing nickel can be simulated in thermal-spectrum fission reactors, where displacement damage is produced by the high-energy neutrons and helium is produced by the capture of two thermal neutrons in the reactions: /sup 58/Ni + n ..-->.. /sup 59/Ni + ..gamma..; /sup 59/Ni + n ..-->.. /sup 56/Fe + ..cap alpha... Examination of type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated in HFIR has shown that swelling due to cavity formation and degradation of mechanical properties are more severe than can be predicted from fast reactor irradiations, where the helium contents produced are far too low to simulate fusion reactor service. Swelling values are greater and the temperature dependence of swelling is different than in the fast reactor case.

  4. Enhanced fuel production in thorium/lithium hybrid blankets utilizing uranium multipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitulski, R.H.

    1979-10-01

    A consistent neutronics analysis is performed to determine the effectiveness of uranium bearing neutron multiplier zones on increasing the production of U 233 in thorium/lithium blankets for use in a tokamak fusion-fission hybrid reactor. The nuclear performance of these blankets is evaluated as a function of zone thicknesses and exposure by using the coupled transport burnup code ANISN-CINDER-HIC. Various parameters such as U 233 , Pu 239 , and H 3 production rates, the blanket energy multiplication, isotopic composition of the fuels, and neutron leakages into the various zones are evaluated during a 5 year (6 MW.y.m -2 ) exposure period. Although the results of this study were obtained for a tokomak magnetic fusion device, the qualitative behavior associated with the use of the uranium bearing neutron multiplier should be applicable to all fusion-fission hybrids

  5. Tokamak blanket design study, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    A cylindrical module concept was developed, analyzed, and incorporated in a tokamak blanket system that includes piping systems, vacuum boundary sealing, and support structures. The design is based on the use of state-of-the-art structural materials (20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel), lithium as the breeding material, and pressurized helium as the coolant. The module design consists of nested concentric cylinders (with an outer diameter of 10 cm) and features direct wall cooling by helium flowing between the outer (first-wall) cylinder and the inner (lithium-containing) cylinder. Each cylinder can withstand full coolant pressure, thus enhancing reliability. Results show that stainless steel is a viable material for a first wall subjected to a neutron wall loading of 4 MW/m 2 and a particle heat flux of 1 MW/m 2 . Lifetime analysis shows that the first-wall design meets the goal of operating at 20-min cycles with 95% duty for 100,000 cycles. To reduce system complexity, a larger 20-cm-diam module also was analyzed for incorporation in the blanket assembly. Reliability assessment indicates that it may be possible to double the module in size from 10 to 20 cm in diameter. With a modest increase in coolant pumping power, a blanket assembly comprising 20-cm-diam modules can still achieve 100,000 operating cycles - equivalent to a 3.6-year design lifetime - with only one or two helium coolant leaks into the plasma

  6. Fusion breeder: its potential role and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a concept that utilizes 14 MeV neutrons from D + T → n(14.1 MeV) + α(3.5 MeV) fusion reactions to produce more fuel than the tritium (T) needed to sustain the fusion process. This excess fuel production capacity is used to produce fissile material (Pu-239 or U-233) for subsequent use in fission reactors. We are concentrating on a class of blankets we call fission suppressed. The blanket is the region surrounding the fusion plasma in which fusion neutrons interact to produce fuel and heat. The fission-suppressed blanket uses non-fission reactions (mainly (n,2n) or (n,n't)) to generate excess neutrons for the production of net fuel. This is in contrast to the fast fission class of blankets which use (n,fiss) reactions to generate excess neutrons. Fusion reactors with fast fission blankets are commony known as fusion-fission hybrids because they combine fusion and fission in the same device

  7. ITER Blanket First Wall (WBS 1.6{sub 1}A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Bong Guen; Kim, H. G.; Kim, J. H. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is the international collaboration one for the commercialization of nuclear fusion energy through the technical and engineering verification. In ITER project, we plan to procure the blanket systems which has the risk of technology and cost when it is newly developed. We are developing the manufacturing process and joining technology for the ITER blanket to complete the procurement with qualified blanket system. To evaluate the soundness of manufacturing process, specimen and mock-up tests are being prepared. Finally, we can obtain the key technology of nuclear fusion reactor especially on the blanket design, joining and manufacturing technology through the present project and these technologies will help the construction of Korea fusion DEMO reactor and the development of commercial nuclear fusion reactor in Korea. In 1st year, through the fabrication of the Cu/SS and Be/Cu joint specimen, fabrication procedure such as material preparation, canning, degassing, HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing), PHHT (Post HIP heat treatment) was established. The optimized HIP conditions (1050 .deg. C, 150 MPa, 2 hr for Cu/SS and 580 - 620 .deg. C, 100-150 MPa, 2 hr for Be/Cu) were developed through the investigation on joint specimen fabricated with the various HIP conditions; the destructive tests of joint and NDT such as UT (10 MHz, 0.25 inch D, flat type) and ECT. Several mock-ups were fabricated for confirming the joint integrity and NDT. specimens fabricated with these mock-ups were used in mechanical tests including microstructure observation. The mock-ups were used in the HHF test after the developed NDT. In 2nd year, PHHT of Cu was investigated in order to recover its mechanical properties, and the pre-qualification mock-up were fabricated against the Qualification Program and sent to RF for HHF testing in TSEFEY. FW fabrication and joining procedure were documented in the form of the TSD. Qualification mock

  8. MHD considerations for poloidal-toroidal coolant ducts of self-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, T.Q.; Walker, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows of liquid metals through sharp elbow ducts with rectangular cross sections and with thin conducting walls in the presence of strong uniform magnetic fields are examined. The geometries simulate the poloidaltoroidal coolant channels in fusion tokamak blankets. Analysis for obtaining the three-dimensional numerical solutions are described. Results for pressure drop, velocity profiles and flow distribution are predicted for the upcoming joint ANL/KfK sharp elbow experiment. Results from a parametric study using fusion relevant parameters to investigate the three-dimensional pressure drop are presented for possible applications to blanket designs. 10 refs., 9 refs

  9. Radiolysis and corrosion aspects of the aqueous self-cooled blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, A.; Snykers, M.; Bogaerts, W.F.; Waeben, R.; Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion and radiolysis aspects of the Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept, proposed as a potential shielding breeding blanket for near term fusion devices and fusion reactors, have been investigated. On the basis of preliminary results for selected aqueous solutions of lithium compounds, no particular corrosion problems have been revealed for the low-temperature concept envisaged for NET and radiolysis effects might be controlled by appropriate countermeasures. For the reactor-relevant high-temperature concept particular attention has to be paid to intergranular stress-corrosion and to the synergistic radiolysis-corrosion effects. Further information is needed from tests performed in relevant operational conditions. (orig.)

  10. Fusion for Energy: The European joint undertaking for ITER and the development of fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diegele, E.

    2009-01-01

    Materials development in nuclear fusion for in-vessel components, i.e. for breeder blankets and divertors, has a history of more than two decades. It is the specific in-service and loading conditions and the consequentially required properties in combination with safety standards and social-economic demands that create a unique set of specifications. Objectives of Fusion for Energy (F4E) include: 1) To provide Europe's contribution to the ITER international fusion energy project; 2) To implement the Broader Approach agreement between Euratom and Japan; 3) To prepare for the construction and demonstration of fusion reactors (DEMO). Consequently, activities in F4E focus on structural materials for the first generations of breeder blankets, i.e. ITER Test Blanket Modules (TBM) and DEMO, whereas a Fusion Materials Topical Group implemented under EFDA coordinates R and D on physically based modelling of irradiation effects and R and D in the longer term (new and /or higher risk materials). The paper focuses on martensitic-ferritic steels and (i) reviews briefly the challenges and the rationales for the decisions taken in the past, (ii) analyses the status of the main activities of development and qualification, (iii) indicates unresolved issues, and (iv) outlines future strategies and needs and their implications. Due to the exposure to intense high energy neutron flux, the main issue for breeder materials is high radiation resistance. The First Wall of a breeder blanket should survive 3-5 full power years or, respectively in terms of irradiation damage, typically 50-70 dpa for DEMO and double figures for a power plant. Even though the objective is to have the materials and key fabrication technologies needed for DEMO fully developed and qualified within the next two decades, a major part of the task has to be completed much earlier. Tritium breeding test blanket modules will be installed in ITER with the objective to test DEMO relevant technologies in fusion

  11. A novel type of EWS-CHOP fusion gene in myxoid liposarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yoshito; Ueda, Takafumi; Kubo, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Mina; Myoui, Akira; Kakunaga, Shigeki; Yasui, Natsuo; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    The cytogenetic hallmark of myxoid type and round cell type liposarcoma consists of reciprocal translocation of t(12;16)(q13;p11) and t(12;22)(q13;q12), which results in fusion of TLS/FUS and CHOP, and EWS and CHOP, respectively. Nine structural variations of the TLS/FUS-CHOP chimeric transcript have been reported, however, only two types of EWS-CHOP have been described. We describe here a case of myxoid liposarcoma containing a novel EWS-CHOP chimeric transcript and identified the breakpoint occurring in intron 13 of EWS. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and direct sequence showed that exon 13 of EWS was in-frame fused to exon 2 of CHOP. Genomic analysis revealed that the breaks were located in intron 13 of EWS and intron 1 of CHOP

  12. Conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for a mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor. Addendum 1. Alternate concepts. 12-month progress report addendum, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Dee, J.B.; Backus, G.A.; Culver, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    During the course of the Mirror Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactor study several alternate concepts were considered for various reactor components. Several of the alternate concepts do appear to exhibit features with potential advantage for use in the mirror hybrid reactor. These are described and should possibly be investigated further in the future

  13. Mirror hybrid reactor blanket and power conversion system conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Backus, G.A.; Baxi, C.B.; Dee, J.B.; Estrine, E.A.; Rao, R.; Veca, A.R.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for a gas-cooled mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor is presented. The designs of the fuel, blanket module and power conversion system are based on existing gas-cooled fission reactor technology that has been developed at General Atomic Company. The uranium silicide fuel is contained in Inconel-clad rods and is cooled by helium gas. The fuel is contained in 16 spherical segment modules which surround the fusion plasma. The hot helium is used to raise steam for a conventional steam cycle turbine generator. The details of the method of support for the massive blanket modules and helium ducts remain to be determined. Nevertheless, the conceptual design appears to be technically feasible with existing gas-cooled technology. A preliminary safety analysis shows that with the development of a satisfactory method of primary coolant circuit containment and support, the hybrid reactor could be licensed under existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations

  14. Thermal hydraulic and power cycle analysis of liquid lithium blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic and power cycle analyses were performed for the first-wall and blanket systems of tokamak-type fusion reactors under a typical set of design and operating conditions. The analytical results for lithium-cooled blanket cells show that with stainless steel as construction material and with no divertor present, the maximum allowable neutron wall loading is approximately 2 MW/m 2 and is limited by thermal stress criteria. With vanadium alloy as construction material and no divertor present, the maximum allowable neutron wall loading is approximately 8 MW/m 2 and is limited by an interplay of constraints imposed on the maximum allowable structural temperature and the minimum allowable coolant inlet temperature. With a divertor these wall loadings can be increased by from 40 to 90 percent. The cost of the vanadium system is found to be competitive with the stainless steel system because of the higher allowable structural temperatures and concomitant higher thermal efficiencies afforded by the vanadium alloys

  15. Trade-off study of liquid-metal self-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A trade-off study of liquid-metal self-cooled blankets was carried out to define the performance of these blankets with respect to the main functions in a fusion reactor, and to determine the potential to operate at the maximum possible values of the performance parameters. The main purpose is to improve the reactor economics by maximizing the blanket energy multiplication factor, reduce the capital cost of the reactor, and satisfy the design requirements. The main parameters during the course of the study were the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the blanket energy multiplication factor, the energy fraction lost to the shield, the 6 Li enrichment in the breeder material, the total blanket thickness, the reflector material selection, and the compositions of the different blanket zones. Also, the impact of different reactor design choices on the performance parameters was analyzed. The effect of the impurity control system (limiter or divertor), the material choice for the limiter, the elimination of tritium breeding from the inboard section of tokamak reactors, the coolant choice for the nonbreeding inboard blanket, and the neutron source distribution were part of the trade-off study. In addition, tritium breeding benchmark calculations were performed to study the impact of the use of different transport codes and nuclear data libraries. The importance and the negative effect of high TBR on the energy multiplication motivated the benchmark calculations

  16. Development of blanket remote maintenance system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Oka, Kiyoshi; Taguchi, Kou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    ITER in-vessel components such as blankets are scheduled maintenance components, including complete shield blanket replacement for breeding blankets. In-vessel components are activated by 14 MeV neutrons, so blanket maintenance requires remote handling equipment and tools able to handle heavy payloads of about 4 tons within a positioning accuracy of 2 mm under intense gamma radiation. To facilitate remote maintenance, blankets are segmented into 730 modules and rail-mounted vehicle remote maintenance was developed. According to the ITER R and D program, critical technology related to blanket maintenance was developed extensively through joint efforts of the Japan, EU, and U.S. home teams. This paper summarizes current blanket maintenance technology conducted by the Japan Home Team, including development of full-scale remote handling equipment and tools for blanket maintenance. (author)

  17. Low activity blanket designs and heat transfer for experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.; Tichler, P.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.

    1976-01-01

    Two minimum activity blanket designs are described, based on the ANL TEPR circular design parameters. A first wall loading (plasma on) of 1.0 MW(th)/m 2 has been assumed. The first option is composed of SAP (sintered aluminum product) modules. The oval shaped SAP shell, in which approximately 45 percent of the fusion energy is removed, is maintained at a temperature of approximately 400 0 C by a He coolant stream. The remaining 55 percent of the fusion energy is deposited in a thermally insulated hot interior (SiC and B 4 C) and removed by a separate He coolant, with exit temperature of 800 0 C. In the second option, the blanket is a thick graphite block structure (approximately 50 cm thickness) with SAP coolant tubes carrying He (50 atm) embedded deep within the graphite to minimize radiation damage. The neutron and gamma energy deposited in the graphite is radiated along internal slots and conducted through the graphite to the coolant tubes. To reduce surface evaporation above 2000 0 C, the blanket surface is radiatively cooled to a low temperature radiation sink, a bank of He cooled SAP tubes. Approximately 20 percent of the fusion energy is removed in this region, the remaining 80 percent in the primary graphite-aluminum blanket. Both blanket options are mounted on heavy Al backing plates, cooled by He, which are in turn supported from the fixed shield

  18. Self-cooled blanket concepts using Pb-17Li as liquid breeder and coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Deckers, H.; Fischer, U.; John, H.; Meyder, R.; Norajitra, P.; Reimann, J.; Reiser, H.; Rust, K.

    1991-01-01

    A blanket design concept using Pb-17Li eutectic alloy as both breeder material and coolant is described. Such a self-cooled blanket for the boundary conditions of a DEMO-reactor is under development at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in the frame of the European blanket development program. Results of investigations in the areas of design, neutronics, magneto-hydrodynamics, thermo-mechanics, ancillary loop systems, and safety are reported. Based on recent progress, it can be concluded that the boundary conditions of a DEMO-reactor can be met, tritium self-sufficiency can be obtained without using beryllium as an additional neutron multiplier, and tritium inventory and permeation are acceptably low. However, to complete judge the feasibility of the proposed concept, further studies are necessary to obtain a better understanding of the magneto-hydrodynamic phenomena and their effects on the thermal-hydraulic performance of a fusion reactor blanket. (orig.)

  19. Design studies on three-dimensional issues for liquid blanket systems in helical reactor FFHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T., E-mail: teru@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sagara, A.; Goto, T.; Yanagi, N.; Tamura, H.; Hirooka, Y.; Miyazawa, J.; Muroga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three-dimensional blanket design issues have been studied for helical DEMO FFHR-d1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (1) A minimum blanket space required for decision of the reactor parameter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (2) A supporting method for a helical blanket system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (3) Size of blanket module and effect of magnetic field on liquid coolants. - Abstract: A new design activity is under way for a helical type DEMO reactor FFHR-d1. The first stage of the activity involves the fundamental issues related to three-dimensional blanket design: (1) the minimum blanket space required for reactor parameter decisions, (2) the support method for the helical blanket system, and (3) the blanket module design. Investigations have been performed with neutronics and mechanical finite-element method calculations. Neutronics investigations indicate that a tungsten carbide radiation shield could reduce the minimum blanket space requirement by {approx}30 cm at the inboard region of FFHR-d1 compared with the blanket space of {approx}100 cm in the previous FFHR2 design. The investigations also showed that main shielding materials, ferritic steel and B{sub 4}C, could be used separately in a two-layered shielding configuration. The ferritic steel layer of the radiation shield is considered suitable to support the helical blanket system instead of relying on a thin vacuum vessel of the helical reactor. A size of a blanket module for a replacement process and the preferable cooling channel direction under a magnetic field are also discussed.

  20. Engineering test station for TFTR blanket module experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Leinoff, S.

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design has been carried out for an Engineering Test Station (ETS) which will provide structural support and utilities/instrumentation services for blanket modules positioned adjacent to the vacuum vessel of the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor). The ETS is supported independently from the Test Cell floor. The ETS module support platform is constructed of fiberglass to eliminate electromagnetic interaction with the pulsed tokamak fields. The ETS can hold blanket modules with dimensions up to 78 cm in width, 85 cm in height, and 105 cm in depth, and with a weight up to 4000 kg. Interfaces for all utility and instrumentation requirements are made via a shield plug in the TFTR igloo shielding. The modules are readily installed or removed by means of TFTR remote handling equipment

  1. Blanket Manufacturing Technologies : Thermomechanical Tests on HCLL Blanket Mocks Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laffont, G.; Cachon, L.; Taraud, P.; Challet, F.; Rampal, G.; Salavy, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    In the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) Blanket concept, the lithium lead plays the double role of breeder and multiplier material, and the helium is used as coolant. The HCCL Blanket Module are made of steel boxes reinforced by stiffening plates. These stiffening plates form cells in which the breeder is slowly flowing. The power deposited in the breeder material is recovered by the breeder cooling units constituted by 5 parallel cooling plates. All the structures such as first wall, stiffening and cooling plates are cooled by helium. Due to the complex geometry of these parts and the high level of pressure and temperature loading, thermo-mechanical phenomena expected in the '' HCLL blanket concept '' have motivated the present study. The aim of this study, carried out in the frame of EFDA Work program, is to validate the manufacturing technologies of HCLL blanket module by testing small scale mock-up under breeder blanket representative operating conditions.The first step of this experimental program is the design and manufacturing of a relevant test section in the DIADEMO facility, which was recently upgraded with an He cooling loop (pressure of 80 bar, maximum temperature of 500 o C,flow rate of 30 g/s) taking the opportunity of synergies with the gas-cooled fission reactor R-and-D program. The second step will deal with the thermo-mechanical tests. This paper focuses on the program made to support the cooling plate mock up tests which will be carried out on the DIADEMO facility (CEA) by thermo-mechanical calculations in order to define the relevant test conditions and the experimental parameters to be monitored. (author)

  2. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  3. Proceedings of the eleventh international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoeda, Mikio

    2004-07-01

    This report is the Proceedings of 'the Eleventh International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders Under the IEA Implementing Agreement on the Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors, and the Japan-US Fusion Collaboration Framework. This workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan on December 15-17, 2003. About thirty experts from China, EU, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Russia and USA attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included 1) evolutions in ceramic breeder blanket design, 2) progress in ceramic breeder material development, 3) irradiation testing, 4) breeder material properties, 5) out-of-pile pebble bed experiment, 6) modeling of the thermal, mechanical and tritium transfer behavior of pebble beds and 7) interfacing issues of solid breeder blanket. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for designs of solid breeder blankets and test blankets in EU, Russia and Japan, recent results of irradiation tests, HICU, EXOTIC-8 and the irradiation tests by IVV-2M, modeling study on tritium release behavior of Li 2 TiO 3 and so on, fabrication technology developments and characterization of the Li 2 TiO 3 and Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles, research on measurements and modeling of thermo-mechanical behaviors of Li 2 TiO 3 and Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles, and interfacing issues, such as, fabrication technology for blanket box structure, neutronics experiments of blanket mockups by fusion neutron source and tritium recovery system. The 26 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. RAMI analysis for DEMO HCPB blanket concept cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongiovanni, Danilo N., E-mail: danilo.dongiovanni@enea.it [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati (Italy); Pinna, Tonio [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati (Italy); Carloni, Dario [KIT, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) – KIT (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) preliminary assessment for HCPB blanket concept cooling system. • Reliability block diagram (RBD) modeling and analysis for HCPB primary heat transfer system (PHTS), coolant purification system (CPS), pressure control system (PCS), and secondary cooling system. • Sensitivity analysis on system availability performance. • Failure models and repair models estimated on the base of data from the ENEA fusion component failure rate database (FCFRDB). - Abstract: A preliminary RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) assessment for the HCPB (helium cooled pebble bed) blanket cooling system based on currently available design for DEMO fusion power plant is presented. The following sub-systems were considered in the analysis: blanket modules, primary cooling loop including pipework and steam generators lines, pressure control system (PCS), coolant purification system (CPS) and secondary cooling system. For PCS and CPS systems an extrapolation from ITER Test Blanket Module corresponding systems was used as reference design in the analysis. Helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) system reliability block diagrams (RBD) models were implemented taking into account: system reliability-wise configuration, operating schedule currently foreseen for DEMO, maintenance schedule and plant evolution schedule as well as failure and corrective maintenance models. A simulation of plant activity was then performed on implemented RBDs to estimate plant availability performance on a mission time of 30 calendar years. The resulting availability performance was finally compared to availability goals previously proposed for DEMO plant by a panel of experts. The study suggests that inherent availability goals proposed for DEMO PHTS system and Tokamak auxiliaries are potentially achievable for the primary loop of the HCPB concept cooling system, but not for the secondary loop. A

  5. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1985-10-01

    KfK is involved in the European Fusion Programme predominantly in the NET and Fusion Technology part. The following fields of activity are covered: Studies for NET, alternative confinement concepts, and needs and issues of integral testing. Research on structural materials. Development of superconducting magnets. Gyrotron development (part of the Physics Programme). Nuclear technology (breeding materials, blanket design, tritium technology, safety and environmental aspects of fusion, remote maintenance). Reported here are status and results of work under contracts with the CEC within the NET and Technology Programme. The aim of the major part of this R and D work is the support of NET, some areas (e.g. materials, safety and environmental impact, blanket design) have a wider scope and address problems of a demonstration reactor. In the current working period, several new proposals have been elaborated to be implemented into the 85/89 Euratom Fusion Programme. New KfK contributions relate to materials research (dual beam and fast reactor irradiations, ferritic steels), to blanket engineering (MHD-effects) and to safety studies (e.g. magnet safety). (orig./GG)

  6. Neutronics Analysis of Water-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingjun; Li, Jia; Liu, Songlin

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate the nuclear response to the water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket models for CFETR, a detailed 3D neutronics model with 22.5° torus sector was developed based on the integrated geometry of CFETR, including heterogeneous WCCB blanket models, shield, divertor, vacuum vessel, toroidal and poloidal magnets, and ports. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code MCNP5 and IAEA Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL2.1, the neutronics analyses were performed. The neutron wall loading, tritium breeding ratio, the nuclear heating, neutron-induced atomic displacement damage, and gas production were determined. The results indicate that the global TBR of no less than 1.2 will be a big challenge for the water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket for CFETR. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000, and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  7. Breeding blankets for thermonuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocaboy, Alain.

    1982-06-01

    Materials with structures suitable for this purpose are studied. A bibliographic review of the main solid and liquid lithiated compounds is then presented. Erosion, dimensioning and maintenance problems associated with the limiter and the first wall of the reactor are studied from the point of view of the constraints they impose on the design of the blankets. Detailed studies of the main solid and liquid blanket concepts enable the best technological compromises to be determined for the indispensable functions of the blanket to be assured under acceptable conditions. Our analysis leads to four classes of solution, which cannot at this stage be considered as final recommendations, but which indicate what sort of solutions it is worthwhile exploring and comparing in order to be in a position to suggest a realistic blanket at the time when plasma control is sufficiently good for power reactors to be envisaged. Some considerations on the general architecture of the reactor are indicated. Energy storage with pulsed reactors is discussed in the appendix, and a first approach made to minimizing the total tritium recovery [fr

  8. Fusion technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elen, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    For the water-cooled liquid lithium INTOR/NET blanket concept, a computational analysis was made of the shock wave loading and the dynamic response of the canister type module after sudden rupture of an internal coolant tube. A start was made, by definition of format and contents, for the compilation of an 'European Fusion File', as a basic tool for neutronics calculations on fusion reactor concepts and plasma physics experiments. To enable a better modelling of the JET torus in the calculations performed for neutron diagnostics, the code system FURNACE has been extended to handle three dimensional geometries. Tensile specimens of V-5%Ti alloy were exposed to liquid sodium during a five month period at 487, 572 and 664 deg C, in parallel to a 5 dpa irradiation also in liquid sodium in the HFR reactor. Tensile testing indicated a slight increase in UTS and yield strength and a lower ductility for the 664 deg C exposure. The radiation damage studies on the reference heat of ss 316L for the European fusion programme are extended towards weldings. In a preparative step, the microstructure of laser beam weldings in 6 mm plate was analysed. Progress on the feasibility study for an in-pile crack growth measurement rig is reported. A subsized prototype forced flow cooled niobium-tin superconductor for a 12 Tesla insert coil for the SULTAN test facility at Villigen was manufactured and tested. A study on upscaling towards the requirements of the NET toroidal field coils commenced. Progress towards a first irradiation experiment on tritium extraction from ceramic breeder material (lithium-aluminate and lithium-silicate) for the joint ECN/SCK/SNL project is reported

  9. Design and technology development of solid breeder blanket cooled by supercritical water in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoeda, M.; Kosaku, Y.; Hatano, T.; Kuroda, T.; Miki, N.; Honma, T.; Akiba, M.; Konishi, S.; Nakamura, H.; Kawamura, Y.; Sato, S.; Furuya, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents results of conceptual design activities and associated R&D of a solid breeder blanket system for demonstration of power generation fusion reactors (DEMO blanket) cooled by supercritical water. The Fusion Council of Japan developed the long-term research and development programme of the blanket in 1999. To make the fusion DEMO reactor more attractive, a higher thermal efficiency of more than 40% was strongly recommended. To meet this requirement, the design of the DEMO fusion reactor was carried out. In conjunction with the reactor design, a new concept of a solid breeder blanket cooled by supercritical water was proposed and design and technology development of a solid breeder blanket cooled by supercritical water was performed. By thermo-mechanical analyses of the first wall, the tresca stress was evaluated to be 428 MPa, which clears the 3Sm value of F82H. By thermal and nuclear analyses of the breeder layers, it was shown that a net TBR of more than 1.05 can be achieved. By thermal analysis of the supercritical water power plant, it was shown that a thermal efficiency of more than 41% is achievable. The design work included design of the coolant flow pattern for blanket modules, module structure design, thermo-mechanical analysis and neutronics analysis of the blanket module, and analyses of the tritium inventory and permeation. Preliminary integration of the design of a solid breeder blanket cooled by supercritical water was achieved in this study. In parallel with the design activities, engineering R&D was conducted covering all necessary issues, such as development of structural materials, tritium breeding materials, and neutron multiplier materials; neutronics experiments and analyses; and development of the blanket module fabrication technology. Upon developing the fabrication technology for the first wall and box structure, a hot isostatic pressing bonded F82H first wall mock-up with embedded rectangular cooling channels was

  10. Fusion power plant for water desalination and reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, A.A.; Desjatov, A.V.; Izvolsky, I.M.; Serikov, A.G.; Smirnov, V.P.; Smirnov, Yu.N.; Shatalov, G.E.; Sheludjakov, S.V.; Vasiliev, N.N.; Velikhov, E.P.

    2001-01-01

    Development of industry and agriculture demands a huge fresh water consumption. Exhaust of water sources together with pollution arises a difficult problem of population, industry, and agriculture water supply. Request for additional water supply in next 50 years is expected from industrial and agricultural sectors of many countries in the world. The presented study of fusion power plant for water desalination and reuse is aimed to widen a range of possible fusion industrial applications. Fusion offers a safe, long-term source of energy with abundant resources and major environmental advantages. Thus fusion can provide an attractive energy option to society in the next century. Fusion power tokamak reactor based on RF DEMO-S project [Proc. ISFNT-5 (2000) in press; Conceptual study of RF DEMO-S fusion reactor (2000)] was chosen as an energy source. A steady state operation mode is considered with thermal power of 4.0 GW. The reactor has to operate in steady-state plasma mode with high fraction of bootstrap current. Average plant availability of ∼0.7 is required. A conventional type of water cooled blanket is the first choice, helium or lithium coolants are under consideration. Desalination plant includes two units: reverse osmosis and distillation. Heat to electricity conversion schemes is optimized fresh water production and satisfy internal plant electricity demand The plant freshwater capacity is ∼6000000 m 3 per day. Fusion power plant of this capacity can provide a region of a million populations with fresh water, heat and electricity

  11. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  12. Productive infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in dendritic cells requires fusion-mediated viral entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janas, Alicia M.; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang Jianhua; Wu Li

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters dendritic cells (DCs) through endocytosis and viral receptor-mediated fusion. Although endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry can generate productive infection in certain cell types, including human monocyte-derived macrophages, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs appears to be dependent on fusion-mediated viral entry. It remains to be defined whether endocytosed HIV-1 in DCs can initiate productive infection. Using HIV-1 infection and cellular fractionation assays to measure productive viral infection and entry, here we show that HIV-1 enters monocyte-derived DCs predominately through endocytosis; however, endocytosed HIV-1 cannot initiate productive HIV-1 infection in DCs. In contrast, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs requires fusion-mediated viral entry. Together, these results provide functional evidence in understanding HIV-1 cis-infection of DCs, suggesting that different pathways of HIV-1 entry into DCs determine the outcome of viral infection

  13. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolodosky, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fratoni, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Lithium is often the preferred choice as breeder and coolant in fusion blankets as it offers excellent heat transfer and corrosion properties, and most importantly, it has a very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and exacerbates plant safety concerns. For this reason, over the years numerous blanket concepts have been proposed with the scope of reducing concerns associated with lithium. The European helium cooled pebble bed breeding blanket (HCPB) physically confines lithium within ceramic pebbles. The pebbles reside within a low activation martensitic ferritic steel structure and are cooled by helium. The blanket is composed of the tritium breeding lithium ceramic pebbles and neutron multiplying beryllium pebbles. Other blanket designs utilize lead to lower chemical reactivity; LiPb alone can serve as a breeder, coolant, neutron multiplier, and tritium carrier. Blankets employing LiPb coolants alongside silicon carbide structural components can achieve high plant efficiency, low afterheat, and low operation pressures. This alloy can also be used alongside of helium such as in the dual-coolant lead-lithium concept (DCLL); helium is utilized to cool the first wall and structural components made up of low-activation ferritic steel, whereas lithium-lead (LiPb) acts as a self-cooled breeder in the inner channels of the blanket. The helium-cooled steel and lead-lithium alloy are separated by flow channel inserts (usually made out of silicon carbide) which thermally insulate the self-cooled breeder region from the helium cooled steel walls. This creates a LiPb breeder with a much higher exit temperature than the steel which increases the power cycle efficiency and also lowers the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop [6]. Molten salt blankets with a mixture of lithium, beryllium, and fluorides (FLiBe) offer good tritium breeding

  14. Regeneration of asymmetric somatic hybrid plants from the fusion of two types of wheat with Russian wildrye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiling; Xia, Guangmin; Xiang, Fengning; Zhou, Chuanen; Cheng, Aixia

    2004-12-01

    Two types of protoplasts of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Jinan 177) were used in fusion experiments--cha9, with a high division frequency, and 176, with a high regeneration frequency. The fusion combination of either cha9 or 176 protoplasts with Russian wildrye protoplasts failed to produce regenerated calli. When a mixture of cha9 and 176 protoplasts were fused with those of Russian wildrye, 14 fusion-derived calli were produced, of which seven differentiated into green plants and two differentiated into albinos. The morphology of all hybrid plants strongly resembled that of the parental wheat type. The hybrid nature of the cell lines was confirmed by cytological, isozyme, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analyses. GISH analysis revealed that only chromosome fragments of Russian wildrye were transferred to the wheat chromosomes of hybrid calli and plants. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis of the chloroplast genome of the hybrids with seven pairs of wheat-specific chloroplast microsatellite primers indicated that all of the cell lines had band patterns identical to wheat. Our results show that highly asymmetric somatic hybrid calli and plants can be produced via symmetric fusion in a triparental fusion system. The dominant effect of two wheat cell lines on the exclusion of Russian wildrye chromosomes is discussed.

  15. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    1998-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials includes studies (1) to investigate fracture mechanics of neutron-irradiated beryllium; (2) to describe the helium behaviour in irradiated beryllium at atomic scale; (3) to define the kinetics of beryllium reacting with air or steam; (3) to perform a feasibility study for the testing of integrated blanket modules under neutron irradiation. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported

  16. Tritium breeding in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets are reviewed. The breeding potential of candidate materials is evaluated and compared to the tritium breeding requirements. The sensitivity of tritium breeding to design and nuclear data parameters is reviewed. A framework for an integrated approach to improve tritium breeding prediction is discussed with emphasis on nuclear data requirements

  17. Minerals resource implications of a tokamak fusion reactor economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, E.; Conn, R.W.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Sviatoslavsky, I.

    1979-09-01

    The mineral resource implications of an economy of tokamak-type fusion reactors are assessed based upon the recent conceptual reactor design study, NUWMAK, developed at the University of Wisconsin. For comparative purposes, various structural alloys of vanadium and steel are assumed to be usable in the NUWMAK design in place of the titanium alloy originally selected. In addition, the inner blanket core and magnet system of the conceptual reactor, HFCTR, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, are assumed to be interchangeable with the comparable components in NUWMAK. These variations permit a range of likely requirements to be assessed

  18. Thermal Hydraulic Design and Analysis of a Water-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket with Superheated Steam for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoman; Ma, Xuebin; Jiang, Kecheng; Chen, Lei; Huang, Kai; Liu, Songlin

    2015-09-01

    The water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) is one of the blanket candidates for China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR). In order to improve power generation efficiency and tritium breeding ratio, WCCB with superheated steam is under development. The thermal-hydraulic design is the key to achieve the purpose of safe heat removal and efficient power generation under normal and partial loading operation conditions. In this paper, the coolant flow scheme was designed and one self-developed analytical program was developed, based on a theoretical heat transfer model and empirical correlations. Employing this program, the design and analysis of related thermal-hydraulic parameters were performed under different fusion power conditions. The results indicated that the superheated steam water-cooled blanket is feasible. supported by the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000 and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  19. Remote servicing features of two new mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Several general approaches to remote servicing are briefly described for the LLL Field Reversed Mirror and Tandem Mirror Fusion reactors. Remote servicing system design considerations for the blanket module are briefly discussed

  20. Neutronic investigation and activation calculation for CFETR HCCB blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuling, XU; Mingzhun, LEI; Sumei, LIU; Kun, LU; Kun, XU; Kun, PEI

    2017-12-01

    The neutronic calculations and activation behavior of the proposed helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) blanket were predicted for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) design model using the MCNP multi-particle transport code and its associated data library. The tritium self-sufficiency behavior of the HCCB blanket was assessed, addressing several important breeding-related arrangements inside the blankets. Two candidate first wall armor materials were considered to obtain a proper tritium breeding ratio (TBR). Presentations of other neutronic characteristics, including neutron flux, neutron-induced damages in terms of the accumulated dpa and helium production were also conducted. Activation, decay heat levels and contact dose rates of the components were calculated to estimate the neutron-induced radioactivity and personnel safety. The results indicate that neutron radiation is efficiently attenuated and slowed down by components placed between the plasma and toroidal field coil. The dominant nuclides and corresponding isotopes in the structural steel were discussed. A radioactivity comparison between pure beryllium and beryllium with specific impurities was also performed. After a millennium cooling time, the decay heat of all the concerned components and materials is less than 1 × 10-4 kW, and most associated in-vessel components qualify for recycling by remote handling. The results demonstrate that acceptable hands-on recycling and operation still require a further long waiting period to allow the activated products to decay.

  1. Mannosylated mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion proteins enhance antigen-specific antibody and T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaf Ahlén

    Full Text Available Targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC improve their immunogenicity and capacity to induce Th1 responses and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. We have generated a mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion protein (PSGL-1/mIgG(2b, which upon expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris became multivalently substituted with O-linked oligomannose structures and bound the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN with high affinity in vitro. Here, its effects on the humoral and cellular anti-ovalbumin (OVA responses in C57BL/6 mice are presented.OVA antibody class and subclass responses were determined by ELISA, the generation of anti-OVA CTLs was assessed in (51Cr release assays using in vitro-stimulated immune spleen cells from the different groups of mice as effector cells and OVA peptide-fed RMA-S cells as targets, and evaluation of the type of Th cell response was done by IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 ELISpot assays.Immunizations with the OVA - mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b conjugate, especially when combined with the AbISCO®-100 adjuvant, lead to faster, stronger and broader (with regard to IgG subclass OVA IgG responses, a stronger OVA-specific CTL response and stronger Th1 and Th2 responses than if OVA was used alone or together with AbISCO®-100. Also non-covalent mixing of mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b, OVA and AbISCO®-100 lead to relatively stronger humoral and cellular responses. The O-glycan oligomannoses were necessary because PSGL-1/mIgG(2b with mono- and disialyl core 1 structures did not have this effect.Mannosylated mucin-type fusion proteins can be used as versatile APC-targeting molecules for vaccines and as such enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses.

  2. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1985-05-01

    In the current Fusion Technology Programme of the European Community the KfK association is working at present on 16 R and D contracts. Most of the work is strongly oriented towards the Next European Torus. Direct support to NET is given by three KfK delegates being member of the NET study group. In addition to the R and D contracts the association is working on 11 NET study contracts. Though KfK contributes to all areas defined in fusion technology, the main emphasis is put on superconducting magnet and breeding blanket development. Other important fields are tritium technology, materials research, and remote handling. (orig./GG)

  3. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised

  4. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised.

  5. Reciprocal complementation of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 lacking either the membrane or fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Marina; Matsuura, Ryosuke; Kokuho, Takehiro; Tsuboi, Takamitsu; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2017-11-01

    Two defective bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) strains were generated, one lacking the membrane (M) protein gene and expressing EGFP (ΔM-EGFP) and the other lacking the fusion (F) protein gene and expressing mStrawberry (ΔF-mSB), by supplying deficient proteins in trans. When Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells were co-infected with ΔM-EGFP and ΔF-mSB at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1, complemented viruses were easily obtained. Complemented viruses grew as efficiently as wild-type BPIV3 and could be passaged in MDBK cell cultures even at an MOI of 0.01, possibly due to multiploid virus particles containing genomes of both ΔM-EGFP and ΔF-mSB. This reciprocal complementation method using two defective viruses would be useful to express large or multiple proteins in cell cultures using paramyxovirus vectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Heat transfer and mechanical interactions in fusion nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    This general review of design issues in heat transfer and mechanical interactions of the first wall, blanket and shield systems of tokamak and mirror fusion reactors begins with a brief introduction to fusion nuclear systems. The design issues are summarized in tables and the following examples are described to illustrate these concerns: the surface heating of limiters, heat transfer from solid breeders, MHD effects in liquid metal blankets, mechanical loads from electromagnetic transients and remote maintenance

  7. DEMO relevance of the test blanket modules in ITER-Application to the European test blanket modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnani, E.; Gabriel, F.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Li-Puma, A.

    2010-01-01

    Test blanket module (TBM) testing programme in ITER as a support to DEMO design is a very important step on the road map to commercial fusion reactors although it is an ambitious task. Finding as much as possible DEMO relevant tests in view of the future DEMO blanket design is therefore a major goal since ITER and DEMO environment and loading conditions are different. To clarify and quantify the meaning of the DEMO relevance, criteria using a structural, functional and behavioural representation of the breeding blanket acting as a system are investigated. Then, a three-step strategy is proposed to carry out TBM DEMO relevant tests associated with a TBM design modification strategy. Key parameters should intensively be used as target for TBM characterization and numerical code validation. When assessing the relevance, on the other hand, not only the actual difference between DEMO and ITER values should be considered, but also whether the analyzed phenomena have a threshold and a range of applicability, as numerical simulations are usually permitted within these limits. The proposed methodology is at the end applied to the design of the HCLL TBM breeding unit configuration.

  8. The State of the Art Report on the Development and Manufacturing Technology of Test Blanket Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Kim, K. H.

    2006-07-01

    The main objective of the present R and D on breeder blanket is the development of test blanket modules (TBMs) to be installed and tested in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). In the program of the blanket development, a blanket module test in the ITER is scheduled from the beginning of the ITER operation, and the performance test of TBM in ITER is the most important milestone for the development of the DEMO blanket. The fabrication of TBMs has been required to test the basic performance of the DEMO blanket, i.e., tritium production/recovery, high-grade heat generation and radiation shielding. Therefore, the integration of the TBM systems into ITER has been investigated with the aim to check the safety, reliability and compatibility under nuclear fusion state. For this reason, in the Test Blanket Working Group (TBWG) as an activity of the International Energy Association (IEA), a variety of ITER TBMs have been proposed and investigated by each party: helium-cooled ceramic (WSG-1), helium-cooled LiPb (WSG-2), water-cooled ceramic (WSG-3), self-cooled lithium (WSG-4) and self-cooled molten salt (WSG-5) blanket systems. Because we are still deficient in investigation of TBM development, the need of development became pressing. In this report, for the development of TBM sub-module and mock-up, it is necessary to analyze and examine the state of the art on the development of manufacturing technology of TBM in other countries. And we will be applied as basic data to establish a manufacturing technology

  9. Updated conceptual design of helium cooling ceramic blanket for HCCB-DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Suhao [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Cao, Qixiang; Wu, Xinghua; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guoshu [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Feng, Kaiming, E-mail: fengkm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An updated design of Helium Cooled Ceramic breeder Blanket (HCCB) for HCCB-DEMO is proposed in this paper. • The Breeder Unit is transformed to TBM-like sub-modules, with double “banana” shape tritium breeder. Each sub-module is inserted in space formed by Stiffen Grids (SGs). • The performance analysis is performed based on the R&D development of material, fabrication technology and safety assessment in CN ITER TBM program. • Hot spots will be located at the FW bend side. - Abstract: The basic definition of the HCCB-DEMO plant and preliminary blanket designed by Southwestern Institution of Physics was proposed in 2009. The DEMO fusion power is 2550 MW and electric power is 800 MW. Based on development of R&D in breeding blanket, a conceptual design of helium cooled blanket with ceramic breeder in HCCB-DEMO was presented. The main design features of the HCCB-DEMO blanket were: (1) CLF-1 structure materials, Be multiplier and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} breeder; (2) neutronic wall load is 2.3 MW/m{sup 2} and surface heat flux is 0.43 MW/m{sup 2} (2) TBR ≈ 1.15; (3) geometry of breeding units is ITER TBM-like segmentation; (4)Pressure of helium is 8 MPa and inlet/outlet temperature is 300/500 °C. On the basis of these design, some important analytical results are presented in aspects of (i) neutronic behavior of the blanket; (ii) design of 3D structure and thermal-hydraulic lay-out for breeding blanket module; (iii) structural-mechanical behavior of the blanket under pressurization. All of these assessments proved current stucture fulfill the design requirements.

  10. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The objectives of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) can be stated as follows: (1) Define a small number (approx. 3) of blanket design concepts that should be the focus of the blanket R and D program. A design concept is defined by the selection of all materials (e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and multiplier) and other major characteristics that significantly influence the R and D requirements. (2) Identify and prioritize the critical issues for the leading blanket concepts. (3) Provide the technical input necessary to develop a blanket R and D program plan. Guidelines for prioritizing the R and D requirements include: (a) critical feasibility issues for the leading blanket concepts will receive the highest priority, and (b) for equally important feasibility issues, higher R and D priority will be given to those that require minimum cost and short time

  11. Design requirement on HYPER blanket fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, B. O.; Nam, C.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Park, W. S.

    2000-07-01

    This document describes design requirements which are needed for designing the blanket assembly of the HYPER as design guidance. The blanket assembly of the HYPER consists of blanket fuel rods, mounting rail, spacer, upper nozzle with handling socket, bottom nozzle with mounting rail and skeleton structure. The blanket fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with key way, blanket fuel slug, and cladding. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array. This report contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, system configuration and essential feature requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements for the blanket fuel assembly of the HYPER

  12. Dual-coolant lead–lithium (DCLL) blanket status and R&D needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolentsev, Sergey, E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Morley, Neil B.; Abdou, Mohamed A. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Malang, Siegfried [Consultancy, Linkenheim (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The DCLL is an attractive breeding blanket concept that leads to a high-temperature (T ∼ 700 °C), high thermal efficiency (η > 40%) blanket system. The key element of the concept is a flow channel insert (FCI) that serves as an electrical and thermal insulator to reduce the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop and to decouple the temperature-limited RAFM (reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic) steel wall from the flowing hot PbLi. The paper introduces the concept, reviews history of the development of the DCLL in the US and worldwide and then identifies critical R&D needs prior to fusion environment testing in four research areas important to the successful development of the DCLL concept: (1) PbLi MHD thermofluids, (2) fluid materials interaction, (3) tritium transport, and (4) FCI development and characterization. For these areas, the most important R&D results obtained in the US in the ITER DCLL TBM program (2005–2011) and more recently are reviewed, including experimental and computational studies of MHD PbLi flows, corrosion of RAFM, tritium permeation, and silicon carbide FCI fabrication and material qualification. We also discuss required features of non-fusion facilities for DCLL blanket testing, where current lab experiments and modeling could progress to multiple effects and partially-integrated studies that approach as nearly as possible prototypic, integrated blanket conditions prior to testing in a fusion environment.

  13. Proposal for a novel type of small scale aneutronic fusion reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gruenwald, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2017), 1-9, č. článku 025011. ISSN 0741-3335 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : fusion * electrostatic confinement * fusion technology Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016

  14. Study on the technical feasibility of disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes by neutron burning in fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yican; Qiu Lijian

    1993-07-01

    Two types of conceptual design of fusion-fission hybrid reactor are presented, which is for transmutation of actinide nuclides with nitride fuel or metallic alloy fuel blanket and transmutation of fission products, especially 90 Sr, with Pu fuel blanket, respectively. Neutronics and thermal hydraulics calculation were performed to estimate the performance of the whole system. It was found that the plasma core with recently experimental parameters of plasma physics or the ones to be reached in the near future may drive the blanket which can transmute 17% of the loaded fission product 90 Sr or 23% of the loaded actinides after one year operation at neutron wall loading of 1 MW/m 2 and 80% load factor. thus, the present system may burn 90 Sr waste from about 40 PWRs of 3 GW(t) or the actinide waste from about 65 PWRs of 3 GW(t), respectively

  15. Fusion-fission hybrid studies in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Berwald, D.H.; Cheng, E.T.; Delene, J.G.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Systems and conceptual design studies have been carried out on the following three hybrid types: (1) The fission-suppressed hybrid, which maximizes fissile material produced (Pu or 233 U) per unit of total nuclear power by suppressing the fission process and multiplying neutrons by (n,2n) reactions in materials like beryllium. (2) The fast-fission hybrid, which maximizes fissile material produced per unit of fusion power by maximizing fission of 238 U (Pu is produced) in which twice the fissile atoms per unit of fusion power (but only a third per unit of nuclear power) are made. (3) The power hybrid, which amplifies power in the blanket for power production but does not produce fuel to sell. All three types must sell electrical power to be economical

  16. Radwaste management aspects of the test blanket systems in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der, E-mail: JaapG.vanderLaan@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Canas, D. [CEA, DEN/DADN, centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Chaudhari, V. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Iseli, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kawamura, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Lee, D.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Petit, P. [European Commission, DG ENER, Brussels (Belgium); Pitcher, C.S.; Torcy, D. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ugolini, D. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Zhang, H. [China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation, Beijing 100032 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Test Blanket Systems are operated in ITER to test tritium breeding technologies. • The in-vessel parts of TBS become radio-active during the ITER nuclear phase. • For each TBM campaign the TBM, its shield and the Pipe Forests are removed. • High tritium contents and novel materials are specific TBS radwaste features. • A preliminary assessment confirmed RW routing, provided its proper conditioning. - Abstract: Test Blanket Systems (TBS) will be operated in ITER in order to prepare the next steps towards fusion power generation. After the initial operation in H/He plasmas, the introduction of D and T in ITER will mark the transition to nuclear operation. The significant fusion neutron production will give rise to nuclear heating and tritium breeding in the in-vessel part of the TBS. The management of the activated and tritiated structures of the TBS from operation in ITER is described. The TBS specific features like tritium breeding and power conversion at elevated temperatures, and the use of novel materials require a dedicated approach, which could be different to that needed for the other ITER equipment.

  17. Recent developments concerning the fusion; Developpements recents sur la fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquinot, J. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, DRFC, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Andre, M. [CEA/DAM Ile de France, 91 - Bruyeres Le Chatel (France); Aymar, R. [ITER Joint Central Team Garching, Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    2000-09-04

    Organized the 9 march 2000 by the SFEN, this meeting on the european program concerning the fusion, showed the utility of the exploitation and the enhancement of the actual technology (JET, Tore Supra, ASDEX) and the importance of the Europe engagement in the ITER program. The physical stakes for the magnetic fusion have been developed with a presentation of the progresses in the knowledge of the stability limits. A paper on the inertial fusion was based on the LMJ (Laser MegaJoule) project. The two blanket concepts chosen in the scope of the european program on the tritium blankets, have been discussed. These concepts will be validated by irradiation tests in the ITER-FEAT and adapted for a future reactor. (A.L.B.)

  18. Tritium inventory in Li2ZrO3 blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Baba, A.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, we have presented the way to estimate the tritium inventory in a solid breeder blanket considering effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions. It is reported in our previous paper that the estimated tritium inventory for a LiAlO 2 blanket agrees well with data observed in various in situ experiments when the effective diffusivity of tritium from the EXOTIC-6 experiment is used and that the better agreement is obtained when existence of some water vapor is assumed in the purge gas. The same way as used for a LiAlO 2 blanket is applied to a Li 2 ZrO 3 blanket in this study and the estimated tritium inventory shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-6 and TRINE experiments. (orig.)

  19. Multiple Module Simulation of Water Cooled Breeding Blankets in K-DEMO Using Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code MARS-KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Hun; Park, Goon-Cherl; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A preliminary concept for the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) has been studied by the National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) based on the National Fusion Roadmap of Korea. The feasibility studies have been performed in order to establish the conceptual design guidelines of the breeding blanket. As a part of the NFRI research, Seoul National University (SNU) is conducting thermal design, evaluation and validation of the water-cooled breeding blanket for the K-DEMO reactor. The purpose of this study is to extend the capability of MARS-KS to the overall blanket system analysis which includes 736 blanket modules in total. The strategy for the multi-module blanket system analysis using MARS-KS is introduced and the analysis result of the 46 blanket modules of single sector was summarized. A thermal-hydraulic analysis code for a nuclear reactor safety, MARS-KS, was applied for thermal analysis of the conceptual design of the K-DEMO breeding blanket. Then, a methodology to simulate multiple blanket modules was proposed, which uses a supervisor program to handle each blanket module individually at first and then distribute the flow rate considering the pressure drop that occurs in each module. For a feasibility test of the proposed methodology, 46 blankets in a sector, which are connected with each other through the common headers for the sector inlet and outlet, were simulated. The calculation results of flow rates, pressure drops, and temperatures showed the validity of the calculation. Because of parallelization using the MPI system, the computational time could be reduced significantly. In future, this methodology will be extended to an efficient simulation of multiple sectors, and further validation for transient simulation will be carried out for more practical applications.

  20. Development and testing of a zero stitch MLI blanket using plastic pins for space use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Miyakita, Takeshi; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Masanori; Hirai, Tomoyuki

    2014-11-01

    New types of MLI blanket have been developed to achieve high thermal performance while maintaining production and assembly workability equivalent to the conventional type. Tag-pins, which are widely used in commercial applications to hook price tags to products, are used to fix the films in place and the pin material is changed to polyetheretherketone (PEEK) for use in space. Thermal performance is measured by using a boil-off calorimeter, in which a rectangular liquid nitrogen tank is used to evaluate the degradation at the bending corner and joint of the blanket. Zero-stitch- and multi-blanket-type MLIs show significantly improved thermal performance (ɛeff is smaller than 0.0050 at room temperature) despite having the same fastener interface as traditional blankets, while the venting design and number of tag-pins are confirmed as appropriate in a depressurization test.

  1. Fusion of WorldView-2 and LiDAR Data to Map Fuel Types in the Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Alonso-Benito

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wildland fires are one of the factors causing the deepest disturbances on the natural environment and severely threatening many ecosystems, as well as economic welfare and public health. Having accurate and up-to-date fuel type maps is essential to properly manage wildland fire risk areas. This research aims to assess the viability of combining Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA and the fusion of a WorldView-2 (WV2 image and low density Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data in order to produce fuel type maps within an area of complex orography and vegetation distribution located in the island of Tenerife (Spain. Independent GEOBIAs were applied to four datasets to create four fuel type maps according to the Prometheus classification. The following fusion methods were compared: Image Stack (IS, Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF, as well as the WV2 image alone. Accuracy assessment of the maps was conducted by comparison against the fuel types assessed in the field. Besides global agreement, disagreement measures due to allocation and quantity were estimated, both globally and by fuel type. This made it possible to better understand the nature of disagreements linked to each map. The global agreement of the obtained maps varied from 76.23% to 85.43%. Maps obtained through data fusion reached a significantly higher global agreement than the map derived from the WV2 image alone. By integrating LiDAR information with the GEOBIAs, global agreement improvements by over 10% were attained in all cases. No significant differences in global agreement were found among the three classifications performed on WV2 and LiDAR fusion data (IS, PCA, MNF. These study’s findings show the validity of the combined use of GEOBIA, high-spatial resolution multispectral data and low density LiDAR data in order to generate fuel type maps in the Canary Islands.

  2. A solid-breeder blanket and power conversion system for the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullis, R.; Clarkson, I.

    1983-01-01

    A solid-breeder blanket has been designed for a commercial fusion power reactor based on the tandem mirror concept (MARS). The design utilizes lithium oxide, cooled by helium which powers a conventional steam electric generating cycle. Maintenance and fabricability considerations led to a modular configuration 6 meters long which incorporates two magnets, shield, blanket and first wall. The modules are arranged to form the 150 meter long reactor central cell. Ferritic steel is used for the module primary structure. The lithium oxide is contained in thin-walled vanadium alloy tubes. A tritium breeding ratio of 1.25 and energy multiplication of 1.1 is predicted. The blanket design appears feasible with only a modest advance in current technology

  3. Mechanical design and thermal hydraulic considerations for a self-cooled lithium-lead blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, B.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid lithium-lead eutectic alloy (17 at-% Li83 at-% Pb, referred to herein as Li-Pb) is currently being considered as a candidate breeding material for fusion reactors. Some important considerations in the design of a Li-Pb blanket are compatibility with the structure, tritium containment and recovery, and safety. Additional design complexities arise because of the high density of Li-Pb, the relatively high melting temperature (235 0 C), and the high tritium overpressure associated with this alloy. In this study, the Li-Pb eutectic was considered both as the breeder and as the coolant. Thermal hydraulic and stress analyses were conducted to assess the technical feasibility of using Li-Pb as the breeder and coolant based on DEMO reactor conditions. The results of the thermo-mechanical analyses showed that the elongated cylindrical blanket modules made from either HT-9 or vanadium alloy offer a viable first wall/blanket design concept

  4. Neutron streaming analysis of an aqueous self-cooled blanket applied to MARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varsamis, G.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.

    1987-01-01

    A novel fusion reactor blanket concept, the Aqueous Self Cooled Blanket concept (ASCB), has recently been proposed. One of the first applications of this concept was to a MARS-like tandem mirror reactor. The design employs spiraling tubes of zircaloy-4 housed in a structural casing made of a vanadium alloy (V-15Cr-5Tl). One potential problem area for this design is the possibility for neutron streaming between the zircaloy tubes. This work examines this potential streaming path using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The results of the total and the uncollided flux indicate a noticeable streaming effect on the uncollided flux only. An analysis of the energy deposition behind the blanket indicates that this effect is small, and therefore design modifications due to this streaming effect are not anticipated

  5. Review of tokamak power reactor and blanket designs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Gohar, Y.; Smith, D.; Sze, D.

    1986-01-01

    The last major conceptual design study of a tokamak power reactor in the United States was STARFIRE which was carried out in 1979-1980. Since that time US studies have concentrated on engineering test reactors, demonstration reactors, parametric systems studies, scoping studies, and studies of selected critical issues such as pulsed vs. steady-state operation and blanket requirements. During this period, there have been many advancements in tokamak physics and reactor technology, and there has also been a recognition that it is desirable to improve the tokamak concept as a commercial power reactor candidate. During 1984-1985 several organizations participated in the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS) with the objective of developing ideas for improving the tokamak as a power reactor. Also, the US completed a comprehensive Blanket Comparison and Selection Study which formed the basis for further studies on improved blankets for fusion reactors

  6. Status on DEMO Helium Cooled Lithium Lead breeding blanket thermo-mechanical analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, J., E-mail: julien.aubert@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiello, G.; Jaboulay, J.-C. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kiss, B. [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary); Morin, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • CEA with the support of Wigner-RCP and IPP-CR, is in charge of the design of the HCLL blanket for DEMO. The DEMO HCLL breeding blanket design capitalizes on the experience acquired on the HCLL Test Blanket Module designed for ITER. Design improvements are being implemented to adapt the design to DEMO specifications and performance objectives. • Thermal and mechanical analyses have been carried out in order to justify the design of the HCLL breeding blanket showing promising results for tie rods modules’ attachments system and relatively good behavior of the box in case of LOCA when comparing to RCC-MRx criteria. • CFD thermal analyses on generic breeding unit have enabled the consolidation of the results obtained with previous FEM design analyses. - Abstract: The EUROfusion Consortium develops a design of a fusion power demonstrator (DEMO) in the framework of the European “Horizon 2020” innovation and research program. One of the key components in the fusion reactor is the breeding blanket surrounding the plasma, ensuring tritium self-sufficiency, heat removal for conversion into electricity, and neutron shielding. The Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) blanket is one of the concepts which is investigated for DEMO. It is made of a Eurofer structure and uses the eutectic liquid lithium–lead as tritium breeder and neutron multiplier, and helium gas as coolant. Within the EUROfusion organization, CEA with the support of Wigner-RCP and IPP-CR, is in charge of the design of the HCLL blanket for DEMO. This paper presents the status of the thermal and mechanical analyses carried out on the HCLL breeding blanket in order to justify the design. CFD thermal analyses on generic breeding unit including stiffening plates and cooling plates have been performed with ANSYS in order to consolidate results obtained with previous FEM design analyses. Moreover in order to expand the justification of the HCLL Breeding blanket design, the most loaded area of

  7. Scoping studies of 233U breeding fusion fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.; Allen, W.O.

    1978-01-01

    Neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to design a laser fusion driven hybrid blanket which maximizes 233 U production per unit of thermal energy (greater than or equal to 1 kg/MW/sub T/-year) with acceptable fusion energy multiplication (M/sub F/ approx. 4). Two hybrid blankets, a thorium and a uranium--thorium blanket, are discussed in detail and their performance is evaluated by incorporating them into an existing hybrid design (the LLL/Bechtel design). The overall performance of the two laser fusion driven 233 U producers is discussed and estimates are given of (1) the number of equivalent thermal power fission reactors (LWR, HWR, SSCR and HTGR) that these fusion breeders can fuel, (2) their capital cost, and (3) the cost of electricity in the combined fusion breeder-converter reactor scenario

  8. Scoping studies of 233U breeding fusion fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.; Allen, W.O.

    1978-05-01

    Neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to design a laser fusion driven hybrid blanket which maximizes 233 U production per unit of thermal energy (greater than or equal to 1 kg/MW/sub T/-year) with acceptable fusion energy multiplication (M/sub F/ approximately 4). Two hybrid blankets, a thorium and a uranium-thorium blanket, are discussed in detail and their performance is evaluated by incorporating them into an existing hybrid design (the LLL/Bechtel design). The overall performance of the two laser fusion driven 233 U producers is discussed and estimates are given of (1) the number of equivalent thermal power fission reactors (LWR, HWR, SSCR and HTGR) that these fusion breeders can fuel, (2) their capital cost, and (3) the cost of electricity in the combined fusion breder-converter reactor scenario

  9. Optimization of the fission--fusion hybrid concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltmarsh, M.J.; Grimes, W.R.; Santoro, R.T.

    1979-04-01

    One of the potentially attractive applications of controlled thermonuclear fusion is the fission--fusion hybrid concept. In this report we examine the possible role of the hybrid as a fissile fuel producer. We parameterize the advantages of the concept in terms of the performance of the fusion device and the breeding blanket and discuss some of the more troublesome features of existing design studies. The analysis suggests that hybrids based on deuterium--tritium (D--T) fusion devices are unlikely to be economically attractive and that they present formidable blanket technology problems. We suggest an alternative approach based on a semicatalyzed deuterium--deuterium (D--D) fusion reactor and a molten salt blanket. This concept is shown to emphasize the desirable features of the hybrid, to have considerably greater economic potential, and to mitigate many of the disadvantages of D--T-based systems

  10. NET test blanket design and remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, C.; Hubert, P.

    1991-01-01

    The NET machine has three horizontal ports reserved for testing tritium breeding blanket designs during the physics phase and possibly five during the technology phase. The design of the ports and test blankets are modular to accept a range of blanket options, provide radiation shielding and allow routine replacement. Radiation levels during replacement or maintenance require that all operations must be carried out remotely. The paper describes the problems overcome in providing a port design which includes attachment to the vacuum vessel with double vacuum seals, an integrated cooled first wall and support guides for the test blanket module. The method selected to remotely replace the test module whilst controlling the spread of contamination is also adressed. The paper concludes that the provisions of a test blanket facility based on the NET machine design is feasible. (orig.)

  11. Classification Using Markov Blanket for Feature Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Luo, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Selecting relevant features is in demand when a large data set is of interest in a classification task. It produces a tractable number of features that are sufficient and possibly improve the classification performance. This paper studies a statistical method of Markov blanket induction algorithm...... for filtering features and then applies a classifier using the Markov blanket predictors. The Markov blanket contains a minimal subset of relevant features that yields optimal classification performance. We experimentally demonstrate the improved performance of several classifiers using a Markov blanket...... induction as a feature selection method. In addition, we point out an important assumption behind the Markov blanket induction algorithm and show its effect on the classification performance....

  12. Engineering of a parainfluenza virus type 5 fusion protein (PIV-5 F): development of an autonomous and hyperfusogenic protein by a combinational mutagenesis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, O; Durupt, F; Cartet, G; Thomas, L; Lina, B; Rosa-Calatrava, M

    2009-12-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is accomplished by fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane. For the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV-5), this fusion involves an attachment protein (HN) and a class I viral fusion protein (F). We investigated the effect of 20 different combinations of 12 amino-acid substitutions within functional domains of the PIV-5 F glycoprotein, by performing cell surface expression measurements, quantitative fusion and syncytia assays. We found that combinations of mutations conferring an autonomous phenotype with mutations leading to an increased fusion activity were compatible and generated functional PIV-5 F proteins. The addition of mutations in the heptad-repeat domains led to both autonomous and hyperfusogenic phenotypes, despite the low cell surface expression of the corresponding mutants. Such engineering approach may prove useful not only for deciphering the fundamental mechanism behind viral-mediated membrane fusion but also in the development of potential therapeutic applications.

  13. Optimization of tritium breeding and shielding analysis to plasma in ITER fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indah Rosidah, M., E-mail: indah.maymunah@gmail.com; Suud, Zaki, E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Yazid, Putranto Ilham [Research and Development of Nuclear Association (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    The development of fusion energy is one of the important International energy strategies with the important milestone is ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project, initiated by many countries, such as: America, Europe, and Japan who agreed to set up TOKAMAK type fusion reactor in France. In ideal fusion reactor the fuel is purely deuterium, but it need higher temperature of reactor. In ITER project the fuels are deuterium and tritium which need lower temperature of the reactor. In this study tritium for fusion reactor can be produced by using reaction of lithium with neutron in the blanket region. With the tritium breeding blanket which react between Li-6 in the blanket with neutron resulted from the plasma region. In this research the material used in each layer surrounding the plasma in the reactor is optimized. Moreover, achieving self-sufficiency condition in the reactor in order tritium has enough availability to be consumed for a long time. In order to optimize Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) value in the fusion reactor, there are several strategies considered here. The first requirement is making variation in Li-6 enrichment to be 60%, 70%, and 90%. But, the result of that condition can not reach TBR value better than with no enrichment. Because there is reduction of Li-7 percent when increasing Li-6 percent. The other way is converting neutron multiplier material with Pb. From this, we get TBR value better with the Be as neutron multiplier. Beside of TBR value, fusion reactor can analyze the distribution of neutron flux and dose rate of neutron to know the change of neutron concentration for each layer in reactor. From the simulation in this study, 97% neutron concentration can be absorbed by material in reactor, so it is good enough. In addition, it is required to analyze spectrum neutron energy in many layers in the fusion reactor such as in blanket, coolant, and divertor. Actually material in that layer can resist in high temperature

  14. A novel technique combining laparoscopic and endovascular approaches using image fusion guidance for anterior embolization of type II endoleak

    OpenAIRE

    Zubair, M. Mujeeb; Chinnadurai, Ponraj; Loh, Francis E.; Loh, Thomas M.; Lumsden, Alan B.; Bechara, Carlos F.

    2016-01-01

    Type II endoleak (T2E) leading to aneurysm sac enlargement is one of the challenging complications associated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Recent guidelines recommend embolization of T2E associated with aneurysmal sac enlargement. Various percutaneous and endovascular techniques have been reported for embolization of T2E. We report a novel technique for T2E embolization combining laparoscopic and endovascular approaches using preoperative image fusion. We believe our technique provides ...

  15. Optimization design study of an innovative divertor concept for future experimental tokamak-type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willem Janssens, Ir.; Crutzen, Y.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Matera, R.

    1991-01-01

    The design optimization study of an innovative divertor concept for future experimental tokamak-type fusion devices is both an answer to the actual problems encountered in the multilayer divertor proposals and an illustration of a rational modelling philosophy and optimization strategy for the development of a new divertor structure. Instead of using mechanical attachment or metallurgical bonding of the protective material to the heat sink as in most actual divertor concepts, the so-called brush divertor in this study uses an array of unidirectional fibers penetrating in both the protective armor and the underling composite heat sink. Although the approach is fully concentrated on the divertor performance, including both a description of its function from the theoretical point of view and an overview of the problems related to the materials choice and evaluation, both the approach followed in the numerical modelling and the judgment of the results are thought to be valid also for other applications. Therefore the spin-off of the study must be situated in both the technological progress towards a feasible divertor solution, which introduces no additional physical uncertainties, and in the general area of the thermo-mechanical finite-element modelling on both macro-and microscale. The brush divertor itself embodies the use, and thus the modelling, of advanced materials such as tailor-made metal matrix composites and dispersion strengthened metals, and is shown to offer large potential advantages, demanding however and experimental validation under working conditions. It is clearly indicated where the need originates for an integrated experimental program which must allow to verify the basic modelling assumptions in order to arrive at the use of numerical computation as a powerful and realistic tool of structural testing and life-time prediction

  16. The fusion protein of wild-type canine distemper virus is a major determinant of persistent infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plattet, Philippe; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Zuber, BenoIt; Brunner, Jean-Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Wittek, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    The wild-type A75/17 canine distemper virus (CDV) strain induces a persistent infection in the central nervous system but infects cell lines very inefficiently. In contrast, the genetically more distant Onderstepoort CDV vaccine strain (OP-CDV) induces extensive syncytia formation. Here, we investigated the roles of wild-type fusion (F WT ) and attachment (H WT ) proteins in Vero cells expressing, or not, the canine SLAM receptor by transfection experiments and by studying recombinants viruses expressing different combinations of wild-type and OP-CDV glycoproteins. We show that low fusogenicity is not due to a defect of the envelope proteins to reach the cell surface and that H WT determines persistent infection in a receptor-dependent manner, emphasizing the role of SLAM as a potent enhancer of fusogenicity. However, importantly, F WT reduced cell-to-cell fusion independently of the cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating that the fusion protein of the neurovirulent A75/17-CDV strain plays a key role in determining persistent infection

  17. Design description and performance analyses of the European HCPB test blanket system in ITER feat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccaccini, L.V. E-mail: lorenzo.boccaccini@irs.fzk.de; Bekris, N.; Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.; Gordeev, S.; Hermsmeyer, S.; Hutter, E.; Kleefeldt, K.; Malang, S.; Schleisiek, K.; Schmuck, I.; Schnauder, H.; Tsige-Tamirat, H

    2002-11-01

    The helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket is one of the two European DEMO blanket concepts proposed for testing in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The purpose of the tests is to validate the design principles and the operational feasibility for the demonstration blanket system. This includes the basic support functions like tritium extraction, helium cooling and heat transport, and helium purification. In addition, the basic properties and operating characteristics of the system's materials will be validated. Safety, reliability, maintenance and dismantling will be equally addressed. To assess these qualities, the ITER horizontal ports will be used to provide a relevant fusion plasma and the appropriate nuclear environment. At conclusion of the ITER feat EDA phase (July 2001), a revised design of the HCPB test blanket system have been completed to adapt the previous design (for ITER FDR) to the new operational conditions of ITER and to a new strategy for the blanket testing in this reactor. Design description, performance and safety analyses are presented in this paper.

  18. Liquid metal blanket module testing and design for ITER/TIBER II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Cha, Y.; Finn, P.A.; Majumdar, S.; Picologlou, B.; Stevens, H.; Turner, L.

    1988-05-01

    A major goal for ITER is the testing of nuclear components to demonstrate the integrated performance of the most attractive concepts that can lead to a commercial fusion reactor. As part of the ITER/TIBER II study, the test program and design of test models were examined for a number of blanket concepts. The work at Argonne National Laboratory focused on self-cooled liquid metal blankets. A test program for liquid metal blankets was developed based upon the ITER/TIBER II operating schedule and the specific data needs to resolve the key issues for liquid metals. Testing can begin early in reactor operation with liquid metal MHD tests to confirm predictive capability. Combined heat transfer/MHD tests can be performed during initial plasma operation. After acceptable heat transfer performance is verified, tests to determine the integrated high temperature performance in a neutron environment can begin. During the high availability phase operation, long term performance and reliability tests will be performed. It is envisioned that a companion test program will be conducted outside ITER to determine behavior under severe accident conditions and upper performance limits. A detailed design of a liquid metal test module and auxiliary equipment was also developed. The module followed the design of the TPSS blanket. Detailed analysis of the heat transfer and tritium systems were performed, and the overall layout of the systems was determined. In general, the blanket module appears to be capable of addressing most of the testing needs. 8 refs., 27 figs., 11 tabs

  19. RF DEMO ceramic helium cooled blanket, coolant and energy transformation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.; Leshukov, A.; Poliksha, V.; Popov, A.; Strebkov, Yu.; Borisov, A.; Shatalov, G.; Demidov, V.; Kapyshev, V.

    2004-01-01

    RF DEMO-S reactor is a prototype of commercial fusion reactors for further generation. A blanket is the main element unit of the reactor design. The segment structure is the basis of the ceramic blanket. The segments mounting/dismounting operations are carried out through the vacuum vessel vertical port. The inboard/outboard blanket segment is the modules welded design, which are welded by back plate. The module contains the back plate, the first wall, lateral walls and breeding zone. The 9CrMoVNb steel is used as structural material. The module internal space formed by the first wall, lateral walls and back plate is used for breeding zone arrangement. The breeding zone design based upon the poloidal BIT (Breeder Inside Tube) concept. The beryllium is used as multiplier material and the lithium orthosilicate is used as breeder material. The helium at 0.1 MPa is used as purge gas. The cooling is provided by helium at 10 MPa. The coolant supply/return to the blanket modules are carrying out on the two independent circuits. The performed investigations of possible transformation schemes of DEMO-S blanket heat power into the electricity allowed to make a conclusion about the preferable using of traditional steam-turbine facility in the secondary circuit. (author)

  20. Development of the Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoeda, Mikio; Tanigawa, Hisashi; Hirose, Takanori; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Nakamichi, Masaru; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji; Yoshikawa, Akira; Tsuru, Daigo; Akiba, Masato

    2012-01-01

    The development of a Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is being performed as one of the most important steps toward DEMO blanket in Japan. For the TBM testing and evaluation toward DEMO blanket, the module fabrication technology development by a candidate structural material, reduced activation martensitic/ferritic steel, F82H, is one of the most critical items from the viewpoint of realization of TBM testing in ITER. In Japan, fabrication of a real scale first wall, side walls, a breeder pebble bed box and assembling of the first wall and side walls have succeeded. Recently, the real scale partial mockup of the back wall was fabricated. The fabrication procedure of the back wall, whose thickness is up to 90 mm, was confirmed toward the fabrication of the real scale back wall by F82H. Important key technologies are almost clarified for the fabrication of the real scale TBM module mockup. From the view point of testing and evaluation, development of the technology of the blanket tritium recovery, development of advanced breeder and multiplier pebbles and the development of the blanket neutronics measurement technology are also performed. Also, tritium production and recovery test using D-T neutron in the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) facility has been started as the verification test of tritium production performance. This paper overviews the recent achievements of the development of the WCCB TBM in Japan.

  1. Neutronics experiments for DEMO blanket at JAERI/FNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Ochiai, K.; Hori, J.; Verzilov, Y.; Klix, A.; Wada, M.; Terada, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Morimoto, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify the accuracy of the tritium production rate (TPR), neutron irradiation experiments have been performed with a mockup relevant to the fusion DEMO blanket consisting of F82H blocks, Li 2 TiO 3 blocks with a 6 Li enrichment of 40 and 95%, and beryllium blocks. Sample pellets of Li 2 TiO 3 were irradiated and the TPR was measured by a liquid scintillation counter. The TPR was also calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B with the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 and ENDF-B/VI. The results agreed with experimental values within the statistical error (10%) of the experiment. Accordingly, it was clarified that the TPR could be evaluated within 10% uncertainty by the calculation code and the nuclear data. In order to estimate the induced activity caused by sequential reactions in cooling water pipes in the DEMO blanket, neutron irradiation experiments have been performed using test specimens simulating the pipes. Sample metals of Fe, W, Ti, Pb, Cu, V and reduced activation ferritic steel F82H were irradiated as typical fusion materials. The effective cross- sections for incident neutron flux to calculate the radioactive nuclei ( 56 Co, 184 Re, 48 V, 206 Bi, 65 Zn and 51 Cr) due to sequential reactions were measured. From the experimental results, it was found that the effective cross-sections remarkably increases with coming closer to polyethylene board that was a substitute of water. As a result of the present study, it has become clear that the sequential reaction rates are important factors to accurately evaluate the induced activity in fusion reactors design. (author)

  2. Neutronics experiments for DEMO blanket at JAERI/FNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Ochiai, K.; Hori, J.; Verzilov, Y.; Klix, A.; Wada, M.; Terada, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Morimoto, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify the accuracy of the tritium production rate (TPR), neutron irradiation experiments have been performed with a mockup relevant to the fusion DEMO blanket consisting of F82H blocks, Li 2 TiO 3 blocks with a 6 Li enrichment of 40 and 95%, and beryllium blocks. Sample pellets of Li 2 TiO 3 were irradiated and the TPR was measured by a liquid scintillation counter. The TPR was also calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B with the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 and ENDF-B/VI. The results agreed with experimental values within the statistical error (10%) of the experiment. Accordingly, it was clarified that the TPR could be evaluated within 10% uncertainty by the calculation code and the nuclear data. In order to estimate the induced activity caused by sequential reactions in cooling water pipes in the DEMO blanket, neutron irradiation experiments have been performed using test speciments simulating the pipes. Sample metals of Fe, W, Ti, Pb, Cu, V and reduced activation ferritic steels F82H were irradiated as typical fusion materials. The effective cross-sections for incident neutron flux to calculate the radioactive nuclei ( 56 Co, 184 Re, 48 V, 206 Bi, 65 Zn and 51 Cr) due to sequential reactions were measured. From the experimental results, it was found that the effective cross-sections remarkably increases with coming closer to polyethylene board that was a substitute of water. As a result of the present study, it has become clear that the sequential reaction rates are important factors to accurately evaluate the induced activity in fusion reactors design. (author)

  3. Frequent CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion in diverse types of T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Pora; Kim, Won Seog; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Sangok; Kang, So Young; Jang, Hye Yoon; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jaesang; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2016-06-01

    CTLA4 and CD28 are co-regulatory receptors with opposite roles in T-cell signaling. By RNA sequencing, we identified a fusion between the two genes from partial gene duplication in a case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The fusion gene, which codes for the extracellular domain of CTLA4 and the cytoplasmic region of CD28, is likely capable of transforming inhibitory signals into stimulatory signals for T-cell activation. Ectopic expression of the fusion transcript in Jurkat and H9 cells resulted in enhanced proliferation and AKT and ERK phosphorylation, indicating activation of downstream oncogenic pathways. To estimate the frequency of this gene fusion in mature T-cell lymphomas, we examined 115 T-cell lymphoma samples of diverse subtypes using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and Sanger sequencing. We identified the fusion in 26 of 45 cases of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (58%), nine of 39 peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified (23%), and nine of 31 extranodal NK/T cell lymphomas (29%). We further investigated the mutation status of 70 lymphoma-associated genes using ultra-deep targeted resequencing for 74 mature T-cell lymphoma samples. The mutational landscape we obtained suggests that T-cell lymphoma results from diverse combinations of multiple gene mutations. The CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion is likely a major contributor to the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas and represents a potential target for anti-CTLA4 cancer immunotherapy. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  4. ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Redler, K.; Reis, E.E.; Will, R.; Cheng, E.; Hasan, C.M.; Sharafat, S.

    1993-11-01

    The ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket (NSB) Design is an alternate blanket concept of the ARIES-IV low activation helium-cooled reactor design. The reference design has the coolant routed in the poloidal direction and the inlet and outlet plena are located at the top and bottom of the torus. The NSB design has the high velocity coolant routed in the toroidal direction and the plena are located behind the blanket. This is of significance since the selected structural material is SiC-composite. The NSB is designed to have key high performance components with characteristic dimensions of no larger than 2 m. These components can be brazed to form the blanket module. For the diverter design, we eliminated the use of W as the divertor coating material by relying on the successful development of the gaseous divertor concept. The neutronics and thermal-hydraulic performance of both blanket concepts are similar. The selected blanket and divertor configurations can also meet all the projected structural, neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design limits and requirements. With the selected blanket and divertor materials, the design has a level of safety assurance rate of I (LSA-1), which indicates an inherently safe design

  5. Overexpression of HMGA2-LPP fusion transcripts promotes expression of the α 2 type XI collagen gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Takahiro; Matsui, Yoshito; Goto, Tomohiro; Yukata, Kiminori; Yasui, Natsuo

    2006-01-01

    In a subset of human lipomas, a specific t (3; 12) chromosome translocation gives rise to HMGA2-LPP fusion protein, containing the amino (N)-terminal DNA binding domains of HMGA2 fused to the carboxyl (C)-terminal LIM domains of LPP. In addition to its role in adipogenesis, several observations suggest that HMGA2-LPP is linked to chondrogenesis. Here, we analyzed whether HMGA2-LPP promotes chondrogenic differentiation, a marker of which is transactivation of the α 2 type XI collagen gene (Col11a2). Real-time PCR analysis showed that HMGA2-LPP and COL11A2 were co-expressed. Luciferase assay demonstrated that either of HMGA2-LPP, wild-type HMGA2 or the N-terminal HMGA2 transactivated the Col11a2 promoter in HeLa cells, while the C-terminal LPP did not. RT-PCR analysis revealed that HMGA2-LPP transcripts in lipomas with the fusion were 591-fold of full-length HMGA2 transcripts in lipomas without the fusion. These results indicate that in vivo overexpression of HMGA2-LPP promotes chondrogenesis by upregulating cartilage-specific collagen gene expression through the N-terminal DNA binding domains

  6. Impact analysis of the time trend of TBR and irradiation damage assessment of HCSB blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Qin, E-mail: zengqin@ustc.edu.cn; Chen, Hongli; Lv, Zhongliang; Pan, Lei; Zhang, Haoran; Shi, Wei

    2017-01-15

    Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) is a test tokamak reactor to bridge the gap between ITER and future fusion power plants and to demonstrate generation of fusion power in China. In fusion power plants, tritium is generated from the reaction of neutron and Lithium. One of the missions of CFETR is the full cycle of tritium self-sufficiency. For the mission, a Helium Cooled Solid Breeder blanket (HCSB) was proposed for CFETR and its conceptual design has been carried out. In order to assess the capacity of the tritium breeding and irradiation damage of first wall of the HCSB blanket during the 8 years’ engineering test stage, this paper presents the time trend of TBR analysis and irradiation damage assessment of HCSB blanket based on the three-dimensional (3D) neutronics model which is created by McCad. In the 3D neutronics model, the outboard blanket on equatorial plane is described based on the detailed 3D engineering model. The calculations were performed by MCNP and FISPACT with FENDL/2.1 data library. The impact analysis of the thickness of coolant plates (CP) and the structural material content in CPs to the TBR is assessment.

  7. Progressive non-infectious anterior vertebral fusion in a baby with Saethre-Chotzen-acrocephalosyndactyly type III syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Али Аль-Каисси

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 3-months old baby of Austrian origin and product of non-consanguineous parents. Abnormal craniofacial contour was the main deformity. The overall clinico-radiographic features were consistent with Saether-Chotzen-acrocephalosyndactyly type III syndrome. Bi-directional sequencing of the exon 8 and of the FGFR3-genes, exons 7 of FGFR3 (Fibroblast growth factor receptor3 genes, the exon 5 of the FGFR1 gene, revealed no mutations. Sagittal MRI imaging of the spine showed anterior vertebral fusion along the thoraco-lumbar vertebrae compatible with the non-infectious type.

  8. Block Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with Condensed Matter Cluster Type Targets for p-B11 Powered Space Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, H.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Osman, F.; Zhang Weiyan; Tuhe Xia

    2009-01-01

    The use of laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) for space propulsion has been the subject of several earlier conceptual design studies, (see: Orth, 1998; and other references therein). However, these studies were based on older ICF technology using either 'direct' or 'in-direct x-ray driven' type target irradiation. Important new directions have opened for laser ICF in recent years following the development of 'chirped' lasers capable of ultra short pulses with powers of TW up to few PW which leads to the concept of 'fast ignition (FI)' to achieve higher energy gains from target implosions. In a recent publication the authors showed that use of a modified type of FI, termed 'block ignition' (Miley et al., 2008), could meet many of the requirements anticipated (but not then available) by the designs of the Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications (VISTA) ICF fusion propulsion ship (Orth, 2008) for deep space missions. Subsequently the first author devised and presented concepts for imbedding high density condensed matter 'clusters' of deuterium into the target to obtain ultra high local fusion reaction rates (Miley, 2008). Such rates are possible due to the high density of the clusters (over an order of magnitude above cryogenic deuterium). Once compressed by the implosion, the yet higher density gives an ultra high reaction rate over the cluster volume since the fusion rate is proportional to the square of the fuel density. Most recently, a new discovery discussed here indicates that the target matrix could be composed of B 11 with proton clusters imbedded. This then makes p-B 11 fusion practical, assuming all of the physics issues such as stability of the clusters during compression are resolved. Indeed, p-B 11 power is ideal for fusion propulsion since it has a minimum of unwanted side products while giving most of the reaction energy to energetic alpha particles which can be directed into an exhaust (propulsion) nozzle. Power plants

  9. Block Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with Condensed Matter Cluster Type Targets for p-B11 Powered Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, H.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie; Osman, F.; Zhang, Weiyan; tu He, Xia

    2009-03-01

    The use of laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) for space propulsion has been the subject of several earlier conceptual design studies, (see: Orth, 1998; and other references therein). However, these studies were based on older ICF technology using either "direct "or "in-direct x-ray driven" type target irradiation. Important new directions have opened for laser ICF in recent years following the development of "chirped" lasers capable of ultra short pulses with powers of TW up to few PW which leads to the concept of "fast ignition (FI)" to achieve higher energy gains from target implosions. In a recent publication the authors showed that use of a modified type of FI, termed "block ignition" (Miley et al., 2008), could meet many of the requirements anticipated (but not then available) by the designs of the Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications (VISTA) ICF fusion propulsion ship (Orth, 2008) for deep space missions. Subsequently the first author devised and presented concepts for imbedding high density condensed matter "clusters" of deuterium into the target to obtain ultra high local fusion reaction rates (Miley, 2008). Such rates are possible due to the high density of the clusters (over an order of magnitude above cryogenic deuterium). Once compressed by the implosion, the yet higher density gives an ultra high reaction rate over the cluster volume since the fusion rate is proportional to the square of the fuel density. Most recently, a new discovery discussed here indicates that the target matrix could be composed of B11 with proton clusters imbedded. This then makes p-B11 fusion practical, assuming all of the physics issues such as stability of the clusters during compression are resolved. Indeed, p-B11 power is ideal for fusion propulsion since it has a minimum of unwanted side products while giving most of the reaction energy to energetic alpha particles which can be directed into an exhaust (propulsion) nozzle. Power plants using p

  10. ITER breeding blanket module design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Kikuchi, Shigeto

    1998-11-01

    The ITER breeding blanket employs a ceramic breeder and Be neutron multiplier both in small spherical pebble form. Radial-poloidal cooling panels are arranged in the blanket box to remove the nuclear heating in these materials and to reinforce the blanket structure. At the first wall, Be armor is bonded onto the stainless steel (SS) structure to provide a low Z plasma-compatible surface and to protect the first wall/blanket structure from the direct contact with the plasma during off-normal events. Thermo-mechanical analyses and investigation of fabrication procedure have been performed for this breeding blanket. To evaluate thermo-mechanical behavior of the pebble beds including the dependency of the effective thermal conductivity on stress, analysis methods have been preliminary established by the use of special calculation option of ABAQUS code, which are briefly summarized in this report. The structural response of the breeding blanket module under internal pressure of 4 MPa (in case of in-blanket LOCA) resulted in rather high stress in the blanket side (toroidal end) wall, thus addition of a stiffening rib or increase of the wall thickness will be needed. Two-dimensional elasto-plastic analyses have been performed for the Be/SS bonded interface at the first wall taking a fabrication process based on HIP bonding and thermal cycle due to pulsed plasma operation into account. The stress-strain hysteresis during these process and operation was clarified, and a procedure to assess and/or confirm the bonding integrity was also proposed. Fabrication sequence of the breeding blanket module was preliminarily developed based on the procedure to fabricate part by part and to assemble them one by one. (author)

  11. Chimeric Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus with Attachment and Fusion Glycoproteins Replaced by Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stope, Matthias B.; Karger, Axel; Schmidt, Ulrike; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2001-01-01

    Chimeric bovine respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV) expressing glycoproteins of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3) instead of BRSV glycoproteins were generated from cDNA. In the BRSV antigenome cDNA, the open reading frames of the major BRSV glycoproteins, attachment protein G and fusion protein F, were replaced individually or together by those of the BPIV-3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and/or fusion (F) glycoproteins. Recombinant virus could not be recovered from cDNA when the BRSV F open reading frame was replaced by the BPIV-3 F open reading frame. However, cDNA recovery of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HNF, with both glycoproteins replaced simultaneously, and of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HN, with the BRSV G protein replaced by BPIV-3 HN, was successful. The replication rates of both chimeras were similar to that of standard rBRSV. Moreover, rBRSV-HNF was neutralized by antibodies specific for BPIV-3, but not by antibodies specific to BRSV, demonstrating that the BRSV glycoproteins can be functionally replaced by BPIV-3 glycoproteins. In contrast, rBRSV-HN was neutralized by BRSV-specific antisera, but not by BPIV-3 specific sera, showing that infection of rBRSV-HN is mediated by BRSV F. Hemadsorption of cells infected with rBRSV-HNF and rBRSV-HN proved that BPIV-3 HN protein expressed by rBRSV is functional. Colocalization of the BPIV-3 glycoproteins with BRSV M protein was demonstrated by confocal laser scan microscopy. Moreover, protein analysis revealed that the BPIV-3 glycoproteins were present in chimeric virions. Taken together, these data indicate that the heterologous glycoproteins were not only expressed but were incorporated into the envelope of recombinant BRSV. Thus, the envelope glycoproteins derived from a member of the Respirovirus genus can together functionally replace their homologs in a Pneumovirus background. PMID:11533200

  12. Materials compatibility considerations for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor is a fusion reactor concept that incorporates a fission-suppressed breeding blanket for the production of 233 U to be used in conventional fission power reactors. The present paper reports on compatibility considerations related to the blanket design. These considerations include solid-solid interactions and liquid metal corrosion. Potential problems are discussed relative to the reference blanket operating temperature (490 0 C) and the recycling time of breeding materials (<1 year)

  13. Fertile blanket for an epithermal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millot, J.P.; Alibran, P.

    1985-01-01

    The invention concerns a fertile blanket for the core of an epithermal nuclear reactor comprising fissile fuel assemblies emitting a neutron flux and fertile blankets absorbing the neutron flux to produce plutonium or reflecting it. The fertile blanket is made of a binary alloy of uranium with a weight ratio between 85 and 95 % and of one of the elements of the Vsub(a) and VIsub(a) column of the periodic classification of elements, in a weight proportion between 5 and 15 % [fr

  14. Deltabaculoviruses encode a functional type I budded virus envelope fusion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envelope fusion proteins (F proteins) are major constituents of budded viruses (BVs) of alpha- and betabaculoviruses (Baculoviridae) and are essential for the systemic infection of insect larvae and insect cells in culture. An F protein homolog gene was absent in gammabaculoviruses. Here we show tha...

  15. Swelling, mechanical properties, and microstructure of Type 316 stainless steel at fusion reactor damage levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, J.A.; Bloom, E.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Stiegler, J.O.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1979-01-01

    Alloys such as AISI 316 stainless steel exhibit more swelling and larger decreases in ductility when irradiated to produce fusion reactor He and dpa levels than at fast reactor He and dpa levels. For T approx. 0 C to ensure adequate ductility for long-term service

  16. Autoprocessing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease miniprecursor fusions in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chaoping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV protease (PR is a virus-encoded aspartic protease that is essential for viral replication and infectivity. The fully active and mature dimeric protease is released from the Gag-Pol polyprotein as a result of precursor autoprocessing. Results We here describe a simple model system to directly examine HIV protease autoprocessing in transfected mammalian cells. A fusion precursor was engineered encoding GST fused to a well-characterized miniprecursor, consisting of the mature protease along with its upstream transframe region (TFR, and small peptide epitopes to facilitate detection of the precursor substrate and autoprocessing products. In HEK 293T cells, the resulting chimeric precursor undergoes effective autoprocessing, producing mature protease that is rapidly degraded likely via autoproteolysis. The known protease inhibitors Darunavir and Indinavir suppressed both precursor autoprocessing and autoproteolysis in a dose-dependent manner. Protease mutations that inhibit Gag processing as characterized using proviruses also reduced autoprocessing efficiency when they were introduced to the fusion precursor. Interestingly, autoprocessing of the fusion precursor requires neither the full proteolytic activity nor the majority of the N-terminal TFR region. Conclusions We suggest that the fusion precursors provide a useful system to study protease autoprocessing in mammalian cells, and may be further developed for screening of new drugs targeting HIV protease autoprocessing.

  17. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  18. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available

  19. Numerical Analysis for Heat transfer characteristic of Helium cooling system in Helium cooled ceramic reflector Test Module Blanket (HCCR-TBM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Kim, Suk Kwon; Cho, Seungyon

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of ITER project can be summarized into three types as follows - Plasma operation for a long time - Large tokamak device technology - Test blanket module (TBM) installation and verification The thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed in the He cooling channel in the BZ region of the HCCR TBM. The maximum temperature in the breeder material is equal to the limit temperature in the present design cooling channel. Nuclear fusion energy has advantage in terms of safety, resource availability, cost and waste management. There is not enough experimental results about the fusion reactor due to the severe experiments restrictions like vacuum environment, plasma production and significant nuclear heating at the same time. Much research and time is required for the commercial fusion reactor. For technical verification against the commercialization of fusion reactor, 7 countries which are EU, USA, Japan, Russia, China, India, and South Korea are building an ITER in the south of France. New designed cooling channels were proposed to improve the cooling performance. The swirl flow accelerates the mixture flow in the channels

  20. Neutron energy spectrum in graphite blankets of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsechanski, A.

    1981-09-01

    Neutron flux measurements were performed in a graphite stack and compared with calculations made with a two dimensional transport computer code. In the present work it is observed that the calculated spectrum in the elastic and inelastic scattering ranges (the first collision range in both cases), is sensitive to details of the angular distribution of these neutrons. Regarding the discrepancies in the elastic scattering range it is concluded that the microscopic cross section library ENDF/B-IV overestimates the large angle scattering (back scattering) as can be seen from comparison of measured and calculated spectra. The two most important conclusions of the present work are: 1. Inelastic scattering interaction of D-T neutrons in graphite cannot be calculated without a proper account of energy-angle correlation. 2. An experimental setup supplying monoenergetic collimated D-T neutrons constitutes a sensitive although indirect means for measuring angular distributions in inelastic and elastic scattering

  1. First wall thermal hydraulic models for fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Subject to normal and off-normal reactor conditions, thermal hydraulic models of first walls, e.g., a thermal mass barrier, a tubular shield, and a radiating liner are reviewed. Under normal operation the plasma behaves as expected in a predicted way for transient and steady-state conditions. The most severe thermal loading on the first wall occurs when the plasma becomes unstable and dumps its energy on the wall in a very short period of time (milliseconds). Depending on the plasma dump time and area over which the energy is deposited may result in melting of the first wall surface, and if the temperature is high enough, vaporization

  2. Irradiation of lithium-based ceramics for fusion blanket application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; Miller, J.M.; Verrall, R.A.; Bokwa, S.R.; Rose, D.H.

    1986-06-01

    Unvented CREATE (Chalk River Experiment to Assess Tritium Emission) tests have shown that under reducing conditions, most of the tritium (greater than 70%) is released from LiAlO 2 and Li 2 O as HT or T 2 ; the balance as HTO or T 2 O. Residual tritium is very small, less than 0.02%. Varying the sweep gas composition has a dramatic effect on the form of tritium released. With a quartz extraction tube during post- irradiation heating, a He sweep gas results in 10-30% release as HT or T 2 ; with a He-1%H 2 sweep gas, greater than 60% release as HT is achieved. The effect of extraction tube material is also significant. Using pure He sweep gas, a quartz extraction tube results in 10-30% release as HT or T 2 ; stainless steel produces 80-95% as HT or T 2 . Chalk River and CEA (Saclay) - fabricated LiAlO 2 behaved similarly to that from ANL in these tests. The first vented test at Chalk River, CRITIC-I, planned for 1986/87, will examine ANL-fabricated Li 2 O, 0.3 wt% 6 Li, 30 mm ID, 40 mm OD annular pellets, in a six-month irradiation at 700-1200 K, varying the sweep gas, with on-line HT/HTO measurement

  3. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a 233 U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed

  4. LWR spent fuel transmutation in a high power density fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Suemer.; Uebeyli, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    The prospect of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel incineration in a high power density fusion reactor has been investigated. The neutron wall load is taken at 10 MW/m 2 and a refractory alloy (W-5Re) is used in the first wall. Neutron transport calculations are conducted over an operation period of 48 months on a simple experimental hybrid blanket in a cylindrical geometry with the help of the SCALE4.3 system by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the XSDRNPM code in 238 neutron groups and a S 8 -P 3 approximation. In the neutron rich environment, the tritium breeding ratio remains > 1.05 so that the tritium self-sufficiency is maintained for the fusion reactor. The presence of fissionable nuclear waste fuel in the investigated blanket causes significant energy amplification. The energy multiplication factor is ∼4 at startup and it increases steadily up to 5.55 during power plant operation so that even a modest fusion reactor can supply a significant quantity of electricity. In the course of nuclear waste incineration, most of the fissionable fuel is burnt in situ. In addition to that, excess fissile fuel production enhances the nuclear quality of the nuclear fuel. Starting with an initial cumulative fissile fuel enrichment (CFFE) value of the spent fuel of 2.172%, CFFE can reach 4% after an irradiation period of ∼12 months. Then the spent fuel becomes suitable for a new recharge in an LWR as a regenerated fuel. Further residence in the fusion blanket continues to upgrade the nuclear waste so that after 48 months, CFFE can reach such a high level (9%) that it becomes qualified to be used in a new type of the advanced high temperature reactors for the Generation-IV

  5. Conceptual design of a hybrid HCPB blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccaccini, L.V. E-mail: lorenzo.boccaccini@iket.fzk.de; Fischer, U.; Gordeev, S.; Malang, S

    2001-11-01

    Following previous studies on helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket concepts based on different structural materials, a hybrid HCPB blanket has been proposed to combine the high load capability of the steel concepts with the high thermal efficiency of the SiC{sub f}/SiC ones. A radial division of the blanket in two components allows us to design the first wall and the first breeder zone with steel as the structural material, while a second breeder zone uses SiC{sub f}/SiC with the possibility to increase the helium outlet temperature. At the same time an advantageous maintenance strategy based on the radial division of the blanket zone into components of different lifetimes can be adopted; this strategy promises a considerable waste reduction and lower fabrication cost. Neutronic and thermohydraulic calculations show that the proposed requirements can be met; on their basis a design of an outboard segment is presented.

  6. Conceptual design of a hybrid HCPB blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccaccini, L.V.; Fischer, U.; Gordeev, S.; Malang, S.

    2001-01-01

    Following previous studies on helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket concepts based on different structural materials, a hybrid HCPB blanket has been proposed to combine the high load capability of the steel concepts with the high thermal efficiency of the SiC f /SiC ones. A radial division of the blanket in two components allows us to design the first wall and the first breeder zone with steel as the structural material, while a second breeder zone uses SiC f /SiC with the possibility to increase the helium outlet temperature. At the same time an advantageous maintenance strategy based on the radial division of the blanket zone into components of different lifetimes can be adopted; this strategy promises a considerable waste reduction and lower fabrication cost. Neutronic and thermohydraulic calculations show that the proposed requirements can be met; on their basis a design of an outboard segment is presented

  7. Blanket design for imploding liner systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The blanket design comprises hot, molten, rotating liquid vortex systems suitable for rapidly compressing confined plasmas, in which stratified immiscible liquid layers having successively greater mass densities outwardly of the axis of rotation are provided

  8. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described

  9. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

  10. Nuclear reactor with self-orificing radial blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, A.A.; Weiss, E.H.G.; Engel, F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The peripheral blanket of a breeder reactor requires a coolant flow rate which is a varying fraction of that of the central core region. A self-orificing blanket cooling structure which is characterized by a predominance of radial coolant flow, generated by the pressure difference across the blanket, is utilized to supply the necessary cooling. The blanket fuel assemblies are surrounded by perforated cans to allow for radial crossflow through the blanket region

  11. Status report. KfK contribution to the development of DEMO-relevant test blankets for NET/ITER. Pt. 1: Self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Reimann, J.; Sebening, H.; Barleon, L.; Bogusch, E.; Bojarsky, E.; Borgstedt, H.U.; Buehler, L.; Casal, V.; Deckers, H.; Feuerstein, H.; Fischer, U.; Frees, G.; Graebner, H.; John, H.; Jordan, T.; Kramer, W.; Krieg, R.; Lenhart, L.; Malang, S.; Meyder, R.; Norajitra, P.; Reimann, J.; Schwenk-Ferrero, A.; Schnauder, H.; Stieglitz, R.; Oschinski, J.; Wiegner, E.

    1991-12-01

    A self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket for a fusion DEMO-reactor and the status of the development programme is described as a part of the European development programme of DEMO relevant test blankets for NET/ITER. Volume 1 (KfK 4907) contains a summary, Volume 2 (KfK 4908) a more detailed version of the report. Both volumes contain sections on previous studies on self-cooled liquid metal breeder blankets, the reference blanket design for a DEMO-reactor, a typical test blanket design including the ancillary loop system and the building requirements for NET/ITER together with the present status of the associated R and D-programme in the fields of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, tritium removal and recovery, liquid metal compatibility and purification, ancillary loop system, safety and reliability. An outlook is given regarding the required R and D-programme for the self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket prior to tests in NET/ITER and the relevant test programme to be performed in NET/ITER. (orig.) [de

  12. Materials handbook for fusion energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the Materials Handbook for Fusion Energy Systems (MHFES) is to provide a readily available source of data to those involved in the design and analysis of fusion reactors or their components. Initially the focus of this Handbook will be on materials properties necessary for the design and analysis of the first wall and blanket structure of both near and long term fusion reactor concepts. However, as more data become available, this effort will be expanded to other aspects of fusion energy systems such as magnets and plasma heaters

  13. Numerical research on the neutronic/thermal-hydraulic/mechanical coupling characteristics of the optimized helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Shijie; Zhang, Dalin, E-mail: dlzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Cheng, Jie; Tian, Wenxi; Su, G.H.

    2017-01-15

    As one of the candidate tritium breeding blankets for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR), a conceptual structure of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket has recently been proposed. The neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical characteristics of the blanket directly affect its tritium breeding and safety performance. Therefore, neutronic/thermal-hydraulic/mechanical coupling analyses are of vital importance for a reliable blanket design. In this work, first, three-dimensional neutronics analysis and optimization of the typical outboard equatorial blanket module (No. 12) were performed for the comprehensive optimal scheme. Then, thermal and fluid dynamic analyses of the scheme under both normal and critical conditions were performed and coupled with the previous neutronic calculation results. With thermal-hydraulic boundaries, thermo-mechanical analyses of the structure materials under normal, critical and blanket over-pressurization conditions were carried out. In addition, several parametric sensitivity studies were also conducted to investigate the influences of the main parameters on the blanket temperature distributions. In this paper, the coupled analyses verify the reasonability of the optimized conceptual design preliminarily and can provide an important reference for the further analysis and optimization design of the CFETR helium cooled solid breeder blanket.

  14. Evaluation of European blanket concepts for DEMO from availability and reliability point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, C.

    1995-12-01

    This technical report is concerned with the ENEA activities relating to reliability and availability for the selection among two of the four European blanket concepts for the DEMO reactor. The activities on the BIT concept, the one proposed by ENEA, are emphasized. In spite of the lack of data relating to the behaviour of structures in an environment similar to that of a fusion reactor, it is evidenced that the available data are relevant to the BIT concept geometry. Moreover, it is evidenced that the qualitative reliability evaluations, compared to the quantitative ones, can lead to a better understanding of the typical problems of a structure to be used in a fusion reactor

  15. Evaluation of European blanket concepts for DEMO from availability and reliability point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardi, C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1996-12-01

    This technical report is concerned with the ENEA activities relating to reliability and availability for the selection among two of the four European blanket concepts for the DEMO reactor. The activities on the BIT concept, the one proposed by ENEA, are emphasized. In spite of the lack of data relating to the behaviour of structures in an environment similar to that of a fusion reactor, it is evidenced that the available data are relevant to the BIT concept geometry. Moreover, it is evidenced that the qualitative reliability evaluations, compared to the quantitative ones, can lead to a better understanding of the typical problems of a structure to be used in a fusion reactor.

  16. IFMIF suitability for evaluation of fusion functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casal, N.; Sordo, F.; Mota, F.; Jordanova, J.; Garcia, A.; Ibarra, A.; Vila, R.; Rapisarda, D.; Queral, V.; Perlado, M.

    2011-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a future neutron source based on the D-Li stripping reaction, planned to test candidate fusion materials at relevant fusion irradiation conditions. During the design of IFMIF special attention was paid to the structural materials for the blanket and first wall, because they will be exposed to the most severe irradiation conditions in a fusion reactor. Also the irradiation of candidate materials for solid breeder blankets is planned in the IFMIF reference design. This paper focuses on the assessment of the suitability of IFMIF irradiation conditions for testing functional materials to be used in liquid blankets and diagnostics systems, since they are been also considered within IFMIF objectives. The study has been based on the analysis and comparison of the main expected irradiation parameters in IFMIF and DEMO reactor.

  17. Waste management procedures for fusion-based central power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.

    1977-08-01

    Several early conceptual designs of fusion demonstration and commercial reactors are used in a discussion of radioactive waste streams, methods of handling these wastes, and their possible environmental effects. Comparisons are made between these waste streams and the fuel cycles of the light water reactor and the liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Most radioactive waste in fusion reactors is generated through replacement of the inner blanket region. Because there is a high degree of uncertainty with regard to blanket lifetimes, there is some uncertainty concerning the activity levels that must be handled. However, in general, fusion reactors are expected to create larger physical amounts of radioactive waste with lower and shorter-lived activity than do fission plants. Material recycling of fusion blanket waste, for nuclear applications, seems feasible after a 100-yr holding time

  18. Status of the EU test blanket systems safety studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, Dobromir; Poitevin, Yves; Ricapito, Italo; Zmitko, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • TBS safety demonstration files. • Safety functions and related design features – detailed TBS components classifications. • Nuclear analyses, radiation shielding and protection. • TBS radiological waste management strategy and categorization. • Selection and definition of reference accidents scenarios and accidents analyses. - Abstract: The European joint undertaking for ITER and the development of fusion energy (‘Fusion for Energy’ – F4E) provides the European contributions to the ITER international fusion energy research project. Among others it includes also the development, design, technological demonstration and implementation of the European test blanket systems (TBS) in ITER. Currently two EU TBS designs are in the phase of conceptual design – helium-cooled lithium-lead (HCLL) and helium-cooled pebble-bed (HCPB). Safety demonstration is an important part of the work devoted to the achievement of the next key project milestone the conceptual design review. The paper reveals the details of the work on EU TBS safety performed in the last couple of years: update of the TBS safety demonstration files; safety functions and related design features; detailed TBS components classifications; nuclear analyses, radiation shielding and protection; TBS radiological waste management strategy and categorization; selection and definition of reference accidents scenarios, and accidents analyses. Finally the authors share the information on on-going and planned future EU TBS safety activities.

  19. A substrate-fusion protein is trapped inside the Type III Secretion System channel in Shigella flexneri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dohlich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Type III Secretion System (T3SS is a macromolecular complex used by Gram-negative bacteria to secrete effector proteins from the cytoplasm across the bacterial envelope in a single step. For many pathogens, the T3SS is an essential virulence factor that enables the bacteria to interact with and manipulate their respective host. A characteristic structural feature of the T3SS is the needle complex (NC. The NC resembles a syringe with a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and a long needle-like structure that protrudes from the bacterium. Based on the paradigm of a syringe-like mechanism, it is generally assumed that effectors and translocators are unfolded and secreted from the bacterial cytoplasm through the basal body and needle channel. Despite extensive research on T3SS, this hypothesis lacks experimental evidence and the mechanism of secretion is not fully understood. In order to elucidate details of the T3SS secretion mechanism, we generated fusion proteins consisting of a T3SS substrate and a bulky protein containing a knotted motif. Because the knot cannot be unfolded, these fusions are accepted as T3SS substrates but remain inside the NC channel and obstruct the T3SS. To our knowledge, this is the first time substrate fusions have been visualized together with isolated NCs and we demonstrate that substrate proteins are secreted directly through the channel with their N-terminus first. The channel physically encloses the fusion protein and shields it from a protease and chemical modifications. Our results corroborate an elementary understanding of how the T3SS works and provide a powerful tool for in situ-structural investigations in the future. This approach might also be applicable to other protein secretion systems that require unfolding of their substrates prior to secretion.

  20. Fusion Development Facility Machine Design Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. P.; Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, R. D.; Wong, C. P. C.

    2008-11-01

    To fill the gap prior to building a fusion demonstration power plant (DEMO), a Fusion Development Facility (FDF) is proposed. As currently configured, FDF is a copper, water-cooled coil machine capable of running continuously for several weeks with the goal to test several blanket configurations in its lifetime. To accommodate multiple changes in blankets, a machine configuration must be chosen that allows for the efficient remote exchange. The TF coil configuration drives the primary maintenance approach decision. A TF coil with joints similar to DIII-D and Alcator C-Mod, allows for one maintenance approach while a continuously wound TF coil drives a different approach. The base machine design parameters are described. The different machine configuration options are presented which consider the design aspects for the machine including alignment of the first wall and divertor, coolant access, and exchange of the blanket.

  1. Tritium control in helium-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Maya, I.; Kessel, C.; Roelant, D.; Schultz, K.R.

    1985-06-01

    As a part of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS), GA Technologies was responsible for the design of helium-cooled, solid- and liquid-metal breeder blankets. Conceptual blanket designs were developed, including the consideration of the generation, transport, and extraction of tritium. Evaluations were made of the inventory and leakage of tritium for helium-cooled Li 2 O and LiAlO 2 and liquid lithium breeder blankets for tokamak and tandem mirror reactors. To facilitate the evaluation, a solid breeder tritium code TRIT4 was developed. The results from this study indicate that tritium inventories and leakages are acceptable for the proposed helium-cooled blankets. An assumption made in the tritium leakage calculations was that tritium is released to the helium purge and coolant streams as T 2 and remains in that form. If oxidation to T 2 O is possible, significant reduction in the tritium leakage will be possible. We conclude that more experimental data on breeder material properties and tritium permeation behavior are needed. However, we are certain that an adequate number of different techniques are available to control the breeder tritium inventory and leakage to an acceptable level in helium-cooled solid- and lithium-breeder blankets

  2. Russian design studies of the DEMO-S demonstration fusion power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbasov, B.; Belyakov, V.; Borisov, A.; Kirillov, I.; Shatalov, G.; Sokolov, Yu.; Strebkov, Yu.; Vasiliev, N. [Kurchatov Institut (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    Different concepts for a fusion power plant have been studied in Russia since 1975. Researchers have considered power facilities using tokamaks, stellarators and inertial fusion devices. Tokamak reactors appear the most promising at this stage of science development. Application of fusion reactors for generation of electricity, production of domestic and industrial heat, hydrogen production, transmutation of non-fissionable isotopes into fissionable ones, water desalination, and burning out of minor actinides was considered. Conceptual design studies of a tokamak-based demonstration fusion reactor have been carried out since 1991. The preferred concept was selected, which was a steady-state operating tokamak with superconducting magnets, one-null divertor configuration and a high contribution of bootstrap current into plasma current drive. The general reactor layout was determined. Plasma characteristics were optimized. Two most attractive blanket concepts were analyzed: (1) a He-cooled ceramic (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) design for tritium breeding, using ferritic steel as structural material, and (2) a blanket using liquid Li as tritium breeding material and coolant and a V-Cr-Ti alloy as structural material. The studies were supported by neutronic, heat-hydraulic and mechanical calculations. A conventional type of water or Li cooled divertor targets with maximum heat load of {proportional_to}10 MW/m{sup 2} was chosen. Blankets of both types require Be as a neutron multiplier and have to be replaced after the integral fusion neutron load on the first wall reaches 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Heat to electricity conversion schemes enable operation with net efficiency of 34% for the He-coolant design and 40% for the liquid Li one. Aspects of radioactive waste management and scarce materials refabrication are considered. In particular, a radiochemical extraction technology for separation of V alloy components and their purification from activation products after reactor

  3. Remote handling of the blanket segments: Testing of 1/3 scale mock-ups on the ROBERTINO facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnier, D.; Amelotti, F.; Chiasera, A.

    1994-01-01

    The remotized replacement of the blanket segments inside the Vacuum Vessel of a fusion reactor is one of the critical tasks for reactor components design, operational procedures, and safety. This open-quotes hostile environmentclose quotes task must be accomplished by a specific Blanket Handling Device, with a grasping device acting as open-quotes end-effectorclose quotes, because of intervention complexity, of components dimensions and weights, and of consequences of possible accidents during the blanket segments handling operations. Therefore, specific support experimental studies in this field appear to be necessary in order to: select appropriate blanket handling devices and procedures; assess the design of all components involved in the handling operations; perform checks in all field related to the robotized handling control (kinematics and dynamics of the grasping device trajectory planning and motion control, sensing and intelligence of the blanket handling devices, etc.); improve reliability and safety for the replacement sequences; give a realistic estimation of the time duration of the replacement duration. During the test phase, handling operations were carried out on the blanket mock-ups by means of different gripping devices. The operations were driven in the control room by means of the Motion command computer and the real time sensing data display allowed operations' control. The results were analyzed by charting the sensors' data

  4. CM-244 as multiplier and breeder in a ThO/sub 2/ hybrid blanket driven by a (D,T) source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, S.; Al-Kusayer, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The safeguard aspects of Cm-244 - a nuclear waste product in LWRs - in a cylindrical hybrid blanket, driven by a (D,T) fusion neutron source have been analyzed. Cm-244 is investigated for two different applications: 1) as a neutron multiplier between the first wall and the fuel zone in a blanket with ThO/sub 2/; and 2) as a component of the mixed fuel, ThO/sub 2/-Cm/sup 244/O/sub 2/, used for power flattening in a hybrid blanket. The calculations show that a relatively small driven with 100 MW/sub th/ fusion power could produce about 5 kg/year Cm-245, enough to provide nuclear fuel for up to 50 explosives. The study suggests an extension of the safe-guarding regulations prior to the commercial introduction of fusion reactors in the energy market

  5. New design of cable-in-conduit conductor for application in future fusion reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, J.; Wu, Y.; Li, J.; Liu, Fang; Dai, Chao; Shi, Y.; Liu, H.; Mao, Z.; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao; Yagotyntsev, Kostyantyn; Lubkemann, Ruben; Anvar, Valiyaparambil Abdulsalam; Devred, A.

    2017-01-01

    The China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new tokamak device whose magnet system includes toroidal field, central solenoid (CS) and poloidal field coils. The main goal is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with about 1 GW fusion power and self-sufficiency by blanket. In order

  6. Fusion Advanced Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Guebaly, Laila [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Henderson, Douglass [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Wilson, Paul [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Blanchard, Jake [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-03-24

    During the January 1, 2013 – December 31, 2015 contract period, the UW Fusion Technology Institute personnel have actively participated in the ARIES-ACT and FESS-FNSF projects, led the nuclear and thermostructural tasks, attended several project meetings, and participated in all conference calls. The main areas of effort and technical achievements include updating and documenting the nuclear analysis for ARIES-ACT1, performing nuclear analysis for ARIES-ACT2, performing thermostructural analysis for ARIES divertor, performing disruption analysis for ARIES vacuum vessel, and developing blanket testing strategy and Materials Test Module for FNSF.

  7. A novel technique combining laparoscopic and endovascular approaches using image fusion guidance for anterior embolization of type II endoleak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mujeeb Zubair, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Type II endoleak (T2E leading to aneurysm sac enlargement is one of the challenging complications associated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Recent guidelines recommend embolization of T2E associated with aneurysmal sac enlargement. Various percutaneous and endovascular techniques have been reported for embolization of T2E. We report a novel technique for T2E embolization combining laparoscopic and endovascular approaches using preoperative image fusion. We believe our technique provides a more direct access to the lumbar feeding vessels that is typically challenging with transarterial or translumbar embolization techniques.

  8. A novel technique combining laparoscopic and endovascular approaches using image fusion guidance for anterior embolization of type II endoleak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, M Mujeeb; Chinnadurai, Ponraj; Loh, Francis E; Loh, Thomas M; Lumsden, Alan B; Bechara, Carlos F

    2017-03-01

    Type II endoleak (T2E) leading to aneurysm sac enlargement is one of the challenging complications associated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Recent guidelines recommend embolization of T2E associated with aneurysmal sac enlargement. Various percutaneous and endovascular techniques have been reported for embolization of T2E. We report a novel technique for T2E embolization combining laparoscopic and endovascular approaches using preoperative image fusion. We believe our technique provides a more direct access to the lumbar feeding vessels that is typically challenging with transarterial or translumbar embolization techniques.

  9. Technology of controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of the following topics treated at the meeting (invited papers and sessions): international programs (Japanese, Joint European Tokamak, Euratom non-JET, ERDA magnetic, ERDA laser, and Electric Power Research Institute programmes); non-commercial reactor designs; commercial reactor designs; radiation damage; plasma engineering; tritium and neutronics; confinement system technology; environment and safety; blanket engineering and materials testing; fusion-fission hybrid reactors

  10. The European fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedkoop, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    With the 1982-86 pluriannual programme, reactor technology became a separate chapter in the fusion research programme of the European Commission. It comprises work on materials, the breeder blanket, tritium management, magnet coils, maintenance and the safety and environmental aspects. After an overview of the programme each of these areas is discussed briefly and some remarks are made on the role played by the European fission energy and magnet laboratories. (author)

  11. Cryogenic aspects of a demountable toroidal field magnet system for tokamak type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, S.Y.; Powell, J.; Lehner, J.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for superconducting Toroidal Field (TF) magnet construction is presented. It is termed the ''Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress'' (DEALS) magnet system. In contrast to continuous wound conventional superconducting coils, each magnet coil is made from several straight coil segments to form a polygon which can be joined and disjoined to improve reactor maintenance accessibility or to replace failed coil segments if necessary. A design example is presented of a DEALS magnet system for a UWMAK II size reactor. The overall magnet system is described, followed by a detailed analysis of the major heat loads in order to assess the refrigeration requirements for the concept. Despite the increased heat loads caused by high current power leads (200,000 amps) and the coil warm reinforcement support system, the analysis shows that at most, only about one percent (approximately 20 Mw) of the plant electrical output (approximately 2,000 Mw) is needed to operate the magnet cryogenic system. The advantages and the drawbacks of the DEALS magnet system are also discussed. The advantages include: capability to replace failed coils, increased accessibility to the blanket shield assembly, reduced reliability requirements for the magnet, much lower stress in conductor, easier application of improved high field brittle superconductors like Nb 3 Sn, improved magnet safety features, etc. The drawbacks are the increased refrigeration requirements and the necessity of a movable coil support system. A comparison with a conventional magnet system is made. It is concluded that the benefits of the DEALS approach far outweigh its penalties, and that the DEALS concept is the most practical, economical way to construct TF magnet systems for Tokamak reactors

  12. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units

  13. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-21

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units. (MOW)

  14. Modelling blanket peatland hydrology and Holocene peatland development in north-eastern Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Ward; Verstraeten, Gert; Broothaerts, Nils

    2017-04-01

    To study long-term peatland dynamics, several peatland models have been constructed in recent decades. Most modelling efforts have focussed on peat bogs, but for other peatland types, such as blanket peatlands, modelling studies are limited. Although blanket peatland is a rare ecosystem type on a global scale, 87 percent of the peat cover in the UK is of this type. Hillslope hydrology is fundamental to blanket peatland development and an improved representation and understanding of the relationships between climate, hydrology and peat growth is crucial to better understand the effects of environmental change on peatland evolution and the carbon balance. Here, a new spatially explicit process-based peat growth model is presented for blanket peatlands, which couples a detailed 2.5D-hillslope hydrology model with a peat accumulation and decomposition module. The resultant model allows to study the hillslope hydrology and blanket peatland development along topographically complex hillslopes over a Holocene timescale. Calibration and validation of the model parameters is based on a dataset of more than 250 peat thickness measurements along several hillslope transects and eight radiocarbon dated peat samples in the headwaters of the river Dee (Cairngorms National Park, north-eastern Scotland). The model results show that the topography-driven hillslope hydrology has a strong influence on the resultant peat development along the hillslope, stressing the need for spatial models in studying blanket peatlands. Model simulations for the studied area result in peat growth initiation dates situated mostly in the period 9000 - 7000 a BP, which corresponds largely to basal calibrated radiocarbon dates for peat deposits in central and north-eastern Scotland. The simulated blanket peat growth initiation occurs before the mid-Holocene forest cover decline. These results indicate that, for the studied area, the blanket peatland development is largely driven by the early

  15. Electromagnetic computations for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1989-09-01

    Among the difficulties in making nuclear fusion a useful energy source, two important ones are producing the magnetic fields needed to drive and confine the plasma, and controlling the eddy currents induced in electrically conducting components by changing fields. All over the world, researchers are developing electromagnetic codes and employing them to compute electromagnetic effects. Ferromagnetic components of a fusion reactor introduce field distortions. Eddy currents are induced in the vacuum vessel, blanket and other torus components of a tokamak when the plasma current disrupts. These eddy currents lead to large forces, and 3-D codes are being developed to study the currents and forces. 35 refs., 6 figs

  16. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C. [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Dauer, William [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Johnson, David [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Roller, Richard J., E-mail: richard-roller@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  17. Performance of the Cascade inertial-confinement-fusion conceptual reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    A 4.5-m-radius rotating fusion reactor made of silicon carbide and containing a moving 1-m-thick lithium-ceramic granular blanket can produce 3000 MW/sub t/. The blanket operates at high temperature (>1200 K) leading to gross plant efficiencies of up to 60% using a combined helium-gas turbine (Brayton cycle) with a vapor bottoming cycle

  18. The tensile and fatigue properties of type 1.4914 ferritic steel for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmy, P.; Victoria, M.; Ruan, Y.

    1989-08-01

    Martensitic steels have received considerable attention as structural materials in fusion reactor applications. In present designs, fusion reactors are expected to operate in a cyclic mode, thus producing cyclic thermal stresses in the first wall. Due to its thermal expansion coefficient and very low swelling rate, 1.4914 martensitic steel is a suitable candidate for the first wall with high neutron loadings. This paper presents the preirradiation results obtained with subsize-specimens designed to be irradiated with a proton beam in the PIREX facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) of Wuerenlingen. Both tensile and low cycle fatigue tests were performed in vacuum in the region from 300 K to 870 K (720 K in the case of fatigue tests). Tensile tests on the subsize specimens (0.33 mm thick) compared well to those on bulk specimens, showing a minimum in ductility at around 620 K. The fatigue tests, performed on tubular specimens (3.4 mm external diameter, 0.35 mm wall thickness) showed substantial softening setting in at a low number of cycles. The initial microstructure observed in transmission microscopy consists of fine martensite laths. As cyclic deformation proceeds, dislocation cells form, that gradually replace the martensitic laths. (author) 19 figs., 5 tabs., 16 refs

  19. Presence of fusion in albinism after strabismus surgery augmented with botulinum toxin (type a) injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolizadeh, Sepideh; Farahi, Azadeh

    2013-08-01

    It is commonly accepted that albino patients with strabismus rarely achieve binocularity and depth perception after strabismus surgery. The presence of retino-geniculo-cortical misrouting, a hallmark of the visual system in albinism, does not necessarily cause total loss of binocular vision, however, not even in albino patients with strabismus. Recently some degrees of stereopsis were reported in albinism patients with minimal clinical nystagmus, if any, in the absence of strabismus. It is possible that patients with albinism and strabismus have binocular visual potential which appears after strabismus correction and provides appropriate postoperative alignment in the long term. Here we present two cases of clinically diagnosed oculocutaneous albinism, an 18-year-old girl and a 16-year-old boy, both with exotropia ≥40 prism diopter, who gained acceptable alignment and fusion after surgical correction of their strabismus as demonstrated on Bagolini testing. In cases of albinism accompanied by visual pathway abnormalities and strabismus, binocular visual potential is not impossible, and some levels can be expected. Thus, these patients, like other cases of strabismus, may benefit from treatment of strabismus at an earlier age to achieve appropriate alignment, cosmetic satisfaction, and a possibly increased chance of fusion.

  20. Development of Fusion Nuclear Technologies and the role of MTR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J.G. van der; Schaaf, B. van der

    2006-01-01

    design for the EU ITER Test Blanket Module. The duration of the irradiation is relevant for the total TBM operation during the ITER lifetime. The major result is that the basic design soundness has been demonstrated under ITER relevant conditions. Besides the ceramic breeder concept experiments with lithium lead breeder sub components are continued to measure the effects of transmutation product helium on the liquid metal properties. Similarly, activities are ongoing to perform in-pile testing of primary wall components, allowing to address fatigue type loading conditions. In the next decade 14 MeV sources such as ITER, IFMIF and maybe a volumetric source will support the crucial demonstration of components under near fusion plasma nuclear conditions. These sources have limitations in accumulated total damage (ITER) irradiation volume (IFMIF) and control. MTR's will thus continue to supply essential facts on component behaviour and materials in parallel to 14 MeV sources. The present generation of MTR's will be closed in this and next decade because they reach their end of life. The new generation will be utilised for 4 major areas of nuclear interest: energy, science, health and environmental issues. Fusion and the next generation fission (Generation 4) power plant development will share the areas energy and science in the next decades. The design and concept of the new MTR's will centre on faster development cycles, thus higher fluxes up to 5 x 10 18 nm -2 . Several MTR replacements in the EU are in different design stages such as the Reacteur Jules Horowitz in France and PALLAS in the Netherlands. The conceptual design of the replacement for the HFR, Petten, named PALLAS envisages a fruitful co-operation of the experimenters for advanced fission power reactor and fusion plant components. Materials science will also be able to use modern MTR facilities for the modelling of radiation damage in both fission and fusion environments. The development of primary fusion

  1. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1986-05-01

    In 1982, KfK joined the fusion programme of EURATOM as a further association introducing its experience in nuclear technology. KfK closely cooperates with IPP Garching, the two institutions forming a research unit aiming at planning and realization of future development steps of fusion. KfK has combined its forces in the Nuclear Fusion Project (PKF) with participation of several KfK departments to the project tasks. Previous work of KfK in magnetic fusion has addressed mainly superconducting magnets, plasma heating by cluster ions and studies on structural materials. At present, emphasis of our work has concentrated increasingly on the nuclear part, i.e. the first wall and blanket structures and the elements of the tritium extraction and purification system. Associated to this component development are studies of remote maintenance and safety. Most of the actual work addresses NET, the next step to a demonstration of fusion feasibility. NET is supposed to follow JET, the operating plasma physics experiment of Euratom, on the 1990's. Detailed progress of the work in the past half year is described in this report. (orig./GG)

  2. Overview of the Last Progresses for the European Test Blanket Modules Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salavy, J.-F.; Rampal, G.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Meyder, R.; Neuberger, H.; Laesser, R.; Poitevin, Y.; Zmitko, M.; Rigal, E.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term objective of the EU Breeding Blankets programme is the development of DEMO breeding blankets, which shall assure tritium self-sufficiency, an economically attractive use of the heat produced inside the blankets for electricity generation and a sufficiently high shielding of the superconducting magnets for long time operation. In the short-term so-called DEMO relevant Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) of these breeder blanket concepts shall be designed, manufactured, tested, installed, commissioned and operated in ITER for first tests in a fusion environment. The Helium Cooled Lithium-Lead (HCLL) breeder blanket and the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) concepts are the two breeder blanket lines presently developed by the EU. The main objective of the EU test strategy related to TBMs in ITER is to provide the necessary information for the design and fabrication of breeding blankets for a future DEMO reactor. EU TBMs shall therefore use the same structural and functional materials, apply similar fabrication technologies, and test adequate processes and components. This paper gives an overview of the last progresses in terms of system design, calculations, test program, safety and R-and-D done these last two years in order to cope with the ambitious objective to introduce two EU TBM systems for day-1 of ITER operation. The engineering design of the two systems is mostly concluded and the priority is now on the development and qualification of the fabrication technologies. From calculations point of view, the last modelling efforts related to the thermal-hydraulic of the first wall, the tritium behaviour, and the box thermal and mechanical resistance in accidental conditions are presented. Last features of the TBM and cooling system designs and integration in ITER reactor are highlighted. In particular, this paper also describes the safety and licensing analyses performed for each concept to be able to include the TBM systems in the ITER preliminary safety report

  3. Summary of sensor evaluation for the Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment (FELIX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, M.J.

    1982-08-01

    As part of the First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program, a test bed called FELIX (Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment) is now under construction at ANL. Its purpose will be to test, evaluate, and develop computer codes for the prediction of electromagnetically induced phenomenon in a magnetic environment modeling that of a fusion reaction. Crucial to this process is the sensing and recording of the various induced effects. Sensor evaluation for FELIX has reached the point where most sensor types have been evaluated and preliminary decisions are being made as to type and quantity for the initial FELIX experiments. These early experiments, the first, flat plate experiment in particular, will be aimed at testing the sensors as well as the pertinent theories involved. The reason for these evaluations, decisions, and proof tests is the harsh electrical and magnetic environment that FELIX presents

  4. [Comparison of two types of cell cultures for preparation of sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shigao; Yin, Yuting; Xiong, Chunhui; Wang, Caihong; Lü, Jianxin; Gao, Jimin

    2013-01-01

    In this study we used two types of cell cultures, i.e., anchorage-dependent basket and full suspension batch cultures of sTNFRII-gAD-expressing CHO cells in the CelliGen 310 bioreactor (7.5 L) to compare their yields in order to optimize the culturing conditions for efficient expression of sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein consisting of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II and globular domain of adiponectin. The anchorage-dependent basket culture was performed in 4L 10% serum-containing medium with the final inoculating concentration of 3 x 10(5) to 4 x 10(5) cells/mL of sTNFRII-gAD-expressing CHO cells for 3 days, and then switched to 4 L serum-free LK021 medium to continue the culture for 4 days. The full suspension batch culture was carried out in the 4 L serum-free LK021 medium with the final inoculating concentration of 3 x 10(5) to 4 x 10(5) cells/mL of sTNFRII-gAD-expressing CHO cells for 7 days. The culturing conditions were monitored in real-time to maintain pH and dissolved oxygen stability through the whole process. The supernatants were collected by centrifuge, and the protein was concentrated through Pellicon flow ultrafiltration system and then purified by DEAE anion exchange. The results showed that the yields of sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein were 8.0 mg/L with 95% purity and 7.5 mg/L with 98% purity in the anchorage-dependent basket and the full suspension batch cultures, respectively. The study provided the framework for the pilot production of sTNFRII-gAD fusion protein.

  5. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    This chapter deals with the analysis and engineering scaling of solid breeded blankets. The limits under which full component behavior can be achieved under changed test conditions are explored. The characterization of these test requirements for integrated testing contributes to the overall test matrix and test plan for the understanding and development of fusion nuclear technology. The second chapter covers the analysis and engineering scaling of liquid metal blankets. The testing goals for a complete blanket program are described. (MOW)

  6. Application of Bondarenko formalism to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Bondarenko formalism used to account for resonance self-shielding effects (temperature and composition) in a Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor is reviewed. A material of interest in the RTPR blanket is 93 Nb, which exhibits a large number of capture resonance in the energy region below 800 keV. Although Nb constitutes a small volume fraction of the blanket, its presence significantly affects the nucleonic properties of the RTPR blanket. The effects of self-shielding in 93 Nb on blanket parameters such as breeding ratio, total afterheat, radioactivity, magnet-coil heating and total energy depositions have been studied. Resonance self-shielding of 93 Nb, as compared to unshielded cross sections, will increase tritium breeding by approximately 7 percent in the RTPR blanket and will decrease blanket radioactivity, total recoverable energy, and magnet-coil heating. Temperature effects change these parameters by less than 2 percent. The method is not restricted to the RTPR, as a single set of Bondarenko f-factors is suitable for application to a variety of fusion reactor designs

  7. Shallow-Land Buriable PCA-type austenitic stainless steel for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron-induced activity in the PCA (Primary Candidate Alloy) austenitic stainless steel is examined, when used for first-wall components in a DEMO fusion reactor. Some low-activity definitions, based on different waste management and disposal concepts, are introduced. Activity in the PCA is so high that any recycling of the irradiated material can be excluded. Disposal of PCA radioactive wastes in Shallow-Land Buriable (SLB) is prevented as well. Mo, Nb and some impurity elements have to be removed or limited, in order to reduce the radioactivity of the PCA. Possible low-activity versions of the PCA are introduced (PCA-la); they meet the requirements for SLB and may also be recycled under certain conditions. (author)

  8. Conceptual design of a hybrid fusion-fission reactor with intrinsic safety and optimized energy productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebi, Hosein; Sadat Kiai, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Designing a high yield and feasible Dense Plasma Focus for driving the reactor. • Presenting a structural method to design the dual layer cylindrical blankets. • Finding, the blanket production energy, in terms of its geometrical and material parameters. • Designing a subcritical blanket with optimization of energy amplification in detail. - Abstract: A hybrid fission-fusion reactor with a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) as a fusion core and the dual layer fissionable blanket as the energy multiplier were conceptually designed. A cylindrical DPF, energized by a 200 kJ bank energy, is considered to produce fusion neutron, and these neutrons drive the subcritical fission in the surrounding blankets. The emphasis has been placed on the safety and energy production with considering technical and economical limitations. Therefore, the k eff-t of the dual cylindrical blanket was defined and mathematically, specified. By applying the safety criterion (k eff-t ≤ 0.95), the geometrical and material parameters of the blanket optimizing the energy amplification were obtained. Finally, MCNPX code has been used to determine the detailed dimensions of the blankets and fuel rods.

  9. Summary: Fusion technology, safety and environmental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, S.

    2003-01-01

    The year 2002 was in the middle of successive governmental negotiation toward the start of the ITER Construction. The ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) continued until July 2001, and most of the highlighted topics were already reported at the last IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Montreal or in other opportunities. However, the ITER EDA was followed by the Coordinated Technical Activities that provided a lot of qualitative achievements such as, the search for predictions on operation capabilities based on various data bases and analysis, optimization of the design based on its validating technology R and D. As a consequence, at this conference, major contribution in the field of Fusion Technology was again from ITER, and its related topics occupied about 38% of the total number of contributions of 86. In ITER, physics analysis, predictions and heating/current drive technologies are highlighted. Another key feature at this conference was the progress of study toward steady-state operation in both physics and technology research as well as their application to toroidal devices. Several tokamaks and helical devises are under construction or under design, and most of them incorporate super-conducting magnet for their coils. Studies were made for various types of fusion reactors including Spherical Torus, Tokamaks, Helical systems etc., and their common understandings are progressing through their comparative study. Looking in the near term, but beyond ITER, about 20% of the papers were devoted to the fusion materials and blanket development, with the neutron irradiation facilities for the research. Because of the importance of this field to be implemented in parallel with ITER, more contributions would be expected in future. With these themes in mind, the remaining sections of this paper are arranged in the order of 2) ITER, 3) Toroidal Devices under Construction or under Design, 4) Reactor Technology, 5) Safety and Environment, and 6) Conclusion

  10. The requirements for processing tritium recovered from liquid lithium blankets: The blanket interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Grimm, T.L.; Sze, D.K.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse.

    1988-03-01

    We have initiated a study to define a blanket processing mockup for Tritium Systems Test Assembly. Initial evaluation of the requirements of the blanket processing system have been started. The first step of the work is to define the condition of the gaseous tritium stream from the blanket tritium recovery system. This report summarizes this part of the work for one particular blanket concept, i.e., a self-cooled lithium blanket. The total gas throughput, the hydrogen to tritium ratio, the corrosive chemicals, and the radionuclides are defined. The key discoveries are: the throughput of the blanket gas stream (including the helium carrier gas) is about two orders of magnitude higher than the plasma exhaust stream;the protium to tritium ratio is about 1, the deuterium to tritium ratio is about 0.003;the corrosion chemicals are dominated by halides;the radionuclides are dominated by C-14, P-32, and S-35;their is high level of nitrogen contamination in the blanket stream. 77 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs

  11. Development of a control system for a heavy object handling manipulator. Application to a remote maintenance system for ITER blanket module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimi, Takashi; Tsuji, Kouichi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Kubo, Tomomi; Kakudate, Satoshi; Tada, Eisuke

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a control system for the heavy object handling manipulator. It has been developed for the blanket module remote maintenance system of ITER (International Thermonuclear Fusion Experimental Reactor). A rail-mounted vehicle-type manipulator is proposed for the precise handling of a blanket module which is about 4 tons in weight. Basically, this manipulator is controlled by teaching-playback technique. When grasping or releasing the module, the manipulator sags and the position of the end-effector changes about 50 [mm]. Applying only the usual teaching-playback control makes the smooth operation of setting/removing modules to/from the vacuum vessel wall difficult due to this position change. To solve this proper problem of heavy object handling manipulator, we have developed a system which uses motion patterns generated from two kinds of teaching points. These motion patterns for setting/removing heavy objects are generated by combining teaching points for positioning the manipulator with and without grasping the object. When these motion patterns are applied, the manipulator can transfer the object's weight smoothly at the setting/removing point. This developed system has been applied to the real-scale mock-up of the vehicle manipulator and through the actual module setting/removing experiments, we have verified its effectiveness and realized smooth maintenance operation. (author)

  12. A Type-2 fuzzy data fusion approach for building reliable weighted protein interaction networks with application in protein complex detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehranfar, Adele; Ghadiri, Nasser; Kouhsar, Morteza; Golshani, Ashkan

    2017-09-01

    Detecting the protein complexes is an important task in analyzing the protein interaction networks. Although many algorithms predict protein complexes in different ways, surveys on the interaction networks indicate that about 50% of detected interactions are false positives. Consequently, the accuracy of existing methods needs to be improved. In this paper we propose a novel algorithm to detect the protein complexes in 'noisy' protein interaction data. First, we integrate several biological data sources to determine the reliability of each interaction and determine more accurate weights for the interactions. A data fusion component is used for this step, based on the interval type-2 fuzzy voter that provides an efficient combination of the information sources. This fusion component detects the errors and diminishes their effect on the detection protein complexes. So in the first step, the reliability scores have been assigned for every interaction in the network. In the second step, we have proposed a general protein complex detection algorithm by exploiting and adopting the strong points of other algorithms and existing hypotheses regarding real complexes. Finally, the proposed method has been applied for the yeast interaction datasets for predicting the interactions. The results show that our framework has a better performance regarding precision and F-measure than the existing approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation effects in Be and Al for a magnetic fusion production reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J. B.

    1986-12-01

    Estimates of the expected performance of beryllium and several aluminum alloy structural components of the breeding blanket of a magnetic fusion production reactor are made based on the known behavior and properties of these materials in fission reactor applications. Comparisons of the irradiation damage effects resulting from the fission reactor neutron spectra and the fusion reactor blanket spectra indicate that beryllium will perform well in the breeding blanket for at least one year and the aluminum alloy 5052 will retain structural integrity for about 5 years.

  14. Radioactive waste produced by DEMO and commerical fusion reactors extrapolated from ITER and advanced data bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.; Hertel, N.E.; Hoffman, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    The potential for providing energy with minimal environmental impact is a powerful motivation for the development of fusion and is the long-term objective of most fusion programs. However, the societal acceptability of magnetic fusion may well be decided in the near-term when decisions are taken on the construction of DEMO to follow ITER (if not when the construction decision is taken on ITER). Component wastes were calculated for DEMOs based on each data base by first calculating reactor sizes needed to satisfy the physics, stress and radiation attenuation requirements, and then calculating component replacement rates based on radiation damage and erosion limits. Then, radioactive inventories were calculated and compared to a number of international criteria for open-quote near-surface close-quote burial. None of the components in either type of design would meet the Japanese LLW criterion ( 3 ) within 10 years of shutdown, although the advanced (V/Li) blanket would do so soon afterwards. The vanadium first wall, divertor and blanket would satisfy the IAEA LLW criterion (<2 mSv/h contact dose) within about 10 years after shutdown, but none of the stainless steel or copper components would. All the components in the advanced data base designs except the stainless steel vacuum vessel and shield readily satisfy the US extended 10CFR61 intruder dose criterion, but none of the components in the open-quotes ITER data baseclose quotes designs do so. It seems unlikely that a stainless steel first wall or a copper divertor plate could satisfy the US (class C) criterion for near surface burial, much less the more stringent international, criteria. On the other hand, the first wall, divertor and blanket of the V/Li system would still satisfy the intruder dose concentration limits even if the dose criterion was reduced by two orders of magnitude

  15. Tritium behaviour in ceramic breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Tritium release from the candidate ceramic materials, Li 2 O, LiA10 2 , Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 ZrO 3 , is being investigated in many blanket programs. Factors that affect tritium release from the ceramic into the helium sweep gas stream include operating temperature, ceramic microstructure, tritium transport and solubility in the solid. A review is presented of the material properties studied and of the irradiation programs and the results are summarized. The ceramic breeder blanket concept is briefly reviewed

  16. Preliminary accident analysis of Loss of Off-Site Power and In-Box LOCA for the CFETR helium cooled solid breeder blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Qiang; Cui, Shijie [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Lab. of Advanced Nuclear Energy and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Tian, Wenxi, E-mail: wxtian@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Lab. of Advanced Nuclear Energy and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Dalin; Su, G.H. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Lab. of Advanced Nuclear Energy and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The CFETR HCSB blanket has been investigated using RELAP5. • Loss of Off-Site Power is investigated. • The parametric analyses during In-Box LOCA are investigated. • The HCSB blanket for CFETR is designed with sufficient decay heat removal capability. - Abstract: As one of three candidate tritium breeding blanket concepts for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR), a conceptual structure of helium cooled solid breeder (HCSB) blanket was recently proposed. In this paper, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic and safety analyses of the typical outboard equatorial blanket module (No.12) have been carried out using RELAP5/Mod3.4 code. Two design basis accidents are investigated based on the steady-state initialization, including Loss of Off-Site Power and In-Box Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The differences between circulator coast down and circulator rotor locked under Loss of Off-Site Power are compared. Regarding the In-Box LOCA, the influences of different break sizes and locations are thoroughly analyzed based on a relatively accurate modeling method of the heat structures in sub-modules. The analysis results show that the blanket and the combined helium cooling system (HCS) are designed with sufficient decay heat removal capability for both accidents, which can preliminarily verify the feasibility of the conceptual design. The research work can also provide an important reference for parameter optimization of the blanket and its HCS in the next stage.

  17. LMFBR blanket physics project progress report No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Lanning, D.D.; Kaplan, I.; Supple, A.T.

    1973-01-01

    During the period covered by the report, July 1, 1972, through June 30, 1973, work was devoted to completion of experimental measurements and data analysis on Blanket Mockup No. 3, a graphite-reflected blanket, and to initiation of experimental work on Blanket Mockup No. 4, a steel-reflected assembly designed to mock up a demonstration plant blanket. Work was also carried out on the analysis of a number of advanced blanket concepts, including the use of high-albedo reflectors, the use of thorium in place of uranium in the blanket region, and the ''parfait'' or completely internal blanket concept. Finally, methods development work was initiated to develop the capability for making gamma heating measurements in the blanket mockups. (U.S.)

  18. Fast power cycle for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Fillo, J.; Makowitz, H.

    1978-01-01

    The unique, deep penetration capability of 14 MeV neutrons produced in DT fusion reactions allows the generation of very high temperature working fluid temperatures in a thermal power cycle. In the FAST (Fusion Augmented Steam Turbine) power cycle steam is directly superheated by the high temperature ceramic refractory interior of the blanket, after being generated by heat extracted from the relatively cool blanket structure. The steam is then passed to a high temperature gas turbine for power generation. Cycle studies have been carried out for a range of turbine inlet temperatures [1600 0 F to 3000 0 F (870 to 1650 0 C)], number of reheats, turbine mechanical efficiency, recuperator effectiveness, and system pressure losses. Gross cycle efficiency is projected to be in the range of 55 to 60%, (fusion energy to electric power), depending on parameters selected. Turbine inlet temperatures above 2000 0 F, while they do increase efficiency somewhat, are not necessarily for high cycle efficiency

  19. Nuclear data needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear design of fusion components (e.g., first wall, blanket, shield, magnet, limiter, divertor, etc.) requires an accurate prediction of the radiation field, the radiation damage parameters, and the activation analysis. The fusion nucleonics for these tasks are reviewed with special attention to point out nuclear data needs and deficiencies which effect the design process. The main areas included in this review are tritium breeding analyses, nuclear heating calculations, radiation damage in reactor components, shield designs, and results of uncertainty analyses as applied to fusion reactor studies. Design choices and reactor parameters that impact the neutronics performance of the blanket are discussed with emphasis on the tritium breeding ratio. Nuclear data required for kerma factors, shielding analysis, and radiation damage are discussed. Improvements in the evaluated data libraries are described to overcome the existing problems. 84 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  20. High density linear systems for fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, W.R.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The physics and technological limitations and uncertainties associated with the linear theta pinch are discussed in terms of a generalized energy balance, which has as its basis the ratio (Q/sub E/) of total electrical energy generated to net electrical energy consumed. Included in this total is the virtual energy of bred fissile fuel, if a hybrid blanket is used, as well as the actual of real energy deposited in the blanket by the fusion neutron. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed operation demanded by the linear theta pinch are also discussed

  1. Neutronics design for a fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Chenglun; Xie Zhongyou

    1987-01-01

    As a fusion breeder, one of the most important figure is support ratio which reflects the economic and fuel production performance of the system to a great extent. In this paper, the support ratio is calculated by using one dimension transport program ANISN and optimized by adjusting 6 Li enrichment and blanket arrangement. The radial distribution of producted U-233 is also taken into account. Measures are taken for better blanket design, and satisfactory results are obtained. Tritium breeding ratio T reaches 1.11 and the support ratio is enhanced from 11 to 14. The engineering, safety and environment performance are improved

  2. Status report. KfK contribution to the development of DEMO-relevant test blankets for NET/ITER. Pt. 2: BOT helium cooled solid breeder blanket. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Bojarsky, E.; Deckers, H.; Dienst, W.; Doerr, L.; Fischer, U.; Giese, H.; Guenther, E.; Haefner, H.E.; Hofmann, P.; Kappler, F.; Knitter, R.; Kuechle, M.; Moellendorf, U. von; Norajitra, P.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Reimann, G.; Reiser, H.; Schulz, B.; Schumacher, G.; Schwenk-Ferrero, A.; Sordon, G.; Tsukiyama, T.; Wedemeyer, H.; Weimar, P.; Werle, H.; Wiegner, E.; Zimmermann, H.

    1991-10-01

    The BOT (Breeder Outside Tube) Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Blanket for a fusion Demo reactor and the status of the R and D program is presented. This is the KfK contribution to the European Program for the Demo relevant test blankets to be irradiated in NET/ITER. Volume 1 (KfK 4928) contains the summary, volume 2 (KfK 4929) a more detailed version of the report. In both volumes are described the reasons for the selected design, the reference blanket design for the Demo reactor, the design of the test blanket including the ancillary systems together with the present status of the relative R and D program in the fields of neutronic and thermohydraulic calculations, of the electromagnetic forces caused by disruptions, of the development and irradiation of the ceramic breeder material, of the tritium release and recovery, and of the technological investigations. An outlook is given on the required R and D program for the BOT Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Blanket prior to tests in NET/ITER and the proposed test program in NET/ITER. (orig.) [de

  3. An electro-hydraulic servo control system research for CFETR blanket RH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Changqi [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, Anhui (China); Tang, Hongjun, E-mail: taurustang@126.com [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, Anhui (China); Qi, Songsong [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, Anhui (China); Cheng, Yong; Feng, Hansheng; Peng, Xuebing; Song, Yuntao [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We discussed the conceptual design of CFETR blanket RH maintenance system. • The mathematical model of electro-hydraulic servo system was calculated. • A fuzzy adaptive PD controller was designed based on control theory and experience. • The co-simulation models of the system were established with AMESim/Simulink. • The fuzzy adaptive PD algorithm was designed as the core strategy of the system. - Abstract: Based on the technical design requirements of China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) blanket remote handling (RH) maintenance, this paper focus on the control method of achieving high synchronization accuracy of electro-hydraulic servo system. Based on fuzzy control theory and practical experience, a fuzzy adaptive proportional-derivative (PD) controller was designed. Then a more precise co-simulation model was established with AMESim/Simulink. Through the analysis of simulation results, a fuzzy adaptive PD control algorithm was designed as the core strategy of electro-hydraulic servo control system.

  4. Radiolysis aspects of the aqueous self-cooled blanket concept and the problem of tritium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, A.; Snykers, M.; DeRegge, P.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket (ASCB) concept, an aqueous 6 Li solution in a metallic structure is used as a fusion reactor shielding-breeding blanket. Radiolysis effects could be very important for the design and the use of an ASCB. Although many aspects of the radiation chemistry of water and dilute aqueous solutions are now reasonably well understood, it is not possible to predict the radiochemical behaviour of the concentrated candidate ASCB solutions quantitatively. However, by means of a worst case calculation for a possible ASCB for the Next European Torus (NET) it is shown that even with an important rate of water decomposition the ASCB concept is still workable. Gas bubbles and explosive mixtures can be avoided by increasing the pressure in the neutron irradiated zone and by extracting and/or recombining the radiolytically produced hydrogen and oxygen. This could require an additional inert gas loop, which could also be used as part of the tritium extraction installation

  5. The European fusion nuclear technology effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darvas, J.

    1989-01-01

    The role of fusion technology in the European fusion development strategy is outlined. The main thrust of the present fusion technology programme is responding to development needs of the Next European Torus. A smaller, but important and growing R and D effort is dealing with problems specific to the Demonstration, or Fusion Power, Reactor. The part of the programme falling under the somewhat arbitrarily defined category of 'fusion nuclear technology' is reviewed and an outlook to future activities is given. The review includes tritium technology, blanket technology and breeder materials development, technology and materials for the protection of the first wall and of other plasma facing components, remote handling technology, and safety and environmental impact studies. A few reflections are offered on the future long-term developments in fusion technology. (orig.)

  6. Radiation effects on structural ceramics in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.R.; Price, R.J.; Trester, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required to serve in a conventional role as electrical and thermal insulators and dielectrics in fusion power reactors. In addition, certain ceramic materials can play a unique structural role in fusion power reactors by virtue of their very low induced radioactivity from fusion neutron capture. The aspects of safety, long-term radioactive waste management, and personnel access for maintenance and repair can all be significantly improved by applying the low-activation ceramics to the structural materials of the first-wall and blanket regions of a fusion reactor. Achievement of long service life at high structural loads and thermal stresses on the materials exposed to high-radiation doses presents a critical challenge for fusion. In this paper, we discuss radiation effects on structural ceramics for fusion application

  7. Fusion: an energy source for synthetic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J; Steinberg, M.

    1980-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion

  8. 75 FR 51482 - Woven Electric Blankets From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-1163 (Final)] Woven Electric Blankets... injured by reason of imports from China of woven electric blankets, provided for in subheading 6301.10.00... notification of a preliminary determination by Commerce that imports of woven electric blankets from China were...

  9. Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Edward I.; Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kramer, Kevin J.

    2015-10-27

    A laser inertial-confinement fusion-fission energy power plant is described. The fusion-fission hybrid system uses inertial confinement fusion to produce neutrons from a fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium. The fusion neutrons drive a sub-critical blanket of fissile or fertile fuel. A coolant circulated through the fuel extracts heat from the fuel that is used to generate electricity. The inertial confinement fusion reaction can be implemented using central hot spot or fast ignition fusion, and direct or indirect drive. The fusion neutrons result in ultra-deep burn-up of the fuel in the fission blanket, thus enabling the burning of nuclear waste. Fuels include depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, spent nuclear fuel, thorium, and weapons grade plutonium. LIFE engines can meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the highly undesirable stockpiles of depleted uranium, spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials.

  10. Delivery of an enzyme-IGFII fusion protein to the mouse brain is therapeutic for mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Shih-Hsin; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Le, Steven Q; Vincelette, Jon; Ohmi, Kazuhiro; Bullens, Sherry; Wendt, Daniel J; Christianson, Terri M; Tiger, Pascale M N; Brown, Jillian R; Lawrence, Roger; Yip, Bryan K; Holtzinger, John; Bagri, Anil; Crippen-Harmon, Danielle; Vondrak, Kristen N; Chen, Zhi; Hague, Chuck M; Woloszynek, Josh C; Cheung, Diana S; Webster, Katherine A; Adintori, Evan G; Lo, Melanie J; Wong, Wesley; Fitzpatrick, Paul A; LeBowitz, Jonathan H; Crawford, Brett E; Bunting, Stuart; Dickson, Patricia I; Neufeld, Elizabeth F

    2014-10-14

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB, Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by profound intellectual disability, dementia, and a lifespan of about two decades. The cause is mutation in the gene encoding α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU), deficiency of NAGLU, and accumulation of heparan sulfate. Impediments to enzyme replacement therapy are the absence of mannose 6-phosphate on recombinant human NAGLU and the blood-brain barrier. To overcome the first impediment, a fusion protein of recombinant NAGLU and a fragment of insulin-like growth factor II (IGFII) was prepared for endocytosis by the mannose 6-phosphate/IGFII receptor. To bypass the blood-brain barrier, the fusion protein ("enzyme") in artificial cerebrospinal fluid ("vehicle") was administered intracerebroventricularly to the brain of adult MPS IIIB mice, four times over 2 wk. The brains were analyzed 1-28 d later and compared with brains of MPS IIIB mice that received vehicle alone or control (heterozygous) mice that received vehicle. There was marked uptake of the administered enzyme in many parts of the brain, where it persisted with a half-life of approximately 10 d. Heparan sulfate, and especially disease-specific heparan sulfate, was reduced to control level. A number of secondary accumulations in neurons [β-hexosaminidase, LAMP1(lysosome-associated membrane protein 1), SCMAS (subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase), glypican 5, β-amyloid, P-tau] were reduced almost to control level. CD68, a microglial protein, was reduced halfway. A large amount of enzyme also appeared in liver cells, where it reduced heparan sulfate and β-hexosaminidase accumulation to control levels. These results suggest the feasibility of enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IIIB.

  11. EU contribution to the procurement of the ITER blanket first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzetto, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Lorenzetto@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Carrer Josep Plà 2, B-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Banetta, Stefano; Bellin, Boris [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Carrer Josep Plà 2, B-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Boireau, Bruno [AREVA NP, Centre Technique, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Bucci, Philippe [Atmostat, rue René Hamon 31, 94815 Villejuif Cedex (France); Cicero, Tindaro [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Carrer Josep Plà 2, B-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Conchon, Denis [Atmostat, rue René Hamon 31, 94815 Villejuif Cedex (France); Dellopoulos, Georges [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Carrer Josep Plà 2, B-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Hardaker, Stephen [Amec Foster Wheeler plc, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Marshall, Paul [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Carrer Josep Plà 2, B-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Nogué, Patrice [AREVA NP, Centre Technique, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Pérez, Marcos [Leading Enterprises SL, Pasaje de La Agüera, 39409 San Felices de Buelna (Spain); Gutierrez, Leticia Ruiz [Iberdrola Ingeniería y Construcción S.A.U., Avenida Manoteras 20, 28050 Madrid (Spain); Samaniego, Fernando [Leading Enterprises SL, Pasaje de La Agüera, 39409 San Felices de Buelna (Spain); Sherlock, Paul [Amec Foster Wheeler plc, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Zacchia, Francesco [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Carrer Josep Plà 2, B-08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Presentation of the blanket first wall design concept to be procured by Europe. • Presentation of the main outcome of the R&D programme with the resulting FW fabrication route. • Presentation of the ITER first wall pre-qualification programme with the results achieved so far. • Presentation of the on-going irradiation experiments. • Presentation of the EU procurement strategy. - Abstract: Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Union’s Domestic Agency for ITER, is responsible for the procurement of about 50% of the ITER blanket first wall (FW), called normal heat flux FW. A procurement strategy has been implemented by the In-Vessel Project Team at F4E aimed at mitigating technical and commercial risks for the procurement of ITER blanket FW panels, promoting as far as possible competition among industrial partners. This procurement strategy has been supported by an extensive Research and Development (R&D) programme, implemented over more than 15 years in Europe, to develop various fabrication technologies. It includes in particular the manufacture and testing of small-scale, medium-scale mock-ups and full-scale prototypes of blanket FW panels. In this R&D programme, significant efforts have been devoted to the development of a reliable materials joining technique. Hot Isostatic Pressing was selected for the manufacture of the FW panels made from beryllium, copper–chromium–zirconium alloy and 316L(N)-IG austenitic stainless steel. This paper presents the main outcome of the on-going R&D programme, the latest results of the FW qualification programme together with the procurement strategy implemented by F4E for the supply of the European contribution to the procurement of the ITER blanket FW.

  12. EU contribution to the procurement of the ITER blanket first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzetto, Patrick; Banetta, Stefano; Bellin, Boris; Boireau, Bruno; Bucci, Philippe; Cicero, Tindaro; Conchon, Denis; Dellopoulos, Georges; Hardaker, Stephen; Marshall, Paul; Nogué, Patrice; Pérez, Marcos; Gutierrez, Leticia Ruiz; Samaniego, Fernando; Sherlock, Paul; Zacchia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Presentation of the blanket first wall design concept to be procured by Europe. • Presentation of the main outcome of the R&D programme with the resulting FW fabrication route. • Presentation of the ITER first wall pre-qualification programme with the results achieved so far. • Presentation of the on-going irradiation experiments. • Presentation of the EU procurement strategy. - Abstract: Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Union’s Domestic Agency for ITER, is responsible for the procurement of about 50% of the ITER blanket first wall (FW), called normal heat flux FW. A procurement strategy has been implemented by the In-Vessel Project Team at F4E aimed at mitigating technical and commercial risks for the procurement of ITER blanket FW panels, promoting as far as possible competition among industrial partners. This procurement strategy has been supported by an extensive Research and Development (R&D) programme, implemented over more than 15 years in Europe, to develop various fabrication technologies. It includes in particular the manufacture and testing of small-scale, medium-scale mock-ups and full-scale prototypes of blanket FW panels. In this R&D programme, significant efforts have been devoted to the development of a reliable materials joining technique. Hot Isostatic Pressing was selected for the manufacture of the FW panels made from beryllium, copper–chromium–zirconium alloy and 316L(N)-IG austenitic stainless steel. This paper presents the main outcome of the on-going R&D programme, the latest results of the FW qualification programme together with the procurement strategy implemented by F4E for the supply of the European contribution to the procurement of the ITER blanket FW.

  13. Neutronic studies of fissile and fusile breeding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taczanowski, S.

    1984-08-01

    In light of the need of convincing motivation substantiating expensive and inherently applied research (nuclear energy), first a simple comparative study of fissile breeding economics of fusion fission hybrids, spallators and also fast breeder reactors has been carried out. As a result, the necessity of maximization of fissile production (in the first two ones, in fast breeders rather the reprocessing costs should be reduced) has been shown, thus indicating the design strategy (high support ratio) for these systems. In spite of the uncertainty of present projections onto further future and discrepancies in available data even quite conservative assumptions indicate that hybrids and perhaps even earlier - spallators can become economic at realistic uranium price increase and successfully compete against fast breeders. Then on the basis of the concept of the neutron flux shaping aimed at the correlation of the selected cross-sections with the neutron flux, the indications for the maximization of respective reaction rates has been formulated. In turn, these considerations serve as the starting point for the guidelines of breeding blanket nuclear design, which are as follows: 1) The source neutrons must face the multiplying layer (of proper thickness) of possibly low concentration of nuclides attenuating the neutron multiplication (i.e. structure materials, nongaseous coolants). 2) For the most effective trapping of neutrons within the breeding zone (leakage and void streaming reduction) it must contain an efficient moderator (not valid for fissile breeding blankets). 3) All regions of significant slow flux should contain 6 Li in order to reduce parasite neutron captures in there. (orig./HP)

  14. The climatic impact of supervolcanic ash blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Sparks, R.S.J. [University of Bristol, Department of Earth Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom); Valdes, Paul J. [University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Supervolcanoes are large caldera systems that can expel vast quantities of ash, volcanic gases in a single eruption, far larger than any recorded in recent history. These super-eruptions have been suggested as possible catalysts for long-term climate change and may be responsible for bottlenecks in human and animal populations. Here, we consider the previously neglected climatic effects of a continent-sized ash deposit with a high albedo and show that a decadal climate forcing is expected. We use a coupled atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model (GCM) to simulate the effect of an ash blanket from Yellowstone volcano, USA, covering much of North America. Reflectivity measurements of dry volcanic ash show albedo values as high as snow, implying that the effects of an ash blanket would be severe. The modeling results indicate major disturbances to the climate, particularly to oscillatory patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Atmospheric disruptions would continue for decades after the eruption due to extended ash blanket longevity. The climatic response to an ash blanket is not significant enough to investigate a change to stadial periods at present day boundary conditions, though this is one of several impacts associated with a super-eruption which may induce long-term climatic change. (orig.)

  15. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  16. Tritium production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1981-08-01

    The present analyses on the possibilities of extracting tritium from the liquid and solid fusion reactor blankets show up many problems. A consistent ensemble of materials and devices for extracting the heat and the tritium has not yet been integrated in a fusion reactor blanket project. The dimensioning of the many pipes required for shifting the tritium can only be done very approximately and the volume taken up by the blanket is difficult to evaluate, etc. The utilization of present data leads to over-dimensioning the installations by prudence and perhaps rejecting the best solutions. In order to measure the parameters of the most promising materials, work must be carried out on well defined samples and not only determine the base physical-chemical coefficients, such as thermal conductivity, scattering coefficients, Sievert parameters, but also the kinetic parameters conventional in chemical engineering, such as the hourly space rates of degassing. It is also necessary to perform long duration experiments under radiation and at operating temperatures, or above, in order to study the ageing of the bodies employed [fr

  17. Preliminary Neutronics Design Studies for a Molten Salt Blanket LIFE Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J

    2008-10-23

    The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Program being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) aims to design a hybrid fission-fusion subcritical nuclear engine that uses a laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) system to drive a subcritical fission blanket. This combined fusion-fission hybrid system could be used for generating electricity, material transmutation or incineration, or other applications. LIFE does not require enriched fuel since it is a sub-critical system and LIFE can sustain power operation beyond the burnup levels at which typical fission reactors need to be refueled. In light of these factors, numerous options have been suggested and are being investigated. Options being investigated include fueling LIFE engines with spent nuclear fuel to aid in disposal/incineration of commercial spent nuclear fuel or using depleted uranium or thorium fueled options to enhance proliferation resistance and utilize non-fissile materials [1]. LIFE engine blanket designs using a molten salt fuel system represent one area of investigation. Possible applications of a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket include uses as a spent nuclear fuel burner, fissile fuel breeding platform, and providing a backup alternative to other LIFE engine blanket designs using TRISO fuel particles in case the TRISO particles are found to be unable to withstand the irradiation they will be subjected to. These molten salts consist of a mixture of LiF with UF{sub 4} or ThF{sub 4} or some combination thereof. Future systems could look at using PuF{sub 3} or PuF{sub 4} as well, though no work on such system with initial plutonium loadings has been performed for studies documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to document preliminary neutronics design studies performed to support the development of a molten salt blanket LIFE engine option, as part of the LIFE Program being performed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory

  18. Improved structure and long-life blanket concepts for heliotron reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, A.; Imagawa, S.; Mitarai, O.; Dolan, T.; Tanaka, T.; Kubota, Y.; Yamazaki, K.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Mizuguchi, N.; Muroga, T.; Noda, N.; Kaneko, O.; Yamada, H.; Ohyabu, N.; Uda, T.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.

    2005-04-01

    New design approaches are proposed for the LHD-type heliotron D-T demo-reactor FFHR2 to solve the key engineering issues of blanket space limitation and replacement difficulty. A major radius of over 14 m is selected to permit a blanket-shield thickness of about 1 m and to reduce the neutron wall loading and toroidal field, while achieving an acceptable cost of electricity. Two sets of optimization are successfully carried out. One is to reduce the magnetic hoop force on the helical coil support structures by adjustment of the helical winding coil pitch parameter and the poloidal coils design, which facilitates expansion of the maintenance ports. The other is a long-life blanket concept using carbon armour tiles that soften the neutron energy spectrum incident on the self-cooled flibe-reduced activation ferritic steel blanket. In this adaptation of the spectral-shifter and tritium breeder blanket (STB) concept a local tritium breeding ratio over 1.2 is feasible by optimized arrangement of the neutron multiplier Be in the carbon tiles, and the radiation shielding of the superconducting magnet coils is also significantly improved. Using constant cross sections of a helically winding shape, the 'screw coaster' concept is proposed to replace in-vessel components such as the STB armour tiles. The key R&D issues for developing the STB concept, such as radiation effects on carbon and enhanced heat transfer of Flibe, are elucidated.

  19. Improved structure and long-life blanket concepts for heliotron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, A.; Imagawa, S.; Mitarai, O.

    2005-01-01

    New design approaches are proposed for the LHD-type heliotron D-T demo-reactor FFHR2 to solve the key engineering issues of blanket space limitation and replacement difficulty. A major radius of over 14m is selected to permit a blanket-shield thickness of about 1m and to reduce the neutron wall loading and toroidal field, while achieving an acceptable cost of electricity. Two sets of optimization are successfully carried out. One is to reduce the magnetic hoop force on the helical coil support structures by adjustment of the helical winding coil pitch parameter and the poloidal coils design, which facilitates expansion of the maintenance ports. The other is a long-life blanket concept using carbon armour tiles that soften the neutron energy spectrum incident on the self-cooled flibe-reduced activation ferritic steel blanket. In this adaptation of the spectral-shifter and tritium breeder blanket (STB) concept a local tritium breeding ratio over 1.2 is feasible by optimized arrangement of the neutron multiplier Be in the carbon tiles, and the radiation shielding of the superconducting magnet coils is also significantly improved. Using constant cross sections of a helically winding shape, the 'screw coaster' concept is proposed to replace in-vessel components such as the STB armour tiles. The key R and D issues for developing the STB concept, such as radiation effects on carbon and enhanced heat transfer of Flibe, are elucidated. (author)

  20. Restoration of lumbopelvic sagittal alignment and its maintenance following transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF): comparison between straight type versus curvilinear type cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Tae; Shin, Myung-Hoon; Lee, Ho-Jin; Choi, Du-Yong

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate a radiological and clinical difference between the curvilinear type cages compared to the straight type cages for the restoration of lumbopelvic sagittal alignment and its maintenance after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure. 68 patients who underwent single-level TLIF using either the straight type or curvilinear type cage were retrospectively reviewed. Assessment of the lumbopelvic parameters and the height of disc space was performed before surgery as well as 2 days, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Clinical outcome was assessed using VAS and ODI. The curvilinear type cages were positioned more anteriorly than the straight type. Restoration of the segmental lordosis (SL) in the curvilinear group was significantly greater than the straight group and at 12 months of follow-up, the straight group showed greater decrease in the disc height than the curvilinear group. The straight group failed to show improvement of lumbar lordosis (LL), while the curvilinear group showed significant restoration of LL and could maintain it to the 6 months of follow-up. In both groups, pelvic tilt was significantly decreased and it lasted to 6 months in the straight group; whereas in the curvilinear group, it was maintained to the last follow-up of 12 months. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean VAS and ODI score over the follow-up period. This study demonstrates that the curvilinear type cage is superior to the straight type cage in improving the SL and maintaining both the restored lumbopelvic parameters and elevated disc height. These results could be attributable to the anterior position of the curvilinear cage which permits easy restoration of segmental lordosis and less sinking of cages.

  1. Final analysis of the GCFR radial blanket and shield integral experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Williams, L.R.

    1981-04-01

    An integral experiment has been performed for verification of radiation transport methods and nuclear data used in the design of the radial shield for the proposed gas-cooled fast breeder reactor demonstration plant. The experiment was conducted at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility and consisted of integral and spectral measurements of the neutron and gamma-ray flux transmitted through slabs of materials which modeled a GCFR-type radial blanket and radial shield. Both UO/sub 2/ and ThO/sub 2/ blankets were investigated as well as several shield designs comprising stainless steel, graphite, and boronated graphite.

  2. Fusion technology annual report of the association EURATOM/CEA 1998; Technologie de la fusion Rapport annuel 1998 Association EURATOM/CEA 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, P.; Le vagueres, F

    1998-07-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works carried out in the frame of the european program of fusion technology, during 1998. The presented activities are: plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety (short and long term), european blanket project (long term) with water cooled lithium lead and helium cooled pebble bed blanket, materials for fusion power plant, socio-economic research on fusion, plasma facing components, fuel cycle, inertial confinement. (A.L.B.)

  3. Thermomechanical analysis of the DFLL test blanket module for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hongli; Wu Yican; Bai Yunqing

    2006-01-01

    The finite element code is used to simulate two kinds of blanket design structure, which are SLL (Quasi-Static Lithium Lead) and DLL (Dual-cooled Lithium Lead) blanket concepts for the Dual Functional Lithium Lead-Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) submitted to the ITER test blanket working group. The temperature and stress distributions have been presented for the two kinds of blanket structure on the basis of the structural design, thermal-hydraulic design and neutronics analysis. Also the mechanical performance is presented for the high temperature component of blanket structure according to the ITER Structural Design Criteria (ISDC). The rationality and feasibility of the two kinds of blanket structure design of DFLL-TBM have been analyzed based on the above results which also acted as the theoretical base for further optimized analysis. (authors)

  4. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolodosky, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratoni, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Pre-conceptual fusion blanket designs require research and development to reflect important proposed changes in the design of essential systems, and the new challenges they impose on related fuel cycle systems. One attractive feature of using liquid lithium as the breeder and coolant is that it has very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and presents plant safety concerns. If the chemical reactivity of lithium could be overcome, the result would have a profound impact on fusion energy and associated safety basis. The overriding goal of this project is to develop a lithium-based alloy that maintains beneficial properties of lithium (e.g. high tritium breeding and solubility) while reducing overall flammability concerns. To minimize the number of alloy combinations that must be explored, only those alloys that meet certain nuclear performance metrics will be considered for subsequent thermodynamic study. The specific scope of this study is to evaluate the neutronics performance of lithium-based alloys in the blanket of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) engine. The results of this study will inform the development of lithium alloys that would guarantee acceptable neutronics performance while mitigating the chemical reactivity issues of pure lithium.

  5. Neutronics investigation of advanced self-cooled liquid blanket systems in helical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Sagara, A.; Muroga, T.; Youssef, M.Z.

    2006-10-01

    Neutronics performances of advanced self-cooled liquid blanket systems have been investigated in design activity of the helical-type reactor FFHR2. In the present study, a new three-dimensional (3-D) neutronics calculation system has been developed for the helical-type reactor to enhance quick feedback between neutronics evaluation and design modification. Using this new calculation system, advanced Flibe-cooled and Li-cooled liquid blanket systems proposed for FFHR2 have been evaluated to make clear design issues to enhance neutronics performance. Based on calculated results, modification of the blanket dimensions and configuration have been attempted to achieve the adequate tritium breeding ability and neutron shielding performance in the helical reactor. The total tritium breeding ratios (TBRs) obtained after modifying the blanket dimensions indicated that all the advanced blanket systems proposed for FFHR2 would achieve adequate tritium self-sufficiency by dimension adjustment and optimization of structures in the breeder layers. Issues in neutron shielding performance have been investigated quantitatively using 3-D geometry of the helical blanket system, support structures, poloidal coils etc. Shielding performance of the helical coils against direct neutrons from core plasma would achieve design target by further optimization of shielding materials. However, suppression of the neutron streaming and reflection through the divertor pumping areas in the original design is important issue to protect the poloidal coils and helical coils, respectively. Investigation of the neutron wall loading indicated that the peaking factor of the neutron wall load distribution would be moderated by the toroidal and helical effect of the plasma distribution in the helical reactor. (author)

  6. Analysis of the WCLL European demo blanket concept in terms of activation and decay heat after exposure to neutron irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Stankunas Gediminas; Tidikas Andrius

    2017-01-01

    This comparative paper describes the activation and decay heat calculations for water-cooled lithium-lead performed part of the EURO fusion WPSAE programme and specifications in comparison to other European DEMO blanket concepts on the basis of using a three-dimensional neutronics calculation model. Results are provided for a range of decay times of interest for maintenance activities, safety and waste management assessments. The study revealed that water-c...

  7. Stochastic modeling to determine the economic effects of blanket, selective, and no dry cow therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijps, K.; Hogeveen, H.

    2007-01-01

    In many countries, blanket dry cow therapy (DCT) is the standard way to dry off cows. Because of concerns about antibiotic resistance, selective DCT is proposed as an alternative. The economic consequences of different types of DCT were studied previously, but variation between input traits and

  8. Preliminary investigation on welding and cutting methods for first wall support leg in ITER blanket module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohri, Kensuke; Suzuki, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Kakudate, Satoshi; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Akiba, Masato

    2006-08-01

    Concept of a module type of blanket has been applied to ITER shield blanket, of which size is typically 1mW x 1mH x 0.4mB with the weight of 4 ton, in order to enhance its maintainability and fabricability. Each shield blanket module consists of a shield block and four first walls which are separable from the shield block for the purpose of reduction of an electro-magnetic force in disruption events, radio-active waste reduction in the maintenance work and cost reduction in fabrication process. A first wall support leg, a part of the first wall component located between the first wall and the shield block, is required not only to be connected metallurgically to the shield block in order to withstand the electro-magnetic force and coolant pressure, but also to be able to replace the first wall more than 2 times in the hot cell during the life time of the reactor. Therefore, the consistent structure where remote handling equipment can be access to the joint and carry out the welding/cutting works perfectly to replace the first wall in the hot cell is required in the shield blanket design. This study shows an investigation of the blanket module no.10 design with a new type of the first wall support leg structure based on Disc-Cutter technology, which had been developed for the main pipe cutting in the maintenance phase and was selected out of a number of candidate methods, taking its large advantages into account, such as 1) a post-treatment can be eliminated in the hot cell because of no making material chips and of no need of lubricant, 2) the cut surface can be rewelded without any machining. And also, a design for the small type of Disc-Cutter applied to the new blanket module no.10 has been investigated. In conclusion, not only the good performance of Disc-Cutter technology applied to the updated blanket module, but also consistent structure of the simplified shield blanket module including the first wall support leg in order to satisfy the requirements in the

  9. Two conceptual designs of helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1A based on ITER technologies and challenging ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, A.; Miyazawa, J.; Tamura, H.; Tanaka, T.; Goto, T.; Yanagi, N.; Sakamoto, R.; Masuzaki, S.; Ohtani, H.; The FFHR Design Group

    2017-08-01

    The Fusion Engineering Research Project (FERP) at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is conducting conceptual design activities for the LHD-type helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1A. This paper newly defines two design options, ‘basic’ and ‘challenging.’ Conservative technologies, including those that will be demonstrated in ITER, are chosen in the basic option in which two helical coils are made of continuously wound cable-in-conduit superconductors of Nb3Sn strands, the divertor is composed of water-cooled tungsten monoblocks, and the blanket is composed of water-cooled ceramic breeders. In contrast, new ideas that would possibly be beneficial for making the reactor design more attractive are boldly included in the challenging option in which the helical coils are wound by connecting high-temperature REBCO superconductors using mechanical joints, the divertor is composed of a shower of molten tin jets, and the blanket is composed of molten salt FLiNaBe including Ti powers to increase hydrogen solubility. The main targets of the challenging option are early construction and easy maintenance of a large and three-dimensionally complicated helical structure, high thermal efficiency, and, in particular, realistic feasibility of the helical reactor.

  10. Overview of principles and challenges of fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.

    2007-01-01

    Fusion offers very attractive features as a sustainable, broadly available energy source: no emissions of greenhouse gases, no risk of severe accident, and no long-lived radioactive waste. Significant advances in the science and technology of fusion have been realized in the past decades. Seven countries (EU, Japan, USA, Russia, S. Korea, China, and India) comprising about half the world population are constructing a major magnetic fusion facility, called ITER, in France. The objectives of ITER are to demonstrate self-sustaining burning fusion plasma and to test fusion technologies relevant to fusion reactor. Many challenges to the practical utilization of fusion energy remain ahead. Among these challenges is the successful development of Fusion Nuclear Technology (FNT). FNT includes those fusion system components circumscribing the plasma and responsible for tritium production and processing, heat removal at high temperature and power density, and high heat flux components. FNT components face a new and more challenging environment than experienced by any previous nuclear application. Beyond plasma physics, FNT has most of the remaining feasibility and attractiveness issues in the development of fusion as an energy source. The blanket, a key FNT component, determines the critical path to DEMO. The blanket is exposed to an intense radiation environment. Radioactivity and decay heat can be produced in the structure and other blanket elements. Hence, material choices have a large impact on safety and environmental attractiveness. The unique conditions of the fusion environment include high radiation flux, high surface heat flux, strong 3-D-component magnetic field with large gradients, and ultra-low vacuum. These conditions, together with the requirements for high-temperature operation and tritium self-sufficiency, make blanket design and development challenging tasks. The blanket concepts being considered worldwide can be classified into solid breeders and liquid

  11. [Transformation activity and antigenicity of the human papillomavirus type 58 E6E7 fusion gene mutant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Yu, Ji-yun; Li, Li

    2013-07-01

    To develop a prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 58-associated cervical carcinoma, and explore its transformation activity and antigenicity. The E6 and E7 three amino acid codons in the HPV 58 virus were modified respectively and fused. The modified and fused gene was named HPV58 mE6E7. The recombinant HPV58 mE6E7 gene was inserted into pIRES-neo vector to generate plasmid pIRES-neo-HPV58 mE6E7. Then NIH/3T3 cell line was transfected with plasmid pIRES-neo-HPV58 mE6E7. The pIRES-neo-HPV58 mE6E7-transfected cells were the experimental group, pIRES-neo-HPV58 E6E7-transfected cells were the positive control group, and pIRES-neo empty vector-transfected cells were the negative control group. The expression of HPV58 mE6E7 protein in the experimental cells was detected by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and Western blot. The transformation activity of HPV58 mE6E7 was tested by soft agar colony formation assay and subcutaneously tumors in nude mice. Finally, DNA vaccine was constructed with HPV58 mE6E7 fusion antigen and used to immunize C57BL/6 mice with the vaccine plasmids. The specific serum antibodies were detected by EIISA, and the number of splenic specific CD8(+) T cells secreting IFN-γ of the immunized mice was detected by ELISPOT assay. Sequencing confirmed the expected mutation and a 100% homogeneity of the HPV58 E6E7 fusion gene. Stable transfected NIH/3T3 cells expressing HPV58 mE6E7 and HPV58 E6E7 gene were 70.3% and 84.1%, respectively. The relative expressions of HPV58 mE6E7 and HPV58 E6E7 fusion protein in 3T3-HPV58 mE6E7 experimental cells and 3T3-HPV58 E6E7 positive control cells were 2.1 ± 1.7 and 3.8 ± 1.4, respectively, and were negative in the negative control group. No colony formation was found in the experimental and 3T3-neo negative control cell groups, and 31 colonies were found in the positive control cell group, among them 10 colonies were consisted of more than 50 cells. No tumor mass was formed

  12. Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. Kessel, et. al.

    2012-02-23

    With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

  13. First wall/blanket fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohri, Kensuke; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yamada, Takeshi; Akiba, Masato; Seki, Masahiro.

    1991-01-01

    In a fusion nuclear reactor, armor is required to protect the in-vessel components from the plasma energy. In many first wall armor concepts, a radiative cooled armor tile first wall is proposed as one of the candidate structure for the first wall components, characterized by a central mechanical attachment, a thermally insulated mount, remote-handling capability and simplicity. In this paper, R and D results on the fabrication of first wall panel with two Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) bonding techniques, i.e. grooved plate type technique and rectangular tube one, and on the fabrication of first wall panel with radiative cooled graphite armor tile are described. A thermal-analysis and stress-analysis for this first wall panel with radiative cooled graphite armor tile are also studied. (author)

  14. Fusion of GFP to the M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase produces a new probe of Type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Roberts, Gareth A.; Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H.; Dryden, David T.F.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein to the C-terminus of the HsdS DNA sequence-specificity subunit of the Type I DNA modification methyltransferase M.EcoKI. The fusion expresses well in vivo and assembles with the two HsdM modification subunits. The fusion protein functions as a sequence-specific DNA methyltransferase protecting DNA against digestion by the EcoKI restriction endonuclease. The purified enzyme shows Förster resonance energy transfer to fluorescently-labelled DNA duplexes containing the target sequence and to fluorescently-labelled ocr protein, a DNA mimic that binds to the M.EcoKI enzyme. Distances determined from the energy transfer experiments corroborate the structural model of M.EcoKI. PMID:20599730

  15. Flow balancing in liquid metal blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Morley, N.B.

    1995-01-01

    Non-uniform flow distribution between parallel channels is one of the most serious concerns for self-cooled liquid metal blankets with electrically insulated walls. We show that uncertainties in flow distribution can be dramatically reduced by relatively simple design modifications. Several design features which impose flow uniformity by electrically coupling parallel channels are surveyed. Basic mechanisms for ''flow balancing'' are described, and a particular self-regulating concept using discrete passive electrodes is proposed for the US ITER advanced blanket concept. Scoping calculations suggest that this simple technique can be very powerful in equalizing the flow, even with massive insulator failures in individual channels. More detailed analyses and experimental verification will be required to demonstrate this concept for ITER. (orig.)

  16. Fusion technologies for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE∗

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer K.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE engine design builds upon on going progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF and offers a near-term pathway to commercial fusion. Fusion technologies that are critical to success are reflected in the design of the first wall, blanket and tritium separation subsystems. The present work describes the LIFE engine-related components and technologies. LIFE utilizes a thermally robust indirect-drive target and a chamber fill gas. Coolant selection and a large chamber solid-angle coverage provide ample tritium breeding margin and high blanket gain. Target material selection eliminates the need for aggressive chamber clearing, while enabling recycling. Demonstrated tritium separation and storage technologies limit the site tritium inventory to attractive levels. These key technologies, along with the maintenance and advanced materials qualification program have been integrated into the LIFE delivery plan. This describes the development of components and subsystems, through prototyping and integration into a First Of A Kind power plant.

  17. Fusion technologies for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, K. J.; Latkowski, J. F.; Abbott, R. P.; Anklam, T. P.; Dunne, A. M.; El-Dasher, B. S.; Flowers, D. L.; Fluss, M. J.; Lafuente, A.; Loosmore, G. A.; Morris, K. R.; Moses, E.; Reyes, S.

    2013-11-01

    The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) engine design builds upon on going progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and offers a near-term pathway to commercial fusion. Fusion technologies that are critical to success are reflected in the design of the first wall, blanket and tritium separation subsystems. The present work describes the LIFE engine-related components and technologies. LIFE utilizes a thermally robust indirect-drive target and a chamber fill gas. Coolant selection and a large chamber solid-angle coverage provide ample tritium breeding margin and high blanket gain. Target material selection eliminates the need for aggressive chamber clearing, while enabling recycling. Demonstrated tritium separation and storage technologies limit the site tritium inventory to attractive levels. These key technologies, along with the maintenance and advanced materials qualification program have been integrated into the LIFE delivery plan. This describes the development of components and subsystems, through prototyping and integration into a First Of A Kind power plant. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Fabrication of prototype mockups of ITER shielding blanket with separable first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaku, Yasuo; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Hatano, Toshihisa; Sato, Satoshi; Akiba, Masato

    2002-07-01

    Design of shielding blanket for ITER-FEAT applies the first wall which has the separable structure from the shield block for the purpose of radio-active waste reduction in the maintenance work and cost reduction in fabrication process. Also, it is required to have various types of slots in both of the first wall and the shield block, to reduce the eddy current for reduction of electro-magnetic force in disruption events. This report summarizes the demonstrative fabrication of the ITER shielding blanket with separable first wall performed for the shielding blanket fabrication technology development, under the task agreement of G 16 TT 108 FJ (T420-2) in ITER Engineering Design Activity Extension Period. The objectives of the demonstrative fabrication are: to demonstrate the comprehensive fabrication technique in a large scale component (e.g the joining techniques for the beryllium armor/copper alloy and copper alloy/SS, and the slotting method of the FW and shield block); to develop an improved fabrication method for the shielding blanket based on the ITER-FEAT updated design. In this work, the fabrication technique of full scale separable first wall shield blanket was confirmed by fabricating full width Be armored first wall panel, full scale of 1/2 shield block with poloidal cooling channels. As the R and D for updated cooling channel configuration, the fabrication technique of the radial channel shield block was also demonstrated. Concluding to the all R and D results, it was demonstrated successfully that the fabrication technique and optimized conditions in the results obtained under the task agreement of G 16 TT 95 FJ (T420-1) was applicable to the prototype of the separable first wall blanket module. Additionally, basic echo data of ultra-sonic test method (UT) was obtained to show the applicability of UT method for in tube access detection of defect on the Cu alloy/SS tube interface. (author)

  19. Dealing with extreme data diversity: extraction and fusion from the growing types of document formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Peter; Hansen, Nichole; Nolan, James J.; Alcocer, Pedro

    2015-05-01

    The growth in text data available online is accompanied by a growth in the diversity of available documents. Corpora with extreme heterogeneity in terms of file formats, document organization, page layout, text style, and content are common. The absence of meaningful metadata describing the structure of online and open-source data leads to text extraction results that contain no information about document structure and are cluttered with page headers and footers, web navigation controls, advertisements, and other items that are typically considered noise. We describe an approach to document structure and metadata recovery that uses visual analysis of documents to infer the communicative intent of the author. Our algorithm identifies the components of documents such as titles, headings, and body content, based on their appearance. Because it operates on an image of a document, our technique can be applied to any type of document, including scanned images. Our approach to document structure recovery considers a finer-grained set of component types than prior approaches. In this initial work, we show that a machine learning approach to document structure recovery using a feature set based on the geometry and appearance of images of documents achieves a 60% greater F1- score than a baseline random classifier.

  20. Analysis of Consistency of Printing Blankets using Correlation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalitha Jayaraman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of an analytical tool to quantify material consistency of offset printing blankets. Printing blankets are essentially viscoelastic rubber composites of several laminas. High levels of material consistency are expected from rubber blankets for quality print and for quick recovery from smash encountered during the printing process. The present study aims at determining objectively the consistency of printing blankets at three specific torque levels of tension under two distinct stages; 1. under normal printing conditions and 2. on recovery after smash. The experiment devised exhibits a variation in tone reproduction properties of each blanket signifying the levels of inconsistency also in thicknessdirection. Correlation technique was employed on ink density variations obtained from the blanket on paper. Both blankets exhibited good consistency over three torque levels under normal printing conditions. However on smash the recovery of blanket and its consistency was a function of manufacturing and torque levels. This study attempts to provide a new metrics for failure analysis of offset printing blankets. It also underscores the need for optimizing the torque for blankets from different manufacturers.

  1. Design of the APT Target/Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappiello, M. W.

    1998-04-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium Target/Blanket system is composed of a separated tungsten spallation target surrounded by a lead moderator, as well as attendant heat removal systems. The system is housed in a building located at the end of a 1.3 km long linear accelerator, which can produce a 100 mA proton beam up to 1700 MeV (170MW). The beam is expanded by a rastering system to a 0.19m x 190.m shape before passing through an Inconel window and impacting the heavy-water cooled tungsten target. Neutrons produced in the tungsten by the spallation process are further multiplied and moderated in a surrounding light-water cooled lead blanket. Neutron capture in tubes of Helium-3 gas inserted in the blanket produce tritium which is removed on a continual basis in an adjacent Tritium Separation Facility (TSF). The APT T/B is a robust design based on existing technology. Where possible, proven materials and component designs are used. To accommodate uncertainties in predicted lifetimes, the design is modularized to allow for a straightforward replacement of spent components. The thermal hydraulic design is well within allowable limits and due to the low temperature and pressure systems, offers additional safety and reliability benefits. The safety by design process has incorporated passive design features, redundancy, and defense in depth to provide adequate protection of both the worker and the public.

  2. Nuclear Analysis of an ITER Blanket Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovaro, P.; Di Maio, P. A.; Parrinello, V.

    2013-08-01

    ITER blanket system is the reactor's plasma-facing component, it is mainly devoted to provide the thermal and nuclear shielding of the Vacuum Vessel and external ITER components, being intended also to act as plasma limiter. It consists of 440 individual modules which are located in the inboard, upper and outboard regions of the reactor. In this paper attention has been focused on to a single outboard blanket module located in the equatorial zone, whose nuclear response under irradiation has been investigated following a numerical approach based on the Monte Carlo method and adopting the MCNP5 code. The main features of this blanket module nuclear behaviour have been determined, paying particular attention to energy and spatial distribution of the neutron flux and deposited nuclear power together with the spatial distribution of its volumetric density. Moreover, the neutronic damage of the structural material has also been investigated through the evaluation of displacement per atom and helium and hydrogen production rates. Finally, an activation analysis has been performed with FISPACT inventory code using, as input, the evaluated neutron spectrum to assess the module specific activity and contact dose rate after irradiation under a specific operating scenario.

  3. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Herniated disk - fusion; Spinal stenosis - fusion; Laminectomy - fusion Patient Instructions Bathroom safety - adults Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Spine surgery - discharge Surgical wound care - open Images Scoliosis Spinal ...

  4. Preliminary analysis of MHD-Brayton cycle applied to fusion reactors (CFAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, M. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Inui, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Umoto, J. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Yoshikawa, K. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611 (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    High performance non-equilibrium magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) disk generators applied to fusion reactors are designed and simplified cycle analyses are carried out which show the following. (1) Disk-type MHD generators of high performance can be designed which result in an enthalpy extraction ratio of 50%-57%. The maximum value of magnetic flux density ranges from 5.4 to 7.9T depending on the maximum temperature of the MHD working gas. (2) Two MHD-Brayton systems are proposed: (a) a simple MHD system and (b) an MHD-gas turbine combined system. The cycle efficiency of the first system ranges from 39.6% to 63.6%, while the second system yields 54.0%-67.8%. The efficiency depends strongly on the maximum temperature of the MHD working gas and on the pressure recovery ratio of the diffuser. (3) A concept of blanket design is briefly described. A detailed study of the overall fusion reactor, including neutronics calculation of the blanket, is required as future work. (orig.).

  5. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J. Ph.; Gulden, W.; Kolbasov, B.; Louzeiro-Malaquias, A.-J.; Petti, D.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reports were presented covering a selection of topics on the safety of fusion power plants. These included a review on licensing studies developed for ITER site preparation surveying common and non-common issues (i.e. site dependent) as lessons to a broader approach for fusion power plant safety. Several fusion power plant models, spanning from accessible technology to more advanced-materials based concepts, were discussed. On the topic related to fusion-specific technology, safety studies were reported on different concepts of breeding blanket modules, tritium handling and auxiliary systems under normal and accident scenarios' operation. The testing of power plant relevant technology in ITER was also assessed in terms of normal operation and accident scenarios, and occupational doses and radioactive releases under these testings have been determined. Other specific safety issues for fusion have also been discussed such as availability and reliability of fusion power plants, dust and tritium inventories and component failure databases. This study reveals that the environmental impact of fusion power plants can be minimized through a proper selection of low activation materials and using recycling technology helping to reduce waste volume and potentially open the route for its reutilization for the nuclear sector or even its clearance into the commercial circuit. Computational codes for fusion safety have been presented in support of the many studies reported. The on-going work on establishing validation approaches aiming at improving the prediction capability of fusion codes has been supported by experimental results and new directions for development have been identified. Fusion standards are not available and fission experience is mostly used as the framework basis for licensing and target design for safe operation and occupational and environmental constraints. It has been argued that fusion can benefit if a specific fusion approach is implemented, in particular

  6. Pre-conceptual design study on K-DEMO ceramic breeder blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Sung, E-mail: jspark@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sungjin; Im, Kihak; Kim, Keeman [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Brown, Thomas; Neilson, George [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A pre-conceptual design study has been carried out for the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) tokamak featured by high magnetic field (B{sub T0} = 7.4 T), R = 6.8 m, a = 2.1 m, and a steady-state operation. The design concepts of the K-DEMO blanket system considering the cooling in-vessel components with pressurized water and a solid pebble breeder are described herein. The structure of the K-DEMO blanket is toroidally subdivided into 16 inboard and 32 outboard sectors, in order to allow the vertical maintenance. Each blanket module is composed of plasma-facing first wall, layers of breeding parts, shielding and manifolds. A ceramic breeder using Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with Be{sub 12}Ti as neuron multiplier is employed for study. MCNP neutronic simulations and thermo-hydraulic analyses are interactively performed in order to satisfy two key aspects: achieving a global Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) >1.05 and operating within the maximum allowable temperature ranges of materials.

  7. Heat deposition, damage, and tritium breeding characteristics in thick liquid wall blanket concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Abdou, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The advanced power extraction (APEX) study aims at exploring new and innovative blanket concepts that can efficiently extract power from fusion devices with high neutron wall load. Among the concepts under investigation is the free liquid FW/liquid blanket concept in which a fast flowing liquid FW (∼2-3 cm) is followed by thick flowing blanket (B) of ∼40-50 cm thickness with minimal amount of structure. The liquid FW/B are contained inside the vacuum vessel (VV) with a shielding zone (S) located either behind the VV and outside the vacuum boundary (case A) or placed after the FW/B and inside the VV (case B). In this paper we investigate the nuclear characteristics of this concept in terms of: (1) attenuation capability of the liquid FW/B/S and protection of the VV and magnet against radiation damage; (2) profiles of tritium production rate and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) for several liquid candidates; and (3) profiles of heat deposition rate and power multiplication. The candidate liquid breeders considered are Li, Flibe, Li-Sn, and Li-Pb. Parameters varied are (1) FW/B thickness, L, (2) Li-6 enrichment and (3) thickness of the shield

  8. Fusion technology annual report of the association EURATOM/CEA 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, P.; Le vagueres, F.

    1998-01-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works carried out in the frame of the european program of fusion technology, during 1998. The presented activities are: plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety (short and long term), european blanket project (long term) with water cooled lithium lead and helium cooled pebble bed blanket, materials for fusion power plant, socio-economic research on fusion, plasma facing components, fuel cycle, inertial confinement. (A.L.B.)

  9. 1982 annual status report: thermonuclear fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this programme is to study the technological problems related to ''Post Jet'' experimental machines and, in a longer range, to assess the engineering aspects of Fusion Power Reactor Plants. According to the decision taken by the Council of Ministers on the JRC multiannual programme (1980-1983), the work performed on 1982 concerns four projects, namely: The Project 1: ''Fusion Reactor Studies''concerns mainly the NET (Next European Torus) studies which have been continued in the framework of the European participation to INTOR (INternational TOkamak Reactor). This represents a collaborative effort to design a major fusion experiment beyond the-upcoming generation of large tokamaks. The Project 2: ''Blanket Technology'' has the aim to investigate the behaviour of blanket materials in fusion conditions. The Project 3: ''Materials Sorting and Development'' has the aim to assess the mechanical properties and radiation damage of standard and advanced materials suited for structures, in particular for application as first wall of the fusion reactors. The Project 4: ''Cyclotron Operation and Experiments''has the task to exploit a cyclotron to simulate radiation damages to materials in a fusion ambient

  10. A conceptual design study of a reversed field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, S.; Tanaka, S.; Terai, T.; Hashizume, H.

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor with a solid breeder blanket REPUTER-1 has been studied through parametric system studies and detailed design and analysis in order to clarify the technical feasibility of a compact fusion reactor. F-θ pumping is used for driving the plasma current necessary for steady state operation. A maintenance policy of replacing a whole fusion power core including TF coils is proposed to cope with the requirements of high wall loading and high mass power density. For the same reason a normal conductor is selected for most of the coils. The first wall is structurally independent of the blanket. The blanket module is composed of SiC reinforced blocks which form a stable arch so as to keep the stresses in SiC basically compressive. The coolant for the first wall and the limiter is pressurized water, while the coolant for the blanket is helium gas. A number of thin Li 2 O and thick beryllium tiles are packed into the blanket block so as to obtain a proper tritium breeding ratio. A pumped limiter is chosen for the plasma exhaust system. The study has shown the technical feasibility of a high power density fusion power reactor (330 kWe/tonne) with solid breeder blanket and many key physics and engineering issues are also clarified. (orig.)

  11. Self-sustaining nuclear pumped laser-fusion reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boody, F.P.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The features of a neutron feedback nuclear pumped (NFNP) laser-fusion reactor equipment were studied with the intention of establishing the feasibility of the concept. The NFNP laser-fusion concept is compared schematically to electrically pumped laser fusion. The study showed that, once a method of energy storage has been demonstrated, a self-sustaining fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a ''blanket multiplication'' of two would be feasible using nuclear pumped Xe F* excimer lasers having efficiencies of 1 to 2 percent and D-D-T pellets with gains of 50 to 100

  12. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cryogenic distillation: a fuel enrichment system for near-term tokamak-type D-T fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, B.; Davis, J.F.

    1980-02-01

    The successful operation and economic viability of deuterium-tritium- (D-T-) fueled tokamak-type commercial power fusion reactors will depend to a large extent on the development of reliable tritium-containment and fuel-recycle systems. Of the many operating steps in the fuel recycle scheme, separation or enrichment of the isotropic species of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation is one of the most important. A parametric investigation was carried out to study the effects of the various operating conditions and the composition of the spent fuel on the degree of separation. A computer program was developed for the design and analysis of a system of interconnected distillation columns for isotopic separation such that the requirements of near-term D-T-fueled reactors are met. The analytical results show that a distillation cascade consisting of four columns is capable of reprocessing spent fuel varying over a wide range of compositions to yield reinjection-grade fuel with essentially unlimited D/T ratio

  14. Economic analysis of the fusion-driven subcritical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Desuo; Wu Yican; Chu Delin; Hu Liqin

    2004-01-01

    The economic performance of the Fusion-Driven Subcritical system (FDS) is discussed. At first, as an example, the impacts of parameters, such as plasma aspect-ratio, elongation, normalized beta, on-axis toroidal field and the blanket energy-gain are analyzed on the costs of the typical case (moderate aspect-ratio) of FDS. Then, the economic characteristics of the 3 possible scenarios of FDS are estimated with respect to the neutronics parameters. The results calculated with the SYSCODE developed by the FDS team show that the cost of electricity of Scenario-1 (low aspect-ratio) and Scenario-2 (moderate aspect-ratio) of FDS is cheaper than that of pure fusion power plant at the same plane size (1 GW e ). The cost of electricity of the FDS power plant depends heavily on the functions of blanket and the blanket energy-gain. (authors)

  15. Preliminary RAMI analysis of WCLL blanket and breeder systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo, Jose Manuel; Brown, Richard; Harman, Jon; Rosa, Elena; Ibarra, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Preliminary RAMI model for WCLL has been developed. • Critical parts and parameters influencing WCLL availability have been focused. • Necessary developments of tools/models to represent system performance have been identified. - Abstract: DEMO will be a prototype fusion reactor designed to prove the capability to produce electrical power in a commercially acceptable way. One of the key factors in that endeavor is the achievement of certain level of plant availability. Therefore, RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability) will be a key element in the engineering development of DEMO. Some studies have been started so as to develop the tools and models to assess different design alternatives from RAMI point of view. The main objective of these studies is to be able to evaluate the influence of different parameters on DEMO availability and to focus the critical parts that should be further researched and improved in order to develop a high-availability oriented DEMO design. A preliminary RAMI analysis of the Water Cooled Lithium-Lead (WCLL) blanket and breeder concept for DEMO has been developed. The amounts of single elements that may fail (e.g. more than 180,000 C-shaped tubes) and the mean down time associated to failures inside the vacuum vessel (around 3 months) have been highlighted as the critical parameters influencing the system availability. On the other hand, the necessary developments of tools/models to better represent the system performance have been identified and proposed for future work.

  16. Preliminary RAMI analysis of WCLL blanket and breeder systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo, Jose Manuel, E-mail: josemanuel.arroyo@ciemat.es [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Brown, Richard [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Harman, Jon [EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Rosa, Elena; Ibarra, Angel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Preliminary RAMI model for WCLL has been developed. • Critical parts and parameters influencing WCLL availability have been focused. • Necessary developments of tools/models to represent system performance have been identified. - Abstract: DEMO will be a prototype fusion reactor designed to prove the capability to produce electrical power in a commercially acceptable way. One of the key factors in that endeavor is the achievement of certain level of plant availability. Therefore, RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability) will be a key element in the engineering development of DEMO. Some studies have been started so as to develop the tools and models to assess different design alternatives from RAMI point of view. The main objective of these studies is to be able to evaluate the influence of different parameters on DEMO availability and to focus the critical parts that should be further researched and improved in order to develop a high-availability oriented DEMO design. A preliminary RAMI analysis of the Water Cooled Lithium-Lead (WCLL) blanket and breeder concept for DEMO has been developed. The amounts of single elements that may fail (e.g. more than 180,000 C-shaped tubes) and the mean down time associated to failures inside the vacuum vessel (around 3 months) have been highlighted as the critical parameters influencing the system availability. On the other hand, the necessary developments of tools/models to better represent the system performance have been identified and proposed for future work.

  17. Recent developments in engineering and technology concepts for prospective tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, G.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The tokamak has become the most developed magnetic fusion system and it appears likely that break-even and possibly ignition will first be demonstrated in existing machines of this type. Yet larger tokamaks could also demonstrate the essential technologies for the production of useful power. World-wide, well over a hundred tritium-breeder/heat-removal blanket concepts have been devised and preliminary engineering design studies undertaken, but the effort deployed on breeding and power recovery systems has been very small compared with that assigned to plasma research and development. The European Communities' NET (Next European Torus) project may offer an opportunity to redress this imbalance. The NET pre-design stage now in progress for some three years has selected many of the best features of plasma and nuclear design from the world's total efforts in these fields, and the NET concept is described in this paper as exemplifying where magnetic fusion power reactor technology stands today. It is concluded that although there are numerous more advanced types of magnetic confinement fusion reactor at early stages of their physics development, the tokamak offers the best opportunity for the early demonstration of fusion power

  18. Preliminary proposal for a beryllium technology program for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    The program was designed to provide the answers to the critical issues of beryllium technology needed in fusion blanket designs. The four tasks are as follows: (1) Beryllium property measurements needed for fusion data base. (2) Beryllium stress relaxation and creep measurements for lifetime modelling calculations. (3) Simplified recycle technique development for irradiated beryllium. (4) Beryllium neutron multiplier measurements using manganese bath absolute calibration techniques

  19. Design considerations in inertially-confined fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1976-08-01

    This paper discusses the effects of short time pulses of energetic particles and waves typical of inertially-confined thermonuclear reactions on the first wall, blanket and shield of conceptual reactors. Several reactor designs are presented which attempt to cope with the various problems from the microexplosion debris. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the first-wall problems of laser-initiated, inertially confined fusion reactors using the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle

  20. Proceedings of the sixth international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji [ed.

    1998-03-01

    This report is the Proceedings of `the Sixth International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions` which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders under Annex II of IEA Implementing Agreement on a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials, and Japan-US Workshop 97FT4-01. This workshop was held in Mito city, Japan on October 22-24, 1997. About forty experts from EU, Japan, USA, and Chile attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included the following: (1) fabrication and characterization of ceramic breeders, (2) properties data for ceramic breeders, (3) tritium release characteristics, (4) modeling of tritium behavior, (5) irradiation effects on performance behavior, (6) blanket design and R and D requirements, (7) hydrogen behavior in materials, and (8) blanket system technology and structural materials. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for fabrication technology of ceramic breeder pebbles in EU and Japan, data of various properties of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, tritium release behavior of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} including tritium diffusion, modeling of tritium release from Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in ITER condition, helium release behavior from Li{sub 2}O, results of tritium release irradiation tests of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles in EXOTIC-7, R and D issues for ceramic breeders for ITER and DEMO blankets, etc. The 23 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Fusion materials research at McMaster University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    McMaster University is actively participating in fusion research, supported by CFFTP. Research activities are focused in three main areas at present: hydrogen isotope permeation and permeation barrier studies; hydrogen isotope diffusion studies; and, the high temperature fatigue behaviour due to the bubble formation in first wall and blanket structural materials

  2. Analysis of deficiencies in fast reactor blanket physics predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.

    1987-12-01

    This analysis addresses a deviation between experimental measurements and fast reactor blanket physics predictions. A review of worldwide results reveals that reaction rates in the blanket are underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration into the blanket. The analysis of this discrepancy involves two parts: quantifying possible error reductions using the most advanced methods and investigating deficiencies in current methodology. The source of these discrepancies was investigated by application of ''state-of-the-art'' group constant generation and flux prediction methodology to flux calculations for the Purdue University Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF). Refined group constant generation methods yielded a significant reduction in the blanket deviations; however, only about half of the discrepancy can be accounted for in this manner. Transport theory calculations were used to predict the blanket neutron transmission problem. The surprising result is that transport theory predictions utilizing diffusion theory group constants did not improve the blanket results. Transport theory predictions exhibited blanket underpredictions similar to the diffusion theory results. The residual blanket discrepancies not explained using advanced methods require a refinement of the theory. For this purpose an analysis of deficiencies in current methodology was performed

  3. Fusion of GFP to the M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase produces a new probe of Type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kai; Roberts, Gareth A.; Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H. [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Dryden, David T.F., E-mail: david.dryden@ed.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Successful fusion of GFP to M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase. {yields} GFP located at C-terminal of sequence specificity subunit does not later enzyme activity. {yields} FRET confirms structural model of M.EcoKI bound to DNA. -- Abstract: We describe the fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein to the C-terminus of the HsdS DNA sequence-specificity subunit of the Type I DNA modification methyltransferase M.EcoKI. The fusion expresses well in vivo and assembles with the two HsdM modification subunits. The fusion protein functions as a sequence-specific DNA methyltransferase protecting DNA against digestion by the EcoKI restriction endonuclease. The purified enzyme shows Foerster resonance energy transfer to fluorescently-labelled DNA duplexes containing the target sequence and to fluorescently-labelled ocr protein, a DNA mimic that binds to the M.EcoKI enzyme. Distances determined from the energy transfer experiments corroborate the structural model of M.EcoKI.

  4. Development and testing of a zero stitch MLI blanket using plastic pins for space use

    OpenAIRE

    畠中, 龍太; 宮北, 健; 杉田, 寛之; Saitoh, Masanori; Hirai, Tomoyuki; Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Miyakita, Takeshi; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Masanori; Hirai, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    New types of MLI blanket have been developed to achieve high thermal performance while maintaining production and assembly workability equivalent to the conventional type. Tag-pins, which are widely used in commercial applications to hook price tags to products, are used to fix the films in place and the pin material is changed to polyetheretherketone (PEEK) for use in space. Thermal performance is measured by using a boil-off calorimeter, in which a rectangular liquid nitrogen tank is used t...

  5. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion reactors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  6. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion ractors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  7. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    1979-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  8. Using one hybrid 3D-1D-3D approach for the conceptual design of WCCB blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Kecheng; Zhang, Xiaokang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Li, Jia [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ma, Xuebin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The Hybrid 3D-1D-3D approach is used for radial building design of WCCB. • Nuclear heat obtained by this method agrees well with 3D neutronics results. • The final results of temperature and TBR satisfy with the requirements. • All the results show that this approach is high efficiency and high reliability. - Abstract: A hybrid 3D-1D-3D approach is proposed for the conceptual design of a blanket. Firstly, the neutron wall loading (NWL) of each blanket module is obtained through a neutronics calculation employing a 3D model, which contains the geometry outline of in-vacuum vessel components and the exact neutron source distribution. Secondly, a 1D cylindrical model with the blanket module containing a detailed radial building is adopted for the neutronics analysis, with the aim of calculating the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and nuclear heating. Being normalized to the NWL, the nuclear heating is transferred to a 2D model for thermal-hydraulics analysis using the FLUENT code. Through a series analysis of nuclear-thermal iterations that considers the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and thermal performance as optimization objectives, the optimized radial building of each module surrounding plasma can be obtained. Thirdly, the 3D structural design of each module is established by adding side walls, cover plates, stiffening plates, and other components based on the radial building. The 3D neutronics and thermal-hydraulics using the detailed blanket modules are re-analyzed. This approach has been successfully applied to the design of a water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). The radial building of each blanket module surrounding plasma is optimized. The global tritium breeding ratio (TBR) calculated by the 3D neutronics analysis is 1.21, and the temperature of all materials in the 3D blanket structure is below the upper limits. As indicated by the comparison of the 1D and 3D neutronics and thermal

  9. Corrosion studies of a stainless steel structure for the ITER aqueous lithium salt blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrisley, K.L.; Duquette, D.J.; Steiner, D.; Motyka, E.F.; Coomer, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    The aqueous lithium salt blanket (ALSB) employs water, with a dissolved lithium compound, as both the coolant and tritium breeding medium. The ALSB concept is one of three blanket options currently being examined for breeding tritium in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). To provide data and recommendations for materials and chemistry selection relevant to application of the ALSB in ITER, corrosion studies have been initiated, focusing on type 316 stainless steel in lithium hydroxide and lithium nitrate solutions. This paper presents the preliminary results of these corrosion studies. The results to date, while preliminary, suggest that even at 90degC, a blanket utilizing 10% LiOH (the current lithium salt of choice for ITER ALSB applications) will not cause catastrophic failure of 316 stainless steel by either stress corrosion cracking or localized corrosion; that the general corrosion rate will not exceed about 40 μm/y and transport of material will certainly be much less than this value since most of the corrosion product will be included in the strong adherent surface film; and that, although hydrogen may be evolved due to electrolysis, the maximum amount of hydrogen is small compared to that expected to be produced by radiolysis. These observations are predicated on the assumption that the blanket will be completely deaerated, and that the corrosion potential of the alloy will be similar to that observed in the laboratory. (orig.)

  10. EMP Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    KUNTAY, Isık

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel fusion scheme, called EMP Fusion, which has the promise of achieving breakeven and realizing commercial fusion power. The method is based on harnessing the power of an electromagnetic pulse generated by the now well-developed flux compression technology. The electromagnetic pulse acts as a means of both heating up the plasma and confining the plasma, eliminating intermediate steps. The EMP Fusion device is simpler compared to other fusion devices and this reduces...

  11. Systematic methodology for estimating direct capital costs for blanket tritium processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed for estimating the relative capital costs of blanket processing systems. The capital costs of the nine blanket concepts selected in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study are presented and compared

  12. Nuclear fusion project. Annual report of the Association Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe/EURATOM. October 1994 - September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, G.

    1996-01-01

    Today about fifty percent of FZK's fusion programme is contracted to ITER via the contribution of the European home team. With the recent selection of blanket concepts in the European frame, a concentration process has been initiated which will result in some restructuring of the blanket programme. The results are documented. Closely related to blanket development is the long term materials programme. FZK has concentrated on reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels. Important project resources for irradiation and hot cell work are devoted to characterize and improve the performance of suitable structural materials. ITER references are given in the nomenclature. The annexes provide with some information on departments and project management. (DG)

  13. Prospects of fusion energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohzaki, Yasuji; Seki, Yasushi; Motojima, Osamu

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear fusion energy that collects large expectation as the energy system of 21st century adopts the tokamak with DT fuel as the main line to advance the research and development, and succeeded in the confinement of plasma that nearly satisfies the condition of zero power output. However, as for nuclear fusion energy, other various generation and utilization forms are conceivable. At present, there are many subjects before the practical use, but as to nuclear fusion energy system which is considered to contribute greatly to mankind when it will be practically used in future, it is significant to clarify the present state of the research and the subjects of the research for the realization. Tokamak type fusion reactor, helical type fusion reactor, D-He-3 FRC fusion reactor, inertial fusion reactor,fusion-fission hybrid reactor, nuclear fusion rocket, muon catalytic nuclear fusion, normal temperature nuclear fusion and so on are described. As the final summary, on the basis of the concepts of individual nuclear fusion reactors, what possibility nuclear fusion energy has as a whole is considered, and the way of advancing the development hereafter is summarized. (K.I.)

  14. Fusion neutronics experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    UCLA has led the neutronics R ampersand D effort in the US for the past several years through the well-established USDOE/JAERI Collaborative Program on Fusion Neutronics. Significant contributions have been made in providing solid bases for advancing the neutronics testing capabilities in fusion reactors. This resulted from the hands-on experience gained from conducting several fusion integral experiments to quantify the prediction uncertainties of key blanket design parameters such as tritium production rate, activation, and nuclear heating, and when possible, to narrow the gap between calculational results and measurements through improving nuclear data base and codes capabilities. The current focus is to conduct the experiments in an annular configuration where the test assembly totally surrounds a simulated line source. The simulated line source is the first-of-a-kind in the scope of fusion integral experiments and presents a significant contribution to the world of fusion neutronics. The experiments proceeded through Phase IIIA to Phase IIIC in these line source simulation experiments started in 1989

  15. Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for treatment of composite fermentation and distillation wastewater. ... Keywords: Composite wastewater, up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic biological treatment, biogas, granulated anaerobic sludge, industrial wastewater. African Journal of ...

  16. 18 CFR 284.402 - Blanket marketing certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blanket marketing... RELATED AUTHORITIES Certain Sales for Resale by Non-interstate Pipelines § 284.402 Blanket marketing... effective for an affiliated marketer with respect to transactions involving affiliated pipelines when an...

  17. Accelerator driven heavy water blanket on circulating fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazaritsky, V.D.; Blagovolin, P.P.; Mladov, V.R.; Okhlopkov, M.L.; Batyaev, V.F.; Stepanov, N.V.; Seliverstov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    A conceptual design of a heavy water blanket with circulating fuel for an accelerator driven transmutation system is described. The hybrid system consists of a high-current linear accelerator of protons and 4 targets, each placed inside a subcritical blanket

  18. An assessment of the base blanket for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.

    1991-01-01

    Ideally, the ITER base blanket would provide the necessary tritium for the reactor to be self-sufficient during operation, while having minimal impact on the overall reactor cost, reliability and safety. A solid breeder blanket has been developed in CDA phase in an attempt to achieve such objectives. The reference solid breeder base blanket configurations at the end of the CDA phase has many attractive features such as a tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 0.8--0.9 and a reasonably low tritium inventory. However, some concerns regarding the risk, cost and benefit of the base blanket have been raised. These include uncertainties associated with the solid breeder thermal control and the potentially high cost of the amount of Be used to achieve high TBR and to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the high temperature solid breeder and low temperature coolant. This work addresses these concerns. The basis for the selection of a breeding blanket is first discussed in light of the incremental risk, cost and benefits relative to a non-breeding blanket. Key issues associated with the CDA breeding blanket configurations are then analyzed. Finally, alternative schemes that could enhance the attractiveness and flexibility of a breeding blanket are explored

  19. An assessment of the base blanket for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.

    1991-01-01

    Ideally, the ITER base blanket would provide the necessary tritium for the reactor to be self-sufficient during operation, while having minimal impact on the overall reactor cost, reliability and safety. A solid breeder blanket has been developed in CDA phase in an attempt to achieve such objectives. The reference solid breeder base blanket configurations at the end of the CDA phase has many attractive features such as a tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 0.8--0.9 and a reasonably low tritium inventory. However, some concerns regarding the risk, cost and benefit of the base blanket have been raised. These include uncertainties associated with the solid breeder thermal control and the potentially high cost of the amount of Be used to achieve high TBR and to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the high temperature solid breeder and low temperature coolant. This work addresses these concerns. The basis for the selection of a breeding blanket is first discussed in light of the incremental risk, cost and benefits relative to a non-breeding blanket. Key issues associated with the CDA breeding blanket configurations are then analyzed. Finally, alternative schemes that could enhance the attractiveness and flexibility of a breeding blanket are explored.

  20. An assessment of the base blanket for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.

    1991-12-31

    Ideally, the ITER base blanket would provide the necessary tritium for the reactor to be self-sufficient during operation, while having minimal impact on the overall reactor cost, reliability and safety. A solid breeder blanket has been developed in CDA phase in an attempt to achieve such objectives. The reference solid breeder base blanket configurations at the end of the CDA phase has many attractive features such as a tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 0.8--0.9 and a reasonably low tritium inventory. However, some concerns regarding the risk, cost and benefit of the base blanket have been raised. These include uncertainties associated with the solid breeder thermal control and the potentially high cost of the amount of Be used to achieve high TBR and to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the high temperature solid breeder and low temperature coolant. This work addresses these concerns. The basis for the selection of a breeding blanket is first discussed in light of the incremental risk, cost and benefits relative to a non-breeding blanket. Key issues associated with the CDA breeding blanket configurations are then analyzed. Finally, alternative schemes that could enhance the attractiveness and flexibility of a breeding blanket are explored.