WorldWideScience

Sample records for blanket structural materials

  1. Investigation of heat treatment conditions of structural material for blanket fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recent results of thermal hysteresis effects on ceramic breeder blanket structural material. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF) steel is the leading candidates for the first wall structural materials of breeding blankets. RAF steel demonstrates superior resistance to high dose neutron irradiation, because the steel has tempered martensite structure which contains the number of sink site for radiation defects. This microstructure obtained by two-step heat treatment, first is normalizing at temperature above 1200 K and the second is tempering at temperature below 1100 K. Recent study revealed the thermal hysteresis has significant impacts on the post-irradiation mechanical properties. The breeding blanket has complicated structure, which consists of tungsten armor and thin first wall with cooling pipe. The blanket fabrication requires some high temperature joining processes. Especially hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is examined as a near-net-shape fabrication process for this structure. The process consists of heating above 1300 K and isostatic pressing at the pressure above 150 MPa followed by tempering. Moreover ceramics pebbles are packed into blanket module and the module is to be seamed by welding followed by post weld heat treatment in the final assemble process. Therefore the final microstructural features of RAFs strongly depend on the blanket fabrication process. The objective of this work is to evaluate the effects of thermal hysteresis corresponding to blanket fabrication process on RAFs microstructure in order to establish appropriate blanket fabrication process. Japanese RAFs F82H (Fe-0.1C-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.05Ta) was investigated by metallurgical method after isochronal heat treatment up to 1473 K simulating high temperature bonding process. Although F82H showed significant grain growth after conventional solid HIP conditions (1313 K x 2 hr.), this coarse grained microstructure was refined by the post HIP normalizing at

  2. Tauro: a ceramic composite structural material self-cooled Pb-17Li breeder blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a low-activation (LA) ceramic composite (CC) as structural material appears essential to demonstrate the potential of fusion power reactors for being inherently or, at least, passively safe. Tauro is a self-cooled Pb-17Li breeder blanket with a SiC/SiC composite as structure. This study determines the required improvements for existing industrial LA composites (mainly SiC/SiC) in order to render them acceptable for blanket operating conditions. 3D SiC/SiC CC, recently launched on the market, is a promising candidate. A preliminary evaluation of a possible joining technique for SiC/SiC is also described. (orig.)

  3. ITER blanket, shield and material data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the summary of the Conceptual Design Activities (CDA) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), this document describes the ITER blanket, shield, and material data base. Part A, ''ITER Blanket and Shield Conceptual Design'', discusses the need for ITER of a tritium breeding blanket to supply most of the tritium for the fuel cycle of the device. Blanket and shield combined must be designed to operate at a neutron wall loading of 1MW/m2, and to provide adequate shielding of the magnets to meet the neutron energy fluence goal of 3MWa/m2 at the first wall. After a summary of the conceptual design, the following topics are elaborated upon: (1) function, design requirement, and critical issues; (2) material selection; (3) blanket and shield segmentation; (4) blanket design description; (5) design analysis; (6) shield; (7) radiation streaming analysis; and (8) a summary of benchmark calculations. Part B, ''ITER Materials Evaluation and Data Base'', treats the compilation and assessment of the available materials data base used for the selection of the appropriate materials for all major components of ITER, including (i) structural materials for the first wall, (ii) Tritium breeding materials for the blanket, (iii) plasma facing materials for the divertor and first wall armor, and (4) electric insulators for use in the blanket and divertor. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Design requirements for SiC/SiC composites structural material in fusion power reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper recalls the main features of the TAURO blanket, a self-cooled Pb-17Li concept using SiC/SiC composites as structural material, developed for FPR. The objective of this design activity is to compare the characteristics of present-day industrial SiC-SiC composites with those required for a fusion power reactor blanket (FPR) and to evaluate the main needs of further R and D. The performed analyses indicated that the TAURO blanket would need the availability of SiC/SiC composites approximately 10 mm thick with a thermal conductivity through the thickness of approximately 15 Wm-1K-1 at 1000 C and a low electrical conductivity. A preliminary MHD analysis has indicated that the electrical conductivity should not be greater than 500 Ω-1m-1. Irradiation effects should be included in these figures. Under these conditions, the calculated pressure drop due to the high Pb-17Li velocity (approximately 1 m s-1) is much lower then 0.1 MPa. The characteristics and data base of the recently developed 3D-SiC/SiC composite, Cerasep trademark N3-1, are reported and discussed in relation to the identified blanket design requirements. The progress on joining techniques is briefly reported. For the time being, the best results have been obtained using Si-based brazing systems initially developed for SiC ceramics and whose major issue is the higher porosity of the SiC/SiC composites. (orig.)

  5. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  6. STRUCTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TARGET/BLANKET SYSTEM COMPONENT MATERIALS FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. JOHNSON; R. RYDER; P. RITTENHOUSE

    2001-01-01

    The design of target/blanket system components for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) plant is dependent on the development of materials properties data specified by the designer. These data are needed to verify that component designs are adequate. The adequacy of the data will be related to safety, performance, and economic considerations, and to other requirements that may be deemed necessary by customers and regulatory bodies. The data required may already be in existence, as in the open technical literature, or may need to be generated, as is often the case for the design of new systems operating under relatively unique conditions. The designers' starting point for design data needs is generally some form of design criteria used in conjunction with a specified set of loading conditions and associated performance requirements. Most criteria are aimed at verifying the structural adequacy of the component, and often take the form of national or international standards such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME B and PV Code) or the French Nuclear Structural Requirements (RCC-MR). Whether or not there are specific design data needs associated with the use of these design criteria will largely depend on the uniqueness of the conditions of operation of the component. A component designed in accordance with the ASME B and PV Code, where no unusual environmental conditions exist, will utilize well-documented, statistically-evaluated developed in conjunction with the Code, and will not be likely to have any design data needs. On the other hand, a component to be designed to operate under unique APT conditions, is likely to have significant design data needs. Such a component is also likely to require special design criteria for verification of its structural adequacy, specifically accounting for changes in materials properties which may occur during exposure in the service environment. In such a situation it is common for the design criteria

  7. Design study of blanket structure for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design study of the blanket structure for JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) has been carried out. Studied here were fabrication and testing of the blanket structure (blanket cells, blanket rings, piping and blanket modules), assembly and disassembly of the blanket module, and monitering and testing technique. Problems in design and fabrication of the blanket structure could be revealed. Research and development problems for the future were also disclosed. (author)

  8. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  9. ITER solid breeder blanket materials database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dienst, W. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Material- und Festkoerperforschung; Flament, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Commissariat A L`Energie Atomique; Lorenzetto, P. [NET Team, Garching (Germany); Noda, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takai, Ibaraki, (Japan); Roux, N. [CEA Centre d`Etudes et de Recherches Les Materiaux (France). Commissariat a L`Energie Atomique

    1993-11-01

    The databases for solid breeder ceramics (Li{sub 2},O, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2}) and beryllium multiplier material are critically reviewed and evaluated. Emphasis is placed on physical, thermal, mechanical, chemical stability/compatibility, tritium, and radiation stability properties which are needed to assess the performance of these materials in a fusion reactor environment. Correlations are selected for design analysis and compared to the database. Areas for future research and development in blanket materials technology are highlighted and prioritized.

  10. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author)

  11. Fusion blanket materials development and recent R and D activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of structural materials plays an important role in the feasibility of fusion power plant. The candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors are Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, nano structured ODS Steel, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiCf composite etc. RAFM steel is presently considered as the structural material for Lead Lithium Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) Test Blanket Module (TBM) because of its high void swelling resistance and improved thermal properties compared to austenitic steel. Development of RAFM steel in India is being carried out in full swing in collaboration with various research laboratories and steel industries. This paper presents an overview of the Indian activities on fusion blanket materials and describes in brief the efforts made to develop IN-RAFM steel as structural material for the LLCB TBM. In future, due to enhanced properties of vanadium base alloy and nano structured materials like ODS RAFMS, RAFM steel may be replaced by these materials for its application in DEMO relevant fusion reactor. Future R and D activities will be specifically towards the development of these structural materials for fusion reactor

  12. First wall and blanket module safety enhancement by material selection and design decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    A thermal/mechanical study has been performed which illustrates the behavior of a fusion reactor first wall and blanket module during a loss of coolant flow event. The relative safety advantages of various material and design options were determined. A generalized first wall-blanket concept was developed to provide the flexibility to vary the structural material (stainless steel vs titanium), coolant (helium vs water), and breeder material (liquid lithium vs solid lithium aluminate). In addition, independent vs common first wall-blanket cooling and coupled adjacent module cooling design options were included in the study. The comparative analyses were performed using a modified thermal analysis code to handle phase change problems.

  13. Multiplier, moderator, and reflector materials for lithium-vanadium fusion blankets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.

    1999-10-07

    The self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has several attractive operational and environmental features. In this concept, liquid lithium works as the tritium breeder and coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because of its superior performance relative to other alloys for this application. However, this concept has poor attenuation characteristics and energy multiplication for the DT neutrons. An advanced self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has been developed to eliminate these drawbacks while maintaining all the attractive features of the conventional concept. An electrical insulator coating for the coolant channels, spectral shifter (multiplier, and moderator) and reflector were utilized in the blanket design to enhance the blanket performance. In addition, the blanket was designed to have the capability to operate at high loading conditions of 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading. This paper assesses the spectral shifter and the reflector materials and it defines the technological requirements of this advanced blanket concept.

  14. A passively-safe fusion reactor blanket with helium coolant and steel structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helium is attractive for use as a fusion blanket coolant for a number of reasons. It is neutronically and chemically inert, nonmagnetic, and will not change phase during any off-normal or accident condition. A significant disadvantage of helium, however, is its low density and volumetric heat capacity. This disadvantage manifests itself most clearly during undercooling accident conditions such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a loss of flow accident (LOFA). This thesis describes a new helium-cooled tritium breeding blanket concept which performs significantly better during such accidents than current designs. The proposed blanket uses reduced-activation ferritic steel as a structural material and is designed for neutron wall loads exceeding 4 MW/m2. The proposed geometry is based on the nested-shell concept developed by Wong, but some novel features are used to reduce the severity of the first wall temperature excursion. These features include the following: (1) A ''beryllium-joint'' concept is introduced, which allows solid beryllium slabs to be used as a thermal conduction path from the first wall to the cooler portions of the blanket. The joint concept allows for significant swelling of the beryllium (10 percent or more) without developing large stresses in the blanket structure. (2) Natural circulation of the coolant in the water-cooled shield is used to maintain shield temperatures below 100 degrees C, thus maintaining a heat sink close to the blanket during the accident. This ensures the long-term passive safety of the blanket

  15. US/Japan collaborative program on fusion reactor materials: Summary of the tenth DOE/JAERI Annex I technical progress meeting on neutron irradiation effects in first wall and blanket structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on March 17, 1989, to review the technical progress on the collaborative DOE/JAERI program on fusion reactor materials. The purpose of the program is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior and dimensional stability of US and Japanese austenitic stainless steels. Phase I of the program focused on the effects of high concentrations of helium on the tensile, fatigue, and swelling properties of both US and Japanese alloys. In Phase II of the program, spectral and isotropic tailoring techniques are fully utilized to reproduce the helium:dpa ratio typical of the fusion environment. The Phase II program hinges on a restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor by mid-1989. Eight target position capsules and two RB* position capsules have been assembled. The target capsule experiments will address issues relating to the performance of austenitic steels at high damage levels including an assessment of the performance of a variety of weld materials. The RB* capsules will provide a unique and important set of data on the behavior of austenitic steels irradiated under conditions which reproduce the damage rate, dose, temperature, and helium generation rate expected in the first wall and blanket structure of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  16. Low activity aluminum blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenati, R.; Tichler, P.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    The basic design of the breeding blanket consists of cylindrical aluminium canisters filled with a ceramic bed of moderating, shielding, and breeding materials all suitably cooled. A technical analysis of the blanket for an EPR design is given. Activation studies are presented. The effect of pulsed magnetic fields on module structure is investigated. (MOW)

  17. Breeding blanket design for ITER and prototype (DEMO) fusion reactors and breeding materials issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsu, H.; Enoeda, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Current status of the designs of the ITER breeding blanket and DEMO blankets is introduced placing emphasis on the breeding materials selection and related issues. The former design is based on the up-to-date design activities, as of October 1997, being performed jointly by Joint Central Team (JCT) and Home Teams (HT`s), while the latter is based on the DEMO blanket test module designs being proposed by each Party at the TBWG (Test Blanket Working Group) meetings. (J.P.N.)

  18. Study on electromagnetic-structural behavior of first wall/blanket structure for tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electromagnetic problems related to the structural design of the first wall/blanket structure, which is a major component of Fusion Reactor, have been studied. The electromagnetic load, which is characteristic and very important of Tokamak type, is necessary for the evaluation of the structural integrity at the last item of the design process. A transient electromagnetic phenomena, which include the measurement of the eddy current obtained by the simulated plasma disruption experiment, the vibration behavior of the beam-plate by the dynamic electromagnetic load and the verification of the numerical codes, have been clarified. A static electromagnetic phenomena have been studied to evaluate the applicability of the ferromagnetic material to the first wall/blanket structure of Tokamak Power Reactor. The numerical code, which can calculate the magnetic field of the finite ferromagnetic body, has been developed and the magnetic field distortions inside and outside the materials has been studied. The deformation by the magnetic torque, which generates inside the ferromagnetic material placed in the magnetic field, has been studied. The effects of the magnetic stiffness and the saturated magnetic field to the deformation has been also clarified. (author)

  19. Convertible liquid metal blankets for ITER with Pb-17Li as breeding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A convertible blanket concept is proposed for ITER, where, without replacement of the blanket structure, a non-breeding Pb alloy is used during the basic performance phase and the eutectic Pb-17Li during the enhanced performance phase. The concept is based on austenitic steel as structural material, an average neutron wall load of 1MWm-2 and either helium or water as coolant. The same design concept was used for both coolant options with respect to a stiff blanket segment box, direct cooling of the first wall using toroidal ducts, poloidal hairpin tubes to cool the quasi-stagnant liquid metal and tritium removal outside the vacuum vessel.Various design options were considered for the first-wall and pool cooling and corresponding headers. Owing to the different coolant properties, different combinations were selected for the two versions. The performance of the two versions was assessed among other things with respect to tritium breeding and control, reliability and R and D needs. (orig.)

  20. Damage Identification of Continuum Structures Using Blanketing Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A damage identification method for the continuum structures with making use of the blanketing effect is proposed in this paper. The conventional damage indicator methods such as flexibility matrix method are difficult to deal with the damage identification of complex continuum structure such as multi-span beam. The presented method takes the change rates according to certain diagonal elements of the damaged structure flexibility matrix as identification indicator function. The 'blanketing effect' of the indicator function with respect to the damage factors makes it easy to identify the damage of multi-span beam and plate structures. Some useful formulas are derived and the sensitivity matrix of the identification indicator function is studied. The numerical simulation is performed and the identification results of several damage status are compared. Both beam and plate structures are used for numerical simulation. The results show that the presented indicator function method is very brevity and effective. It is especially suitable for the damage identification of the multi-span beam and plate structures such as bridges and floor

  1. Transient electromagnetic and dynamic structural analyses of a blanket structure with coupling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient electromagnetic and dynamic structural analyses of a blanket structure in the fusion experimental reactor (FER) under a plasma disruption event and a vertical displacement event (VDE) have been performed to investigate the dynamic structural characteristics and the feasibility of the structure. Coupling effects between eddy currents and dynamic deflections have also been taken into account in these analyses. In this study, the inboard blanket was employed because of our computer memory limitation. A 1/192 segment model of a full torus was analyzed using the analytical code, EDDYCUFF. In the plasma disruption event, the maximum magnetic pressure caused by eddy currents and poloidal fields was 1.2MPa. The maximum stress intensity by this magnetic pressure was 114MPa. In the VDE, the maximum magnetic pressure was 2.4MPa and the maximum stress intensity was 253MPa. This stress was somewhat beyond the allowable stress limit. Therefore, the blanket structure and support design should be reviewed to reduce the stress to a suitable value. In summary, the dynamic structural characteristics and design issues of the blanket structure have been identified. (orig.)

  2. Acoustic contributions of a sound absorbing blanket placed in a double panel structure: Absorption Versus Transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Doutres, Olivier; 10.1121/1.3458845

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose a simple tool to estimate the absorption vs. transmission loss contributions of a multilayered blanket unbounded in a double panel structure and thus guide its optimization. The normal incidence airborne sound transmission loss of the double panel structure, without structure-borne connections, is written in terms of three main contributions; (i) sound transmission loss of the panels, (ii) sound transmission loss of the blanket and (iii) sound absorption due to multiple reflections inside the cavity. The method is applied to four different blankets frequently used in automotive and aeronautic applications: a non-symmetric multilayer made of a screen in sandwich between two porous layers and three symmetric porous layers having different pore geometries. It is shown that the absorption behavior of the blanket controls the acoustic behavior of the treatment at low and medium frequencies and its transmission loss at high frequencies. Acoustic treatment having poor sound ...

  3. Preliminary lifetime predictions for 304 stainless steel as the LANL ABC blanket material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.; Houts, M.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1997-11-01

    The prediction of materials lifetime in the preconceptual Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Accelerator-Based Conversion of Plutonium (ABC) is of utmost interest. Because Hastelloy N showed good corrosion resistance to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Molten Salt Reactor Experiment fuel salt that is similar to the LANL ABC fuel salt, Hastelloy N was originally proposed for the LANL ABC blanket material. In this paper, the possibility of using 304 stainless steel as a replacement for the Hastelloy N is investigated in terms of corrosion issues and fluence-limit considerations. An attempt is made, based on the previous Fast Flux Test Facility design data, to predict the preliminary lifetime estimate of the 304 stainless steel used in the blanket region of the LANL ABC.

  4. Tritium self-sufficiency time and inventory evolution for solid-type breeding blanket materials for DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, L. W.; Pampin, R.; Zheng, S.

    2011-10-01

    One of the primary functions of a fusion blanket is to generate enough tritium to make a fusion power plant (FPP) self-sufficient. To ensure that there is satisfactory tritium production in a real plant the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) in the blanket must be greater than 1 + M, where M is the breeding margin. For solid-type blanket designs, the initial TBR must be significantly higher than 1 + M, since the blanket TBR will be reduced over time as the lithium fuel is consumed. The rate of TBR reduction will impact on the overall blanket self-sufficiency time, the time in which the net tritium inventory of the system is positive. DEMO relevant blanket materials, Li 4SiO 4 and Li 2TiO 3, are investigated by computational simulation using radiation transport tools coupled with time-dependent inventory calculations. The results include tritium inventory assessments and depletion of breeding materials over time, which enable self-sufficiency times and maximum surplus tritium inventories to be evaluated, which are essential quantities to determine to allow one to design a credible FPP using solid-type breeding material concepts. The blanket concepts investigated show self-sufficiency times of several years in some cases and maximum surplus inventories of up to a few tens of kg.

  5. Assessment of titanium for use in the 1st wall/blanket structure of fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a portion of the work that was performed as part of a First Wall/Blanket Systems Analysis Study. The objective of this part of the study was to assess the suitability of using titanium alloys in the first wall/blanket structure of commercial controlled thermonuclear reactors (CTR). While the purpose of this study was not to recommend a specific titanium alloy, but to examine titanium alloys, in general, two near-alpha titanium alloys were selected for an indepth examination. These alloys were Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo. Using properties important to the CTR first wall/blanket structures application, these titanium alloys were compared with five other candidate structural materials (2219 aluminum, 316 stainless steel, V-20 Ti, Nb-1Zr, and Mo-0.5 Ti-0.08 Zr (TZM)). The results of this study revealed that titanium offers potential for use in a CTR from strength, minimum radioactivity, and resources standpoints and should be considered in future fusion reactor studies

  6. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) can be stated as follows: (1) Define a small number (approx. 3) of blanket design concepts that should be the focus of the blanket R and D program. A design concept is defined by the selection of all materials (e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and multiplier) and other major characteristics that significantly influence the R and D requirements. (2) Identify and prioritize the critical issues for the leading blanket concepts. (3) Provide the technical input necessary to develop a blanket R and D program plan. Guidelines for prioritizing the R and D requirements include: (a) critical feasibility issues for the leading blanket concepts will receive the highest priority, and (b) for equally important feasibility issues, higher R and D priority will be given to those that require minimum cost and short time

  7. Study of the effects of corrugated wall structures due to blanket modules around ICRH antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumortier, Pierre; Louche, Fabrice; Messiaen, André; Vervier, Michel [LPP-ERM/KMS, EURATOM-Belgian State Association, TEC partner, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-02-12

    In future fusion reactors, and in ITER, the first wall will be covered by blanket modules. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF properties of the antenna if they are in the ICRF operating range. The effect on the wave propagation along the wall structure, which is acting as a spatially periodic (toroidally and poloidally) corrugated structure, and hence constitutes a slow wave structure modifying the wall boundary condition, is examined.

  8. Structural materials assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection of first wall and structural materials is strongly dependent on the proposed design of breeding blanket components and the targets for a fusion reactor development. An envelope of parameters which have to be covered in future R and D activities and which have been adapted in different proposals has been compiled. A short description of interesting material groups like ferritic-martensitic steels, vanadium alloys and ceramic composites, major criteria for their selection and a survey on existing irradiation data is given. This is followed by a comparative assessment of relevant properties and an identification of major issues for each material group. A more detailed proposal for the future R and D activities is then developed for the ferritic-martensitic steels, the present reference material for the European Breeding Blankets. It describes different phases of development necessary for the qualification of this material for DEMO and gives time schedules which are compatible with parallel component developments. A more selective strategy is proposed for the development of vanadium alloys and the ceramic composite material SiC/SiC. For these alternatives work should be concentrated on identified high-risk issues, before a comprehensive development programme is started. The necessity of efficient irradiation facilities to study the irradiation behaviour of the materials under simulation - and realistic fusion conditions is discussed. The availability of high flux fission reactors and necessary extensions of irradiation rigs for the next decade is stressed. Finally it is shown that for the qualification of materials under realistic fusion conditions a high-energetic, high-flux neutron source is mandatory. An accelerator-driven d-Li neutron source (IFMIF) can fulfil essential users requirements as test bed for materials and can technically be made available in due time. In combination with ITER and DEMO, where a concept verification and full scale

  9. Progress on DCLL Blanket Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Clement; Abdou, M.; Katoh, Yutai; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lumsdaine, A.; Marriott, Edward P.; Merrill, Brad; Morley, Neil; Pint, Bruce A.; Sawan, M.; Smolentsev, S.; Williams, Brian; Willms, Scott; Youssef, M.

    2013-09-01

    Under the US Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Development program, we have selected the Dual Coolant Lead Lithium concept (DCLL) as a reference blanket, which has the potential to be a high performance DEMO blanket design with a projected thermal efficiency of >40%. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF/M) steel is used as the structural material. The self-cooled breeder PbLi is circulated for power conversion and for tritium breeding. A SiC-based flow channel insert (FCI) is used as a means for magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop reduction from the circulating liquid PbLi and as a thermal insulator to separate the high-temperature PbLi (~700°C) from the helium-cooled RAF/M steel structure. We are making progress on related R&D needs to address critical Fusion Nuclear Science and Facility (FNSF) and DEMO blanket development issues. When performing the function as the Interface Coordinator for the DCLL blanket concept, we had been developing the mechanical design and performing neutronics, structural and thermal hydraulics analyses of the DCLL TBM module. We had estimated the necessary ancillary equipment that will be needed at the ITER site and a detailed safety impact report has been prepared. This provided additional understanding of the DCLL blanket concept in preparation for the FNSF and DEMO. This paper will be a summary report on the progress of the DCLL TBM design and R&Ds for the DCLL blanket concept.

  10. Activation analysis and waste management for blanket materials of multi-functional experimental fusion–fission hybrid reactor (FDS-MFX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary studies of the activation analysis and waste management for blanket materials of the multi-functional experimental fusion–fission hybrid reactor, i.e. Multi-Functional eXperimental Fusion Driven Subcritical system named FDS-MFX, were performed. The neutron flux of the FDS-MFX blanket was calculated using VisualBUS code and Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (HENDL) developed by FDS Team. Based on these calculated neutron fluxes, the activation properties of blanket materials were analyzed by the induced radioactivity, the decay heat and the contact dose rate for different regions of the FDS-MFX blanket. The safety and environment assessment of fusion power (SEAFP) strategy, which was developed in Europe, was applied to FDS-MFX blanket for the management of activated materials. Accordingly, the classification and management strategy of activated materials after different cooling time were proposed for FDS-MFX blanket

  11. Microstructure and hardness of HIP-bonded regions in F82H blanket structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, K.; Wakai, E.; Ando, M.; Sawai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Iwabuchi, A.

    2002-12-01

    Metallurgical examinations and hardness measurements were performed at hot isostatic pressing (HIP)-bonded regions in blanket structures made from F82H alloy in order to investigate the HIP-bondability and the influence on the microstructure due to the HIP and heat treatments which would correspond to the fabrication of an actual blanket. The metallurgical examination showed that the HIP-bonded interfaces were sufficiently diffusion-bonded without significant defects, i.e. voids and/or exfoliations, although grain coarsening was observed at a part of the HIP interfaces. Hardness was nearly equal in the coarsening region and a region without coarsening, but about a 10 Hv increase was found in a boundary in between the regions with and without coarsening. Microcrystallized grains were observed in a region about ˜6 μm from HIP interfaces, and the hardness increased by about 0.2 GPa in the region.

  12. Tritium self-sufficiency of HCPB blanket modules for DEMO considering time-varying neutron flux spectra and material compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aures, A., E-mail: Alexander.Aures@ccfe.ac.uk; Packer, L.W.; Zheng, S.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Simulations on the tritium breeding performance of HCPB blanket modules were done. • MCNP5 and FISPACT were used for coupled transport and activation calculations. • Material transmutation affects the neutron flux spectra within the blanket modules. • The consequences of time-dependent spectra on TBR and tritium self-sufficiency were investigated. -- Abstract: Significant transmutation of solid-type breeding blanket materials affects the time and spatial variation of neutron energy within such materials. This has an impact on simulation assumptions required to accurately assess tritium surplus quantities for conceptual power plant devices. This paper details an investigation, via simulation, of the consequences for the tritium breeding ratio and the tritium self-sufficiency of a DEMO concept with homogeneous Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed blanket modules containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} ceramic breeder material. For this purpose, a code was developed to couple MCNP5 and FISPACT to supply material compositions from activation calculations to the neutron transport calculation in an iterative loop covering several time steps. Simulation results are presented for a simple 1D spherical device model and a DEMO tokamak model.

  13. Compatibility of structural materials with fusion reactor coolant and breeder fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion reactors are characterized by a lithium-containing blanket, a heat transfer medium that is integral with the blanket and first wall, and a heat engine that couples to the heat transfer medium. A variety of lithium-containing substances have been identified as potential blanket materials, including molten lithium metal, molten LiF--BeF2, Pb--Li alloys, and solid ceramic compounds such as Li2O. Potential heat transfer media include liquid lithium, liquid sodium, molten nitrates, water, and helium. Each of these coolants and blankets requires a particular set of chemical and mechanical properties with respect to the associated reactor and heat engine structural materials. This paper discusses the materials factors that underlie the selection of workable combinations of blankets and coolants. It also addresses the materials compatibility problems generic to those blanket-coolant combinations currently being considered in reactor design studies

  14. ITER breeding blanket module design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER breeding blanket employs a ceramic breeder and Be neutron multiplier both in small spherical pebble form. Radial-poloidal cooling panels are arranged in the blanket box to remove the nuclear heating in these materials and to reinforce the blanket structure. At the first wall, Be armor is bonded onto the stainless steel (SS) structure to provide a low Z plasma-compatible surface and to protect the first wall/blanket structure from the direct contact with the plasma during off-normal events. Thermo-mechanical analyses and investigation of fabrication procedure have been performed for this breeding blanket. To evaluate thermo-mechanical behavior of the pebble beds including the dependency of the effective thermal conductivity on stress, analysis methods have been preliminary established by the use of special calculation option of ABAQUS code, which are briefly summarized in this report. The structural response of the breeding blanket module under internal pressure of 4 MPa (in case of in-blanket LOCA) resulted in rather high stress in the blanket side (toroidal end) wall, thus addition of a stiffening rib or increase of the wall thickness will be needed. Two-dimensional elasto-plastic analyses have been performed for the Be/SS bonded interface at the first wall taking a fabrication process based on HIP bonding and thermal cycle due to pulsed plasma operation into account. The stress-strain hysteresis during these process and operation was clarified, and a procedure to assess and/or confirm the bonding integrity was also proposed. Fabrication sequence of the breeding blanket module was preliminarily developed based on the procedure to fabricate part by part and to assemble them one by one. (author)

  15. Stress and lifetime calculations for first wall and blanket structural components. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the lifetime of first wall and blanket structures of fusion reactors is investigated. The extension of small pre-existing cracks by the cyclic operation of a fusion reactor seems to be the most important failure mode. The special application of the present investigation are tubes acting directly as parts of the first wall and affected by various radiation effects. The outer surface is asymmetrically heated and by combination of thermal extension, swelling, irradiation creep and internal pressure a complex time dependent stress distribution results. Crack growth until failure caused by cyclic operation of the reactor is computed by application of fracture mechanical methods. (orig.)

  16. High power density self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Majumdar, S.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-01

    A self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket concept capable of operating with 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading has been developed. The blanket has liquid lithium as the tritium breeder and the coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because it can accommodate high heat loads. Also, it has good mechanical properties at high temperatures, high neutron fluence capability, low degradation under neutron irradiation, good compatibility with the blanket materials, low decay heat, low waste disposal rating, and adequate strength to accommodate the electromagnetic loads during plasma disruption events. Self-healing electrical insulator (CaO) is utilized to reduce the MHD pressure drop. A poloidal coolant flow with high velocity at the first wall is used to reduce the peak temperature of the vanadium structure and to accommodate high surface heat flux. The blanket has a simple blanket configuration and low coolant pressure to reduce the fabrication cost, to improve the blanket reliability, and to increase confidence in the blanket performance. Spectral shifter, moderator, and reflector are utilized to improve the blanket shielding capability and energy multiplication, and to reduce the radial blanket thickness. Natural lithium is used to avoid extra cost related to the lithium enrichment process.

  17. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies

  18. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  19. Safety and personnel access aspects of low activation fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of silicon carbide and carbon materials for structural applications in fusion reactor first wall and blanket regions has been proposed and a continuing effort spent on the development of the ceramics technology. The advantages identified are an extremely low induced radioactivity inventory, a high temperature operating capability, abundant raw material resource availability, and minimized plasma impurity effects. One of the unique features of the applications of these materials to fusion reactor blanket designs is that no alloying element is needed in order to assure the specified mechanical properties such as occurs in metal alloys. The major source of long term radioactivity in these materials is impurities. The impurity elements and their concentrations carried over to the blanket structure during fabrication can be minimized by proper fabrication procedures and techniques. The safety and personnel access aspects of such fusion blankets in conjunction with the impurity element concentration are the main subjects of this paper

  20. Design and safety analysis of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhou, Guangming; Lv, Zhongliang; Jin, Cheng; Chen, Hongli [University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China). School of Nuclear Science and Technology

    2016-05-15

    This paper reports the design and safety analysis results of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket of the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Materials selection and basic structure of the blanket have been presented. Performance analysis including neutronics analysis and thermo-mechanical analysis has shown good results. And the safety analysis of the blanket under Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions has been described. Results showed the current design can deal well with the selected accident scenarios.

  1. Design and safety analysis of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the design and safety analysis results of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket of the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Materials selection and basic structure of the blanket have been presented. Performance analysis including neutronics analysis and thermo-mechanical analysis has shown good results. And the safety analysis of the blanket under Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions has been described. Results showed the current design can deal well with the selected accident scenarios.

  2. Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) blanket design study, December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work represents only the second iteration of the conceptual design of a DTHR blanket; consequently, a number of issues important to a detailed blanket design have not yet been evaluated. The most critical issues identified are those of two-phase flow maldistribution, flow instabilities, flow stratification for horizontal radial inflow of boiling water, fuel rod vibrations, corrosion of clad and structural materials by high quality steam, fretting and cyclic loads. Approaches to minimizing these problems are discussed and experimental testing with flow mock-ups is recommended. These implications on a commercial blanket design are discussed and critical data needs are identified

  3. Thermal and structural design issues of breeding blankets for testing in the Next European Torus (NET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.

    1988-05-01

    A review of the breeding blankets under study in Europe for testing in the Next European Torus is presented. In many concepts, the breeder modules are enclosed in boxes whose side walls in front of the plasma act as the first wall of the machine. Various types of breeder modules are investigated, involving both liquid and solid breeders, namely: - Pb-17Li liquid breeder concepts, the coolant being either water or Pb-17Li itself; - solid (ceramic) breeder concepts, the coolant being in all cases helium. The various ceramic concepts differ in the breeder/coolant arrangement (breeder-out-of-tube and breeder-in-tube), the orientation of the coolant tubes (poloidal or toroidal) and the breeder geometry (rods, plates or pebble bed). For each of these concepts the main design features are shown and the thermomechanical problems are discussed. The problems related to a coolant tube rupture are in many cases the most severe from the structural design point of view. The first wall box enclosing the breeder modules appears to be a weak secondary containment barrier. The liquid breeder-water cooled concept looks manageable from the thermal and structural design of point view. In the case of the self-cooled liquid breeder concept, the main problems are related to the magnetohydrodynamic effects. Solutions are envisaged to overcome these difficulties. In the case of ceramic breeders, the use of plates implies small dimensions in order to limit the thermal stresses and a poor exploitation of the permitted temperature operation window. Solutions involving rods associated with a multipass cooling scheme or pebble bed enable achievement of better thermomechanical conditions and, therefore, are preferred in the current investigations. However, they lead to design complications and require experimental verification which is in progress at the European laboratories.

  4. Flexible armored blanket development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E.S.

    1978-05-01

    An exploratory development contract was undertaken on December 23, 1977 which had as its purpose the development and demonstration of a flexible armored blanket design suitable for providing ballistic protection to nuclear weapons during shipment. Objectives were to design and fabricate a prototype blanket which will conform to the weapon shape, is troop-handleable in the field, and which, singly or in multiple layers, can defeat a range of kinetic energy armor piercing (AP) ammunition potentially capable of damaging the critical portion of the nuclear weapon. Following empirical testing, including the firing of threat ammunition under controlled laboratory and field test conditions, materials were selected and assembled into two blanket designs, each weighing approximately 54 kg/m{sup 2} (11 lbs/ft{sup 2}) and estimated to cost from $111 to $180 per ft{sup 2} in production. A firing demonstration to evidence blanket performance against terrorist/light infantry weapons, heavy infantry weapons, and aircraft cannon was conducted for representatives of the DOD and interested Sandia employees on April 12, 1978. The blankets performed better than anticipated defeating bullets up to 7.62 mm x 51 mm AP with one layer and projectiles up to 23 mm HEI with two layers. Based on these preliminary tests it is recommended that development work be continued with the following objectives: (1) the selection by the DOD of priority applications, (2) the specific design and fabrication of sufficient quantities of armored blankets for field testing, (3) the evaluation of the blankets by DOD operational units, with reports to Sandia Laboratories to enable final design.

  5. An examination into weldability of irradiated material by a laser welding method for repair of ITER blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SS316L(N)-IG is the candidate material for the in-vessel and ex-vessel components of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). This paper describes an examination into weldability of irradiated and un-irradiated SS316L(N)-IG for coolant piping and investigation of the mechanical properties of welding joints as well as the effect of helium generation on weldability. A YAG laser welding process was used for repair welding of the water cooling branch pipelines. It was clarified that welding of SS316L(N)-IG irradiated up to 0.3 dpa (He content: about 3 appm) can be carried out without a significant deterioration of tensile properties due to helium accumulation. Therefore, repair of coolant pipes for the ITER blanket can be performed by the laser welding process. (author)

  6. Crucial issues on liquid metal blanket design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malang, S. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)); Leroy, P. (CEA, CEN Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Casini, G.P. (CEC, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra (Italy)); Mattas, R.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Strebkov, Yu. (Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-12-01

    Typical design concepts of liquid metal breeder blankets for power reactors are explained and characterized. The major problems of these concepts are described for both water-cooled blankets and self-cooled blankets. Three crucial issues of liquid metal breeder blankets are investigated. They are in the fields of magnetohydrodynamics, tritium control and safety. The influence of the magnetic field on liquid metal flow is of special interest for self-cooled blankets. The main problems in this field and the status of the related R and D work are described. Tritium permeation losses to the cooling water is a crucial issue for water-cooled blankets. Methods for its reduction are discussed. An inherent problem of all liquid breeder blankets is the potential release of activated products in the case of chemical reactions between the breeder material and water or reactive gases. The most important issues in this field are described. (orig.).

  7. Review: BNL graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) minimum activity graphite blanket designs is made. Three designs are identified and discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a thick graphite screen (typically 30 cm or greater, depending on type as well as application-experimental power reactor or commercial reactor). Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy. This energy is then either radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or is removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the structural material of the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude by the graphite screen, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma, whatever the degree of radiation damage

  8. Blanket for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blanket of the present invention can keep the temperature of breeding materials within a predetermined range even if the breeding materials are consumed and the amount of heat generated from the breeding materials is reduced, thereby enabling to release tritium stably. That is, a neutron incident amount control means is disposed to the blanket for controlling the amount of neutrons incident to the breeding materials. Alternatively, a material to form hollow layers are disposed to the periphery of the breeding materials. With such constitution, the neutron incident amount control means enables to control the incident amount of neutrons from plasmas to the breeding materials, thereby enabling to suppress the change of the amount of heat generated in the breeding materials. In addition, the hollow layers formed at the periphery of the breeding materials enables selective filling of fluids having different heat transfer characteristics thereby enabling to control heat resistance between the breeding materials and cooling tubes. Accordingly, temperature of the breeding materials can be kept constant even in any of the cases. (I.S.)

  9. Thermohydraulics design and thermomechanics analysis of two European breeder blanket concepts for DEMO. Pt. 1 and Pt. 2. Pt. 1: BOT helium cooled solid breeding blanket. Pt. 2: Dual coolant self-cooled liquid metal blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different breeding blanket concepts are being elaborated at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe within the framework of the DEMO breeding blanket development, the concept of a helium cooled solid breeding blanket and the concept of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The breeder material used in the first concept is Li4SiO4 as a pebble bed arranged separate from the beryllium pebble bed, which serves as multiplier. The breeder material zone is cooled by several toroidally-radially configurated helium cooling plates which, at the same time, act as reinforcements of the blanket structures. In the liquid metal blanket concept lead-lithium is used both as the breeder material and the coolant. It flows at low velocity in poloidal direction downwards and back in the blanket front zone. In both concepts the First Wall is cooled by helium gas. This report deals with the thermohydraulics design and thermomechanics analysis of the two blanket concepts. The performance data derived from the Monte-Carlo computations serve as a basis for the design calculations. The coolant inlet and outlet temperatures are chosen with the design criteria and the economics aspects taken into account. Uniform temperature distribution in the blanket structures can be achieved by suitable branching and routing of the coolant flows which contributes to reducing decisively the thermal stress. The computations were made using the ABAQUS computer code. The results obtained of the stresses have been evaluated using the ASME code. It can be demonstrated that all maximum values of temperature and stress are below the admissible limit. (orig.)

  10. Materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Theodore T.; Langenbeck, Sharon L.; Al-Jamily, Ghanim; Arnold, Joe; Barbee, Troy; Coulter, Dan; Dolgin, Ben; Fichter, Buck; George, Patricia; Gorenstein, Paul

    1992-08-01

    Materials and structures technology covers a wide range of technical areas. Some of the most pertinent issues for the Astrotech 21 missions include dimensionally stable structural materials, advanced composites, dielectric coatings, optical metallic coatings for low scattered light applications, low scattered light surfaces, deployable and inflatable structures (including optical), support structures in 0-g and 1-g environments, cryogenic optics, optical blacks, contamination hardened surfaces, radiation hardened glasses and crystals, mono-metallic telescopes and instruments, and materials characterization. Some specific examples include low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) structures (0.01 ppm/K), lightweight thermally stable mirror materials, thermally stable optical assemblies, high reliability/accuracy (1 micron) deployable structures, and characterization of nanometer level behavior of materials/structures for interferometry concepts. Large filled-aperture concepts will require materials with CTE's of 10(exp 9) at 80 K, anti-contamination coatings, deployable and erectable structures, composite materials with CTE's less than 0.01 ppm/K and thermal hysteresis, 0.001 ppm/K. Gravitational detection systems such as LAGOS will require rigid/deployable structures, dimensionally stable components, lightweight materials with low conductivity, and high stability optics. The Materials and Structures panel addressed these issues and the relevance of the Astrotech 21 mission requirements by dividing materials and structures technology into five categories. These categories, the necessary development, and applicable mission/program development phasing are summarized. For each of these areas, technology assessments were made and development plans were defined.

  11. Tokamak blanket design study, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cylindrical module concept was developed, analyzed, and incorporated in a tokamak blanket system that includes piping systems, vacuum boundary sealing, and support structures. The design is based on the use of state-of-the-art structural materials (20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel), lithium as the breeding material, and pressurized helium as the coolant. The module design consists of nested concentric cylinders (with an outer diameter of 10 cm) and features direct wall cooling by helium flowing between the outer (first-wall) cylinder and the inner (lithium-containing) cylinder. Each cylinder can withstand full coolant pressure, thus enhancing reliability. Results show that stainless steel is a viable material for a first wall subjected to a neutron wall loading of 4 MW/m2 and a particle heat flux of 1 MW/m2. Lifetime analysis shows that the first-wall design meets the goal of operating at 20-min cycles with 95% duty for 100,000 cycles. To reduce system complexity, a larger 20-cm-diam module also was analyzed for incorporation in the blanket assembly. Reliability assessment indicates that it may be possible to double the module in size from 10 to 20 cm in diameter. With a modest increase in coolant pumping power, a blanket assembly comprising 20-cm-diam modules can still achieve 100,000 operating cycles - equivalent to a 3.6-year design lifetime - with only one or two helium coolant leaks into the plasma

  12. Analysis of the multiplication of D-T neutron sources in blanket materials of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A D-T neutron source is amplified when emitted into a body of material with appreciable (n,2n), (n,3n) or (n,f) cross sections. This amplification is described by a simple theory, approximating the strict integral transport description of the process. The distribution of neutrons in energy, from 14 MeV down to the (n,2n) threshold, is approximated by effective one-group cross sections for amplifiers of high and medium mass numbers; two-group cross sections are needed for Be. The spatial character of the multiplication is described by average collision probabilities for non-flat collision sources. The probabilities are approximated for spherical shell geometry with a small number of geometrical parameters. The theory enables a very accurate determination of sigmasub(n,2n) + 2sigmasub(n,3n) + (vsub(f)-1)sigmasub(f) at the source energy from measurements of total multiplications. If total leakages above the (n,2n) threshold are also measured, then the hardness of the secondary neutron spectra can be estimated. The accuracy of the approximate theory was ascertained by energy-space detailed transport comparison calculations for Be, Cu, Zr, Fe, Pb and U238. (orig.)

  13. Auxetic materials and structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the fundamentals of the mechanics and design of auxetic solids and structures, which possess a negative Poisson’s ratio. It will benefit two groups of readers: (a) industry practitioners, such as product and structural designers, who need to control mechanical stress distributions using auxetic materials, and (b) academic researchers and students who intend to produce structures with unique mechanical and other physical properties using auxetic materials.

  14. Blanket concept of water-cooled lithium lead with beryllium for the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an advanced option for SlimCS blanket, conceptual design study of water-cooled lithium lead (WCLL) blanket was performed. In SlimCS, the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR) supplied from WCLL blanket was not enough because the thickness of blanket in SlimCS was limited to about 0.5 m so as to allocate the conducting shell position near the plasma for high beta access and vertical stability of plasma. Therefore, the beryllium (Be) pebble bed was adopted as additional multiplier to reach a required TBR (≥ 1.05). Considering the operating temperature of blanket materials, a double pipe structure was adopted. The nuclear and thermal analysis were carried out by a nuclear-thermal-coupled code, ANIHEAT and DOHEAT so that blanket materials were appropriately arranged to satisfy the acceptable operation temperatures. The temperatures of materials were kept in appropriate range for the neutron wall load Pn = 5 MW/m2. It was found that the local TBR of WCLL with Be blanket was comparable with that of solid breeder blanket. (author)

  15. Low technology high tritium breeding blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main function of this low technology blanket is to produce the necessary tritium for INTOR operation with minimum first wall coverage. The INTOR first wall, blanket, and shield are constrained by the dimensions of the reference design and the protection criteria required for different reactor components and dose equivalent after shutdown in the reactor hall. It is assumed that the blanket operation at commercial power reactor conditions and the proper temperature for power generation can be sacrificed to achieve the highest possible tritium breeding ratio with minimum additional research and developments and minimal impact on reactor design and operation. A set of blanket evaluation criteria has been used to compare possible blanket concepts. Six areas: performance, operating requirements, impact on reactor design and operation, safety and environmental impact, technology assessment, and cost have been defined for the evaluation process. A water-cooled blanket was developed to operate with a low temperature and pressure. The developed blanket contains a 24 cm of beryllium and 6 cm of solid breeder both with a 0.8 density factor. This blanket provides a local tritium breeding ratio of ∼2.0. The water coolant is isolated from the breeder material by several zones which eliminates the tritium buildup in the water by permeation and reduces the changes for water-breeder interaction. This improves the safety and environmental aspects of the blanket and eliminates the costly process of the tritium recovery from the water. 12 refs., 13 tabs

  16. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented

  17. Breeding blanket for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently being investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme. (orig.)

  18. Breeding blanket for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proust, E. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DRN/DMT/SERMA, CE, Saclay (France)); Anzidei, L. (ENEA/FUS, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Casini, G. (Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Center, Ispara (Italy)); Dalle Donne, M. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)); Giancarli, L. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DRN/DMT/SERMA, CE, Saclay (France)); Malang, S. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently being investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme. (orig.)

  19. Breeding blanket for Demo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proust, E.; Giancarli, L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie; Anzidei, L. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia; Casini, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Dalle Donne, M.; Malang, S. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme.

  20. Development and trial manufacturing of 1/2-scale partial mock-up of blanket box structure for fusion experimental reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Sato, Satoshi

    1994-07-01

    Conceptual design of breeding blanket has been discussed during the CDA (Conceptual Design Activities) of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). Structural concept of breeding blanket is based on box structure integrated with first wall and shield, which consists of three coolant manifolds for first wall, breeding and shield regions. The first wall must have cooling channels to remove surface heat flux and nuclear heating. The box structure includes plates to form the manifolds and stiffening ribs to withstand enormous electromagnetic load, coolant pressure and blanket internal (purge gas) pressure. A 1/2-scale partial model of the blanket box structure for the outboard side module near midplane is manufactured to estimate the fabrication technology, i.e. diffusion bonding by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) and EBW (Electron Beam Welding) procedure. Fabrication accuracy is a key issue to manufacture first wall panel because bending deformation during HIP may not be small for a large size structure. Data on bending deformation during HIP was obtained by preliminary manufacturing of HIP elements. For the shield structure, it is necessary to reduce the welding strain and residual stress of the weldment to establish the fabrication procedure. Optimal shape of the parts forming the manifolds, welding locations and welding sequence have been investigated. In addition, preliminary EBW tests have been performed in order to select the EBW conditions, and fundamental data on built-up shield have been obtained. Especially, welding deformation by joining the first wall panel to the shield has been measured, and total deformation to build-up shield by EBW has been found to be smaller than 2 mm. Consequently, the feasibility of fabrication technologies has been successfully demonstrated for a 1m-scaled box structure including the first wall with cooling channels by means of HIP, EBW and TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas arc)-welding.

  1. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers

  2. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Manly, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

  3. Advisory group meeting on design and performance of reactor and subcritical blanket systems with lead and lead-bismuth as coolant and/or target material. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Design and Performance of Reactor and Sub-critical Blanket Systems with Lead and Lead-Bismuth as Coolant and/or Target Material was to provide a forum for international information exchange on all the topics relevant to Pb and Pb/Bi cooled critical and sub-critical reactors. In addition, the AGM aimed at: (1) finding ways and means to improve international co-ordination efforts in this area; (2) obtaining advice from the Member States with regard to the activities to be implemented in this area by the IAEA, in order to best meet their needs; and (3) laying out the plans for an effective co-ordination and support of the R and D activities in this area. The AGM stressed that nuclear energy is a realistic solution to satisfy the energy demand, considering the limited resources of fossil fuel, its uneven distribution in the world and the impact of its use on the planet, and taking into account the expected doubling of the world population in the 21st century and tripling of the electricity demand (especially in the developing countries). However, the AGM concluded that the development of an innovative nuclear technology meeting the following requirements must be pursued: (a) deterministic exclusion of any severe accident; (b) proliferation resistance; (c) cost competitiveness with alternative energy sources; (d) sustainable fuel supply; and (e) solution of the radioactive waste management problem

  4. A high tritium breeding ratio (TBR) blanket concept and requirements for nuclear data relating to TBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significance of developing a blanket having a sufficiently larger tritium breeding ratio (TBR) than 1.0 is discussed. For this purpose, a high TBR blanket with a front breeder zone just before the multiplier is introduced together with conventional blankets. From discussion of TBR characteristics in these blankets, the necessity of improving on nuclear data, i.e. reducing uncertainties is presented as follows; σs, σnp and σnα of structural and coolant materials, and σn2n of the multiplier at higher energies above several MeV, and σnγ of these materials and σnαT of 6Li at energies from several hundred keV to thermal energy. (author)

  5. TCT hybrid preconceptual blanket design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aase, D.T.; Bampton, M.C.C.; Doherty, T.J.; Leonard, B.R.; McCann, R.A.; Newman, D.F.; Perry, R.T.; Stewart, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    The conceptual design of a tokamak fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor, which produces electric power and fissile material, has been performed in a cooperative effort between Princeton's Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). PPPL, who had overall project lead responsibility, designed the fusion driver system. Its core consists of a tokamak plasma maintained in the two-component torus (TCT) mode by both D and T beams and having a single null poloidal divertor. The blanket concept selected by PPPL consists of a neutron multiplying converter region, containing natural Uranium Molybdenum (U-Mo) slugs followed by a fuel burning blanket region of molten salt containing PuF/sub 3/. PNL analyzed this concept to determine its structural, thermal and hydraulic performance characteristics. An adequate first wall cooling method was determined, utilizing low pressure water in a double wall design. A conceptual layout of the converter region tubes was performed, providing adequate helium cooling and the desired movement of U-Mo slugs. A thermal hydraulic analysis of the power-producing blanket regions indicated that either more helium coolant tubes are needed or the salt must be circulated to obtain adequate heat removal capability.

  6. Attachment system for helium-cooled blanket of RF DEMO fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leshukov, A. E-mail: leshu@entek.ru; Blinov, Y.; Kovalenko, V.; Shatalov, G.; Strebkov, Y.; Strizhov, A

    2002-11-01

    The development of DEMO thermonuclear reactor is a part of Russian national program on the fusion process mastering. The DEMO-S (stationary thermonuclear reactor) should be the logic continuation of the ITER-type projects (pulse thermonuclear reactors) and the prototype for commercial power plants. DEMO reactor layout suggests to use the segmented blanket with mounting/dismounting procedure through the vacuum vessel vertical ports. Taking into account this layout the blanket attachment system has been developed and the present paper is devoted to this subject. The considered attachment system includes the lower and upper toroidal support assemblies which connect all the blanket segments in the enclosed ring. In it's turn the lower support assemblies attached to the vacuum vessel through the system of hinged support pillars. The heights of support pillars for inboard and outboard blankets are selected so that to indemnify the blanket massif thermal expansions in vertical and radial directions. The support pillars have been calculated on strength taking into account the electromagnetic loads from the plasma disruptions and blanket mass. The selection of high-strength chromium steel as a structural material for the support pillars could be considered as the results of strength analysis. The conclusions on the possibility to apply this attachment system for fusion reactor blanket and the critical issues are contained in this paper too.

  7. Structure - materials - production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard Nielsen, Anders; Gammel, Peder; Busch, Jens

    2002-01-01

    For the last six years th Aarhus School of Architecture has introduced the first year students (there are about 200 students admitted each year) to structure, materials, design and production through a five week course in collaboration with a group of local companies.......For the last six years th Aarhus School of Architecture has introduced the first year students (there are about 200 students admitted each year) to structure, materials, design and production through a five week course in collaboration with a group of local companies....

  8. Structural and Material Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes, Gustavo Cifuentes

    This work is a small contribution to the general problem of structural and material instability. In this work, the main subject is the analysis of cracking and failure of structural elements made from quasi-brittle materials like concrete. The analysis is made using the finite element method. Three....... Numerical problems associated with the use of elements with embedded cracks based on the extended finite element method are presented in the next part of this work. And an alternative procedure is used in order to successfully remove these numerical problems. In the final part of this work, a computer...

  9. Development of the water cooled lithium lead blanket for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, J., E-mail: julien.aubert@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Aiello, G.; Jonquères, N. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LPEC, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Morin, A.; Rampal, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The WCLL blanket design has been modified to adapt it to the 2012 EFDA DEMO specifications. • Preliminary CAD design of the equatorial outboard module of the WCLL blanket has been developed for DEMO. • Finite elements analyses have been carried out in order to assess the module thermal behavior in the straight part of the module. - Abstract: The water cooled lithium lead (WCLL) blanket, based on near-future technology requiring small extrapolation from present-day knowledge both on physical and technological aspect, is one of the breeding blanket concepts considered as possible candidates for the EU DEMOnstration power plant. In 2012, the EFDA agency issued new specifications for DEMO: this paper describes the work performed to adapt the WCLL blanket design to those specifications. Relatively small modules with straight surfaces are attached to a common Back Supporting Structure housing feeding pipes. Each module features reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel as structural material, liquid Lithium-Lead as breeder, neutron multiplier and carrier. Water at typical Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) conditions is chosen as coolant. A preliminary design of the equatorial outboard module has been achieved. Finite elements analyses have been carried out in order to assess the module thermal behavior. Two First Wall (FW) concepts have been proposed, one favoring the thermal efficiency, the other favoring the manufacturability. The Breeding Zone has been designed with C-shaped Double-Walled Tubes in order to minimize the Water/Pb-15.7Li interaction likelihood. The priorities for further development of the WCLL blanket concept are identified in the paper.

  10. An Analysis of Ripple and Error Fields Induced by a Blanket in the CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guanying; Liu, Xufeng; Liu, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    The Chinese Fusion Engineering Tokamak Reactor (CFETR) is an important intermediate device between ITER and DEMO. The Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) blanket whose structural material is mainly made of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel, is one of the candidate conceptual blanket design. An analysis of ripple and error field induced by RAFM steel in WCCB is evaluated with the method of static magnetic analysis in the ANSYS code. Significant additional magnetic field is produced by blanket and it leads to an increased ripple field. Maximum ripple along the separatrix line reaches 0.53% which is higher than 0.5% of the acceptable design value. Simultaneously, one blanket module is taken out for heating purpose and the resulting error field is calculated to be seriously against the requirement. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China (No. 2013GB108004)

  11. Development of Solid Breeder Blanket at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing blanket development based on the long-term research program of fusion blankets in Japan, which was approved by the Fusion Council of Japan in 1999. The blanket development consists of out-pile R and D, In-pile R and D, TBM Neutronics and TPR Tests and Tritium Recovery System R and D. Based on the achievements of element technology development, the R and D program is now stepping to the engineering testing phase, in which scalable mockup tests will be performed for obtaining engineering data unique to the specific structure of the components, with the objective to define the fabrication specification of test blanket modules for ITER. This paper presents the major achievements of the element technology development of solid breeder blanket in JAERI

  12. Lifetime predictions for the first wall and blanket structure of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifetime analysis of the first wall including the divertor and limiter is an important subject for the design of fusion reactors. These components are exposed to severe mechanical, thermal, and irradiation effects that limit their useful structural life, and their design lifetime has a large influence on the selection of major reactor design parameters. Particular attention (at the meeting whose papers are included in this report) was given to different approaches and models for the prediction of component lifetimes. Topics covered include life-limiting mechanisms, stress analysis and lifetime evaluation, and erosion and deposition effects

  13. Evaluation of Cortaderia selloana (Capim-dos-pampas) blankets as sorbent materials for oil spills in simulated hydro equipment; Estudo do desempenho de tecidos e mantas para utilizacao como sorventes para petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonetti, T.F.; Sydenstricker, T.H.D. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: thais@demec.ufpr.br; Amico, S.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Oil spills in aquatic environments may cause serious economy losses and severe environmental impact which both drive the development of commercial systems (e.g. sorbents) to control these accidents. One way of using sorbents is to encapsulate them with an involucre or cover, i.e. producing blankets. The focus of this research is to evaluate the key characteristics of interest (aerial density, water and oil sorption, mechanical strength and cost) of different materials to use as covers for blankets and to prepare blankets and compare their performance when made with various core materials, such as Cortaderia selloana fibers and different commercial sorbents. A simulated aqueous body with stream was used for the sorption experiments, where the oil and water phases were circulated and forced to pass under the blankets. On the sorption tests, the fibers of Cortaderia selloana reached a performance lower to that of commercial sorbents, mainly due to their low density and high volume (difficult packing), nevertheless a clear trend was noted, heavier blankets with higher sorption periods lead to higher sorption. (author)

  14. Preliminary Design of a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR Based on the BIT Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CFETR is the “ITER-like” China fusion engineering test reactor. The design of the breeding blanket is one of the key issues in achieving the required tritium breeding radio for the self-sufficiency of tritium as a fuel. As one option, a BIT (breeder insider tube) type helium cooled ceramic breeder blanket (HCCB) was designed. This paper presents the design of the BIT—HCCB blanket configuration inside a reactor and its structure, along with neutronics, thermo-hydraulics and thermal stress analyses. Such preliminary performance analyses indicate that the design satisfies the requirements and the material allowable limits. (fusion engineering)

  15. Preliminary Design of a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR Based on the BIT Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuebin; Liu, Songlin; Li, Jia; Pu, Yong; Chen, Xiangcun

    2014-04-01

    CFETR is the “ITER-like” China fusion engineering test reactor. The design of the breeding blanket is one of the key issues in achieving the required tritium breeding radio for the self-sufficiency of tritium as a fuel. As one option, a BIT (breeder insider tube) type helium cooled ceramic breeder blanket (HCCB) was designed. This paper presents the design of the BIT—HCCB blanket configuration inside a reactor and its structure, along with neutronics, thermo-hydraulics and thermal stress analyses. Such preliminary performance analyses indicate that the design satisfies the requirements and the material allowable limits.

  16. Blanket design study for a Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of a study on two blanket design concepts for application in a Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). Both blankets operate on the U-Pu cycle and are designed to achieve tritium self-sufficiency while maximizing the fissile fuel production within thermal and mechanical design constraints. The two blanket concepts that were evaluated were: (1) a UC fueled, stainless steel clad and structure, helium cooled blanket; and (2) a UO2 fueled, zircaloy clad, stainless steel structure, boiling water cooled blanket. Two different tritium breeding media, Li2O and LiH, were evaluated for use in both blanket concepts. The use of lead as a neutron multiplier or reflector and graphite as a reflector was also considered for both blankets

  17. Benchmark calculations for fusion blanket development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchmark problems representing the leading fusion blanket concepts are presented. Benchmark calculations for self-cooled Li17Pb83 and helium-cooled blankets were performed. Multigroup data libraries generated from ENDF/B-IV and V files using the NJOY and AMPX processing codes with different weighting functions were used. The sensitivity of the tritium breeding ratio to group structure and weighting spectrum increases as the thickness and Li enrichment decrease with up to 20% discrepancies for thin natural Li17Pb83 blankets. (author)

  18. Nano structured Magnetic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The saga of nanostructured magnetic materials (NMMs) has prevailed since the discovery of the first giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in metals in 1988. NMMs represent a unique system that incorporates the interplay between the properties associated with spin degrees of freedom and the nanoscaled structures, which provide a very strong platform for exploring both basic science and technical applications in the fields of solid-state physics, chemistry, materials science, and engineering. In fact, an active research field called “spintronics,” which has a big overlap with NMMs, has emerged and prevailed very recently. Through manipulation of spin of electrons in solids, a wide variety of NMMs and devices have been playing a prominent role in information processing and transport in our modern life. A rich variety of materials, such as transition metals, manganite, wide bandgap semiconductors, and nanocomposites, have already been developed for generating well-controlled nanostructures with new functionalities. Many scientists believe that the 21st century will be a “Century of Spin.” Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies have provided historical opportunities for research and development of novel spintronics materials and devices. NMSs manifest fascinating properties compared to the bulks because of size effect and quantum effect. Nanotechnologies have been proven to be an effective way to fabricate devices with fine nanostructures. The combination of spintronics and nanomaterials will undisputedly open new pathways in solid-state physics. The present special issue focuses on the recent development in the understanding of the synthesis, the studies on magnetic properties of nanostructures, and their potential applications based on the multiple functionalities.

  19. Divertor and gas blanket impurity control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Derini, Z; Stacey, Jr, W M

    1979-04-01

    A simple calculational model for the transport of particles across the scrap off region between the plasma and the wall in the presence of a divertor or a gas blanket has been developed. The model departs from previous work in including: (a) the entire impurity transport as well as its effect on the energy balance equations; (b) the recycling neutrals from the divertor, and (c) the reflected neutrals from the wall. Results obtained with this model show how the steady state impurity level in the plasma depends on the divertor parameters such as the neutral backflow from the divertor, the particle residence time and the scrape off thickness; and on the gas blanket parameters such as the neutral source strength and the gas blanket thickness. The variation of the divertor or gas blanket performance as a function of the heat and particle fluxes escaping from the plasma, the wall material and the cross field diffusion is examined and numerical examples are given.

  20. Analysis of Consistency of Printing Blankets using Correlation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalitha Jayaraman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of an analytical tool to quantify material consistency of offset printing blankets. Printing blankets are essentially viscoelastic rubber composites of several laminas. High levels of material consistency are expected from rubber blankets for quality print and for quick recovery from smash encountered during the printing process. The present study aims at determining objectively the consistency of printing blankets at three specific torque levels of tension under two distinct stages; 1. under normal printing conditions and 2. on recovery after smash. The experiment devised exhibits a variation in tone reproduction properties of each blanket signifying the levels of inconsistency also in thicknessdirection. Correlation technique was employed on ink density variations obtained from the blanket on paper. Both blankets exhibited good consistency over three torque levels under normal printing conditions. However on smash the recovery of blanket and its consistency was a function of manufacturing and torque levels. This study attempts to provide a new metrics for failure analysis of offset printing blankets. It also underscores the need for optimizing the torque for blankets from different manufacturers.

  1. Neutronic optimization of solid breeder blankets for STARFIRE design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive neutronic tradeoff studies were carried out to define and optimize the neutronic performance of the different solid breeder options for the STARFIRE blanket design. A set of criteria were employed to select the potential blanket materials. The basic criteria include the neutronic performance, tritium-release characteristics, material compatibility, and chemical stability. Three blanket options were analyzed. The first option is based on separate zones for each basic blanket function where the neutron multiplier is kept in a separate zone. The second option is a heterogeneous blanket type with two tritium breeder zones. In the first zone the tritium breeder is assembled in a neutron multiplier matrix behind the first wall while the second zone has a neutron moderator matrix instead of the neutron multiplier. The third blanket option is similar to the second concept except the tritium breeder and the neutron multiplier form a homogeneous mixture

  2. Technical evaluation of major candidate blanket systems for fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key functions required for tritium breeding blankets for a fusion power reactor are: (1) self-sufficient tritium breeding, (2) in-situ tritium recovery and low tritium inventory, (3) high temperature cooling giving a high efficiency of electricity generation and (4) thermo-mechanical reliability and simplified remote maintenance to obtain high plant availability. Blanket performance is substantially governed by materials selection. Major options of structure/breeder/coolant/neutron multiplier materials considered for the present design study are PCA/Li2O/H2O/Be, Mo-alloy/Li2O/He/Be, Mo-alloy/LiAlO2/He/Be, V-alloy/Li/Li/none, and Mo-alloy/Li/He/none. In addition, remote maintenance of blankets, tritium recovery system, heat transport and energy conversion have been investigated. In this report, technological problems and critical R and D issues for power reactor blanket development are identified and a comparison of major candidate blanket concepts is discussed in terms of the present materials data base, economic performance, prospects for future improvements, and engineering feasibility and difficulties based on the results obtained from individual design studies. (author)

  3. Proceedings of the eleventh international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of 'the Eleventh International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders Under the IEA Implementing Agreement on the Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors, and the Japan-US Fusion Collaboration Framework. This workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan on December 15-17, 2003. About thirty experts from China, EU, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Russia and USA attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included 1) evolutions in ceramic breeder blanket design, 2) progress in ceramic breeder material development, 3) irradiation testing, 4) breeder material properties, 5) out-of-pile pebble bed experiment, 6) modeling of the thermal, mechanical and tritium transfer behavior of pebble beds and 7) interfacing issues of solid breeder blanket. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for designs of solid breeder blankets and test blankets in EU, Russia and Japan, recent results of irradiation tests, HICU, EXOTIC-8 and the irradiation tests by IVV-2M, modeling study on tritium release behavior of Li2TiO3 and so on, fabrication technology developments and characterization of the Li2TiO3 and Li4SiO4 pebbles, research on measurements and modeling of thermo-mechanical behaviors of Li2TiO3 and Li4SiO4 pebbles, and interfacing issues, such as, fabrication technology for blanket box structure, neutronics experiments of blanket mockups by fusion neutron source and tritium recovery system. The 26 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Activation Analysis for a He/LiPb dual Coolant Blanket for DEMO Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Catalán, J.P.; Ogando Serrano, Francisco; Sanz Gonzalo, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the Spanish national project TECNO_FUS is to generate a conceptual design of a DCLL (Dual-Coolant Lithium-Lead) blanket for the DEMO fusion reactor. The dually-cooled breeding zone is composed of He/Pb-15.7 6Li and SiC as liquid metal flow channel inserts. Structural materials are ferritic-martensitic steel (Eurofer-97) for the blanket and austenitic steel (316LN) for the Vacuum Vessel (VV). The goal of this work is to analyze the radioactive waste production by the neutron-i...

  5. Experimental investigations on the substantiation of the conception of tokamak blanket cooling with a lead-lithium eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One describes the experiments to look into possible application of Pb-Li eutectic to cool tokamak blanket. One investigated into effect of Pb-Li eutectic on characteristics of insulating coatings (IC) of structural materials. One investigated, as well, into MHD resistance of Pb-Li eutectic and into interaction within structural material - IC - Li(17)Pb(83) eutectic - H2O, O2, H2, Bi impurities system. The derived results are used to justify application of the mentioned coolant to cool tokamak blanket

  6. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    OpenAIRE

    Saeidi, Sheida

    2014-01-01

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. Implementation of RAFM steel and PbLi in blanket applications still requires material compatibility studies as many questions related to physical/chemical interactions in the RAFM...

  7. Development of anti-corrosion coating on low activation materials against fluoridation and oxidation in Flibe blanket environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Takuya, E-mail: Nagasaka@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kondo, Masatoshi; Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio; Motojima, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tsutsumi, Tatsuya; Oishi, Tatsuya [Shinto Industrial Co., Ltd., Kururi 376-10, Tokitsu, Nagasaki 851-2107 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    W coating by vacuum plasma spray process and Cr coating by chromizing process were performed on fusion low activation materials, JLF-1 ferritic steel and NIFS-HEAT-2 vanadium alloy. The present study discusses feasibility of the coatings as anti-corrosion coating against fluoridation in Flibe for fusion low activation materials. Coatings were characterized by microstructural analysis and examination on chemical stability by corrosion tests. The corrosion tests were conducted with H{sub 2}O-47% HF solution at RT and He-1% HF-0.06 H{sub 2}O gas mixture at 823 K to simulate fluoridation and oxidation in Flibe. The coatings presented suppression of fluoride formation compared with JLF-1 or NIFS-HEAT-2, however weight loss due to WF{sub 6} formation was induced, and much Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was formed.

  8. 75 FR 51482 - Woven Electric Blankets From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of March 11, 2010 (75 FR 11557). The hearing was held in... COMMISSION Woven Electric Blankets From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... United States is materially injured by reason of imports from China of woven electric blankets,...

  9. Development of the Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enoeda, Mikio, E-mail: enoeda.mikio@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hisashi; Hirose, Takanori; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Nakamichi, Masaru; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji; Yoshikawa, Akira; Tsuru, Daigo; Akiba, Masato [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    The development of a Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is being performed as one of the most important steps toward DEMO blanket in Japan. For the TBM testing and evaluation toward DEMO blanket, the module fabrication technology development by a candidate structural material, reduced activation martensitic/ferritic steel, F82H, is one of the most critical items from the viewpoint of realization of TBM testing in ITER. In Japan, fabrication of a real scale first wall, side walls, a breeder pebble bed box and assembling of the first wall and side walls have succeeded. Recently, the real scale partial mockup of the back wall was fabricated. The fabrication procedure of the back wall, whose thickness is up to 90 mm, was confirmed toward the fabrication of the real scale back wall by F82H. Important key technologies are almost clarified for the fabrication of the real scale TBM module mockup. From the view point of testing and evaluation, development of the technology of the blanket tritium recovery, development of advanced breeder and multiplier pebbles and the development of the blanket neutronics measurement technology are also performed. Also, tritium production and recovery test using D-T neutron in the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) facility has been started as the verification test of tritium production performance. This paper overviews the recent achievements of the development of the WCCB TBM in Japan.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic performance and structural thermal stress analysis for ITER shield blanket module nearby NB rejoin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydraulic and thermal analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) standard neutral beam (NB) blanket module was carried out in order to check whether the latest design meets ITER requirements. Minor-loss coefficients were estimated with a CFD code, and friction factors of straight channels were obtained using existing formulas. The effects of different radial hole's diameter, length of the back of the radial hole, size of clearance, type of flow driver, branch velocity and flow direction on minor-loss coefficients for radial holes were investigated. Since total mass flow rate and dimensions of the cooling channels were given, when pressure drop due to intersection of the radial hole with back drilled collector was ignored, we can obtain pressure drop, flow rate, velocity and heat transfer coefficient in each radial hole. An improved calculation without neglecting the pressure drop caused by the intersection was also done to compare with the simplified one. Finally, maximum temperature, thermal stress and deformation were evaluated according to FEM thermal analysis. The results of the latest hydraulic and thermal analysis indicate that the current design meets ITER requirements well, except that flow distribution is not so uniform when different types of flow drivers are used, and temperature in the front head surface is a little high. Improved design is necessary in the further. (authors)

  11. Hypersonic Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this presentation is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components.

  12. European DEMO BOT solid breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BOT (Breeder Outside Tube) Solid Breeder Blanket for a fusion DEMO reactor is presented. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. In the paper the reference blanket design and external loops are described as well as the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, tritium control and extraction, development and irradiation of the ceramic breeder material, beryllium development, ferromagnetic forces caused by disruptions, safety and reliability. An outlook is given on the remaining open questions and on the required R and D program. (orig.)

  13. Neutronic implications of lead-lithium blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    Lead-lithium alloys have been proposed for use in several conceptual blanket designs for both inertial and magnetic confinement fusion reactors. In most cases, Pb/sub 83/Li/sub 17/, a eutectic with a melting point of 235/sup 0/C, is the chosen composition. The primary reasons for using Pb/sub 83/Li/sub 17/ instead of Li as the tritium breeding material are the perceived safety advantages, low tritium solubility, and favorable neutronic characteristics. This paper describes the neutronic characteristics of Pb/sub 83/Li/sub 17/ blankets with emphasis on the enhanced neutron leakage through chamber ports and the degradation in blanket performance parameters that occurs as a result of the enhanced leakage.

  14. Blanket and vacuum vessel design of the next tokamak. (Swimming pool type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural design study of a reactor module for a swimming pool type reactor (SPTR) was conducted. Since pool water plays the role of radiation shielding in the SPTR, the module does not have a solid shield. It consists of tritium breeding blankets, divertor collector plates and a vacuum vessel. The object of this study is to show the reactor module design which has a simple structure and a sufficient tritium breeding ratio. A large coverage of the plasma chamber surface with tritium breeding blanket is essential in order to obtain a high tritium breeding ratio. A breeding blanket is also placed behind the divertor collector plate, i.e. in the upper and lower region, as well as in the outboard and inboard regions of the module. A concept in which the first wall is an integral part of the blanket is employed to minimize the thickness of structural and cooling material brazed in front of the breeding material (Li2O) and to enhance the tritium breeding capability. In order to simplify the module structure the vacuum vessel and breeding blanket is also integrated in the inboard region. One of the features inherent in the swimming pool type reactor is an additional external force on the vacuum vessel, namely hydraulic pressure. A detailed structural analysis of the vacuum vessel is performed. Divertor collector plates are assemblies of co-axial tubes. They minimize the electromagnetic force on the plate induced by the plasma disruption. A thermal and structural analysis and life time estimation of the first wall and divertor collector plates are performed. (author)

  15. Structural materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to preserve the condition of an environmentally safe machine, present selection of materials for structural components of a fusion reactor is made not only on the basis of adequate mechanical properties, behavior under irradiation and compatibility with other materials and cooling media, but also on their radiological properties, i.e. activity, decay heat, radiotoxicity. These conditions strongly limit the number of materials available to a few families of alloys, generically known as low activation materials. We discuss the criteria for deciding on such materials, the alloys resulting from the application of the concept and the main issues and problems of their use in a fusion environment. (author)

  16. Behaviour of Structural Materials: China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since accelerator driven system (ADS) will be used as the facility for long life radioactive waste transmutation, some issues in structure materials of ADS are being paid attention, such as the compatibility of the materials and coolant, the development and selection of materials which are irradiation resistance to neutron and high energy proton, and corrosion resistance to Pb-Bi. In China, ADS material programme was proposed in 2000, started in 2001, and the compatibility project is focused on three topics: – The compatibility studies of tungsten with sodium and with water; – The development and investigation of the structure materials; – The primary tests of the complex technologies for W–S.S. and W–Zr cladding. Some primary results from these researches have been obtained, and some investigations are being performed. Since our investigation is in an early step, a lot of issues on materials have to be studied further in the near future

  17. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Stork, D.; Agostini, P.; Boutard, J.L.; Buckthorpe, D.; Diegele, E.; Dudarev, S. L.; English, C.; Federici, G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; LI PUMA, A; Marbach, G.; Morris, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a 'Starter Blanket' and 'Starter Divertor' is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding >= 2 MW yr m(-2) fusion neutron...

  18. Maximizing fluence rate and field uniformity of light blanket for intraoperative PDT

    OpenAIRE

    LIANG, XING; Kundu, Palak; Finlay, Jarod; Goodwin, Michael; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2012-01-01

    A light blanket is designed with a system of cylindrically diffusing optical fibers, which are spirally oriented. This 25×30 cm rectangular light blanket is capable of providing uniform illumination during intraoperative photodynamic therapy. The flexibility of the blanket proves to be extremely beneficial when conforming to the anatomical structures of the patient being treated. Previous tests of light distribution from the blanket have shown significant loss of intensity with the length of ...

  19. Design of ITER shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mechanical configuration of ITER integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module were developed focusing on the welded attachment of its support leg to the back plate. A 100 mm x 150 mm space between the legs of adjacent modules was incorporated for the working space of welding/cutting tools. A concept of coolant branch pipe connection to accommodate deformation due to the leg welding and differential displacement of the module and the manifold/back plate during operation was introduced. Two-dimensional FEM analyses showed that thermal stresses in Cu-alloy (first wall) and stainless steel (first wall coolant tube and shield block) satisfied the stress criteria following ASME code for ITER BPP operation. On the other hand, three-dimensional FEM analyses for overall in-vessel structures exhibited excessive primary stresses in the back plate and its support structure to the vacuum vessel under VDE disruption load and marginal stresses in the support leg of module No.4. Fabrication procedure of the integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module was developed based on single step solid HIP for the joining of Cu-alloy/Cu-alloy, Cu-alloy/stainless steel, and stainless steel/stainless steel. (author)

  20. The neutronic calculations for some fluids, libraries and structural materials in a hybrid reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenay, Mehtap [Inoenue Univ., Malatya (Turkey). Physics Dept.

    2015-11-15

    In the present investigation, a hybrid reactor system was designed by using 100 % Flibe, 90 % Flibe-10 % ThF{sub 4}, 90 % Flibe-10 % UF{sub 4} fluids, ENDF/B-VII, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND, BROND-2.2, CENDL-3.1 evaluated nuclear data libraries and Ferritic Steel, 9Cr2WVTa, V4Cr4Ti, SiC structural materials. The fluids were used in the liquid first wall, liquid second wall (blanket) and shield zones of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor system. The nuclear parameters of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor such as tritium breeding ratio (TBR), energy multiplication factor (M), heat deposition rate were computed in liquid first wall, blanket and shield zones. Three-dimensional nucleonic calculations were performed using the most recent version MCNPX-2.7.0 the Monte Carlo code.

  1. The neutronic calculations for some fluids, libraries and structural materials in a hybrid reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present investigation, a hybrid reactor system was designed by using 100 % Flibe, 90 % Flibe-10 % ThF4, 90 % Flibe-10 % UF4 fluids, ENDF/B-VII, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND, BROND-2.2, CENDL-3.1 evaluated nuclear data libraries and Ferritic Steel, 9Cr2WVTa, V4Cr4Ti, SiC structural materials. The fluids were used in the liquid first wall, liquid second wall (blanket) and shield zones of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor system. The nuclear parameters of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor such as tritium breeding ratio (TBR), energy multiplication factor (M), heat deposition rate were computed in liquid first wall, blanket and shield zones. Three-dimensional nucleonic calculations were performed using the most recent version MCNPX-2.7.0 the Monte Carlo code.

  2. Proceedings of the sixth international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of ''the Sixth International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions'' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders under Annex II of IEA Implementing Agreement on a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials, and Japan-US Workshop 97FT4-01. This workshop was held in Mito city, Japan on October 22-24, 1997. About forty experts from EU, Japan, USA, and Chile attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included the following: 1) fabrication and characterization of ceramic breeders, 2) properties data for ceramic breeders, 3) tritium release characteristics, 4) modeling of tritium behavior, 5) irradiation effects on performance behavior, 6) blanket design and R and D requirements, 7) hydrogen behavior in materials, and 8) blanket system technology and structural materials. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for fabrication technology of ceramic breeder pebbles in EU and Japan, data of various properties of Li2TiO3, tritium release behavior of Li2TiO3 and Li2ZrO3 including tritium diffusion, modeling of tritium release from Li2ZrO3 in ITER condition, helium release behavior from Li2O, results of tritium release irradiation tests of Li4SiO4 pebbles in EXOTIC-7, R and D issues for ceramic breeders for ITER and DEMO blankets, etc. The 23 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. Porous Materials - Structure and Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents some viewpoints on the description of the pore structure and the modelling of the properties of the porous building materials. Two examples are given , where it has been possible to connect the pore structure to the properties: Shrinkage of autoclaved aerated concrete and the p...... and the properties of lime mortar....

  4. Structural Chemistry of Functional Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ This innovative research group on structural chemistry of functional materials was approved by NSFC in 2005.Headed by Prof.HONG Maochun, the team consists of several young research scientists from the CAS Fujian Institute of Research on the Structures of Matter, including Profs CAO Rong, LU Canzhong, GUO Guocong, CHEN Zhongning, MAO Jianggao Mao and CHEN Ling.

  5. LMFBR Blanket Physics Project progress report No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the second annual report of an experimental program for the investigation of the neutronics of benchmark mock-ups of LMFBR blankets. Work was devoted primarily to measurements on Blanket Mock-Up No. 2, a simulation of a typical large LMFBR radial blanket and its steel reflector. Activation traverses and neutron spectra were measured in the blanket; calculations of activities and spectra were made for comparison with the measured data. The heterogeneous self-shielding effect for 238U capture was found to be the most important factor affecting the comparison. Optimization and economic studies were made which indicate that the use of a high-albedo reflector material such as BeO or graphite may improve blanket neutronics and economics

  6. Structural materials for fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of major technical and cost impact to Magnetic Fusion Energy development are the materials for the magnet structure. Likened to gas pressure, the magnetic field lines try to expand the structure with equivalent pressures up to 1000 atm. Not only are large tensile forces produced, but significant bending forces may also be present. To withstand these forces in the restricted spaces available, materials of exceptional strength and toughness are required. In this regard, the low-temperature environment of superconducting magnets can be an advantage because many materials exhibit enhanced properties at reduced temperatures. Those materials and fabrication techniques that are attractive to fusion magnets are discussed and relative comparisons made. Considerations such as strength, toughness, and joining techniques are balanced agains recommended design criteria to reach an optimum design. Several examples of material selection are cited for large fusion magnets such as Baseball II, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility, the Toroidal Fusion Test Facility, and the Large Coil Project. (orig.)

  7. DEMO blanket testing in ITER. Influence on reaching DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatalov, G. E-mail: geshat@nfi.kiae.ru

    2001-10-01

    ITER goal was specified as one step between now and the DEMO fusion reactor. One of the major issues is the tritium breeding blankets test relevant to future reactors. The major objectives of blanket modules (TBM) experiments in ITER are reduced in comparison with proposed test objectives in ITER-FDR. Thus, results of DEMO blanket designs testing in ITER will provide limited (but still useful) information that will need strong support from non-fusion facilities testing. The role of non-fusion tests is increased now to provide additional data required for DEMO blanket construction and qualification. A strategy of testing steps to DEMO blanket qualifications has to include parallel testing in ITER and in non-fusion devices. Experiments in fission reactors are able to provide essential data on materials radiation properties; tritium release, inventory and permeation; and thermomechanical behavior of the blanket breeder/multiplier. However, the volume in fission reactors is rather small and neutron spectra differ from the fusion reactor one. Nonetheless in the near future one depends primarily on fission reactor irradiation. The powerful accelerator based neutron source IFMIF could also provide useful information on radiation material properties. Plasma based neutron sources of different fusion devices could be the best choice for testing DEMO materials and blanket mock-ups. Timetable and costs of these devices are not clear now.

  8. Design analyses of self-cooled liquid metal blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A trade-off study of liquid metal self-cooled blankets was carried out to define the performance of these blankets and to determine the potential to operate at the maximum possible values of the performance parameters. The main parameters considered during the course of the study were the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the blanket energy multiplication factor, the energy fraction lost to the shield, the lithium-6 enrichment in the breeder material, the total blanket thickness, the reflector material selection, and the compositions of the different blanket zones. Also, a study was carried out to assess the impact of different reactor design choices on the reactor performance parameters. The design choices include the impurity control system (limiter or divertor), the material choice for the limiter, the elimination of tritium breeding from the inboard section of tokamak reactors, and the coolant choice for the nonbreeding inboard blanket. In addition, tritium breeding benchmark calculations were performed using different transport codes and nuclear data libraries. The importance of the TBR in the blanket design motivated the benchmark calculations

  9. Development of the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead blanket for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiello, G., E-mail: giacomo.aiello@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Aubert, J.; Jonquères, N. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LPEC, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Morin, A.; Rampal, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The HCLL blanket design has been modified to adapt it to the 2012 EFDA DEMO specifications. • The new design has been developed with the aim to capitalize on TBM experience in ITER. • A new attachment system for the modules has been proposed. - Abstract: The Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) blanket is one of the candidate European blanket concepts selected for the DEMOnstration fusion power plant that should follow ITER. In a fusion power plant, the blanket is one of the key components because of its impact on the plant performance, availability, safety and economics. In 2012, the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) agency issued new specifications for DEMO: this paper describes the work performed to adapt the previous 2007 HCLL-DEMO blanket design to those specifications. A new segmentation has been defined assuming straight surfaces for all blanket modules. Following the Multi Module Segment (MMS) option, all modules are attached to a common back supporting structure which also serves as manifold for Helium and PbLi distribution. A detailed CAD design of the central outboard module has been defined. Thermo-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analyses on of the First Wall and Breeder Zone have been carried out. For the attachment of the modules to the common backplate, a new solution based on the use of Tie Rods, derived from the design of the corresponding HCLL Test Blanket Module for ITER, has been proposed. This paper also identifies the priorities for further development of the HCLL blanket design.

  10. Structural materials for fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of major technical and cost impact to Magnetic Fusion Energy development are the materials for the magnet structure. Those materials and fabrication techniques that are attractive to fusion magnets are discussed and relative comparisons made. Considerations such as strength, toughness, and joining techniques are balanced against recommended design criteria to reach an optimum design. Several examples of material selection are cited for large fusion magnets such as Base II, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility, the Toroidal Fusion Test Facility, and the Large Coil Project

  11. Study on compact design of remote handling equipment for ITER blanket maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the ITER, the neutrons created by D-T reactions activate structural materials, and thereby, the circumstance in the vacuum vessel is under intense gamma radiation field. Thus, the in-vessel components such as blanket are handled and replaced by remote handling equipment. The objective of this report is to study the compactness of the remote handling equipment (a vehicle/manipulator) for the ITER blanket maintenance. In order to avoid the interferences between the blanket and the equipment during blanket replacement in the restricted vacuum vessel, a compact design of the equipment is required. Therefore, the compact design is performed, including kinematic analyses aiming at the reduction of the sizes of the vehicle equipped with a manipulator handling the blanket and the rail for the vehicle traveling in the vacuum vessel. Major results are as follows: 1. The compact vehicle/manipulator is designed concentration on the reduction of the rail size and simplification of the guide roller mechanism as well as the reduction of the gear diameter for vehicle rotation around the rail. Height of the rail is reduced from 500 mm to 400 mm by a parameter survey for weight, stiffness and stress of the rail. The roller mechanism is divided into two simple functional mechanisms composed of rollers and a pad, that is, the rollers support relatively light loads during rail deployment and vehicle traveling while a pad supports heavy loads during blanket replacement. Regarding the rotation mechanism, the double helical gear is adopted, because it has higher contact ratio than the normal spur gear and consequently can transfer higher force. The smaller double helical gear, 996 mm in diameter, can achieve 26% higher output torque, 123.5 kN·m, than that of the original spur gear of 1,460 mm in diameter, 98 kN·m. As a result, the manipulator becomes about 30% lighter, 8 tons, than the original weight, 11.2 tons. 2. Based on the compact design of the vehicle/manipulator, the

  12. Impact of aluminum chloride on process performance and microbial community structure of granular sludge in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for natural rubber processing wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Nguyen Thi; Watari, Takahiro; Thao, Tran Phuong; Hatamoto, Masashi; Tanikawa, Daisuke; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Fukuda, Masao; Tan, Nguyen Minh; Anh, To Kim; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Huong, Nguyen Lan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, granular sludge formation was carried out using an aluminum chloride supplement in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating natural rubber processing wastewater. Results show that during the first 75 days after the start-up of the UASB reactor with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.65 kg-COD·m(-3)·day(-1), it performed stably with a removal of 90% of the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sludge still remained in small dispersed flocs. However, after aluminum chloride was added at a concentration of 300 mg·L(-1) and the OLR range was increased up to 5.32 kg-COD·m(-3)·day(-1), the total COD removal efficiency rose to 96.5 ± 2.6%, with a methane recovery rate of 84.9 ± 13.4%, and the flocs began to form granules. Massively parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the sludge retained in the UASB reactor showed that total sequence reads of Methanosaeta sp. and Methanosarcina sp., reported to be the key organisms for granulation, increased after 311 days of operation. This indicates that the microbial community structure of the retained sludge in the UASB reactor at the end of the experiment gave a good account of itself in not only COD removal, but also granule formation.

  13. Water-cooled blanket concepts for the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) was to select a limited number of blanket concepts for fusion power reactors, to serve as the focus for the U.S. Department of Energy blanket research and development program. The concepts considered most seriously by the BCSS can be grouped for discussion purposes by coolant: liquid metals and alloys, pressurized water, helium, and nitrate salts. Concepts using pressurized water as the coolant are discussed. Water-cooled concepts using liquid breeders-lithium and 17Li-83Pb (LiPb)-have severe fundamental safety problems. The use of lithium and water in the blanket was considered unacceptable. Initial results of tests at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory using steam injected into molten LiPb indicate that use of LiPb and water together in a blanket is a very serious concern from the safety standpoint. Key issues for water-cooled blankets with solid tritium breeders (Li2O, or a ternary oxide such as LiAlO2) were identified and examined: reliability against leaks, control of tritium permeation into the coolant, retention of breeder physical integrity, breeder temperature predictability, determination of allowable temperature limits for breeders, and 6Li burnup effects (for LiAlO2). The BCSS's final rankings and associated rationale for all water-cooled concepts are examined. Key issues and factors for tokamak and tandem mirror reactor versions of water-cooled solid breeder concepts are discussed. The reference design for the top-ranked concept-LiAlO2 breeder, ferritic steel structure, and beryllium neutron multiplier-is presented. Finally, some general conclusions for water-cooled blanket concepts are drawn based on the study's results

  14. Advanced Acoustic Blankets for Improved Aircraft Interior Noise Reduction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed Phase II research effort is to develop heterogeneous (HG) blankets for improved sound reduction in aircraft structures. Phase I...

  15. Integral neutronics experiments in analytical mockups for blanket of a hybrid reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rong, E-mail: liurongzy@163.com; Zhu, Tonghua; Lu, Xinxin; Wang, Xinhua; Yan, Xiaosong; Feng, Song; Yang, Yiwei; Wang, Mei; Jiang, Li

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • For checking property of the hybrid blanket by integral experiments, three mockups are established. • In spherical mockup with depleted uranium and cubic mockup with natural uranium, the plutonium production rates and uranium fission rates are measured. • In spherical mockup with depleted uranium and LiPb, tritium production rates are measured. • The measured results are compared to the calculated ones with MCNP-4B code and ENDF/B-VI library data. - Abstract: The paper describes recent progress in integral neutronics experiments in the analytical mockups for the blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor. A conceptual blanket of the hybrid reactor is mainly loaded with natural uranium and lithium material. In the fission fuel region, uranium material and light water are arranged alternately. The mockups of the conceptual blanket are designed and used for checking neutron property of the blanket by integral experiments. Based on materials available, the spherical fission mockup for fission research and plutonium production consists of three layers of depleted uranium shells and several layers of polyethylene and graphite shells. The spherical lithium mockup for tritium production consists of depleted uranium and LiPb alloy shells. The cubic mockup consists of natural uranium and polyethylene and its structure is basically consistent with one of the fuel region. In the mockups with the D-T neutron source, the plutonium production rates, uranium fission rates and tritium production rates are measured, separately. The measured results are compared to the calculated ones with MCNP-4B code and ENDF/B-VI library data.

  16. Radiation damage of structural materials

    CERN Document Server

    Koutsky, Jaroslav

    1994-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of nuclear power plants is critical in the prevention or control of severe accidents. This monograph deals with both basic groups of structural materials used in the design of light-water nuclear reactors, making the primary safety barriers of NPPs. Emphasis is placed on materials used in VVER-type nuclear reactors: Cr-Mo-V and Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel for RPV and Zr-Nb alloys for fuel element cladding. The book is divided into 7 main chapters, with the exception of the opening one and the chapter providing a phenomenological background for the subject of radiation damage. Ch

  17. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  18. Behaviour of Structural Materials: India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two buoyancy driven LBE loops have been set up in BARC to study corrosion effects of LBE on candidate structural materials for spallation target module; like SS-316 L, 316 LN, SS-304 L, 9Cr-1Mo etc. The larger loops getting ready would be ~ 7 metre high and its riser and downcomer legs would operate at 5500°C and 4500°C respectively. The buoyancy head is estimated to provide a LBE mass flow rate of 1.7kg/s. The flow velocity around the sample is ~0.6 m/s. Material samples exposed in an already operational smaller corrosion loop were being evaluated by Charpy and Tensile tests after exposing the samples for 2000 hours in the flow with oxygen control. Provision is also being made in this loop to enhance the LBE flow by gas injection

  19. The impact of blanket design on activation and thermal safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation and thermal safety analyses for experimental and power reactors are presented. The effects of a strong neutron absorber, B4C, on activation and temperature response of experimental reactors to Loss-of-Cooling Accidents are investigated. Operational neutron fluxes, radioactivities of elements and thermal transients are calculated using the codes ONEDANT, REAC and THIOD, respectively. The inclusion of a small amount of B4C in the steel blanket of an experimental reactor reduces its activation and the post LOCA temperature escalation significantly. Neither the inclusion of excessive amounts of B4C nor enriched 10B in the first walls of an experimental reactor bring much advantage. The employment of a 2 cm graphite tile liner before the first wall helps to limit the post LOCA escalation of first wall temperature. The effect of replacing a 20 cm thick section of a steel shield of a fusion power reactor with B4C is also analyzed. The first wall temperature peak is reduced by 100 degree C in the modified blanket. The natural convection effect on thermal safety of a liquid lithium cooled blanket are investigated. Natural convection has no impact at all, unless the magnetic field can be reduced. If magnets can be shut off rapidly after the accident, then the temperature escalation of the first wall will be limited. Upflow of the coolant is better than the initial downflow design from a thermal safety point of view. Activities of three structural materials, OTR stainless steel, SS-316 and VCrTi are compared. Although VCrTi has higher activity for a period of two hours after the accident, it has one to two orders of magnitude less activity than those of the steels in the mid- and long-terms. 29 refs., 42 figs., 9 tabs

  20. A Precambrian proximal ejecta blanket from Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Kenneth; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Porcelli, Don; Thackrey, Scott; Parnell, John

    2008-04-01

    Ejecta blankets around impact craters are rarely preserved onEarth. Although impact craters are ubiquitous on solid bodiesthroughout the solar system, on Earth they are rapidly effaced,and few records exist of the processes that occur during emplacementof ejecta. The Stac Fada Member of the Precambrian Stoer Groupin Scotland has previously been described as volcanic in origin.However, shocked quartz and biotite provide evidence for high-pressureshock metamorphism, while chromium isotope values and elevatedabundances of platinum group metals and siderophile elementsindicate addition of meteoritic material. Thus, the unit isreinterpreted here as having an impact origin. The ejecta blanketreaches >20 m in thickness and contains abundant dark green,vesicular, devitrified glass fragments. Field observations suggestthat the deposit was emplaced as a single fluidized flow thatformed as a result of an impact into water-saturated sedimentarystrata. The continental geological setting and presence of groundwatermake this deposit an analogue for Martian fluidized ejecta blankets.

  1. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Helium-Gas Accident Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Helium Supply Rupture into Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    The model results are used to determine if beam power shutdown is necessary (or not) as a result of the LOHGA accident to maintain the blanket system well below any of the thermal-hydraulic constraints imposed on the design. The results also provide boundary conditions to the detailed bin model to study the detailed temperature response of the hot blanket module structure. The results for these two cases are documented in the report.

  2. Ceramic helium-cooled blanket test module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leshukov, A. E-mail: leshu@entek.ru; Kovalenko, V.; Shatalov, G.; Goroshkin, G.; Obukhov, A

    2000-11-01

    The design of RF DEMO-relevant ceramic helium cooled blanket test module (CHC BTM) for testing in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) is under consideration. The RF concept of DEMO BTM is based upon the breeder inside tube (BIT)-concept. This concept suggests the use of solid breeding ceramic material, helium as coolant and tritium purge-gas, ferrite-martensite steel as structural material, and beryllium as neutron multiplier. The parameters of the primary circuit coolant are the following, pressure -8 MPa, inlet/outlet temperature -300/550 deg. C, respectively. Helium (0.1 MPa pressure) is used for tritium removal from ceramic breeder. The ITER water coolant is the secondary circuit coolant of DEMO BTM cooling system. Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) is used as tritium breeding material (pebbles-bed of diameter 0.5-1 mm spheres). It is planned to use the beryllium as neutron multiplier (spheres diameter 1 mm pebbles-bed or the porous beryllium). The 3-D neutronic calculations on Monte Carlo method, in accordance with FENDL-1 library of the nuclear data, have been performed for CHC BTM. To validate the CHC BTM concept, the thermal hydraulic analysis has been performed for the design elements and cooling system equipment. The preliminary stress analysis for BTM design elements has been carried out on the ASME-code and RF strength regulations. The four types of LOFA and LOCA accidents have been investigated. The parameters of cooling, coolant purification and tritium extraction systems have been determined.

  3. Low-Activation structural ceramic composites for fusion power reactors: materials development and main design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to the development of advanced Low-Activation Materials (LAMs) with favourable short-term activation characteristics for the use as structural materials in a fusion power reactor (in order to reduce the risk associated with a major accident, in particular those related with radio-isotopes release in the environment), and to try to approach the concept of an inherently safe reactor. LA Ceramics Composites (LACCs) are the most promising LAMs because of their relatively good thermo-mechanical properties. At present, SiC/SiC composite is the only LACC considered by the fusion community, and therefore is the one having the most complete data base. The preliminary design of a breeding blanket using SiC/SiC as structural material indicated that significant improvement of its thermal conductivity is required. (orig.)

  4. Studies on steps affecting tritium residence time in solid blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the self sustaining of CTR fuel cycle, the effective tritium recovery from blankets is essential. This means that not only tritium breeding ratio must be larger than 1.0, but also high recovering speed is required for the short residence time of tritium in blankets. Short residence time means that the tritium inventory in blankets is small. In this paper, the tritium residence time and tritium inventory in a solid blanket are modeled by considering the steps constituting tritium release. Some of these tritium migration processes were experimentally evaluated. The tritium migration steps in a solid blanket using sintered breeding materials consist of diffusion in grains, desorption at grain edges, diffusion and permeation through grain boundaries, desorption at particle edges, diffusion and percolation through interconnected pores to purging stream, and convective mass transfer to stream. Corresponding to these steps, diffusive, soluble, adsorbed and trapped tritium inventories and the tritium in gas phase are conceivable. The code named TTT was made for calculating these tritium inventories and the residence time of tritium. An example of the results of calculation is shown. The blanket is REPUTER-1, which is the conceptual design of a commercial reversed field pinch fusion reactor studied at the University of Tokyo. The experimental studies on the migration steps of tritium are reported. (Kako, I.)

  5. Neutronic design analyses for a dual-coolant blanket concept: Optimization for a fusion reactor DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Dual-Coolant He/Pb15.7Li breeding blanket for a DEMO fusion reactor is studied. ► An iterative process optimizes neutronic responses minimizing reactor dimension. ► A 3D toroidally symmetric geometry has been generated from the CAD model. ► Overall TBR values support the feasibility of the conceptual model considered. ► Power density in TF coils is below load limit for quenching. - Abstract: The generation of design specifications for a DEMO reactor, including breeding blanket (BB), vacuum vessel (VV) and magnetic field coils (MFC), requires a consistent neutronic optimization of structures between plasma and MFC. This work targets iteratively to generate these neutronic specifications for a Dual-Coolant He/Pb15.7Li breeding blanket design. The iteration process focuses on the optimization of allowable space between plasma scrapped-off-layer and VV in order to generate a MFC/VV/BB/plasma sustainable configuration with minimum global system volumes. Two VV designs have been considered: (1) a double-walled option with light-weight stiffeners and (2) a thick massive one. The optimization process also involves VV materials, looking to warrant radiation impact operational limits on the MFC. The resulting nuclear responses: peak nuclear heating in toroidal field (TF) coil, tritium breeding ratio (TBR), power amplification factor and helium production in the structural material are provided.

  6. ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] shield and blanket work package report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes nuclear-related work in support of the US effort for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Study. The purpose of this work was to prepare for the first international ITER workshop devoted to defining a basic ITER concept that will serve as a basis for an indepth conceptual design activity over the next 2-1/2 years. Primary tasks carried out during the past year included: design improvements of the inboard shield developed for the TIBER concept, scoping studies of a variety of tritium breeding blanket options, development of necessary design guidelines and evaluation criteria for the blanket options, further safety considerations related to nuclear components and issues regarding structural materials for an ITER device. 44 refs., 31 figs., 29 tabs

  7. An analysis of electron beam welds in a dual coolant liquid metal breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulation of electron beam welding of blanket segments was performed using non-linear finite element code ABAQUS. The thermal and stress fields were assumed uncoupled, while preserving the temperature dependency of all material parameters. The martensite-austenite and austenite-martensite transformations were taken into account through volume shrinking/expansion effects, which is consistent with available data. The distributions of post welding residual stress in a complex geometry of the first wall are obtained. Also, the effects of preheating and post-welding heat treatment were addressed. Time dependent temperature and stress-strain fields obtained provide good insight into the welding process. They may be used directly to support reliability and life-time studies of blanket structures. On the other hand, they provide useful hints about the feasibility of the geometrical configurations as proposed by different design concepts. (orig.)

  8. Degrading the Plutonium Produced in Fast Breeder Reactor Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Kuno, Yusuke [Tokyo University, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Plutonium quality, defined as the plutonium isotopic composition, is an important measure for proliferation-resistance (PR) of a nuclear energy system. The quality of the plutonium produced in the blanket assemblies of a fast breeder reactor could be as good as or better than the weapons-grade (WG). The presence of such good quality plutonium is a proliferation concern. There are various options to degrade the plutonium produced in the breeder blanket. The obvious one is to blend the blanket plutonium with those produced from the reactor core during reprocessing. Other options try to prevent the generation of good quality plutonium (Pu). The Protected Plutonium Production (P{sup 3}) Project proposed by Tokyo Institute of Technology (TIT)1,2,3 advocates the doping of certain amount of neptunium (Np), or americium (Am) in fresh blanket fuel for irradiation. The increased production of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu by neutron capture in {sup 237}Np and Am would degrade the blanket plutonium. However, as {sup 237}Np is a controlled material according to IAEA, its use as doping material in fresh blanket fuel presents a concern for nuclear proliferation. In addition, the fabrication of fresh blanket fuel with inclusion of americium would be complicated due to the emission of intense low-energy gamma radiation from {sup 241}Am. Am is normally accompanied by Cm since the separation of those 2 elements is very difficult. Fuel containing both Am and Cm may make Safeguards measurement difficult. A variation would be doping the fresh blanket fuel with minor actinide (e.g., a group of neptunium, americium, and curium), or with separated reactor-grade (RG) plutonium. The drawback of such schemes would be the need for glove boxes in fresh blanket fuel fabrication. It is possible to fuel the breeder blankets with recycled (reprocessed) uranium oxide. The recycled uranium, recovered from reprocessing, contains {sup 236}U, which when irradiated in the blanket would

  9. Proceedings of the sixth international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji [ed.

    1998-03-01

    This report is the Proceedings of `the Sixth International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions` which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders under Annex II of IEA Implementing Agreement on a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials, and Japan-US Workshop 97FT4-01. This workshop was held in Mito city, Japan on October 22-24, 1997. About forty experts from EU, Japan, USA, and Chile attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included the following: (1) fabrication and characterization of ceramic breeders, (2) properties data for ceramic breeders, (3) tritium release characteristics, (4) modeling of tritium behavior, (5) irradiation effects on performance behavior, (6) blanket design and R and D requirements, (7) hydrogen behavior in materials, and (8) blanket system technology and structural materials. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for fabrication technology of ceramic breeder pebbles in EU and Japan, data of various properties of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, tritium release behavior of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} including tritium diffusion, modeling of tritium release from Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in ITER condition, helium release behavior from Li{sub 2}O, results of tritium release irradiation tests of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles in EXOTIC-7, R and D issues for ceramic breeders for ITER and DEMO blankets, etc. The 23 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Radiation effects on structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support

  11. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  12. A Feasible DEMO Blanket Concept Based on Water Cooled Solid Breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: JAEA has conducted the conceptual design study of blanket for a fusion DEMO reactor SlimCS. Considering DEMO specific requirements, we place emphasis on a blanket concept with durability to severe irradiation, ease of fabrication for mass production, operation temperature of blanket materials, and maintainability using remote handling equipment. This paper present a promising concept satisfying these requirements, which is characterized by minimized welding lines near the front, a simplified blanket interior consisting of cooling tubes and a mixed pebble bed of breeder and neutron multiplier, and approximately the same outlet temperature for all blanket modules. Neutronics calculation indicated that the blanket satisfies a self-sufficient production of tritium. An important finding is that little decrease is seen in tritium breeding ratio even when the gap between neighboring blanket modules is as wide as 0.03 m. This means that blanket modules can be arranged with such a significant clearance gap without sacrifice of tritium production, which will facilitate the access of remote handling equipment for replacement of the blanket modules and improve the access of diagnostics. (author)

  13. Oxygen plasma damage to blanket and patterned ultralow-κ surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen plasma damage to blanket and patterned ultralow-κ (ULK) dielectric surfaces was investigated by examining the effect of plasma species and dielectric materials. Blanket ULK films and patterned structures were treated by O2 plasma in a remote plasma chamber where the ions and radicals from the plasma source can be separately controlled to study their respective roles in the damage process. The plasma damage was characterized by angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Studies of the angle dependence of oxygen plasma damage to blanket ULK films indicated that damage by ions was anisotropic while that by radicals was isotropic. Ions were found to play an important role in assisting carbon depletion by oxygen radicals on the blanket film surface. More plasma damage was observed with increasing porosity in ultralow-κ films. Probable reaction paths were proposed by analyzing the reaction by-products. Plasma damage to the sidewall of low-κ trenches was examined by electron energy loss (EELS) analysis. The depletion depth of carbon was found to be related to the penetration of radical species into the porous dielectric and the distribution at the sidewall and trench bottom was affected by the trench pattern geometry, i.e., the aspect ratio, which can be correlated with the electron potential distribution and subsequent trajectory of ions. Vapor silylation was applied for dielectric recovery of trench structure and the result was examined by EELS. The trimethylchlorosilane was found to be effective for recovery of the sidewall carbon loss. The recovery was better for loss induced by radical O2 than by hybrid O2 and the difference was attributed to the surface densification by ions limiting the mass transport of vapor chemicals.

  14. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  15. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 1: External HR Break Near Inlet Header

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    The APT blanket system has about 57 MW of thermal energy deposited within the blanket region under normal operating conditions from the release of neutrons and the interaction of the High energy particles with the blanket materials. This corresponds to about 48 percent of total thermal energy deposited in the APT target/blanket system. The deposited thermal energy under normal operation conditions is an important input parameter used in the thermal-hydraulic design and accident analysis.

  16. Requirements for a helium-cooled blanket heat removal system development facility for fusion reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Existing and potential design problems associated with the helium-cooled blanket assemblies of experimental, demonstration and hybrid reactor designs considered in the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Program were assessed. It was observed that a balanced program of design, analysis and experimentation would be required to develop, verify and qualify these designs and those of related hardware and equipment. To respond to the potential experimental requirements of the first-generation reactors (the EPRs and possibly the hybrid concept), the need for a helium test facility was identified. It was determined that this facility should have the capacity for recirculating 100,000 kg/hr of helium at 70 atm and 6000C and should have 3 MW of electrical power available for simulating neutron heating. No radioactive material or processes should be used to facilitate ''hands-on'' experimentation and development. The general types of testing anticipated in this facility would include: (1) thermal and coolant flow performance of the blanket and other components in the primary cooling circuit; (2) structural adequacy of the blanket and first wall including vibration considerations; (3) capability for accommodating safety/off-normal conditions. Existing facilities worldwide were surveyed. It was determined that a number of facilities exist in foreign nations for performing the anticipated experiments. However, no large helium gas flow loop exists within the USA. Consequently, it is recommended that a helium thermal-hydraulic blanket test facility be planned and build on a schedule that will meet the unique design development and verification needs of the fusion program. This report provides the rationale and preliminary scoping of the operational characteristics and requirements for such a facility

  17. Euro hybrid materials and structures. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, Joachim M.; Siebert, Marc (eds.)

    2016-08-01

    In order to use the materials as best as possible, several different materials are usually mixed in one component, especially in the field of lightweight design. If these combinations of materials are joined inherently, they are called multi material design products or hybrid structures. These place special requirements on joining technology, design methods and manufacturing and are challenging in other aspects, too. The eight chapters with manuscripts of the presentations are: Chapter 1- Interface: What happens in the interface between the two materials? Chapter 2 - Corrosion and Residual Stresses: How about galvanic corrosion and thermal residual stresses in the contact zone of different materials? Chapter 3 - Characterization: How to characterize and test hybrid materials? Chapter 4 - Design: What is a suitable design and dimensioning method for hybrid structures? Chapter 5 - Machining and Processing: How to machine and process hybrid structures and materials? Chapter 6 - Component Manufacturing: What is a suitable manufacturing route for hybrid structures? Chapter 7 - Non-Destructive Testing and Quality Assurance: How to assure the quality of material and structures? Chapter 8 - Joining: How to join components of different materials?.

  18. Structure and properties of layered inorganic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Duan

    2010-01-01

    @@ Inorganic layered materials are a class of advanced functional materials that have attracted considerable attention by virtue of their practical applications in a wide variety of fields. Sys-tematic studies of structure, design, synthesis, and fabrication processing may extend the range of practical utility of inor-ganic layered functional materials, in areas such as food industry,chemical industry, energy engineering, environmental engineer-ing, drug and gene delivery, electronics technology, and materials protection.

  19. Recent global trends in structural materials research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hideyuki; Ohmura, Takahito; Nishimura, Toshiyuki

    2013-02-01

    Structural materials support the basis of global society, such as infrastructure and transportation facilities, and are therefore essential for everyday life. The optimization of such materials allows people to overcome environmental, energy and resource depletion issues on a global scale. The creation and manufacture of structural materials make a large contribution to economies around the world every year. The use of strong, resistant materials can also have profound social effects, providing a better quality of life at both local and national levels. The Great East Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011 caused significant structural damage in the Tohoku and Kanto regions of Japan. On a global scale, accidents caused by the ageing and failure of structural materials occur on a daily basis. Therefore, the provision and inspection of structural reliability, safety of nuclear power facilities and construction of a secure and safe society hold primary importance for researchers and engineers across the world. Clearly, structural materials need to evolve further to address both existing problems and prepare for new challenges that may be faced in the future. With this in mind, the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) organized the 'NIMS Conference 2012' to host an extensive discussion on a variety of global issues related to the future development of structural materials. Ranging from reconstruction following natural disasters, verification of structural reliability, energy-saving materials to fundamental problems accompanying the development of materials for high safety standards, the conference covered many key issues in the materials industry today. All the above topics are reflected in this focus issue of STAM, which introduces recent global trends in structural materials research with contributions from world-leading researchers in this field. This issue covers the development of novel alloys, current methodologies in the characterization of structural

  20. Resonance self-shielding in the blanket of a hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three sets of energy group cross sections were obtained using various approximations for resonance self shielding. The three models used in obtaining the cross sections were: (a) infinitely dilute model, (b) homogeneous-medium resonance self shielding, and (c) heterogeneous-medium resonance self shielding. The effects on the blanket performance of fusion--fission hybrid reactors, and in particular, on the performance of the current reference Westinghouse Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor blanket, were compared and analyzed for a variety of fuel-coolant combinations. It has been concluded that (1) the infinitely dilute cross sections can be used to produce preliminary crude estimates for beginning-of-life (BOL) only, (2) the resonance absorber finite dilution should be considered for BOL, poorly moderated blankets and well moderated blankets with low fissile material content situations, and (3) the spacial details should be considered in high fissile content, well moderated blanket situations

  1. Magnetism and Structure in Functional Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Planes, Antoni; Saxena, Avadh

    2005-01-01

    Magnetism and Structure in Functional Materials addresses three distinct but related topics: (i) magnetoelastic materials such as magnetic martensites and magnetic shape memory alloys, (ii) the magnetocaloric effect related to magnetostructural transitions, and (iii) colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) and related magnanites. The goal is to identify common underlying principles in these classes of materials that are relevant for optimizing various functionalities. The emergence of apparently different magnetic/structural phenomena in disparate classes of materials clearly points to a need for common concepts in order to achieve a broader understanding of the interplay between magnetism and structure in this general class of new functional materials exhibiting ever more complex microstructure and function. The topic is interdisciplinary in nature and the contributors correspondingly include physicists, materials scientists and engineers. Likewise the book will appeal to scientists from all these areas.

  2. Neutronic studies of fissile and fusile breeding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In light of the need of convincing motivation substantiating expensive and inherently applied research (nuclear energy), first a simple comparative study of fissile breeding economics of fusion fission hybrids, spallators and also fast breeder reactors has been carried out. As a result, the necessity of maximization of fissile production (in the first two ones, in fast breeders rather the reprocessing costs should be reduced) has been shown, thus indicating the design strategy (high support ratio) for these systems. In spite of the uncertainty of present projections onto further future and discrepancies in available data even quite conservative assumptions indicate that hybrids and perhaps even earlier - spallators can become economic at realistic uranium price increase and successfully compete against fast breeders. Then on the basis of the concept of the neutron flux shaping aimed at the correlation of the selected cross-sections with the neutron flux, the indications for the maximization of respective reaction rates has been formulated. In turn, these considerations serve as the starting point for the guidelines of breeding blanket nuclear design, which are as follows: 1) The source neutrons must face the multiplying layer (of proper thickness) of possibly low concentration of nuclides attenuating the neutron multiplication (i.e. structure materials, nongaseous coolants). 2) For the most effective trapping of neutrons within the breeding zone (leakage and void streaming reduction) it must contain an efficient moderator (not valid for fissile breeding blankets). 3) All regions of significant slow flux should contain 6Li in order to reduce parasite neutron captures in there. (orig./HP)

  3. Beryllium data base for in-pile mockup test on blanket of fusion reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium has been used in the fusion blanket designs with ceramic breeder as a neutron multiplier to increase the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The properties of beryllium, that is physical properties, chemical properties, thermal properties, mechanical properties, nuclear properties, radiation effects, etc. are necessary for the fusion blanket design. However, the properties of beryllium have not been arranged for the fusion blanket design. Therefore, it is indispensable to check and examine the material data of beryllium reported previously. This paper is the first one of the series of papers on beryllium data base, which summarizes the reported material data of beryllium. (author)

  4. Space structures concepts and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowitzky, A. M.; Supan, E. C.

    1988-01-01

    An extension is preseted of the evaluation of graphite/aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC) for space structures application. A tubular DWG graphite/aluminum truss assembly was fabricated having the structural integrity and thermal stability needed for space application. DWG is a proprietary thin ply continuous graphite reinforced aluminum composite. The truss end fittings were constructed using the discontinuous ceramic particulate reinforced MMC DWAl 20 (trademark). Thermal stability was incorporated in the truss by utilizing high stiffness, negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) P100 graphite fibers in a 6061 aluminum matrix, crossplied to provide minimized CTE in the assembled truss. Tube CTE was designed to be slightly negative to offset the effects of the end fitting and sleeve, CTE values of which are approx. 1/2 that of aluminum. In the design of the truss configuration, the CTE contribution of each component was evaluated to establish the component dimension and layup configuration required to provide a net zero CTE in the subassemblies which would then translate to a zero CTE for the entire truss bay produced.

  5. Lithium-vanadium advanced blanket development. ITER final report on U.S. contribution: Task T219/T220

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.F. [comps.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this task is to develop the required data base and demonstrate the performance of a liquid lithium-vanadium advanced blanket design. The task has two main activities related to vanadium structural material and liquid lithium system developments. The vanadium alloy development activity included four subtasks: (1.1) baseline mechanical properties of non irradiated base metal and weld metal joints; (1.2) compatibility with liquid lithium; (1.3) material irradiation tests; and (1.4) development of material manufacturing and joining methods. The lithium blanket technology activity included four subtasks: (2.1) electrical insulation development and testing for liquid metal systems; (2.2) MHD pressure drop and heat transfer study for self-cooled liquid metal systems; (2.3) chemistry of liquid lithium; and (2.4) design, fabrication and testing of ITER relevant size blanket mockups. A summary of the progress and results obtained during the period 1995 and 1996 in each of the subtask areas is presented in this report.

  6. Trade-off study of liquid-metal self-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A trade-off study of liquid-metal self-cooled blankets was carried out to define the performance of these blankets with respect to the main functions in a fusion reactor, and to determine the potential to operate at the maximum possible values of the performance parameters. The main purpose is to improve the reactor economics by maximizing the blanket energy multiplication factor, reduce the capital cost of the reactor, and satisfy the design requirements. The main parameters during the course of the study were the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the blanket energy multiplication factor, the energy fraction lost to the shield, the 6Li enrichment in the breeder material, the total blanket thickness, the reflector material selection, and the compositions of the different blanket zones. Also, the impact of different reactor design choices on the performance parameters was analyzed. The effect of the impurity control system (limiter or divertor), the material choice for the limiter, the elimination of tritium breeding from the inboard section of tokamak reactors, the coolant choice for the nonbreeding inboard blanket, and the neutron source distribution were part of the trade-off study. In addition, tritium breeding benchmark calculations were performed to study the impact of the use of different transport codes and nuclear data libraries. The importance and the negative effect of high TBR on the energy multiplication motivated the benchmark calculations

  7. Steels from materials science to structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sha, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Steels and computer-based modelling are fast growing fields in materials science as well as structural engineering, demonstrated by the large amount of recent literature. Steels: From Materials Science to Structural Engineering combines steels research and model development, including the application of modelling techniques in steels.  The latest research includes structural engineering modelling, and novel, prototype alloy steels such as heat-resistant steel, nitride-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel and low nickel maraging steel.  Researchers studying steels will find the topics vital to their work.  Materials experts will be able to learn about steels used in structural engineering as well as modelling and apply this increasingly important technique in their steel materials research and development. 

  8. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic considerations for designing a lithium-cooled tokamak blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for the design of lithium cooled blankets is developed. The thermal-hydraulics, neutronics and interactions between them are extensively investigated. In thermal hydraulics, two models illustrate the methodology used to obtain the acceptable ranges for a set of design parameters. The methodology can be used to identify the limiting constraints for a particular design. A complete neutronic scheme is set up for the calculations of the volumetric heating rate as a function of the distance from the first wall, the breeding ratio as a function of the amount of structural material in the blanket, and the radiation damage in terms of atom displacements and gas production rate. Different values of the volume percent of Type-316 stainless steel are assigned in four breeding zones to represent a nonuniformly distributed structural material which satisfies various thermal-hydraulic requirements. The role that the radiation damage plays in the overall design methodology is described. The product of the first wall lifetime and neutron loading is limited by the radiation damage which degrades the mechanical properties of the material

  9. Application of the integrated blanket-coil concept (IBC) to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component and several unique applications to fusion reactor embodiments are identified. The proposed concept takes advantage of the fact that lithium is a good electrical conductor in addition to being a unique tritium-breeding material capable of energy recovery and transport at high temperatures. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept'' has the potential for: allowing fusion reactor embodiments which are easier to maintain; making fusion reactors more compact with an intrinsic ultra-high mass power density (net kW/sub E//metric tonne); and enhancing the tritium breeding potential for special coil applications such as ohmic heating and bean identation. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls (i.e., a layered combination of a thin wall of structural material, insulator and structural materials) the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are modest and well below design limits. Possible unique applications of the IBC concept have been investigated and include the IBC concept applied to the poloidal field (PF) coils, toroidal field (TF) coils, divertor coils, ohmic heating (OH) coils, and identation coils for bean shaping

  10. Development of the structural materials information center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a Structural Aging Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify potential structural safety issues related to continued service of nuclear power plants and to establish criteria for evaluating and resolving these issues. One of the tasks in this program focuses on the establishment of a Structural Materials Information Center where data and information on the time variation of concrete and other structural material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors are being collected and assembled into a data base. This data base will be used to assist in the prediction of potential long-term deterioration of critical structural components in nuclear power plants and to establish limits on hostile environmental exposure for these structures and materials. Two complementary data base formats have been developed. The Structural Materials Handbook is an expandable, hard-copy reference document that contains complete sets of data and information for selected portland cement concrete, metallic reinforcement prestressing tendon, and structural steel materials. Baseline data, reference properties and environmental information are presented in the hand book as tables, notes and graphs. The handbook, which will be published inn four volumes, serves as the information source for the electronic data base. The Structural Materials Electronic Data Base is accessible by an IBM-compatible personal computer and provides an efficient means for searching the various data base files to locate materials with similar properties. Properties are reported in the International System of Units (SI) and in customary units whenever possible

  11. Development of the Structural Materials Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a Structural Aging Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify potential structural safety issues related to continued service of nuclear power plants and to establish criteria for evaluating and resolving these issues. One of the tasks in this program focuses on the establishment of a Structural Materials Information Center where data and information on the time variation of concrete and other structural material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors are being collected and assembled into a data base. This data base will be used to assist in the prediction of potential long-term deterioration of critical structural components in nuclear power plants and to establish limits on hostile environmental exposure for these structures and materials. Two complementary data base formats have been developed. The Structural Materials Handbook is an expandable, hard-copy reference document that contains complete sets of data and information for selected portland cement concrete, metallic reinforcement, prestressing tendon, and structural steel materials. Baseline data, reference properties and environmental information are presented in the handbook as tables, notes and graphs. The handbook, which will be published in four volumes, serves as the information source for the electronic data base. The Structural Materials Electronic Data Base is accessible by an IBM-compatible personal computer and provides an efficient means for searching the various data base files to locate materials with similar properties. Properties will be reported in the International System of Units (SI) and in customary units whenever possible. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Establishment of design and fabrication technology and domestic qualification for ITER blanket system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain and analyze the detailed design and manufacturing technology of the blanket system for each components, the related data are collected through the various sources. And also, design processes and results of the FWs, shield blocks, and TBMs are investigated. From these analysis of the blanket R and D status of each party, we develop the KO R and D plan and it is used in the selection of manufacturing method and the materials. For the ITA16-10 subtask1, we had the official agreement with ITER IT in December 2004 for the qualification of the FW panel fabrication methods and to establish the NDT methods for the FW panel. From the technical reports we published, we compare the manufacturing methods and the proposed material for each component according to the parties. Be is proposed as a plasma facing material and most parties have interest in S-65C. Cu alloy is proposed as a heat sink material and DSCu or CuCrZr are investigated now. For the structural material, stainless steel such as SS316L(N) is investigated internationally. HIP and brazing are proposed as the manufacturing methods. In order to establish the blanket system technology, design contents of shield block by ITER IT and other parties were investigated through participating the international workshop and meeting, dispatching the researcher to the ITER IT or other parties to collect the drafting and 3D modeling files. The modification items of blanket design were investigated and a researcher was dispatched in the ITER IT and participated in the analysis on cooling problem in shield block such as front header and drilled manifold. To investigate the development status of TBM, we participated the 14th TBWG meeting and proposed the KO HCSB and HCML as candidates. And also, we obtain the R and D results of other parties and make document about the R and D status of other parties for the TBM. Finally, we establish the KO TBM R and D plan and proposed it to ITER IT and other parties. In which, the

  13. Establishment of design and fabrication technology and domestic qualification for ITER blanket system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Bong Guen; In, S. R.; Bae, Y. D. (and others)

    2006-02-15

    To obtain and analyze the detailed design and manufacturing technology of the blanket system for each components, the related data are collected through the various sources. And also, design processes and results of the FWs, shield blocks, and TBMs are investigated. From these analysis of the blanket R and D status of each party, we develop the KO R and D plan and it is used in the selection of manufacturing method and the materials. For the ITA16-10 subtask1, we had the official agreement with ITER IT in December 2004 for the qualification of the FW panel fabrication methods and to establish the NDT methods for the FW panel. From the technical reports we published, we compare the manufacturing methods and the proposed material for each component according to the parties. Be is proposed as a plasma facing material and most parties have interest in S-65C. Cu alloy is proposed as a heat sink material and DSCu or CuCrZr are investigated now. For the structural material, stainless steel such as SS316L(N) is investigated internationally. HIP and brazing are proposed as the manufacturing methods. In order to establish the blanket system technology, design contents of shield block by ITER IT and other parties were investigated through participating the international workshop and meeting, dispatching the researcher to the ITER IT or other parties to collect the drafting and 3D modeling files. The modification items of blanket design were investigated and a researcher was dispatched in the ITER IT and participated in the analysis on cooling problem in shield block such as front header and drilled manifold. To investigate the development status of TBM, we participated the 14th TBWG meeting and proposed the KO HCSB and HCML as candidates. And also, we obtain the R and D results of other parties and make document about the R and D status of other parties for the TBM. Finally, we establish the KO TBM R and D plan and proposed it to ITER IT and other parties. In which, the

  14. Structural materials for fission & fusion energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Zinkle

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Structural materials represent the key for containment of nuclear fuel and fission products as well as reliable and thermodynamically efficient production of electrical energy from nuclear reactors. Similarly, high-performance structural materials will be critical for the future success of proposed fusion energy reactors, which will subject the structures to unprecedented fluxes of high-energy neutrons along with intense thermomechanical stresses. Advanced materials can enable improved reactor performance via increased safety margins and design flexibility, in particular by providing increased strength, thermal creep resistance and superior corrosion and neutron radiation damage resistance. In many cases, a key strategy for designing high-performance radiation-resistant materials is based on the introduction of a high, uniform density of nanoscale particles that simultaneously provide good high temperature strength and neutron radiation damage resistance.

  15. Structure and thermal stability of nanocrystalline materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Murty; M K Datta; S K Pabi

    2003-02-01

    Nanocrystalline materials, which are expected to play a key role in the next generation of human civilization, are assembled with nanometre-sized “building blocks” consisting of the crystalline and large volume fractions of intercrystalline components. In order to predict the unique properties of nanocrystalline materials, which are a combination of the properties of the crystalline and intercrystalline regions, it is essential to understand precisely how the structures of crystalline and intercrystalline regions vary with decrease in crystallite size. In addition, study of the thermal stability of nanocrystalline materials against significant grain growth is both scientific and technological interest. A sharp increase in grain size (to micron levels) during consolidation of nanocrystalline powders to obtain fully dense materials may consequently result in the loss of some unique properties of nanocrystalline materials. Therefore, extensive interest has been generated in exploring the size effects on the structure of crystalline and intercrystalline region of nanocrystalline materials, and the thermal stability of nanocrystalline materials against significant grain growth. The present article is aimed at understanding the structure and stability of nanocrystalline materials.

  16. Preparation of Nickel Materials with Fractal Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A way of manufacturing nickel material with fractal structure has been studied. Some algae with natural fractalstructure were used as the basic substrates. The nickel was coated on the substrates by both electroless depositionand electrodeposition. After elimination of the foundational algae by erosion, dissolution etc, the pure nickel materialswith fractal structure were obtained. At last, the specific surface area was analyzed by BET analyses and the fractaldimension of the nickel material was calculated by means of box-counting technique. The comparison of fractaldimension between Ni structure and natural algae was also given.

  17. Fabrication of ITER Semi-Prototype Blanket First Wall for the Final Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byoung Kwon; Jung, Yang Il; Park, Jeong Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk Kwon; Lee, Don Won; Kim, Duck Hoi; Cho, Seung Yon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The ITER semi-prototype was designed to qualify the manufacturing technology for the ITER blanket first wall. According to the design of the semi-prototype, its fabrication is expected to face great difficulty. The blanket first wall consists of three different materials, i.e., beryllium (Be), CuCrZr, and stainless-steel (SS), which are joined into one part. For fabrication of these multi-layered structures, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), which is one of the diffusion bonding methods, has been considered as a promising technology to realize sufficient mechanical integrity of a joint under the anticipated high neutron and stress fields. HIP provides high dimensional accuracy, low residual stress during the joining process, and the joining of three-dimensionally complex structures in comparison with other joining methods. Even though the joining technology for the different materials had been developed in the first stage of the qualification, the joining is still a key issue for the fabrication of the semi-prototype

  18. Understanding structural conservation through materials science:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuster-López, Laura; Krarup Andersen, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    provide both explanation and prediction of failure in materials. It has therefore shown to be an effective method for developing useful solutions to conservation problems. Since materials science and mechanics can help conservators predict the long term consequences of their treatments and provide them......Mechanical properties and the structure of materials are key elements in understanding how structural interventions in conservation treatments affect cultural heritage objects. In this context, engineering mechanics can help determine the strength and stability found in art objects as it can...... with tools to avoid future problems, it should be present in all conservation-restoration training programs to help promote students’ understanding of the degradation mechanisms in cultural materials (and their correlation with chemical and biological degradation) as well as the implications behind...

  19. Dynamic and structural control utilizing smart materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of several novel 'smart material' structural control concepts that are currently under development. The thrust of these investigations is the evolution of intelligent materials and structures superceding the recently defined variable-geometry trusses and shape memory alloy-reinforced composites; the substances envisioned will be able to autonomously evaluate emergent environmental conditions and adapt to them, and even change their operational objectives. While until now the primary objective of the developmental efforts presently discussed has been materials that mimic biological functions, entirely novel concepts may be formulated in due course.

  20. Electronic structure studies of topological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuyun

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac fermions are a new class of topological quantum materials. In 3D Dirac semimetals, the conduction and valence bands touch each other at discrete points in the momentum space and show linear dispersions along all momentum directions, forming 3D Dirac cones which are protected by the crystal symmetry. Here I will present our recent studies of the electronic structures of novel materials which host 3D Dirac fermions by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  1. Proceedings of the fifteenth international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of 'the Fifteenth International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders Under the IEA Implementing Agreement on the Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors. This workshop was held in Sapporo, Japan on 3-4, Sept. 2009. Twenty six participants from EU, Japan, India, Russia and USA attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included 1) evolutions in ceramic breeder blanket design, 2) progress in ceramic breeder material development, 3) irradiation testing, 4) breeder material properties, 5) out-of-pile pebble bed experiment, 6) modeling of the thermal, mechanical and tritium transfer behavior of pebble beds and 7) interfacing issues of solid breeder blanket development. By this workshop, advance of key technologies for solid breeder blanket development was shared among the participants. Also, desired direction of further investigation and development was recognized. The 20 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Electrochemical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    For a period covering October 1, 1995 through August 12, 1996, the research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on "Electrochemical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Structures. " The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the applicability of electrochemical techniques for characterization of complex device structures based on InP and GaAs, Ge, InGaAs, InSb, InAs and InSb, including: (1) accurate EC-V net majority carrier concentration depth profiling, and (2) surface and bulk structural and electrical type defect densities. Our motivation for this R&D effort was as follows: "Advanced space solar cells and ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells are fabricated using a large variety of III-V materials based on InP and GaAs for solar cells and low bandgap materials such as Ge, InGaAs, InAs and InSb for TPV applications. At the present time for complex device structures using these materials, however, there is no simple way to assess the quality of these structures prior to device fabrication. Therefore, process optimization is a very time consuming and a costly endeavor". Completion of this R&D effort would have had unquestionable benefits for space solar cell and TPV cells, since electrochemical characterization of the above cell structures, if properly designed can provide many useful structural and electrical material information virtually at any depth inside various layers and at the interfaces. This, could have been applied for step-by-step process optimization, which could have been used for fabrication of new generation high efficiency, low cost space PV and TPV cells.

  3. Layer like porous materials with hierarchical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wieslaw J; Gil, Barbara; Makowski, Wacław; Marszalek, Bartosz; Eliášová, Pavla

    2016-06-13

    Many chemical compositions produce layered solids consisting of extended sheets with thickness not greater than a few nanometers. The layers are weakly bonded together in a crystal and can be modified into various nanoarchitectures including porous hierarchical structures. Several classes of 2-dimensional (2D) materials have been extensively studied and developed because of their potential usefulness as catalysts and sorbents. They are discussed in this review with focus on clays, layered transition metal oxides, silicates, layered double hydroxides, metal(iv) phosphates and phosphonates, especially zirconium, and zeolites. Pillaring and delamination are the primary methods for structural modification and pore tailoring. The reported approaches are described and compared for the different classes of materials. The methods of characterization include identification by X-ray diffraction and microscopy, pore size analysis and activity assessment by IR spectroscopy and catalytic testing. The discovery of layered zeolites was a fundamental breakthrough that created unprecedented opportunities because of (i) inherent strong acid sites that make them very active catalytically, (ii) porosity through the layers and (iii) bridging of 2D and 3D structures. Approximately 16 different types of layered zeolite structures and modifications have been identified as distinct forms. It is also expected that many among the over 200 recognized zeolite frameworks can produce layered precursors. Additional advances enabled by 2D zeolites include synthesis of layered materials by design, hierarchical structures obtained by direct synthesis and top-down preparation of layered materials from 3D frameworks. PMID:26489452

  4. Eddy current induced electromagnetic loads on shield blankets during plasma disruptions in ITER: A benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to recent updates of ITER shield blanket design, electromagnetic loads during the plasma disruption are being evaluated to verify the mechanical confidence and reliability. As a course of such evaluations, a benchmark activity for the electromagnetic analysis, coordinated by ITER Organization, is underway between ITER parties to compare the calculation results for disruption loads on the blankets. In this paper, we present calculation results for the electromagnetic loads on the simplified but practical model of ITER shield blankets with respect to six representative disruption scenarios of which ITER distributes simulation results based on the DINA code as a reference of the design and analysis. Commercial finite element method software, ANSYS/EmagTM, was employed to evaluate the eddy current on the blanket modules with the 40o sector model for major conducting structure of the tokamak including double-walled vacuum vessel, triangular support, and vertical targets of divertors. An interface between ANSYS/EmagTM and plasma simulator was implemented with a conversion tool assigning the plasma current density on the ANSYS elements corresponding to the current filaments in DINA outputs. Discussions are made of the possible improvement of the blanket model taking more realistic blanket configuration into account at the cost of the moderate increase in computational time. A final remark is given of the possibility of incorporating halo currents into ANSYS disruption simulations, which are major sources of electromagnetic loads on in-vessel components including blankets.

  5. Hierarchically structured materials for lithium batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles, including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles. With the increasing demand for devices of high-energy densities (>500 Wh kg−1), new energy storage systems, such as lithium–oxygen (Li–O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB, have attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performance of these energy storage systems depends not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of the electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performance characteristics of batteries often have conflicting requirements with the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflicting requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li–O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate (1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and (2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties and prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime. (paper)

  6. Development of the breeding blanket and shield model for the fusion power reactors system SYCOMORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li-Puma, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.lipuma@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: Jean-Charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martin, Brunella, E-mail: brunella.martin@gmail.com [Incka, 19-21 Rue du 8 mai 1945, F-94110 Arcueil (France)

    2014-10-15

    SYCOMORE, a fusion reactor system code based on a modular approach is under development at CEA. Within this framework, this paper describes the relevant sub-modules which have been implemented to model the main outputs of the breeding blanket and shield block of the system code: tritium breeding ratio, peak energy deposition in toroidal field coils, reactor layout and power deposition, blanket pressure drops and materials inventory. Blanket and shield requirements are calculated by several sub-modules: the blanket assembly and layout sub-module, the neutronic sub-module, the blanket design sub-module (thermal hydraulic and thermo-mechanic pre-design tool). A power flow module has also been developed which is directly linked to the blanket thermo-dynamic performances, which is not described in this paper. For the blanket assembly and layout and the blanket module design sub-modules, explicit analytic models have been developed and implemented; for the neutronic sub-module neural networks that replicate the results of appropriate simplified 1D and 2D neutronic simulations have been built. Presently, relevant model for the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead is available. Sub-modules have been built in a way that they can run separately or coupled into the breeding blanket and shield module in order to be integrated in SYCOMORE. In the paper, the objective and main input/output parameters of each sub-module are reported and relevant models discussed. The application to previous studied reactor models (PPCS model AB, DEMO-HCLL 2006–2007 studies) is also presented.

  7. Ordered mesoporous silica materials with complicated structures

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2012-05-01

    Periodically ordered mesoporous silicas constitute one of the most important branches of porous materials that are extensively employed in various chemical engineering applications including adsorption, separation and catalysis. This short review gives an introduction to recently developed mesoporous silicas with emphasis on their complicated structures and synthesis mechanisms. In addition, two powerful techniques for solving complex mesoporous structures, electron crystallography and electron tomography, are compared to elucidate their respective strength and limitations. Some critical issues and challenges regarding the development of novel mesoporous structures as well as their applications are also discussed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2012-10-09

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  9. Fast breeder reactor blanket management: comparison of LMFBR and GCFR blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic performance of the fast breeder reactor blanket, considering different fuel management schemes was studied. To perform this, the investigation started with a standard reactor physics calculation. Then, two economic models for evaluation of the economic performance of the radial blanket were developed. These models formed the basis of a computer code, ECOBLAN, which computes the net economic gain and the levelized fuel cost due to the radial blanket. The net gain in terms of dollars and $/kgHM-y and the levelized fuel cost in mills/kWhe were obtained as a function of blanket thickness and a residence time of the fuel in the blanket. A LMFBR and a GCFR were the reactor models considered in this study. The optimum radial blanket of a GCFR consists of two rows, that of a LMFBR consists of three rows. Regarding the different fuel management schemes, the fixed blanket was found to be more favorable than reshuffled blanket. Out-in and in-out reshuffled blanket offer almost the same net gain. In all the cases, the burnup calculated for the fuel was found to be less than the acceptable limit. There is an optimum residence time for the fuel in the blanket which depends on the position of the fuel in the blanket and the fuel management scheme studied. As expected, except for very short residence times (less than 2.5 years), the radial blanket is a net income producer. There is no significant difference between the economic performance of the blanket of a LMFBR and a GCFR

  10. Application of smart materials in automotive structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Holger; Breitbach, Elmar J.

    2001-06-01

    The demand in the automobile sector for greater comfort in the vehicle is of a high importance alongside the requirements for a low emission of pollutants. With regard to a higher comfort the reduction of the interior noise level is mostly associated with a higher structural weight. It is for this reason that the application of so-called intelligent materials is appropriate since these can be used to realize an overall adaptive system. The materials under discussion are pizeceramic foils and fibers which can easily be fitted to thin-walled structures like a roof panel or a dash-board. Investigations have shown that the knowledge of the dynamic structural behavior is vital at the design of an adaptive system. Mostly this knowledge can only be gained by using sophisticated numerical models associated with a great effort of computing time. In order not to expand the computing time a model has been developed which allows a fast assessment of the dynamic behavior of a structure with integrated smart materials. The results of this model are presented for a flat steel plate with bonded piezoceramic foils. The accuracy of this model is being proved by the presentation of experimental results.

  11. Multivariable optimization of fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization problem consists of four key elements: a figure of merit for the reactor, a technique for estimating the neutronic performance of the blanket as a function of the design variables, constraints on the design variables and neutronic performance, and a method for optimizing the figure of merit subject to the constraints. The first reactor concept investigated uses a liquid lithium blanket for breeding tritium and a steel blanket to increase the fusion energy multiplication factor. The capital cost per unit of net electric power produced is minimized subject to constraints on the tritium breeding ratio and radiation damage rate. The optimal design has a 91-cm-thick lithium blanket denatured to 0.1% 6Li. The second reactor concept investigated uses a BeO neutron multiplier and a LiAlO2 breeding blanket. The total blanket thickness is minimized subject to constraints on the tritium breeding ratio, the total neutron leakage, and the heat generation rate in aluminum support tendons. The optimal design consists of a 4.2-cm-thick BeO multiplier and 42-cm-thick LiAlO2 breeding blanket enriched to 34% 6Li

  12. Materials and structures under shock and impact

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    In risk studies, engineers often have to consider the consequences of an accident leading to a shock on a construction. This can concern the impact of a ground vehicle or aircraft, or the effects of an explosion on an industrial site.This book presents a didactic approach starting with the theoretical elements of the mechanics of materials and structures, in order to develop their applications in the cases of shocks and impacts. The latter are studied on a local scale at first. They lead to stresses and strains in the form of waves propagating through the material, this movement then extending

  13. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  14. The electronic structure of hard materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarski, Robert Paul

    This research dissertation involves an experimental as well as a theoretical examination of the electronic structure of hard materials. The materials that are presented in this dissertation cover a wide class of materials, consisting of transition metal borides, irradiated polymer films, theoretically predicted superhard semiconductors, doped intermetallic alloys, and transition metal carbides. The borides are traditionally used in high temperature, hard coating applications, such as rocket nozzle linings, extreme wear surfaces, and corrosion coatings. Measurements of the borides appear to show that the bonding in these hard materials is primarily between the boron atoms in these systems. Also of note are the remarkably short interatomic distances between the boron atoms and between the boron and metal atoms in these materials. Irradiated polymer films are being developed for electronic applications, in the hopes that circuits can be developed that can benefit from the high thermal stability, dielectric properties, and mechanical properties provided by these materials. C3N4 is a theoretically predicted superhard material, and some of the first soft x-ray emission measurements of well-characterized samples of this compound are discussed in this work. Intermetallic alloys, in particular Ni3Al, are rather hard, but brittle metallic alloys. It has been found that the addition of boron atoms, in rather low concentrations, can increase the ductility of these alloys, allowing them to be utilized in a wider variety of applications. Measurements of this system have examined a question regarding the positioning of the boron atoms in the structures of this alloy. Finally, the transition metal carbides are used extensively as coatings in industrial applications such as cutting and grinding tools, and polishing compounds. Measurements of these materials suggest that the high degree of covalency between the metal and carbon atoms is primarily responsible for the hardness of

  15. Mechanical and thermal design of hybrid blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal and mechanical aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design considerations are discussed. This paper is intended as a companion to that of J. D. Lee of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on the nuclear aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design. The major design characteristics of hybrid reactor blankets are discussed with emphasis on the areas of difference between hybrid reactors and standard fusion or fission reactors. Specific examples are used to illustrate the design tradeoffs and choices that must be made in hybrid reactor design. These examples are drawn from the work on the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

  16. Nondestructive Testing of Materials and Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Akkaya, Yılmaz

    2013-01-01

    Condition assessment and characterization of materials and structures by means of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods is a priority need around the world to meet the challenges associated with the durability, maintenance, rehabilitation, retrofitting, renewal and health monitoring of new and existing infrastructures including historic monuments. Numerous NDT methods that make use of certain components of the electromagnetic and acoustic spectra are currently in use to this effect with various levels of success and there is an intensive worldwide research effort aimed at improving the existing methods and developing new ones. The knowledge and information compiled in this book captures the current state-of-the-art in NDT methods and their application to civil and other engineering materials and structures. Critical reviews and advanced interdisciplinary discussions by world-renowned researchers point to the capabilities and limitations of the currently used NDT methods and shed light on current and future res...

  17. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ''Nonlinear Materials'' seminar series and international conferences including ''Fracture, Friction and Deformation,'' ''Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,'' and ''Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology''; invited talks at international conference on ''Synthetic Metals,'' ''Quantum Phase Transitions,'' ''1996 CECAM Euroconference,'' and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors

  18. On Structure and Properties of Amorphous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew H. Stachurski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical, optical, magnetic and electronic properties of amorphous materials hold great promise towards current and emergent technologies. We distinguish at least four categories of amorphous (glassy materials: (i metallic; (ii thin films; (iii organic and inorganic thermoplastics; and (iv amorphous permanent networks. Some fundamental questions about the atomic arrangements remain unresolved. This paper focuses on the models of atomic arrangements in amorphous materials. The earliest ideas of Bernal on the structure of liquids were followed by experiments and computer models for the packing of spheres. Modern approach is to carry out computer simulations with prediction that can be tested by experiments. A geometrical concept of an ideal amorphous solid is presented as a novel contribution to the understanding of atomic arrangements in amorphous solids.

  19. Strength of structural materials of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monography reviews the phenomenon of stress-corrosion craving of zirconium-alloy fuel cans in the nuclear fuel fission products and ways of its prevention. Equations of creep and limiting state of FBR core materials were derived on the basis of the concept of deformation processes unity taking into account the degree of structural stability of alloys, temperature, nonstationary loading and aggressive media effects. Equations of durability under joint quasistatic and cyclic loading are developed. 146 refs.; 91 figs.; 16 tabs

  20. Safety Evaluation of the EVOLVE Blanket Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes the results of the safety evaluation of the Evaporation of Lithium and Vapor Extraction (EVOLVE) W-alloy first wall (FW) and blanket concept. We have analyzed the EVOLVE design response during a confinement bypass accident. A confinement bypass accident was chosen because, based on previous safety studies, this accident can produce environmental releases by breaching the primary radioactive confinement boundary of EVOLVE, which is the EVOLVE vacuum vessel (VV). As a consequence of a bypass accident, air from a room adjoining the reactor enters the plasma chamber by way of a failed VV port. This air reacts with the high temperature metals inside of the VV to release energy in the case of a lithium spill, or to mobilize radioactive material by oxidation, and then transport this material to the environment by natural convection airflow through the failed VV port. We use the MELCOR code to analyze the response of EVOLVE during this accident. Based on these results, the EVOLVE concept can meet the no-evacuation dose goal set by the DOE Fusion Safety Standard if the EVOLVE confinement building ventilation system is closed within two hours of the onset of this accident

  1. The gas-cooled Li2O moderator/breeder canister blanket for fusion-synfuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new integrated power and breeding blanket is described. The blanket incorporates features that make it suitable for synthetic fuel production. It is matched to the thermal and electrical requirements of the General Atomic water-splitting process for producing hydrogen. The fusion reaction is the Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR) using Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) physics. The canister blanket is a high temperature, pressure balanced, crossflow heat exchanger contained within a low activity, independently cooled, moderate temperature, first wall structural envelope. The canister uses Li2O as the moderator/breeder and helium as the coolant. ''In situ'' tritium control, combined with slip stream processing and self-healing permeation barriers, assures a hydrogen product essentially free of tritium. The blanket is particularly adapted to synfuels production but is equally useful for electricity production or co-generation

  2. Engineering test station for TFTR blanket module experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual design has been carried out for an Engineering Test Station (ETS) which will provide structural support and utilities/instrumentation services for blanket modules positioned adjacent to the vacuum vessel of the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor). The ETS is supported independently from the Test Cell floor. The ETS module support platform is constructed of fiberglass to eliminate electromagnetic interaction with the pulsed tokamak fields. The ETS can hold blanket modules with dimensions up to 78 cm in width, 85 cm in height, and 105 cm in depth, and with a weight up to 4000 kg. Interfaces for all utility and instrumentation requirements are made via a shield plug in the TFTR igloo shielding. The modules are readily installed or removed by means of TFTR remote handling equipment

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics of Structures with Material Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, P.; Wagg, D. J.; Pinna, C.; Whear, R.; Briody, C.

    2016-09-01

    Structures usually experience deterioration during their working life. Oxidation, corrosion, UV exposure, and thermo-mechanical fatigue are some of the most well-known mechanisms that cause degradation. The phenomenon gradually changes structural properties and dynamic behaviour over their lifetime, and can be more problematic and challenging in the presence of nonlinearity. In this paper, we study how the dynamic behaviour of a nonlinear system changes as the thermal environment causes certain parameters to vary. To this end, a nonlinear lumped mass modal model is considered and defined under harmonic external force. Temperature dependent material functions, formulated from empirical test data, are added into the model. Using these functions, bifurcation parameters are defined and the corresponding nonlinear responses are observed by numerical continuation. A comparison between the results gives a preliminary insight into how temperature induced properties affects the dynamic response and highlights changes in stability conditions of the structure.

  4. Power reactors and sub-critical blanket systems with lead and lead-bismuth as coolant and/or target material. Utilization and transmutation of actinides and long lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    collaborative R and D programmes are becoming of increasing importance. It is with this focus that the IAEA convened the Advisory Group Meeting on Design and Performance of Reactor and Subcritical Blanket Systems with Lead and Lead-Bismuth as Coolant and/or Target Material, in co-operation with the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE). the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and Minatom in the Russian Federation. This meeting, which assembled sixteen participants from eight countries, drew upon the vast experience of a group of international experts in order to review and discuss the recent R and D developments in critical and sub-critical concepts, coolant properties, and experimental and analytical validation work, as well as to exchange information on the experience accumulated. and to discuss the issues requiring further R and D. A total of twenty-four presentations and/or statements were made by the participants

  5. Preliminary neutronics design and analysis of helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Zhongliang; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; Chen, Chong; Li, Min; Zhou, Guangming

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Neutronics design of a helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR was presented. • The breeding zones parallel to FW and perpendicular to FW were optimized. • A series of neutronics analyses for the proposed blanket were shown. - Abstract: Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a test tokamak reactor being designed in China to bridge the gap between ITER and future fusion power plant. Tritium self-sufficiency is one of the most important issues for CFETR and the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) is recommended not less than 1.2. As one of the candidates, a helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR superconducting tokamak option was proposed. In the concept, radial arranged U-shaped breeding zones are adopted for higher TBR and simpler structure. In this work, three-dimensional neutronics design and analysis of the blanket were performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP with IAEA data library FENDL-2.1. Tritium breeding capability of the proposed blanket was assessed and the breeding zones parallel to first wall (FW) and perpendicular to FW were optimized. Meanwhile, the nuclear heating analysis and shielding performance were also presented for later thermal and structural analysis. The results showed that the blanket could well meet the tritium self-sufficiency target and the neutron shield could satisfy the design requirements.

  6. Conceptual design of a water cooled breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Pu, Yong; Cheng, Xiaoman [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Jia; Peng, ChangHong [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Ma, Xuebing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Chen, Lei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We proposed a water cooled ceramic breeder blanket with superheated steam. • Superheated steam is generated at the first wall and the front part of breeder zone. • Superheated steam has negligible impact on neutron absorption by coolant in FW and improves TBR. • The superheated steam at higher temperature can improve thermal efficiency. - Abstract: China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is an ITER-like superconducting tokamak reactor. Its major radius is 5.7 m, minor radius is 1.6 m and elongation ratio is 1.8. Its mission is to achieve 50–200 MW of fusion power, 30–50% of duty time factor, and tritium breeding ratio not less than 1.2 to ensure the self-sufficiency. As one of the breeding blanket candidates for CFETR, a water cooled breeder blanket with superheated steam is proposed and its conceptual design is being carried out. In this design, sub-cooling water at 265 °C under the pressure of 7 MPa is fed into cooling plates in breeding zone and is heated up to 285 °C with saturated steam generated, and then this steam is pre-superheated up to 310 °C in first wall (FW), final, the pre-superheated steam coming from several blankets is fed into the other one blanket to superheat again up to 517 °C. Due to low density of superheated steam, it has negligible impact on neutron absorption by coolant in FW so that the high energy neutrons entering into breeder zone moderated by water in cooling plate help enhance tritium breeding by {sup 6}Li(n,α)T reaction. Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles and Be{sub 12}Ti pebbles are chosen as tritium breeder and neutron multiplier respectively, because Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Be{sub 12}Ti are expected to have better chemical stability and compatibility with water in high temperature. However, Be{sub 12}Ti may lead to a reduction in tritium breeding ratio (TBR). Furthermore, a spot of sintered Be plate is used to improve neutron multiplying capacity in a multi-layer structure. As one alternative option

  7. Conceptual design of a water cooled breeder blanket for CFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We proposed a water cooled ceramic breeder blanket with superheated steam. • Superheated steam is generated at the first wall and the front part of breeder zone. • Superheated steam has negligible impact on neutron absorption by coolant in FW and improves TBR. • The superheated steam at higher temperature can improve thermal efficiency. - Abstract: China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is an ITER-like superconducting tokamak reactor. Its major radius is 5.7 m, minor radius is 1.6 m and elongation ratio is 1.8. Its mission is to achieve 50–200 MW of fusion power, 30–50% of duty time factor, and tritium breeding ratio not less than 1.2 to ensure the self-sufficiency. As one of the breeding blanket candidates for CFETR, a water cooled breeder blanket with superheated steam is proposed and its conceptual design is being carried out. In this design, sub-cooling water at 265 °C under the pressure of 7 MPa is fed into cooling plates in breeding zone and is heated up to 285 °C with saturated steam generated, and then this steam is pre-superheated up to 310 °C in first wall (FW), final, the pre-superheated steam coming from several blankets is fed into the other one blanket to superheat again up to 517 °C. Due to low density of superheated steam, it has negligible impact on neutron absorption by coolant in FW so that the high energy neutrons entering into breeder zone moderated by water in cooling plate help enhance tritium breeding by 6Li(n,α)T reaction. Li2TiO3 pebbles and Be12Ti pebbles are chosen as tritium breeder and neutron multiplier respectively, because Li2TiO3 and Be12Ti are expected to have better chemical stability and compatibility with water in high temperature. However, Be12Ti may lead to a reduction in tritium breeding ratio (TBR). Furthermore, a spot of sintered Be plate is used to improve neutron multiplying capacity in a multi-layer structure. As one alternative option, in spite of lower TBR, Pb is taken into

  8. Exploratory Study of Blanket Liquid Curtain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUGang; HUANGJinhua; FENGKaiming

    2003-01-01

    Blankets and other in-vessel components are easily damaged owing to their circumstance of high radiation and high heat. To protect them, first wall design should be considered. Owing to its high heat removal nd self-refreshing capability, liquid metal first wall has been seen as a potential first wall for a fusion reactor in the future. Blanketliquid curtain is actually a special liquid metal wall to protect blanket.

  9. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  10. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  11. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  12. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  13. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  14. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  15. A ceramic breeder in a poloidal tube blanket for a tokamak reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amici, A.; Anzidei, L.; Gallina, M.; Rado, V.; Simbolotti, G.; Violante, V.; Zampaglione, V.; Petrizzi, L. (Associazione Euratom-CNEN sulla Fusione, Centro di Frascati (Italy))

    1989-04-01

    A conceptual study of a helium-cooled solid breeder blanket for a tokamak reactor is presented. Tritium breeding capability together with system reliability are taken as the main design criteria. The blanket consists of tubular poloidal modules made of a central bundle of ceramic rods ({gamma}LiAlO/sub 2/) with a coaxial distribution of the inlet/outlet coolant flow (He) surrounded by a multiplier material (Be) in the form of bored bricks. The Be to {gamma}LiAlO/sub 2/ volume ratio is 4/1. The He inlet and outlet branches are cooling Be and {gamma}LiAlO/sub 2/, respectively. A purge He flow running through small central holes of the ceramic rods is derived from the main flow. Under the typical conditions of a tokamak reactor (neutron wall load=2 MW/m/sup 2/), a full coverage tritium breeding ratio of 1.47 is achieved for the following design and operating parameters: outlet He temperature=570/sup 0/C; inlet He temperature=250/sup 0/; total extracted power=2700 MW; He pumping power percentage=2%; minimum/maximum {gamma}LiAlO/sub 2/ temperature=400/900/sup 0/C; maximum structural temperature=475/sup 0/C; and maximum Be temperature=525/sup 0/C. (orig.).

  16. Basic principles of lead and lead-bismuth eutectic application in blanket of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the main requirements of advanced nuclear-power engineering is inherent safety of power installations. It initiates R and D of heavy liquid metals (lead, lead- bismuth eutectic) application in fission reactors as substitute of sodium. The same requirement makes advisable R and D of the lead and lead-bismuth eutectic application in blanket of fusion reactors as substitute of lithium. High magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop is an important issue for liquid metal blanket concepts. To decrease MHD-resistance authors propose to form electro-insulating coatings on internal surface of blanket ducts at any moment of fusion reactor exploitation. It may be achieved easily if lead or lead-bismuth eutectic is used and technology of oxidative potential handling is applied. A number of experiments carried out in NNSTU show the availability of the proposed technology. It bases on formation of the insulating coatings that consist of the oxides of components of the structural materials and of the coolant components. In-situ value of the electro-insulating coatings characteristics rd (r - specific resistance of coatings, d - thickness) is ∼ 10-5Ω·m2 for steels and 5, 0x10-6 - 5, 0x10-5Ω·m2 for vanadium alloys. Thermal cycling is possible during exploitation of a blanket. The experimental research of the insulating coatings properties during thermal cycling have shown that the coatings formed into the lead and lead-bismuth coolants save there electro-insulating properties. Experience of many years is an undoubted advantage of the lead-bismuth coolant and less of the lead coolant in comparison with lithium. Russian Federation possesses of experience of exploitation of the research and industrial facilities, of experience of creation of the pumps, steam generators and another equipment with heavy liquid metal coolants. The unique experience of designing, assembling and exploitation of the fission reactors with lead-bismuth coolant is also available. The problem

  17. Structural Materials: New Challenges, Manufacturing and Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important criteria of innovative fast reactors and advanced fuel cycle initiatives are improved efficiency, economic competitiveness and reduction of waste. To reach these goals and keep high safety standards, at least at the level of currently operating nuclear reactors, key issues are the availability of suitable structural materials and their performance assessment. The authors, on the basis of the wealth of experience gained in the European Union, India and Japan, aim to define the challenges and current status of material development and set the agenda for R and D in the coming years and decades. It is hoped that the joint perspective would enable realizing the expected criteria of sustainability envisaged through sodium cooled fast reactors and closed fuel cycles. (author)

  18. On Optimal Shapes in Materials and Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pauli

    2000-01-01

    In the micromechanics design of materials, as well as in the design of structural connections, the boundary shape plays an important role. The objective may be the stiffest design, the strongest design or just a design of uniform energy density along the shape. In an energy formulation it is proven...... that these three objectives have the same solution, at least within the limits of geometrical constraints, including the parametrization. Without involving stress/strain fields, the proof holds for 3D-problems, for power-law nonlinear elasticity and for anisotropic elasticity. To clarify the importance...... of parametrization, the problem of material/hole design for maximum bulk modulus is analysed. A simple optimality criterion is derived and with a simple superelliptic parametrization, agreement with Hashin-Shtrikman bounds are found. More general examples including nonequal principal strains, nonlinear elasticity...

  19. LIFE Materials: Overview of Fuels and Structural Materials Issues Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J

    2008-09-08

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission

  20. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, D.; Agostini, P.; Boutard, J. L.; Buckthorpe, D.; Diegele, E.; Dudarev, S. L.; English, C.; Federici, G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Li Puma, A.; Marbach, G.; Morris, P. F.; Packer, L. W.; Raj, B.; Rieth, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Ward, D. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a 'Starter Blanket' and 'Starter Divertor' is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m-2 fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m-2 first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290-320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R&D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200-350 °C) that could be realised, as a baseline-concept, using tungsten on a copper

  1. Flow characteristics of the Cascade granular blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of a single granule on a rotating cone shows that for the 350 half-angle, double-cone-shaped Cascade chamber, blanket granules will stay against the chamber wall if the rotational speed is 50 rpm or greater. The granules move axially down the wall with a slight (5-mm or less) sinusoidal oscillation in the circumferential direction. Granule chute-flow experiments confirm that two-layered flow can be obtained when the chute is inclined slightly above the granular material angle of repose. The top surface layer is thin and fast moving (supercritical flow). A thick bottom layer moves more slowly (subcritical flow controlled at the exit) with a velocity that increases with distance from the bottom of the chute. This is a desirable velocity profile because in the Cascade chamber about one-third of the fusion energy is deposited in the form of x rays and fusion-fuel-pellet debris in the top surface (inner-radius) layer

  2. Electrical connectors for blanket modules in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Analysis of static and cyclic strength for L-shaped and Z-shaped ES has been performed. • Analysis results do show that for L-shaped ES static and cyclic strength criteria are not satisfied. • Static and cyclic strength criteria are met well by ES with Z-shaped elastic elements. • ES with Z-shaped elastic elements has been adopted as a new baseline design for ITER. - Abstract: Blanket electrical connectors (E-straps, ES) are low-impedance electrical bridges crossing gaps between blanket modules (BMs) and vacuum vessel (VV). Similar ES are used between two parts on each BM: the first wall panel (FW) and shield block (SB). The main functions of E-straps are to: (a) conduct halo currents intercepting some rows of BM, (b) provide grounding paths for all BMs, and (c) operate as electrical shunts which protect water cooling pipes (branch pipes) from excessive halo and eddy currents. E-straps should be elastic enough to absorb 3-D imposed displacements of BM relative VV in a scale of ±2 mm and at the same time strong enough to not be damaged by EM loads. Each electrical strap is a package of flexible conductive sheets made of CuCrZr bronze. Halo current up to 137 kA and some components of eddy currents do pass through one E-strap for a few tens or hundreds milliseconds during the plasma vertical displacement events (VDE) and disruptions. These currents deposit Joule heat and cause rather high electromagnetic loads in a strong external magnetic field, reaching 9 T. A gradual failure of ES to conduct Halo and Eddy currents with low enough impedance gradually redistributes these currents into branch pipes and cause excessive EM loads. When branch pipes will be bent so much that will touch surrounding structures, the Joule heating in accidental electrical contact spots will cause local melting and may lead to a water leak. The paper presents and compares two design options of E-straps: with L-shaped and Z-shaped elastic elements. The latter option was

  3. Producing and optimizing novel materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahdi

    2011-12-01

    A series of detailed experimental and finite element investigations were carried out to study the response of selected objects which are currently utilized for load carrying. These investigations were later applied to optimize the mechanical performance of the studied structures and materials. First, a number of experiments and detailed finite element simulations were carried out to study the response and failure of single lap joints with non-flat interface under uniaxial tension. The adherents were made from fiber reinforced epoxy composite and the custom-made mold allowed the fibers to follow the profile of the bonded joint interface. The experiments showed that the interface shape has significant effect on the mechanical behavior and strength of the bonded joints. Finite element simulations were performed to estimate the distribution of shear and peeling stresses along the bonded joints and the results were linked to the experimental investigations. Additional parametric calculations were also carried out to highlight the role of interface shape on the distribution of stresses, and inherently the overall strength and behavior of the bonded joints. In addition, the role of a central void on the distribution of the stresses in a bonded joint with flat and non-flat sinusoidal interfaces was investigated. The second topic concerns Wood Plastic Composites (WPC) which are widely used in the industry due to its durability, low cost, and anti-moisture properties in comparison with the natural wood. In this research, we have produced flout shaped WPC samples using African black wood powder and Phenolic resin in a hot compression molding set-up. Initial WPC composites were produced by systematically changing the wood volume fraction. Based on these results the optimum temperature, pressure and wood volume fraction for developing WPC in a form of a flute is developed. A series of experimental procedures were performed to improve mechanical properties of WPC samples by

  4. The current status of fusion reactor blanket thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The available thermodynamic information is reviewed for three categories of materials that meet essential criteria for use as breeding blankets in D-T fuelled fusion reactors: liquid lithium, solid lithium alloys, and lithium-containing ceramics. The leading candidate, liquid lithium, which also has potential for use as a coolant, has been studied more extensively than have the solid alloys or ceramics. Recent studies of liquid lithium have concentrated on its sorption characteristics for hydrogen isotopes and its interaction with common impurity elements. Hydrogen isotope sorption data (P-C-T relations, activity coefficients, Sieverts' constants, plateau pressures, isotope effects, free energies of formation, phase boundaries, etc.) are presented in a tabular form that can be conveniently used to extract thermodynamic information for the α-phases of the Li-LiH, Li-LiD and Li-LiT systems and to construct complete phase diagrams. Recent solubility data for Li3N, Li2O, and Li2C2 in liquid lithium are discussed with emphasis on the prospects for removing these species by cold-trapping methods. Current studies on the sorption of hydrogen in solid lithium alloys (e.g. Li-Al and Li-Pb), made using a new technique (the hydrogen titration method), have shown that these alloys should lead to smaller blanket-tritium inventories than are attainable with liquid lithium and that the P-C-T relationships for hydrogen in Li-M alloys can be estimated from lithium activity data for these alloys. There is essentially no refined thermodynamic information on the prospective ceramic blanket materials. The kinetics of tritium release from these materials is briefly discussed. Research areas are pointed out where additional thermodynamic information is needed for all three material categories. (author)

  5. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  6. Two dimensional distribution of tritium breeding ratio and induced activity in Japanese water cooled and helium cooled test blanket modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    not take into account the common frame. In the verification of the tritium breeding ability of TBMs, this effect should be accounted. The result of induced activation analysis showed that induced activation level of the TBM is one order of magnitude lower than the fusion power plant. However, the activation level of the test blanket module seems to be two orders of magnitude higher than the acceptable activation level for recycle of the activated material. Analysis results obtained in this work will be used for the detailed estimation of tritium production performance and thermo-mechanical performance of TBM structures. The results of induced activation analysis will be used for the planning of the post-irradiation examination of TBM's. (author)

  7. Requirements for helium cooled pebble bed blanket and R and D activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carloni, D., E-mail: dario.carloni@kit.edu; Boccaccini, L.V.; Franza, F.; Kecskes, S.

    2014-10-15

    This work aims to give an outline of the design requirements of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket and its associated R and D activities. In DEMO fusion reactor the plasma facing components have to fulfill several requirements dictated by safety and process sustainability criteria. In particular the blanket of a fusion reactor shall transfer the heat load coming from the plasma to the cooling system and also provide tritium breeding for the fuel cycle of the machine. KIT has been investigating and developed a helium-cooled blanket for more than three decades: the concept is based on the adoption of separated small lithium orthosilicate (tritium breeder) and beryllium (neutron multiplier) pebble beds, i.e. the HCPB blanket. One of the test blanket modules of ITER will be a HCPB type, aiming to demonstrate the soundness of the concept for the exploitation in future fusion power plants. A discussion is reported also on the development of the design criteria for the blanket to meet the requirements, such as tritium environmental release, also with reference to the TBM. The selection of materials and components to be used in a unique environment as the Tokamak of a fusion reactor requires dedicated several R and D activities. For instance, the performance of the coolant and the tritium self-sufficiency are key elements for the realization of the HCPB concept. Experimental campaigns have been conducted to select the materials to be used inside the solid breeder blanket and R and D activities have been carried out to support the design. The paper discusses also the program of future developments for the realization of the HCPB concept, also focusing to the specific campaigns necessary to qualify the TBM for its implementation in the ITER machine.

  8. Requirements for helium cooled pebble bed blanket and R and D activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to give an outline of the design requirements of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket and its associated R and D activities. In DEMO fusion reactor the plasma facing components have to fulfill several requirements dictated by safety and process sustainability criteria. In particular the blanket of a fusion reactor shall transfer the heat load coming from the plasma to the cooling system and also provide tritium breeding for the fuel cycle of the machine. KIT has been investigating and developed a helium-cooled blanket for more than three decades: the concept is based on the adoption of separated small lithium orthosilicate (tritium breeder) and beryllium (neutron multiplier) pebble beds, i.e. the HCPB blanket. One of the test blanket modules of ITER will be a HCPB type, aiming to demonstrate the soundness of the concept for the exploitation in future fusion power plants. A discussion is reported also on the development of the design criteria for the blanket to meet the requirements, such as tritium environmental release, also with reference to the TBM. The selection of materials and components to be used in a unique environment as the Tokamak of a fusion reactor requires dedicated several R and D activities. For instance, the performance of the coolant and the tritium self-sufficiency are key elements for the realization of the HCPB concept. Experimental campaigns have been conducted to select the materials to be used inside the solid breeder blanket and R and D activities have been carried out to support the design. The paper discusses also the program of future developments for the realization of the HCPB concept, also focusing to the specific campaigns necessary to qualify the TBM for its implementation in the ITER machine

  9. A granulation model using diosgenin wastewater in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo BAO; Hui LIU; Yanxin WANG; Lijun ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    An enhanced start-up of an upfiow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for diosgenin wastewater treatment was designed and experimentally tested. Gran-ular sludge was formed on day 35 in the reactor with high concentrations of chloride (4000-7000 mg/L) and COD (5000-13000mg/L) as substrate. A new model for the granulation was proposed which divides the formation of anaerobic granules into six consecutive stages; they include semi-embryonic granule formation, embryonic granule formation, single-nucleus granule formation, multi-nuclei granule formation, granule growth and granule maturation. A model of the granule structure was also proposed based on scanning electron microscope observation. The microspores occurring on the surface and further leading into the interior of the granules were considered as the channels and the passage of the materials and the products of the microorganisms' metabolism inside the granules.

  10. Neutronic Analysis of Flux Dispersion in a Multi-Layered, (D-T) Driven Hybrid Blanket

    OpenAIRE

    İPEK, Osman

    2000-01-01

    The concept of `hybrid blanket' is based on the placement of the nuclear fuel layer, which is a fertile material and fissionable by the fusion neutrons, at the front or the rear sides of the tritium breeding zone so that, in addition to gaining fission energy, a fissile fuel is produced. The neutronic flux distribution (neutron spectrum) along the radial direction varies with the type of material and the geometry used in the blanket, and also according to whether it is multi-layered or s...

  11. Atmospheric corrosion of structural materials in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents investigations of the effects of aggressive atmospheric corrosion agents on the progress of corrosion of metal structure materials: carbon steel, zinc, copper and aluminium. The tests were performed at the corrosion stations according standards: ISO 9223:1992; ISO 9224:1992; ISO 9225:1992; ISO 9226:1992; ISO 8565:1992. As the result of 8 years of experience were determined main atmospheric factors influencing corrosion rates of the several standard metals. It was shown that except factors discussed in the standard ISO 9223:1992 (sulfur dioxide, time of wetness and chloride ion deposition) ozone play a main part in corrosion rates. Ozone accelerates particularly the corrosion of copper, however steel and aluminium too. (author)

  12. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolodosky, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fratoni, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Lithium is often the preferred choice as breeder and coolant in fusion blankets as it offers excellent heat transfer and corrosion properties, and most importantly, it has a very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and exacerbates plant safety concerns. For this reason, over the years numerous blanket concepts have been proposed with the scope of reducing concerns associated with lithium. The European helium cooled pebble bed breeding blanket (HCPB) physically confines lithium within ceramic pebbles. The pebbles reside within a low activation martensitic ferritic steel structure and are cooled by helium. The blanket is composed of the tritium breeding lithium ceramic pebbles and neutron multiplying beryllium pebbles. Other blanket designs utilize lead to lower chemical reactivity; LiPb alone can serve as a breeder, coolant, neutron multiplier, and tritium carrier. Blankets employing LiPb coolants alongside silicon carbide structural components can achieve high plant efficiency, low afterheat, and low operation pressures. This alloy can also be used alongside of helium such as in the dual-coolant lead-lithium concept (DCLL); helium is utilized to cool the first wall and structural components made up of low-activation ferritic steel, whereas lithium-lead (LiPb) acts as a self-cooled breeder in the inner channels of the blanket. The helium-cooled steel and lead-lithium alloy are separated by flow channel inserts (usually made out of silicon carbide) which thermally insulate the self-cooled breeder region from the helium cooled steel walls. This creates a LiPb breeder with a much higher exit temperature than the steel which increases the power cycle efficiency and also lowers the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop [6]. Molten salt blankets with a mixture of lithium, beryllium, and fluorides (FLiBe) offer good tritium breeding

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic research in fusion blanket engineering and metallurgical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of recent research activities in liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics (LM-MHDs) is presented in this article. Two major reserach areas are discussed. The first topic involves the thermomechanical design issues in a proposed tokamak fusion reactor. The primary concerns are in the magneto-thermal-hydraulic performance of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The second topic involves the application of MHD in material processing in the metallurgical and semiconductor industries. The two representative applications are electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of continuously cast steel and the Czochralski (CZ) method of crystal growth in the presence of a magnetic field. (author) 24 figs., 10 tabs., 136 refs

  14. Mechanical and materials engineering of modern structure and component design

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on mechanical and materials engineering as applied to the design of modern engineering materials and components. The contributions cover the classical fields of mechanical, civil and materials engineering, as well as bioengineering and advanced materials processing and optimization. The materials and structures discussed can be categorized into modern steels, aluminium and titanium alloys, polymers/composite materials, biological and natural materials, material hybrids and modern nano-based materials. Analytical modelling, numerical simulation, state-of-the-art design tools and advanced experimental techniques are applied to characterize the materials’ performance and to design and optimize structures in different fields of engineering applications.

  15. Neutronic evaluation of fissile fuel breeding blankets for the fission-suppressed Tandem-Mirror Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational study was performed on the blanket design of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) fission-suppressed Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor (TMHR) to qualify the methods and data bases available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for use in analyzing the neutronic performance of fissile fuel breeding blankets. The eventual goal of the study was to establish the capability for analysis and optimization of advanced fissile fuel production blanket designs. Discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations were performed in one-dimensional cylindrical geometry to obtain the blanket spatial distribution and energy spectra of the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes resulting from the monoenergetic (14.1 MeV) fusion first wall source. Key macroscopic cross sections of the blanket materials were then folded with the flux spectra to obtain reaction rates critical to evaluating blanket feasibility. Finally, a time-dependent depletion analysis was performed to evaluate the blanket performance during equilibrium cycle conditions. The results of the study are presented both as graphs and tables

  16. Some new ideas for Tandem Mirror blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tandem Mirror Reactor, with its cylindrical central cell, has led to numerous blanket designs taking advantage of the simple geometry. Also many new applications for fusion neutrons are now being considered. To the pure fusion electricity producers and hybrids producing fissile fuel, we are adding studies of synthetic fuel producers and fission-suppressed hybrids. The three blanket concepts presented are new ideas and should be considered illustrative of the breadth of Livermore's application studies. They are not meant to imply fully analyzed designs

  17. Lightweight IMM PV Flexible Blanket Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) photovoltaic (PV) integrated modular blanket assembly (IMBA) that can be rolled or z-folded. This IMM PV IMBA technology enables a revolutionary flexible PV blanket assembly that provides high specific power, exceptional stowed packaging efficiency, and high-voltage operation capability. DSS's technology also accommodates standard third-generation triple junction (ZTJ) PV device technologies to provide significantly improved performance over the current state of the art. This SBIR project demonstrated prototype, flight-like IMM PV IMBA panel assemblies specifically developed, designed, and optimized for NASA's high-voltage solar array missions.

  18. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Afsaneh [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  19. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  20. Status of LWR primary pressure boundary structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrity of major systems, structures and components is a prerequisite to the economy and safety of an existing light water reactor and also for the next generation reactors. As few reactor structural materials are being manufactured by domestic companies, based on economic and safety reasons, a new demand to improve the quality of domestic reactor structural materials and to develop reactor structural steels has arisen. Investigations on the state-of-the-art of the materials specifications, performance and current state of structural materials development were performed as a first step to domestic reactor structural steel development and summarized the result in the present report. (Author) 10 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs

  1. Reversible Hydrogen Storage MaterialsStructure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Ian M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Lab., Iowa

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  2. Dynamic response of structures constructed from smart materials

    OpenAIRE

    Caughey, T. K.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of structures constructed of homogeneous smart materials is greatly simplified by the observation that the eigenfunctions of such structures are identical to those of the same structures constructed entirely of purely elastic materials. The dynamic analysis of such structures is thus reduced to the analysis of the temporal behaviour of the eigenmodes of the structure. The theory is illustrated for both continuous and discrete structures using the generalization of 'positi...

  3. Controlled structuration and functionalization of organic-inorganic hybrid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials obtained by sol-gel process are very interesting materials. Indeed, these materials have both the properties of the organic phase and those of the inorganic matrix. Two functionalization and structuration ways are presented here: 1)the meso-porous hybrid materials formed in presence of structuring surfactant and the lamellar hybrid materials obtained by auto-assembling. (O.M.)

  4. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stork, D., E-mail: derek.stork@btinternet.com [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Agostini, P. [ENEA, Brasimone Research Centre, 40032 Cumugnano, Bologna (Italy); Boutard, J.L. [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Buckthorpe, D. [AMEC, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Diegele, E. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); English, C. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Federici, G. [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Gilbert, M.R. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gonzalez, S. [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Ibarra, A. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid (Spain); Linsmeier, Ch. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Li Puma, A. [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marbach, G. [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morris, P.F. [Formerly of TATA Steel Europe, Swinden Technology Centre, Moorgate, Rotherham S60 3AR (United Kingdom); Packer, L.W. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Raj, B. [Indian National Academy of Engineering, Shaheed Jeet Singh Marg, New Delhi 110016 (India); Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2014-12-15

    The findings of the EU ‘Materials Assessment Group’ (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R and D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a ‘Starter Blanket’ and ‘Starter Divertor’ is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m{sup −2} fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m{sup −2} first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R and D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290–320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R and D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200–350 °C) that could be realised, as a

  5. 47 CFR 22.353 - Blanketing interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements § 22.353 Blanketing interference. Licensees of...: ER17NO94.007 where d is the radial distance to the boundary, in kilometers p is the radial effective radiated power, in kilowatts The maximum effective radiated power in the pertinent direction,...

  6. Advanced Polymer For Multilayer Insulating Blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighat, R. Ross; Shepp, Allan

    1996-01-01

    Polymer resisting degradation by monatomic oxygen undergoing commercial development under trade name "Aorimide" ("atomic-oxygen-resistant imidazole"). Intended for use in thermal blankets for spacecraft in low orbit, useful on Earth in outdoor applications in which sunlight and ozone degrades other plastics. Also used, for example, to make threads and to make films coated with metals for reflectivity.

  7. ITER driver blanket, European Community design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbolotti, G. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Zampaglione, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Ferrari, M. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Gallina, M. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Mazzone, G. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Nardi, C. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Petrizzi, L. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Rado, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Violante, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Daenner, W. (NET Team, Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)); Lorenzetto, P. (NET Team, Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)); Gierszewski, P. (CFFTP, Mississauga, ON (Canada)); Gratt

    1993-07-01

    Depending on the final decision on the operation time of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the Driver Blanket might become a basic component of the machine with the main function of producing a significant fraction (close to 0.8) of the tritium required for the ITER operation, the remaining fraction being available from external supplies. The Driver Blanket is not required to provide reactor relevant performance in terms of tritium self-sufficiency. However, reactor relevant reliability and safety are mandatory requirements for this component in order not to significantly afftect the overall plant availability and to allow the ITER experimental program to be safely and successfully carried out. With the framework of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities (CDA, 1988-1990), a conceptual design of the ITER Driver Blanket has been carried out by ENEA Fusion Dept., in collaboration with ANSALDO S.p.A. and SRS S.r.l., and in close consultation with the NET Team and CFFTP (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project). Such a design has been selected as EC (European Community) reference design for the ITER Driver Blanket. The status of the design at the end of CDA is reported in the present paper. (orig.)

  8. Fidget Blankets: A Sensory Stimulation Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustos, Kelly Reilly; Trautwein, Heidi; Kerns, Rachel; Sobota, Kristen Finley

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) include behaviors such as aberrant motor behavior, agitation, anxiety, apathy, delusions, depression, disinhibition, elation, hallucinations, irritability, and sleep or appetite changes. A student-led project to provide sensory stimulation in the form of "fidget blankets" developed into a community outreach program. The goal was to decrease the use of antipsychotics used for BPSD.

  9. RF test blanket sub-module with ceramic breeder and helium cooling for test in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, V. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: koval@nikiet.ru; Kapyshev, V. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Leshukov, A. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Poliksha, V. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Shatalov, G. [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Strebkov, Yu. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Strizhov, A. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Sviridenko, M. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation)

    2006-02-15

    International thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) is anticipated as the only one step to DEMO fusion reactor. One of its main objectives is to demonstrate the availability and integration of technologies essential for a fusion reactor by testing of components for a future reactor including the test blanket modules (TBM) with different types of breeding materials. RF proposed to divide the TBM on two parts and to use two independent test blanket sub-modules (TBSM) which fixed on the frame in ITER horizontal experimental port for testing. CHC TBSM design description, its mechanical attachment on the frame, and principle schemes of helium cooling system and tritium cycle system are presented in this paper.

  10. Beryllium usage in fusion blankets and beryllium data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing numbers of designers are choosing beryllium for fusion reactor blankets because it, among all nonfissile materials, produces the highest number (2.5 neutron in an infinite media) of neutrons per 14-MeV incident neutron. In amounts of about 20 cm of equivalent solid density, it can be used to produce fissile material, to breed all the tritium consumed in ITER from outboard blankets only, and in designs to produce Co-60. The problem is that predictions of neutron multiplication in beryllium are off by some 10 to 20% and appear to be on the high side, which means that better multiplication measurements and numerical methods are needed. The n,2n reactions result in two helium atoms, which cause radiation damage in the form of hardening at low temperatures (300/degree/C). The usual way beryllium parts are made is by hot pressing the powder. A lower cost method is to cold press and then sinter. There is no radiation damage data on this form of beryllium. The issues of corrosion, safety relative to the release of the tritium built-up inside beryllium, and recycle of used beryllium are also discussed. 10 figs

  11. A demonstration of simple airfoils: Structural design and materials choices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunnell, L.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Piippo, S.W. (Richland School District, WA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    An educational unit is presented for building and evaluating simple wing structures, in order to learn about materials choice and lightweight construction. This unit is appropriate for a high school materials science class or lower-division college courses in structural engineering, materials science, or aeronautical engineering.

  12. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 16 contributions to the following topics: 1. Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; 2. Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environment under Off-Normal Conditions; 3. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; and 4. Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium. (MM)

  13. Recent developments of discrete material optimization of laminated composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Erik; Sørensen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    This work will give a quick summary of recent developments of the Discrete Material Optimization approach for structural optimization of laminated composite structures. This approach can be seen as a multi-material topology optimization approach for selecting the best ply material and number...

  14. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised.

  15. Material, Structural Design of Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    Stone and concrete are two materials generally used for the construction of rubble mound breakwaters. This paper deals with concrete only.......Stone and concrete are two materials generally used for the construction of rubble mound breakwaters. This paper deals with concrete only....

  16. Structured Piezoelectric Composites: Materials and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ende, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The piezoelectric effect, which causes a material to generate a voltage when it deforms, is very suitable for making integrated sensors, and (micro-) generators. However, conventional piezoelectric materials are either brittle ceramics or certain polymers with a low thermal stability, which limits t

  17. Hierarchical Optimization of Material and Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Helder C.; Guedes, Jose M.; Bendsøe, Martin P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a hierarchical computational procedure for optimizing material distribution as well as the local material properties of mechanical elements. The local properties are designed using a topology design approach, leading to single scale microstructures, which may be restricted...... in various ways, based on design and manufacturing criteria. Implementation issues are also discussed and computational results illustrate the nature of the procedure....

  18. Tritium recovery in Pb17Li-water cooled blanket systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malara, C. [Safety Technology Inst., Ispra (Italy); Casini, G. [Systems Engineering & Information Inst., Ispra (Italy); Viola, A. [Univ. of Cagliari (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    The question of tritium recovery in Pb17Li, water cooled blankets is under investigation since several years at JRC Ispra. The method which has been more extensively analyzed is that of slowly circulating the breeder out from the blanket units and of extracting the tritium from it outside the plasma vacuum vessel by helium gas purging in a suited process apparatus. The design features of the process systems are related to: (1) the very low tritium solubility in Pb17Li which implies high permeation rates through the containment structures; (2) the need of keeping as low as possible the tritium concentration in the cooling water both for safety and economical reasons. A computerized model of the tritium behavior in the blanket units and in the extraction system has been developed.

  19. Perspective: Role of structure prediction in materials discovery and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2016-05-01

    Materials informatics owes much to bioinformatics and the Materials Genome Initiative has been inspired by the Human Genome Project. But there is more to bioinformatics than genomes, and the same is true for materials informatics. Here we describe the rapidly expanding role of searching for structures of materials using first-principles electronic-structure methods. Structure searching has played an important part in unraveling structures of dense hydrogen and in identifying the record-high-temperature superconducting component in hydrogen sulfide at high pressures. We suggest that first-principles structure searching has already demonstrated its ability to determine structures of a wide range of materials and that it will play a central and increasing part in materials discovery and design.

  20. Optimization of Structure and Material Properties for Solids Composed of Softening Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendsøe, Martin P.; Guedes, J.M.; J.M., Plaxton;

    1996-01-01

    be expressed as a convex problem. However, the optimal distribution of material properties predicted in the nonlinear problem depends on the magnitude of load, in contrast to the case with linear material. Computational solutions are presented for several example problems, showing how the optimal designs vary......Recent results on the design of material properties in the context of global structural optimization provide, in analytical form, a prediction of the optimal material tensor distributions for two or three dimensional continuum structures. The model developed for that purpose is extended here...... to cover the design of a structure and associated material properties for a system composed of a generic form of nonlinear softening material. As was established in the earlier study on design with linear materials, the formulation for combined 'material and structure' design with softening materials can...

  1. Multi-Material Design Optimization of Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hvejsel, Christian Frier

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis entitled “Multi-Material Design Optimization of Composite Structures” addresses the design problem of choosing materials in an optimal manner under a resource constraint so as to maximize the integral stiffness of a structure under static loading conditions. In particular stiffness design of laminated composite structures is studied including the problem of orienting orthotropic material optimally. The approach taken in this work is to consider this multi-material design probl...

  2. Innovated Building Material's Interactions with Structural Form in Architectural Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaikci, Begüm

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Interpretation of building materials into architectural form, is gaining greater interest and attention due to the conservation of architectural heritage. This study highlight, the influences of technological developments of building materials and their interactions with structural form in architectural design projects. Architectural form and decisions can potentially effects by introduced new materials and this study focus on the interaction of new material and structural form...

  3. Normal operation and maintenance safety lessons from the ITER US PbLi test blanket module program for a US FNSF and DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A leading power reactor breeding blanket candidate for a fusion demonstration power plant (DEMO) being pursued by the US Fusion Community is the Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) concept. The safety hazards associated with the DCLL concept as a reactor blanket have been examined in several US design studies. These studies identify the largest radiological hazards as those associated with the dust generation by plasma erosion of plasma blanket module first walls, oxidation of blanket structures at high temperature in air or steam, inventories of tritium bred in or permeating through the ferritic steel structures of the blanket module and blanket support systems, and the 210Po and 203Hg produced in the PbLi breeder/coolant. What these studies lack is the scrutiny associated with a licensing review of the DCLL concept. An insight into this process was gained during the US participation in the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) Program. In this paper we discuss the lessons learned during this activity and make safety proposals for the design of a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) or a DEMO that employs a lead lithium breeding blanket

  4. Computational Design of Ageless Structural Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Crack initiation and propagation is a dominant failure mode for many materials and applications – usually managed via damage tolerance approaches." ...

  5. 2nd Generation RLV Airframe Structures and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Theodore F.

    2000-01-01

    The goals and objectives of the project summarized in this viewgraph presentation are the following: (1) Develop and demonstrate verified airframe and cryotank structural design and analysis technologies, including damage tolerance, safety, reliability, and residual strength technologies, robust nonlinear shell and cryotank analysis technologies, high-fidelity analysis and design technologies for local structural detail features and joints, and high-fidelity analysis technologies for sandwich structures; (2) Demonstrate low cost, robust materials and processing, including polymeric matrix composite (PMC) and metallic materials and processing, and refractory composite and metallic hot structures materials and processing; (3) Develop and demonstrate robust airframe structures and validated integrated airframe structural concepts, including low cost fabrication and joining, operations efficient designs and inspection techniques (non-destructive evaluation), scale-up and integrated thermal structure tests, and airframe structures IVHM; (4) Demonstrate low cost, robust repair techniques; and (5) Develop verified integrated airframe structural concepts, including integrated structural concepts.

  6. Optical Spectroscopy of Nano Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenhao

    In this thesis, nanostructures and nanomaterials ranging from 3D to OD will be studied compresively, by using optical methods. Firstly, for 3D and 2D nanomaterials, nanoporous zeolite crystals, such as AFI and AEL are introduced as host materials to accommodate diatomic iodine molecules. Polarized Raman spectroscopy is utilized to identify the two configurations of iodine molecules to stay in the channels of AEL: the lying mode (the bond of the two atoms is parallel to the direction of the channels) and the standing mode (the bond is perpendicular to the direction of the channels). The lying mode and standing mode are switchable and can be well controlled by the amount of water molecules inside the crystal, revealed by both molecule dynamics simulation and experiment observation. With more water molecules inside, iodine molecules choose to stay in the standing mode, while with less water molecules, iodine molecules prefer to lie along the channel. Therefore, the configurations of molecules could be precisely controlled, globally by the surrounding pressure and temperature, and locally by the laser light. Ii is believed that this easy and reversible control of single molecule will be valuable in nanostructured devices, such as molecular sieving or molecular detection. Secondly, for 1D case, the PL spectrum of ZnO nanowire under uniaxial strain is studied. When a ZnO nanowire is bent, besides the lattice constant induced bandgap change on the tensile and compressive sides, there is a piezoelectric field generated along the cross section. This piezoelectric potential, together with the bandgap changes induced by the deformation, will redistribute the electrons excited by incident photons from valence band to conduction band. As a result, the electrons occupying the states at the tensile side will largely outnumbered the ones at the compressive side. Therefore, the PL spectrum we collected at the whole cross section will manifest a redshift, other than the peak

  7. Diffusive heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Beznogov, M V; Yakovlev, D G

    2016-01-01

    We construct new models of outer heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars composed of binary ion mixtures (H - He, He - C, C - Fe) in and out of diffusive equilibrium. To this aim, we generalize our previous work on diffusion of ions in isothermal gaseous or Coulomb liquid plasmas to handle non-isothermal systems. We calculate the relations between the effective surface temperature Ts and the temperature Tb at the bottom of heat blanketing envelopes (at a density rhob= 1e8 -- 1e10 g/cc) for diffusively equilibrated and non-equilibrated distributions of ion species at different masses DeltaM of lighter ions in the envelope. Our principal result is that the Ts - Tb relations are fairly insensitive to detailed distribution of ion fractions over the envelope (diffusively equilibrated or not) and depend almost solely on DeltaM. The obtained relations are approximated by analytic expressions which are convenient for modeling the evolution of neutron stars.

  8. Water-cooled lithium-lead blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is an appendix to a study of the reactor relevance of the NET design concept. The present study examines whether the water-cooled lithium-lead blanket designed for NET can be directly extrapolated to a demonstration (DEMO) reactor. A fundamental requirement of the exercise is that the DEMO design should have a tritium breeding ratio which is higher than that in NET. The water-cooled lithium-lead blanket is discussed with respect to: neutronics design, design parameter survey and thermohydraulics, and engineering design. Results are reported of three-dimensional calculations using the Monte Carlo code MORSE-H to investigate possible neutron leakage between the poloidally disposed breeder tubes, and to determine the global tritium breeding ratio for the final double null machine design. (U.K.)

  9. Course Modules on Structural Health Monitoring with Smart Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hui-Ru; Walters, Wilbur L.; Zheng, Wei; Everett, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is an emerging technology that has multiple applications. SHM emerged from the wide field of smart structures, and it also encompasses disciplines such as structural dynamics, materials and structures, nondestructive testing, sensors and actuators, data acquisition, signal processing, and possibly much more. To…

  10. Economic evaluation of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic impact of employing the highly ranked blankets in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) was evaluated in the context of both a tokamak and a tandem mirror power reactor (TMR). The economic evaluation criterion was determined to be the cost of electricity. The influencing factors that were considered are the direct cost of the blankets and related systems; the annual cost of blanket replacement; and the performance of the blanket, heat transfer, and energy conversion systems. The technical and cost bases for comparison were those of the STARFIRE and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study conceptual design power plants. The economic evaluation results indicated that the nitrate-salt-cooled blanket concept is an economically attractive concept for either reactor type. The water-cooled, solid breeder blanket is attractive for the tokamak and somewhat less attractive for the TMR. The helium-cooled, liquidlithium breeder blanket is the least economically desirable of higher ranked concepts. The remaining self-cooled liquid-metal and the helium-cooled blanket concepts represent moderately attractive concepts from an economic standpoint. These results are not in concert with those found in the other BCSS evaluation areas (engineering feasibility, safety, and research and development (R and D) requirements). The blankets faring well economically had generally lower cost components, lower pumping power requirements, and good power production capability. On the other hand, helium- and lithium-cooled systems were preferred from the standpoints of safety, engineering feasibility, and R and D requirements

  11. Detection of Breeding Blankets Using Antineutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Bernadette; Huber, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement between the United States and Russia makes arrangements for the disposal of 34 metric tons of excess weapon-grade plutonium. Under this agreement Russia plans to dispose of its excess stocks by processing the plutonium into fuel for fast breeder reactors. To meet the disposition requirements this fuel would be burned while the fast reactors are run as burners, i.e., without a natural uranium blanket that can be used to breed plutonium surrounding the core. This talk discusses the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the verification of the presence or absence of a breeding blanket. It is found that a 36 kg antineutrino detector, exploiting coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering and made of silicon, could determine the presence of a breeding blanket at a liquid sodium cooled fast reactor at the 95% confidence level within 90 days. Such a detector would be a novel non-intrusive verification tool and could present a first application of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering to a real-world challenge.

  12. Lightweight Materials and Structures (LMS): Inflatable Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Inflatable Structures (InSTAR) project goal is to demonstrate long term durability of inflatable habitat structures for potential utilization as either in-space...

  13. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  14. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  15. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  16. An educational program on structural design with brittle /ceramic/ materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J. I.

    1978-01-01

    The organization of a proposed ceramic structural materials program is described, and a suggested course sequence for college-level and graduate-level courses is presented. The course work on ceramics and brittle fracture are intended to lead to a brittle material design project and a brittle material design problem. Criteria for the selection of appropriate projects/problems are considered.

  17. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  18. The ITER Blanket System Design Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The blanket system is one of the most technically challenging components of the ITER machine, having to accommodate high heat fluxes from the plasma, large electromagnetic loads during off-normal events and demanding interfaces with many key components (in particular the vacuum vessel and in-vessel coils) and the plasma. Plasma scenarios impose demanding requirements on the blanket in terms of heat fluxes on various areas of the first wall during different phases of operation (inboard and outboard midplane for start-up/shut-down scenarios and the top region close to the secondary X-point during flat top) as well as large electro-magnetic (EM) loads and transient energy deposition during off-normal plasma events (such as disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDE)). The high heat fluxes resulting in some areas have necessitated the use of “enhanced heat flux” panels capable of accommodating an incident heat flux of up to 5 MW/m2 in steady state. The other regions utilize “normal heat flux” panels, which have been developed and tested for a heat flux of the order of 1 — 2 MW/m2. The FW shaping design requires a compromise between the conflicting requirements for accommodation of steady state and transient loads (energy deposition during off-normal events). A shaped surface increases the heat loads which are due to plasma particles following the field lines compared to a perfectly toroidal surface. The blanket provides a major contribution to the shielding of the vacuum vessel and coils. A challenging criterion is the need to limit the integrated heating in the toroidal field coil (TFC) to ∼ 14 kW. This is particularly severe on the inboard leg where approximately 80% of the total nuclear heat on the TFC is deposited. Several design modifications were considered and analyzed to help achieve this, including increasing the inboard blanket radial thickness and reducing the assembly gaps. This paper summarizes the latest progress in the

  19. Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Harold H.; Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M.; Kung, Mayfair C.

    2016-05-31

    Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

  20. Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Harold H; Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M; Kung, Mayfair C

    2013-10-08

    Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

  1. Structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, C.J.

    1976-12-01

    The selection of structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamak-type fusion reactors is considered. The important criteria are working stress, radiation resistance, electromagnetic interaction, and general feasibility. The most advantageous materials appear to be face-centered-cubic alloys in the Fe-Ni-Cr system, but high-modulus composites may be necessary where severe pulsed magnetic fields are present. Special-purpose structural materials are considered briefly.

  2. Polymer composite material structures comprising carbon based conductive loads

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme, Robert; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Detrembleur, Christophe; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Bailly, Christian; Bednarz, Luikasz; Daussin, Raphaël; Saib, Aimad; Baudouin, Anne-Christine; Laloyaux, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a polymer composite material structure comprising at least one layer of a foamed polymer composite material comprising a foamed polymer matrix and 0.1 wt % to 6 wt % carbon based conductive loads, such as e.g. carbon nanotubes, dispersed in the foamed polymer matrix. The polymer composite material structure according to embodiments of the present invention shows good shielding and absorbing properties notwithstanding the low amount of carbon based conductive loa...

  3. Polymer composite material structures comprising carbon based conductive loads

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme, Robert; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Detrembleur, Christophe; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Bailly, Christian; Bednarz, Lucasz; Daussin, Raphaël; Saib, Aimad

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a polymer composite material structure comprising at least one layer of a foamed polymer composite material comprising a foamed polymer matrix and 0.1 to 6 wt% carbon based conductive loads, such as e.g. carbon nanotubes, dispersed in the foamed polymer matrix. The polymer composite material structure according to embodiments of the present invention shows good shielding and absorbing properties notwithstanding the low amount of carbon based conductive loads. Th...

  4. Smart Materials in Structural Health Monitoring, Control and Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Soh, Chee-Kiong; Bhalla, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    "Smart Materials in Structural Health Monitoring, Control and Biomechanics" presents the latest developments in structural health monitoring, vibration control and biomechanics using smart materials. The book mainly focuses on piezoelectric, fibre optic and ionic polymer metal composite materials. It introduces concepts from the very basics and leads to advanced modelling (analytical/ numerical), practical aspects (including software/ hardware issues) and case studies spanning civil, mechanical and aerospace structures, including bridges, rocks and underground structures. This book is intended for practicing engineers, researchers from academic and R&D institutions and postgraduate students in the fields of smart materials and structures, structural health monitoring, vibration control and biomedical engineering. Professor Chee-Kiong Soh and Associate Professor Yaowen Yang both work at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Dr. Suresh Bhalla is an A...

  5. A data base for aging of structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a Structural Aging (SAG) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the program is to provide assistance in identifying potential structural safety issues and to establish acceptance criteria for use in nuclear power plant evaluations for continued service. One of the main parts of the program focuses on the development of a Structural Materials Information Center where long-term and environment-dependent material properties are being collected and assembled into a data base. This data base is presented in two complementary formats. The Structural Materials Handbook is an expandable, hard-copy reference document that contains the complete data base for each material. The Structural Materials Electronic Data Base is accessible using an IBM-compatible personal computer. This paper presents an overview of the Structural Materials Information Center and briefly describes the features of the handbook and the electronic data base. In addition, a proposed method for using the data base to establish current property values for materials in existing concrete structures and to estimate the future performance of these materials is also presented. (author)

  6. A data base for aging of structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    USNRC initiated a Structural Aging (SAG) Program ORNL. The objective of the program is to provide assistance in identifying potential structural safety issues and to establish acceptance criteria for use in nuclear power plant evaluations for continued service. One main part focuses on the development of a Structural Materials Information Center where long-term and environment-dependent material properties are being collected and assembled into a data base. This data base is presented in two complementary formats. The Structural Materials Handbook is an expandable, hard-copy reference document that contains the complete data base for each material. The Structural Materials Electronic Data Base is accessible using an IBM-compatible personal computer. This paper presents an overview of the Structural Materials Information Center and briefly describes the features of the handbook and the electronic data base. In addition, a proposed method for using the data base to establish current property values for materials in existing concrete structures and to estimate the future performance of these materials is also presented

  7. Design of Spintronic Materials with Simple Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, C Y; Qian, M C; Liu, K; Yang, L H; Pask, J E

    2007-05-03

    A brief comparison of conventional electronics and spintronics is given. The key features of half metallic binary compounds with the zincblende structure are presented, using MnAs as an example. We discuss the interactions responsible for the half metallic properties. Special properties of superlattices and a digital ferromagnetic heterostructure incorporating zincblende half metals are also discussed.

  8. Heating performances of a IC in-blanket ring array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosia, G.; Ragona, R.

    2015-12-01

    An important limiting factor to the use of ICRF as candidate heating method in a commercial reactor is due to the evanescence of the fast wave in vacuum and in most of the SOL layer, imposing proximity of the launching structure to the plasma boundary and causing, at the highest power level, high RF standing and DC rectified voltages at the plasma periphery, with frequent voltage breakdowns and enhanced local wall loading. In a previous work [1] the concept for an Ion Cyclotron Heating & Current Drive array (and using a different wave guide technology, a Lower Hybrid array) based on the use of periodic ring structure, integrated in the reactor blanket first wall and operating at high input power and low power density, was introduced. Based on the above concept, the heating performance of such array operating on a commercial fusion reactor is estimated.

  9. Heating performances of a IC in-blanket ring array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosia, G., E-mail: gbosia@to.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Turin (Italy); Ragona, R. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics-LPP-ERM/KMS, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-10

    An important limiting factor to the use of ICRF as candidate heating method in a commercial reactor is due to the evanescence of the fast wave in vacuum and in most of the SOL layer, imposing proximity of the launching structure to the plasma boundary and causing, at the highest power level, high RF standing and DC rectified voltages at the plasma periphery, with frequent voltage breakdowns and enhanced local wall loading. In a previous work [1] the concept for an Ion Cyclotron Heating & Current Drive array (and using a different wave guide technology, a Lower Hybrid array) based on the use of periodic ring structure, integrated in the reactor blanket first wall and operating at high input power and low power density, was introduced. Based on the above concept, the heating performance of such array operating on a commercial fusion reactor is estimated.

  10. Fast-Breeder-Blanket Project: FBBF. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the final report for DOE contract DE-AC02-76ET37237 with the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Project. The Project was initiated to investigate the uncertainties in Fast Breeder Reactor blanket calculations. Absolute measurements of key neutron reaction rates, neutron spectra, and gamma-ray energy depositions were made in simulated FBF blankets in the Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF), a Cf-252 driven subcritical facility. Calculation of the spectra and integral reaction rates were made using methods, computer codes, and cross section data typical of those currently used in the design of FBR's. Comparisons of calculated to experimental integral neutron reaction rates give good agreement at the inner portions of the blanket by diverge to C/E ratios of about 0.65 at the outer edge of the blanket for reactions sensitive to the neutron density

  11. Micro-and nano-structured conducting polymeric materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Gewu; CHEN Feng'en; WU Xufeng; QU Liangti; ZHANG Jiaxin; SHI Gaoquan

    2005-01-01

    Conducting polymeric materials with micro-/nano-structures have potential applications in fabrication of various optical, electronic, sensing and electrochemical devices. This is mainly because these materials not only possess the characteristics of conducting polymers, but also have special functions based on their micro- or nano-structures. In this review, we summarize the recent work on "soft" and "hard" template-guided syntheses of micro-/nano-structured conducting polymers and open up the prospects of the main trends in this field.

  12. New progress on design and R and D for solid breeder test blanket module in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, K.M., E-mail: fengkm@swip.ac.cn; Zhang, G.S.; Hu, G.; Chen, Y.J.; Feng, Y.J.; Li, Z.X.; Wang, P.H.; Zhao, Z.; Ye, X.F.; Xiang, B.; Zhang, L.; Wang, Q.J.; Cao, Q.X.; Zhao, F.C.; Wang, F.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, M.C.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The new progress on design and R and D of Chinese solid breeder TBM are introduced. • The mock-up fabrication and component tests for Chinese HCCB TBM have being developed. • The neutron multiplier Be pebbles, tritium breeder Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, and structure material CFL-1 are being prepared. • The fabrication of 1/3 sized mock-up is being carried-out. • The key technology development is proceeding to the large-scale mock-up fabrication. - Abstract: ITER will be used to test tritium breeding module concepts, which will lead to the design of DEMO fusion reactor demonstrating tritium self-sufficiency and the extraction of high grade heat for electricity production. China plans to test the HCCB TBM modules during different operation phases. Related design and R and D activities for each TBM module with the auxiliary system are introduced. The helium-cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) is the primary option of the Chinese TBM program. The preliminary conceptual design of CN HCCB TBM has been completed. A modified design to reduce the RAFM material mass to 1.3 ton has been carried out based on the ITER technical requirement. Basic characteristics and main design parameters of CN HCCB TBM are introduced briefly. The mock-up fabrication and component tests for Chinese test blanket module are being developed. Recent status of the components of CN HCCB TBM and fabrication technology development are also reported. The neutron multiplier Be pebbles, tritium breeder Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, and structure material CLF-1 of ton-class are being prepared in laboratory scale. The fabrication of pebble bed container and experiment of tritium breeder pebble bed will be started soon. The fabrication technology development is proceeding as the large-scale mock-up fabrication enters into the R and D stage and demonstration tests toward TBM testing on ITER test port are being done as scheduled.

  13. A review of fusion breeder blanket technology, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study of fusion breeder blanket technology. It reviews the role of the breeder blanket, the current understanding of the scientific and engineering bases of liquid metal and solid breeder blankets and the programs now underway internationally to resolve the uncertainities in current knowledge. In view of existing national expertise and experience, a solid breeder R and D program for Canada is recommended

  14. Family Structure, Materialism, and Compulsive Consumption.

    OpenAIRE

    Rindfleisch, Aric; Burroughs, James E; Denton, Frank

    1997-01-01

    Despite the rapid and dramatic changes in the structure of the American family over the past thirty years (e.g., divorce, single parenting), consumer researchers have largely neglected the issue of how alternative family forms influence consumer behavior. The authors' initial inquiry into this area finds that young adults reared in disrupted families are more materialistic and exhibit higher levels of compulsive consumption than young adults reared in intact families. Furthermore, they show t...

  15. Preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis of ITER breeding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Shigeto; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1999-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical analysis has been conducted on ITER breeding blanket taking into account thermo-mechanical characteristics peculiar to pebble beds. The features of the analysis are to adopt an elasto-plastic constitutive model for pebble beds and to take into account spatially varying thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient, especially in the Be pebble bed, depending on the stress. ABAQUS code and COUPLED TEMPERATURE-DISPLACEMENT procedure of the code are selected so that thermal conductivity is automatically calculated in each calculation point depending on the stress. The modified DRUCKER-PRAGER/Cap plasticity model for granular materials of the code is selected so as to deal with such mechanical features of pebble bed as shear failure flow and hydrostatic plastic compression, and capability of the model is studied. The thermal property-stress correlation used in the analysis is obtained based on the experimental results at FZK and the results of additional thermo-mechanical analysis performed here. The thermo-mechanical analysis of an ITER breeding blanket module has been performed for four conditions: case A; nominal case with spatial distribution of thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient in Be pebble bed depending on the stress, case B; constant thermal conductivity, case C; thermal conductivity = -20% of nominal case, and case D; thermal conductivity = +20% of nominal case. In the nominal case the temperature of breeding material (Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}) ranges from 317degC to 554degC and the maximum temperature of Be pebble bed is 446degC. It is concluded that the temperature distribution is within the current design limits. Though the analyses performed here are preliminary, the results exhibit well the qualitative features of the pebble bed mechanical behaviors observed in experiments. For more detail quantitative estimates of the blanket performance, further investigation on mechanical properties of pebble beds by experiment

  16. NONLINEAR BUCKLING CHARACTERISTIC OF GRADED MULTIWEB STRUCTURE OF HETEROGENEOUS MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; ZHANG Zhi-min

    2005-01-01

    The graded multiweb structure of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, which makes full use of the continuous, gradual and changing physical mechanical performance of material properties, has a widespread application in aeroplane aerofoil structure and automobile lightweight structure. On the basis of laminate buckling theory,the equivalent rigidity method is adopted to establish the corresponding constitutive relation and the non-linear buckling governing equation for the graded multiweb structure. In finding the solution, the critical load of buckling under different complicated boundary conditions together with combined loads were obtained and testification of the experimental analysis shows that the calculation results can satisfy the requirements of engineering design in a satisfactory way. Results obtained from the research say that: graded materials can reduce the concentrated stress on the interface in an effective way and weaken the effect of initial defect in materials and thereby improve the strength and toughness of materials.

  17. Advanced Acoustic Blankets for Improved Aircraft Interior Noise Reduction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project advanced acoustic blankets for improved low frequency interior noise control in aircraft will be developed and demonstrated. The improved...

  18. Analysis of deficiencies in fast reactor blanket physics predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis addresses a deviation between experimental measurements and fast reactor blanket physics predictions. A review of worldwide results reveals that reaction rates in the blanket are underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration into the blanket. The analysis of this discrepancy involves two parts: quantifying possible error reductions using the most advanced methods and investigating deficiencies in current methodology. The source of these discrepancies was investigated by application of ''state-of-the-art'' group constant generation and flux prediction methodology to flux calculations for the Purdue University Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF). Refined group constant generation methods yielded a significant reduction in the blanket deviations; however, only about half of the discrepancy can be accounted for in this manner. Transport theory calculations were used to predict the blanket neutron transmission problem. The surprising result is that transport theory predictions utilizing diffusion theory group constants did not improve the blanket results. Transport theory predictions exhibited blanket underpredictions similar to the diffusion theory results. The residual blanket discrepancies not explained using advanced methods require a refinement of the theory. For this purpose an analysis of deficiencies in current methodology was performed

  19. Neutral gas blanket effects in a gaseous divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gaseous divertor employs a neutral gas blanket to absorb the plasma heat flux in the divertor chamber. This novel method for resolving the heat loading problem in a conventional divertor system is simulated experimentally. In our operational range (nsub(e) 13 cm-3, Tsub(e) <= 5 eV) it is demonstrated that the localized plasma heat flux is scattered relatively uniformly with neutral pressures of a few microns. At large neutral pressures the plasma stream is neutralized without touching a material wall. Plasma pumping inhibits neutral backflow and can sustain a neutral pressure difference comparable to the plasma pressure. Effective divertor channel conductance is measured to be reduced by a factor of six. (orig.)

  20. Overview of European Community (Activity 3) work on materials properties of fast reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fast Reactor Coordinating Committee set up in 1974 the Working Group Codes and Standards, and organized its work into four main activities: Manufacturing standards, Structural analysis, Materials and Classification of components. The main purpose of materials activity is to compare and contrast existing national specifications and associated properties relevant to structural materials in fast reactors. Funds are available on a yearly basis for tasks to be carried out through Study Contracts. At present about four Study Contract Reports are prepared each year

  1. Flight service environmental effects on composite materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Baker, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley and the U.S. Army have jointly sponsored programs to assess the effects of realistic flight environments and ground-based exposure on advanced composite materials and structures. Composite secondary structural components were initially installed on commercial transport aircraft in 1973; secondary and primary structural components were installed on commercial helicopters in 1979; and primary structural components were installed on commercial aircraft in the mid-to-late 1980's. Service performance, maintenance characteristics, and residual strength of numerous components are reported. In addition to data on flight components, 10 year ground exposure test results on material coupons are reported. Comparison between ground and flight environmental effects for several composite material systems are also presented. Test results indicate excellent in-service performance with the composite components during the 15 year period. Good correlation between ground-based material performance and operational structural performance has been achieved.

  2. Advanced structural integrity assessment procedures. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for discussion on recent results in research and utility practice in the field of methodology for the structural integrity assessment of components including relevant non-codified procedures. The scope of the meeting included deterministic and probabilistic approaches. The papers covered the following topics: Leak-before-break concepts; non-destructive examination (NDE) and surveillance results; statistical evaluation of non-destructive examination data; pressurized thermal shock evaluation; fatigue effects (including vibration); and verification qualification. The meeting was attended by 32 specialists from 8 countries. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Analysis of Time-Dependent Tritium Breeding Capability of Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiaokang; Pu, Yong; Zhu, Qingjun; Liu, Songlin

    2016-08-01

    Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is an important mission for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) operating on a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel cycle. It is necessary to study the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and breeding tritium inventory variation with operation time so as to provide an accurate data for dynamic modeling and analysis of the tritium fuel cycle. A water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) blanket is one candidate of blanket concepts for the CFETR. Based on the detailed 3D neutronics model of CFETR with the WCCB blanket, the time-dependent TBR and tritium surplus were evaluated by a coupling calculation of the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and the fusion activation code FISPACT-2007. The results indicated that the TBR and tritium surplus of the WCCB blanket were a function of operation time and fusion power due to the Li consumption in breeder and material activation. In addition, by comparison with the results calculated by using the 3D neutronics model and employing the transfer factor constant from 1D to 3D, it is noted that 1D analysis leads to an over-estimation for the time-dependent tritium breeding capability when fusion power is larger than 1000 MW. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2015GB108002, and 2014GB119000), and by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  4. Neutron Scattering Studies of Nanomagnetism and Artificially Structured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Bader, S.D.; Borchers, J.A.; Felcher, G.P.; Furdyna, J.K.; Hoffmann, A.; Kortright, J.B.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Schulthess, T.C.; Sinha, S.K.; Toney, M.F.; Weller, D.; Wolf, S.

    2003-02-01

    Nanostructured magnetic materials are intensively studied due to their unusual properties and promise for possible applications. The key issues in these materials relate to the connection between their physical properties (transport, magnetism, mechanical, etc.) and their chemical-physical structure. In principle, a detailed knowledge of the chemical and physical structure allows calculation of their physical properties. Theoretical and computational methods are rapidly evolving so that magnetic properties of nanostructured materials might soon be predicted. Success in this endeavor requires detailed quantitative understanding of the magnetic structure and properties.

  5. Microfabrication of hierarchical structures for engineered mechanical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera Canudas, Marc

    Materials found in nature present, in some cases, unique properties from their constituents that are of great interest in engineered materials for applications ranging from structural materials for the construction of bridges, canals and buildings to the fabrication of new lightweight composites for airplane and automotive bodies, to protective thin film coatings, amongst other fields. Research in the growing field of biomimetic materials indicates that the micro-architectures present in natural materials are critical to their macroscopic mechanical properties. A better understanding of the effect that structure and hierarchy across scales have on the material properties will enable engineered materials with enhanced properties. At the moment, very few theoretical models predict mechanical properties of simple materials based on their microstructures. Moreover these models are based on observations from complex biological systems. One way to overcome this challenge is through the use of microfabrication techniques to design and fabricate simple materials, more appropriate for the study of hierarchical organizations and microstructured materials. Arrays of structures with controlled geometry and dimension can be designed and fabricated at different length scales, ranging from a few hundred nanometers to centimeters, in order to mimic similar systems found in nature. In this thesis, materials have been fabricated in order to gain fundamental insight into the complex hierarchical materials found in nature and to engineer novel materials with enhanced mechanical properties. The materials fabricated here were mechanically characterized and compared to simple mechanics models to describe their behavior with the goal of applying the knowledge acquired to the design and synthesis of future engineered materials with novel properties.

  6. Systematic methodology for estimating direct capital costs for blanket tritium processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the methodology developed for estimating the relative capital costs of blanket processing systems. The capital costs of the nine blanket concepts selected in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study are presented and compared

  7. Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, I.; Murty, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-W reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses, and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This article addresses the material requirements for these advanced fission reactor types, specifically addressing structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas.

  8. Application of Advanced Radiation Shielding Materials to Inflatable Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovation is a weight-optimized, inflatable structure that incorporates radiation shielding materials into its construction, for use as a habitation module or...

  9. Low Cost, Lightweight, Multifunctional Structural Shielding Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR involves the development of a lightweight innovative material for use as structure and radiation shielding in one. APS has assembled a uniquely qualified...

  10. Classic and New Materials Used for Structural Rehabilitation. Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lute, M.

    2016-06-01

    New materials development with different combination of properties were always a challenge in terms of their adequate use in civil engineering. Introduction of carbon fibres as strength material for structures was a beginning of a new approach in structural rehabilitation, and sometimes meant the end of classic rehabilitation solution use. The present paper gives an example of a building rehabilitation that use a melt of both new and old solutions in order to achieve the optimum result for building itself. The problem was even more challenging, because the structure considered is only 22 years old, but having some design faults in terms of seismic behaviour and, in addition, one floor was added to existing structure. The chosen solution was a compromise between the use of old and new materials in places where their qualities were best suitable and their minuses could be compensated by the other material.

  11. Material and structural instabilities of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Wu; K. C. Hwang; J. Song; Y. Huang

    2008-01-01

    The nonlinear atomistic interactions usually involve softening behavior. Instability resulting directly from this softening are called the material instability, while those unrelated to this softening are called the structural instability. We use the finite-deformation shell theory based on the interatomic potential to show that the tension instability of single-wall carbon nanotubes is the material instability, while the compression and torsion instabilities are structural instability.

  12. Structure and properties of sintered tool gradient materials

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; B. Dołżańska

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of the presented is to elaborate the fabrication technology of novel sintered tool gradient materials on the basis of hard wolfram carbide phase with cobalt binding phase, and to carry out research studies on the structure and properties of the newly elaborated sintered tool gradient materials.Design/methodology/approach: The following research studies have been carried out to elaborate a new group of sintered tool gradient materials, wolfram carbide with cobalt ma...

  13. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF POLYMERIC MATERIALS IN NANO-SCALE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshio Nishi; So Fujinami; Dong Wang; Hao Liu; Ken Nakajima

    2011-01-01

    The nano-palpation technique, i.e., nanometer-scale elastic and viscoelastic measurements based on atomic force microscope, is introduced. It is demonstrated to be very useful in analyzing nanometer-scale materials properties for the surfaces and interfaces of various types of soft materials. It enables us to obtain not only structural information but also mechanical information about a material at the same place and at the same time.

  14. Extended propagation model for interfacial crack in composite material structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫相桥; 冯希金

    2002-01-01

    An interfacial crack is a common damage in a composite material structure . An extended propaga-tion model has been established for an interfacial crack to study the dependence of crack growth on the relativesizes of energy release rates at left and right crack tips and the properties of interfacial material characterize thegrowth of interfacial crack better.

  15. Simultaneous dynamic electrical and structural measurements of functional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchini, C.; Stewart, M.; Muñiz-Piniella, A.; Wooldridge, J. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Thompson, P.; McMitchell, S. R. C.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.; Wermeille, D.; Lucas, C. A. [XMaS, The UK-CRG, ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS40220, F-38043, Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Lepadatu, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Bikondoa, O.; Hase, T. P. A. [XMaS, The UK-CRG, ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS40220, F-38043, Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Lesourd, M. [ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS40220, F-38043, Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Dontsov, D. [SIOS Meßtechnik GmbH, Am Vogelherd 46, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Cain, M. G. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Electrosciences Ltd., Farnham, Surrey GU9 9QT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    A new materials characterization system developed at the XMaS beamline, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France, is presented. We show that this new capability allows to measure the atomic structural evolution (crystallography) of piezoelectric materials whilst simultaneously measuring the overall strain characteristics and electrical response to dynamically (ac) applied external stimuli.

  16. Dosimetry methods for fuels, cladding and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of the proceedings of the symposium on reactor dosimetry covers the following topics: the metallurgy and dosimetry interface, radiation damage correlations of structural materials and damage analyses techniques, dosimetry for fusion materials, light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance in practice and irradiation experiments, fast reactor and reseach reactor characterization

  17. Analysis and Design of Biological Materials and Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; Altenbach, Holm

    2012-01-01

    This collection provides researchers and scientists with advanced analyses and materials design techniques in Biomaterials and presents mechanical studies of biological structures. In 16 contributions well known experts present their research on Stress and Strain Analysis, Material Properties, Fluid and Gas mechanics and they show related problems.

  18. Tunable structural color in organisms and photonic materials for design of bioinspired materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fudouzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the key topics of tunable structural color in biology and material science are overviewed. Color in biology is considered for selected groups of tropical fish, octopus, squid and beetle. It is caused by nanoplates in iridophores and varies with their spacing, tilting angle and refractive index. These examples may provide valuable hints for the bioinspired design of photonic materials. 1D multilayer films and 3D colloidal crystals with tunable structural color are overviewed from the viewpoint of advanced materials. The tunability of structural color by swelling and strain is demonstrated on an example of opal composites.

  19. Analyses of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Multilayer Insulation Blankets Retrieved After 19 Years of Space Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groh, Kim K.; Perry, Bruce A.; Mohammed, Jelila S.; Banks, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Since its launch in April 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has made many important observations from its vantage point in low Earth orbit (LEO). However, as seen during five servicing missions, the outer layer of multilayer insulation (MLI) has become increasingly embrittled and has cracked in many areas. In May 2009, during the 5th servicing mission (called SM4), two MLI blankets were replaced with new insulation and the space-exposed MLI blankets were retrieved for degradation analyses by teams at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The retrieved MLI blankets were from Equipment Bay 8, which received direct sunlight, and Equipment Bay 5, which received grazing sunlight. Each blanket was divided into several regions based on environmental exposure and/or physical appearance. The aluminized-Teflon (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) outer layers of the retrieved MLI blankets have been analyzed for changes in optical, physical, and mechanical properties, along with chemical and morphological changes. Pristine and as-retrieved samples (materials) were heat treated to help understand degradation mechanisms. When compared to pristine material, the analyses have shown how the Al-FEP was severely affected by the space environment. Most notably, the Al-FEP was highly embrittled, fracturing like glass at strains of 1 to 8 percent. Across all measured properties, more significant degradation was observed for Bay 8 material as compared to Bay 5 material. This paper reviews the tensile and bend-test properties, density, thickness, solar absorptance, thermal emittance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental composition measurements, surface and crack morphologies, and atomic oxygen erosion yields of the Al-FEP outer layer of the retrieved HST blankets after 19 years of space exposure.

  20. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  1. Irradiation environment and materials behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation environment is unique for materials used in a nuclear energy system. Material itself as well as irradiation and environmental conditions determine the material behaviour. In this review, general directions of research and development of materials in an irradiation environment together with the role of materials science are discussed first, and then recent materials problems are described for energy systems which are already existing (LWR), under development (FBR) and to be realized in the future (CTR). Topics selected are (1) irradiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels for LWRs, (2) high fluence performance of cladding and wrapper materials for fuel subassemblies of FBRs and (3) high fluence irradiation effects in the first wall and blanket structural materials of a fusion reactor. Several common topics in those materials issues are selected and discussed. Suggestions are made on some elements of radiation effects which might be purposely utilized in the process of preparing innovative materials. (J.P.N.) 69 refs

  2. Fluoridation and oxidation behavior of JLF-1 and NIFS-HEAT-2 low activation structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, T.; Muroga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science - NIFS, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Kondo, M. [Fusion Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Nishimura, H. [Tokyo Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Nuclear Pressional School, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Noda, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Corrosion of structural materials, such as JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.1C-V-Ta) and NIFSHEAT- 2 (V-4Cr-4Ti), is paid attention most in Flibe (LiF-BeF{sub 2}) blanket development. In a previous corrosion study on steels, only oxides were identified as corrosion products after a conventional Flibe exposure test, while fluorides were indicated in another report with high purity Flibe after dehydration treatment. In order to clarify the corrosion mechanism in Flibe, it is essential to understand the competitive process by fluoridation and oxidation. Purpose of the present study is to characterize corrosion products of the low activation materials after fluoridation, oxidation and Flibe exposure tests, and to evaluate corrosion resistance of the materials in various conditions. JLF-1 JOYO-II heat and NIFS-HEAT-2 were machined and polished into specimens with 1 x 10 x 20 mm or 1 x 10 x 15 mm in size. The same size specimens of pure Fe, Cr, W, V and Ti were also prepared. The specimens were exposed to HF-H{sub 2}O solution at room temperature, and to flowing He-HF-O{sub 2} gas mixture and static molten salt Flibe at 673-873 K. High purity HF gas was made by a reaction between NiF{sub 2} and dehydrated He-H{sub 2} gas mixture. Flibe was dehydrated by HF gas bubbling treatment. After the exposure tests, weight change was measured. Corrosion products and microstructural change at the surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). In a XRD spectrum of JLF-1 after Flibe exposure at 823 K for 2003 hr, some peaks considered as FeF{sub 2} and CrF{sub 2} were observed, however their intensity was not enough to identify the compounds. The morphology and composition of the corrosion products were analyzed by SEM and compared with the one made in accelerated fluoridation tests with various composition of He-HF-O{sub 2} gas mixture. (authors)

  3. Fluoridation and oxidation behavior of JLF-1 and NIFS-HEAT-2 low activation structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Corrosion of structural materials, such as JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.1C-V-Ta) and NIFSHEAT- 2 (V-4Cr-4Ti), is paid attention most in Flibe (LiF-BeF2) blanket development. In a previous corrosion study on steels, only oxides were identified as corrosion products after a conventional Flibe exposure test, while fluorides were indicated in another report with high purity Flibe after dehydration treatment. In order to clarify the corrosion mechanism in Flibe, it is essential to understand the competitive process by fluoridation and oxidation. Purpose of the present study is to characterize corrosion products of the low activation materials after fluoridation, oxidation and Flibe exposure tests, and to evaluate corrosion resistance of the materials in various conditions. JLF-1 JOYO-II heat and NIFS-HEAT-2 were machined and polished into specimens with 1 x 10 x 20 mm or 1 x 10 x 15 mm in size. The same size specimens of pure Fe, Cr, W, V and Ti were also prepared. The specimens were exposed to HF-H2O solution at room temperature, and to flowing He-HF-O2 gas mixture and static molten salt Flibe at 673-873 K. High purity HF gas was made by a reaction between NiF2 and dehydrated He-H2 gas mixture. Flibe was dehydrated by HF gas bubbling treatment. After the exposure tests, weight change was measured. Corrosion products and microstructural change at the surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). In a XRD spectrum of JLF-1 after Flibe exposure at 823 K for 2003 hr, some peaks considered as FeF2 and CrF2 were observed, however their intensity was not enough to identify the compounds. The morphology and composition of the corrosion products were analyzed by SEM and compared with the one made in accelerated fluoridation tests with various composition of He-HF-O2 gas mixture. (authors)

  4. ITER blanket manifold system: Integration, assembly and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Alex, E-mail: alex.martin@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Dellopoulos, George [F4E, EU ITER Domestic Agency, Barcelona (Spain); Edwards, Paul; Furmanek, Andreas; Gicquel, Stefan; Macklin, Brian [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Martin, Patrick [RÜECKER LYPSA, Carretera del Prat, 65, Cornellá de Llobregat (Spain); Merola, Mario; Norman, Mark; Raffray, Rene [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The ITER in-vessel components have experienced a major redesign since the ITER Design Review of 2007. •-The blanket manifold system has been redesigned to improve leak detection and localization. •-The redesign of the blanket manifold system into a system based on individual pipes has proven to be a major engineering challenge. -- Abstract: The ITER Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) provides coolant for blankets and divertor. The blanket system consists of 440 blanket modules (BMs). The blanket manifold consists of a system of seamless pipes arranged in bundles and routed in poloidal direction from the upper ports of the Vacuum Vessel (VV) to the bottom of the machine. In each of the 18 upper ports there are 20 inlet and 20 outlet pipes, which split at the port exit in two directions, supplying cooling water to either the inboard or the outboard blanket modules. The manifold is routed between the VV and BMs. Branch pipes provide the connection between the manifold and the blanket cooling circuits through a coaxial connector welded to the shield block. A complex, sequential installation sequence has been developed in order to enable the assembly. Once installed the manifold is considered a semi-permanent component, but since failure would prevent ITER operation a maintenance strategy has been planned.

  5. An assessment of the base blanket for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.

    1991-12-31

    Ideally, the ITER base blanket would provide the necessary tritium for the reactor to be self-sufficient during operation, while having minimal impact on the overall reactor cost, reliability and safety. A solid breeder blanket has been developed in CDA phase in an attempt to achieve such objectives. The reference solid breeder base blanket configurations at the end of the CDA phase has many attractive features such as a tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 0.8--0.9 and a reasonably low tritium inventory. However, some concerns regarding the risk, cost and benefit of the base blanket have been raised. These include uncertainties associated with the solid breeder thermal control and the potentially high cost of the amount of Be used to achieve high TBR and to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the high temperature solid breeder and low temperature coolant. This work addresses these concerns. The basis for the selection of a breeding blanket is first discussed in light of the incremental risk, cost and benefits relative to a non-breeding blanket. Key issues associated with the CDA breeding blanket configurations are then analyzed. Finally, alternative schemes that could enhance the attractiveness and flexibility of a breeding blanket are explored.

  6. An assessment of the base blanket for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.

    1991-01-01

    Ideally, the ITER base blanket would provide the necessary tritium for the reactor to be self-sufficient during operation, while having minimal impact on the overall reactor cost, reliability and safety. A solid breeder blanket has been developed in CDA phase in an attempt to achieve such objectives. The reference solid breeder base blanket configurations at the end of the CDA phase has many attractive features such as a tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 0.8--0.9 and a reasonably low tritium inventory. However, some concerns regarding the risk, cost and benefit of the base blanket have been raised. These include uncertainties associated with the solid breeder thermal control and the potentially high cost of the amount of Be used to achieve high TBR and to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the high temperature solid breeder and low temperature coolant. This work addresses these concerns. The basis for the selection of a breeding blanket is first discussed in light of the incremental risk, cost and benefits relative to a non-breeding blanket. Key issues associated with the CDA breeding blanket configurations are then analyzed. Finally, alternative schemes that could enhance the attractiveness and flexibility of a breeding blanket are explored.

  7. ITER blanket manifold system: Integration, assembly and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The ITER in-vessel components have experienced a major redesign since the ITER Design Review of 2007. •-The blanket manifold system has been redesigned to improve leak detection and localization. •-The redesign of the blanket manifold system into a system based on individual pipes has proven to be a major engineering challenge. -- Abstract: The ITER Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) provides coolant for blankets and divertor. The blanket system consists of 440 blanket modules (BMs). The blanket manifold consists of a system of seamless pipes arranged in bundles and routed in poloidal direction from the upper ports of the Vacuum Vessel (VV) to the bottom of the machine. In each of the 18 upper ports there are 20 inlet and 20 outlet pipes, which split at the port exit in two directions, supplying cooling water to either the inboard or the outboard blanket modules. The manifold is routed between the VV and BMs. Branch pipes provide the connection between the manifold and the blanket cooling circuits through a coaxial connector welded to the shield block. A complex, sequential installation sequence has been developed in order to enable the assembly. Once installed the manifold is considered a semi-permanent component, but since failure would prevent ITER operation a maintenance strategy has been planned

  8. Achievements of element technology development for breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing the development of breeding blanket for fusion power plant, as a leading institute of the development of solid breeder blankets, according to the long-term R and D program of the blanket development established by the Fusion Council of Japan in 1999. This report is an overview of development plan, achievements of element technology development and future prospect and plan of the development of the solid breeding blanket in JAERI. In this report, the mission of the blanket development activity in JAERI, key issues and roadmap of the blanket development have been clarified. Then, achievements of the element technology development were summarized and showed that the development has progressed to enter the engineering testing phase. The specific development target and plan were clarified with bright prospect. Realization of the engineering test phase R and D and completion of ITER test blanket module testing program, with universities/NIFS cooperation, are most important steps in the development of breeding blanket of fusion power demonstration plant. (author)

  9. Spectral fine structure effects on material and doppler reactivity worth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New formulations concerning the fine structure effects on the reactivity worth of resonances are developed and conclusions are derived following the extension to more general types of perturbations which include: the removal of resonance material at finite temperatures and the temperature variation of part of the resonance material. It is concluded that the flux method can overpredict the reactivity worth of resonance materials more than anticipated. Calculations on the Doppler worth were carried out; the results can be useful for asessing the contribution of the fine structure effects to the large discrepancy that exists between the calculated and measured small sample Doppler worths. (B.G.)

  10. FIRE PROTECTION OF TIMBER STRUCTURES STRENGTHENED WITH FRP MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Zigler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern, progressive methods of structures’ strengthening based on the use of composite materials composed of high strength fibers (carbon, glass, aramid or basalt and matrices based on epoxy resins brings, among many indisputable advantages (low weight, high effectiveness, easy application etc. also some disadvantages. One of the major disadvantages is a low fire resistance of these materials due to the low glass transition temperature Tg of the resin used. Based on an extensive research of strengthening of historic structures with FRP materials [1], the article outlines possible approaches to this problem, especially while strengthening timber load- bearing structures of historic buildings.

  11. LMFBR Blanket Physics Project progress report No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is summarized in experimental and analytical investigations of the neutronics and photonics of benchmark mockups of LMFBR blankets. During the reporting period work was devoted primarily to a wide range of analytical/numerical investigations, including blanket fuel management/economics studies, evaluation of improved blanket designs, and assessment of state-of-the-art methods for gamma heating calculations. Experimental work included preparations for resumption of MIT Reactor operations, primarily fabrication of improved steel reflector assemblies for blanket mockups, and development of an improved radiophotoluminescent readout device for LiF thermoluminescent detectors. The most significant finding was that the neutronic and economic performance of radial blanket assemblies are essentially independent of core size (rating) for radially-power-flattened cores. Hence the methodology and results of current experiments and calculations should be valid for the large commercial LMFBR's of the future

  12. LMFBR Blanket Physics Project progress report No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, M.J. (ed.)

    1975-06-30

    Progress is summarized in experimental and analytical investigations of the neutronics and photonics of benchmark mockups of LMFBR blankets. During the reporting period work was devoted primarily to a wide range of analytical/numerical investigations, including blanket fuel management/economics studies, evaluation of improved blanket designs, and assessment of state-of-the-art methods for gamma heating calculations. Experimental work included preparations for resumption of MIT Reactor operations, primarily fabrication of improved steel reflector assemblies for blanket mockups, and development of an improved radiophotoluminescent readout device for LiF thermoluminescent detectors. The most significant finding was that the neutronic and economic performance of radial blanket assemblies are essentially independent of core size (rating) for radially-power-flattened cores. Hence the methodology and results of current experiments and calculations should be valid for the large commercial LMFBR's of the future.

  13. MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, M.J.

    1983-08-01

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record.

  14. MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record

  15. Topology optimization of coated structures and material interface problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Aage, Niels; Sigmund, Ole

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for including coated structures and prescribed material interface properties into the minimum compliance topology optimization problem. Several elements of the method are applicable to a broader range of interface problems. The approach extends the standard SIMP...... method by including the normalized norm of the spatial gradient of the design field into the material interpolation function, enforcing coating material at interfaces by attributing particular properties. The length scales of the base structure and the coating are separated by introducing a two......-step filtering/projection approach. The modeled coating thickness is derived analytically, and the coating is shown to be accurately controlled and applied in a highly uniform manner over the structure. An alternative interpretation of the model is to perform single-material design for additive manufacturing...

  16. Status report. KfK contribution to the development of DEMO-relevant test blankets for NET/ITER. Pt. 2: BOT helium cooled solid breeder blanket. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BOT (Breeder Outside Tube) Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Blanket for a fusion Demo reactor and the status of the R and D program is presented. This is the KfK contribution to the European Program for the Demo relevant test blankets to be irradiated in NET/ITER. Volume 1 (KfK 4928) contains the summary, volume 2 (KfK 4929) a more detailed version of the report. In both volumes are described the reasons for the selected design, the reference blanket design for the Demo reactor, the design of the test blanket including the ancillary systems together with the present status of the relative R and D program in the fields of neutronic and thermohydraulic calculations, of the electromagnetic forces caused by disruptions, of the development and irradiation of the ceramic breeder material, of the tritium release and recovery, and of the technological investigations. An outlook is given on the required R and D program for the BOT Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Blanket prior to tests in NET/ITER and the proposed test program in NET/ITER. (orig.)

  17. Corrosion of structural materials for Generation IV systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generation IV International Forum aims at developing future generation nuclear energy systems. Six systems have been selected for further consideration: sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). CEA, in the frame of a national program, of EC projects and of the GIF, contributes to the structural materials developments and research programs. Particularly, corrosion studies are being performed in the complex environments of the GEN IV systems. As a matter of fact, structural materials encounter very severe conditions regarding corrosion concerns: high temperatures and possibly aggressive chemical environments. Therefore, the multiple environments considered require also a large diversity of materials. On the other hand, the similar levels of working temperatures as well as neutron spectrum imply also similar families of materials for the various systems. In this paper, status of the research performed in CEA on the corrosion behavior of the structural material in the different environments is presented. The materials studied are either metallic materials as austenitic (or Y, La, Ce doped) and ferrito-martensitic steels, Ni base alloys, ODS steels, or ceramics and composites. In all the environments studied, the scientific approach is identical, the objective being in all cases the understanding of the corrosion processes to establish recommendations on the chemistry control of the coolant and to predict the long term behavior of the materials by the development of corrosion models. (author)

  18. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  19. Point Defect Phenomena of Crystalline Structure in Some Common Structural Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Yu-Zhong; WU Ren-Ping; YU Yan

    2005-01-01

    The existence and its movement rule of crystalline structure defect are closely related to the diffusion, solid phase reaction, sintering, phase transformation as well as the physical and chemical properties of materials. Point defect theory has been widely applied in material mineralization research, unfavorable transformation controlling, material modification,the research and development of new materials and so on. Point defect theory is one of the important theories for new material research and development. Herein we mainly discuss the application of point defect theory in some structural material researches.

  20. NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project - Structures and Materials Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Johnson, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The Structures & Materials Discipline within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project is focused on developing rotorcraft technologies. The technologies being developed are within the task areas of: 5.1.1 Life Prediction Methods for Engine Structures & Components 5.1.2 Erosion Resistant Coatings for Improved Turbine Blade Life 5.2.1 Crashworthiness 5.2.2 Methods for Prediction of Fatigue Damage & Self Healing 5.3.1 Propulsion High Temperature Materials 5.3.2 Lightweight Structures and Noise Integration The presentation will discuss rotorcraft specific technical challenges and needs as well as details of the work being conducted in the six task areas.

  1. Basic reactions of osteoblasts on structured material surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B�chter A.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess how bone substitute materials determine bone formation in vivo it is useful to understand the mechanisms of the material surface/tissue interaction on a cellular level. Artificial materials are used in two applications, as biomaterials alone or as a scaffold for osteoblasts in a tissue engineering approach. Recently, many efforts have been undertaken to improve bone regeneration by the use of structured material surfaces. In vitro studies of bone cell responses to artificial materials are the basic tool to determine these interactions. Surface properties of materials surfaces as well as biophysical constraints at the biomaterial surface are of major importance since these features will direct the cell responses. Studies on osteoblastlike cell reactivity towards materials will have to focus on the different steps of protein and cell reactions towards defined surface properties. The introduction of new techniques allows nowadays the fabrication of materials with ordered surface structures. This paper gives a review of present knowledge on the various stages of osteoblast reactions on material surfaces, focused on basic cell events under in vitro conditions. Special emphasis is given to cellular reactions towards ordered nano-sized topographies.

  2. Materials for Alternative Energies: Computational Materials Discovery and Crystal Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Chris

    2013-03-01

    Many of the key technological problems associated with alternative energies may be traced back to the lack of suitable materials. The materials discovery process may be greatly aided by the use of computational methods, particular those atomistic methods based on density functional theory. In this talk, we present an overview of recent work on energy-related materials from density-functional based approaches. We have developed novel computational tools which enable accurate prediction of crystal structures for new materials (using both Monte Carlo and Genetic Algorithm based approaches), materials discovery via high-throughput, data mining techniques, and automated phase diagram calculations. We highlight applications in the area of Li battery materials and hydrogen storage materials.

  3. DEM modeling of flexible structures against granular material avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Stéphane; Albaba, Adel; Nicot, François; Chareyre, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    This article presents the numerical modeling of flexible structures intended to contain avalanches of granular and coarse material (e.g. rock slide, a debris slide). The numerical model is based on a discrete element method (YADE-Dem). The DEM modeling of both the flowing granular material and the flexible structure are detailed before presenting some results. The flowing material consists of a dry polydisperse granular material accounting for the non-sphericity of real materials. The flexible structure consists in a metallic net hanged on main cables, connected to the ground via anchors, on both sides of the channel, including dissipators. All these components were modeled as flexible beams or wires, with mechanical parameters defined from literature data. The simulation results are presented with the aim of investigating the variability of the structure response depending on different parameters related to the structure (inclination of the fence, with/without brakes, mesh size opening), but also to the channel (inclination). Results are then compared with existing recommendations in similar fields.

  4. Fluctuation electron microscopy studies of complex structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gongpu; Rougée, Annick; Buseck, Peter; Treacy, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) is a hybrid imaging-diffraction technique. This technique is particularly sensitive to paracrystalline structures of dimension 0.5-2 nm, which are difficult to detect by either imaging or diffraction techniques alone. It has been successfully deployed to study paracrystalline structures in amorphous silicon, germanium thin film. This technique has also been used to study metallic glasses and oxide glasses. Until now, FEM has not been used to study disordered geological materials. In this talk we present our FEM studies of shungite, a naturally occurring disordered carbonaceous material, reveal that trace quantities of tightly curved graphene structures such as C60, or fragments of C60, is present in shungite. We also present results from our study of metamict zircon, whose crystal structure is destroyed by self-radiation during naturally occurring α decay events. Work is in progress to study the structural evolution during the metamictization process.

  5. 外科梗阻性黄疸综合治疗现状%Surgical Obstructive Jaundice Blanket Treatment Prorogation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓琳

    2002-01-01

    Objective To probe efficacy of blanket through summary of disease on surgical obstructive jaundice.Methods To analyze the material of varied pathogeny and treatment approaches to obstructive jaundice. Results Choosingthe superlative treatment method for early diagnose and blanket treatment based on varied pathogeny, situation of disease andthe doctor's techonical circumstance, will be major method of diagnose and treatment at present and even long time in thefuture. Conclustion With accurate choice of approaches on blanket treatment to obstructive jaundice surgery, to yiled variedand positive efficacy on both malignity and benign patients, and to improve the living quality of patients with malignityobstructive jaundice and prolong their life span. Therefore, we may set up more and better opportunities to operational treatmentfor obetructive jaundice patients,and rise the ratio of successful operation.

  6. Surface property variations in Venusian fluidized ejecta blanket craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Baker, Victor R.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive study of Magellan Cycles 1 and 2 radar data from Venus reveals surface roughness and dielectric variations associated with fluidized ejecta blanket (FEB) craters that help illuminate styles of flow ejecta emplacement. This study develops new procedures of digital unit mapping and polygon-filling algorithms using Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR), altimetry, and radiometry data. These techniques allow the extraction of radiophysical information for FEB crater materials, nearby plains, and lava flows. Backscatter curve slopes of the FEBs studied here are consistent with surface textures that are transitional between a'a and pahoehoe-like. Average surface property values of ejecta units are relatively similar for a given crater, but are discernibly different from other craters. Individual crater ejecta reflectivity and emissivity values are relatively similar to those for the surrounding plains, which may suggest a link between plains material and ejecta dielectric properties. Increasing FEB roughness downflow are interpreted to be associated with more lava-like flows, while decreasing roughness are more similar to trends typical of gravity (pyroclastic-like or debris-like) flows. Most commonly, FEB crater flow materials exhibit transitions from proximal, lava/melt-like flow styles to distal, gravity flow-like styles. Some FEBs show more complicated behavior, however, or appear to be more dominated by dielectric differences downflow, as inferred from correlations between the data sets. Such transitions may result from changes in local topography or from overlapping of flow lobes during FEB emplacement.

  7. Manufacture of blanket shield modules for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzetto, P. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: Patrick.Lorenzetto@tech.efda.org; Boireau, B. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, BP181, F-71200 Le Creusot (France); Boudot, C. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, BP181, F-71200 Le Creusot (France); Bucci, P. [CEA, DTEN/S3ME/LMIC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Furmanek, A. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ioki, K. [ITER IT, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Liimatainen, J. [Metso Powdermet, P.O. Box 306, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland); Peacock, A. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sherlock, P. [NNC Ltd., Booths Hall, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Taehtinen, S. [VTT Industrial Systems, P.O. Box 1704, Espoo, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    A research and development programme for the ITER blanket shield modules has been implemented in Europe to provide input for the design and the manufacture of the full-scale production components. It involves in particular the fabrication and testing of mock-ups (small scale and medium scale) and full-scale prototypes of shield blocks (SB) and first wall (FW) panels. The manufacturing feasibility of FW panels has been demonstrated for two copper alloy candidates. Two designs have been developed for the manufacture of the SB, one for a conventional fabrication route and one for a fabrication route based on the hot isostatic press technology. This paper presents the fabrication routes developed in Europe for the manufacture of the ITER Shield modules.

  8. Simulation of sludge blanket height in clarifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhen; WU Zhi-chao; WANG Zhi-wei; GU Guo-wei

    2009-01-01

    Sludge blanket height (SBH) is an important parameter in the clarifier design,operation and control.Based on an overview and classification of SBH algorithms,a modifed SBH algorithm is proposed by incorporating a threshold concentration limit into a relative concentration sharp change algorithm to eliminate the disturbance of compression interfaces on the correct simulation of SBH.Pilot-scale test data are adopted to compare reliability of three SBH algorithms reported in literature and the modified SBH algorithm developed in this paper.Calculated results demonstrate that the three SBH algorithms give results with large deviation (>50%) from measured SBH,especially under low solid flux conditions.The modified algorithm is computationally efficient and reliable in matching the measured data.It is incorporated into a onedimensional clarifier model for stable simulation of pilot-scale experimental clarifier data and into dynamic simulation of a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) clarifier data.

  9. Materializing a responsive interior: designing minimum energy structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie; Kofod, Guggi; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    (Lendlein, Kelch 2002) or light (van Oosten, Bastiaansen et al. 2009). All in all, this approach could form a whole new design paradigm, in which efficient 2D-manufacturing can lead to highly flexible, low weight and adaptable 3D-structures. This is illustrated by the design and manufacture of electro......This paper discusses a series of design-led experiments investigating future possibilities for architectural materialization relying on minimum energy structures as an example of adaptive structure. The structures have been made as laminates of elastic membrane under high tension with flexible...

  10. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  11. Strengthening of building structures using carbon composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Paranicheva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the question of ensuring the reliability of various building structures both at the stage of their construction and during operation is very urgent. There are a lot of different ways and constructive methods of structures strengthening. Аt the same time, traditional ways of concrete structures strengthening with steel reinforcement are such expensive, time consuming and in some cases require to interrupt the building operation. As an alternative, it is proposed to use composite materials based on high-strength carbon fibers.The authors consider the properties, advantages, disadvantages and the methods of application of these materials. This article presents results of a technical survey carried out in a public building in 2009. In this building the CFRP was used to strengthen concrete slabs, resting on the crossbar consoles. The calculation of the strength is adduced and the section selection is made. The authors demonstrate their conclusions about the feasibility of using carbon composite materials.

  12. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid bismuth, lead, and mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, J.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, a substantial program existed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel reactor program on the compatibility of bismuth, lead, and their alloys with structural materials. Subsequently, compatibility investigations of mercury with structural materials were performed in support of development of Rankine cycle mercury turbines for nuclear applications. The present talk will review present understanding of the corrosion/mass-transfer reactions of structural materials with these liquid metal coolants. Topics to be discussed include the basic solubility relationships of iron, chromium, nickel, and refractory metals in these liquid metals, the results of inhibition studies, the role of oxygen on the corrosion processes, and specialized topics such as cavitation-corrosion and liquid metal embrittlement. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing the understanding gained in this earlier work on the development of heavy liquid metal targets in spallation neutron sources.

  13. Porous structures of natural materials and bionic design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This investigation and morphology analysis of porous structure of some kinds of natural materials such as chicken eggshell, partridge eggshell, pig bone, and seeds of mung bean, soja, ginkgo, lotus seed, as well as the epidermis of apples, with SEM (Scanning Electronic Microscope) showed that natural structures' pores can be classified into uniform pores, gradient pores and multi pores from the viewpoint of the distribution variation of pore density, size and geometry. Furthermore, an optimal design of porous bearings was for the first time developed based on the gradient configuration of natural materials. The bionic design of porous structures is predicted to be widely developed and applied in the fields of materials and mechanical engineering in the future.

  14. Tritium isolation from lithium inorganic compounds applicable to thermonuclear reactor breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium separation from inorganic lithium compounds: Li2O, LiAlO2, Li2SiO3, Li4SiO4, LiF, LiBeF3, Li2BeF4 irradiated with a beam of a gamma facility and a nuclear reactor, has been studied. In the first case the gas phase is absent. In the latter one- the tritium amount in the gas does not exceed 1-2% of its total amount in the salt. Based on the EPR spectra of irradiated salts the concentrations of paramagnetic centres are calculated. It is shown that during thermal annealing the main portion of tritium in the gas phase is in the form of oxide (HTO, T2O). Tritium is separated from lithium fluoroberyllates in the form of hydrogen (HT, T2). The kinetics of tritium oxide isolation from irradiated lithium oxide aluminate, metha- and orthosilicates, lithium sulphate has been studied. The activation energies of tritium oxide separation process are presented. A supposition is made that chemical reaction of the HTO (T2O) or HT(T2) or HF(TF) formation is a limiting stage. Clarification of the process stage limiting the rate of tritium recovery will permit to evaluate conditions for the optimum work of lithium material in the blanket, lithium zone to select the lithium element structure and temperature regime of irradiation

  15. Spacecraft thermal blanket cleaning: Vacuum bake of gaseous flow purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1990-01-01

    The mass losses and the outgassing rates per unit area of three thermal blankets consisting of various combinations of Mylar and Kapton, with interposed Dacron nets, were measured with a microbalance using two methods. The blankets at 25 deg C were either outgassed in vacuum for 20 hours, or were purged with a dry nitrogen flow of 3 cu. ft. per hour at 25 deg C for 20 hours. The two methods were compared for their effectiveness in cleaning the blankets for their use in space applications. The measurements were carried out using blanket strips and rolled-up blanket samples fitting the microbalance cylindrical plenum. Also, temperature scanning tests were carried out to indicate the optimum temperature for purging and vacuum cleaning. The data indicate that the purging for 20 hours with the above N2 flow can accomplish the same level of cleaning provided by the vacuum with the blankets at 25 deg C for 20 hours, In both cases, the rate of outgassing after 20 hours is reduced by 3 orders of magnitude, and the weight losses are in the range of 10E-4 gr/sq cm. Equivalent mass loss time constants, regained mass in air as a function of time, and other parameters were obtained for those blankets.

  16. Material relation to assess the crashworthiness of ship structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlers, Sören

    2009-01-01

    A ship collision accident can result in severe environmental damage and loss of life. Therefore the non-linear finite element method with shell elements is used to assess the crashworthiness of ship steel structures through collision simulations. However, a non-linear finite element-based benchmark revealed inconsistencies and inaccuracies in the results of collision analysis using current material relations and failure criteria. To overcome these problems in this thesis, the steel material's...

  17. Structural integrity of materials in nuclear service: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains 679 abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) computer file dated 1973 through 1976 covering material properties with respect to structural integrity. All materials important to the nuclear industry (except concrete) are covered for mechanical properties, chemical properties, corrosion, fracture or failure, radiation damage, creep, cracking, and swelling. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for the convenience of the user

  18. Structural integrity of materials in nuclear service: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1977-06-07

    This report contains 679 abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) computer file dated 1973 through 1976 covering material properties with respect to structural integrity. All materials important to the nuclear industry (except concrete) are covered for mechanical properties, chemical properties, corrosion, fracture or failure, radiation damage, creep, cracking, and swelling. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for the convenience of the user.

  19. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  20. Left Handed Materials: A New Paradigm in Structured Electromagnetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new paradigm has emerged exhibiting reverse electromagnetic properties. Novel composite and micro-structured materials (metamaterials) have been designed to control electromagnetic radiation. Such substances have been called as Left Handed Material (LHM) with simultaneous negative permittivity and negative permeability and negative refractive index as well. Left handed materials are of importance because of their ability to influence the behavior of electromagnetic radiation and to display properties beyond those available in naturally occurring materials. Typically these are sub-wavelength artificial structures where the dimensions are very small compared to the working wavelength. These dimensions are normally of the order of λ/10 where λ is the wavelength of electromagnetic wave propagating in the material. Emergence of this new paradigm leads to some very interesting consequences, such as, to create lenses that are not diffraction limited, cloaking, sensors (chemical, biological and individual molecule), optical and radio communication. This new development in structured electromagnetic materials has had a dramatic impact on the physics, optics and engineering communities. (author)

  1. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments

  2. Modeling high temperature materials behavior for structural analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents approaches to characterize inelastic behavior of materials and structures at high temperature. Starting from experimental observations, it discusses basic features of inelastic phenomena including creep, plasticity, relaxation, low cycle and thermal fatigue. The authors formulate constitutive equations to describe the inelastic response for the given states of stress and microstructure. They introduce evolution equations to capture hardening, recovery, softening, ageing and damage processes. Principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics are presented to provide a framework for the modeling materials behavior with the aim of structural analysis of high-temperature engineering components.

  3. Nuclear data for radiation damage estimates for reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Nuclear Data for Radiation Damage Estimates for Reactor Structural Materials was convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA from 20-22 May 1985. The meeting was attended by 17 participants from 10 countries and 2 international organizations. The main objectives of the meeting were to review the status of displacement cross sections and the requirements for nuclear data needed for radiation damage estimates in reactor structural materials, and to develop recommendations for future activities in this field. This publication contains the text of all the papers prepared especially for this meeting including the conclusions and recommendations worked out during the meeting

  4. VAMAS tests of structural materials on aluminum alloy and composite material at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, T. [National Research Institute for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Evans, D. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    A Technical Working Area 17, cryogenic structural materials, has been organized in the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) to promote the prestandardization program on material properties tests of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials and alloys at liquid helium temperature. A series of international interlaboratory comparisons of both tensile and fracture toughness tests for aluminum alloy 2219 and compression and shear tests for composite material G-10CR were performed. Nine research institutes from seven nations have participated in this project. The results prove that there are few problems in cryogenic tensile tests for alloy materials. In compression and shear tests, the amount of data scatter was identified and further experiments are planned. This paper presents the program details and interim results of round robin tests.

  5. VAMAS tests of structural materials on aluminum alloy and composite material at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Technical Working Area 17, cryogenic structural materials, has been organized in the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) to promote the prestandardization program on material properties tests of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials and alloys at liquid helium temperature. A series of international interlaboratory comparisons of both tensile and fracture toughness tests for aluminum alloy 2219 and compression and shear tests for composite material G-10CR were performed. Nine research institutes from seven nations have participated in this project. The results prove that there are few problems in cryogenic tensile tests for alloy materials. In compression and shear tests, the amount of data scatter was identified and further experiments are planned. This paper presents the program details and interim results of round robin tests

  6. Structural Integrity Analysis On Superheater Material Of Plt Surabaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural integrity analysis on superheater material of PLTU Suralaya has been carried out. Tested material was carbon steel SA 209 T1A and ferritic steel SA 213 T2 based on data specification from PLTU Suralaya. All stages in analysis include collection of operation history background and material specification, visual examination, radiography testing, chemical composition testing, hardness testing and metallography testing. From analysis and testing results, it is shown that material suffered from decarburization on outside surface (00), hardness decrease and pitting corrosion on 00 surface. Primary cause of pipe failure is decarburization due to carbon element inside material that diffuses from inside to OD surface so that microstructure is only pure ferrite

  7. Multi-Material Design Optimization of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvejsel, Christian Frier

    properties. The modeling encompasses discrete orientationing of orthotropic materials, selection between different distinct materials as well as removal of material representing holes in the structure within a unified parametrization. The direct generalization of two-phase topology optimization to any number...... of phases including void as a choice using the well-known material interpolation functions is novel. For practical multi-material design problems the parametrization leads to optimization problems with a large number of design variables limiting the applicability of combinatorial solution approaches...... or random search techniques. Thus, a main issue is the question of how to parametrize the originally discrete optimization problem in a manner making it suitable for solution using gradient-based algorithms. This is a central theme throughout the thesis and in particular two gradient-based approaches...

  8. Laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Mezel, C., E-mail: candice.mezel@cea.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); CEA Le Ripault, 37260 Monts (France); Guillemot, F., E-mail: fabien.guillemot@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Chimier, B., E-mail: chimier@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Bourgeade, A., E-mail: antoine.bourgeade@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France); Regan, C., E-mail: regan@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Duchateau, G., E-mail: duchateau@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Souquet, A., E-mail: agnes.souquet@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Hebert, D., E-mail: david.hebert@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study we model nanomaterial structuring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser energy deposition is discussed first. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full and approximate models are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic material response is addressed via hydrodynamics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sild effects are accounted for - Abstract: Interaction of ultrafast laser, i.e. from the femtosecond (fs) to the nanosecond (ns) regime, with initially transparent matter may produce very high energy density hot spots in the bulk as well as at the material surface, depending on focusing conditions. In the fs regime, absorption is due to ionisation of the dielectric, which enables absorption process to begin, and then hydrodynamic to take place. In the ns regime both absorption and hydrodynamic are coupled to each other, which complexifies considerably the comprehension but matter structuration looks similar. A numerical tool including solution of 3D Maxwell equations and a rate equation for free electrons is first compared to some available simple models of laser energy absorption. Then, subsequent material deformation, i.e. structuration, is determined by solving hydrodynamic equations, including or not solid behaviour. We show that nature of the final structures strongly depends on the amount of deposited energy and on the shape of the absorption zone. Then we address some problems related to laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials in the fs, ps and ns regimes.

  9. The effects of coagulants on the structure of PBO materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin-huan; HUANG Yu-dong; MENG Lin

    2006-01-01

    PBO materials possess super mechanical properties and high thermal and chemical resistance due to their special rigid-rod backbones with heterocyclic chemical structure and supermolecular microstructure. But these structures may be affected by a series of preparing technologies, among which the coagulant is even more important. In this paper the chemical and microstructure changes of PBO materials coagulated with different solvents were investigated. Analyses of molecular weight and chemical structure of PBO coagulated indicate that the heterocyclic ring of PBO will experience cleavage in coagulation and in this stage water plays an important role. The final structure of PBO materials may involve several intermediate structures lying between benzoxazole and the open ring. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) 2θ scans and scanning probe microscope (SPM) show that the microstructure of PBO materials coagulated in solvents with different properties will change a lot and those coagulants with the smaller rate of diffusion like methanol can cause more ordered molecule alignment containing fewer voids.

  10. Extracellular Polymers in Granular Sludge from Different Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1994-01-01

    Thermal extraction was used to quantify extracellular polymers (ECP) in granules from anaerobic upflow reactors. The optimal time for extraction was determined as the time needed before the intracellular material gives a significant contribution to the extracted extracellular material due to cell...... of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor from a sugar-containing waste-water to a synthetic waste-water containing acetate, propionate and butyrate resulted in a decrease in both the protein and polysaccharide content and an increase in the lipid content of the extracellular material. Furthermore...

  11. Influence of start up and pulsed operation on tritium release and inventory of NET ceramic blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first estimate for the tritium release behaviour of a ceramic breeder blanket in pulsed operation is obtained by assuming a linear steady state temperature distribution and taking into account the time constant of the thermal behaviour. The release behaviour of the breeder exposed to consecutive periods of tritium generation is described with an analytical solution of the diffusion equation. The results are compared with a simple exponential approach valid for surfacte desorption controlled release. The exponential model is used to simulate a blanket with aluminate as breeder material, which takes longest to reach steady state. The simulation demonstrates that a significant fraction (>67%) of steady state can be achieved after a testing time of about one day. (author). 7 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Cell-based composite materials with programmed structures and functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-01

    The present invention is directed to the use of silicic acid to transform biological materials, including cellular architecture into inorganic materials to provide biocomposites (nanomaterials) with stabilized structure and function. In the present invention, there has been discovered a means to stabilize the structure and function of biological materials, including cells, biomolecules, peptides, proteins (especially including enzymes), lipids, lipid vesicles, polysaccharides, cytoskeletal filaments, tissue and organs with silicic acid such that these materials may be used as biocomposites. In many instances, these materials retain their original biological activity and may be used in harsh conditions which would otherwise destroy the integrity of the biological material. In certain instances, these biomaterials may be storage stable for long periods of time and reconstituted after storage to return the biological material back to its original form. In addition, by exposing an entire cell to form CSCs, the CSCs may function to provide a unique system to study enzymes or a cascade of enzymes which are otherwise unavailable.

  13. Phosphorus recovery by mesoporous structure material from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S H; Lee, B C; Lee, K W; Lee, S H; Choi, Y S; Park, K Y; Iwamoto, M

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the fundamental aspects of a possible removal of phosphorous from wastewater by using the mesoporous structure materials for wastewater reuse. The zirconium sulphate with mesoporous structure as a new type of ion exchangers was synthesised by hydrothermal reaction. From the results of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, it was discovered that the synthesised material had hexagonal mesoporous structure with a pore size of approximately 40-50A. Experimental results showed that the zirconium sulphate with mesoporous structure had very high sorption capacity for the phosphorus. The novel ion exchange occurred between PO4(3-) and SO4(2-), OH-. The amount of phosphate ions exchanged into the solid was as great as 3.4 mmol/g-ZS. Furthermore, it is possible to obtain a higher removal efficiency than other ion exchange media and adsorbents.

  14. Development of ITER shielding blanket prototype mockup by HIP bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of fabrication steps. Based on the results of study for optimization of the simultaneous HIP bonding conditions, the HIP conditions were 1050degC, 150 MPa and holding time of 2 hours. Before this assembly for the HIP process, a deep drilling was performed for the coolant channels of the shield block from both sides of the block, then the shield block was bent by 10000-ton press machine to provide the specified curvature. During the bending, iced water was inserted into the drilled holes to prevent excessive deformation of the holes. Iced water was applied as the inserted material in this study because it was easy to remove the inserted material from the drilled holes and chemical reaction could be prevented during removal of the inserted materials. After the HIP process, the first wall surface was finally machined. The back part of the module was also machined to provide coolant manifolds, then cover plates of the manifolds were welded by TIG welding. A series of measurements and inspections was performed in the course of fabrication to make sure the dimensional accuracy and integrity of pressure boundaries. A destructive inspection was also performed with a cut specimen from the edge of the fabricated module to examine the bondability of HIPed interfaces. As a result of this fabrication experience, sufficient bonding by the single step solid HIP process has been demonstrated, and sufficient technical data base on the fabrication of the ITER shielding blanket module has been obtained. (author)

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of critical composite material structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, John C., Jr.; Lesko, John J.; Weyers, R.

    1996-11-01

    A small span bridge that has suffered corrosive deterioration of a number of the steel structural members is in the process of being rehabilitated with glass and carbon fiber reinforced, pultruded polymer structural beams. As part of a comprehensive research program to develop methods for modeling long term durability of the composite material, nondestructive evaluation if being used to provide a preliminary assessment of the initial condition of the beams as well as to monitor the deterioration of the beams during service.

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and Pore Structure Analysis of Mesoporous Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Saldarriaga Lopez, Laura Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly provides a route to make mesoporous structures that have accessible internal surface area. These types of materials show promise for use in opto-electronic devices as well as for energy storage devices. In this work we synthesize a range of mesoporous thin films from molecular and nanocrystal precursors. We characterize these films' porous structure and surface area using ellipsometric-porosimetry. This work is divided into three parts; the first section focuses on synthesizing ...

  17. New smart materials to address issues of structural health monitoring.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaplya, Pavel Mikhail

    2004-12-01

    Nuclear weapons and their storage facilities may benefit from in-situ structural health monitoring systems. Appending health-monitoring functionality to conventional materials and structures has been only marginally successful. The purpose of this project was to evaluate feasibility of a new smart material that includes self-sensing health monitoring functions similar to that of a nervous system of a living organism. Reviews of current efforts in the fields of heath-monitoring, nanotechnology, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and wireless sensor networks were conducted. Limitations of the current nanotechnology methods were identified and new approaches were proposed to accelerate the development of self-sensing materials. Wireless networks of MEMS sensors have been researched as possible prototypes of self-sensing materials. Sensor networks were also examined as enabling technologies for dense data collection techniques to be used for validation of numerical methods and material parameter identification. Each grain of the envisioned material contains sensors that are connected in a dendritic manner similar to networks of neurons in a nervous system. Each sensor/neuron can communicate with the neighboring grains. Both the state of the sensor (on/off) and the quality of communication signal (speed/amplitude) should indicate not only a presence of a structural defect but the nature of the defect as well. For example, a failed sensor may represent a through-grain crack, while a lost or degraded communication link may represent an inter-granular crack. A technology to create such material does not exist. While recent progress in the fields of MEMS and nanotechnology allows to envision these new smart materials, it is unrealistic to expect creation of self-sensing materials in the near future. The current state of MEMS, nanotechnology, communication, sensor networks, and data processing technologies indicates that it will take more than ten years for the

  18. R and D activities of the liquid breeder blanket in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Won, E-mail: dwlee@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eo Hwak; Kim, Suk Kwon; Yoon, Jae Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MARS and GAMMA were developed for He coolant and liquid breeder analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FMS/FMS and Be/FMS joining methods were developed and verified with high heat flux test. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High temperature and pressure nitrogen and He loops were constructed for heat transfer experiment for developed codes validation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A PbLi breeder loop was constructed for components, MHD, and corrosion tests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A chamber for tritium extraction with a gas-liquid contact method was constructed. - Abstract: A liquid breeder blanket has been developed in parallel with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Test Blanket Module (TBM) program in Korea. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the common fields of a solid TBM such as design tools, structural material, fabrication methods, and He cooling technology to support this concept for the ITER. Also, other fields such as a liquid breeder technology and tritium extraction have been developed from the designed liquid TBM. For design tools, system codes for safety analysis such as Multi-dimensional Analysis of Reactor Safety (MARS) and GAs Multi-component Mixture Analysis (GAMMA) were developed for He coolant and liquid breeder. For the fabrication methods, Ferritic Martensitic Steel (FMS) to FMS and Be to FMS joinings with a Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) were developed and verified with a high heat flux test of up to 0.5-1.0 MW/m{sup 2}. Moreover, three mockups were successfully fabricated and a 10-channel prototype is being fabricated to make a rectangular channel FW. For the integrity of the joining, two high heat flux test facilities were constructed, and one using an electron beam has been constructed. With the 6 MPa nitrogen loop, a basic heat transfer experiment for code validation was performed. From the verification of the components such as preheater and

  19. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Victoria, M.

    2007-09-01

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors.

  20. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors

  1. Breeding zone models of DEMO ceramic helium cooled blanket test module for testing in IVV-2M reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of DEMO ceramic helium cooled blanket test module (CHC BTM) is to demonstrate a breeding capability that would lead to tritium self-sufficiency in ITER reactor and to extract a high-grade heat suitable for electricity generation. Experimental validation of all the adopted design solutions is main important problem at design and calculation works carrying out in order to develop the CHC BTM. One important task for breeding zones feasibility validation is in-pile tests. Two models were developed and fabricated for testing in the fission IVV-2M reactor. Breeding zone is based on poloidal BIT-conception. The models structural material is ferrito-martensitic steel. Breeder material is lithium orthosilicate in pebble beds and pellet forms. Multiplier material is beryllium in pebble beds and porosity forms. The cooling is provided by helium at 10 MPa. The tritium produced in the breeder material is purged by the helium flow at 0.1-0.2 MPa. Designs of model description and experimental channel, results of neutronic and thermo-hydraulic calculations are presented in the paper. (orig.)

  2. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  3. RILEM International Symposium on Materials and Joints in Timber Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, H-W; Garrecht, Harald

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the contributions from the RILEM International Symposium on Materials and Joints in Timber Structures that was held in Stuttgart, Germany from October 8 to 10, 2013. It covers recent developments in the materials and the joints used in modern timber structures. Regarding basic wooden materials, the contributions highlight the widened spectrum of products comprising cross-laminated timber, glulam and LVL from hardwoods and block glued elements. Timber concrete compounds, cement bonded wood composites and innovative light-weight constructions represent increasingly employed alternatives for floors, bridges and facades. With regard to jointing technologies, considerable advances in both mechanical connections and glued joints are presented. Self-tapping screws have created unprecedented options for reliable, strong as well as ductile joints and reinforcement technologies. Regarding adhesives, which constitute the basis of the jointing/laminating technology of modern timber products, extended o...

  4. Identification of material properties of sandwich structure with piezoelectric patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemčík R.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The work focuses on light-weight sandwich structures made of carbon-epoxy skins and foam core which have unique bending stiffness compared to conventional materials. The skins are manufactured by vacuum autoclave technology from unidirectional prepregs and the sandwich is then glued together. The resulting material properties of the structure usually differ from those provided by manufacturer or even those obtained from experimental tests on separate materials, which makes computational models unreliable. Therefore, the properties are identified using the combination of experimental analysis of the sandwich with attached piezoelectric transducer and corresponding static and modal finite element analyses. Simple mathematical optimization with repetitive finite element solution is used. The model is then verified by transient analysis when the piezoelectric patch is excited by harmonic signals covering the first two eigen-frequencies and the induced oscillations are measured by laser sensor.

  5. Structure and mechanics of interfaces in biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelat, Francois; Yin, Zhen; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-04-01

    Hard biological materials — for example, seashells, bone or wood — fulfil critical structural functions and display unique and attractive combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness, owing to their intricate architectures, which are organized over several length scales. The size, shape and arrangement of the ‘building blocks’ of which these materials are made are essential for defining their properties and their exceptional performance, but there is growing evidence that their deformation and toughness are also largely governed by the interfaces that join these building blocks. These interfaces channel nonlinear deformations and deflect cracks into configurations in which propagation is more difficult. In this Review, we discuss comparatively the composition, structure and mechanics of a set of representative biological interfaces in nacre, bone and wood, and show that these interfaces possess unusual mechanical characteristics, which can encourage the development of advanced bioinspired composites. Finally, we highlight recent examples of synthetic materials inspired from the mechanics and architecture of natural interfaces.

  6. Survey on structural material investigations for SNR 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 304 SS in a modified, fully austenitic version has been used for the construction of the primary and secondary heat transfer system, including the vessel and the pumps; the steam generators were built of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo-Nb ferritic steel. Coordinated programs involving INTERATOM, KfK, ECN, TNO, CEN/Mol have been performed. The SNR-300 project related structural material activities have provided a broad base to describe materials properties behaviour and design limitations under aspects of long-term component reliability and availability. High temperature design needs have been covered by the development of constitutive relations and computational programs. Integrity considerations and deformation limits under hypothetical circumstances have been verified successfully. Investigations on alternative materials for permanent structure have been started

  7. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  8. Applicability of tungsten/EUROFER blanket module for the DEMO first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we analyse a sandwich-type blanket configuration of W/EUROFER for DEMO first wall under steady-state normal operation and off-normal conditions, such as vertical displacements and runaway electrons. The heat deposition and consequent erosion of the tungsten armour is modelled under condition of helium cooling of the first wall blanket module and by taking into account the conversion of the magnetic energy stored in the runaway electron current into heat through the ohmic dissipation of the return current induced in the metallic armour structure. It is shown that under steady-state DEMO operation the first wall sandwich type module will tolerate heat loads up to ∼14 MW/m2. It will also sustain the off-normal events, apart from the hot vertical displacement events, which will melt the tungsten armour surface

  9. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  10. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242293

  11. Effects on electrochemical performances for host material caused by structure change of modifying material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yantao; Zhou, Enlou; Song, Dawei; Shi, Xixi; Wang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Jian; Zhang, Lianqi

    2014-09-01

    High ionic conductive lithium niobium oxides were selected as the modifying material to investigate the effects on the electrochemical performances for host material LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 caused by the structure change of the modifying material at various calcination temperatures and modifying amounts. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies revealed that the structure of the modifying material was single LiNbO3 phase after being calcined at 500 °C and changed to LiNbO3-Li3NbO4 mixture phases at 600 and 700 °C, and further changed to single Li3NbO4 phase at 800 °C. Electrochemical tests displayed that both LiNbO3 and Li3NbO4 phases of modifying material could contribute to the improvement of the cycle performances for the host material, but the improvement degree of Li3NbO4 phase was more evident. The cycle performances and high rate performances of the modified host material (calcined at 700 °C) electrodes were improved with the right modifying amount.

  12. Safety analysis of a loss-of-coolant accident in a breeding blanket for experimental fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocco, P.; Casini, G.; Djerassi, H.; Papa, L.; Pautasso, G.; Renda, V.; Rouyer, J.L.

    1985-07-01

    A LOCA in a blanket design proposed for NET (Next European Torus) is investigated. The structural analysis of a damaged breeder unit shows that this first containment barrier has a high probability of survival to this accident. The radioactive sources involved are evaluated and an assessment is made of all containment barriers and associated protection systems.

  13. 18 CFR 284.402 - Blanket marketing certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... effective for an affiliated marketer with respect to transactions involving affiliated pipelines when an affiliated pipeline receives its blanket certificate pursuant to § 284.284. (2) Should a marketer...

  14. Lightweight IMM Multi-Junction Photovoltaic Flexible Blanket Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DSS's recently completed successful NASA SBIR Phase 1 program has established a TRL 3/4 classification for an innovative IMM PV Integrated Modular Blanket Assembly...

  15. Basic materials and structures aspects for hypersonic transport vehicles (HTV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinheil, E.; Uhse, W.

    A Mach 5 transport design is used to illustrate structural concepts and criteria for materials selections and also key technologies that must be followed in the areas of computational methods, materials and construction methods. Aside from the primary criteria of low weight, low costs, and conceivable risks, a number of additional requirements must be met, including stiffness and strength, corrosion resistance, durability, and a construction adequate for inspection, maintenance and repair. Current aircraft construction requirements are significantly extended for hypersonic vehicles. Additional consideration is given to long-duration temperature resistance of the airframe structure, the integration of large-volume cryogenic fuel tanks, computational tools, structural design, polymer matrix composites, and advanced manufacturing technologies.

  16. Pelamis WEC - main body structural design and materials selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.

    2003-07-01

    This report summarises the results of a study evaluating the potential use of rolled steel, glass reinforced plastic, wood-epoxy laminate, and different forms of concrete as primary structural materials for the Pelamis Wave Energy Converter (WEC) as part of a strategy to refine the design by highlighting cost savings for long-term manufacture. Details are given of the drawing up of a load spectrum in order to assess the candidate structures, the choice of glass reinforced plastic, concrete, and steel for further evaluation based on preliminary screening, the assessment of the material requirements for each candidate structure, and cost estimates. The advantages of the use of concrete are discussed and recommendations are presented.

  17. Global Materials Structure Search with Chemically Motivated Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panosetti, Chiara; Krautgasser, Konstantin; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J

    2015-12-01

    Identification of relevant reaction pathways in ever more complex composite materials and nanostructures poses a central challenge to computational materials discovery. Efficient global structure search, tailored to identify chemically relevant intermediates, could provide the necessary first-principles atomistic insight to enable a rational process design. In this work we modify a common feature of global geometry optimization schemes by employing automatically generated collective curvilinear coordinates. The similarity of these coordinates to molecular vibrations enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures for covalently bound systems. In the application to hydrogenated Si clusters, we concomitantly observe a significantly increased efficiency in identifying low-energy structures and exploit it for an extensive sampling of potential products of silicon-cluster soft landing on Si(001) surfaces.

  18. Light thermal structures and materials for high speed flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Earl A.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, unified viscoplastic constitutive models have evolved to meet this need. These constitutive models provide a means for representing a material's response from the elastic through the plastic range including strain-rate dependent plastic flow, creep, and stress relaxation. Rate-dependent plasticity effects are known to be important at elevated temperatures. The purpose of this paper is to describe computational and experimental research programs underway at the Light Thermal Structures Center focused on the investigation of the response of structures and materials to local heating. In the first part of the paper, finite element thermoviscoplastic analysis is highlighted. In the second part of the paper, the thermal-structures experimental program is outlined.

  19. Interpenetration in coordination polymers: structural diversities toward porous functional materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Haldar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpenetration is a natural phenomenon frequently encountered in porous coordination polymers (PCPs or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs. Traditionally interpenetration has been considered as a threat to permanent porosity and several strategies have been adopted to control the framework interpenetration. Recent literature reports have unveiled that interpenetration has paramount importance in several material properties particularly in storage and separation of small gas molecules. Such frameworks also show interesting structural flexibility based on shearing or movement of the nets and also reveals guest induced dynamic structural transformation for modulated specific functions. In this review, we will emphasize several interpenetration phenomena observed in coordination polymers, their intriguing structural aspects and fascinating material properties.

  20. Failure modes and materials design for biomechanical layer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan

    Ceramic materials are finding increasing usage in the area of biomechanical replacements---dental crowns, hip and bone implants, etc.---where strength, wear resistance, biocompatibility, chemical durability and even aesthetics are critical issues. Aesthetic ceramic crowns have been widely used in dentistry to replace damaged or missing teeth. However, the failure rates of ceramic crowns, especially all-ceramic crowns, can be 1%˜6% per year, which is not satisfactory to patients. The materials limitations and underlying fracture mechanisms of these prostheses are not well understood. In this thesis, fundamental fracture and damage mechanisms in model dental bilayer and trilayer structures are studied. Principle failure modes are identified from in situ experimentation and confirmed by fracture mechanics analysis. In bilayer structures of ceramic/polycarbonate (representative of ceramic crown/dentin structure), three major damage sources are identified: (i) top-surface cone cracks or (ii) quasiplasticity, dominating in thick ceramic bilayers; (iii) bottom-surface radial cracks, dominating in thin ceramic bilayers. Critical load P for each damage mode are measured in six dental ceramics: Y-TZP zirconia, glass-infiltrated zirconia and alumina (InCeram), glass-ceramic (Empress II), Porcelain (Mark II and Empress) bonded to polymer substrates, as a function of ceramic thickness d in the range of 100 mum to 10 mm. P is found independent of d for mode (i) and (ii), but has a d 2 relations for mode (iii)---bottom surface radial cracking. In trilayer structures of glass/core-ceramic/polycarbonate (representing veneer porcelain/core/dentin structures), three inner fracture origins are identified: radial cracks from the bottom surface in the (i) first and (ii) second layers; and (iii) quasiplasticity in core-ceramic layer. The role of relative veneer/core thickness, d1/d 2 and materials properties is investigated for three core materials with different modulus (114--270GPa

  1. Blankets for tritium catalyzed deuterium (TCD) fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TCD fusion fuel cycle - where the 3He from the D(D,n)3He reaction is transmuted, by neutron capture in the blanket, into tritium which is fed back to the plasma - was recently recognized as being potentially more promising than the Catalyzed Deuterium (Cat-D) fuel cycle for tokamak power reactors. It is the purpose of the present work to assess the feasibility of, and to identify promising directions for designing blankets for TCD fusion reactors

  2. Impact of prescribed burning on blanket peat hydrology

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, J; Palmer, SM; Johnston, K; Wearing, C.; Irvine, B; Brown, LE

    2015-01-01

    Fire is known to impact soil properties and hydrological flowpaths. However, the impact of prescribed vegetation burning on blanket peatland hydrology is poorly understood. We studied ten blanket peat headwater catchments. Five were subject to prescribed burning, while five were unburnt controls. Within the burnt catchments we studied plots where the last burn occurred ∼2 (B2), 4 (B4), 7 (B7) or greater than 10 years (B10+) prior to the start of measurements. These were compared with plots at...

  3. Axial blanket for 16NGF Angra 1 fuel type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadde, Luciano Martins; Faria, Eduardo Fernandes [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: sadde@inb.gov.br; faria@inb.gov.br; Sang-Keun You [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd. (KNFC), Taejon (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: skyou@knfc.co.kr

    2007-07-01

    Angra-1, Kori-2 and Krsko are nuclear power plants with the same design. However, the fuel assemblies have some differences in design due to the countries strategies and the differences in the fabrication process. The 16NGF (16x16 Next Generation Fuel) was developed by INB, KNFC and Westinghouse in order to be used in these three nuclear power plants and the 'Axial Blanket' is one of the new features for the 16NGF design. The main purpose of the Axial Blanket Optimization study is to determine which axial blanket enrichment and length would provide the better fuel cycle cost benefit. All of the calculations were performed using Gadolinium as Burnable Absorber and solid pellets type for Axial Blanket. The results indicate 1.8 w/o U235 enrichment and 8 inches length as the best option of Axial Blanket from the fuel cycle cost benefit standpoint. The economy is about 1.8%. The difference in the reload cost in the range between 1.5 and 2.6 w/o U235 enrichment and for the 6 and 8 inches length is not so significant. Due that, from the Fq limit standpoint and also for longer cycle length requirements, a higher axial blanket enrichment (2.6 w/o) and shorter length (6 inches) is recommended. (author)

  4. Ferromagnetic materials in the zinc-blende structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, B.; Bergqvist, L.; Eriksson, O.

    2003-08-01

    New materials are currently sought for use in spintronics applications. Ferromagnetic materials with half metallic properties are valuable in this respect. Here we present the electronic structure and magnetic properties of binary compounds consisting of 3d transition metals and group V elements, viz., P, Sb, and As in the zinc-blende structure. We demonstrate that compounds of V, Cr, and Mn show half metallic behavior for appropriate lattice constants. By comparing the total energies in the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic structures, we have ascertained that the ferromagnetic phase is stable over the antiferromagnetic one. Of the different compounds studied, the Cr based systems exhibit the strongest interatomic exchange interactions, and are hence predicted to have the highest critical temperatures. Also, we predict that VAs under certain growth conditions should be a semiconducting ferromagnet. Moreover, critical temperatures of selected half metallic compounds have been estimated from mean field theory and Monte Carlo simulations using parameters obtained from a ab initio noncollinear, tight binding linearized muffin-tin orbital method. From a simple model, we calculate the reflectance from an ideal MnAs/InAs interface considering the band structures of MnAs and InAs. Finally, we present results on the relative stabilities of MnAs and CrSb compounds in the NiAs and zinc-blende structures, and suggest a parameter space in substrate lattice spacings for when the zinc-blende structure is expected to be stable.

  5. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  6. Uncertainty Quantification in Experimental Structural Dynamics Identification of Composite Material Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, Marcin; Peeters, Bart; Kahsin, Maciej;

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace and wind energy structures are extensively using components made of composite materials. Since these structures are subjected to dynamic environments with time-varying loading conditions, it is important to model their dynamic behavior and validate these models by means of vibration...... for uncertainty evaluation in experimentally estimated models. Investigated structures are plates, fuselage panels and helicopter main rotor blades as they represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled structures made of composite materials. To evaluate...

  7. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic of pebble bed blanket on hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives thermal-hydraulic studies of pebble bed blanket on Hybrid Reactor. The concept of whole pebble bed blanket and the cooling methods are presented. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics of pebble bed are summarized. The theoretical model and code for solving heat transfer and flowing are presented. By using this code the calculation and analysis of thermal hydraulic of pebble bed Blanket of Hybrid Reactor are also given. In order to improve the flexibility, safety and economy, the authors select pebble beds not only to breed Tritium, but also to breed fission material and to multiply neutron. 5 MPa Helium is used as coolant and 0.05 MPa-0.1 MPa Helium is used as Purge gas. The heat transfer mechanisms of pebble bed are very complicated which include conduction, convection and radiation. In order to study the thermal-hydraulic of the bed, the authors just simply consider it as homogeneous and continuous binary phase medium as that used in the porous medium at the condition that the size of the bed is much greater than that of the balls. The coolant or the purge gas flowing through the bed is just considered existing a cooling source in the bed. It also significantly influences the effective conductivity's of the bed. Porous fraction, the main factor of the bed depends on the geometry position and parameters. From this model, one can obtain the thermal-hydraulic governing equations of the bed

  8. Water-cooled, fire boom blanket, test and evaluation for system prototype development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial development of actively cooled fire booms indicated that water-cooled barriers could withstand direct oil fire for several hours with little damage if cooling water were continuously supplied. Despite these early promising developments, it was realized that to build reliable full-scale system for Navy host salvage booms would require several development tests and lengthy evaluations. In this experiment several types of water-cooled fire blankets were tested at the Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Test Tank (OHMSETT). After the burn test the blankets were inspected for damage and additional tests were conducted to determine handling characteristics for deployment, recovery, cleaning and maintenance. Test results showed that water-cooled fire boom blankets can be used on conventional offshore oil containment booms to extend their use for controlling large floating-oil marine fires. Results also demonstrated the importance of using thermoset rubber coated fabrics in the host boom to maintain sufficient reserve seam strength at elevated temperatures. The suitability of passively cooled covers should be investigated to protect equipment and boom from indirect fire exposure. 1 ref., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  9. Structural Behaviour of Strengthened Composite Materials. Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Munteanu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Masonry represents one of the earliest structural materials used by mankind. A lot of the ancient building structures were made using masonry. A large number of these buildings have been stated historical monuments. Most commonly masonry elements which are able to cover large spans was masonry arches. The paper makes a detailed presentation on structural behaviour and failure mechanisms of a horizontally loaded masonry arch. The arch model was built at a 1 : 1 scale using solid bricks and M10Z mortar. It was firstly loaded with vertically acting dead loads and with horizontal load acting in its plane. In this loading hypothesis, a plastic hinge occurred leading to the failure of the arch and loss of load bearing capacity. In the next stage of the experimental program, the arch was strengthened using a composite material membrane at the upper face. The membrane consisted in a continuous, glass-fiber fabric and epoxy resin. After proper curing, the same loading hypothesis was used. The failure mechanisms changed and a larger horizontal loading level was noticed. Further on, the arch was rehabilitated using a different composite material layout, the membrane was applied both on upper and bottom faces as well as partially on the lateral faces of the arch. This new rehabilitation layout leads to a significant increase in the load bearing capacity of the arch. The failure mechanisms were changed causing a significantly better overall structural behaviour of the arch.

  10. Molecular Dynamics of Shock Wave Interaction with Nanoscale Structured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. Nano-structured materials have the potential to attenuate the strength of traveling shock waves because of their high surface-to-volume ratio. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Short Range Attractive interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either embedded atom potentials (target structure) or tethered potential (rigid piston, holding wall). Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this work we present results of the elastic behavior of solid structures subjected to shock wave impact and analysis of energy transport and absorption in porous materials. The results indicated that the presence of nano-porous material layers in front of a target wall reduced the stress magnitude detected inside and the energy deposited there by about 30 percent while, at the same time, its loading rate was decreased substantially.

  11. Fast Detection of Material Deformation through Structural Dissimilarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2015-10-29

    Designing materials that are resistant to extreme temperatures and brittleness relies on assessing structural dynamics of samples. Algorithms are critically important to characterize material deformation under stress conditions. Here, we report on our design of coarse-grain parallel algorithms for image quality assessment based on structural information and on crack detection of gigabyte-scale experimental datasets. We show how key steps can be decomposed into distinct processing flows, one based on structural similarity (SSIM) quality measure, and another on spectral content. These algorithms act upon image blocks that fit into memory, and can execute independently. We discuss the scientific relevance of the problem, key developments, and decomposition of complementary tasks into separate executions. We show how to apply SSIM to detect material degradation, and illustrate how this metric can be allied to spectral analysis for structure probing, while using tiled multi-resolution pyramids stored in HDF5 chunked multi-dimensional arrays. Results show that the proposed experimental data representation supports an average compression rate of 10X, and data compression scales linearly with the data size. We also illustrate how to correlate SSIM to crack formation, and how to use our numerical schemes to enable fast detection of deformation from 3D datasets evolving in time.

  12. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  13. The integrated-blanket-coil concept applied to the poloidal field and blanket systems of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil'' (IBC) concept, is applied to the poloidal field and blanket systems of a tokamak reactor. An examination of resistive power losses in the IBC suggests that these losses can be limited to 10% of the fusion thermal power. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are shown to be modest and well below design limits. For the stainless steel reference case examined, the MHD-induced pressure drop was estimated to be about 1/3 MPa and the associated primary membrane stress was estimated to be about 47 MPa. The preliminary analyses indicate that the IBC concept offers promise as a means for making fusion reactors more compact by combining blanket and coil functions in a single component

  14. Analysis of tritium behaviour and recovery from a water-cooled Pb17Li blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malara, C. [Institute Regional des Materiaux Avances, Ispra (Italy); Casini, G. [Systems Engineering and Informatics Institute, JRC Ispra, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Viola, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy)

    1995-03-01

    The question of the tritium recovery in water-cooled Pb17Li blankets has been under investigation for several years at JRC Ispra. The method which has been more extensively analysed is that of slowly circulating the breeder out from the blanket units and of extracting the tritium from it outside the plasma vacuum vessel by helium gas purging or vacuum degassing in a suited process apparatus. A computerized model of the tritium behaviour in the blanket units and in the extraction system was developed. It includes four submodels: (1) tritium permeation process from the breeder to the cooling water as a function of the local operative conditions (tritium concentration in Pb17Li, breeder temperature and flow rate); (2) tritium mass balance in each breeding unit; (3) tritium desorption from the breeder material to the gas phase of the extraction system; (4) tritium extraction efficiency as a function of the design parameters of the recovery apparatus. In the present paper, on the basis of this model, a parametric study of the tritium permeation rate in the cooling water and of the tritium inventory in the blanket is carried out. Results are reported and discussed in terms of dimensionless groups which describe the relative effects of the overall resistance on tritium transfer to the cooling water (with and without permeation barriers), circulating Pb17Li flow rate and extraction efficiency of the tritium recovery unit. The parametric study is extended to the recovery unit in the case of tritium extraction by helium purge or vacuum degassing in a droplet spray unit. (orig.).

  15. Neutron transport-burnup code MCORGS and its application in fusion fission hybrid blanket conceptual research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xue-Ming; Peng, Xian-Jue

    2016-09-01

    Fusion science and technology has made progress in the last decades. However, commercialization of fusion reactors still faces challenges relating to higher fusion energy gain, irradiation-resistant material, and tritium self-sufficiency. Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactors (FFHR) can be introduced to accelerate the early application of fusion energy. Traditionally, FFHRs have been classified as either breeders or transmuters. Both need partition of plutonium from spent fuel, which will pose nuclear proliferation risks. A conceptual design of a Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactor for Energy (FFHR-E), which can make full use of natural uranium with lower nuclear proliferation risk, is presented. The fusion core parameters are similar to those of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. An alloy of natural uranium and zirconium is adopted in the fission blanket, which is cooled by light water. In order to model blanket burnup problems, a linkage code MCORGS, which couples MCNP4B and ORIGEN-S, is developed and validated through several typical benchmarks. The average blanket energy Multiplication and Tritium Breeding Ratio can be maintained at 10 and 1.15 respectively over tens of years of continuous irradiation. If simple reprocessing without separation of plutonium from uranium is adopted every few years, FFHR-E can achieve better neutronic performance. MCORGS has also been used to analyze the ultra-deep burnup model of Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) from LLNL, and a new blanket design that uses Pb instead of Be as the neutron multiplier is proposed. In addition, MCORGS has been used to simulate the fluid transmuter model of the In-Zinerater from Sandia. A brief comparison of LIFE, In-Zinerater, and FFHR-E will be given.

  16. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  17. Current status of fusion reactor blanket thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies of liquid lithium have concentrated on its sorption characteristics for hydrogen isotopes and its interaction with common impurity elements. Hydrogen isotope sorption data (P-C-T relations, activity coefficients, Sieverts' constants, plateau pressures, isotope effects, free energies of formation, phase boundaries etc.) are presented in a tabular form that can be conveniently used to extract thermodynamic information for the α-phase of the Li-LiH, Li-LiD, and Li-LiT systems and to construct complete phase diagrams. Recent solubility data for Li3N, Li2O, and Li2C2 in liquid lithium are discussed with emphasis on the prospects for removing these species by cold-trapping methods. Current studies on the sorption of hydrogen in solid lithium alloys (e.g., Li--Al and Li--Pb), made using a new technique (the hydrogen titration method), have shown that these alloys should lead to smaller blanket-tritium inventories than are attainable with liquid lithium and that the P-C-T relationships for hydrogen in Li--M alloys can be estimated from lithium activity data for these alloys

  18. Molecule-surface interaction processes of relevance to gas blanket type fusion device divertor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowdon, K.J. [Newcastle Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Tawara, H.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms which may lead to the departure of molecular species from surfaces exposed to low energy (0.1-100 eV) particle or photon and electron irradiation are reviewed. Where possible, the charge and electronic state, angular, translational and internal energy distributions of the departing molecules are described and the physical origin of the nature of those distributions identified. The consequences, for the departing molecules, of certain material choices become apparent from such an analysis. Such information may help guide the choice of appropriate materials for plasma facing components of gas-blanket type divertors such as that recently proposed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). (author). 71 refs.

  19. Helium-Cooled Refractory Alloys First Wall and Blanket Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Nygren, R.E.; Baxi, C.B.; Fogarty, P.; Ghoniem, N.; Khater, H.; McCarthy, K.; Merrill, B.; Nelson, B.; Reis, E.E.; Sharafat, S.; Schleicher, R.; Sze, D.K.; Ulrickson, M.; Willms, S.; Youssef, M.; Zinkel, S.

    1999-08-01

    Under the APEX program the He-cooled system design task is to evaluate and recommend high power density refractory alloy first wall and blanket designs and to recommend and initiate tests to address critical issues. We completed the preliminary design of a helium-cooled, W-5Re alloy, lithium breeder design and the results are reported in this paper. Many areas of the design were assessed, including material selection, helium impurity control, and mechanical, nuclear and thermal hydraulics design, and waste disposal, tritium and safety design. System study results show that at a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) gross thermal efficiency of 57.5%, a superconducting coil tokamak reactor, with an aspect ratio of 4, and an output power of 2 GWe, can be projected to have a cost of electricity at 54.6 mill/kWh. Critical issues were identified and we plan to continue the design on some of the critical issues during the next phase of the APEX design study.

  20. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Allison, Sidney G.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in materials and structures by performing temperature measurements with fiber Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of structures with subsurface defects or thickness variations. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. The data obtained from grating sensors were further analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with those from conventional thermography techniques. Limitations of the technique were investigated using both experimental and numerical simulation techniques. Methods for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  1. TRADITIONAL METALLURGY, NANOTECHNOLOGIES AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS: A SORBY AWARD LECTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louthan, M

    2007-07-17

    Traditional metallurgical processes are among the many ''old fashion'' practices that use nanoparticles to control the behavior of materials. Many of these practices were developed long before microscopy could resolve nanoscale features, yet the practitioners learned to manipulate and control microstructural elements that they could neither see nor identify. Furthermore, these early practitioners used that control to modify microstructures and develop desired material properties. Centuries old colored glass, ancient high strength steels and medieval organ pipes derived many of their desirable features through control of nanoparticles in their microstructures. Henry Sorby was among the first to recognize that the properties of rocks, minerals, metals and organic materials were controlled by microstructure. However, Mr. Sorby was accused of the folly of trying to study mountains with a microscope. Although he could not resolve nanoscale microstructural features, Mr. Sorby's observations revolutionized the study of materials. The importance of nanoscale microstructural elements should be emphasized, however, because the present foundation for structural materials was built by manipulating those features. That foundation currently supports several multibillion dollar industries but is not generally considered when the nanomaterials revolution is discussed. This lecture demonstrates that using nanotechnologies to control the behavior of metallic materials is almost as old as the practice of metallurgy and that many of the emergent nanomaterials technologists are walking along pathways previously paved by traditional metallurgists.

  2. Structural Materials and Fuels for Space Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl; Busby, Jeremy; Porter, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    A fission reactor combined with Stirling convertor power generation is one promising candidate in on-going Fission Surface Power (FSP) studies for future lunar and Martian bases. There are many challenges for designing and qualifying space-rated nuclear power plants. In order to have an affordable and sustainable program, NASA and DOE designers want to build upon the extensive foundation in nuclear fuels and structural materials. This talk will outline the current Fission Surface Power program and outline baseline design options for a lunar power plant with an emphasis on materials challenges. NASA first organized an Affordable Fission Surface Power System Study Team to establish a reference design that could be scrutinized for technical and fiscal feasibility. Previous papers and presentations have discussed this study process in detail. Considerations for the reference design included that no significant nuclear technology, fuels, or material development were required for near term use. The desire was to build upon terrestrial-derived reactor technology including conventional fuels and materials. Here we will present an overview of the reference design, Figure 1, and examine the materials choices. The system definition included analysis and recommendations for power level and life, plant configuration, shielding approach, reactor type, and power conversion type. It is important to note that this is just one concept undergoing refinement. The design team, however, understands that materials selection and improvement must be an integral part of the system development.

  3. Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto (University of New Mexico); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

  4. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a ‘fracture safe design’ is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242293

  5. Structure/property relationships in non-linear optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, J.M. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)]|[Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Howard, J.A.K. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); McIntyre, G.J. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    The application of neutrons to the study of structure/property relationships in organic non-linear optical materials (NLOs) is described. In particular, charge-transfer effects and intermolecular interactions are investigated. Charge-transfer effects are studied by charge-density analysis and an example of one such investigation is given. The study of intermolecular interactions concentrates on the effects of hydrogen-bonding and an example is given of two structurally similar molecules with very disparate NLO properties, as a result of different types of hydrogen-bonding. (author). 3 refs.

  6. Some Material Characteristics of Cold-Sprayed Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor K. Champagne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition and consolidation of metal powders by means of cold spray are methods whereby powder particles are accelerated to high velocity through entrainment in a gas undergoing expansion in a rocket nozzle and are subsequently impacted upon a surface. The impacted powder particles form a consolidated structure which can be several centimeters thick. The characteristics of this structure depend on the initial characteristics of the metal powder and upon impact velocity. The influence of impact velocity on strain hardening and porosity are examined. A materials model is proposed for these phenomena, and model calculation is compared with experiment for the cold spraying of aluminum.

  7. Geometric and material nonlinear analysis of tensegrity structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoang Chi Tran; Jaehong Lee

    2011-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for the large deflection in elastic analysis of tensegrity structures including both geometric and material nonlinearities.The geometric nonlinearity is considered based on both total Lagrangian and updated Lagrangian formulations,while the material nonlinearity is treated through elastoplastic stressstrain relationship.The nonlinear equilibrium equations are solved using an incremental-iterative scheme in conjunction with the modified Newton-Raphson method.A computer program is developed to predict the mechanical responses of tensegrity systems under tensile,compressive and flexural loadings.Numerical results obtained are compared with those reported in the literature to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed program.The flexural behavior of the double layer quadruplex tensegrity grid is sufficiently good for lightweight large-span structural applications.On the other hand,its bending strength capacity is not sensitive to the self-stress level.

  8. Geometric and material nonlinear analysis of tensegrity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hoang Chi; Lee, Jaehong

    2011-12-01

    A numerical method is presented for the large deflection in elastic analysis of tensegrity structures including both geometric and material nonlinearities. The geometric nonlinearity is considered based on both total Lagrangian and updated Lagrangian formulations, while the material nonlinearity is treated through elastoplastic stress-strain relationship. The nonlinear equilibrium equations are solved using an incremental-iterative scheme in conjunction with the modified Newton-Raphson method. A computer program is developed to predict the mechanical responses of tensegrity systems under tensile, compressive and flexural loadings. Numerical results obtained are compared with those reported in the literature to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed program. The flexural behavior of the double layer quadruplex tensegrity grid is sufficiently good for lightweight large-span structural applications. On the other hand, its bending strength capacity is not sensitive to the self-stress level.

  9. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  10. Acousto-Ultrasonics to Assess Material and Structural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    2002-10-01

    This report was created to serve as a manual for applying the Acousto-Ultrasonic NDE method, as practiced at NASA Glenn, to the study of materials and structures for a wide range of applications. Three state of the art acousto-ultrasonic (A-U) analysis parameters, ultrasonic decay (UD) rate, mean time (or skewing factor, "s"), and the centroid of the power spectrum, "fc," have been studied and applied at GRC for NDE interrogation of various materials and structures of aerospace interest. In addition to this, a unique application of Lamb wave analysis is shown. An appendix gives a brief overview of Lamb Wave analysis. This paper presents the analysis employed to calculate these parameters and the development and reasoning behind their use. It also discusses the planning of A-U measurements for materials and structures to be studied. Types of transducer coupling are discussed including contact and non-contact via laser and air. Experimental planning includes matching transducer frequency range to material and geometry of the specimen to be studied. The effect on results of initially zeroing the DC component of the ultrasonic waveform is compared with not doing so. A wide range of interrogation problems are addressed via the application of these analysis parameters to real specimens is shown for five cases: Case 1: Differences in density in 0 SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composite. Case 2: Effect of tensile fatigue cycling in +/-45 SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite. Case 3: Detecting creep life, and failure, in Udimet 520 Nickel-Based Super Alloy. Case 4: Detecting Surface Layer Formation in T-650-35/PMR-15 Polymer Matrix Composites Panels due to Thermal Aging. Case 5: Detecting Spin Test Degradation in PMC Flywheels. Among these cases a wide range of materials and geometries are studied.

  11. Welcome to the 2014 volume of Smart Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-01-01

    Welcome to Smart Materials and Structures (SMS). Smart materials and structures are comprised of structural matter that responds to a stimulus. These materials can be controlled or have properties that can be altered in a prescribed manner. Smart materials generate non-traditional forms of transduction. We are all familiar with common forms of transduction, electromechanical motors. Lorenz's forces utilize permanent and variable magnets, controlled by current, to generate magnetically generated forces that oppose each other. Utilizing this simple principal we have advanced the industrial revolution of the 19th Century by the creation of the servo-mechanism. Controlled velocity and position generation systems that have automated manufacturing, our machines and the very environs in which we dwell. Smart materials often rely on a variety of new and different methods of transduction. Piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, electrostrictive, and phase-change materials, such as shape memory alloys, are among the most common smart materials. Other approaches such as polymer actuators that rely on complex three-dimensional chemical-based composites are also emerging. The trinity of engineering research is analysis, simulation and experimentation. To perform analyses we must understand the physical phenomena at hand in order to develop a mathematical model for the problem. These models form the basis of simulation and complex computational modeling of a system. It is from these models that we begin to expand our understanding about what is possible, ultimately developing simulation-based tools that verify new designs and insights. Experimentation offers the opportunity to verify our analyses and simulations in addition to providing the 'proof of the pudding' so to speak. But it is our ability to simulate that guides us and our expectations, predicting the behavior of what we may see in the lab or in a prototype. Experimentation ultimately provides the feedback to our modeling

  12. Use of UHPC in Bridge Structures: Material Modeling and Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz Gunes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC is a promising new class of concrete material that is likely to make a significant contribution to addressing the challenges associated with the load capacity, durability, sustainability, economy, and environmental impact of concrete bridge infrastructures. This paper focuses on the material modeling of UHPC and design of bridge girders made of UHPC. A two-phase model used for modeling the behavior of UHPC was briefly discussed, and the model was implemented in a preliminary design case study. Based on the implemented design and the reported use of UHPC in bridge applications, the advantages, limitations, and future prospects of UHPC bridges were discussed, highlighting the need for innovative research and design to make optimum use of the favorable properties of the material in bridge structures.

  13. Spatio-structural granularity of biological material entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Lars

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the continuously increasing demands on knowledge- and data-management that databases have to meet, ontologies and the theories of granularity they use become more and more important. Unfortunately, currently used theories and schemes of granularity unnecessarily limit the performance of ontologies due to two shortcomings: (i they do not allow the integration of multiple granularity perspectives into one granularity framework; (ii they are not applicable to cumulative-constitutively organized material entities, which cover most of the biomedical material entities. Results The above mentioned shortcomings are responsible for the major inconsistencies in currently used spatio-structural granularity schemes. By using the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO as a top-level ontology and Keet's general theory of granularity, a granularity framework is presented that is applicable to cumulative-constitutively organized material entities. It provides a scheme for granulating complex material entities into their constitutive and regional parts by integrating various compositional and spatial granularity perspectives. Within a scale dependent resolution perspective, it even allows distinguishing different types of representations of the same material entity. Within other scale dependent perspectives, which are based on specific types of measurements (e.g. weight, volume, etc., the possibility of organizing instances of material entities independent of their parthood relations and only according to increasing measures is provided as well. All granularity perspectives are connected to one another through overcrossing granularity levels, together forming an integrated whole that uses the compositional object perspective as an integrating backbone. This granularity framework allows to consistently assign structural granularity values to all different types of material entities. Conclusions The here presented framework provides a spatio-structural

  14. Health sociology from post-structuralism to the new materialisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nick J

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the impact of post-structuralism and postmodern social theory upon health sociology during the past 20 years. It then addresses the emergence of new materialist perspectives, which to an extent build upon insights of post-structuralist concerning power, but mark a turn away from a textual or linguistic focus to address the range of materialities that affect health, illness and health care. I conclude by assessing the impact of these movements for health sociology. PMID:26572797

  15. Health sociology from post-structuralism to the new materialisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nick J

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the impact of post-structuralism and postmodern social theory upon health sociology during the past 20 years. It then addresses the emergence of new materialist perspectives, which to an extent build upon insights of post-structuralist concerning power, but mark a turn away from a textual or linguistic focus to address the range of materialities that affect health, illness and health care. I conclude by assessing the impact of these movements for health sociology.

  16. Electromagnetic wave propagation in alternating material-metamaterial layered structures

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera-Escobedo, V H

    2016-01-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, we examine the parametric behavior of the transmittance of an electromagnetic plane wave propagating in the lossless regime through a periodic multilayered system as a function of the frequency and angle of incidence of the electromagnetic wave for the case in which the periodic structure comprises alternating material-metamaterial layers. A specific example of high transmittance at any angle of incidence in the visible region of the spectrum is identified

  17. Development of fuels and structural materials for fast breeder reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baldev Raj; S L Mannan; P R Vasudeva Rao; M D Mathew

    2002-10-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBRs) are destined to play a crucial role inthe Indian nuclear power programme in the foreseeable future. FBR technology involves a multi-disciplinary approach to solve the various challenges in the areas of fuel and materials development. Fuels for FBRs have significantly higher concentration of fissile material than in thermal reactors, with a matching increase in burn-up. The design of the fuel is an important aspect which has to be optimised for efficient, economic and safe production of power. FBR components operate under hostile and demanding environment of high neutron flux, liquid sodium coolant and elevated temperatures. Resistance to void swelling, irradiation creep, and irradiation embrittlement are therefore major considerations in the choice of materials for the core components. Structural and steam generator materials should have good resistance to creep, low cycle fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction and sodium corrosion. The development of carbide fuel and structural materials for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor at Kalpakkam was a great technological challenge. At the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), advanced research facilities have been established, and extensive studies have been carried out in the areas of fuel and materials development. This has laid the foundation for the design and development of a 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. Highlights of some of these studies are discussed in this paper in the context of our mission to develop and deploy FBR technology for the energy security of India in the 21st century.

  18. Target and structural materials under dual-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is planned to have a beam power of 5 MW (3.75 mA of 1.334 GeV protons). This is by a factor 30 higher than the available most powerful spallation source ISIS at Rutherford-Appleton Lab. (RAL) in Great-Britain. This causes a damage rate of approx. 10 dpa (displacements per atom) per month in target materials (W or Ta) or structural materials. The problem of radiation damage by high energy protons in different alloys has been recently reviewed. At HMI, simulation irradiation using heavy ions and helium or hydrogen ions at the dual-beam facility are being out. Here, we report on some preliminary results obtained on tantalum as target material and on ferritic/martensitic steels (HT9 type steels or comparable steels), which are proposed to be used as structural materials. Goal of these investigations is to correlate the results with those obtained at spallation irradiated specimens and to investigate the unexplored field of simultaneous production of damage, helium and hydrogen at high levels. (author) 4 figs., 1 tab., 9 refs

  19. Oxide Thermoelectric Materials: A Structure-Property Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Abanti; Shubha, V.

    2014-04-01

    Recent demand for thermoelectric materials for power harvesting from automobile and industrial waste heat requires oxide materials because of their potential advantages over intermetallic alloys in terms of chemical and thermal stability at high temperatures. Achievement of thermoelectric figure of merit equivalent to unity ( ZT ≈ 1) for transition-metal oxides necessitates a second look at the fundamental theory on the basis of the structure-property relationship giving rise to electron correlation accompanied by spin fluctuation. Promising transition-metal oxides based on wide-bandgap semiconductors, perovskite and layered oxides have been studied as potential candidate n- and p-type materials. This paper reviews the correlation between the crystal structure and thermoelectric properties of transition-metal oxides. The crystal-site-dependent electronic configuration and spin degeneracy to control the thermopower and electron-phonon interaction leading to polaron hopping to control electrical conductivity is discussed. Crystal structure tailoring leading to phonon scattering at interfaces and nanograin domains to achieve low thermal conductivity is also highlighted.

  20. Characterization of ion-exchange membrane materials: properties vs structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezina, N P; Kononenko, N A; Dyomina, O A; Gnusin, N P

    2008-06-22

    This review focuses on the preparation, structure and applications of ion-exchange membranes formed from various materials and exhibiting various functions (electrodialytic, perfluorinated sulphocation-exchange and novel laboratory-tested membranes). A number of experimental techniques for measuring electrotransport properties as well as the general procedure for membrane testing are also described. The review emphasizes the relationships between membrane structures, physical and chemical properties and mechanisms of electrochemical processes that occur in charged membrane materials. The water content in membranes is considered to be a key factor in the ion and water transfer and in polarization processes in electromembrane systems. We suggest the theoretical approach, which makes it possible to model and characterize the electrochemical properties of heterogeneous membranes using several transport-structural parameters. These parameters are extracted from the experimental dependences of specific electroconductivity and diffusion permeability on concentration. The review covers the most significant experimental and theoretical research on ion-exchange membranes that have been carried out in the Membrane Materials Laboratory of the Kuban State University. These results have been discussed at the conferences "Membrane Electrochemistry", Krasnodar, Russia for many years and were published mainly in Russian scientific sources.

  1. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  2. Report of the second joint Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Materials. July 12, 2002, Tokyo, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    Joint research committees in purpose of the discussion on DEMO blanket in view point of the both of reactor technology and materials were held by the Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Fusion Materials. The joint research committee was held in Tokyo on July 12, 2002. In the committee, the present status of development of solid and liquid breeding blanket, the present status of development of reduced activation structure materials, and IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) program were discussed based on the discussions of the development programs of the blanket and materials at the first joint research committee. As a result, it was confirmed that high electric efficiency with 41% would be obtained in the solid breeding blanket system, that neutron radiation data of reduced activation ferritic steel was obtained by HFIR collaboration, and that KEP (key element technology phase) of IFMIF would be finished at the end of 2002 and the data base for the next step, i.e. EVEDA (engineering validation/engineering design activity) was obtained. In addition, the present status of ITER CTA, which was a transient phase for the construction, and the outline of ITER Fast Track, which was an accelerated plan for the performance of the power plants, were reported. This report consists of the summary of the discussion and the viewgraphs which were used at the second joint research committee, and these are very useful for the researchers of the fusion area in Japan. (author)

  3. Materials, Structures and Manufacturing: An Integrated Approach to Develop Expandable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Zander, Martin E.; Sleight, Daid W.; Connell, John; Holloway, Nancy; Palmieri, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Membrane dominated space structures are lightweight and package efficiently for launch; however, they must be expanded (deployed) in-orbit to achieve the desired geometry. These expandable structural systems include solar sails, solar power arrays, antennas, and numerous other large aperture devices that are used to collect, reflect and/or transmit electromagnetic radiation. In this work, an integrated approach to development of thin-film damage tolerant membranes is explored using advanced manufacturing. Bio-inspired hierarchical structures were printed on films using additive manufacturing to achieve improved tear resistance and to facilitate membrane deployment. High precision, robust expandable structures can be realized using materials that are both space durable and processable using additive manufacturing. Test results show this initial work produced higher tear resistance than neat film of equivalent mass. Future research and development opportunities for expandable structural systems designed using an integrated approach to structural design, manufacturing, and materials selection are discussed.

  4. Protection and Reinforcement of Tooth Structures by Dental Coating Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Nikaido

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that a resin coating can serve as a means to protect dental structure after preparation of the tooth for indirect restorations, sealing the exposed dentin. The resin coating is applied on the cut surfaces immediately after tooth preparation and before making an impression by assembling a dentin bonding system and a flowable composite. Resin coatings minimize pulp irritation and improve the bond strength between a resin cement and tooth when bonding the restoration to tooth. Recently, thin-film coating dental materials based on all-in-one adhesive technology were introduced for resin coating of indirect restorations. The thin coating materials are applied in a single clinical step and create a barrier-like film layer on the prepared dentin. The thin coatings play an important role in protecting the dentin from physical, chemical, and biological irritation. In addition, these thin-film coating materials reportedly prevent marginal leakage beneath inlays or crown restorations. In light of the many benefits provided by such a protective layer, these all-in-one adhesive materials may therefore also have the potential to cover exposed root dentin surfaces and prevent caries formation. In this paper, recent progress of the dental coating materials and their clinical applications are reviewed.

  5. Disaster mitigation based on smart structures/materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, H.; Su, J.; Shahinpoor, M.; Felli, F.; Paolozzi, A.; Nejhad, M.; Hihara, L.; Aimmanee, S.; Furuya, Y.; Adachi, K.; Yanaseko, T.

    2016-04-01

    The concept "Disaster Mitigation and Sustainable Engineering" is introduced comprehensively and several examples are shown in this paper. It is emphasized that it can be effectively realized in the field "smart materials and structural systems." As serious disasters may not occur for a long period of time, and the structures for disaster mitigation suffer from vast amount of maintenance cost etc., they are better to be used daily. Their compactness and deploying function are also very useful. In order to demonstrate the concept, two examples having been experimentally tried are introduced, that is, artificial forests and deployable structure based on honeycomb to be used against flooding. Other examples and products in the world are also introduced and future directions are discussed.

  6. Effects of the magnetic field on the structure of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report of the ''Meeting on the effects of a magnetic field on the structure of materials'' held at KEK, Japan. The purpose of the Meeting was to study the diffraction of SR X-ray in a magnetic field. It was found that the effects of a magnetic field have been seen in various substnaces. The effects are due to the Zeeman effect, the Lamor diamagnetism, the Landau diamagnetism, the Meissner effect and the polarization effect. The topics discussed at the Meeting were the structure study of biological specimens by field orientation, the study of cell structure by field orientation, the phase transition under a strong pulse field, the behavior of high molecular liquid crystal in a magnetic field, the change of the f-electron density of the Tb3+ ions in Tb IG in a magnetic field at low temperature, an electromagnet loaded on a goniometer and an in-situ observation system for the structure of magnetic domain, the control of structural phase transition by a magnetic field, the use of synchrotron orbit radiation for the structural analysis of random systems, and the field effect on chemical reactions. (Kato, T.)

  7. Abrasion test of flexible protective materials on hydraulic structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin WANG; Shao-ze LUO; Guang-sheng LIU; Lu-chen ZHANG; Yong WANG

    2014-01-01

    In this study, several kinds of flexible protective materials sprayed with polyurea elastomers (hereinafter referred to as polyurea elastomer protective material) were adopted to meet the abrasion resistance requirement of hydraulic structures, and their abrasion resistances against the water flow with suspended load or bed load were studied systematically through tests. Natural basalt stones were adopted as the abrasive for simulation of the abrasion effect of the water flow with bed load, and test results indicate that the basalt stone is suitable for use in the abrasion resistance test of the flexible protective material. The wear process of the polyurea elastomer protective material is stable, and the wear loss is linear with the time of abrasion. If the wear thickness is regarded as the abrasion resistance evaluation factor, the abrasion resistance of the 351 pure polyurea is about twice those of pure polyurea with a high level of hardness and aliphatic polyurea, and over five times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with suspended load. It is also about 50 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load. Overall, the abrasion resistance of pure polyurea presented a decreasing trend with increasing hardness. Pure polyurea with a Shore hardness of D30 has the best abrasion resistance, which is 60 to 70 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load, and has been recommended, among the five kinds of pure polyurea materials with different hardness, in anti-abrasion protection of hydraulic structures.

  8. Abrasion test of flexible protective materials on hydraulic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin WANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several kinds of flexible protective materials sprayed with polyurea elastomers (hereinafter referred to as polyurea elastomer protective material were adopted to meet the abrasion resistance requirement of hydraulic structures, and their abrasion resistances against the water flow with suspended load or bed load were studied systematically through tests. Natural basalt stones were adopted as the abrasive for simulation of the abrasion effect of the water flow with bed load, and test results indicate that the basalt stone is suitable for use in the abrasion resistance test of the flexible protective material. The wear process of the polyurea elastomer protective material is stable, and the wear loss is linear with the time of abrasion. If the wear thickness is regarded as the abrasion resistance evaluation factor, the abrasion resistance of the 351 pure polyurea is about twice those of pure polyurea with a high level of hardness and aliphatic polyurea, and over five times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with suspended load. It is also about 50 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load. Overall, the abrasion resistance of pure polyurea presented a decreasing trend with increasing hardness. Pure polyurea with a Shore hardness of D30 has the best abrasion resistance, which is 60 to 70 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load, and has been recommended, among the five kinds of pure polyurea materials with different hardness, in anti-abrasion protection of hydraulic structures.

  9. Analysis on tritium management in FLiBe blanket for LHD-type helical reactor FFHR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In FFHR2 (LHD-type helical reactor) design, FLiBe has been selected as a self-cooling tritium breeder for low reactivity with oxygen and water and lower conductivity. Considering the fugacity of the tritium, particular care and adequate mitigation measures should be applied for the effectively extracting tritium from breeder and controlling the tritium release to the environment. In this paper, a tritium analysis model of the FLiBe blanket system was developed and the preliminary analysis on tritium permeation and extraction for FLiBe blanket system were done. The results of the analysis showed that it was reasonable to select W alloy as heat exchanger (HX) material, the proportion of FLiBe flow in tritium recover system (TRS) was 0.2, the efficiency of TRS was 0.85 and tritium permeation reduction factor (TPRF) was 20 in blanket etc.. In addition, further R and D efforts were required for FFHR2 tritium system to guarantee the tritium self-sufficient and safety, for example reasonable quality of tritium permeation barriers on blanket, requirement for the TRS and fabrication technology of the heat exchanger etc.. (author)

  10. Analysis on tritium management in FLiBe blanket for force-free helical reactor FFHR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In FFHR2 design, FLiBe has been selected as a self-cooling tritium breeder for low reactivity with oxygen and water and lower conductivity. Considering the fugacity of the tritium, particular care and adequate mitigation measures should be applied for the effectively extract tritium from breeder and control the tritium release to the environment. In this paper, a tritium analysis model of the FLiBe blanket system was developed and the preliminary analysis on tritium permeation and extraction for FLiBe blanket system were done. The factors which affected tritium extraction and permeation were calculated and evaluated, such as the heat exchanger material, tritium permeation reduction factor (TPRF) in blanket, proportion of FLiBe flow in tritium recover system (TRS) and efficiency of TRS etc. The results of the analysis showed that further R and D efforts were required for FFHR2 tritium system to guarantee the tritium self-sufficient and safety, for example reasonable quality of tritium permeation barriers on blanket, requirement for the TRS and fabrication technology of the heat exchanger etc.. (author)

  11. Impact of blanket tritium against the tritium plant of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breeder blanket and the blanket tritium recovery system are tested using test blanket modules during ITER campaign. And then, these are integrated with the tritium plant for the first time at a prototype reactor after ITER. In this work, impact to the tritium plant by integration of the solid breeder blanket was discussed. The method of tritium extraction from the blanket and the choice of the process for breeder blanket interface should be discussed not only from the viewpoint of tritium release but also from the viewpoint of the load of processing. (author)

  12. Corrosion Issues of High Temperature Reactor Structural Metallic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooling helium of high temperature reactors (HTRs) is expected to contain a low level of impurities: oxidizing gases and carbon-bearing species. Reference structural materials for pipes and heat exchangers are chromia former nickel base alloys, typically alloys 617 and 230. And as is generally the case in any high temperature process, their long term corrosion resistance relies on the growth of a surface chromium oxide that can act as a barrier against corrosive species. This implies that the HTR environment must allow for oxidation of these alloys to occur, while it remains not too oxidizing against in-core graphite. First, studies on the surface reactivity under various impure helium containing low partial pressures of H2, H2O, CO, and CH4 show that alloys 617 and 230 oxidize in many atmosphere at intermediate temperatures (up to 890-970 degrees C, depending on the exact gas composition). However when heated above a critical temperature, the surface oxide becomes unstable. It was demonstrated that at the scale/alloy interface, the surface oxide interacts with the carbon from the material. These investigations have established an environmental area that promotes oxidation. When exposed in oxidizing HTR helium, alloys 617 and 230 actually develop a sustainable surface scale over thousands of hours. On the other hand, if the scale is destabilized by reaction with the carbon, the oxide is not protective anymore, and the alloy surface interacts with gaseous impurities. In the case of CH4-containing atmospheres, this causes rapid carburization in the form of precipitation of coarse carbides on the surface and in the bulk. Carburization was shown to induce an extensive embrittlement of the alloys. In CH4-free helium mixtures, alloys decarburize with a global loss of carbon and dissolution of the pre-existing carbides. As carbides take part in the alloy strengthening at high temperature, it is expected that decarburization impacts the creep properties. Carburization and

  13. Continuation of tailored composite structures of ordered staple thermoplastic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santare, Michael H.; Pipes, R. Byron

    1992-01-01

    The search for the cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising approaches is the conversion of a planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. A framework was established which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. Predictions for the effective viscosities of a hyper-anisotropic medium consisting of collimated, discontinuous fibers suspended in viscous matrix were extended to capture the characteristics of typical polymers including non-Newtonian behavior and temperature dependence. In addition, the influence of fiber misorientation was also modeled by compliance averaging to determine ensemble properties for a given orientation distribution. A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams such as those used in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during manufacturing processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing radial and tangential gradients in material properties. Two analysis procedures are used to solve the beam problems. The first method uses separate two-dimensional elasticity solutions for the stresses in the flange and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring that forces and displacements match section boundaries. The second method uses an approximate Rayleigh-Ritz technique to find the solutions for more complex beams. Analyses

  14. Embrittlement and Flow Localization in Reactor Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xianglin Wu; Xiao Pan; James Stubbins

    2006-10-06

    Many reactor components and structural members are made from metal alloys due, in large part, to their strength and ability to resist brittle fracture by plastic deformation. However, brittle fracture can occur when structural material cannot undergo extensive, or even limited, plastic deformation due to irradiation exposure. Certain irradiation conditions lead to the development of a damage microstructure where plastic flow is limited to very small volumes or regions of material, as opposed to the general plastic flow in unexposed materials. This process is referred to as flow localization or plastic instability. The true stress at the onset of necking is a constant regardless of the irradiation level. It is called 'critical stress' and this critical stress has strong temperature dependence. Interrupted tensile testes of 316L SS have been performed to investigate the microstructure evolution and competing mechanism between mechanic twinning and planar slip which are believed to be the controlling mechanism for flow localization. Deformation twinning is the major contribution of strain hardening and good ductility for low temperatures, and the activation of twinning system is determined by the critical twinning stress. Phases transform and texture analyses are also discussed in this study. Finite element analysis is carried out to complement the microstructural analysis and for the prediction of materaials performance with and without stress concentration and irradiation.

  15. Giant Mechanocaloric Effects in Fluorite-Structured Superionic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Errandonea, Daniel

    2016-05-11

    Mechanocaloric materials experience a change in temperature when a mechanical stress is applied on them adiabatically. Thus, far, only ferroelectrics and superelastic metallic alloys have been considered as potential mechanocaloric compounds to be exploited in solid-state cooling applications. Here we show that giant mechanocaloric effects occur in hitherto overlooked fast ion conductors (FIC), a class of multicomponent materials in which above a critical temperature, Ts, a constituent ionic species undergoes a sudden increase in mobility. Using first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the superionic transition in fluorite-structured FIC, which is characterized by a large entropy increase of the order of 10(2) JK(-1) kg(-1), can be externally tuned with hydrostatic, biaxial, or uniaxial stresses. In particular, Ts can be reduced several hundreds of degrees through the application of moderate tensile stresses due to the concomitant drop in the formation energy of Frenkel pair defects. We predict that the adiabatic temperature change in CaF2 and PbF2, two archetypal fluorite-structured FIC, close to their critical points are of the order of 10(2) and 10(1) K, respectively. This work advocates that FIC constitute a new family of mechanocaloric materials showing great promise for prospective solid-state refrigeration applications. PMID:27070506

  16. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, Martin

    1996-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis techniques to determine the damping loss factor of a material. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity as a function of time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method. If an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the amount of coil current used in vibrating the magnet. If a reciprocating transducer is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the reciprocating transducer. Using known vibrational analysis methods, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity measurements. The damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  17. A Study on Salt Attack Protection of Structural and Finishing Materials in Power Plant Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, W.B.; Kweon, K.J.; Suh, Y.P.; Nah, H.S.; Lee, K.J.; Park, D.S.; Jo, Y.K. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This is a final report written by both KEPRI and KICT as a co-operative research titled {sup A} study on Salt Protection of Structural and Finishings in Power Plant Structures{sup .} This study presented the methods to prevent the chloride-induced corrosion of power plant structures through collection and analysis of research datum relating to design, construction and maintenance for the prevention of structural and finishing materials, thru material performance tests for anti-corrosion under many kinds of chloride-induced corrosion environments. As a result, this study proposed the guidelines for design, construction and maintenance of power plant structures due to chloride-induced corrosion. (author). 257 refs., 111 figs., 86 tabs.

  18. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-09

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the

  19. Structure and magnetic properties of powder soft magnetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Konieczny

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents influence of high-energy mechanical milling process, isothermal annealing and toa combination of these two technologies of cobalt base metallic glasses Co77Si11.5B11.5 on magnetic propertiesand their structure.Design/methodology/approach: The powder test piece obtained from the input amorphous ribbon in highenergyball milling. The diffraction examinations and examinations of thin foils were made on the JEOL JEM200CX transmission electron microscope. Observations of the structure of powders were made on the OptonDSM-940 scanning electron microscope. The X-ray tests were realized with the use of the XRD 7 SEIFERTFPMdiffractometer.Findings: analysis of the magnetic properties test results of the of the Co77Si11.5B11.5 powders obtained inthe high-energy ball of milling process proved that the process causes significant decrease in the magneticproperties. The structure and magnetic properties of this material may be improved by means of a proper choiceof parameters of this process as well as the final thermal treatment.Research limitations/implications: For the powders, further magnetical, structure and composition examinationsare planed.Practical implications: The amorphous and nanocrystalline metal powders obtained by high-energy ballmilling of metallic glasses feature an alternative to solid alloys and make it possible to obtain the ferromagneticnanocomposites, whose shape and dimensions can be freely formed.Originality/value: The paper presents influence of parameters of the high-energy ball milling process onstructure and magnetic properties of soft magnetic powder materials obtained in this technique. Results and adiscussion of the influence of high energy mechanical milling process on particle size and their distribution aswell as structure and magnetic properties of investigated samples is presented.

  20. U.S. fast reactor materials and structures program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. DOE has sponsored a vigorous breeder reactor materials and structures program for 15 years. Important contributions have resulted from this effort in the areas of design (inelastic rules, verified methods, seismic criteria, mechanical properties data); resolution of licensing issues (technical witnessing, confirmatory testing); construction (fabrication/welding procedures, nondestructive testing techniques); and operation (sodium purification, instrumentation and chemical analysis, radioactivity control, and in-service inspection. The national LMFBR program currently is being restructured. The Materials and Structures Program will focus its efforts in the following areas: (1) removal of anticipated licensing impediments through confirmation of the adequacy of structural design methods and criteria for components containing welds and geometric discontinuities, the generation of mechanical properties for stainless steel castings and weldments, and the evaluation of irradiation effects; (2) qualification of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and tribological coatings for design flexibility; (3) development of improved inelastic design guidelines and procedures; (4) reform of design codes and standards and engineering practices, leading to simpler, less conservative rules and to simplified design analysis methods; and (5) incorporation of information from foreign program

  1. Structural analysis of bioceramic materials for denture application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Nurlaela; Tahir, Dahlang; Arbiansyah, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Structural analysis has been performed on bioceramic materials for denture application by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF is using for analysis chemical composition of raw materials. XRF shows the ratio 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 between feldspar, quartz, kaolin and eggshell, respectively, resulting composition CaO content of 56.78 %, which is similar with natural tooth. Sample preparation was carried out on temperature of 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction result showed that the structure is crystalline with trigonal crystal system for SiO2 (a=b=4.9134 Å and c=5.4051 Å) and CaH2O2 (a=b=3.5925 Å and c=4.9082 Å). Based on the Scherrer's equation showed the crystallite size of the highest peak (SiO2) increase with increasing the temperature preparation. The highest hardness value (87 kg/mm2) and match with the standards of dentin hardness. The surface structure was observed by using SEM also discussed.

  2. Computational modelling of cohesive cracks in material structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vala, J.; Jarošová, P.

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of crack formation, considered as the creation of new surfaces in a material sample due to its microstructure, leads to nontrivial physical, mathematical and computational difficulties even in the rather simple case of quasistatic cohesive zone modelling inside the linear elastic theory. However, quantitative results from such evaluations are required in practice for the development and design of advanced materials, structures and technologies. Although most available software tools apply ad hoc computational predictions, this paper presents the proper formulation of such model problem, including its verification, and sketches the more-scale construction of finite-dimensional approximation of solutions, utilizing the finite element or similar techniques, together with references to original simulations results from engineering practice.

  3. Direct methods for limit states in structures and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Weichert, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the safety factor for limit states such as plastic collapse, low cycle fatigue or ratcheting is always a major design consideration for civil and mechanical engineering structures that are subjected to loads. Direct methods of limit or shakedown analysis that proceed to directly find the limit states offer a better alternative than exact time-stepping calculations as, on one hand, an exact loading history is scarcely known, and on the other they are much less time-consuming. This book presents the state of the art on various topics concerning these methods, such as theoretical advances in limit and shakedown analysis, the development of relevant algorithms and computational procedures, sophisticated modeling of inelastic material behavior like hardening, non-associated flow rules, material damage and fatigue, contact and friction, homogenization and composites.

  4. Cost - The challenge for advanced materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John G., Jr.; Freeman, William T., Jr.; Siddiqi, Shahid

    1992-01-01

    Information is presented on the cost of various aircraft structures, together with methods for predicting and reducing cost. The need for the development of cost models, and of a comparative cost algorithm which could function as an engineering design tool to evaluate different design concepts, is emphasized. Efforts are underway to develop cost models that establish building-block unit cell elements that represent different material forms, geometric shapes, fabrication processes, and methods of assembly, with the purpose of expressing cost per pound or labor per pound data, with physical design and manufacture variables that a designer can visualize.

  5. Structure of boronized hot-worked powder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific features of microstructure are studied in hot worked powder materials based on iron and iron-carbon hypoeutectoid compositions after boriding and additional pressing in the presence of a liquid eutectic phase of Fe-B system. It is states that diffusion boriding results in the formation of three structural and phase zones: boride, sublayer and transition ones. The boride zone consists of FeB and Fe2B borides. In the sublayer the formation of α-Fe + Fe2B eutectics is observed. the transition zone is characterized by a boride network along austenite grain boundaries

  6. Advanced Burner Reactor with Breed-and-Burn Thorium Blankets for Improved Economics and Resource Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-11-04

    This study assesses the feasibility of designing Seed and Blanket (S&B) Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) to generate a significant fraction of the core power from radial thorium fueled blankets that operate on the Breed-and-Burn (B&B) mode without exceeding the radiation damage constraint of presently verified cladding materials. The S&B core is designed to maximize the fraction of neutrons that radially leak from the seed (or “driver”) into the subcritical blanket and reduce neutron loss via axial leakage. The blanket in the S&B core makes beneficial use of the leaking neutrons for improved economics and resource utilization. A specific objective of this study is to maximize the fraction of core power that can be generated by the blanket without violating the thermal hydraulic and material constraints. Since the blanket fuel requires no reprocessing along with remote fuel fabrication, a larger fraction of power from the blanket will result in a smaller fuel recycling capacity and lower fuel cycle cost per unit of electricity generated. A unique synergism is found between a low conversion ratio (CR) seed and a B&B blanket fueled by thorium. Among several benefits, this synergism enables the very low leakage S&B cores to have small positive coolant voiding reactivity coefficient and large enough negative Doppler coefficient even when using inert matrix fuel for the seed. The benefits of this synergism are maximized when using an annular seed surrounded by an inner and outer thorium blankets. Among the high-performance S&B cores designed to benefit from this unique synergism are: (1) the ultra-long cycle core that features a cycle length of ~7 years; (2) the high-transmutation rate core where the seed fuel features a TRU CR of 0.0. Its TRU transmutation rate is comparable to that of the reference Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) with CR of 0.5 and the thorium blanket can generate close to 60% of the core power; but requires only one sixth of the reprocessing and

  7. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  8. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulden, Johannes

    2013-03-15

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  9. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Luke [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-30

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  10. Direct Lit Electrolysis In A Metallic Lithium Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Babineau, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Vaquer, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-13

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed.  The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fission/fusion reactors is critical in order to maintained low concentrations.  This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket, extraction is complicated at the required low levels. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering the hydrogen and deuterium thru an electrolysis step at high temperatures. 

  11. Structure of Solvent-Free Nanoparticle−Organic Hybrid Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Hsiu-Yu

    2010-11-16

    We derive the radial distribution function and the static structure factor for the particles in model nanoparticleorganic hybrid materials composed of nanoparticles and attached oligomeric chains in the absence of an intervening solvent. The assumption that the oligomers form an incompressible fluid of bead-chains attached to the particles that is at equilibrium for a given particle configuration allows us to apply a density functional theory for determining the equilibrium configuration of oligomers as well as the distribution function of the particles. A quasi-analytic solution is facilitated by a regular perturbation analysis valid when the oligomer radius of gyration R g is much greater than the particle radius a. The results show that the constraint that each particle carries its own share of the fluid attached to itself yields a static structure factor that approaches zero as the wavenumber approaches zero. This result indicates that each particle excludes exactly one other particle from its neighborhood. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  12. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  13. Structure and magnetic properties of powder HITPERM material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Frąckowiak

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the work is to investigate the structure and magnetic properties of the cobalt based HITPERM amorphous alloy Co68Fe4Mo1Si13.5B13.5 subjected high-energy ball milling and to the isothermal annealing to a combination of these two technologies.Design/methodology/approach: The nanocrystalline ferromagnetic powders were manufactured by high-energy ball milling of metallic glasses ribbons in as state. Using the HFQS program the distributions of the magnetic hyperfine P(H fields were determined for spectra smoothed in this way, employing the Hesse-Rübartsch method. Observations of the structure of powders were made on the OPTON DSM-940 scanning electron microscope. The diffraction examinations and examinations of thin foils were made on the JEOL JEM 200CX transmission electron microscope equipped in equipped with the EDS LINK ISIS X- ray energy dispersive spectrometer made by Oxford. Graphical analyses of the obtained X-ray diffraction patterns, as well as of the HC=f(TA relationship were made using the MICROCAL ORIGIN 6.0 program.Findings: The analysis of the structure and magnetic properties test results of the HITPERM powders alloy Co68Fe4Mo1Si13.5B13.5 obtained in the high-energy ball of milling process proved that the process causes significant decrease in the magnetic properties. The magnetic properties of this material and structure and may be improved by means of a proper choice of parameters of this process as well as the final thermal treatment.Research limitations/implications: For the soft magnetic powder material, further magnetical, composition examinations and structure are planed.Practical implications: Feature an alternative to solid alloys are the amorphous and nanocrystalline metal powders obtained by milling of metallic glasses and make it possible to obtain the ferromagnetic nanocomposites, whose dimensions and shape can be freely formed.Originality/value: The paper presents results of influence of parameters

  14. Low Temperature Regolith Bricks for In-Situ Structural Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Kevin; Sakthivel, Tamil S.; Mantovani, James; Seal, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Current technology for producing in-situ structural materials on future missions to Mars or the moon relies heavily on energy-intensive sintering processes to produce solid bricks from regolith. This process requires heating the material up to temperatures in excess of 1000 C and results in solid regolith pieces with compressive strengths in the range of 14000 to 28000 psi, but are heavily dependent on the porosity of the final material and are brittle. This method is currently preferred over a low temperature cementation process to prevent consumption of precious water and other non-renewable materials. A high strength structural material with low energy requirements is still needed for future colonization of other planets. To fulfill these requirements, a nano-functionalization process has been developed to produce structural bricks from regolith simulant and shows promising mechanical strength results. Functionalization of granular silicate particles into alkoxides using a simple low temperature chemical process produces a high surface area zeolite particles that are held together via inter-particle oxygen bonding. Addition of water in the resulting zeolite particles produces a sol-gel reaction called "inorganic polymerization" which gives a strong solid material after a curing process at 60 C. The aqueous solution by-product of the reaction is currently being investigated for its reusability; an essential component of any ISRU technology. For this study, two batches of regolith bricks are synthesized from JSC-1A; the first batch from fresh solvents and chemicals, the second batch made from the water solution by-product of the first batch. This is done to determine the feasibility of recycling necessary components of the synthesis process, mainly water. Characterization including BET surface area, SEM, and EDS has been done on the regolith bricks as well as the constituent particles,. The specific surface area of 17.53 sq m/g (average) of the granular regolith

  15. CaO insulator and Be intermetallic coatings on V-base alloys for liquid-lithium fusion blanket applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop (a) stable CaO insulator coatings at the Liquid-Li/structural-material interface, with emphasis on electrically insulating coating that prevent adverse MHD-generated currents from passing through the V-alloy wall, and (b) stable Be-V intermetallic coating for first-wall components that face the plasma. Electrically insulating and corrosion-resistant coatings are required at the liquid-Li/structural interface in fusion first-wall/blanket application. The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on oxygen-enriched surface layers of V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposing the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5-85 wt% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. Crack-free Be{sub 2}V intermetallic coatings were also produced by exposing V-alloys to liquid Li that contained Be as a solute. These techniques can be applied to various shapes (e.g., inside/outside of tubes, complex geometrical shapes) because the coatings are formed by liquid-phase reactions.

  16. Structural properties of the material control and accounting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    A unified digraph approach is proposed for the assessment of the structure of the MC and A System. The approach emphasizes the two structural aspects of the system: vulnerability and reliability. Vulnerability is defined as a possibility of loosing connectedness in a given structure due to line and/or node removals. It is purely deterministic notion which leads to a qualitative analysis of redundancy of connections in the corresponding system. Reliability of the MC and A System structure provides a more quantitative way of assessing how safe the system is to random failures of the links representing lines of communication, material paths, monitors, and the components of the power supply network. By assigning probabilities to the lines and nodes of the corresponding digraph, the least reliable path can be used as a measure of the goodness of the system, which can be computed by efficient shortest path algorithms. Both vulnerability and reliability considerations are important in determining the effect of tampering of an adversary with the elements of the MC and M System.

  17. Structural properties of the material control and accounting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unified digraph approach is proposed for the assessment of the structure of the MC and A System. The approach emphasizes the two structural aspects of the system: vulnerability and reliability. Vulnerability is defined as a possibility of loosing connectedness in a given structure due to line and/or node removals. It is purely deterministic notion which leads to a qualitative analysis of redundancy of connections in the corresponding system. Reliability of the MC and A System structure provides a more quantitative way of assessing how safe the system is to random failures of the links representing lines of communication, material paths, monitors, and the components of the power supply network. By assigning probabilities to the lines and nodes of the corresponding digraph, the least reliable path can be used as a measure of the goodness of the system, which can be computed by efficient shortest path algorithms. Both vulnerability and reliability considerations are important in determining the effect of tampering of an adversary with the elements of the MC and M System

  18. Computational Design of Photovoltaic Materials with Self Organized Nano Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    Chalcopyrite and II-VI semiconductors, such as Cu(In, Ga)Se2, Cu2ZnSn(S, Se)4 and Cd(S, Te), are one of the most promising materials for low cost photovoltaic solar-cells. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations, we propose that self-organized nano-structures in these compounds will enhance the conversion efficiency. Our calculations are based on the KKR-CPA-LDA with the self-interaction correction. We also use VASP package for calculating mixing energy and effective interactions of the systems by using the cluster expansion method. For phase separating systems, we simulate nano-structure formation by using the Monte Carlo method. It is expected that the photo-generated electron-hole pairs are efficiently separated by the type-II interface and then effectively transferred along the quasi-one-dimensional structures. Moreover, we can expect multiplication of generated carriers due to the multi-exciton effects in nano-structures.

  19. Innovative reactor systems and requirements for structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast growing energy demand requires nuclear energy to play a role among other energy sources to satisfy future energy needs of mankind. Generation III light water reactors (LWRs) are anticipated to be built in large numbers to replace existing nuclear power plants or to augment the nuclear production capacity. Beyond the commercialization of best available light water reactor technologies, it is essential to start now the development of breakthrough technologies that will be needed to prepare the longer term future for nuclear power. These innovative systems include fast neutron reactors with a closed fuel cycle, high temperature reactors which could be used for process heat applications, accelerator driven systems or fusion reactors. Key technologies for such nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant fuels and core materials, advanced fuel recycle processes with co-management of actinides, possibly including minor actinides, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat-exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes...). The paper will give a brief overview of various materials that are essential for above nuclear systems' feasibility and performance, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel-based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617...), oxide dispersion strengthened -ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics. The paper will also give an insight into the various natures of R and D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, multi-scale modelling to predict macroscopic materials properties and to direct innovative research for improvements, lab-scale tests to characterise candidate materials mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, as well as component mock-up tests on technology loops to

  20. First wall and blanket concepts for experimental fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Biggio, M.; Cardella, A.; Daenner, W.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Ponti, C.; Rieger, M.; Vieider, G.

    1985-07-01

    The paper describes the progress of the studies on first wall and liquid breeder blankets for tritium production in the Next European Torus (NET). Two concepts of first wall/blanket segments are described, using 17Li83Pb as breeder and water as coolant. In both concepts the first wall is integrated in a steel box enveloping the breeder units which are cylindrical vessels with an inside heat transfer system. The thermomechanical and neutronics features of the two concepts are evaluated. Finally, the questions related to tritium permeation into coolant and tritium recovery from breeder are discussed on the basis of the analysis in progress in Europe.

  1. Nano-structured carbon materials for improved biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razumiene, J., E-mail: julija.razumiene@bchi.vu.lt [Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Mokslininku 12, Vilnius 08662 (Lithuania); Sakinyte, I. [Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Mokslininku 12, Vilnius 08662 (Lithuania); Barkauskas, J. [Faculty of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius 03225 (Lithuania); Baronas, R. [Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius 03225 (Lithuania)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel protocols of graphite oxidation were used for successful synthesis of GOPs. • Newly synthesized GOPs were applicable for electrode design in reagentless bioelectrocatalytic systems operating on direct electron transfer. • We show that bioelectrocatalytic processes strongly depend on functionalities, morphology and structural features of GOPs. - Abstract: A set of oxidized graphite samples have been newly synthesized using different protocols. Atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis revealed the changes in structure and functionalities of obtained graphite oxidation products (GOPs) compared to pristine graphite. The substances have been tested as electrode materials applicable for bioelectrocatalytic systems using pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-GDH). The application of GOPs allowed achieving the direct electron transfer (DET) from active site of PQQ-GDH to the electrode surface. Needless of additional electron transfer (ET) mediating compounds highly improved features of the biosensors. The efficiency of the biosensors has been evaluated for all types of biosensors varied from 32 μA/cm{sup 2} to 64 μA/cm{sup 2} using as electrode materials GOP1 and thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO), respectively. TRGO containing function groups (according TGA, ∼6% of the weight loss) and smallest particles (average diameter was ∼11 nm and the average height was ∼0.5 nm) exhibited the higher efficiency for ET acceleration in the biosensor acting on principle of DET.

  2. Microstructure-based modelling of multiphase materials and complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Ewald; Wesenjak, Robert; Fillafer, Alexander; Meier, Felix; Krempaszky, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Micromechanical approaches are frequently employed to monitor local and global field quantities and their evolution under varying mechanical and/or thermal loading scenarios. In this contribution, an overview on important methods is given that are currently used to gain insight into the deformational and failure behaviour of multiphase materials and complex structures. First, techniques to represent material microstructures are reviewed. It is common to either digitise images of real microstructures or generate virtual 2D or 3D microstructures using automated procedures (e.g. Voronoï tessellation) for grain generation and colouring algorithms for phase assignment. While the former method allows to capture exactly all features of the microstructure at hand with respect to its morphological and topological features, the latter method opens up the possibility for parametric studies with respect to the influence of individual microstructure features on the local and global stress and strain response. Several applications of these approaches are presented, comprising low and high strain behaviour of multiphase steels, failure and fracture behaviour of multiphase materials and the evolution of surface roughening of the aluminium top metallisation of semiconductor devices.

  3. Preparation and properties on hollow nano-structured smoke material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Dai, Meng-yan; Fang, Guo-feng; Shi, Wei-dong; Cheng, Xiang; Liu, Hai-feng; Zhang, Tong

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser guidance and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. Notwithstanding, military smoke, as a rapid and effective passive jamming means, can effectively counteract the attack of enemy precision-guided weapons by scattering and absorbability. Conventional smoke has good attenuation capability only to visible light (0.4-0.76 μm), but hardly any effect to other electromagnetic wave band. The weapon systems of laser guidance and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including near IR (1-3 μm), middle IR (3-5 μm), far IR (8-14 μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting and using new efficient obscurant materials, which is one of the important factors that develop smoke technology, have become a focus and attracted more interests around the world. Then nano-structured materials that are developing very quickly have turned into our new choice. Hollow nano-structured materials (HNSM) have many special properties because of their nano-size wall-thickness and sub-micron grain-size. After a lot of HNSM were synthesized in this paper, their physical and chemical properties, including grain size, phase composition, microstructure, optical properties and resistivity were tested and analysed. Then the experimental results of the optical properties showed that HNSM exhibit excellent wave-absorbing ability in ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions. On the basis of the physicochemmical properties, HNSM are firstly applied in smoke technology field. And the obscuration performance of HNSM smoke was tested in smoke chamber. The testing waveband included 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. Then the main parameters were obtained, including the attenuation rate, the transmission rate, the mass extinction coefficient, the efficiency obscuring time, and the sedimentation rate, etc. The main parameters of HNSM smoke were

  4. Hybrid fusion-fission reactor with a thorium blanket: Its potential in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Salahutdinov, G. H.; Kulikov, E. G.; Apse, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Discussions are currently going on as to whether it is suitable to employ thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle. This work demonstrates that the 231Pa-232U-233U-Th composition to be produced in the thorium blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor (HTR) as a fuel for light-water reactors opens up the possibility of achieving high, up to 30% of heavy metals (HM), or even ultrahigh fuel burnup. This is because the above fuel composition is able to stabilize its neutron-multiplying properties in the process of high fuel burnup. In addition, it allows the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) to be better protected against unauthorized proliferation of fissile materials owing to an unprecedentedly large fraction of 232U (several percent!) in the uranium bred from the Th blanket, which will substantially hamper the use of fissile materials in a closed NFC for purposes other than power production.

  5. Hybrid fusion–fission reactor with a thorium blanket: Its potential in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussions are currently going on as to whether it is suitable to employ thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle. This work demonstrates that the 231Pa–232U–233U–Th composition to be produced in the thorium blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor (HTR) as a fuel for light-water reactors opens up the possibility of achieving high, up to 30% of heavy metals (HM), or even ultrahigh fuel burnup. This is because the above fuel composition is able to stabilize its neutron-multiplying properties in the process of high fuel burnup. In addition, it allows the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) to be better protected against unauthorized proliferation of fissile materials owing to an unprecedentedly large fraction of 232U (several percent!) in the uranium bred from the Th blanket, which will substantially hamper the use of fissile materials in a closed NFC for purposes other than power production

  6. Hybrid fusion–fission reactor with a thorium blanket: Its potential in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmelev, A. N., E-mail: shmelan@mail.ru; Kulikov, G. G., E-mail: ggkulikov@mephi.ru; Kurnaev, V. A., E-mail: kurnaev@yandex.ru; Salahutdinov, G. H., E-mail: saip07@mail.ru; Kulikov, E. G., E-mail: egkulikov@mephi.ru; Apse, V. A., E-mail: apseva@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Discussions are currently going on as to whether it is suitable to employ thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle. This work demonstrates that the {sup 231}Pa–{sup 232}U–{sup 233}U–Th composition to be produced in the thorium blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor (HTR) as a fuel for light-water reactors opens up the possibility of achieving high, up to 30% of heavy metals (HM), or even ultrahigh fuel burnup. This is because the above fuel composition is able to stabilize its neutron-multiplying properties in the process of high fuel burnup. In addition, it allows the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) to be better protected against unauthorized proliferation of fissile materials owing to an unprecedentedly large fraction of {sup 232}U (several percent!) in the uranium bred from the Th blanket, which will substantially hamper the use of fissile materials in a closed NFC for purposes other than power production.

  7. DT neutron irradiation experiment for evaluation of tritium recovery from WCCB blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochiai, Kentaro, E-mail: ochiai.kentaro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Kawamura, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Hoshino, Tsuyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori (Japan); Edao, Yuki; Takakura, Kosuke; Ohta, Masayuki; Sato, Satoshi; Konno, Chikara [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We have performed the tritium recovery experiment with the DT neutron source. • The recovered tritium corresponded to the calculated tritium production. • The recovered HTO was recovered at lower temperature and high water moisture. • The recovered HT increases at higher temperature and dry hydrogen circumstance. - Abstract: The Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} is one of candidate breeding materials of a water cooled ceramic breeding (WCCB) blanket. In order to clarify the tritium recovery property of the WCCB blanket with the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} breeding material, we have performed the tritium recovery online experiment with the DT neutron source at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-FNS). We irradiated an experimental assembly simulating the WCCB blanket and recovered the tritium recovered from the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles put into the assembly with a heater system, sweep gases and bubblers. The activity of the recovered tritium was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. From our tritium recovery online experiment and calculation, the followings were found out: (1) the recovered tritium corresponded to the calculated tritium production within the experimental error in the range of 573–1073 K and (2) the recovered HTO tended to be easily recovered at lower temperature and high water moisture. The recovered HT increases at higher temperature and dry hydrogen circumstance. However, the maximum level of the tritium gas recovery is around 90% even at higher temperature and 1% H{sub 2} circumstance.

  8. The structural evolution of carbonaceous material during metamorphism : a geothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyssac, O.; Goffe, B.; Brunet, F.; Bollinger, L.; Avouac, J.; Rouzaud, J.

    2003-12-01

    With increasing metamorphic temperature, the organic matter present in sedimentary rocks is progressively transformed into graphite (graphitization). The degree of organization of this carbonaceous material (CM) as characterized by Raman spectroscopy (RSCM), can be used as a geothermometer which yields the maximum temperature reached during the metamorphic cycle (Beyssac et al., 2002). We used this RSCM geothermometer to map the maximum metamorphic temperatures through the Lesser Himalaya (LH) in Nepal. This study provides a large dataset (80 samples) to estimate uncertainty of this method and to ascertain its reliability by comparison with conventional petrological investigations. We show that the RSCM geothermometer might be used to detect inter-samples temperature variations as small as 10° C or so, but absolute temperatures are only loosely determined to +/- 50° C due to the uncertainty on the calibration. This successful application of the RSCM geothermometer confirms that, at the timescale of regional metamorphism (several My), the transformation of CM is mainly controlled by temperature. However, laboratory investigations suggest that, in addition to temperature, pressure should also play a role (Beyssac et al. 2003). As a matter of fact, high degree of organizations encountered in natural CM cannot be reproduced in laboratory without pressure, even at temperatures as high as 3000° C. In addition to the data acquired on natural CM, we will discuss laboratory experiments performed up to 8 GPa which show that (1) a few kbar of hydrostatic pressure are required to initiate microtextural and subsequent structural transformations within CM and (2) the overall effect of increasing pressure is to speed up graphitization process. Beyssac, O., Goffe, B., Chopin, C., and Rouzaud, J.N., 2002, Raman spectra of carbonaceous material in metasediments: a new geothermometer. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 20, 859-871. Beyssac, O., Brunet, F., Petitet, J.P., Goffe, B

  9. Neutronic analysis of a dual He/LiPb coolant breeding blanket for DEMO

    OpenAIRE

    Catalán, J.P.; Ogando Serrano, Francisco; Sanz Gonzalo, Javier; Palermo, I.; Veredas, G.; Gómez Ros, J. M.; Sedano, L

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual design of a DEMO fusion reactor is being developed under the Spanish Breeding Blanket Technology Programme: TECNO_FUS based on a He/LiPb dual coolant blanket as reference design option. The following issues have been analyzed to address the demonstration of the neutronic reliability of this conceptual blanket design: power amplification capacity of the blanket, tritium breeding capability for fuel self-sufficiency, power deposition due to nuclear heating in superconducting coils ...

  10. APT Blanket Safety Analysis: Counter Current Flow Limitation for Cavity Spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal-hydraulic modeling aspects for the APT blanket system have been broken up into two basic modeling components: (1) the blanket system and (2) the cavity flood system. In most cases these systems are modeled separately. This separate study for the coolability of the blanket modules can also be used to establish/evaluate a functional design requirement on gap size between the blanket modules

  11. Material Distribution Optimization for the Shell Aircraft Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goal in aircraft structures designing isweight decreasing and stiffness increasing. Composite structures recently became popular in aircraft because of their mechanical properties and wide range of optimization possibilities.Weight distribution and lay-up are keys to creating lightweight stiff strictures. In this paperwe discuss optimization of specific structure that undergoes the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflowinduced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. Initial model was created with CAD tool Siemens NX, finite element analysis and post processing were performed with COMSOL Multiphysicsr and MATLABr. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. Wall thickness has been changed using parametric approach by an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. To avoid a local stress concentration, wall thickness increment was defined as smooth function on the shell surface dependent of auxiliary sphere position and size. Our study consists of multiple steps: CAD/CAE transformation of the model, determining wind pressure for different flow angles, optimizing wall thickness distribution for specific flow angles, designing a lay-up for optimal material distribution. The studied structure was improved in terms of maximum and average strain energy at the constrained expense ofweight growth. Developed methods and tools can be applied to wide range of shell-like structures made of multilayered quasi-isotropic laminates.

  12. Analysis of Induced Gamma Activation by D-T Neutrons in Selected Fusion Reactor Relevant Materials with EAF-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klix, Axel; Fischer, Ulrich; Gehre, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Samples of lanthanum, erbium and titanium which are constituents of structural materials, insulating coatings and tritium breeder for blankets of fusion reactor designs have been irradiated in a fusion peak neutron field. The induced gamma activities were measured and the results were used to check calculations with the European activation system EASY-2010. Good agreement for the prediction of major contributors to the contact dose rate of the materials was found, but for minor contributors the calculation deviated up to 50%.

  13. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  14. Variable stiffness material and structural concepts for morphing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuder, Izabela K.; Arrieta, Andres F.; Raither, Wolfram E.; Ermanni, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Morphing, understood as the ability to undergo pronounced shape adaptations to optimally respond to a diversity of operational conditions, has been singled out as a future direction in the pursuit of maximised efficiency of lightweight structures. Whereas a certain degree of adaptivity can be accomplished conventionally by means of mechanical systems, compliance allowing for substantial reversible deformability exhibits far more potential as a morphing strategy. A promising solution to the inherent contradiction between high stiffness and reversible deformation capacity posed by morphing is offered by introducing variable stiffness components. This notion indicates the provision of a controllable range of deformation resistance levels in place of fixed properties, as required by real-time shape adaptation dictated by maximum efficiency under changing external conditions. With special emphasis on the morphing context, the current review aims to identify the main tendencies, undertaking a systematic classification of existing approaches involving stiffness variability. Four broad categories in which variable stiffness has been applied to morphing are therefore distinguished and detailed: material engineering, active mechanical design, semi-active techniques and elastic structural behaviour. Adopting a wide perspective, the study highlights key capabilities, limitations and challenges. The need for attention directed to the variable stiffness strategy is recognised and the significance of intensive research activities in a highly integrated and multidisciplinary environment emphasised if higher maturity stages of the concepts are to be reached. Finally, the potential of emerging directions of semi-active design involving electro-bonded laminates and multi-stable structures is brought into focus.

  15. Structural characterisation of amorphous materials by solid state NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Mollison, N B

    2002-01-01

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a structural elucidation technique that is ideal as a probe in the investigation of atomic structure of highly complex amorphous materials. In this study, NMR is employed in the structural characterisation of a series of sodium-lithium disilicate glasses. These so-called 'mixed-alkali' glasses are of great scientific interest, since they exhibit non-linear ionic transport related properties; the theory of which is not understood, but is thought to be related to the cation distribution in the disilicate network. This project attempts to utilise solid state NMR to its fullest potential, by combining several techniques, including the novel MQMAS experiment and a series of double resonance measurements. The double resonance techniques TRAPDOR and SEDOR have been attempted to measure sup 2 sup 9 Si-left brace sup 2 sup 3 Na right brace and sup 6 sup , sup 7 Li-left brace sup 7 sup , sup 6 Li right brace interactions respectively. Since these experiments rely on the d...

  16. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  17. 75 FR 60095 - Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... LNG Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY..., by Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC (Sempra), requesting blanket authorization to export up to a total of... Order No. 2795, which granted Cheniere Marketing, LLC (Cheniere) blanket authorization to...

  18. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  19. Fusion blanket testing in MFTF-α + T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility-α + T (MFTF-α + T) is an upgraded version of the current MFTF-B test facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and is designed for near-term fusion-technology-integrated tests at a neutron flux of 2 MW/m2. Currently, the fusion community is screening blanket and related issues to determine which ones can be addressed using MFTF-α + T. In this work, the minimum testing needs to address these issues are identified for the liquid-metal-cooled blanket and the solid-breeder blanket. Based on the testing needs and on the MFTF-α + T capability, a test plan is proposed for three options; each option covers a six to seven year testing phase. The options reflect the unresolved question of whether to place the research and development (R and D) emphasis on liquid-metal or solid-breeder blankets. In each case, most of the issues discussed can be addressed to a reasonable extent in MFTF-α+T

  20. 75 FR 11557 - Woven Electric Blankets From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... permitted by section 201.8 of the Commission's rules, as amended, 67 FR 68036 (November 8, 2002). Even where... specified in II (C) of the Commission's Handbook on Electronic Filing Procedures, 67 FR 68168, 68173... COMMISSION Woven Electric Blankets From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission....

  1. 18 CFR 33.1 - Applicability, definitions, and blanket authorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the outstanding voting securities; or (iii) Any security of a subsidiary company within the holding... company subsidiary in connection with such acquisition. (4) A holding company granted blanket... subsidiaries, or associate companies within the holding company system has captive customers in the...

  2. Microstructure characterization and magnetic properties of nano structured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis deals with the unique microstructural properties and their novel magnetic properties of core-shell Ni-Ce nano composite particles, carbon encapsulated Fe, Co, and Ni nanoparticles and the nano crystallization behavior of typical ferromagnetic Fe78Si9B13 ribbons. These properties have intensively been investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (Eds.); selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED), Ft-IR, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). In addition, magnetic moments measurements at different temperatures and applied fields have been performed by transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The present studies may provide the insights for the better understanding of the correlation between the unique microstructure and novel magnetic properties for several magnetic nano structured materials. (Author)

  3. Microstructure characterization and magnetic properties of nano structured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.C

    2000-07-01

    The present thesis deals with the unique microstructural properties and their novel magnetic properties of core-shell Ni-Ce nano composite particles, carbon encapsulated Fe, Co, and Ni nanoparticles and the nano crystallization behavior of typical ferromagnetic Fe{sub 78}Si{sub 9}B{sub 13} ribbons. These properties have intensively been investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy [eds.]; selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED), Ft-IR, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). In addition, magnetic moments measurements at different temperatures and applied fields have been performed by transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The present studies may provide the insights for the better understanding of the correlation between the unique microstructure and novel magnetic properties for several magnetic nano structured materials. (Author)

  4. Novel Method Used to Inspect Curved and Tubular Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Carney, Dorothy V.; Bodis, James R.; Rauser, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a technique for the ultrasonic characterization of plates has been extended to tubes and to curved structures in general. In this technique, one performs measurements that yield a thickness-independent value of the local through-the-thickness speed of sound in a specimen. From such measurements at numerous locations across the specimen, one can construct a map of velocity as a function of location. The gradients of velocity indicated by such a map indicate local through-the-thickness-averaged microstructural parameters that affect the speed of sound. Such parameters include the pore volume fraction, mass density, fiber volume fraction (in the case of a composite material), and chemical composition. Apparatus was designed to apply the technique to tubular and other curved specimens.

  5. Electron Crystallography Novel Approaches for Structure Determination of Nanosized Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Weirich, Thomas E; Zou, Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade we have been witness to several exciting achievements in electron crystallography. This includes structural and charge density studies on organic molecules complicated inorganic and metallic materials in the amorphous, nano-, meso- and quasi-crystalline state and also development of new software, tailor-made for the special needs of electron crystallography. Moreover, these developments have been accompanied by a now available new generation of computer controlled electron microscopes equipped with high-coherent field-emission sources, cryo-specimen holders, ultra-fast CCD cameras, imaging plates, energy filters and even correctors for electron optical distortions. Thus, a fast and semi-automatic data acquisition from small sample areas, similar to what we today know from imaging plates diffraction systems in X-ray crystallography, can be envisioned for the very near future. This progress clearly shows that the contribution of electron crystallography is quite unique, as it enables to r...

  6. Biomimetics materials, structures and processes : examples, ideas and case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bruckner, Dietmar; Hellmich, Christian; Schmiedmayer, Heinz-Bodo; Stachelberger, Herbert; Gebeshuber, Ille

    2011-01-01

    The book presents an outline of current activities in the field of biomimetics and integrates a variety of applications comprising biophysics, surface sciences, architecture and medicine. Biomimetics as innovation method is characterised by interdisciplinary information transfer from the life sciences to technical application fields aiming at increased performance, functionality and energy efficiency. The contributions of the book relate to the research areas: - Materials and structures in nanotechnology and biomaterials - Biomimetic approaches to develop new forms, construction principles and design methods in architecture - Information and dynamics in automation, neuroinformatics and biomechanics Readers will be informed about the latest research approaches and results in biomimetics with examples ranging from bionic nano-membranes to function-targeted design of tribological surfaces and the translation of natural auditory coding strategies.

  7. Optimization of Neutron Beam Techniques for Haracterization of Structural Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The result of the activities on the CRP project titled: Optimization of Neutron Beam Techniques for Characterization of Structural Materials has been reported. The activities consist of individual project which was proposed at the beginning of the project and collaborative works which is jointly carried out with the other members of the CRP. The individual project which is mainly focused on the optimization of the neutron diffractometer and neutron radiography has been sucessfully completed. The collaborative works which are mainly targeted to perform Round Robin exercise using VAMAS sample for neutron diffractometer and standard samples for tomography obtained from PSI have been carried out sucessfully. However, the texture measurement on Al alloys, applying data correction was not sucessfully achieved since the proper standard sample is not available and this is still needed for the the future plan. (author)

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DATA AND THE RECORDING OF MATERIAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parenti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The “description” of a material structure requires a high degree of objectivity to serve the scientific interests of certain disciplines (archeological documentation, conservation and restoration, safeguarding of cultural assets and heritage. Geometric data and photographic documentation of surfaces are thus the best instruments for efficacious, clear and objective recording of architectural objects and other anthropic manifestations. In particular, the completeness and diachrony of photographic documentation has always proven essential in recording the material structure of historical buildings.The aim of our contribution is to show the results of several projects carried out with the aid of survey methodologies that utilize digital photographic images to generate RGB (ZScan point clouds of architectural monuments (urban standing buildings, monuments in archaeological areas, etc. and art objects. These technologies allow us to capture data using digital photogrammetric techniques; although not based on laser scanners, they can nonetheless create dense 3D point clouds, simply by using images that have been obtained via digital camera. The results are comparable to those achieved with laser scanner technology, although the procedures are simpler, faster and cheaper. We intend to try to adapt these technologies to the requirements and needs of scientific research and the conservation of cultural heritage. Furthermore, we will present protocols and procedures for data recording, processing and transfer in the cultural heritage field, especially with regard to historical buildings. Cooperation among experts from different disciplines (archaeology, engineering and photogrammetry will allow us to develop technologies and proposals for a widely adoptable workflow in the application of such technologies, in order to build an integrated system that can be used throughout the scientific community. Toward this end, open formats and integration will be

  9. Three-Dimensional Data and the Recording of Material Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, R.; Gilento, P.; Ceccaroni, F.

    2011-09-01

    The "description" of a material structure requires a high degree of objectivity to serve the scientific interests of certain disciplines (archeological documentation, conservation and restoration, safeguarding of cultural assets and heritage). Geometric data and photographic documentation of surfaces are thus the best instruments for efficacious, clear and objective recording of architectural objects and other anthropic manifestations. In particular, the completeness and diachrony of photographic documentation has always proven essential in recording the material structure of historical buildings.The aim of our contribution is to show the results of several projects carried out with the aid of survey methodologies that utilize digital photographic images to generate RGB (ZScan) point clouds of architectural monuments (urban standing buildings, monuments in archaeological areas, etc.) and art objects. These technologies allow us to capture data using digital photogrammetric techniques; although not based on laser scanners, they can nonetheless create dense 3D point clouds, simply by using images that have been obtained via digital camera. The results are comparable to those achieved with laser scanner technology, although the procedures are simpler, faster and cheaper. We intend to try to adapt these technologies to the requirements and needs of scientific research and the conservation of cultural heritage. Furthermore, we will present protocols and procedures for data recording, processing and transfer in the cultural heritage field, especially with regard to historical buildings. Cooperation among experts from different disciplines (archaeology, engineering and photogrammetry) will allow us to develop technologies and proposals for a widely adoptable workflow in the application of such technologies, in order to build an integrated system that can be used throughout the scientific community. Toward this end, open formats and integration will be taken into account

  10. Certification of Discontinuous Composite Material Forms for Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, Michael Roger

    New, high performance chopped, discontinuous, or short fiber composites (DFCs), DFCs, such as HexMC and Lytex, made by compression molding of randomly oriented pre-impregnated unidirectional tape, can be formed into complex geometry while retaining mechanical properties suitable for structural use. These DFCs provide the performance benefits of Continuous Fiber Composites (CFCs) in form factors that were previously unavailable. These materials demonstrate some notably different properties from continuous fiber composites, especially with respect to damage tolerance and failure behavior. These behaviors are not very well understood, and fundamental research efforts are ongoing to better characterize the material and to ease certification for future uses. Despite this, these new DFCs show such promise that they are already in service in the aerospace industry, for instance in the Boeing 787. Unfortunately, the relative novelty of these parts means that they needed to be certified by “point design”, an excess of physical testing, rather than by a mix of physical testing and finite element analysis, which would be the case for CFCs or metals. In this study, one particular approach to characterizing both linear-elastic and failure behaviors are considered. The Stochastic Laminate Analogy, which represents a novel approach to modeling DFCs, and its combination with a Ply Discount scheme. Owing to limited available computational resources, only preliminary results are available, but those results are quite promising and warrant further investigation.

  11. Graphene/Epoxy Coating as Multifunctional Material for Aircraft Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullio Monetta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the use of graphene as a conductive nanofiller in the preparation of inorganic/polymer nanocomposites has attracted increasing interest in the aerospace field. The reason for this is the possibility of overcoming problems strictly connected to the aircraft structures, such as electrical conductivity and thus lightning strike protection. In addition, graphene is an ideal candidate to enhance the anti-corrosion properties of the resin, since it absorbs most of the light and provides hydrophobicity for repelling water. An important aspect of these multifunctional materials is that all these improvements can be realized even at very low filler loadings in the polymer matrix. In this work, graphene nanoflakes were incorporated into a water-based epoxy resin, and then the hybrid coating was applied to Al 2024-T3 samples. The addition of graphene considerably improved some physical properties of the hybrid coating as demonstrated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS analysis, ameliorating anti-corrosion performances of raw material. DSC measurements and Cross-cut Test showed that graphene did not affect the curing process or the adhesion properties. Moreover, an increment of water contact angle was displayed.

  12. Measurement of hemispherical transmittance of structured materials like transparent insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzer, Werner J.; Apian-Bennewitz, Peter; Wittwer, Volker

    1990-08-01

    The determination of the hemispherical-hemispherical (or diffuse-diffuse) solar transmittance Tdif of transparent insulation materials like honeycomb structures or of shading devices like venetian blinds is important to estimate the efficiency of passive solar components using these materials. Tdjf may be calculated from the measured angle-dependent hemispherical (or diffuse) transmittance 7‡j(). Alternatively one may try to measure the quantity directly by using a large radiation source for isotropic irradiation of the sample. The measuring device in both cases is a large integrating sphere. A calculation of Td.f needs an underlying physical model for the radiation transmittance of the sample. This model might not be availab'e for complicated structures and is idealized for samples in practice. The arising problems for a honeycomb structure will be discussed in detail. The differences of up to 10 percent in Tdjf are not negligible. The main problem is a practical one, not a fundamental one. In order to save measurement time and costs, only two scans along the principal directions of the cell walls are selected, thus essentiallyvarying only the polar incidence angle. These two curves can be fitted with a transmittance model. Then for every arbitrary incidence angle the transmittance can be calculated using the theoretical model, i.e. also Tdjf may be determined. The selection of the right model, however, needs information about the azimuthal dependance. This in principle can be obtained by varying the azimuthal angle systematically in additional scans. Information about this dependance can be obtained also from a scanning radiometer, where both angles for incident and outgoing radiation can be chosen without restrictions. However, this is rather time-consuming and poses new problems as well. Therefore the use of isotropic irradiation of the sample certainly is the fastest way. This approach may be realized in different ways. Two of them are discussed in the

  13. Fusion-Driven Sub-Critical Dual-Cooled Waste Transmutation Blanket:Design and Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Weihua(汪卫华); Wu Yican(吴宜灿); Ke Yan(柯严); Kang Zhicheng(康志诚); Wang Hongyan(王红艳); Huang Qunying(黄群英)

    2003-01-01

    The Fusion-Driven Sub-critical System (FDS) is one of the Chinese programs to be further developed for fusion application. Its Dual-cooled Waste Transmutation Blanket (DWTB),as one the most important part of the FDS is cooled by helium and liquid metal, and have the features of safety, tritium self-sustaining, high efficiency and feasibility. Its conceptual design has been finished. This paper is mainly involved with the basic structure design and thermalhydraulics analysis of DWTB. On the basis of a three-dimensional (3-D) model of radial-toroidal sections of the segment box, thermal temperature gradients and structure analysis made with a comprehensive finite element method (FEM) have been performed with the computer code ANSYS5.7 and computational fluid dynamic finite element codes. The analysis refers to the steady-state operating condition of an outboard blanket segment. Furthermore, the mechanical loads due to coolant pressure in normal operating conditions have been also taken into account.All the above loads have been combined as an input for a FEM stress analysis and the resulting stress distribution has been evaluated. Finally, the structure design and Pb-17Li flow velocity has been optimized according to the calculations and analysis.

  14. Target/Blanket Design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium Target/Blanket (T/B) system is comprised of an assembly of tritium-producing modules supported by safety, heat removal, shielding, and retargeting systems. The T/B assembly produces tritium using a high-energy proton beam, a tungsten/lead spallation neutron source and 3He gas as the tritium-producing feedstock. The supporting heat removal systems remove the heat deposited by the proton beam during both normal and off-normal conditions. The shielding protects workers from ionizing radiation, and the retargeting systems remove and replace components that have reached their end of life. All systems reside within the T/B building, which is located at the end of a linear accelerator. For the nominal production mode, protons are accelerated to an energy of 1030 MeV at a current of 100 mA and are directed onto the T/B assembly. The protons are expanded to a 0.19- x 1.9-m beam spot before striking a centrally located tungsten neutron source. A surrounding lead blanket produces additional neutrons from scattered high-energy particles. A total of 27 neutrons are produced per incident proton. Tritium is produced by neutron capture in 3He gas that is contained in aluminum tubes throughout the blanket. The 3He/tritium mixture is removed on a semi-continuous basis for purification in an adjacent Tritium Separation Facility. Systems and components are designed with safety as a primary consideration to minimize risk to the workers and the public. Materials and component designs were chosen based on the experiences of operating spallation neutron sources that have been designed and built for the neutron science community. An extensive engineering development and demonstration program provides detailed information for the completion of the design

  15. An Experimental Evaluation of the Application of Smart Damping Materials for Reducing Structural Noise and Vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Jeric, Kristina Marie

    1999-01-01

    An Experimental Evaluation of the Application of Smart Damping Materials for Reducing Structural Noise and Vibrations Kristina M. Jeric (ABSTRACT) This study evaluates the application of smart damping materials for reducing structural noise and vibrations. The primary purposes of this study are to: 1. Explore the feasibility of smart damping materials, such as piezoelectric materials, for augmenting and improving the noise and v...

  16. Composition, structure and mechanical properties of several natural cellular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The stem piths of sunflower, kaoliang and corn are natural cellular materials. In this paper, the contents of the compositions of these piths are determined and their cell shapes and structures are examined through scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Further research is conducted in the effects of the compositions and structures of the piths on the mechanical properties after testing the partial mechanical properties. The results show that the total cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin content of each sample approaches 75% of the dry mass of its primary cell walls. With the fall of R value, a parameter relative to the contents of the main compositions, the flexibilities of the cellular piths descend while their stresses and rigidities increase. The basic cell shape making up the sunflower pith is approximately a tetrakaidehedron. The stem piths of kaoliang and corn are made up of cells close to hexangular prisms and a few tubular ones which can observably reinforce their mechanical properties in the axial directions.

  17. Structural Properties of Concrete Materials Containing RoadCem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Holmes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings from a preliminary study to assess the structural and material properties of a nonstandard, concrete type mix containing RoadCem, a traditional soil stabilising additive. Two different mixes determined the effect of adding RoadCem in terms of compressive and flexural strengths, breaking strain, thermal expansion and contraction behaviour, permeability using a falling head, and Young’s modulus. RoadCem is a fine powder containing alkali metals and synthetic zeolites which are complemented with a complex activator. RoadCem modifies the dynamics and chemistry of cement hydration by enhancing the crystallisation process and forming longer needle crystalline structures. It reduces the heat of hydration with an early strength development. Varying the volume in the mix varies the viscosity and alters curing times while maintaining the water cement ratio. The results from this study have shown a modest increase in compressive strength and Young’s modulus with improvements in thermal performance, particularly at low temperatures. The flexural strength of the two mixes was similar with a much reduced permeability in the RoadCem mix. The results demonstrate the improved performance of concrete incorporating RoadCem but further improvements are possible by using a better graded aggregate and controlling the maximum dry density and moisture contents.

  18. Photoimageable Polyimide: A Dielectric Material For High Aspect Ratio Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Jay M.; Oprysko, Modest M.; Young, Peter L.; Li, Kin

    1986-07-01

    Polyimide has been identified as a useful material for microelectronic packaging because of its low dielectric constant and high temperature stability. Difficulties involved with reactive ion etching (RIE), a conventional technique for patterning thick polyimide films (thickness greater than 5 microns) with vertical walls, can be overcome by using photimageable polyimide precursors. The processing steps are similar to those used with negative photoresists. EM Chemical's HTR-3 photosensitive polyimide has been spun on up to a thickness of 12 microns. Exposure with a dose of 780 mJcm-2 of ultraviolet light, followed by spin development produces clean patterns as small as 5 microns corresponding to an aspect ratio of 2.4. When the patterned precursor is heated, an imidization reaction occurs converting the patterned film to polyimide. Baking to ca. 400 degrees C results in substantial loss in the thickness and in line width. However, shrinkage occurs reproducibly so useful rules for mask design can be formulated. Near vertical wall structures can be fabricated by taking advantage of the optical and shrinkage properties of the polyimide precursor. After development, an undercut wall profile can be produced since the bottom of the film receives less exposure and is hence more soluble in the developer. During heating, lateral shrinkage pulls the top of the film inward producing a vertical wall since the bottom is fixed to the substrate by adhesion. As a result, fully cured polyimide structures with straight walls and aspect ratios greater than one can be obtained. Dielectric properties of the fully imidized films were investigated with capacitor test structures. A relative dielectric constant of 3.3 and a loss tangent of .002 were measured at 20 kHz. It was also found that the dielectric constant increases as a linear function of relative humidity.

  19. Integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept applied to the poloidal field and blanket systems of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component. This concept, designated the integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept, is applied to the poloidal field and blanket systems of a Tokamak reactor. An examination of resistive power losses in the IBC suggests that these losses can be limited to less than or equal to 10% of the fusion thermal power. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls, MHD-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are shown to be modest and well below design limits. For the stainless steel reference case examined in this paper, the MHD-induced pressure drop was estimated to be approx. 1/3 MPa and the associated primary membrane stress was estimated to be approx. 47 MPa. The preliminary analyses presented in this paper indicate that the IBC concept offers promise as a means for making fusion reactors more compact by combining blanket and coils functions in a single component

  20. Interactions of tritium and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamawaki, Michio; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Tanaka, Satoru; Ono, Futaba (Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.); Yamamoto, Takuya

    1993-11-01

    In D-T burning fusion reactors, problems related to tritium-material interactions are vitally important. From this point of view, plasma-material interactions, blanket breeder material-tritium interactions, safety aspects of tritium-material interactions and tritium storage materials are reviewed with emphasis on the works going on in the authors' laboratories. (author) 83 refs.