WorldWideScience

Sample records for blanket remote handling

  1. Concept for a vertical maintenance remote handling system for multi module blanket segments in DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •A conceptual architectural model for a vertical maintenance DEMO is presented. •Novel concepts for a set of DEMO remote handling equipment are put forward. •Remote maintenance of a multi module segment blanket is found to be feasible. •The criticality of space in the vertical port is highlighted. -- Abstract: The anticipated high neutron flux, and the consequent damage to plasma-facing components in DEMO, results in the need to regularly replace the tritium breeding and radiation shielding blanket. The current European multi module segment (MMS) blanket concept favours a less invasive small port entry maintenance system over large sector transport concepts, because of the reduced impact on other tokamak systems – particularly the magnetic coils. This paper presents a novel conceptual remote maintenance strategy for a Vertical Maintenance Scheme DEMO, incorporating substantiated designs for an in-vessel mover, to detach and attach the blanket segments, and cask-housed vertical maintenance devices to open and close access ports, cut and join service connections, and extract blanket segments from the vessel. In addition, a conceptual architectural model for DEMO was generated to capture functional and spatial interfaces between the remote maintenance equipment and other systems. Areas of further study are identified in order to comprehensively establish the feasibility of the proposed maintenance system

  2. Robot vision system R and D for ITER blanket remote-handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Takahito, E-mail: maruyama.takahito@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Aburadani, Atsushi; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Tesini, Alessandro [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    For regular maintenance of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a system called the ITER blanket remote-handling system is necessary to remotely handle the blanket modules because of the high levels of gamma radiation. Modules will be handled by robotic power manipulators and they must have a non-contact-sensing system for installing and grasping to avoid contact with other modules. A robot vision system that uses cameras was adopted for this non-contact-sensing system. Experiments for grasping modules were carried out in a dark room to simulate the environment inside the vacuum vessel and the robot vision system's measurement errors were studied. As a result, the accuracy of the manipulator's movements was within 2.01 mm and 0.31°, which satisfies the system requirements. Therefore, it was concluded that this robot vision system is suitable for the non-contact-sensing system of the ITER blanket remote-handling system.

  3. Robot vision system R and D for ITER blanket remote-handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For regular maintenance of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a system called the ITER blanket remote-handling system is necessary to remotely handle the blanket modules because of the high levels of gamma radiation. Modules will be handled by robotic power manipulators and they must have a non-contact-sensing system for installing and grasping to avoid contact with other modules. A robot vision system that uses cameras was adopted for this non-contact-sensing system. Experiments for grasping modules were carried out in a dark room to simulate the environment inside the vacuum vessel and the robot vision system's measurement errors were studied. As a result, the accuracy of the manipulator's movements was within 2.01 mm and 0.31°, which satisfies the system requirements. Therefore, it was concluded that this robot vision system is suitable for the non-contact-sensing system of the ITER blanket remote-handling system

  4. Study on compact design of remote handling equipment for ITER blanket maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the ITER, the neutrons created by D-T reactions activate structural materials, and thereby, the circumstance in the vacuum vessel is under intense gamma radiation field. Thus, the in-vessel components such as blanket are handled and replaced by remote handling equipment. The objective of this report is to study the compactness of the remote handling equipment (a vehicle/manipulator) for the ITER blanket maintenance. In order to avoid the interferences between the blanket and the equipment during blanket replacement in the restricted vacuum vessel, a compact design of the equipment is required. Therefore, the compact design is performed, including kinematic analyses aiming at the reduction of the sizes of the vehicle equipped with a manipulator handling the blanket and the rail for the vehicle traveling in the vacuum vessel. Major results are as follows: 1. The compact vehicle/manipulator is designed concentration on the reduction of the rail size and simplification of the guide roller mechanism as well as the reduction of the gear diameter for vehicle rotation around the rail. Height of the rail is reduced from 500 mm to 400 mm by a parameter survey for weight, stiffness and stress of the rail. The roller mechanism is divided into two simple functional mechanisms composed of rollers and a pad, that is, the rollers support relatively light loads during rail deployment and vehicle traveling while a pad supports heavy loads during blanket replacement. Regarding the rotation mechanism, the double helical gear is adopted, because it has higher contact ratio than the normal spur gear and consequently can transfer higher force. The smaller double helical gear, 996 mm in diameter, can achieve 26% higher output torque, 123.5 kN·m, than that of the original spur gear of 1,460 mm in diameter, 98 kN·m. As a result, the manipulator becomes about 30% lighter, 8 tons, than the original weight, 11.2 tons. 2. Based on the compact design of the vehicle/manipulator, the

  5. In-vessel remote handling machine for blanket replacement in the demo fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the current state of investigations concerning the adaptation of the ITER in-vessel remote handling system of 1998 to DEMO conditions. The outline of the concept is the following: a rail is built up in the middle of the vessel along the major radius forming a full circle. It is supported from the four equatorial ports by long radial arms connected perpendicularly to the rail. On the rail four manipulators with telescopic arms are operating each being responsible for a 90 deg section of the rail. Within their section the manipulators are capable of reaching and removing every element, and can manipulate 10 t elements at 3,5 m distance with great precision. Element exchange will take place through the lower section of the ports. Great advantage of the system is that it is only supported from the ports, thus the maintenance of the divertor and blanket can be planned independently. For this reason the system is preferred for DEMO, but there are challenges to face, and they come from the large and heavy elements having to be inserted through the ports of limited size, the complicated installation process and the need for precision. The results of this work indicate that this adaptation can be done, although more investigation is necessary regarding the manipulator design (author)

  6. Progress of R and D and design of blanket remote handling equipment for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of in-vessel transporter (IVT) including vehicle manipulator has been updated according to the design changes such as blanket segmentation and structure, taking account of the interface between modules and vehicle manipulator. In particular, the updated design of the vehicle manipulator and rail has been carried out because of collision avoidance between modules and vehicle manipulator. According to the updated design, the vehicle manipulator has been reduced by about 30% in weight, compared with the reference design. In parallel with design activities, the R and D to clarify the specifications of the IVT design in detail is also performed, i.e., simulation system to provide the visual information during maintenance, dry lubricant to prevent the lubricant oil from spreading in the vacuum vessel (VV). The rail connection and cable handling in the transfer cask, which are critical issues for IVT system, are under preparation of the demonstration tests to finalize the design of the IVT system. Connection of the rail joint and cable handling test facilities are planned and under fabrication now. These test facility will be installed by the end of March 2008, and the performance tests will be carried out from April 2008

  7. Development of a control system for a heavy object handling manipulator. Application to a remote maintenance system for ITER blanket module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a control system for the heavy object handling manipulator. It has been developed for the blanket module remote maintenance system of ITER (International Thermonuclear Fusion Experimental Reactor). A rail-mounted vehicle-type manipulator is proposed for the precise handling of a blanket module which is about 4 tons in weight. Basically, this manipulator is controlled by teaching-playback technique. When grasping or releasing the module, the manipulator sags and the position of the end-effector changes about 50 [mm]. Applying only the usual teaching-playback control makes the smooth operation of setting/removing modules to/from the vacuum vessel wall difficult due to this position change. To solve this proper problem of heavy object handling manipulator, we have developed a system which uses motion patterns generated from two kinds of teaching points. These motion patterns for setting/removing heavy objects are generated by combining teaching points for positioning the manipulator with and without grasping the object. When these motion patterns are applied, the manipulator can transfer the object's weight smoothly at the setting/removing point. This developed system has been applied to the real-scale mock-up of the vehicle manipulator and through the actual module setting/removing experiments, we have verified its effectiveness and realized smooth maintenance operation. (author)

  8. Remote handling at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental area A at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) encompasses a large area. Presently there are four experimental target cells along the main proton beam line that have become highly radioactive, thus dictating that all maintenance be performed remotely. The Monitor remote handling system was developed to perform in situ maintenance at any location within area A. Due to the complexity of experimental systems and confined space, conventional remote handling methods based upon hot cell and/or hot bay concepts are not workable. Contrary to conventional remote handling which require special tooling for each specifically planned operation, the Monitor concept is aimed at providing a totally flexible system capable of remotely performing general mechanical and electrical maintenance operations using standard tools. The Monitor system is described

  9. The remote handling systems for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Isabel, E-mail: mir@isr.ist.utl.pt [Institute for Systems and Robotics/Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Damiani, Carlo [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Tesini, Alessandro [ITER Organization, Cadarache (France); Kakudate, Satoshi [ITER Tokamak Device Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Siuko, Mikko [VTT Systems Engineering, Tampere (Finland); Neri, Carlo [Associazione EURATOM ENEA, Frascati (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The ITER remote handling (RH) maintenance system is a key component in ITER operation both for scheduled maintenance and for unexpected situations. It is a complex collection and integration of numerous systems, each one at its turn being the integration of diverse technologies into a coherent, space constrained, nuclearised design. This paper presents an integrated view and recent results related to the Blanket RH System, the Divertor RH System, the Transfer Cask System (TCS), the In-Vessel Viewing System, the Neutral Beam Cell RH System, the Hot Cell RH and the Multi-Purpose Deployment System.

  10. Analysis of ITER upper port plug remote handling maintenance scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, J. F.; M.R. de Baar,; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Heemskerk, C. J. M.; Ronden, D. M. S.; Schuth, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ITER tokamak has a modular design, with port plugs, blanket modules and divertor cassettes. This set-up allows for maintenance of diagnostics, heating systems and first wall elements. The maintenance can be done in situ, or in the Hot Cell. Safe and effective remote handling (RH) will be ensured

  11. Advanced technologies for remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Master slave manipulators (MSMs), in-cell cranes and power manipulators are the general-purpose remote handling tools used in nuclear industry. In-cell cranes and power manipulators can handle heavy objects; whereas MSMs can handle objects with precision and dexterity. The department had identified the importance of indigenising these technologies and developed a variety of mechanical MSMs and Servo Manipulators. This paper traces the history and evolution of these technologies. It also mentions about the telepresence technologies that are set to transform the operator's experience of manipulation by bringing in visual, haptic and aural immersion in the slave environment. (author)

  12. Remote Handling System for Ignitor^*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbiati, L.; Bianchi, A.; Lucca, F.; Coppi, B.

    2005-10-01

    Since access in Ignitor is through the limited width of the equatorial ports, the use of remote handling (RH) technology for any in-vessel intervention is required, even before the vessel becomes activated. In particular, the first wall of Ignitor, which is made of TZM (Molybdenum) tiles mounted on Inconel tile-carriers covering the entire plasma chamber, has been designed to be installed and replaced entirely by the RH system. The presence of radiation screens inside the cryostat and around the ports ensure a sufficiently low level of activation around the machine to avoid the need of ex-vessel RH techniques. The in-vessel RH system is based on two transporters carrying an articulated boom with end-effectors, supported by a movable structure over a transport system that can be lifted and set in position adjacent to two opposite horizontal ports. The design of the in-vessel RH system, of the boom and its enclosure, and of the most significant end-effectors (welding and cutting tools, and tools for the removal and handling of tile carriers) has been completed. A series of other dedicated tools for installation and maintainances of diagnostics components, of the RF antennas, vacuum cleaners, tools for general inspection and metrology are included in the design. ^*Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy and by the U.S. DOE.

  13. The ITER EC H&CD Upper Launcher: Analysis of vertical Remote Handling applied to the BSM maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossetti, G.; Aiello, G.; Heemskerk, C.; Elzendoorn, B.; Geßner, R.; Koning, J.; Meier, A.; Ronden, D.; Späh, P.; Scherer, T.; Schreck, S.; Strauß, D.; Vaccaro, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with Remote Handling activities foreseen on the Blanket Shield Module, the plasma facing component of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive Upper Launcher. The maintenance configuration considered here is the Vertical Remote Handling, meaning gravity acting along the

  14. Apparatus for remotely handling components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkrybalo, Gregory A.; Griffin, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    The inventive apparatus for remotely handling bar-like components which define a longitudinal direction includes a gripper mechanism for gripping the component including first and second gripper members longitudinally fixedly spaced from each other and oriented parallel to each other in planes transverse to the longitudinal direction. Each gripper member includes a jaw having at least one V-groove with opposing surfaces intersecting at a base and extending radially relative to the longitudinal direction for receiving the component in an open end between the opposing surfaces. The V-grooves on the jaw plate of the first and second gripper members are aligned in the longitudinal direction to support the component in the first and second gripper members. A jaw is rotatably mounted on and a part of each of the first and second gripper members for selectively assuming a retracted mode in which the open end of the V-groove is unobstructed and active mode in which the jaw spans the open end of the V-groove in the first and second gripper members. The jaw has a locking surface for contacting the component in the active mode to secure the component between the locking surface of the jaw and the opposing surfaces of the V-groove. The locking surface has a plurality of stepped portions, each defining a progressively decreasing radial distance between the base of the V-groove and the stepped portion opposing the base to accommodate varying sizes of components.

  15. Mechanical characteristics and position control of vehicle/manipulator for ITER blanket remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), blanket maintenance requires the 4-tonne module handling with high positioning accuracy of ±2 mm. In order to meet this requirement, it is essential to suppress the dynamic deflection and vibration of the remote handling equipment due to sudden transfer of the module weight from/to the back-plate supports to/from the equipment itself during installation and removal. A new control scheme was proposed and tested so as to suppress the dynamic behaviors. As a result, the dynamic deflection of the rail and the acceleration of the manipulator were successfully decreased to nearly zero. Based on the test results, the proposed control scheme was concluded to be effective so as to suppress this kind of dynamic effect during heavy component handling

  16. Remote-handled transuranic system assessment appendices. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Volume 2 of this report contains six appendices to the report: Inventory and generation of remote-handled transuranic waste; Remote-handled transuranic waste site storage; Characterization of remote-handled transuranic waste; RH-TRU waste treatment alternatives system analysis; Packaging and transportation study; and Remote-handled transuranic waste disposal alternatives.

  17. Remote technologies for handling spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear programme in India involves building and operating power and research reactors, production and use of isotopes, fabrication of reactor fuel, reprocessing of irradiated fuel, recovery of plutonium and uranium-233, fabrication of fuel containing plutonium-239, uranium-233, post-irradiation examination of fuel and hardware and handling solid and liquid radioactive wastes. Fuel that could be termed 'spent' in thermal reactors is a source for second generation fuel (plutonium and uranium-233). Therefore, it is only logical to extend remote techniques beyond handling fuel from thermal reactors to fuel from fast reactors, post-irradiation examination etc. Fabrication of fuel containing plutonium and uranium-233 poses challenges in view of restriction on human exposure to radiation. Hence, automation will serve as a step towards remotisation. Automated systems, both rigid and flexible (using robots) need to be developed and implemented. Accounting of fissile material handled by robots in local area networks with appropriate access codes will be possible. While dealing with all these activities, it is essential to pay attention to maintenance and repair of the facilities. Remote techniques are essential here. There are a number of commonalities in these requirements and so development of modularized subsystems, and integration of different configurations should receive attention. On a long-term basis, activities like decontamination, decommissioning of facilities and handling of waste generated have to be addressed. While robotized remote systems have to be designed for existing facilities, future designs of facilities should take into account total operation with robotic remote systems. (author)

  18. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, the remote handling technology was developed for the ACP application. The ACP gives a possible solution to reduce the rapidly cumulative amount of spent fuels generated from the nuclear power plants in Korea. The remote technologies developed in this work are a slitting device, a voloxidizer, a modified telescopic servo manipulator and a digital mock-up. A slitting device was developed to declad the spent fuel rod-cuts and collect the spent fuel UO2 pellets. A voloxidizer was developed to convert the spent fuel UO2 pellets obtained from the slitting process in to U3O8 powder. Experiments were performed to test the capabilities and remote operation of the developed slitting device and voloxidizer by using simulated rod-cuts and fuel in the ACP hot cell. A telescopic servo manipulator was redesigned and manufactured improving the structure of the prototype. This servo manipulator was installed in the ACP hot cell, and the target module for maintenance of the process equipment was selected. The optimal procedures for remote operation were made through the maintenance tests by using the servo manipulator. The ACP digital mockup in a virtual environment was established to secure a reliability and safety of remote operation and maintenance. The simulation for the remote operation and maintenance was implemented and the operability was analyzed. A digital mockup about the preliminary conceptual design of an enginnering-scale ACP was established, and an analysis about a scale of facility and remote handling was accomplished. The real-time diagnostic technique was developed to detect the possible fault accidents of the slitting device. An assessment of radiation effect for various sensors was also conducted in the radiation environment

  19. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, B. S.; Yoon, J. S.; Hong, H. D. (and others)

    2007-02-15

    In this research, the remote handling technology was developed for the ACP application. The ACP gives a possible solution to reduce the rapidly cumulative amount of spent fuels generated from the nuclear power plants in Korea. The remote technologies developed in this work are a slitting device, a voloxidizer, a modified telescopic servo manipulator and a digital mock-up. A slitting device was developed to declad the spent fuel rod-cuts and collect the spent fuel UO{sub 2} pellets. A voloxidizer was developed to convert the spent fuel UO{sub 2} pellets obtained from the slitting process in to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder. Experiments were performed to test the capabilities and remote operation of the developed slitting device and voloxidizer by using simulated rod-cuts and fuel in the ACP hot cell. A telescopic servo manipulator was redesigned and manufactured improving the structure of the prototype. This servo manipulator was installed in the ACP hot cell, and the target module for maintenance of the process equipment was selected. The optimal procedures for remote operation were made through the maintenance tests by using the servo manipulator. The ACP digital mockup in a virtual environment was established to secure a reliability and safety of remote operation and maintenance. The simulation for the remote operation and maintenance was implemented and the operability was analyzed. A digital mockup about the preliminary conceptual design of an enginnering-scale ACP was established, and an analysis about a scale of facility and remote handling was accomplished. The real-time diagnostic technique was developed to detect the possible fault accidents of the slitting device. An assessment of radiation effect for various sensors was also conducted in the radiation environment.

  20. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Sup; Park, B. S.; Park, Y. S.; Oh, S. C.; Kim, S. H.; Cho, M. W.; Hong, D. H

    1997-12-01

    Since the nation`s policy on spent fuel management is not finalized, the technical items commonly required for safe management and recycling of spent fuel - remote technologies of transportation, inspection, maintenance, and disassembly of spent fuel - are selected and pursued. In this regards, the following R and D activities are carried out : collision free transportation of spent fuel assembly, mechanical disassembly of spent nuclear fuel and graphical simulation of fuel handling / disassembly process. (author). 36 refs., 16 tabs., 77 figs

  1. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the nation's policy on spent fuel management is not finalized, the technical items commonly required for safe management and recycling of spent fuel - remote technologies of transportation, inspection, maintenance, and disassembly of spent fuel - are selected and pursued. In this regards, the following R and D activities are carried out : collision free transportation of spent fuel assembly, mechanical disassembly of spent nuclear fuel and graphical simulation of fuel handling / disassembly process. (author). 36 refs., 16 tabs., 77 figs

  2. DEMO hot cell and ex-vessel remote handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Justin, E-mail: justin.thomas@ccfe.ac.uk [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Loving, Antony [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bachmann, Christian; Harman, Jon [EFDA, PPP and T, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Overview of current DEMO maintenance concepts. ► Comparison of current dextrous remote handling technologies and their rebalance to DEMO. ► Presentation of some ideas to improve the productivity and reliability of the DEMO ex-vessel transport system. ► A description of the size and type facilities that might be required in the DEMO hot cell. ► Identification of some areas that need to be developed further to meet the requirements of DEMO. -- Abstract: In Europe the work on the specification and design of a demonstration power plant (DEMO) is being carried out by EFDA in the power plant physics and technology (PPP and T) programme. DEMO will take fusion from experimental research into showing the potential for commercial power generation. During the fusion reaction, components in the tokamak become highly activated. The estimated dose rate levels after shutdown (zero decay time) due to 60 dpa accumulation in steel (blanket) and 30 dpa (divertor) are 13.1–17.4 kGy/h (blanket); 8.8–11.6 kGy/h (divertor) [1], much higher than those to be encountered at ITER. Upon removal from the tokamak, components would be transported to the hot cell facility with attention to minimizing the spread of activated dust and tritium contamination. It is proposed to use a sealed cask of ∼20 tonnes, running on air castors with 50% lifting capability redundancy. Due to the number and complexity of the routes taken by this transporter it would have to be an un-tethered semi-autonomous system. This poses some technical challenges, including providing sufficient battery capacity, reliable guidance and a fail safe un-tethered control system. The mass of the components being moved is assumed here to range from a few tonnes to in excess of one hundred tonnes. Before the removed in-vessel components can be processed in the hot cell, they would require a period of cooling, approximately 2.5 years, to allow dose rate and decay heating to reduce. This reduces the decay

  3. Beginnings of remote handling at the RAL Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expenditure of funds and resources for remote maintenance systems traditionally are delayed until late in an accelerator's development. However, simple remote-surveillance equipment can be included early in facility planning to set the stage for future remote-handling needs and to identify appropriate personnel. Some basic equipment developed in the UK at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that serves this function and that has been used to monitor beam loss during commissioning is described. A photograph of this equipment, positioned over the extractor septum magnet, is shown. This method can serve as a pattern approach to the problem of initiating remote-handling activities in other facilities

  4. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2001-08-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document representsthe development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specificidentification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing|description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance withwaste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The contentcode gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and|packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability ofthe waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on themanner in which a payload can be assembled.The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures|applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this|classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON,|RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and|justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. |Each content code uniquely

  5. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document represents the development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specific identification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance with waste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The content code gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability of the waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the 72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on the manner in which a payload can be assembled. The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7 of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON, RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. Each content code uniquely

  6. Multilayered Pipe Cutting Test for Remote Handling Maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Haibin Chen; Jianwen Guo; Zhenzhong Sun; Xuejun Jia; Hong Tang

    2015-01-01

    Based on the requirements for remote handling maintenance (RHM) of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) multilayered pipes, pipes cutting tests were performed under remote handling maintenance conditions. In this study, the results were obtained from different cutting directions and supporting intensities of pipe baseplates comparisons: When enough power was provided and the blade gripper did not slip, the cutting direction had little impact on the cutting capacity but more on the fault sur...

  7. Design of remote handling equipment for the ITER NBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Tada, Eisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-08-01

    The ITER machine has three Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) placed tangential to the plasma at a minimum radius of 6.25 m. During operation, neutrons produced by the D-T reactions will irradiate the NBI structure and it will become radioactive. Radiation levels will be such that all subsequent maintenance of the NBIs must be carried out remotely. The presence of tritium and possibly radioactive dust requires that precautions be taken during maintenance to prevent the escape of these contaminants beyond the prescribed boundaries. The scope of this task is both the development of remote maintenance procedures and the design of the remote handling equipment to handle the NBIs. This report describes the design of remote handling tools for the ion source and its filaments, transfer cask, maintenance time, manufacturing schedule and cost estimation. (author)

  8. Evaluating ITER remote handling middleware concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, J. F.; Heemskerk, C. J. M.; Schoen, P.; Smedinga, D.; Boode, A. H.; Hamilton, D. T.

    2013-01-01

    Remote maintenance activities in ITER will be performed by a unique set of hardware systems, supported by an extensive software kit. A layer of middleware will manage and control a complex set of interconnections between teams of operators, hardware devices in various operating theatres, and databas

  9. Remote handling in nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the Joint European Torus (JET) commences operation in 1992, the neutron flux will increase by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude activating the components of the machine to such an extent as to prohibit the access of personnel into the machine hall to carry out maintenance tasks. This paper lists operations which will have to be carried out remotely either because they are essential to the routine running of the machine or in emergencies. Remotely operated equipment which has been developed to perform these tasks is described. It is based on a system of conveyors which carry manipulators and tools to their point of operation. The principal conveyors are: a telescopic articulated mast carried on a bridge over the machine enabling tasks around and above the torus to be performed; conveyors running on rails which can reach otherwise inaccessible regions beneath the machine; an articulated arm which can position a manipulator within the torus; and a radio controlled support vehicle running on caterpillar tracks carrying a camera and tools for connecting cables to other conveyors. The main features of the control room from which the conveyors, manipulators, tools and cameras are remotely operated is also described. (UK)

  10. Preliminary design of blanket handling device and evaluation of the feasibility of eliminating the spread of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study makes the synthesis of ongoing works concerning the remote handling device required for the handling of the internals of a fusion reactor like NET, with the double nul configuration. This work follows the analysis of the comparison of vertical versus horizontal maintenance approach

  11. Remote filter handling machine for Sizewell B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Filter Handling machines (FHM) have been supplied to Nuclear Electric plc for use at Sizewell B Power Station. These machines have been designed and built following ALARP principles with the functional objective being to remove radioactive filter cartridges from a filter housing and replace them with clean filter cartridges. Operation of the machine is achieved by the prompt of each distinct task via an industrial computer or the prompt of a full cycle using the automatic mode. The design of the machine features many aspects demonstrating ALARP while keeping the machine simple, robust and easy to maintain. (author)

  12. Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Duncan

    2010-10-01

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  13. An underwater work systems package. [remote handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, N. B.

    1975-01-01

    A modular unit which is adaptable to several existing deep sea submersibles was developed to extend their working abilities and acquire knowledge of components and techniques for working in the deep sea environment. This work systems package is composed of an aluminum pipe structure on which are mounted two six-function grabber arms, a seven function manipulator, tool suit, 1,000/lb. capacity winch, electrohydraulic power supply, electronics housing, lights, and television. The unit is designed to be operated by itself either remotely or with divers, attached to manned submersibles, or mounted on unmanned cable-controlled submersibles.

  14. The ITER EC H and CD Upper Launcher: Analysis of vertical Remote Handling applied to the BSM maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossetti, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.grossetti@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Aiello, Gaetano [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Heemskerk, Cock [Heemskerk Innovative Technology, Merelhof 2, 2172 HZ Sassenheim (Netherlands); Elzendoorn, Ben [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Geßner, Robby [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Koning, Jarich [Heemskerk Innovative Technology, Merelhof 2, 2172 HZ Sassenheim (Netherlands); Meier, Andreas [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ronden, Dennis [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Späh, Peter; Scherer, Theo; Schreck, Sabine; Strauß, Dirk; Vaccaro, Alessandro [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    This paper deals with Remote Handling activities foreseen on the Blanket Shield Module, the plasma facing component of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive Upper Launcher. The maintenance configuration considered here is the Vertical Remote Handling, meaning gravity acting along the launcher radial axis. The plant, where the maintenance under consideration is occurring, is the Hot Cell Facility Work Cell. The study here reported has been carried out within the presently ongoing EFDA Goal Oriented Training program on Remote Handling (GOT-RH), which aims to support ITER activities. This document and its contents have to be considered as part of a more vast RAMI analysis to be developed within the GOT-RH, which aims to maximize the Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive system availability. The Baseline CAD model of the Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive Upper Launcher is currently in its preliminary design phase and does not provide enough details for developing a fully detailed maintenance strategy. Therefore, through a System Engineering approach, a set of assumptions was conceived on the launcher structure, as a basis for development of a Remote Handling strategy. Moreover, to compare different design solutions related to the possibility of integrating a quasi-optical component into the Blanket Shield Module, a Trade-Off was made, and its contents are shown here. The outcome of this System Engineering approach has been formalized into Task Definition Forms whose contents are reported here. The Remote Handling strategy presented in this work will be tested in the near future both through Virtual Reality simulations and through prototype experiments.

  15. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the amount of the spent fuel rapidly increases, the current R and D activities are focused on the technology development related with the storage and utilization of the spent fuel. In this research, to provide such a technology, the mechanical head-end process has been developed. In detail, the swing and shock-free crane and the RCGLUD(Remote Cask Grappling and Lid Unbolting Device) were developed for the safe transportation of the spent fuel assembly, the LLW drum and the transportation cask. Also, the disassembly devices required for the head-end process were developed. This process consists of an assembly downender, a rod extractor, a rod cutter, a fuel decladding device, a skeleton compactor, a force-rectifiable manipulator for the abnormal spent fuel disassembly, and the gantry type telescopic transporter, etc. To provide reliability and safety of these devices, the 3 dimensional graphic design system is developed. In this system, the mechanical devices are modelled and their operation is simulated in the virtual environment using the graphic simulation tools. So that the performance and the operational mal-function can be investigated prior to the fabrication of the devices. All the devices are tested and verified by using the fuel prototype at the mockup facility

  16. Remote handling facility and equipment used for space truss assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACCESS truss remote handling experiments were performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Remote Operation and Maintenance Demonstration (ROMD) facility. The ROMD facility has been developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program to develop and demonstrate remote maintenance techniques for advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment and other programs of national interest. The facility is a large-volume, high-bay area that encloses a complete, technologically advanced remote maintenance system that first began operation in FY 1982. The maintenance system consists of a full complement of teleoperated manipulators, manipulator transport systems, and overhead hoists that provide the capability of performing a large variety of remote handling tasks. This system has been used to demonstrate remote manipulation techniques for the DOE, the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan, and the US Navy in addition to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACCESS truss remote assembly was performed in the ROMD facility using the Central Research Laboratory's (CRL) model M-2 servomanipulator. The model M-2 is a dual-arm, bilateral force-reflecting, master/slave servomanipulator which was jointly developed by CRL and ORNL and represents the state of the art in teleoperated manipulators commercially available in the United States today. The model M-2 servomanipulator incorporates a distributed, microprocessor-based digital control system and was the first successful implementation of an entirely digitally controlled servomanipulator. The system has been in operation since FY 1983. 3 refs., 2 figs

  17. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, G.

    1999-12-16

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

  18. Remote-handling challenges in fusion research and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Rob; Loving, Antony

    2016-05-01

    Energy-producing nuclear fusion reactions taking place in tokamaks cause radiation damage and radioactivity. Remote-handling technology for repairing and replacing in-vessel components has evolved enormously over the past two decades -- and is now being deployed elsewhere too.

  19. Super-FRS Target Area Remote Handling: Scenario and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Orona

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Super-FRS, Superconducting Fragment Separator, is a unique machine that presents several challenging technical problems. One of these is regarding how to conduct maintenance in the target area where high levels of radiation will be generated and human access is forbidden. To address this problem the use of a remote maintenance system is foreseen. The objective of this paper is to develop a systems engineering (SE research and development (R&D approach suitable to develop the Super-FRS Target Area Remote Maintenance Systems (TARMS and the RH design adaptation of the components in the target area. The Super-FRS target area is described in detail in order to introduce the need for a remote maintenance system. Components in the target area are classified by adopting ITER RH maintenance classification. The general scenario of remote handling and the current target area remote maintenance system are described. Finally, the proposed systems engineering approach is presented.

  20. Engineering the SNS RTBT/Target Interface for Remote Handling

    CERN Document Server

    Holding, M; Lang, Bonnie; Murdoch, Graeme R; Potter, Kerry G; Roseberry, Ronald T

    2005-01-01

    The SNS facility is designed for a 1.4MW 1.0GeV proton beam and the interface region of this beam with the Hg spallation target will be highly activated. This installation is located about fifteen feet below the access floor and the activity levels in the RTBT/Target interface are sufficiently high to warrant the application of Remote Handling techniques. The installed components are manufactured from radiation hard materials with serviceability beyond the lifetime of the machine, and all connections and mechanisms have been simplified to allow remote handling. The application of pneumatics to facilitate the assembly of major components and to the operation of moveable diagnostics has produced some unique design solutions.

  1. ITER L 7 duct remote handling equipment design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation, design and interfaces of the 'Duct Vehicle' and it's associated remote handling equipment are briefly described in this document. This equipment is being designed by Spar Aerospace Ltd. for the Divertor Test Platform as part of ITER Research and Development Project L-7. Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project funds this work as part of the Canadian Contribution to ITER. This document describes the equipment design status at the September 1996 design review. 23 figs

  2. Protecting worker health and safety using remote handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently developing and installing two large-scale, remotely controlled systems for use in improving worker health and safety by minimizing exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The first system is a full-scale liquid feed system for use in delivering chemical reagents to LLNL's existing aqueous low-level radioactive and mixed waste treatment facility (Tank Farm). The Tank Farm facility is used to remove radioactive and toxic materials in aqueous wastes prior to discharge to the City of Livermore Water Reclamation Plant (LWRP), in accordance with established discharge limits. Installation of this new reagent feed system improves operational safety and process efficiency by eliminating the need to manually handle reagents used in the treatment processes. This was done by installing a system that can inject precisely metered amounts of various reagents into the treatment tanks and can be controlled either remotely or locally via a programmable logic controller (PLC). The second system uses a robotic manipulator to remotely handle, characterize, process, sort, and repackage hazardous wastes containing tritium. This system uses an IBM-developed gantry robot mounted within a special glove box enclosure designed to isolate tritiated wastes from system operators and minimize the potential for release of tritium to the atmosphere. Tritiated waste handling is performed remotely, using the robot in a teleoperational mode for one-of-a-kind functions and in an autonomous mode for repetitive operations. The system is compatible with an existing portable gas cleanup unit designed to capture any gas-phase tritium inadvertently released into the glove box during waste handling

  3. Remote-handled/special case TRU waste characterization summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRU wastes are those (other than high level waste) contaminated with specified quantities of certain alpha-emitting radionuclides of long half-life and high specific radiotoxicity. TRU waste is defined as 226Ra isotopic sources and those other materials that, without regard to source or form, are contaminated with transuranic elements with half-lives greater than 20 years, and have TRU alpha contamination greater than 100 nCi/g. RH TRU waste has high beta and gamma radiation levels, up to 30,000 R/hr, and thermal output may be a few hundred watts per container. The radiation levels in most of this remotely handled (RH) TRU waste, however, are below 100 R/hr. Remote-handled wastes are stored at Los Alamos, Hanford, Oak Ridge, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This report presents a site by site discussion of RH waste handling, placement, and container data. This is followed by a series of data tables that were compiled in the TRU Waste Systems Office. These tables are a compendium of data that are the most up to date and accurate data available today. 10 tables

  4. Remote waste handling and feed preparation for Mixed Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, S.A.; Merrill, R.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Densley, P.J. [Science Applications International Corp., (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will serve as a national testbed to demonstrate mature mixed waste handling and treatment technologies in a complete front-end to back-end --facility (1). Remote operations, modular processing units and telerobotics for initial waste characterization, sorting and feed preparation have been demonstrated at the bench scale and have been selected for demonstration in MWMF. The goal of the Feed Preparation design team was to design and deploy a robust system that meets the initial waste preparation flexibility and productivity needs while providing a smooth upgrade path to incorporate technology advances as they occur. The selection of telerobotics for remote handling in MWMF was made based on a number of factors -- personnel protection, waste generation, maturity, cost, flexibility and extendibility. Modular processing units were selected to enable processing flexibility and facilitate reconfiguration as new treatment processes or waste streams are brought on line for demonstration. Modularity will be achieved through standard interfaces for mechanical attachment as well as process utilities, feeds and effluents. This will facilitate reconfiguration of contaminated systems without drilling, cutting or welding of contaminated materials and with a minimum of operator contact. Modular interfaces also provide a standard connection and disconnection method that can be engineered to allow convenient remote operation.

  5. Remote waste handling and feed preparation for Mixed Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will serve as a national testbed to demonstrate mature mixed waste handling and treatment technologies in a complete front-end to back-end --facility (1). Remote operations, modular processing units and telerobotics for initial waste characterization, sorting and feed preparation have been demonstrated at the bench scale and have been selected for demonstration in MWMF. The goal of the Feed Preparation design team was to design and deploy a robust system that meets the initial waste preparation flexibility and productivity needs while providing a smooth upgrade path to incorporate technology advances as they occur. The selection of telerobotics for remote handling in MWMF was made based on a number of factors -- personnel protection, waste generation, maturity, cost, flexibility and extendibility. Modular processing units were selected to enable processing flexibility and facilitate reconfiguration as new treatment processes or waste streams are brought on line for demonstration. Modularity will be achieved through standard interfaces for mechanical attachment as well as process utilities, feeds and effluents. This will facilitate reconfiguration of contaminated systems without drilling, cutting or welding of contaminated materials and with a minimum of operator contact. Modular interfaces also provide a standard connection and disconnection method that can be engineered to allow convenient remote operation

  6. Remote automated material handling of radioactive waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To enhance personnel safety, improve productivity, and reduce costs, the design team incorporated a remote, automated stacker/retriever, automatic inspection, and automated guidance vehicle for material handling at the Enhanced Radioactive and Mixed Waste Storage Facility - Phase V (Phase V Storage Facility) on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The Phase V Storage Facility, scheduled to begin operation in mid-1997, is the first low-cost facility of its kind to use this technology for handling drums. Since 1970, the Hanford Site's suspect transuranic (TRU) wastes and, more recently, mixed wastes (both low-level and TRU) have been accumulating in storage awaiting treatment and disposal. Currently, the Hanford Site is only capable of onsite disposal of radioactive low-level waste (LLW). Nonradioactive hazardous wastes must be shipped off site for treatment. The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facilities will provide the primary treatment capability for solid-waste storage at the Hanford Site. The Phase V Storage Facility, which accommodates 27,000 drum equivalents of contact-handled waste, will provide the following critical functions for the efficient operation of the WRAP facilities: (1) Shipping/Receiving; (2) Head Space Gas Sampling; (3) Inventory Control; (4) Storage; (5) Automated/Manual Material Handling

  7. Development of nuclear fuel cycle remote handling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the development of remote handling systems and remote equipment for use in the pyprocessing verification at the PRIDE (PyRoprocess Integrated inactive Demonstration facility). There are three areas conducted in this work. In first area, developed were the prototypes of an engineering-scale high-throughput decladding voloxidizer which is capable of separating spent fuel rod-cuts into hulls and powder and collecting them separately and an automatic equipment which is capable of collecting residual powder remaining on separated hulls. In second area, a servo-manipulator prototype was developed to operate and maintain pyroprocess equipment located at the argon cell of the PRIDE in a remote manner. A servo-manipulator with dual arm that is mounted on the lower part of a bridge transporter will be installed on the ceiling of the in-cell and can travel the length of the ceiling. In last area, a simulator was developed to simulate and evaluate the design developments of the pyroprocess equipment from the in-cell arrangements, remote operability and maintainability viewpoint in a virtual process environment in advance before they are constructed. The developed decladding voloxidizer and automatic equipment will be utilized in the development of a head-end process for pyroprocessing. In addition, the developed servo-manipulator will be installed in the PRIDE and used for remote operation and maintenance of the pyroprocess equipment. The developed simulator will be also used to verify and improve the design of the pyroprocess equipment for the PRIDE application. Moreover, these remote technologies described above can be directly used in the PRIDE and applied for the ESPF (Engineering Scale Pyroprocess Facility) and KAPF (Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility) development

  8. Remote Inspection, Measurement and Handling for Maintenance and Operation at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Kershaw; Bruno Feral; Jean-Louis Grenard; Thierry Feniet; Sven De Man; Cathelijne Hazelaar-Bal; Caterina Bertone; Ruehl Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Remote inspection, measurement and handling techniques are under development for use in CERN’s particle accelerator facilities to reduce radiation exposure of personnel and reduce facility downtime when scheduled maintenance or breakdown repairs are needed. This paper gives an explanation of the potential benefits to CERN of remote inspection, measurement and handling along with a brief history of remote handling work at CERN. Recent projects are then described, covering the development work ...

  9. ITER Equatorial Port plug engineering: Design and remote handling activities supported by Virtual Reality tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of ITER, CEA/IRFM has participated to the design and integration of several components in the Equatorial Port plug region. Particularly, in the framework of the grant F4E-2008-GRT-09-PNS-TBM, CEA/IRFM has contributed to the test blanket module system (TBS) design and robot access feasibility study in the Port Cell. Simulations of the maintenance procedure were studied and fully integrated to the design process, enabling to provide space reservation for human and robotic access. For this mean, CEA/IRFM has used a CEA LIST Virtual Reality simulation software directly integrated to the Solidworks CAD software. The feasibility to connect/dis-connect the pipes in front of the Bioshield by a set of potential standard industrial arms was demonstrated. Aiming to give more realism to maintenance scenario and CAD models, CEA IRFM has decided to build a Virtual Reality platform in the institute, integrated to the design office. With the expertise of CEA LIST, this platform aims to provide the nearest possible links between design and remote handling needs. This paper presents the outcome of the robot access study and discusses about the Virtual Reality tools that are being developed for these applications.

  10. Safer Transportation and Disposal of Remote Handled Transuranic Waste - 12033

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Vicente; Timm, Christopher M.; Fox, Jerry V. [PECOS Management Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Since disposal of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) began in 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) has had difficulty meeting the plans and schedule for disposing this waste. PECOS Management Services, Inc. (PECOS) assessed the feasibility of proposed alternate RH-TRU mixed waste containerisation concepts that would enhance the transportation rate of RH-TRU waste to WIPP and increase the utilization of available WIPP space capacity for RH-TRU waste disposal by either replacing or augmenting current and proposed disposal methods. In addition engineering and operational analyses were conducted that addressed concerns regarding criticality, heat release, and worker exposure to radiation. The results of the analyses showed that the concept, development, and use of a concrete pipe based design for an RH-TRU waste shipping and disposal container could be potentially advantageous for disposing a substantial quantity of RHTRU waste at WIPP in the same manner as contact-handled RH waste. Additionally, this new disposal method would eliminate the hazard associated with repackaging this waste in other containers without the requirement for NRC approval for a new shipping container. (authors)

  11. The National Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened for nonmixed contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste receipt on March 26, 1999, planning for the receipt of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste has been revitalized. WIPP is scheduled to begin receiving RH TRU waste in January 2002. Before the first receipt of RH waste at WIPP, the disposal of RH TRU waste must be coordinated with the waste management plans at the TRU waste sites, the packaging and transportation system must be in place and operational, and the WIPP RH must be operational. Successful implementation of the National RH TRU Waste Program will require that a commitment to sustained funding and full support of the entire DOE TRU waste complex be maintained. Implementation will also require effective application of capital assets, human resources, and a continued effort to identify and resolve programmatic and technical issues. Involvement of regulatory agencies, stakeholders, and affected tribal nations in decision-making processes will have a positive impact on successful implementation

  12. Simulating and visualizing deflections of a remote handling mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, Hannu, E-mail: hannu.saarinen@vtt.fi [VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tekniikankatu 1, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Hämäläinen, Vesa; Karjalainen, Jaakko; Määttä, Timo; Siuko, Mikko [VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tekniikankatu 1, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Esqué, Salvador [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Hamilton, David [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► An infinitesimal transformation represents elastic deflections. ► Equivalent spring factor is used to combine several deformations. ► Initial VR model accuracy improved from 80 to 5 mm. ► The deflection model is capable of adapting to changes in load at the end-effector. ► The algorithms and approach described are generic and can be adopted for other mechanisms. -- Abstract: Continuing ITER divertor second cassette (SC) remote handling (RH) test campaign has been carried out at divertor test platform (DTP2) in Finland. One of the goals has been to develop and implement efficient algorithms and software tools for simulating and visualizing for the operator the non-instrumented deflections of the RH mechanisms under loading conditions. Based on assumptions of the classical beam theory, the presented solution suggests utilization of an infinitesimal transformation to represent elastic deflections in a mechanical structure. Both structural analysis and measurements of the real structure are utilised during the process. The solution suggests one possible implementation strategy of a software component called structural simulator (SS), which is a software component of the remote handling control system (RHCS) architectural model specified by ITER organisation. Utilisation of the proposed SS necessitates modification of the initial virtual reality (VR) model of RH equipment to a format, which can visually represent the structural deflections. In practise this means adding virtual joints into the model. This will improve the accuracy of the VR visualization and will ensure that the virtual representation of the RH equipment closely aligns with the actual RH equipment. Cassette multifunctional mover (CMM) and second cassette end effector (SCEE) carrying SC were selected to be the initial target system for developing the approach. Demonstrations proved that the approach used can give high levels of accuracy even in complex structures such as the CMM

  13. Survey of technology for decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 8. Remote handling and cutting techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Ishijima, Noboru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-03-01

    In nuclear fuel cycle facility decommissioning and refurbishment, the remote handling techniques such as dismantling, waste handling and decontamination are needed to reduce personnel radiation exposure. The survey research for the status of R and D activities on remote handling tools suitable for nuclear facilities in the world and domestic existing commercial cutting tools applicable to decommissioning of the facilities was conducted. In addition, the drive mechanism, sensing element and control system applicable to the remote handling devices were also surveyed. This report presents brief surveyed summaries. (H. Itami)

  14. Remote controlled stud bolt handling device for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear power stations, at the time of regular inspection, the works of opening and fixing the upper covers of reactor pressure vessels are carried out for inspecting the inside of reactor pressure vessels and exchanging fuel rods. These upper covers are fastened with many stud bolts, therefore, the works of opening and fixing require a large amount of labor, and are done under the restricted condition of wearing protective clothings and masks. Babcock Hitachi K.K. has completed the development of a remotely controlled automatic bolt tightenig device for this purpose, therefore, its outline is reported. The conventional method of these works and the problems in it are described. The design of the new device aimed at the parallel execution of cleaning screw threads, loosening and tightening nuts, and taking off and putting on nuts and washers, thus contributing to the shortening of regular inspection period, the reduction of the radiation exposure of workers, and the decrease of the number of workers. The function, reliability and endurance of the new device were confirmed by the verifying test using a device made for trial. The device is composed of a stand, a rail and four stations each with a cleaning unit, a stud tensioner and a nut handling unit. (K.I.)

  15. Remote handling devices for radioactive materials - Part 4: Power manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This part of ISO 17874 deals with power manipulators used for nuclear applications. These manipulators consist mainly of multipurpose remote handling devices. These devices replace hands and arms and even light hoists, depending on the model used, in areas inaccessible to personnel (mostly behind shielding walls). Power manipulators were originally developed for hot cells designed for research and development in fuel elements for nuclear power reactors. They are now also in widespread use in other nuclear installations, such as plants for reprocessing of fuel elements, waste treatment stations, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Alternative manipulators used in these fields and resulting in a wide variety of different designs are considered to be skill in an emergent phase or applied uniquely in special circumstances and are not addressed further in this current edition of this standard. Power manipulators are sometimes modified or especially designed for non-nuclear applications. This part of ISO 17874 does not address the special requirements of any of these applications. Although designers may not be taken advantage of standardized features and components from the nuclear sector to achieve efficient and cost-effective designs for other purposes where appropriate. This part of ISO 17874 is intended to provide assistance to designers of nuclear process and research plants, as well as manufacturers, users and licensing authorities

  16. Development of a Remote Handling System in an Integrated Pyroprocessing Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Hyo Jik Lee; Jong Kwang Lee; Byung Suk Park; Kiho Kim; Won Il Ko; Il Je Cho

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of a decade-long research programme, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed several remote handling systems for use in pyroprocessing research facilities. These systems are now used successfully for the operation and maintenance of processing equipment. The most recent remote handling system is the bridge-transported dual arm servo-manipulator system (BDSM), which is used for remote operation at the world’s largest pyroprocess integrated inactive demo...

  17. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-05-01

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  18. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-10-01

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  19. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-02-01

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  20. Project Execution Plan for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny Anderson

    2014-07-01

    As part of ongoing cleanup activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is proceeding under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (42 USC 9601 et seq. 1980). INL-generated radioactive waste has been disposed of at RWMC since 1952. The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at RWMC accepted the bulk of INL’s contact and remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) for disposal. Disposal of contact-handled LLW and remote-handled LLW ion-exchange resins from the Advanced Test Reactor in the open pit of the SDA ceased September 30, 2008. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at RWMC will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the SDA (approximately at the end of fiscal year FY 2017). The continuing nuclear mission of INL, associated ongoing and planned operations, and Naval spent fuel activities at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) require continued capability to appropriately dispose of contact and remote handled LLW. A programmatic analysis of disposal alternatives for contact and remote-handled LLW generated at INL was conducted by the INL contractor in Fiscal Year 2006; subsequent evaluations were completed in Fiscal Year 2007. The result of these analyses was a recommendation to the Department of Energy (DOE) that all contact-handled LLW generated after September 30, 2008, be disposed offsite, and that DOE proceed with a capital project to establish replacement remote-handled LLW disposal capability. An analysis of the alternatives for providing replacement remote-handled LLW disposal capability has been performed to support Critical Decision-1. The highest ranked alternative to provide this required capability has been determined to be the development of a new onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility to replace the existing remote-handled LLW disposal vaults at the SDA. Several offsite DOE

  1. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-05-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  2. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-02-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  3. Preliminary Safety Design Report for Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Solack; Carol Mason

    2012-03-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled low-level waste disposal for remote-handled low-level waste from the Idaho National Laboratory and for nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled low-level waste in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This preliminary safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by discussing site characteristics that impact accident analysis, by providing the facility and process information necessary to support the hazard analysis, by identifying and evaluating potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled low-level waste, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  4. Applying remote handling attributes to the ITER neutral beam cell monorail crane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maintenance requirements for the equipment in the ITER neutral beam cell require components to be lifted and transported within the cell by remote means. To meet this requirement, the provision of an overhead crane with remote handling capabilities has been initiated. The layout of the cell has driven the design to consist of a monorail crane that travels on a branched monorail track attached to the cell ceiling. This paper describes the principle design constraints and how the remote handling attributes were applied to the concept design of the monorail crane, concentrating on areas where novel design solutions have been required and on the remote recovery requirements and solutions

  5. Applying Remote Handling Attributes to the ITER Neutral Beam Cell Monorail Crane

    CERN Document Server

    Crofts, O; Raimbach, J; Tesini, A; Choi, C-H; Damiani, C; Van Uffelen, M

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance requirements for the equipment in the ITER Neutral Beam Cell requires components to be lifted and transported within the cell by remote means. To meet this requirement, the provision of an overhead crane with remote handling capabilities has been initiated. The layout of the cell has driven the design to consist of a monorail crane that travels on a branched monorail track attached to the cell ceiling. This paper describes the principle design constraints and how the remote handling attributes were applied to the concept design of the monorail crane, concentrating on areas where novel design solutions have been required and on the remote recovery requirements and solutions.

  6. Development of monitoring-control methods for heavy remote handling operations in an irradiated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy remote handling equipment units have benefited from the progress made in robotics, but with certain specific constraints linked to the environment in which they are required to operate. Notably, these constraints impose the exclusive use of electrical techniques

  7. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2014-06-01

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  8. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austad, S. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Guillen, L. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKnight, C. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ferguson, D. S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  9. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2012-04-01

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  10. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2012-06-01

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  11. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2011-04-01

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility, the highest ranked alternative, will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  12. A Feasible DEMO Blanket Concept Based on Water Cooled Solid Breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: JAEA has conducted the conceptual design study of blanket for a fusion DEMO reactor SlimCS. Considering DEMO specific requirements, we place emphasis on a blanket concept with durability to severe irradiation, ease of fabrication for mass production, operation temperature of blanket materials, and maintainability using remote handling equipment. This paper present a promising concept satisfying these requirements, which is characterized by minimized welding lines near the front, a simplified blanket interior consisting of cooling tubes and a mixed pebble bed of breeder and neutron multiplier, and approximately the same outlet temperature for all blanket modules. Neutronics calculation indicated that the blanket satisfies a self-sufficient production of tritium. An important finding is that little decrease is seen in tritium breeding ratio even when the gap between neighboring blanket modules is as wide as 0.03 m. This means that blanket modules can be arranged with such a significant clearance gap without sacrifice of tritium production, which will facilitate the access of remote handling equipment for replacement of the blanket modules and improve the access of diagnostics. (author)

  13. Uncertainty Handling in Remote Sensing Data Analysis for Defence

    OpenAIRE

    D. P. Mandal; Murthy, C. A.; Pal, S K

    1995-01-01

    Describes a way of handling uncertainty in IRS imagery by utilising a multivalued recognition system. Roads and bridges can be detected effectively by using the multiple class choices provided by the multivalued recognition system.

  14. Conceptualization of a generic remote handling system for tokamak maintenance applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote handling will have an important role in the operation of the fusion machines. When operation begins, it will be impossible to make changes, conduct inspections, or repair any of the Tokamak components in the activated areas other than by remote handling. Very reliable and robust remote handling techniques will be necessary to manipulate and exchange components. With high temperatures and radiation levels and the huge work space, much of the inspection and maintenance tasks would be carried out by articulated manipulators. The Tokamak remote handling (RH) maintenance system is a key component in Tokamak operation both for scheduled maintenance and for unexpected situations. It is a complex collection and integration of numerous systems, each one at its turn being the integration of diverse technologies into a coherent, space constrained, nuclearized design. This paper presents a concept for a generic remote handling system which can cater to various repairing, installation and maintenance requirements of a tokamak device. The system is divided into several modules like Deployer, Multi-Purpose Manipulator, Task Module, Transfer and Service casks. Various RH end effectors and tools can be mounted on the manipulator to perform maintenance tasks such as cleaning of the In-Vessel components, heavy material handling, In-Vessel viewing and Inspection etc. The design and analysis methodology based on the kinematic parameters, Servo Joint mechanisms, and Gear based mechanisms is presented. (author)

  15. Localization of cask and plug remote handling system in ITER using multiple video cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, João, E-mail: jftferreira@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear - Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Vale, Alberto [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear - Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, Isabel [Laboratório de Robótica e Sistemas em Engenharia e Ciência - Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Localization of cask and plug remote handling system with video cameras and markers. ► Video cameras already installed on the building for remote operators. ► Fiducial markers glued or painted on cask and plug remote handling system. ► Augmented reality contents on the video streaming as an aid for remote operators. ► Integration with other localization systems for enhanced robustness and precision. -- Abstract: The cask and plug remote handling system (CPRHS) provides the means for the remote transfer of in-vessel components and remote handling equipment between the Hot Cell building and the Tokamak building in ITER. Different CPRHS typologies will be autonomously guided following predefined trajectories. Therefore, the localization of any CPRHS in operation must be continuously known in real time to provide the feedback for the control system and also for the human supervision. This paper proposes a localization system that uses the video streaming captured by the multiple cameras already installed in the ITER scenario to estimate with precision the position and the orientation of any CPRHS. In addition, an augmented reality system can be implemented using the same video streaming and the libraries for the localization system. The proposed localization system was tested in a mock-up scenario with a scale 1:25 of the divertor level of Tokamak building.

  16. Localization of cask and plug remote handling system in ITER using multiple video cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Localization of cask and plug remote handling system with video cameras and markers. ► Video cameras already installed on the building for remote operators. ► Fiducial markers glued or painted on cask and plug remote handling system. ► Augmented reality contents on the video streaming as an aid for remote operators. ► Integration with other localization systems for enhanced robustness and precision. -- Abstract: The cask and plug remote handling system (CPRHS) provides the means for the remote transfer of in-vessel components and remote handling equipment between the Hot Cell building and the Tokamak building in ITER. Different CPRHS typologies will be autonomously guided following predefined trajectories. Therefore, the localization of any CPRHS in operation must be continuously known in real time to provide the feedback for the control system and also for the human supervision. This paper proposes a localization system that uses the video streaming captured by the multiple cameras already installed in the ITER scenario to estimate with precision the position and the orientation of any CPRHS. In addition, an augmented reality system can be implemented using the same video streaming and the libraries for the localization system. The proposed localization system was tested in a mock-up scenario with a scale 1:25 of the divertor level of Tokamak building

  17. Design and operation of a remotely operated plutonium waste size reduction and material handling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noncombustible 238Pu and 239Pu waste is generated as a result of normal operation and decommissioning activity at the Savannah River Plant, and is being retrievably stored there. As part of the long-term plant to process the stored waste and current waste for permanent disposal, a remote size reduction and material handling process is being cold-tested at Savannah River Laboratory. The process consists of a large, low-speed shredder and material handling system, a remote worktable, a bagless transfer system, and a robotically controlled manipulator. Initial testing of the shredder and material handling system and a cycle test of the bagless transfer system has been completed. Fabrication and acceptance testing of the Telerobat, a robotically controlled manipulator has been completed. Testing is scheduled to begin in 3/86. Design features maximizing the ability to remotely maintain the equipment were incorporated. Complete cold-testing of the equipment is scheduled to be completed in 1987

  18. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Duncan

    2011-04-01

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  19. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Duncan

    2011-03-01

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  20. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Duncan

    2009-10-01

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  1. Design and operation of a remotely operated plutonium waste size reduction and material handling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, III, J A; Charlesworth, D L

    1986-01-01

    Noncombustible /sup 238/Pu and /sup 239/Pu waste is generated as a result of normal operation and decommissioning activity at the Savannah River Plant, and is being retrievably stored there. As part of the long-term plant to process the stored waste and current waste for permanent disposal, a remote size reduction and material handling process is being cold-tested at Savannah River Laboratory. The process consists of a large, low-speed shredder and material handling system, a remote worktable, a bagless transfer system, and a robotically controlled manipulator. Initial testing of the shredder and material handling system and a cycle test of the bagless transfer system has been completed. Fabrication and acceptance testing of the Telerobat, a robotically controlled manipulator has been completed. Testing is scheduled to begin in 3/86. Design features maximizing the ability to remotely maintain the equipment were incorporated. Complete cold-testing of the equipment is scheduled to be completed in 1987.

  2. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Duncan

    2010-06-01

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  3. Reliability requirements management for ITER Remote Handling maintenance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Väyrynen, J., E-mail: jukka.vayrynen@tut.fi [Department of Intelligent Hydraulics and Automation, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland); Mattila, J. [Department of Intelligent Hydraulics and Automation, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A model for reliability requirements management is presented. ► A proof of concept reliability allocation is made for a manipulator. ► System reliability and maintenance assessment is done based on the previous allocations. -- Abstract: This paper presents a model that can be used to ease reliability requirements management and designing reliability into the ITER remote maintenance equipment from the get-go, parallel to the mechanical design of the system. In addition, following the model presented automatically creates a reliability verification method during the physical design process with no or little additional cost and work involved.

  4. Reliability requirements management for ITER Remote Handling maintenance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A model for reliability requirements management is presented. ► A proof of concept reliability allocation is made for a manipulator. ► System reliability and maintenance assessment is done based on the previous allocations. -- Abstract: This paper presents a model that can be used to ease reliability requirements management and designing reliability into the ITER remote maintenance equipment from the get-go, parallel to the mechanical design of the system. In addition, following the model presented automatically creates a reliability verification method during the physical design process with no or little additional cost and work involved

  5. High-definition television evaluation for remote handling task performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Y.; Omori, E.; Hayashi, S.; Draper, J. V.; Herndon, J. N.

    Described are experiments designed to evaluate the impact of HDTV (High-Definition Television) on the performance of typical remote tasks. The experiments described in this paper compared the performance of four operators using HDTV with their performance while using other television systems. The experiments included four television systems: (1) high-definition color television, (2) high-definition monochromatic television, (3) standard-resolution monochromatic television, and (4) standard-resolution stereoscopic monochromatic television. The stereo system accomplished stereoscopy by displaying two cross-polarized images, one reflected by a half-silvered mirror and one seen through the mirror. Observers wore spectacles with cross-polarized lenses so that the left eye received only the view from the left camera and the right eye received only the view from the right camera.

  6. High-definition television evaluation for remote handling task performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes experiments designed to evaluate the impact of HDTV on the performance of typical remote tasks. The experiments described in this paper compared the performance of four operators using HDTV with their performance while using other television systems. The experiments included four television systems: (1) high-definition color television, (2) high-definition monochromatic television, (3) standard-resolution monochromatic television, and (4) standard-resolution stereoscopic monochromatic television. The stereo system accomplished stereoscopy by displaying two cross-polarized images, one reflected by a half-silvered mirror and one seen through the mirror. Observers wore a pair of glasses with cross-polarized lenses so that the left eye received only the view from the left camera and the right eye received only the view from the right camera

  7. The functioning capability of a mobile remote handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In areas exposed to ionizing radiation, for instance, in decommissioning and demolishing nuclear installations or in handling radioactive waste, so-called telerobotic systems are employed. These are integrated systems comprising a human operator and a robot with limited autonomy. The robots must be able to withstand radiation of up to 300 kGy. In order to make robot systems mobile, part of the electronics must be installed on board of these systems. Planning and design must bear in mind the high sensitivity to ionizing radiation of solid state components. The MF4 manipulator vehicle has been examined with respect to its sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The unit is a double track laying vehicle driven by electric motors and equipped with a manipulator, a stereoscopic camera, two cameras for driving, a dose rate probe, and a microphone. The service life of the vehicle has been extended considerably as a result of analyses of its individual components. A proposal is made in the report to shield extremely sensitive highly integrated subassemblies and make only enduring subassemblies of comparatively lower complexity more to radiation. In this way, tolerable radiation levels and the duration of missions can be increased. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of a Mobile Hot Cell Technology for Processing Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.J. Orchard; L.A. Harvego; R.P. Miklos; F. Yapuncich; L. Care

    2009-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) currently does not have the necessary capabilities to process all remote-handled wastes resulting from the Laboratory’s nuclear-related missions. Over the years, various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored programs undertaken at the INL have produced radioactive wastes and other materials that are categorized as remote-handled (contact radiological dose rate > 200 mR/hr). These materials include Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), transuranic (TRU) waste, waste requiring geological disposal, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (both radioactive and hazardous per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA]), and activated and/or radioactively-contaminated reactor components. The waste consists primarily of uranium, plutonium, other TRU isotopes, and shorter-lived isotopes such as cesium and cobalt with radiological dose rates up to 20,000 R/hr. The hazardous constituents in the waste consist primarily of reactive metals (i.e., sodium and sodium-potassium alloy [NaK]), which are reactive and ignitable per RCRA, making the waste difficult to handle and treat. A smaller portion of the waste is contaminated with other hazardous components (i.e., RCRA toxicity characteristic metals). Several analyses of alternatives to provide the required remote-handling and treatment capability to manage INL’s remote-handled waste have been conducted over the years and have included various options ranging from modification of existing hot cells to construction of new hot cells. Previous analyses have identified a mobile processing unit as an alternative for providing the required remote-handled waste processing capability; however, it was summarily dismissed as being a potentially viable alternative based on limitations of a specific design considered. In 2008 INL solicited expressions of interest from Vendors who could provide existing, demonstrated technology that could be applied to the retrieval, sorting, treatment (as required), and

  9. An overview of the waste handling and packaging plant, a major processing facility for remote-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Handling and Packaging Plant (WHPP) is a FY 1991 line item project proposed for construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the facility is to receive, package, certify and ship remote-handled (RH) and special case (SC) transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The scope of the facility includes the mobilization of liquids and sludges from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, transport of these liquids and sludges to the WHPP, solidification to a certifiable waste form, and final packaging and shipment to WIPP. Various solid hot cell wastes will be received at the WHPP from storage at ORNL and from other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The solid wastes will be removed from the storage or shipping container, examined, processed as required, certified and packaged for shipment to WIPP. All packages coming from the processing cell will be in 55 gallon drums, and the facility will have the capability to load these directly into a shielded drum shipping cask, or to load these into the RH TRU canister for remote welding and shipment to WIPP using the RH TRU canister cask. 4 figs

  10. The remote handling compatibility analysis of the ITER generic upper port plug structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronden, D. M. S.; Dammann, A.; Elzendoorn, B.; Giacomin, T.; Heemskerk, C.; Loesser, D.; Maquet, P.; van Oosterhout, J.; Pak, S.; Pitcher, C. S.; M. Portalès,; Proust, M.; Udintsev, V.S.; Walsh, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The ITER diagnostics generic upper port plug (GUPP) is developed as a standardized design for all diagnostic upper port plugs, in which a variety of payloads can be mounted. Here, the remote handling compatibility analysis (RHCA) of the GUPP design is presented that was performed for the GUPP final

  11. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  12. Robotics and remote handling concepts for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes preliminary remote handling and robotic concepts being developed as part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project. The DOE is currently evaluating the Yucca Mountain Nevada site for suitability as a possible underground geologic repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. The current advanced conceptual design calls for the disposal of more than 12,000 high level nuclear waste packages within a 225 km underground network of tunnels and emplacement drifts. Many of the waste packages may weigh as much as 66 tonnes and measure 1.8 m in diameter and 5.6 m long. The waste packages will emit significant levels of radiation and heat. Therefore, remote handling is a cornerstone of the repository design and operating concepts. This paper discusses potential applications areas for robotics and remote handling technologies within the subsurface repository. It also summarizes the findings of a preliminary technology survey which reviewed available robotic and remote handling technologies developed within the nuclear, mining, rail and industrial robotics and automation industries, and at national laboratories, universities, and related research institutions and government agencies

  13. Siting Study for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Joan Connolly; Lance Peterson; Brennon Orr; Bob Starr

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has identified a mission need for continued disposal capacity for remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). An alternatives analysis that was conducted to evaluate strategies to achieve this mission need identified two broad options for disposal of INL generated remote-handled LLW: (1) offsite disposal and (2) onsite disposal. The purpose of this study is to identify candidate sites or locations within INL boundaries for the alternative of an onsite remote handled LLW disposal facility and recommend the highest-ranked locations for consideration in the National Environmental Policy Act process. The study implements an evaluation based on consideration of five key elements: (1) regulations, (2) key assumptions, (3) conceptual design, (4) facility performance, and (5) previous INL siting study criteria, and uses a five-step process to identify, screen, evaluate, score, and rank 34 separate sites located across INL. The result of the evaluation is identification of two recommended alternative locations for siting an onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility. The two alternative locations that best meet the evaluation criteria are (1) near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and (2) west of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility.

  14. Remote technology related to the handling, storage and disposal of spent fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced radiation exposure, greater reliability and cost savings are all potential benefits of the application of remote technologies to the handling of spent nuclear fuel. Remote equipment and technologies are used to some extent in all facilities handling fuel and high-level wastes whether they are for interim storage, processing/repacking, reprocessing or disposal. In view of the use and benefits of remote technologies, as well as recent technical and economic developments in the area, the IAEA organized the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Remote Technology Related to the Handling, Storage and/or Disposal of Spent Fuel. Twenty-one papers were presented at the TCM, divided into five general areas: 1. Choice of technologies; 2. Use of remote technologies in fuel handling; 3. Use of remote technologies for fuel inspection and characterization; 4. Remote maintenance of facilities; and 5. Current and future developments. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Development of a Remote Handling System in an Integrated Pyroprocessing Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jik Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of a decade-long research programme, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI has developed several remote handling systems for use in pyroprocessing research facilities. These systems are now used successfully for the operation and maintenance of processing equipment. The most recent remote handling system is the bridge-transported dual arm servo-manipulator system (BDSM, which is used for remote operation at the world’s largest pyroprocess integrated inactive demonstration facility (PRIDE. Accurate and reliable servo-control is the basic requirement for the BDSM to accomplish any given tasks successfully in a hot- cell environment. To achieve this end, the hardware and software of a digital signal processor-based remote control system were fully custom-developed and implemented to control the BDSM. To reduce the residual vibration of the BDSM, several input profiles, including input shaping, were carefully chosen and evaluated. Furthermore, a time delay controller was employed to achieve good tracking performance and systematic gain tuning. The experimental results demonstrate that the applied control algorithms are more effective than conventional approaches. The BDSM successfully completed its performance tests at a mock-up and was installed at PRIDE for real-world operation. The remote handling system at KAERI is expected to advance the actualization of pyroprocessing.

  16. Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project: Puck packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, inspecting the cans, loading the cans into magazines, loading magazines into Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and transporting the canisters to the DWPF. The DWPF will fill the canister with a mixture of high-level waste and glass for permanent storage. Because of the radiation, remote equipment will perform PIP operations in a contained environment. The PIP puck packaging includes loading pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, and inspecting the cans. A magnetically coupled elevator will lower a tray of pucks onto a magnetically coupled transport cart. This cart will carry the tray through an air lock into the can-loading glove box. Inside the glove box, a magnetically coupled tray lifter will raise the tray off the cart. A three-axis Cartesian robot will use a vacuum cup on a long pipe to lift the 67.3-mm (2.65-in.)-diam, 25.4-mm (1.0-in.)-tall pucks from the transfer tray and place 20 pucks in a 76.2-mm (3.0-in.)-diam stainless steel can. The Cartesian robot will place a custom hood on the open metal can, and this hood will remove the air from the can, insert helium, and place a hollow plug in the can. The SRS-developed bagless transfer system will weld the plug to the can wall and cut the can in the weld area. The can stub and the upper plug half above the cut line will remain in the sphincter seal to maintain the glove-box seal. The puck can and the lower plug half below the cut line is lowered into the bagless transfer enclosure. A floor-mounted robot in this enclosure will swipe the can exterior for contamination and place the

  17. Calculations to support JET neutron yield calibration: Modelling of the JET remote handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka, E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM-MHEST Association, Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova Cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor; Čufar, Aljaž [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM-MHEST Association, Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova Cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Syme, Brian; Popovichev, Sergey [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, OXON (United Kingdom); Conroy, Sean [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM-VR Association, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Meredith, Lewis [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, OXON (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► We model JET remote handling system in MCNP. ► We examine the effect of JET remote handling system on neutron monitor response. ► The integral effect of JET RH system on neutron monitors is less than 5%. -- Abstract: After the coated CFC wall to ITER-Like Wall (Beryllium/Tungsten/Carbon) transition in 2010–2011, confirmation of the neutron yield calibration will be ensured by direct measurements using a calibrated {sup 252}Cf neutron source deployed by the in-vessel remote handling boom and Mascot manipulator inside the JET vacuum vessel. Neutronic calculations are required to calculate the effects of the JET remote handling (RH) system on the neutron monitors. We developed a simplified geometrical computational model of the JET remote handling system in MCNP. In parallel we developed a script that translates the RH movement data to transformations of individual geometrical parts of the RH model in MCNP. After that a benchmarking of the model was performed to verify and validate the accordance of the target positions of source and RH system with the ones from our model. In the last phase we placed the JET RH system in the simplified MCNP model of the JET tokamak and studied its effect on neutron monitor response for some example source positions and boom configurations. As the correction factors due to presence of the JET RH system can potentially be significant in cases when the boom is blocking a port close to the detector under investigation, we have chosen boom configurations so that this is avoided in the vast majority of the source locations. Examples are given.

  18. Analysis of operational possibilities and conditions of remote handling systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accepting the development of the occupational radiation exposure in nuclear facilities, it will be showing possibilities of cost effective reduction of the dose rate through the application of robots and manipulators for the maintenance of nuclear power plants, fuel reprocessing plants, decommissioning and dismantling of the mentioned plants. Based on the experiences about industrial robot applications by manufacturing and manipulator applications by the handling of radioactive materials as well as analysis of the handling procedures and estimation of the dose intensity, it will be defining task-orientated requirements for the conceptual design of the remote handling systems. Furthermore the manifold applications of stationary and mobil arranged handling systems in temporary or permanent operation are described. (orig.)

  19. Flexible path optimization for the Cask and Plug Remote Handling System in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vale, Alberto, E-mail: avale@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Fonte, Daniel; Valente, Filipe; Ferreira, João [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, Isabel [Laboratório de Robótica e Sistemas em Engenharia e Ciência, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Gonzalez, Carmen [Fusion for Energy Agency (F4E), Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Complementary approach for path optimization named free roaming that takes full advantage of the rhombic like kinematics of the Cask and Plug Remote Handling System (CPRHS). ► Possibility to find trajectories not possible in the past using the line guidance developed in a previous work, in particular when moving the Cask Transfer System (CTS) beneath the pallet or in rescue missions. ► Methodology that maximizes the common parts of different trajectories in the same level of ITER buildings. -- Abstract: The Cask and Plug Remote Handling System (CPRHS) provides the means for the remote transfer of in-vessel components and remote handling equipment between the Hot Cell Building and the Tokamak Building in ITER along pre-defined optimized trajectories. A first approach for CPRHS path optimization was previously proposed using line guidance as the navigation methodology to be adopted. This approach might not lead to feasible paths in new situations not considered during the previous work, as rescue operations. This paper addresses this problem by presenting a complementary approach for path optimization inspired in rigid body dynamics that takes full advantage of the rhombic like kinematics of the CPRHS. It also presents a methodology that maximizes the common parts of different trajectories in the same level of ITER buildings. The results gathered from 500 optimized trajectories are summarized. Conclusions and open issues are presented and discussed.

  20. Flexible path optimization for the Cask and Plug Remote Handling System in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Complementary approach for path optimization named free roaming that takes full advantage of the rhombic like kinematics of the Cask and Plug Remote Handling System (CPRHS). ► Possibility to find trajectories not possible in the past using the line guidance developed in a previous work, in particular when moving the Cask Transfer System (CTS) beneath the pallet or in rescue missions. ► Methodology that maximizes the common parts of different trajectories in the same level of ITER buildings. -- Abstract: The Cask and Plug Remote Handling System (CPRHS) provides the means for the remote transfer of in-vessel components and remote handling equipment between the Hot Cell Building and the Tokamak Building in ITER along pre-defined optimized trajectories. A first approach for CPRHS path optimization was previously proposed using line guidance as the navigation methodology to be adopted. This approach might not lead to feasible paths in new situations not considered during the previous work, as rescue operations. This paper addresses this problem by presenting a complementary approach for path optimization inspired in rigid body dynamics that takes full advantage of the rhombic like kinematics of the CPRHS. It also presents a methodology that maximizes the common parts of different trajectories in the same level of ITER buildings. The results gathered from 500 optimized trajectories are summarized. Conclusions and open issues are presented and discussed

  1. Demonstration of remotely operated TRU waste size reduction and material handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing remote size reduction and material handling equipment to prepare 238Pu contaminated waste for permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. The waste is generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) from normal operation and decommissioning activity and is retrievably stored onsite. A Transuranic Waste Facility for preparing, size-reducing, and packaging this waste for disposal is scheduled for completion in 1995. A cold test facility for demonstrating the size reduction and material handling equipment was built, and testing began in January 1987. 9 figs., 1 tab

  2. Demonstration of remotely operated TRU waste size reduction and material handling equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looper, M G; Charlesworth, D L

    1988-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing remote size reduction and material handling equipment to prepare /sup 238/Pu contaminated waste for permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. The waste is generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) from normal operation and decommissioning activity and is retrievably stored onsite. A Transuranic Waste Facility for preparing, size-reducing, and packaging this waste for disposal is scheduled for completion in 1995. A cold test facility for demonstrating the size reduction and material handling equipment was built, and testing began in January 1987. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Conceptual design for remote handling methods using the HIP process in the Calcine Immobilization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report recommends the remote conceptual design philosophy for calcine immobilization using the hot isostatic press (HIP) process. Areas of remote handling operations discussed in this report include: (1) introducing the process can into the front end of the HIP process, (2) filling and compacting the calcine/frit mixture into the process can, (3) evacuating and sealing the process can, (4) non-destructive testing of the seal on the process can, (5) decontamination of the process can, (6) HIP furnace loading and unloading the process can for the HIPing operation, (7) loading an overpack canister with processed HIP cans, (8) sealing the canister, with associated non-destructive examination (NDE) and decontamination, and (9) handling canisters for interim storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site

  4. Conceptual Design Report for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Duncan

    2011-05-01

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  5. Conceptual Design Report for Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; David Duncan; Joan Connolly; Margaret Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz; Gary Mecham

    2010-10-01

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  6. Conceptual Design Report for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; David Duncan; Joan Connolly; Margaret Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz; Gary Mecham

    2011-03-01

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  7. A passive-active neutron device for assaying remote-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined passive-active neutron assay device was constructed for assaying remote-handled transuranic waste. A study of matrix and source position effects in active assays showed that a knowledge of the source position alone is not sufficient to correct for position-related errors in highly moderating or absorbing matrices. An alternate function for the active assay of solid fuel pellets was derived, although the efficacy of this approach remains to be established

  8. Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-18

    This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

  9. Benchmarking the Remote-Handled Waste Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O. P. Mendiratta; D. K. Ploetz

    2000-02-29

    ABSTRACT Facility decontamination activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the site of a former commercial nuclear spent fuel reprocessing facility near Buffalo, New York, have resulted in the removal of radioactive waste. Due to high dose and/or high contamination levels of this waste, it needs to be handled remotely for processing and repackaging into transport/disposal-ready containers. An initial conceptual design for a Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RHWF), completed in June 1998, was estimated to cost $55 million and take 11 years to process the waste. Benchmarking the RHWF with other facilities around the world, completed in November 1998, identified unique facility design features and innovative waste pro-cessing methods. Incorporation of the benchmarking effort has led to a smaller yet fully functional, $31 million facility. To distinguish it from the June 1998 version, the revised design is called the Rescoped Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RRHWF) in this topical report. The conceptual design for the RRHWF was completed in June 1999. A design-build contract was approved by the Department of Energy in September 1999.

  10. Benchmarking the Remote-Handled Waste Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABSTRACT Facility decontamination activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the site of a former commercial nuclear spent fuel reprocessing facility near Buffalo, New York, have resulted in the removal of radioactive waste. Due to high dose and/or high contamination levels of this waste, it needs to be handled remotely for processing and repackaging into transport/disposal-ready containers. An initial conceptual design for a Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RHWF), completed in June 1998, was estimated to cost $55 million and take 11 years to process the waste. Benchmarking the RHWF with other facilities around the world, completed in November 1998, identified unique facility design features and innovative waste processing methods. Incorporation of the benchmarking effort has led to a smaller yet fully functional, $31 million facility. To distinguish it from the June 1998 version, the revised design is called the Rescoped Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RRHWF) in this topical report. The conceptual design for the RRHWF was completed in June 1999. A design-build contract was approved by the Department of Energy in September 1999

  11. Mission Need Statement for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego

    2009-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory proposes to establish replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability to meet Nuclear Energy and Naval Reactors mission-critical, remote-handled low-level waste disposal needs beyond planned cessation of existing disposal capability at the end of Fiscal Year 2015. Remote-handled low-level waste is generated from nuclear programs conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory, including spent nuclear fuel handling and operations at the Naval Reactors Facility and operations at the Advanced Test Reactor. Remote-handled low-level waste also will be generated by new programs and from segregation and treatment (as necessary) of remote-handled scrap and waste currently stored in the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex. Replacement disposal capability must be in place by Fiscal Year 2016 to support uninterrupted Idaho operations. This mission need statement provides the basis for the laboratory’s recommendation to the Department of Energy to proceed with establishing the replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, project assumptions and constraints, and preliminary cost and schedule information for developing the proposed capability. Without continued remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, Department of Energy missions at the Idaho National Laboratory would be jeopardized, including operations at the Naval Reactors Facility that are critical to effective execution of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and national security. Remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability is also critical to the Department of Energy’s ability to meet obligations with the State of Idaho.

  12. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for remote handling transfer systems of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) at component level was done to study safety-relevant implications arising from possible failures in performing remote handling (RH) operations at ITER facility . Autonomous air cushion transporter, pallet, sealed casks and tractor movers needed for port plug mounting/dismantling operation were analysed. For each sub-system, the breakdown of significant components was outlined and, for each component, possible failure modes have been investigated pointing out possible causes, possible actions to prevent the causes, consequences and actions to prevent or mitigate consequences. Off-normal events which may result in hazardous consequences to the public and the environment have been defined as Postulated Initiating Events (PIEs). Two safety-relevant PIEs have been defined by assessing elementary failures related to the analysed system. Each PIE has been discussed in order to qualitatively identify accident sequences arising from each of them. As an output of this FMEA study, possible incidental scenarios, where the intervention of rescue RH equipments is required to overcome critical situations determined by fault of RH components, were defined as well. Being rescue scenarios of main concern for ITER remote handling activities, such families could be helpful in defining the design requirements of port handling systems in general and on RH transfer system in particular. Furthermore, they could be useful in defining casks and vehicles to be used for rescue activities

  13. New System For Tokamak T-10 Experimental Data Acquisition, Data Handling And Remote Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For carrying out the experiments on nuclear fusion devices in the Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Moscow, a system for experimental data acquisition, data handling and remote access (further 'DAS-T10') was developed and has been used in the Institute since the year 2000. The DAS-T10 maintains the whole cycle of experimental data handling: from configuration of data measuring equipment and acquisition of raw data from the fusion device (the Device), to presentation of math-processed data and support of the experiment data archive. The DAS-T10 provides facilities for the researchers to access the data both at early stages of an experiment and well afterwards, locally from within the experiment network and remotely over the Internet.The DAS-T10 is undergoing a modernization since the year 2007. The new version of the DAS-T10 will accommodate to modern data measuring equipment and will implement improved architectural solutions. The innovations will allow the DAS-T10 to produce and handle larger amounts of experimental data, thus providing the opportunities to intensify and extend the fusion researches. The new features of the DAS-T10 along with the existing design principles are reviewed in this paper

  14. Integrated digital control and man-machine interface for complex remote handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS) is part of a continuing effort within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop and extend the capabilities of remote manipulation and maintenance technology. The AIMS is a totally integrated approach to remote handling in hazardous environments. State-of-the-art computer systems connected through a high-speed communication network provide a real-time distributed control system that supports the flexibility and expandability needed for large integrated maintenance applications. A Man-Machine Interface provides high-level human interaction through a powerful color graphics menu-controlled operator console. An auxiliary control system handles the real-time processing needs for a variety of support hardware. A pair of dedicated fiber-optic-linked master/slave computer system control the Advanced Servomanipulator master/slave arms using powerful distributed digital processing methods. The FORTH language was used as a real-time operating and development environment for the entire system, and all of these components are integrated into a control room concept that represents the latest advancements in the development of remote maintenance facilities for hazardous environments

  15. Integrated digital control and man-machine interface for complex remote handling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, J.C.; Spille, R.F.; Zimmermann, S.D.

    1986-12-01

    The Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS) is part of a continuing effort within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop and extend the capabilities of remote manipulation and maintenance technology. The AIMS is a totally integrated approach to remote handling in hazardous environments. State-of-the-art computer systems connected through a high-speed communication network provide a real-time distributed control system that supports the flexibility and expandability needed for large integrated maintenance applications. A Man-Machine Interface provides high-level human interaction through a powerful color graphics menu-controlled operator console. An auxiliary control system handles the real-time processing needs for a variety of support hardware. A pair of dedicated fiber-optic-linked master/slave computer system control the Advanced Servomanipulator master/slave arms using powerful distributed digital processing methods. The FORTH language was used as a real-time operating and development environment for the entire system, and all of these components are integrated into a control room concept that represents the latest advancements in the development of remote maintenance facilities for hazardous environments.

  16. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology - Kinematic analysis of bilateral arms for abnormal spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyu Won; Yoo, Ju Sang; Kim, Jong Yoon [Chungbuk National University, Chongju (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    In the project of 'Development of Spent Fuel Remote Handling Technology', Preprocessing technique, mechanism and teleoperation technique are being developed. One of the mechanisms is a device for disassembling of the spent fuel bundle. However, there may be abnormal fuel bar among the fuel bundle, In this case the unpacking task will be difficult and dangerous. So, in that case, a force reflected teleoperation manipulator is desirable. The system is composed of a anthropomorphic input device at control site, power manipulator at remote site and control system. In this research, the forward and inverse kinematic equations of input device and manipulators has been solved, respectively. In addition, the mapping algorithm is proposed and shown using computer simulation. The reaction force of the telemanipulator with the environmental object is reflected through control system. The reaction force is decomposed into joint torque of the input device based on the jacobian equation. The obtained theoretical relations are verified through computer simulation and they will be used effectively in the spent fuel remote handling technology. 6 refs., 26 figs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  17. State and outlooks of remote handling and automation techniques use for industrial radioactive operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handling in reactors mainly concerns charging and discharging operations and inspection. Specific means are being developed for each operation, with an increasing degree of automation. This serves to reduce exposure of personnel. However, the development of these means conflicts in certain cases with the original plant design, which did not provide for remote maintenance. With regard to fuel reprocessing, handling at the processing level is becoming increasingly automated. The difficulties lie principally in maintenance and waste conditioning operations. These involve less specialized means than is the case with reactors and can only be automated to a limited extent, save in exceptional cases. The greatest progress will be achieved by laying down stringent maintenance principles and taking them into consideration at the design stage

  18. ITER ECH and CD Upper Launcher: Design options and Remote Handling issues of the waveguide assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossetti, G., E-mail: giovanni.grossetti@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Aiello, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Chavan, R. [CRPP, EURATOM – Confédération Suisse, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Geßner, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Goodman, T. [CRPP, EURATOM – Confédération Suisse, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Heemskerk, C. [Heemskerk Innovative Technology, Merelhof 2, 2172 HZ Sassenheim (Netherlands); Meier, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ronden, D. [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Scherer, T.; Späh, P.; Schreck, S.; Strauß, D.; Vaccaro, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Van Oosterhout, J. [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Paper deals with ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive Upper Launcher. • Design options and Remote Handling issues related to the waveguide assembly have been investigated. • Description of preliminary assessments on the RH compatibility of the sub-assembly is shown. • Assessment on possible replacement procedure and the required tools are presented. - Abstract: The ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive Upper Launcher, developed by the ECHUL-CA Consortium of Euratom Associations (CRPP, CNR, ITER-NL, IPF, IPP, KIT and Politecnico di Milano), is presently in its final design phase. The study presented here deals with design options and Remote Handling issues related to the waveguide assembly, an ensemble of mm-wave transmission line components mounted on a vacuum flange. This flange is part of the primary vacuum boundary of the ITER vessel. This paper describes the preliminary assessment of the RH compatibility of the sub-assembly, and a conceptual description of the maintenance actions to be performed on it. A comparison between two possible configurations for the tapers is reported: a waveguide integrated design, in which tapers are integral part of the in-plug waveguide, and an auxiliary shield integrated design, in which the tapers are integrated into the Auxiliary Shield. An important aspect in the design is to ensure the Remote Handling compatibility. Due to lack of space and limited dexterity of the slave manipulator, the general approach in defining the maintenance strategy is to avoid breaking the interfaces of the different components of the assembly, and to extract it from the Upper Port Plug as a single entity. An assessment on possible replacement procedure and the required tools are presented here.

  19. Remote-handling devices for radioactive materials - Part 2: Mechanical master-slave manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ISO 17874 consists of the following parts, under the general title Remote-handling devices for radioactive materials: Part 1: General requirements; Part 2: Mechanical master-slave manipulators; Part 3: Electrical master-slave manipulators; Part 4: Power manipulators; Part 5: Remote-handling tongs. This part of ISO 17874 deals with mechanical master-slave manipulators used for nuclear applications. These devices replace the hands and arms of the operators in areas inaccessible to personnel (mostly behind shielding walls). Mechanical master-slave manipulators were originally developed for hot cells, which were designed for research and development for nuclear power reactor-fuel elements. They are now also in use in other nuclear installations, such as fabrication or reprocessing plants for fuel elements, waste-treatment stations and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. This part of ISO 17874 should be of assistance to designers of nuclear plants, as well as to manufacturers, users and license authorities. This part (2) of ISO 17874 specifies the criteria for the selection, installation and use of a mechanical master-slave manipulator, for remote handling of radiaoactive materials in a nuclear facility. This part of ISO 17874 deals only with the technical aspects related to the manipulator and its interface with the nuclear facility in which it is intended to be installed. In particular, the process apparatus and the manipulator features need to be studied in parallel in order to optimize all the functionalities of the manipulator. However, this part of ISO 17874 does not cover the fundamental design criteria of the nuclear facility (e.g. the process involved, maintenance of the process equipment, intervention for other purposes)

  20. The remote handling compatibility analysis of the ITER generic upper port plug structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronden, D.M.S., E-mail: d.m.s.ronden@differ.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Dammann, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Elzendoorn, B. [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Giacomin, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Heemskerk, C. [Heemskerk Innovative Technology, Merelhof 2, 2172 HZ Sassenheim (Netherlands); Loesser, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Maquet, P. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Oosterhout, J. van [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Pak, S.; Pitcher, C.S.; Portales, M.; Proust, M.; Udintsev, V.S.; Walsh, M.J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We describe the remote handling compatibility of the ITER generic upper port plug. • Concepts are presented of specific design solutions to improve RH compatibility. • Simulation in VR of the GUPP DSM replacement indicates possible collisions. • Specific tooling concepts are proposed for GUPP handling equipment for the hot cell. - Abstract: The ITER diagnostics generic upper port plug (GUPP) is developed as a standardized design for all diagnostic upper port plugs, in which a variety of payloads can be mounted. Here, the remote handling compatibility analysis (RHCA) of the GUPP design is presented that was performed for the GUPP final design review. The analysis focuses mainly on the insertion and extraction procedure of the diagnostic shield module (DSM), a removable cassette that contains the diagnostic in-vessel components. It is foreseen that the DSM is a replaceable component – the procedure of which is to be performed inside the ITER hot cell facility (HCF), where the GUPP can be oriented in a vertical position. The DSM removal procedure in the HCF consists of removing locking pins, an M30 sized shoulder bolt and two electrical straps through the use of a dexterous manipulator, after which the DSM is lifted out of the GUPP by an overhead crane. For optimum access to its internals, the DSM is mounted in a handling device. The insertion of a new or refurbished DSM follows the reverse procedure. The RHCA shows that the GUPP design requires a moderate amount of changes to become fully compatible with RH maintenance requirements.

  1. The remote handling compatibility analysis of the ITER generic upper port plug structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We describe the remote handling compatibility of the ITER generic upper port plug. • Concepts are presented of specific design solutions to improve RH compatibility. • Simulation in VR of the GUPP DSM replacement indicates possible collisions. • Specific tooling concepts are proposed for GUPP handling equipment for the hot cell. - Abstract: The ITER diagnostics generic upper port plug (GUPP) is developed as a standardized design for all diagnostic upper port plugs, in which a variety of payloads can be mounted. Here, the remote handling compatibility analysis (RHCA) of the GUPP design is presented that was performed for the GUPP final design review. The analysis focuses mainly on the insertion and extraction procedure of the diagnostic shield module (DSM), a removable cassette that contains the diagnostic in-vessel components. It is foreseen that the DSM is a replaceable component – the procedure of which is to be performed inside the ITER hot cell facility (HCF), where the GUPP can be oriented in a vertical position. The DSM removal procedure in the HCF consists of removing locking pins, an M30 sized shoulder bolt and two electrical straps through the use of a dexterous manipulator, after which the DSM is lifted out of the GUPP by an overhead crane. For optimum access to its internals, the DSM is mounted in a handling device. The insertion of a new or refurbished DSM follows the reverse procedure. The RHCA shows that the GUPP design requires a moderate amount of changes to become fully compatible with RH maintenance requirements

  2. Development of a remote handling system for replacement of armor tiles in the Fusion Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The armor tiles of the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) planned by JAERI are categorized as scheduled maintenance components, since they are damaged by severe heat and particle loads from the plasma during operation. A remote handling system is thus required to replace a large number of tiles rapidly in the highly activated reactor. However, the simple teaching-playback method cannot be adapted to this system because of deflection of the tiles caused by thermal deformation and so on. We have developed a control system using visual feedback control to adapt to this deflection and an end-effector for a single arm. We confirm their performance in tests. (orig.)

  3. Joint Working Group-39, Manufacturing Technology Subworking Group-F, remote handling and automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    The terms of reference were reviewed and continue to encompass the scope of activities of the SUBWOG. No revisions to the terms of reference were proposed. The list of site contacts who should receive copies of SUBWOG correspondence and meeting minutes was reviewed and updated. Documents exchanged related to the meeting include: Minutes of the sixth SUBOG 39F meeting; transactions of the fifth topical meeting on robotics and remote handling; data on manipulators was forwarded to LLNL from the robotics group at AEA Harwell; and the specifications of the duct remediation robot from the Rocky Flats Plant.

  4. Remote Handling and Maintenance in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; DeVore, Joe R [ORNL; Giuliano, Dominic R [ORNL; Graves, Van B [ORNL; Bennett, Richard P [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Bollen, Georg [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Cole, Daniel F. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Ronningen, Reginald M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Schein, Mike E [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Zeller, Albert F [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB)

    2011-01-01

    Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, MI was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design and establish a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), a cutting-edge research facility to advance the understanding of rare nuclear isotopes and the evolution of the cosmos. The research conducted at the FRIB will involve experimentation with intense beams of rare isotopes within a well-shielded target cell that will result in activation and contamination of components. The target cell is initially hands-on accessible after shutdown and a brief cool-down period. Personnel are expected to have hands-on access to the tops of shielded component modules with the activated in-beam sections suspended underneath. The modules are carefully designed to include steel shielding for protecting personnel during these hand-on operations. However, as the facility has greater levels of activation and contamination, a bridge mounted servomaniputor may be added to the cell, to perform the disconnecting of services to the component assemblies. Dexterous remote handling and exchange of the modularized activated components is completed at a shielded window workstation with a pair of master-slave manipulators. The primary components requiring exchange or maintenance are the production target, the beam wedge filter, the beam dump, and the beam focusing and bending magnets. This paper provides an overview of the FRIB Target Facility remote handling and maintenance design requirements, concepts, and techniques.

  5. Concept design of divertor remote handling system for the FAST machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gironimo, G., E-mail: giuseppe.digironimo@unina.it [Association Euratom/ENEA/CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Labate, C.; Renno, F. [Association Euratom/ENEA/CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Brolatti, G.; Crescenzi, F.; Crisanti, F. [CR ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 27, Frascati (RM) (Italy); Lanzotti, A. [Association Euratom/ENEA/CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Lucca, F. [LT Calcoli SaS, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate (Italy); Siuko, M. [VTT Systems Engineering, Tekniikankatu 1, 33720 Tampere (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    The paper presents a concept design of a remote handling (RH) system oriented to maintenance operations on the divertor second cassette in FAST, a satellite of ITER tokamak. Starting from ITER configuration, a suitably scaled system, composed by a cassette multifunctional mover (CMM) connected to a second cassette end-effector (SCEE), can represent a very efficient solution for FAST machine. The presence of a further system able to open the divertor port, used for RH aims, and remove the first cassette, already aligned with the radial direction of the port, is presumed. Although an ITER-like system maintains essentially shape and proportions of its reference configuration, an appropriate arrangement with FAST environment is needed, taking into account new requirements due to different dimensions, weights and geometries. The use of virtual prototyping and the possibility to involve a great number of persons, not only mechanical designers but also physicist, plasma experts and personnel assigned to remote handling operations, made them to share the multiphysics design experience, according to a concurrent engineering approach. Nevertheless, according to the main objective of any satellite tokamak, such an approach benefits the study of enhancements to ITER RH system and the exploration of alternative solutions.

  6. TechnoFusion, a relevant facility for fusion technologies: The remote handling area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future commercial production of electricity based on thermonuclear fusion requires the development of a number of research projects in addition to ITER, mostly related to the development of long-term technologies needed for future fusion reactors. Among the priority areas identified in the framework of international fusion research programmes, it is projected to build a specific research centre for fusion technologies in Spain. The so-called National Centre for Fusion Technologies, TechnoFusion, will be equipped with a large number of top facilities for the fusion technological development. The research activities will be focused primarily on several areas, including the implementation of advanced manufacturing technologies, the evaluation of radiation effects on low activation structural and functional materials, the in-beam and out-beam characterization of materials, the development of robotics and automated systems for remote handling, studies of liquid metal technologies and computer simulation. Currently no similar facilities to TechnoFusion exist, so it will provide more realistic tests than those available in other facilities up today, helping in the fast track to DEMO and IFMIF. The present document summarizes a review of the different facilities to be included in TechnoFusion, with special emphasis on those proposed for remote handling (RH) applications. The paper will review the technical specifications concerning the RH facility, the analysis of the mock-up components and tests to be performed, and the relevance of the RH lab capabilities, particularly the required equipment under irradiation conditions.

  7. Preliminary concept design of the divertor remote handling system for DEMO power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Concept design of the RH system for the DEMO fusion power plant. • Divertor Mover: Hydraulic telescopic boom concept design. An alternative solution to ITER rack and pinion divertor mover (CMM). • Divertor cassettes end effector studies. • Transportation cask conceptual studies and logistic. - Abstract: This paper is based on the remote maintenance system project (WPRM) for the demonstration fusion power reactor (DEMO). Following ITER, DEMO aims to confirm the capability of generating several hundred of MW of net electricity by 2050. The main objective of these activities is to develop an efficient and reliable remote handling (RH) system for replacing the divertor cassettes. This paper presents the preliminary results of the concept design of the divertor RH system. The proposed divertor mover is a hydraulic telescopic boom driven from the transportation cask through the maintenance tunnel of the reactor. The boom is divided in three sections of 4 m each, and it is driving an end-effector in order to perform the scheduled operations of maintenance inside the vacuum vessel. Two alternative design of the end effector to grip and manipulate the divertor cassette are also presented in this work. Both the concepts are hydraulically actuated, basing on the ITER previous studies. The divertor cassette end-effector consists of a lifting arm linked to the divertor mover, a tilting plate, a cantilever arm and a hook-plate. The main objective of this paper is to illustrate the feasibility of DEMO divertor remote maintenance operations

  8. Processing Plan for Potentially Reactive/Ignitable Remote Handled Transuranic Waste at the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12090

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote Handle Transuranic (RH-TRU) Waste generated at Argonne National Laboratory - East, from the examination of irradiated and un-irradiated fuel pins and other reactor materials requires a detailed processing plan to ensure reactive/ignitable material is absent to meet WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria prior to shipping and disposal. The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) approach to repackaging Lot 2 waste and how we ensure prohibited materials are not present in waste intended for disposal at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 'WIPP' uses an Argon Repackaging Station (ARS), which provides an inert gas blanket. Opening of the Lot 2 containers under an argon gas blanket is proposed to be completed in the ARS. The ARS is an interim transition repackaging station that provides a mitigation technique to reduce the chances of a reoccurrence of a thermal event prior to rendering the waste 'Safe'. The consequences, should another thermal event be encountered, (which is likely) is to package the waste, apply the reactive and or ignitable codes to the container, and store until the future treatment permit and process are available. This is the same disposition that the two earlier containers in the 'Thermal Events' were assigned. By performing the initial handling under an inert gas blanket, the waste can sorted and segregate the fines and add the Met-L-X to minimize risk before it is exposed to air. The 1-gal cans that are inside the ANL-E canister will be removed and each can is moved to the ARS for repackaging. In the ARS, the 1-gal can is opened in the inerted environment. The contained waste is sorted, weighed, and visually examined for non compliant items such as unvented aerosol cans and liquids. The contents of the paint cans are transferred into a sieve and manipulated to allow the fines, if any, to be separated into the tray below. The fines are weighed and then blended with a minimum 5:1 mix of Met-L-X. Other debris materials found are segregated from the cans into containers

  9. Progress in the design, R and D and procurement preparation of the ITER Divertor Remote Handling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The ITER Divertor Remote Handling System (DRHS) reference design is presented. •Different R and D activities that have contributed to the development and validation of the current reference design are reported. •The DRHS turns to be a unique system in terms of complexity due to size of the to-be-handled components, the novelty of the remote operations and the operational conditions. -- Abstract: The ITER Divertor Remote Handling System (DRHS) consists of a number of dedicated remote handling equipment and tooling that will provide the means to perform the exchange of the divertor system in a full-remote way. In order to achieve this objective the DRHS will need to perform a number of novel and complex remote operations in a contaminated and space-constrained environment, in rather poor lightening conditions. Fusion for Energy has recently launched the tendering phase for the in-kind procurement of the DRHS. The procurement is based on a set of system requirements and functional specifications supported by a reference design which are presented and discussed in this paper along with the main outcomes of the different R and D activities that have contributed to the development and validation of the current reference design

  10. Automation of remote handling in uranium and mixed oxide fuel element fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of the analyses are plants for the fabrication or uranium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel elements. The reference basis of the paper is an overview of the state-of-the-art of manufacturing technologies with regard to automation and remote handling during fuel element fabrication in national and foreign plants, and in comparabel sectors of conventional technologies. Proceeding from ambient dose rates, residence times, and technical conditions or individual doses at typical work-places during fuel element fabrication, work processes are pointed out which, taking into account technical possibilities, should be given priority when automating, and technical solutions for it are sought. Advantages and disadvantages of such measures are outlined, and reduction of radiation exposure is shown (example: mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant at Hanau). (orig./HP)

  11. Apparatus for remote handling of materials. [mixing or analyzing dangerous chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, R. B.; Hodder, D. T.; Wrinkle, W. W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus for remote handling of materials are described. A closed housing is provided with first and second containers and first and second reservoirs for holding materials to be mixed. The materials are transferable from the reservoirs to the first container where they are mixed. The mixed materials are then conveyed from the first container to the second container preferably by dumping the mixed materials into a funnel positioned over the second container. The second container is then moved to a second position for analysis of the mixed materials. For example, the materials may be ignited and the flame analyzed. Access, such as a sight port, is provided in the housing at the analysis position. The device provides a simple and inexpensive apparatus for safely mixing a pyrophoric material and an oxidizer which together form a thermite type mixture that burns to produce a large quantity of heat and light.

  12. Preliminary Project Execution Plan for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Duncan

    2011-05-01

    This preliminary project execution plan (PEP) defines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project objectives, roles and responsibilities of project participants, project organization, and controls to effectively manage acquisition of capital funds for construction of a proposed remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The plan addresses the policies, requirements, and critical decision (CD) responsibilities identified in DOE Order 413.3B, 'Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets.' This plan is intended to be a 'living document' that will be periodically updated as the project progresses through the CD process to construction and turnover for operation.

  13. Calibration and compensation of deflections and compliances in remote handling equipment configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a generic method of calibrating and compensating remote handling system configurations subject to manufacturing and assembly tolerances, deflections and compliances. A method consists of kinematic part and non-kinematic part. A kinematic calibration algorithm is presented for finding the values of kinematic model errors by measuring the end-effector Cartesian position. This is a conventional way to calibrate industrial robots. However, in this case the kinematic calibration is not able to compensate flaws fully due to large deflections and compliances caused by a massive Cassette payload (approx. 9 ton). Positioning error at the furthest point of the cassette before any compensation was 80 mm. Therefore, extra compensation must be introduced in addition to a kinematic calibration. A kinematic calibration together with an extra compensation is a demanding task to carry out. The resulting complex compensation function has to be such that it can be implemented in real-time Cassette Multifunctional Mover (CMM) control system software.

  14. Interoperability of remote handling control system software modules at Divertor Test Platform 2 using middleware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuominen, Janne, E-mail: janne.m.tuominen@tut.fi [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Intelligent Hydraulics and Automation, Tampere (Finland); Rasi, Teemu; Mattila, Jouni [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Intelligent Hydraulics and Automation, Tampere (Finland); Siuko, Mikko [VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tampere (Finland); Esque, Salvador [F4E, Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla2, 08019, Barcelona (Spain); Hamilton, David [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The prototype DTP2 remote handling control system is a heterogeneous collection of subsystems, each realizing a functional area of responsibility. ► Middleware provides well-known, reusable solutions to problems, such as heterogeneity, interoperability, security and dependability. ► A middleware solution was selected and integrated with the DTP2 RH control system. The middleware was successfully used to integrate all relevant subsystems and functionality was demonstrated. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on the inter-subsystem communication channels in a prototype distributed remote handling control system at Divertor Test Platform 2 (DTP2). The subsystems are responsible for specific tasks and, over the years, their development has been carried out using various platforms and programming languages. The communication channels between subsystems have different priorities, e.g. very high messaging rate and deterministic timing or high reliability in terms of individual messages. Generally, a control system's communication infrastructure should provide interoperability, scalability, performance and maintainability. An attractive approach to accomplish this is to use a standardized and proven middleware implementation. The selection of a middleware can have a major cost impact in future integration efforts. In this paper we present development done at DTP2 using the Object Management Group's (OMG) standard specification for Data Distribution Service (DDS) for ensuring communications interoperability. DDS has gained a stable foothold especially in the military field. It lacks a centralized broker, thereby avoiding a single-point-of-failure. It also includes an extensive set of Quality of Service (QoS) policies. The standard defines a platform- and programming language independent model and an interoperability wire protocol that enables DDS vendor interoperability, allowing software developers to avoid vendor lock-in situations.

  15. Simulation-based design process for the verification of ITER remote handling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibois, Romain, E-mail: romain.sibois@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Määttä, Timo; Siuko, Mikko [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Mattila, Jouni [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Verification and validation process for ITER remote handling system. •Simulation-based design process for early verification of ITER RH systems. •Design process centralized around simulation lifecycle management system. •Verification and validation roadmap for digital modelling phase. -- Abstract: The work behind this paper takes place in the EFDA's European Goal Oriented Training programme on Remote Handling (RH) “GOT-RH”. The programme aims to train engineers for activities supporting the ITER project and the long-term fusion programme. One of the projects of this programme focuses on the verification and validation (V and V) of ITER RH system requirements using digital mock-ups (DMU). The purpose of this project is to study and develop efficient approach of using DMUs in the V and V process of ITER RH system design utilizing a System Engineering (SE) framework. Complex engineering systems such as ITER facilities lead to substantial rise of cost while manufacturing the full-scale prototype. In the V and V process for ITER RH equipment, physical tests are a requirement to ensure the compliance of the system according to the required operation. Therefore it is essential to virtually verify the developed system before starting the prototype manufacturing phase. This paper gives an overview of the current trends in using digital mock-up within product design processes. It suggests a simulation-based process design centralized around a simulation lifecycle management system. The purpose of this paper is to describe possible improvements in the formalization of the ITER RH design process and V and V processes, in order to increase their cost efficiency and reliability.

  16. Interoperability of remote handling control system software modules at Divertor Test Platform 2 using middleware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The prototype DTP2 remote handling control system is a heterogeneous collection of subsystems, each realizing a functional area of responsibility. ► Middleware provides well-known, reusable solutions to problems, such as heterogeneity, interoperability, security and dependability. ► A middleware solution was selected and integrated with the DTP2 RH control system. The middleware was successfully used to integrate all relevant subsystems and functionality was demonstrated. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on the inter-subsystem communication channels in a prototype distributed remote handling control system at Divertor Test Platform 2 (DTP2). The subsystems are responsible for specific tasks and, over the years, their development has been carried out using various platforms and programming languages. The communication channels between subsystems have different priorities, e.g. very high messaging rate and deterministic timing or high reliability in terms of individual messages. Generally, a control system's communication infrastructure should provide interoperability, scalability, performance and maintainability. An attractive approach to accomplish this is to use a standardized and proven middleware implementation. The selection of a middleware can have a major cost impact in future integration efforts. In this paper we present development done at DTP2 using the Object Management Group's (OMG) standard specification for Data Distribution Service (DDS) for ensuring communications interoperability. DDS has gained a stable foothold especially in the military field. It lacks a centralized broker, thereby avoiding a single-point-of-failure. It also includes an extensive set of Quality of Service (QoS) policies. The standard defines a platform- and programming language independent model and an interoperability wire protocol that enables DDS vendor interoperability, allowing software developers to avoid vendor lock-in situations

  17. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Chirstensen

    2012-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  18. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Chirstensen

    2012-08-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  19. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Mecham

    2009-10-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  20. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Chirstensen

    2015-03-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1C, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  1. Divertor cassette locking system remote handling trials with WHMAN at DTP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyytikäinen, Ville; Kinnunen, Pasi; Koivumäki, Janne; Mattila, Jouni [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Siuko, Mikko [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Esque, Salvador [F4E, Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla2, 08019, Barcelona (Spain); Palmer, Jim, E-mail: ville.lyytikainen@tut.fi [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► RH requirements were developed from operator feedback, potential problem analysis and task description. ► Tools were designed according to these RH specific requirements. ► Two RH capable were developed and their functionality was verified at DPT2. -- Abstract: A key ITER maintenance activity is the exchange of the divertor cassettes. The current major step in this programme involves the full scale physical test facility, namely divertor test platform 2 (DTP2), in Tampere, Finland. The objective of the DTP2 is the design and proof of concept studies of various remote handling (RH) device prototypes and their RH control systems, but is also important to define principles for standardizing control systems and methods around the ITER maintenance equipment. The development process of divertor cassette locking system (CLS) RH Tool prototypes is presented in this paper. The validation of the developed CLS Tool prototypes is accomplished in RH trials at DTP2. For this RH Trial, a CLS task description (TD) and tool prototypes were developed, manufactured and, finally, tested under remote operations. These tools, designed to be operated by water hydraulic manipulator (WHMAN), are water hydraulic jack (WHJ), pin tool (PT) and wrench tool (WT)

  2. Results from simulated remote-handled transuranic waste experiments at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-year, simulated remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU, nonradioactive) experiments are being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot-Plant (WIPP) facility. These experiments involve the near-reference (thermal and geometrical) testing of eight full size RH TRU test containers emplaced into horizontal, unlined rock salt boreholes. Half of the test emplacements are partially filled with bentonite/silica-sand backfill material. All test containers were electrically heated at about 115 W/each for three years, then raised to about 300 W/each for the remaining time. Each test borehole was instrumented with a selection of remote-reading thermocouples, pressure gages, borehole vertical-closure gages, and vertical and horizontal borehole-diameter closure gages. Each test emplacements was also periodically opened for visual inspections of brine intrusions and any interactions with waste package materials, materials sampling, manual closure measurements, and observations of borehole changes. Effects of heat on borehole closure rates and near-field materials (metals, backfill, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored as a function of time. This paper summarizes results for the first five years of in situ test operation with supporting instrumentation and laboratory data and interpretations. Some details of RH TRU waste package materials, designs, and assorted underground test observations are also discussed. Based on the results, the tested RH TRU waste packages, materials, and emplacement geometry in unlined salt boreholes appear to be quite adequate for initial WIPP repository-phase operations

  3. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Strategy for the Remote-Handled Low-level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggy Hinman

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to have disposal capability for remote-handled low level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the time the existing disposal facility is full or must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the INL Subsurface Disposal Area in approximately the year 2017.

  4. Irradiation tests of critical components for remote handling system in gamma radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Kenjiro; Kakudate, Satoshi; Oka, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    1996-03-01

    This report covers the gamma ray irradiation tests according to the Agreement of ITER R and D Task (T35) in 1994 and describes radiation hardness of the standard components for the ITER remote handling system which are categorized into the robotics (Subtask-1), the viewing system (Subtask-2) and the common components (Subtask-3). The gamma ray irradiation tests have been conducted using No.2 and No.3 cells at the cobalt building of Takasaki Establishment in JAERI. The radiation source is cobalt sixty (Co-60), and the maximum dose rate of No.2 and No.3 cells is about 1x10{sup 6} R/h and 2x10{sup 6} R/h, respectively. The environmental conditions of the irradiation tests are described below and all of components excepting electrical wires have been tested in the No.2 cell. [No.2 cell : Atmosphere and ambient temperature No.3 cell : Nitrogen gas and 250degC] As a whole, many of components have been irradiated up to the rated dose of around 1x10{sup 10} rads and the following main results are obtained. The developed AC servo motor and periscope for radiation use have shown excellent durability with the radiation hardness tolerable for more than 10{sup 9} rads. An electrical connector compatible with remote operation has also shown no degradation of electrical characteristics after the irradiation of 10{sup 10} rads. As for polyimide insulated wires, the mechanical and electrical characteristics are not degradated after the irradiation of 10{sup 9} rads and more radiation hardness can be expected than the anticipation. On the contrary, standard position sensors such as rotary encoder show extremely low radiation hardness and further efforts have to be made for improvements. (J.P.N.).

  5. Engineering test station for TFTR blanket module experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual design has been carried out for an Engineering Test Station (ETS) which will provide structural support and utilities/instrumentation services for blanket modules positioned adjacent to the vacuum vessel of the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor). The ETS is supported independently from the Test Cell floor. The ETS module support platform is constructed of fiberglass to eliminate electromagnetic interaction with the pulsed tokamak fields. The ETS can hold blanket modules with dimensions up to 78 cm in width, 85 cm in height, and 105 cm in depth, and with a weight up to 4000 kg. Interfaces for all utility and instrumentation requirements are made via a shield plug in the TFTR igloo shielding. The modules are readily installed or removed by means of TFTR remote handling equipment

  6. Overview of Bore Tools Systems for divertor remote maintenance of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the radiation levels preventing direct, hands-on access to the machine components, maintenance work on ITER will eventually require the use of Remote Handling techniques. In particular, the replacement of components such as divertor and blanket modules will require the use of remote cutting, welding and Non Destructive Testing of water cooling pipes

  7. An Approach for Integrated Analysis of Human Factors in Remote Handling Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering dangerous environmental conditions, maintenance of radioactive equipment can be performed by remote handling maintenance (RHM system. The RHM system is a sophisticated man-machine system. Therefore, human factors analysis is an inevitable aspect considered in guaranteeing successful and safe task performance. This study proposes an approach for integrated analysis of human factors in RHM so as to make the evaluating process more practical. In the approach, indicators of accessibility, health safety, and fatigue are analyzed using virtual human simulation technologies. The human error factors in the maintenance process are analyzed using the human error probability (HEP based on the success likelihood index method- (SLIM- analytic hierarchy process (AHP. The psychological factors level of maintenance personnel is determined with an expert scoring. The human factors for the entire RHM system are then evaluated using the interval method. An application example is present, and the application results show that the approach can support the evaluation of the human factors in RHM.

  8. The European contribution to the procurement of the ITER Remote Handling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiani, Carlo [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: carlo.damiani@f4e.europa.eu; Irving, Mike; Semeraro, Luigi [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Fusion for Energy (F4E) will manage the European in-kind contribution of various remote handling (RH) systems for the maintenance of ITER components: (i) the divertor cassette movers, end effectors, manipulator arms and tooling; (ii) 50% of the transfer casks, in particular the air transfer systems and some in-cask devices; (iii) the in-vessel viewing and metrology system (IVVS); (iv) the Neutral Beam (NB) Cell crane, manipulator arms, tooling, Caesium Oven replacement tooling, NB source installation/removal trolley, auxiliary vehicles. A wide range of technologies is involved: special monorail crane, movers, manipulator arms, pipe cutting/welding tooling, special cameras, laser-based metrology devices, control systems, virtual reality. An important aspect to consider is the resistance to radiation levels that range from max {approx}10 KGy/h for IVVS down to {approx}1 Gy/h for the RH devices operating in the NB cell. Given the unprecedented complexity of the ITER maintenance scenario, a development strategy is being implemented that includes prototyping and testing of RH subsystems before proceeding with the final production for ITER. This paper presents an overview of the various procurement packages, the status of development for each of them, the validation and procurement strategy, including issues like radiation resistance and standardisation policy, and the organisational and managerial challenges in relation with the complex ITER Organisation (IO)

  9. Command and Control application framework for interoperable heterogeneous ITER Remote Handling devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER divertor Remote Handling maintenance concepts are under investigation at a full scale mockup facility, the Divertor Test Platform, located in Tampere, Finland. The key devices to carry out these operations are the (CMM), Cassette Toroidal Mover, Multi Axis Manipulators (MAM) and related tooling. Despite their differences, in essence all of these devices are manipulators with varying specifications. Hence, from the operator's point of view, they perform similar operations, such as following predefined position trajectories and lifting and carrying tools and equipment. This paper explores how to implement a software framework for a Command and Control application, otherwise known as Human Machine Interface (HMI), in such a way that it could be used to control different manipulators. A framework is presented that supports the combining of small, independent modules into a single cohesive HMI. It is then shown that a HMI can be built by combining modules that are common to these manipulators and modules that are specific to a single manipulator. This will not only minimize the programming effort but also reduce the training required of operators. To elaborate on the concept, an example HMI is implemented to control virtual models of CMM and MAM.

  10. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Hollie Gilbert; Julie Braun Williams; Clayton Marler; Dino Lowrey; Cameron Brizzee

    2010-06-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a facility for disposal of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) generated remote-handled low-level waste. Initial screening has resulted in the identification of two recommended alternative locations for this new facility: one near the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex and one near the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility (ICDF). In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, intensive archaeological field surveys, and initial coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by new construction within either one of these candidate locations. This investigation showed that construction within the location near the ATR Complex may impact one historic homestead and several historic canals and ditches that are potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No resources judged to be of National Register significance were identified in the candidate location near the ICDF. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both locations. This report outlines recommendations for protective measures to help ensure that the impacts of construction on the identified resources are not adverse.

  11. Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2012-05-01

    This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

  12. Logistics management for storing multiple cask plug and remote handling systems in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We model the logistics management problem in ITER, taking into account casks of multiple typologies. ► We propose a method to determine the best position of the casks inside a given storage area. ► Our method obtains the sequence of operations required to retrieve or store an arbitrary cask, given its storage place. ► We illustrate our method with simulation results in an example scenario. -- Abstract: During operation, maintenance inside the reactor building at ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) has to be performed by remote handling, due to the presence of activated materials. Maintenance operations involve the transportation and storage of large, heavyweight casks from and to the tokamak building. The transportation is carried out by autonomous vehicles that lift and move beneath these casks. The storage of these casks face several challenges, since (1) the cask storage area is limited in space, and (2) all casks have to be accessible for transportation by the vehicles. In particular, casks in the storage area may block other casks, so that the former has to be moved to a temporary position to give way to the latter. This paper addresses the challenge of managing the logistics of cask storage, where casks may have different typologies. In particular, we propose an approach to (1) determine the best position of the casks inside the storage area, and to (2) obtain the sequence of operations required to retrieve and store an arbitrary cask from/to a given storage place. A combinatorial optimization approach is used to obtain solutions to both these problems. Simulation results illustrate the application of the proposed method to a simple scenario

  13. Proximity measuring device with backscattering radiation usable noticeably in remote handling or robotics and related data processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention is aimed at a proximity measuring device whose emitter, an electroluminescent diode, is controlled by control means to emit short duration ( 1A) flashes with periods higher than 100 microseconds. Emetter-object distance can be precisely measured on an 0-30 cm interval with the help of data processing of the response given by the proximity device receiver. This device can be used in remote handling and robotics

  14. Progress on the interface between UPP and CPRHS (Cask and Plug Remote Handling System) tractor/gripping tool for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► UPP interface requirements in the plug RH extraction/insertion for ITER. ► Analyze of maximum misalignment between port duct and port cell. ► Friction study between plug skids and VV port/ramp rails during the plug transfer. ► Definition of the tolerance in the plug skids to avoid the plug jamming. ► Concepts of gripping tools based on one gripping point and avoiding force feedback. -- Abstract: EFDA finances a training programme called Goal Oriented Training Programme for Remote Handling (GOT RH), whose goal is to train engineers in Remote Handling for ITER. As part of this training programme, the conceptual design of the mechanical interface between Upper Port Plug (UPP) and Cask and Plug Remote Handling System (CPRHS) as well as the conceptual design of the needed tools for UPP Remote Handling is carried out. The paper presents the conceptual design of the UPP/Gripping Tool Interface. This includes the conceptual design of the gripping tool for introducing/removing the UPP in/from the ITER port and the mechanical features on both sides of the UPP/Gripping Tool Interface (e.g. alignment features, mechanical connectors, fasteners). In order to develop the design of the interface between UPP and CPRHS it is necessary to first identify the functional requirements of the Transfer Cask System (TCS) and the CPRHS, such as required degrees of freedom (DoF), required performances of system, geometrical constraints, loading conditions, alignment requirements, RAMI requirements. These requirements are the input data for the design of the interface between UPP and gripping tool and some of them are also described in the paper

  15. Preliminary Analysis of Remote Handling Feasibility of the ITER Type B Radwaste Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Kwon Pyo; Oh, Wan Ho; Hong, Dae Seok; Ji, Young Yong; Kim, Tae Kook; Ahn, Sang Bok; Ryu, Wu Seog; Cheon, Je Keun; Na, Byung Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ki Jung [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); John Blight [ITER Organization, Paul lez Durance (France)

    2010-10-15

    ITER Type B radwaste, which is defined as intermediate level and long lived radioactive waste, is mainly resulted from the replacement of in-vessel components of Tokamak such as divertor targets and domes and first walls of blankets, etc. They are mostly metallic components activated by neutrons and contaminated by tritium. The Type B radwaste is to be stored in ITER site for the life time of ITER. For this purpose the Type B radwaste treatment and storage system (RWTS) is located in the level 2 basement of the ITER Hot Cell Building (HCB)

  16. Project Plan 7930 Cell G PaR Remote Handling System Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Kathryn A [ORNL

    2009-10-01

    For over 40 years the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have made Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) available for a wide range of industries including medical, nuclear fuels, mining, military and national security. The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) located within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) processes irradiated production targets from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operations in Building 7930, Cell G provide over 70% of the world's demand for {sup 252}Cf. Building 7930 was constructed and equipped in the mid-1960s. Current operations for {sup 252}Cf processing in Building 7930, Cell G require use of through-the-wall manipulators and the PaR Remote Handling System. Maintenance and repairs for the manipulators is readily accomplished by removal of the manipulator and relocation to a repair shop where hands-on work can be performed in glove boxes. Contamination inside cell G does not currently allow manned entry and no provisions were created for a maintenance area inside the cell. There has been no maintenance of the PaR system or upgrades, leaving operations vulnerable should the system have a catastrophic failure. The Cell G PaR system is currently being operated in a run to failure mode. As the manipulator is now 40+ years old there is significant risk in this method of operation. In 2006 an assessment was completed that resulted in recommendations for replacing the manipulator operator control and power centers which are used to control and power the PaR manipulator in Cell G. In mid-2008 the chain for the bridge drive failed and subsequent examinations indicated several damaged links (see Figure 1). To continue operations the PaR manipulator arm is being used to push and pull the bridge as a workaround. A retrieval tool was fabricated, tested and staged inside Cell G that will allow positioning of the bridge and manipulator arm for removal from the cell should the PaR system completely fail. A fully

  17. Development of a Remote Handling Robot for the Maintenance of an ITER-Like D-Shaped Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic operation is one of the major challenges in the remote maintenance of ITER vacuum vessel (VV and future fusion reactors as inner operations of Tokamak have to be done by robots due to the internal adverse conditions. This paper introduces a novel remote handling robot (RHR for the maintenance of ITER-like D-shaped vessel. The modular designed RHR, which is an important part of the remote handling system for ITER, consists of three parts: an omnidirectional transfer vehicle (OTV, a planar articulated arm (PAA, and an articulated teleoperated manipulator (ATM. The task of RHR is to carry processing tools, such as the viewing system, leakage detector, and electric screwdriver, to inspect and maintain the components installed inside the D-shaped vessel. The kinematics of the OTV, as well as the kinematic analyses of the PAA and ATM, is studied in this paper. Because of its special length and heavy payload, the dynamics of the PAA is also investigated through a dynamic simulation system based on robot technology middleware (RTM. The results of the path planning, workspace simulations, and dynamic simulation indicate that the RHR has good mobility together with satisfying kinematic and dynamic performances and can well accomplish its maintenance tasks in the ITER-like D-shaped vessel.

  18. The application of mature dry storage technology and remote handling robotics to nuclear plant extension, clean-up and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews a mature dry storage technology developed by GEC ALSTHOM Engineering Systems Limited (GAES) which offers a passive, economical and licensable method of providing irradiated fuel storage capacity at operational nuclear power stations. The evolution of the modular vault dry store (MVDS) technology has taken place over 25 years of operational experience, culminating in a product which meets all of the concerns of licensing authorities regarding safety and fuel integrity. The application of remote handling robotics to nuclear fuel and active component handling as a routine process rather than as an intervention technique is also reviewed. The growth of the application of this technology is governed by several factors which include: statutory requirements, safety assurance, risk reduction and economic pressures. The availability of a mature MVDS technology with an evolving process-capable robotics technology opens up opportunities for exploring proven UK products. (Author)

  19. Fast Flux Test Facility interim examination and maintenance cell contaminated sodium recovery system: Remote handling design consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company is installing a remotely operated Contaminated Sodium Recovery System (CSRS) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) located in Richland, Washington. The CSRS will recover activated sodium that accumulates in fuel transfer machines during core component transfer operations. Drip pots from the FFTF fuel handling machines will be delivered to the shielded, argon-inerted Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell, a hot cell located in the FFTF containment structure. Installation of the CSRS replaces a previously manual operation that required disposal of radioactive sodium with a completely remote operation that will return sodium to service in the plant. The CSRS will minimize the accumulation of hazardous waste and reduce personnel exposure to radioactive materials. Equipment for the CSRS is currently being fabricated and tested before installation in the IEM Cell. 6 figs

  20. Selected solutions and design features from the design of remotely handled filters and the technology of remote filter handling. Previous operating experience with these components in the PASSAT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prototype filter offgas cleaning system for reprocessing plants (PASSAT) built at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center a fullscale filter cell with remotely handled filters for aerosol and iodine removal and the corresponding remote handling systems for exchange, bagging out, packaging and disposal of spent filter elements has been installed and run in trial operation since July 1978. The filters and the replacement techniques have been tested for the past two years or so and so far have always worked satisfactory over the test period involving some 150 replacement events. Neither wear nor corrosion phenomena were found in the filter housings and the replacement systems. The seals and clamping devices were selected so that during operation the prescribed leak rates of -3 Torr l/s were always maintained on the filter lid, the seat of the filter element and the cell lock. The total clamping loads for the filter element and the filter lid amount to approx. 20 kN. The force necessary to separate the filter element from the filter housing is approx. 3.5 kN. No ruptures of seals or gaskets were to be detected. The design of the filters and of the handling systems has been found satisfactorily in the cold test operation so far and can be recommended for use in nuclear facilities. In all experiments conducted until now PASSAT has worked without any failure. All operating data required in the specifications were met in the test period. The maximum pressure loss in the system with loaded filter elements amounts to some 3000 mm of water. After operation with iodine and NO/sub x/, plant components exposed to 100% relative humidity and condensate showed corrosion

  1. Enhancement of the use of digital mock-ups in the verification and validation process for ITER remote handling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibois, R., E-mail: romain.sibois@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Salminen, K.; Siuko, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Mattila, J. [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Määttä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, 33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Verification and validation process for ITER remote handling system. • Verification and validation framework for complex engineering systems. • Verification and validation roadmap for digital modelling phase. • Importance of the product life-cycle management in the verification and validation framework. -- Abstract: The paper is part of the EFDA's programme of European Goal Oriented Training programme on remote handling (RH) “GOT-RH”. The programme aims to train engineers for activities supporting the ITER project and the long-term fusion programme. This paper is written based on the results of a project “verification and validation (V and V) of ITER RH system using digital mock-ups (DMUs)”. The purpose of this project is to study efficient approach of using DMU for the V and V of the ITER RH system design utilizing a system engineering (SE) framework. This paper reviews the definitions of DMU and virtual prototype and overviews the current trends of using virtual prototyping in the industry during the early design phase. Based on the survey of best industrial practices, this paper proposes ways to improve the V and V process for ITER RH system utilizing DMUs.

  2. Enhancement of the use of digital mock-ups in the verification and validation process for ITER remote handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Verification and validation process for ITER remote handling system. • Verification and validation framework for complex engineering systems. • Verification and validation roadmap for digital modelling phase. • Importance of the product life-cycle management in the verification and validation framework. -- Abstract: The paper is part of the EFDA's programme of European Goal Oriented Training programme on remote handling (RH) “GOT-RH”. The programme aims to train engineers for activities supporting the ITER project and the long-term fusion programme. This paper is written based on the results of a project “verification and validation (V and V) of ITER RH system using digital mock-ups (DMUs)”. The purpose of this project is to study efficient approach of using DMU for the V and V of the ITER RH system design utilizing a system engineering (SE) framework. This paper reviews the definitions of DMU and virtual prototype and overviews the current trends of using virtual prototyping in the industry during the early design phase. Based on the survey of best industrial practices, this paper proposes ways to improve the V and V process for ITER RH system utilizing DMUs

  3. Remote handling prospects. Computer aided remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical manipulators, electrical control manipulators and computer aided manipulators were successively developed. The aim of computer aided manipulators is the realization of complex or tricky job in adverse environment but man is required for non routine work or for situation in evolution. French effort is developed in the frame of the project automation and advanced robotics and new problems have to be solved particularly at the interface man/machine

  4. Breeding blanket for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently being investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme. (orig.)

  5. Breeding blanket for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proust, E. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DRN/DMT/SERMA, CE, Saclay (France)); Anzidei, L. (ENEA/FUS, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Casini, G. (Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Center, Ispara (Italy)); Dalle Donne, M. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)); Giancarli, L. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DRN/DMT/SERMA, CE, Saclay (France)); Malang, S. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently being investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme. (orig.)

  6. Breeding blanket for Demo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proust, E.; Giancarli, L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie; Anzidei, L. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia; Casini, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Dalle Donne, M.; Malang, S. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme.

  7. A practical experience of using special remote handling tools on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 50 cutting and 200 UHV welding operations were made during the installation of new water cooled belt limiters and ICRF Antennae into the JET Vacuum Vessel. This work was performed by the hands-on use of 45 special tools which have been specifically designed for use with the Mascot servomanipulator in preparation for the JET D-T phase when all maintenance will be performed remotely. This paper reports on the techniques used and the performance of the tools. (author)

  8. Electromechanical three-axis development for remote handling in the Hot Experimental Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-axis closed-loop position control system has been designed and installed on an overhead bridge, carriage, tube hoist for automotive positioning of manipulation at a remotely maintained work site. The system provides accurate (within 3 min) and repeatable three-axis positioning of the manipulator. The position control system has been interfaced to a supervisory minicomputer system that provides teach-playback capability of manipulator positioning and color graphic display of the three-axis system position

  9. Cultural Resource Protection Plan for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, Brenda Ringe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gilbert, Hollie Kae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This plan addresses cultural resource protection procedures to be implemented during construction of the Remote Handled Low Level Waste project at the Idaho National Laboratory. The plan proposes pre-construction review of proposed ground disturbing activities to confirm avoidance of cultural resources. Depending on the final project footprint, cultural resource protection strategies might also include additional survey, protective fencing, cultural resource mapping and relocation of surface artifacts, collection of surface artifacts for permanent curation, confirmation of undisturbed historic canal segments outside the area of potential effects for construction, and/or archaeological test excavations to assess potential subsurface cultural deposits at known cultural resource locations. Additionally, all initial ground disturbing activities will be monitored for subsurface cultural resource finds, cultural resource sensitivity training will be conducted for all construction field personnel, and a stop work procedure will be implemented to guide assessment and protection of any unanticipated discoveries after initial monitoring of ground disturbance.

  10. An electro-hydraulic servo control system research for CFETR blanket RH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Changqi [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, Anhui (China); Tang, Hongjun, E-mail: taurustang@126.com [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, Anhui (China); Qi, Songsong [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, Anhui (China); Cheng, Yong; Feng, Hansheng; Peng, Xuebing; Song, Yuntao [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We discussed the conceptual design of CFETR blanket RH maintenance system. • The mathematical model of electro-hydraulic servo system was calculated. • A fuzzy adaptive PD controller was designed based on control theory and experience. • The co-simulation models of the system were established with AMESim/Simulink. • The fuzzy adaptive PD algorithm was designed as the core strategy of the system. - Abstract: Based on the technical design requirements of China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) blanket remote handling (RH) maintenance, this paper focus on the control method of achieving high synchronization accuracy of electro-hydraulic servo system. Based on fuzzy control theory and practical experience, a fuzzy adaptive proportional-derivative (PD) controller was designed. Then a more precise co-simulation model was established with AMESim/Simulink. Through the analysis of simulation results, a fuzzy adaptive PD control algorithm was designed as the core strategy of electro-hydraulic servo control system.

  11. Remote handling dynamical modelling: assessment on new approach to enhance positioning accuracy with heavy load manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vessel maintenance work in Fusion Tokamak will be carried out with help several sets of robotic devices. Heavy loads handling in constrained space is identified by all players of the RH community as a key-issue in the latest Fusion Tokamak facilities. To deal with high-level dexterity tasks, high payload to mass ratio and limited operating space, RH equipment designers can only propose systems whose mechanical flexibility is no longer negligible and need to be taken into account in the control scheme. Traditional approaches where control system only includes a linear model of deformation of the structure leads to poor positioning accuracy. Uncontrolled or under evaluated errors could be damaging for in-vessel components during maintenance operations in the Tokamak facility. To address the control of complex flexible systems, we will investigate the use of specific mechanical software that combines both finite element and kinematical joints analyses, with a strong-coupled formulation, to perform system dynamics simulations. This procedure will be applied on a single axis mock up robotic joint with highly flexible structure. A comparison of experimental results with the traditional linear approach and the specified software model will be carried out. Benefits introduced by this new approach will finally be assessed in view of RH design or specification in the field of RH in Fusion Tokamak scale such as ITER. (orig.)

  12. Development of an Anthropomorphous, Remote-Controlled Machine for Handling Radiation Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In handling radiation accidents personnel should be kept outside dangerous radiation fields wherever possible. It is obvious that human beings should generally be replaced by machines, which should possess the universal attributes of man. but be insensitive to high radiation activities. The master-slave system appears especially suitable. In this sytem the master is a human being who stays away from the radiation field in a safe room equipped with the necessary information and telecommand devices, and controls and watches the work of the slave from there. The master represents the brain of the machine. The slave is the actual machine and to a certain extent the executive motor part of the human being. It is equipped with limb-like devices, some sense organs such as stereo-television eyes, stereo-microphones, and, by means of power force meters, possesses a certain sense of touch. Further development towards a biped walking machine is outlined. The machine must be given human dimensions as existing atomic plants are made for human operation. (author)

  13. Automation, robotics and remote handling technology in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automation and Robotics technology are making significant contributions in almost all fields of engineering and technology and their presence is felt in all spheres of human life. The importance of automation and robotics has increased rapidly in the recent years to cater to the global competitive pressures by the manufacturing industry by utilizing the increased productivity and improved quality this technology offers. Improvement of productivity, quality, profitability and, indeed, survival are the major motivating factors in the implementation of automation and robotics technology in the manufacturing sector. Robots are used extensively in the automotive industry, primarily for welding, painting and material handling applications. The electronics, aerospace, metalworking and consumer goods industries are also major potential robot users. The common uses of robots in industries mostly include the four Ps - Picking, Placing, Packaging and Painting - apart from other industrial routines like assembly and welding. As is the case with industrial tools and machineries, a properly designed robot (for the appropriate task) has almost unlimited endurance with the added benefit of precisions unmatched by human workers. With robot technology as a key element, integrated factory automation systems touch on nearly all types of manufacturing. The productivity and competitiveness in these industries will depend in large part on flexible automation through robotics

  14. Remote handling dynamical modelling: assessment on new approach to enhance positioning accuracy with heavy load manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagarina-Sasia, T.; David, O.; Dubus, G.; Perrot, Y.; Riwain, A. [CEA, LIST, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France). Service de Robotique Interactive; Gabellini, E.; Pretot, P. [SAMTECH, 91 - Massy (France)

    2007-07-01

    In vessel maintenance work in Fusion Tokamak will be carried out with help several sets of robotic devices. Heavy loads handling in constrained space is identified by all players of the RH community as a key-issue in the latest Fusion Tokamak facilities. To deal with high-level dexterity tasks, high payload to mass ratio and limited operating space, RH equipment designers can only propose systems whose mechanical flexibility is no longer negligible and need to be taken into account in the control scheme. Traditional approaches where control system only includes a linear model of deformation of the structure leads to poor positioning accuracy. Uncontrolled or under evaluated errors could be damaging for in-vessel components during maintenance operations in the Tokamak facility. To address the control of complex flexible systems, we will investigate the use of specific mechanical software that combines both finite element and kinematical joints analyses, with a strong-coupled formulation, to perform system dynamics simulations. This procedure will be applied on a single axis mock up robotic joint with highly flexible structure. A comparison of experimental results with the traditional linear approach and the specified software model will be carried out. Benefits introduced by this new approach will finally be assessed in view of RH design or specification in the field of RH in Fusion Tokamak scale such as ITER. (orig.)

  15. Tritium contamination studies involving test materials and jet remote handling tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the potential contamination of remote cutting and welding tools to be used in the JET torus after the introduction of tritium, experiments were performed using these tools on INCONEL pipe specimens which had been exposed to elemental tritium (HT) at a concentration of 4.6 x 1010 Bq/m3. A maximum tritium release of ∼15,600 Bq was measured during welding, resulting in the tool's surface contamination of 0.5 Bq/cm2. A second series of tests was performed in order to determine the degree of surface contamination of various materials when exposed to HTO as a function of the exposure time and the relative efficacy of different decontamination techniques. Stainless steel, aluminium alloy and PVC rigid were exposed to HTO (liquid) at a concentration 4.4 x 1010 Bq/1 for 1, 24, 120 hours and decontaminated. The decontamination techniques used included; leaching in water, baking at 100 degree C, hot air stream, weathering. The maximum levels of tritium surface contamination measured during the test were ∼12 Bq/cm2 for stainless steel, ∼ Bq/cm2 for aluminium alloy and ∼1,700 Bq/cm2 for PVC. A decontamination factor of about 80% as measured by smears was achieved using hot air stream at 125 degree C on stainless steel and aluminium alloy and baking PVC at 100 degree C. 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Cybernetic group method of data handling (GMDH) statistical learning for hyperspectral remote sensing inverse problems in coastal ocean optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Anthony Matthew

    For complex systems, sufficient a priori knowledge is often lacking about the mathematical or empirical relationship between cause and effect or between inputs and outputs of a given system. Automated machine learning may offer a useful solution in such cases. Coastal marine optical environments represent such a case, as the optical remote sensing inverse problem remains largely unsolved. A self-organizing, cybernetic mathematical modeling approach known as the group method of data handling (GMDH), a type of statistical learning network (SLN), was used to generate explicit spectral inversion models for optically shallow coastal waters. Optically shallow water light fields represent a particularly difficult challenge in oceanographic remote sensing. Several algorithm-input data treatment combinations were utilized in multiple experiments to automatically generate inverse solutions for various inherent optical property (IOP), bottom optical property (BOP), constituent concentration, and bottom depth estimations. The objective was to identify the optimal remote-sensing reflectance Rrs(lambda) inversion algorithm. The GMDH also has the potential of inductive discovery of physical hydro-optical laws. Simulated data were used to develop generalized, quasi-universal relationships. The Hydrolight numerical forward model, based on radiative transfer theory, was used to compute simulated above-water remote-sensing reflectance Rrs(lambda) psuedodata, matching the spectral channels and resolution of the experimental Naval Research Laboratory Ocean PHILLS (Portable Hyperspectral Imager for Low-Light Spectroscopy) sensor. The input-output pairs were for GMDH and artificial neural network (ANN) model development, the latter of which was used as a baseline, or control, algorithm. Both types of models were applied to in situ and aircraft data. Also, in situ spectroradiometer-derived Rrs(lambda) were used as input to an optimization-based inversion procedure. Target variables

  17. Remote handling techniques in decommissioning - A report of the NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning (CPD) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NEA Co-operative Programme for the Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information Concerning Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Projects (CPD) is a joint undertaking of a limited number of organisations actively executing on planning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The objective of the CPD is to acquire information from operational experience in decommissioning nuclear installations that is useful for future projects. Although part of the information exchanged within CPD is confidential in nature and is restricted to programme participants, experience of general interest gained under the programme's auspices is released for broader use. Such information is brought to the attention of all NEA members through regular reports to the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), as well as through published studies. This report describes generic results obtained by a CPD Task Group analysing the needs for remote technologies. The existing technologies able to meet these needs, the lessons learned and showing where improvements or further developments should be made in this domain. During the D and D process, the handling of highly radioactive materials, the deployment of tools and sensors and the dismantling of components built from many different materials can be a long, labor-intensive process that has the potential for high exposure rates, heat stress and injury to personnel. Mobile robotics systems provide solutions to these hazards. Such remote handling systems are required to perform tasks within budget and on schedule while justifying the expense by a saving in cumulative doses received by project personnel. To reach this goal, the following are additional factors that need to be evaluated when preparing a project: - System and peripherals must be operator-friendly. Ideally, the system must be designed to allow personnel currently available for the D and D project to become trained as operators within a reasonable time frame. - The

  18. ITER articulated inspection arm (AIA): R and d progress on vacuum and temperature technology for remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is part of the remote handling (RH) activities for the future fusion reactor ITER. The aim of the R and D program performed under the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) work program is to demonstrate the feasibility of close inspection tasks such as viewing or leak testing of the Divertor cassettes and the Vacuum Vessel (VV) first wall of ITER. It is assumed that a long reach, limited payload carrier penetrates the ITER chamber through the openings evenly distributed around the machine such as In-Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) access or through upper port plugs. To perform an intervention a short time after plasma shut down, the operation of the robot should be realised under ITER conditioning i.e. under high vacuum and temperature conditions (120 oC). The feasibility analysis drove the design of the so-called articulated inspection arm (AIA) which is a 8.2 m long robot made of five modules with a 11 actuated joints kinematics. A single module prototype was designed in detail and manufactured to be tested under ITER realistic conditions at CEA-Cadarache test facility. As well as demonstrating the potential for the application of an AIA type device in ITER, this program is also dedicated to explore the necessary robotic technologies required to ITER's IVVS deployment system. This paper presents the whole AIA robot concept, the first results of the test campaign on the prototype vacuum and temperature demonstrator module

  19. Assessment of Geochemical Environment for the Proposed INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Craig Cooper

    2011-11-01

    Conservative sorption parameters have been estimated for the proposed Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. This analysis considers the influence of soils, concrete, and steel components on water chemistry and the influence of water chemistry on the relative partitioning of radionuclides over the life of the facility. A set of estimated conservative distribution coefficients for the primary media encountered by transported radionuclides has been recommended. These media include the vault system, concrete-sand-gravel mix, alluvium, and sedimentary interbeds. This analysis was prepared to support the performance assessment required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management.' The estimated distribution coefficients are provided to support release and transport calculations of radionuclides from the waste form through the vadose zone. A range of sorption parameters are provided for each key transport media, with recommended values being conservative. The range of uncertainty has been bounded through an assessment of most-likely-minimum and most-likely-maximum distribution coefficient values. The range allows for adequate assessment of mean facility performance while providing the basis for uncertainty analysis.

  20. Remote Handling and Plasma Conditions to Enable Fusion Nuclear Science R&D Using a US Component Testing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; Neumeyer, C. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Canik, John [ORNL; Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Dorland, W. D. [University of Maryland; Fogarty, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Kotschenreuther, M. [University of Texas, Austin; LaHaye, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Mahajan, S. [University of Texas, Austin; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Tsai, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vanlanju, P. [University of Texas, Austin; Wagner, Jill C [ORNL; Yoder, III, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The use of a fusion component testing facility to study and establish, during the ITER era, the remaining scientific and technical knowledge needed by fusion Demo is considered and described in this paper. This use aims to lest components in an integrated fusion nuclear environment, for the first time, to discover and understand the underpinning physical properties, and to develop improved components for further testing, in a time-efficient manner. It requires a design with extensive modularization and remote handling of activated components, and flexible hot-cell laboratories. It further requires reliable plasma conditions to avoid disruptions and minimize their impact, and designs to reduce the divertor heat flux to the level of ITER design. As the plasma duration is extended through the planned ITER level (similar to 10(3) s) and beyond, physical properties with increasing time constants, progressively for similar to 10(4) s, similar to 10(5) s, and similar to 10(6) s, would become accessible for testing and R&D. The longest time constants of these are likely to be of the order of a week ( 106 S). Progressive stages of research operation are envisioned in deuterium, deuterium-tritium for the ITER duration, and deuterium-tritium with increasingly longer plasma durations. The fusion neutron fluence and operational duty factor anticipated for this "scientific exploration" phase of a component test facility are estimated to be up to 1 MW-yr/m(2) and up to 10%, respectively.

  1. Low activity aluminum blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenati, R.; Tichler, P.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    The basic design of the breeding blanket consists of cylindrical aluminium canisters filled with a ceramic bed of moderating, shielding, and breeding materials all suitably cooled. A technical analysis of the blanket for an EPR design is given. Activation studies are presented. The effect of pulsed magnetic fields on module structure is investigated. (MOW)

  2. High gamma-rays irradiation tests of critical components for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in-vessel remote handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ITER, the in-vessel remote handling is inevitably required to assemble and maintain the activated in-vessel components due to deuterium and tritium operation. Since the in-vessel remote handling system has to be operated under the intense of gamma ray irradiation, the components of the remote handling system are required to have radiation hardness so as to allow maintenance operation for a sufficient length of time under the ITER in-vessel environments. For this, the Japan, European and Russian Home Teams have extensively conducted gamma ray irradiation tests and quality improvements including optimization of material composition through ITER R and D program in order to develop radiation hard components which satisfy the doses from 10 MGy to 100 MGy at a dose rate of 1 x 106 R/h (ITER R and D Task: T252). This report describes the latest status of radiation hard component development which has been conducted by the Japan Home Team in the ITER R and D program. The number of remote handling components tested is about seventy and these are categorized into robotics (Subtask 1), viewing system (Subtask 2) and common components (Subtask 3). The irradiation tests, including commercial base products for screening, modified products and newly developed products to improve the radiation hardness, were carried out using the gamma ray irradiation cells in Takasaki Establishment, JAERI. As a result, the development of the radiation hard components which can be tolerable for high temperature and gamma radiation has been well progressed, and many components, such as AC servo motor with ceramics insulated wire, optical periscope and CCD camera, have been newly developed. (author)

  3. High gamma-rays irradiation tests of critical components for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in-vessel remote handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Kenjiro; Kakudate, Satoshi; Oka, Kiyoshi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1999-02-01

    In ITER, the in-vessel remote handling is inevitably required to assemble and maintain the activated in-vessel components due to deuterium and tritium operation. Since the in-vessel remote handling system has to be operated under the intense of gamma ray irradiation, the components of the remote handling system are required to have radiation hardness so as to allow maintenance operation for a sufficient length of time under the ITER in-vessel environments. For this, the Japan, European and Russian Home Teams have extensively conducted gamma ray irradiation tests and quality improvements including optimization of material composition through ITER R and D program in order to develop radiation hard components which satisfy the doses from 10 MGy to 100 MGy at a dose rate of 1 x 10{sup 6} R/h (ITER R and D Task: T252). This report describes the latest status of radiation hard component development which has been conducted by the Japan Home Team in the ITER R and D program. The number of remote handling components tested is about seventy and these are categorized into robotics (Subtask 1), viewing system (Subtask 2) and common components (Subtask 3). The irradiation tests, including commercial base products for screening, modified products and newly developed products to improve the radiation hardness, were carried out using the gamma ray irradiation cells in Takasaki Establishment, JAERI. As a result, the development of the radiation hard components which can be tolerable for high temperature and gamma radiation has been well progressed, and many components, such as AC servo motor with ceramics insulated wire, optical periscope and CCD camera, have been newly developed. (author)

  4. Pre-conceptual Design Assessment of DEMO Remote Maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Loving, A; Sykes, N; Iglesias, D; Coleman, M; Thomas, J; Harman, J; Fischer, U; Sanz, J; Siuko, M; Mittwollen, M; others,

    2013-01-01

    EDFA, as part of the Power Plant Physics and Technology programme, has been working on the pre-conceptual design of a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO). As part of this programme, a review of the remote maintenance strategy considered maintenance solutions compatible with expected environmental conditions, whilst showing potential for meeting the plant availability targets. A key finding was that, for practical purposes, the expected radiation levels prohibit the use of complex remote handling operations to replace the first wall. In 2012/13, these remote maintenance activities were further extended, providing an insight into the requirements, constraints and challenges. In particular, the assessment of blanket and divertor maintenance, in light of the expected radiation conditions and availability, has elaborated the need for a very different approach from that of ITER. This activity has produced some very informative virtual reality simulations of the blanket segments and pipe removal that are exceptionally ...

  5. Flexible armored blanket development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E.S.

    1978-05-01

    An exploratory development contract was undertaken on December 23, 1977 which had as its purpose the development and demonstration of a flexible armored blanket design suitable for providing ballistic protection to nuclear weapons during shipment. Objectives were to design and fabricate a prototype blanket which will conform to the weapon shape, is troop-handleable in the field, and which, singly or in multiple layers, can defeat a range of kinetic energy armor piercing (AP) ammunition potentially capable of damaging the critical portion of the nuclear weapon. Following empirical testing, including the firing of threat ammunition under controlled laboratory and field test conditions, materials were selected and assembled into two blanket designs, each weighing approximately 54 kg/m{sup 2} (11 lbs/ft{sup 2}) and estimated to cost from $111 to $180 per ft{sup 2} in production. A firing demonstration to evidence blanket performance against terrorist/light infantry weapons, heavy infantry weapons, and aircraft cannon was conducted for representatives of the DOD and interested Sandia employees on April 12, 1978. The blankets performed better than anticipated defeating bullets up to 7.62 mm x 51 mm AP with one layer and projectiles up to 23 mm HEI with two layers. Based on these preliminary tests it is recommended that development work be continued with the following objectives: (1) the selection by the DOD of priority applications, (2) the specific design and fabrication of sufficient quantities of armored blankets for field testing, (3) the evaluation of the blankets by DOD operational units, with reports to Sandia Laboratories to enable final design.

  6. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF SYSTEMS FOR THE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING OF REMOTE-HANDLED SLUDGE FROM HANFORD K-WEST FUEL STORAGE BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAYMOND RE

    2011-12-27

    In 2011, significant progress was made in developing and deploying technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 105-K West Fuel Storage Basin on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The sludge in the 105-K West Basin is an accumulation of degraded spent nuclear fuel and other debris that collected during long-term underwater storage of the spent fuel. In 2010, an innovative, remotely operated retrieval system was used to successfully retrieve over 99.7% of the radioactive sludge from 10 submerged temporary storage containers in the K West Basin. In 2011, a full-scale prototype facility was completed for use in technology development, design qualification testing, and operator training on systems used to retrieve, transport, and store highly radioactive K Basin sludge. In this facility, three separate systems for characterizing, retrieving, pretreating, and processing remote-handled sludge were developed. Two of these systems were successfully deployed in 2011. One of these systems was used to pretreat knockout pot sludge as part of the 105-K West Basin cleanup. Knockout pot sludge contains pieces of degraded uranium fuel ranging in size from 600 {mu}m to 6350 {mu}m mixed with pieces of inert material, such as aluminum wire and graphite, in the same size range. The 2011 pretreatment campaign successfully removed most of the inert material from the sludge stream and significantly reduced the remaining volume of knockout pot product material. Removing the inert material significantly minimized the waste stream and reduced costs by reducing the number of transportation and storage containers. Removing the inert material also improved worker safety by reducing the number of remote-handled shipments. Also in 2011, technology development and final design were completed on the system to remove knockout pot material from the basin and transport the material to an onsite facility for interim storage. This system is

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK). A technique for characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. Part 1. Methodology and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK) is a technique for the characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. GSAK uses gamma-ray spectrometry to quantify a portion of the fission product inventory of RH-TRU wastes. These fission product results are then coupled with calculated inventories derived from acceptable process knowledge to characterize the radionuclide content of the assayed wastes. GSAK has been evaluated and tested through several test exercises. GSAK approach is described, while test results are presented in Part II. (author)

  8. Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK). A technique for characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. Part 2. Testing and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK) is a technique for the characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. GSAK uses gamma-ray spectrometry to quantify a portion of the fission product inventory of RH-TRU wastes. These fission product results are then coupled with calculated inventories derived from acceptable process knowledge to characterize the radionuclide content of the assayed wastes. GSAK has been evaluated and tested through several test exercises. These tests and their results are described; while the former paper in this issue presents the methodology, equipment and techniques. (author)

  9. The use of virtual reality and intelligent database systems for procedure planning, visualisation, and real-time component tracking in remote handling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organisation of remote handling (RH) operations in fusion environments is increasingly critical as the number of tasks, components and tooling that RH operations teams must deal with inexorably rises. During the recent JET EP1 RH shutdown the existing virtual reality (VR) and procedural database systems proved essential for visualisation and tracking of operations, particularly due to the increasing complexity of remote tasks. A new task planning system for RH operations is in development, and is expected to be ready for use during the next major shutdown, planned for 2009. The system will make use of information available from the remote operations procedures, the RH equipment human-machine interfaces, the on-line RH equipment control systems and also the virtual reality (VR) system to establish a complete database for the location of plant items and RH equipment as RH operations progress. It is intended that the system be used during both preparation and implementation of shutdowns. In the preparations phase the system can be used to validate procedures and overall logistics by allowing an operator to increment through each operation step and to use the VR system to visualise the location and status of all components, manipulators and RH tools. During task development the RH operations engineers can plan and visualise movement of components and tooling to examine handling concepts and establish storage requirements. In the implementation of operations the daily work schedules information will be integrated with the RH operations procedures tracking records to enable the VR system to provide a visual representation of the status of remote operations in real time. Monitoring of the usage history of items will allow estimates of radiation dosage and contaminant exposure to be made. This paper describes the overall aims, structure and use of the system, discusses its application to JET and also considers potential future developments.

  10. Overview of remote-maintenance scenarios for the ITER machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will have to be carried out remotely. A preliminary study has been made of remote-handling scenarios of the main components, including blanket, divertor and coils. Frequent scheduled maintenance operations will be carried out without breaking the cryostat vacuum and by working from (shielded) containers connected to maintenance ports external to the cryostat. Exchange of the blanket is foreseen after the initial basic performance phase. This involves application of special welding and cutting techniques that will have to be developed and remotized, as well as handling of modules weighing up to 60 tonnes via complex trajectories inside the vessel and through narrow ports, whilst balancing forces will have to be applied to counteract the out-of-centre-of-gravity lifting. Maintenance scenarios are designed with radiation exposure and contamination control as an overriding requirement. This may require the use of shielded, very heavy containment casks. Following the detailed study of remote handling feasibility, equipment design will proceed up to the end of Engineering Design Activities and beyond. Development will be required for welding, cutting and inspection equipment, and for radiation-hard components, and tests will have to be undertaken to verify particularly difficult operations. (orig.)

  11. Diffusive heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Beznogov, M V; Yakovlev, D G

    2016-01-01

    We construct new models of outer heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars composed of binary ion mixtures (H - He, He - C, C - Fe) in and out of diffusive equilibrium. To this aim, we generalize our previous work on diffusion of ions in isothermal gaseous or Coulomb liquid plasmas to handle non-isothermal systems. We calculate the relations between the effective surface temperature Ts and the temperature Tb at the bottom of heat blanketing envelopes (at a density rhob= 1e8 -- 1e10 g/cc) for diffusively equilibrated and non-equilibrated distributions of ion species at different masses DeltaM of lighter ions in the envelope. Our principal result is that the Ts - Tb relations are fairly insensitive to detailed distribution of ion fractions over the envelope (diffusively equilibrated or not) and depend almost solely on DeltaM. The obtained relations are approximated by analytic expressions which are convenient for modeling the evolution of neutron stars.

  12. ITER-FEAT vacuum vessel and blanket design features and implications for the R and D programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tight fitting configuration of the VV to the plasma aids the passive plasma vertical stability, and ferromagnetic material in the VV reduces the TF ripple. The blanket modules are supported directly by the VV. A full-scale VV sector model has provided critical information related to fabrication technology, and the magnitude of welding distortions and achievable tolerances. This R and D validated the fundamental feasibility of the double-wall VV design. The blanket module configuration consists of a shield body to which a separate first wall is mounted. The separate first wall has a facet geometry consisting of multiple flat panels, where 3-D machining will not be required. A configuration with deep slits minimizes the induced eddy currents and loads. The feasibility and the robustness of solid HIP joining was demonstrated in R and D, by manufacturing and testing several small and medium scale mock-ups and finally two prototypes. Remote handling tests and assembly tests of a blanket module have demonstrated the basic feasibility of its installation and removal. (author)

  13. First analysis of remote handling maintenance procedure in the hot cell for the ITER ICH and CD antenna – RVTL replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with a first analysis of the Remote Handling (RH) maintenance procedure for the replacement of Removable Vacuum Transmission Lines (RVTL) of the ICRH antenna Port Plug (PP). In the framework of the grant F4E-2009-GRT-026, CEA IRFM studied the maintenance in parallel with the design of the antenna provided by CCFE. The RVTL are 8 components of the ICRH antenna which form the interface between the matching system and the four port junction integrating the straps. A folded stub is attached to the principal line to ensure water cooling of the interspace. At the front and the rear of the RVTL are installed double RF windows that provide the first tritium barrier. In case of failure of the first window, all the RVTL have to be replaced. Due to the contamination and activation, the replacement must take place in the hot cell. The complete maintenance sequence is studied. It starts when the PP is in place in the Tokamak equatorial port, it continues with: the preparation in the port cell, transfer to the HC, cleaning, RVTL replacement, returns to the port cell. It finishes with reconnection to the port. The ITER requirements [1] and the hot cell constraints [2] are used to extract specifications for the RH tooling (for handling, cutting, welding, etc.). Each step is studied and suitable tools identified. For specific steps, mechanical concepts for dedicated tools are proposed. Furthermore, the critical steps identified are simulated to check the feasibility

  14. Pre-conceptual design assessment of DEMO remote maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loving, A., E-mail: antony.loving@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/Culham Center Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Crofts, O.; Sykes, N.; Iglesias, D.; Coleman, M.; Thomas, J. [EURATOM/Culham Center Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Harman, J. [EFDA Close Support Unit Garching, Boltzmannstaße 2, D-85748 Garching Bei München (Germany); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanz, J. [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear/UPM, Madrid (Spain); Siuko, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Mittwollen, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut für Fördertechnik und Logistiksysteme, Gotthard-Franz-Straße 8, Geb.50.38, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    EDFA, as part of the Power Plant Physics and Technology programme, has been working on the pre-conceptual design of a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO). As part of this programme, a review of the remote maintenance strategy considered maintenance solutions compatible with expected environmental conditions, whilst showing potential for meeting the plant availability targets. A key finding was that, for practical purposes, the expected radiation levels prohibit the use of complex remote handling operations to replace the first wall. In 2012/2013, these remote maintenance activities were further extended, providing an insight into the requirements, constraints and challenges. In particular, the assessment of blanket and divertor maintenance, in light of the expected radiation conditions and availability, has elaborated the need for a very different approach from that of ITER. This activity has produced some very informative virtual reality simulations of the blanket segments and pipe removal that are exceptionally valuable in communicating the complexity and scale of the required operations. Through these simulations, estimates of the maintenance task durations have been possible demonstrating that a full replacement of the blankets within 6 months could be achieved. The design of the first wall, including the need to use sacrificial limiters must still be investigated. In support of the maintenance operations, a first indication of the requirements of an Active Maintenance Facility (AMF) has been elaborated.

  15. Pre-conceptual design assessment of DEMO remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDFA, as part of the Power Plant Physics and Technology programme, has been working on the pre-conceptual design of a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO). As part of this programme, a review of the remote maintenance strategy considered maintenance solutions compatible with expected environmental conditions, whilst showing potential for meeting the plant availability targets. A key finding was that, for practical purposes, the expected radiation levels prohibit the use of complex remote handling operations to replace the first wall. In 2012/2013, these remote maintenance activities were further extended, providing an insight into the requirements, constraints and challenges. In particular, the assessment of blanket and divertor maintenance, in light of the expected radiation conditions and availability, has elaborated the need for a very different approach from that of ITER. This activity has produced some very informative virtual reality simulations of the blanket segments and pipe removal that are exceptionally valuable in communicating the complexity and scale of the required operations. Through these simulations, estimates of the maintenance task durations have been possible demonstrating that a full replacement of the blankets within 6 months could be achieved. The design of the first wall, including the need to use sacrificial limiters must still be investigated. In support of the maintenance operations, a first indication of the requirements of an Active Maintenance Facility (AMF) has been elaborated

  16. Structural dynamic analysis of a servo-manipulator for the remote handling of the PRIDE process equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A slave manipulator which handles a payload in highly hazardous hot cell, is designed to have 6-DOF motions such as pitching and rolling motion of a shoulder joint, a elbow joint, and a wrist joint. Structural dynamic analysis of the slave manipulator needs to be investigated for safe manipulation. In this report, we developed analysis models based on flexible multi-bodies dynamics and performed simulations for some operation cases with predefined tracking trajectories in order to obtain dynamic stress of structures, joint reaction torques, and tensions of cables. The main results are as follows: (1) joint reaction torques, the maximum stress of structures, and cable tensions at dynamic movement are much larger than those of static ones due to the inertia force of payloads which are accelerated to 3g. (2) we could reduce the reaction torques significantly through adjustment of the direction of the inertia force during operation. The results obtained in this study will help the safe manipulation of the slave manipulator, and will be applied to the re-design of the slave manipulator

  17. Structural dynamic analysis of a servo-manipulator for the remote handling of the PRIDE process equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Kwang; Lee, Hyo Jik; Park, Byung Suk; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Chang Hoi; Yu, Seung Nam; Kim, Ki Ho; Kim, Ho Dong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    A slave manipulator which handles a payload in highly hazardous hot cell, is designed to have 6-DOF motions such as pitching and rolling motion of a shoulder joint, a elbow joint, and a wrist joint. Structural dynamic analysis of the slave manipulator needs to be investigated for safe manipulation. In this report, we developed analysis models based on flexible multi-bodies dynamics and performed simulations for some operation cases with predefined tracking trajectories in order to obtain dynamic stress of structures, joint reaction torques, and tensions of cables. The main results are as follows: (1) joint reaction torques, the maximum stress of structures, and cable tensions at dynamic movement are much larger than those of static ones due to the inertia force of payloads which are accelerated to 3g. (2) we could reduce the reaction torques significantly through adjustment of the direction of the inertia force during operation. The results obtained in this study will help the safe manipulation of the slave manipulator, and will be applied to the re-design of the slave manipulator

  18. Blanket for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blanket of the present invention can keep the temperature of breeding materials within a predetermined range even if the breeding materials are consumed and the amount of heat generated from the breeding materials is reduced, thereby enabling to release tritium stably. That is, a neutron incident amount control means is disposed to the blanket for controlling the amount of neutrons incident to the breeding materials. Alternatively, a material to form hollow layers are disposed to the periphery of the breeding materials. With such constitution, the neutron incident amount control means enables to control the incident amount of neutrons from plasmas to the breeding materials, thereby enabling to suppress the change of the amount of heat generated in the breeding materials. In addition, the hollow layers formed at the periphery of the breeding materials enables selective filling of fluids having different heat transfer characteristics thereby enabling to control heat resistance between the breeding materials and cooling tubes. Accordingly, temperature of the breeding materials can be kept constant even in any of the cases. (I.S.)

  19. Handling and quantifying uncertainty in geological 3D models: A methodological approach based on remote-sensing and field work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, Roland; Wehrens, Philip; Herwegh, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Geological 3D models are always just an approximation of a complex natural situation. This is especially true in regions, where hard underground data (e.g. bore holes, tunnel mappings and seismic data) is lacking. One of the key problems while developing valid geological 3D models is the three-dimensional spatial distribution of geological structures, particularly with increasing distance from the surface. In our study, we investigate the Alpine 3D Deformation of the crystalline rocks of the Aar massif (Haslital valley, Central Switzerland). Deformation in this area is dominated by different sets of large-scale shear zones, which acted under both ductile and brittle deformation conditions. The goal of our study is the prediction of the geometry and the evolution of the structures in 3D space and time. A key point in our project is the generation of a reliable 3D model of today's structures. In this sense, estimation of the reliability of the surface information for the extrapolation to depth is mandatory. Based on our data, a method will be presented that contributes to a possible solution of the questions addressed above. The basic idea consists of the fact that (i) mechanical anisotropies as shear zones and faults show prominent three-dimensional information in the landscape, (ii) these geometries can be used as input data for a geological 3D model and (iii) that the 3D information mentioned allows a projection to depth. As a great advantage of the study area, a large number of underground tunnels exist, which allow to evaluate the quality of the aforementioned extrapolations. The method is based on a combined remote-sensing and field work approach: morphological incisions recognized on digital elevation models as well as on aerial photos on the computer screen were evaluated, described and attributed in detail in the field. Our approach is based on a six step workflow: (1) Elaboration of a large-scale structural map of geological structures by means of remote

  20. Handling tongs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design is presented of remotely controlled handling tongs for placing fuel assemblies of a fast nuclear reactor in the desired positions in the reactor vessel. The tongs consist of a head and clamps pivoted an the head. The head machined at the end of an inner pull rod which is swing connected to the main pull rod guide bar. The connection is effected from the inner pull rod side. Grip pins are pivoted on the main pull rod guide bar. The side projections of the grip pins engage the inner wall of the channel while the grip pin bodies lean against the opening link. The link pull rod and its height is adjustable. Its inner cut-outs engage the upper tips of the clamps. A fixing ring which the grip pin bodies engage is attached to the opening link such that it can be deflected to both sides. (E.S.)

  1. A method for enabling real-time structural deformation in remote handling control system by utilizing offline simulation results and 3D model morphing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A full scale physical test facility, DTP2 (Divertor Test Platform 2) has been established in Finland for demonstrating and refining the Remote Handling (RH) equipment designs for ITER. The first prototype RH equipment at DTP2 is the Cassette Multifunctional Mover (CMM) equipped with Second Cassette End Effector (SCEE) delivered to DTP2 in October 2008. The purpose is to prove that CMM/SCEE prototype can be used successfully for the 2nd cassette RH operations. At the end of F4E grant 'DTP2 test facility operation and upgrade preparation', the RH operations of the 2nd cassette were successfully demonstrated to the representatives of Fusion For Energy (F4E). Due to its design, the CMM/SCEE robot has relatively large mechanical flexibilities when the robot carries the nine-ton-weighting 2nd Cassette on the 3.6-m long lever. This leads into a poor absolute accuracy and into the situation where the 3D model, which is used in the control system, does not reflect the actual deformed state of the CMM/SCEE robot. To improve the accuracy, the new method has been developed in order to handle the flexibilities within the control system's virtual environment. The effect of the load on the CMM/SCEE has been measured and minimized in the load compensation model, which is implemented in the control system software. The proposed method accounts for the structural deformations of the robot in the control system through the 3D model morphing by utilizing the finite element method (FEM) analysis for morph targets. This resulted in a considerable improvement of the CMM/SCEE absolute accuracy and the adequacy of the 3D model, which is crucially important in the RH applications, where the visual information of the controlled device in the surrounding environment is limited.

  2. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies

  3. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  4. Seismic Characterization of Basalt Topography at Two Candidate Sites for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Sondrup; Gail Heath; Trent Armstrong; Annette Shafer; Jesse Bennett; Clark Scott

    2011-04-01

    This report presents the seismic refraction results from the depth to bed rock surveys for two areas being considered for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RH-LLW) disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. The first area (Site 5) surveyed is located southwest of the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and the second (Site 34) is located west of Lincoln Boulevard near the southwest corner of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). At Site 5, large area and smaller-scale detailed surveys were performed. At Site 34, a large area survey was performed. The purpose of the surveys was to define the topography of the interface between the surficial alluvium and underlying basalt. Seismic data were first collected and processed using seismic refraction tomographic inversion. Three-dimensional images for both sites were rendered from the data to image the depth and velocities of the subsurface layers. Based on the interpreted top of basalt data at Site 5, a more detailed survey was conducted to refine depth to basalt. This report briefly covers relevant issues in the collection, processing and inversion of the seismic refraction data and in the imaging process. Included are the parameters for inversion and result rendering and visualization such as the inclusion of physical features. Results from the processing effort presented in this report include fence diagrams of the earth model, for the large area surveys and iso-velocity surfaces and cross sections from the detailed survey.

  5. First wall and blanket module safety enhancement by material selection and design decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    A thermal/mechanical study has been performed which illustrates the behavior of a fusion reactor first wall and blanket module during a loss of coolant flow event. The relative safety advantages of various material and design options were determined. A generalized first wall-blanket concept was developed to provide the flexibility to vary the structural material (stainless steel vs titanium), coolant (helium vs water), and breeder material (liquid lithium vs solid lithium aluminate). In addition, independent vs common first wall-blanket cooling and coupled adjacent module cooling design options were included in the study. The comparative analyses were performed using a modified thermal analysis code to handle phase change problems.

  6. Progress on DCLL Blanket Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Clement; Abdou, M.; Katoh, Yutai; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lumsdaine, A.; Marriott, Edward P.; Merrill, Brad; Morley, Neil; Pint, Bruce A.; Sawan, M.; Smolentsev, S.; Williams, Brian; Willms, Scott; Youssef, M.

    2013-09-01

    Under the US Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Development program, we have selected the Dual Coolant Lead Lithium concept (DCLL) as a reference blanket, which has the potential to be a high performance DEMO blanket design with a projected thermal efficiency of >40%. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF/M) steel is used as the structural material. The self-cooled breeder PbLi is circulated for power conversion and for tritium breeding. A SiC-based flow channel insert (FCI) is used as a means for magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop reduction from the circulating liquid PbLi and as a thermal insulator to separate the high-temperature PbLi (~700°C) from the helium-cooled RAF/M steel structure. We are making progress on related R&D needs to address critical Fusion Nuclear Science and Facility (FNSF) and DEMO blanket development issues. When performing the function as the Interface Coordinator for the DCLL blanket concept, we had been developing the mechanical design and performing neutronics, structural and thermal hydraulics analyses of the DCLL TBM module. We had estimated the necessary ancillary equipment that will be needed at the ITER site and a detailed safety impact report has been prepared. This provided additional understanding of the DCLL blanket concept in preparation for the FNSF and DEMO. This paper will be a summary report on the progress of the DCLL TBM design and R&Ds for the DCLL blanket concept.

  7. Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources

  8. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annette Schafer, Arthur S. Rood, A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-23

    Groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility. The analysis was prepared to support the National Environmental Policy Act environmental assessment for the top two ranked sites for the proposed disposal facility. A four-phase screening and analysis approach was documented and applied. Phase I screening was site independent and applied a radionuclide half-life cut-off of 1 year. Phase II screening applied the National Council on Radiation Protection analysis approach and was site independent. Phase III screening used a simplified transport model and site-specific geologic and hydrologic parameters. Phase III neglected the infiltration-reducing engineered cover, the sorption influence of the vault system, dispersion in the vadose zone, vertical dispersion in the aquifer, and the release of radionuclides from specific waste forms. These conservatisms were relaxed in the Phase IV analysis which used a different model with more realistic parameters and assumptions. Phase I screening eliminated 143 of the 246 radionuclides in the inventory from further consideration because each had a half-life less than 1 year. An additional 13 were removed because there was no ingestion dose coefficient available. Of the 90 radionuclides carried forward from Phase I, 57 radionuclides had simulated Phase II screening doses exceeding 0.4 mrem/year. Phase III and IV screening compared the maximum predicted radionuclide concentration in the aquifer to maximum contaminant levels. Of the 57 radionuclides carried forward from Phase II, six radionuclides were identified in Phase III as having simulated future aquifer concentrations exceeding maximum contaminant limits. An additional seven radionuclides had simulated Phase III groundwater concentrations exceeding 1/100th of their respective maximum contaminant levels and were also retained for Phase IV analysis. The Phase IV analysis predicted that none of the thirteen remaining

  9. Crucial issues on liquid metal blanket design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malang, S. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)); Leroy, P. (CEA, CEN Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Casini, G.P. (CEC, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra (Italy)); Mattas, R.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Strebkov, Yu. (Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-12-01

    Typical design concepts of liquid metal breeder blankets for power reactors are explained and characterized. The major problems of these concepts are described for both water-cooled blankets and self-cooled blankets. Three crucial issues of liquid metal breeder blankets are investigated. They are in the fields of magnetohydrodynamics, tritium control and safety. The influence of the magnetic field on liquid metal flow is of special interest for self-cooled blankets. The main problems in this field and the status of the related R and D work are described. Tritium permeation losses to the cooling water is a crucial issue for water-cooled blankets. Methods for its reduction are discussed. An inherent problem of all liquid breeder blankets is the potential release of activated products in the case of chemical reactions between the breeder material and water or reactive gases. The most important issues in this field are described. (orig.).

  10. Assessment of Potential Flood Events and Impacts at INL's Proposed Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter

    2010-09-01

    Rates, depths, erosion potential, increased subsurface transport rates, and annual exceedance probability for potential flooding scenarios have been evaluated for the on-site alternatives of Idaho National Laboratory’s proposed remote handled low-level waste disposal facility. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of flood impacts are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE-O 435.1), its natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95), and the Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) guidance in addition to being required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA). Potential sources of water evaluated include those arising from (1) local precipitation events, (2) precipitation events occurring off of the INL (off-site precipitation), and (3) increased flows in the Big Lost River in the event of a Mackay Dam failure. On-site precipitation events include potential snow-melt and rainfall. Extreme rainfall events were evaluated for the potential to create local erosion, particularly of the barrier placed over the disposal facility. Off-site precipitation carried onto the INL by the Big Lost River channel was evaluated for overland migration of water away from the river channel. Off-site precipitation sources evaluated were those occurring in the drainage basin above Mackay Reservoir. In the worst-case scenarios, precipitation occurring above Mackay Dam could exceed the dam’s capacity, leading to overtopping, and eventually complete dam failure. Mackay Dam could also fail during a seismic event or as a result of mechanical piping. Some of the water released during dam failure, and contributing precipitation, has the potential of being carried onto the INL in the Big Lost River channel. Resulting overland flows from these flood sources were evaluated for

  11. Design study of blanket structure for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design study of the blanket structure for JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) has been carried out. Studied here were fabrication and testing of the blanket structure (blanket cells, blanket rings, piping and blanket modules), assembly and disassembly of the blanket module, and monitering and testing technique. Problems in design and fabrication of the blanket structure could be revealed. Research and development problems for the future were also disclosed. (author)

  12. Development of Thermal-hydraulic Analysis Methodology for Multi-module Breeding Blankets in K-DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Hun; Park, Goon-Cherl; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the purpose of the analyses is to extend the capability of MARS-KS to the entire blanket system which includes a few hundreds of single blanket modules. Afterwards, the plan for the whole blanket system analysis using MARS-KS is introduced and the result of the multiple blanket module analysis is summarized. A thermal-hydraulic analysis code for a nuclear reactor safety, MARS-KS, was applied for the conceptual design of the K-DEMO breeding blanket thermal analysis. Then, a methodology to simulate multiple blanket modules was proposed, which uses a supervisor program to handle each blanket module individually at first and then distribute the flow rate considering pressure drops arises in each module. For a feasibility test of the proposed methodology, 10 outboard blankets in a toroidal field sector were simulated, which are connected with each other through the inlet and outlet common headers. The calculation results of flow rates, pressure drops, and temperatures showed the validity of the calculation and thanks to the parallelization using MPI, almost linear speed-up could be obtained.

  13. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) can be stated as follows: (1) Define a small number (approx. 3) of blanket design concepts that should be the focus of the blanket R and D program. A design concept is defined by the selection of all materials (e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and multiplier) and other major characteristics that significantly influence the R and D requirements. (2) Identify and prioritize the critical issues for the leading blanket concepts. (3) Provide the technical input necessary to develop a blanket R and D program plan. Guidelines for prioritizing the R and D requirements include: (a) critical feasibility issues for the leading blanket concepts will receive the highest priority, and (b) for equally important feasibility issues, higher R and D priority will be given to those that require minimum cost and short time

  14. Low technology high tritium breeding blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main function of this low technology blanket is to produce the necessary tritium for INTOR operation with minimum first wall coverage. The INTOR first wall, blanket, and shield are constrained by the dimensions of the reference design and the protection criteria required for different reactor components and dose equivalent after shutdown in the reactor hall. It is assumed that the blanket operation at commercial power reactor conditions and the proper temperature for power generation can be sacrificed to achieve the highest possible tritium breeding ratio with minimum additional research and developments and minimal impact on reactor design and operation. A set of blanket evaluation criteria has been used to compare possible blanket concepts. Six areas: performance, operating requirements, impact on reactor design and operation, safety and environmental impact, technology assessment, and cost have been defined for the evaluation process. A water-cooled blanket was developed to operate with a low temperature and pressure. The developed blanket contains a 24 cm of beryllium and 6 cm of solid breeder both with a 0.8 density factor. This blanket provides a local tritium breeding ratio of ∼2.0. The water coolant is isolated from the breeder material by several zones which eliminates the tritium buildup in the water by permeation and reduces the changes for water-breeder interaction. This improves the safety and environmental aspects of the blanket and eliminates the costly process of the tritium recovery from the water. 12 refs., 13 tabs

  15. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented

  16. Technical evaluation of major candidate blanket systems for fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key functions required for tritium breeding blankets for a fusion power reactor are: (1) self-sufficient tritium breeding, (2) in-situ tritium recovery and low tritium inventory, (3) high temperature cooling giving a high efficiency of electricity generation and (4) thermo-mechanical reliability and simplified remote maintenance to obtain high plant availability. Blanket performance is substantially governed by materials selection. Major options of structure/breeder/coolant/neutron multiplier materials considered for the present design study are PCA/Li2O/H2O/Be, Mo-alloy/Li2O/He/Be, Mo-alloy/LiAlO2/He/Be, V-alloy/Li/Li/none, and Mo-alloy/Li/He/none. In addition, remote maintenance of blankets, tritium recovery system, heat transport and energy conversion have been investigated. In this report, technological problems and critical R and D issues for power reactor blanket development are identified and a comparison of major candidate blanket concepts is discussed in terms of the present materials data base, economic performance, prospects for future improvements, and engineering feasibility and difficulties based on the results obtained from individual design studies. (author)

  17. Design of ITER shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mechanical configuration of ITER integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module were developed focusing on the welded attachment of its support leg to the back plate. A 100 mm x 150 mm space between the legs of adjacent modules was incorporated for the working space of welding/cutting tools. A concept of coolant branch pipe connection to accommodate deformation due to the leg welding and differential displacement of the module and the manifold/back plate during operation was introduced. Two-dimensional FEM analyses showed that thermal stresses in Cu-alloy (first wall) and stainless steel (first wall coolant tube and shield block) satisfied the stress criteria following ASME code for ITER BPP operation. On the other hand, three-dimensional FEM analyses for overall in-vessel structures exhibited excessive primary stresses in the back plate and its support structure to the vacuum vessel under VDE disruption load and marginal stresses in the support leg of module No.4. Fabrication procedure of the integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module was developed based on single step solid HIP for the joining of Cu-alloy/Cu-alloy, Cu-alloy/stainless steel, and stainless steel/stainless steel. (author)

  18. ITER blanket, shield and material data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the summary of the Conceptual Design Activities (CDA) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), this document describes the ITER blanket, shield, and material data base. Part A, ''ITER Blanket and Shield Conceptual Design'', discusses the need for ITER of a tritium breeding blanket to supply most of the tritium for the fuel cycle of the device. Blanket and shield combined must be designed to operate at a neutron wall loading of 1MW/m2, and to provide adequate shielding of the magnets to meet the neutron energy fluence goal of 3MWa/m2 at the first wall. After a summary of the conceptual design, the following topics are elaborated upon: (1) function, design requirement, and critical issues; (2) material selection; (3) blanket and shield segmentation; (4) blanket design description; (5) design analysis; (6) shield; (7) radiation streaming analysis; and (8) a summary of benchmark calculations. Part B, ''ITER Materials Evaluation and Data Base'', treats the compilation and assessment of the available materials data base used for the selection of the appropriate materials for all major components of ITER, including (i) structural materials for the first wall, (ii) Tritium breeding materials for the blanket, (iii) plasma facing materials for the divertor and first wall armor, and (4) electric insulators for use in the blanket and divertor. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Development of Solid Breeder Blanket at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing blanket development based on the long-term research program of fusion blankets in Japan, which was approved by the Fusion Council of Japan in 1999. The blanket development consists of out-pile R and D, In-pile R and D, TBM Neutronics and TPR Tests and Tritium Recovery System R and D. Based on the achievements of element technology development, the R and D program is now stepping to the engineering testing phase, in which scalable mockup tests will be performed for obtaining engineering data unique to the specific structure of the components, with the objective to define the fabrication specification of test blanket modules for ITER. This paper presents the major achievements of the element technology development of solid breeder blanket in JAERI

  20. Fast breeder reactor blanket management: comparison of LMFBR and GCFR blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic performance of the fast breeder reactor blanket, considering different fuel management schemes was studied. To perform this, the investigation started with a standard reactor physics calculation. Then, two economic models for evaluation of the economic performance of the radial blanket were developed. These models formed the basis of a computer code, ECOBLAN, which computes the net economic gain and the levelized fuel cost due to the radial blanket. The net gain in terms of dollars and $/kgHM-y and the levelized fuel cost in mills/kWhe were obtained as a function of blanket thickness and a residence time of the fuel in the blanket. A LMFBR and a GCFR were the reactor models considered in this study. The optimum radial blanket of a GCFR consists of two rows, that of a LMFBR consists of three rows. Regarding the different fuel management schemes, the fixed blanket was found to be more favorable than reshuffled blanket. Out-in and in-out reshuffled blanket offer almost the same net gain. In all the cases, the burnup calculated for the fuel was found to be less than the acceptable limit. There is an optimum residence time for the fuel in the blanket which depends on the position of the fuel in the blanket and the fuel management scheme studied. As expected, except for very short residence times (less than 2.5 years), the radial blanket is a net income producer. There is no significant difference between the economic performance of the blanket of a LMFBR and a GCFR

  1. Multivariable optimization of fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization problem consists of four key elements: a figure of merit for the reactor, a technique for estimating the neutronic performance of the blanket as a function of the design variables, constraints on the design variables and neutronic performance, and a method for optimizing the figure of merit subject to the constraints. The first reactor concept investigated uses a liquid lithium blanket for breeding tritium and a steel blanket to increase the fusion energy multiplication factor. The capital cost per unit of net electric power produced is minimized subject to constraints on the tritium breeding ratio and radiation damage rate. The optimal design has a 91-cm-thick lithium blanket denatured to 0.1% 6Li. The second reactor concept investigated uses a BeO neutron multiplier and a LiAlO2 breeding blanket. The total blanket thickness is minimized subject to constraints on the tritium breeding ratio, the total neutron leakage, and the heat generation rate in aluminum support tendons. The optimal design consists of a 4.2-cm-thick BeO multiplier and 42-cm-thick LiAlO2 breeding blanket enriched to 34% 6Li

  2. ITER breeding blanket module design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER breeding blanket employs a ceramic breeder and Be neutron multiplier both in small spherical pebble form. Radial-poloidal cooling panels are arranged in the blanket box to remove the nuclear heating in these materials and to reinforce the blanket structure. At the first wall, Be armor is bonded onto the stainless steel (SS) structure to provide a low Z plasma-compatible surface and to protect the first wall/blanket structure from the direct contact with the plasma during off-normal events. Thermo-mechanical analyses and investigation of fabrication procedure have been performed for this breeding blanket. To evaluate thermo-mechanical behavior of the pebble beds including the dependency of the effective thermal conductivity on stress, analysis methods have been preliminary established by the use of special calculation option of ABAQUS code, which are briefly summarized in this report. The structural response of the breeding blanket module under internal pressure of 4 MPa (in case of in-blanket LOCA) resulted in rather high stress in the blanket side (toroidal end) wall, thus addition of a stiffening rib or increase of the wall thickness will be needed. Two-dimensional elasto-plastic analyses have been performed for the Be/SS bonded interface at the first wall taking a fabrication process based on HIP bonding and thermal cycle due to pulsed plasma operation into account. The stress-strain hysteresis during these process and operation was clarified, and a procedure to assess and/or confirm the bonding integrity was also proposed. Fabrication sequence of the breeding blanket module was preliminarily developed based on the procedure to fabricate part by part and to assemble them one by one. (author)

  3. Mechanical and thermal design of hybrid blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal and mechanical aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design considerations are discussed. This paper is intended as a companion to that of J. D. Lee of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on the nuclear aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design. The major design characteristics of hybrid reactor blankets are discussed with emphasis on the areas of difference between hybrid reactors and standard fusion or fission reactors. Specific examples are used to illustrate the design tradeoffs and choices that must be made in hybrid reactor design. These examples are drawn from the work on the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

  4. Benchmark calculations for fusion blanket development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchmark problems representing the leading fusion blanket concepts are presented. Benchmark calculations for self-cooled Li17Pb83 and helium-cooled blankets were performed. Multigroup data libraries generated from ENDF/B-IV and V files using the NJOY and AMPX processing codes with different weighting functions were used. The sensitivity of the tritium breeding ratio to group structure and weighting spectrum increases as the thickness and Li enrichment decrease with up to 20% discrepancies for thin natural Li17Pb83 blankets. (author)

  5. Divertor and gas blanket impurity control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Derini, Z; Stacey, Jr, W M

    1979-04-01

    A simple calculational model for the transport of particles across the scrap off region between the plasma and the wall in the presence of a divertor or a gas blanket has been developed. The model departs from previous work in including: (a) the entire impurity transport as well as its effect on the energy balance equations; (b) the recycling neutrals from the divertor, and (c) the reflected neutrals from the wall. Results obtained with this model show how the steady state impurity level in the plasma depends on the divertor parameters such as the neutral backflow from the divertor, the particle residence time and the scrape off thickness; and on the gas blanket parameters such as the neutral source strength and the gas blanket thickness. The variation of the divertor or gas blanket performance as a function of the heat and particle fluxes escaping from the plasma, the wall material and the cross field diffusion is examined and numerical examples are given.

  6. Exploratory Study of Blanket Liquid Curtain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUGang; HUANGJinhua; FENGKaiming

    2003-01-01

    Blankets and other in-vessel components are easily damaged owing to their circumstance of high radiation and high heat. To protect them, first wall design should be considered. Owing to its high heat removal nd self-refreshing capability, liquid metal first wall has been seen as a potential first wall for a fusion reactor in the future. Blanketliquid curtain is actually a special liquid metal wall to protect blanket.

  7. Remote maintenance considerations for swimming pool tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swimming Pool Tokamak Reactor (SPTR) is one of the candidate devices which are expected to demonstrate physical and engineering feasibility for fusion power reactors. In SPTR, water shield is adopted instead of solid shield structures. Among the advantages of SPTR are, from viewpoint of remote maintenance, small handling weight and high space availability between TF coils and a vacuum vessel. On the other hand, high dose rate during reactor repair and adverse effects on remote maintenance equipment by the shielding water might be the disadvantage of SPTR, where it is assumed that the shielding water is drained during reactor repair. Since the design of SPTR is still at the preliminary stage, for remote maintenance, much effort has been directed to clarification of design conditions such as environment and handling weight. As for the remote maintenance system concepts, studies have been focussed on those for a vacuum vessel and its internal structure (blanket, divertor and protection walls) expected to be repaired more frequently. The vacuum vessel assembly is divided into 21 sectors and number of TF coils is 14. A pair of TF coils are connected with each other by antitorque beams on the whole side surface. Vacuum vessel cassettes and associated blanket, divertor and protection walls are replaced through seven windows between TF coils pairs. Therefore each vacuum vessel cassette is required moving mechanisms in toroidal and radial directions. Options for slide mechanisms are wheels, balls, rollers and water bearings. Options for driving the cassette are self-driving by hydraulic motors and external driving by rack-pinion, wires or specific vehicles. As a result of studies, the moving mechanism with wheels and hydraulic motors has been selected for the reference design, and the system with water bearings and rack-pinion as an alternative. Furthermore typical concepts have been obtained for remote maintenance equipment such as wall-mounted manipulators, tools for

  8. Puck Handling Glovebox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium in a solid ceramic form. The plutonium, in oxide powder form, will be mixed with uranium oxide powder, ceramic precursors and binders. The combined powder mixture will be milled and possibly granulated; this processed powder will then be dispensed to a (dual action) cold press where it will be formed into green (unsintered) compacts. The compact will have the shape of a puck measuring approximately 3 1/2'' in diameter and 1 3/8'' thick. The green puck, once ejected from the press die, will be picked up by a robot and transferred into the Puck Handling Glovebox. Here the green puck will be inspected and then palletized onto furnace trays. The loaded furnace trays will be stacked/assembled and transported to the furnace where sintering operations will be performed. Finally the sintered pucks will be off loaded, inspected and transferred onto Transfer Trays which will carry the pucks from the Puck Handling Glovebox downstream to subsequent Bagless Transfer Can (BTC) operations. Due to contamination potential and high radiation rates, all Puck Handling Glovebox operations will be performed remotely using robots and specialized automation

  9. MHD pressure drop at bare welding positions in pipes of DCLL blankets (KIT Scientific Reports ; 7636)

    OpenAIRE

    Bühler, Leo

    2013-01-01

    A systematic parametric analysis has been performed using asymptotic numerical methods for determination of MHD flows near gaps of electrically insulating inserts in well conducting pipes. Such gaps could be present at several positions in fusion blankets, where cutting and rewelding by remotely controlled tools is foreseen. Gaps in the insulation provide additional current paths which leads to increased current density and braking electromagnetic Lorentz forces.

  10. Test blanket module maintenance operations between port plug and ancillary equipment unit in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In collaboration between the FZK and KFKI-RMKI, in the frame of the activities of the EU Breeder Blanket Programme a concept for test blanket module (TBM) integration, maintenance schedules and all required special purpose equipments has been developed. During the first 10 years of ITER operation four different plasma scenarios will be used. Hence it will be possible to investigate the characteristics (e.g. tritium breeding performance) of different TBM concepts which will be installed during operation for the different phases of ITER operation in the equatorial ports 2, 16 and 18. In every port two TBMs will be accommodated, in the port 16 will be the European helium-cooled pebble bed blanket. In different phases of ITER operation different TBMs will be used. Therefore a complex maintenance process is necessary for the exchange of TBMs. Two TBMs are mounted onto one common frame, into a port plug (PP), which offers a standardised interface to the vacuum vessel (VV). It is cantilevered with a flange to VV port extension. This attachment system is the same in every equatorial port, so the exchange process of this structure with the TBMs is also the standard operation of ITER. Several components of the helium cooling system of the EU breeder modules, valves, pipes, gas mixers, thermal sleeves, pipes for tritium extraction, measurement system are integrated into the ancillary equipment unit (AEU), which during the operation will connect the port plug to the subsystems. The bigger part of the AEU is accommodated in the port cell and the rest part of it is penetrated into the interspace inside the bioshield and reach the back plane of the installed PP. The remote handling operations for connection/disconnection of an interface between the PP of the EU-TBMs and the AEU are investigated with the goal to reach a quick and simple TBM exchange procedure. The current design of the EU-TBMs foresees up to 18 supply lines for both TBMs. These lines have to be connected here. A

  11. Test blanket module maintenance operations between port plug and ancillary equipment unit in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In collaboration between the FZK and KFKI-RMKI, in the frame of the activities of the EU Breeder Blanket Programme a concept for Test Blanket Module (TBM) integration, maintenance schedules and all required special purpose equipments has been developed. During the first 10 years of ITER operation 4 different plasma scenarios will be used. Hence it will be possible to investigate the characteristics (e.g. tritium breeding performance) of different TBM concepts which will be installed during operation for the different phases of ITER operation in the equatorial ports 2, 16 and 18. In every port will be two TBMs accomodated, in the port 16 will be the the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed blanket. In the different phases of ITER operation different TBMs will be used. Therefore a complex maintenance process is necessary for exchange the TBMs. Two TBMs are mounted into one common frame, into a Port Plug (PP), which offers a standardised interface to the Vacuum Vessel (VV). It is cantilevered with a flange to VV Port Extension. This attachment system is the same in every equatorial port, so the exchange process of this structure with the TBMs are also standard operation of ITER. Several components of the Helium cooling system of the EU breeder modules, valves, pipes, gas mixers, thermal sleeves, pipes for tritium extraction, measurement system, etc. All of them is integrated into the Ancillary Equipment Unit (AEU) which during operation will connect the port plug to the sub systems. The bigger part of the AEU is accomodated in the Port Cell and the rest part of it is penetrate to the interspace inside the bioshield and reach the back plane of the installed PP. The remote handling operations for connection / disconnection of an interface between the PP of the EU-TBMs and the AEU are investigated with the goal to reach a quick and simple TBM exchange procedure. The current design of the EU-TBMs foresees up to 18 supply lines for both TBMs. These lines have to be connected

  12. European DEMO BOT solid breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BOT (Breeder Outside Tube) Solid Breeder Blanket for a fusion DEMO reactor is presented. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. In the paper the reference blanket design and external loops are described as well as the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, tritium control and extraction, development and irradiation of the ceramic breeder material, beryllium development, ferromagnetic forces caused by disruptions, safety and reliability. An outlook is given on the remaining open questions and on the required R and D program. (orig.)

  13. Neutronic implications of lead-lithium blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    Lead-lithium alloys have been proposed for use in several conceptual blanket designs for both inertial and magnetic confinement fusion reactors. In most cases, Pb/sub 83/Li/sub 17/, a eutectic with a melting point of 235/sup 0/C, is the chosen composition. The primary reasons for using Pb/sub 83/Li/sub 17/ instead of Li as the tritium breeding material are the perceived safety advantages, low tritium solubility, and favorable neutronic characteristics. This paper describes the neutronic characteristics of Pb/sub 83/Li/sub 17/ blankets with emphasis on the enhanced neutron leakage through chamber ports and the degradation in blanket performance parameters that occurs as a result of the enhanced leakage.

  14. Multiple Module Simulation of Water Cooled Breeding Blankets in K-DEMO Using Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code MARS-KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Hun; Park, Goon-Cherl; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A preliminary concept for the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) has been studied by the National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) based on the National Fusion Roadmap of Korea. The feasibility studies have been performed in order to establish the conceptual design guidelines of the breeding blanket. As a part of the NFRI research, Seoul National University (SNU) is conducting thermal design, evaluation and validation of the water-cooled breeding blanket for the K-DEMO reactor. The purpose of this study is to extend the capability of MARS-KS to the overall blanket system analysis which includes 736 blanket modules in total. The strategy for the multi-module blanket system analysis using MARS-KS is introduced and the analysis result of the 46 blanket modules of single sector was summarized. A thermal-hydraulic analysis code for a nuclear reactor safety, MARS-KS, was applied for thermal analysis of the conceptual design of the K-DEMO breeding blanket. Then, a methodology to simulate multiple blanket modules was proposed, which uses a supervisor program to handle each blanket module individually at first and then distribute the flow rate considering the pressure drop that occurs in each module. For a feasibility test of the proposed methodology, 46 blankets in a sector, which are connected with each other through the common headers for the sector inlet and outlet, were simulated. The calculation results of flow rates, pressure drops, and temperatures showed the validity of the calculation. Because of parallelization using the MPI system, the computational time could be reduced significantly. In future, this methodology will be extended to an efficient simulation of multiple sectors, and further validation for transient simulation will be carried out for more practical applications.

  15. Some new ideas for Tandem Mirror blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tandem Mirror Reactor, with its cylindrical central cell, has led to numerous blanket designs taking advantage of the simple geometry. Also many new applications for fusion neutrons are now being considered. To the pure fusion electricity producers and hybrids producing fissile fuel, we are adding studies of synthetic fuel producers and fission-suppressed hybrids. The three blanket concepts presented are new ideas and should be considered illustrative of the breadth of Livermore's application studies. They are not meant to imply fully analyzed designs

  16. Lightweight IMM PV Flexible Blanket Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) photovoltaic (PV) integrated modular blanket assembly (IMBA) that can be rolled or z-folded. This IMM PV IMBA technology enables a revolutionary flexible PV blanket assembly that provides high specific power, exceptional stowed packaging efficiency, and high-voltage operation capability. DSS's technology also accommodates standard third-generation triple junction (ZTJ) PV device technologies to provide significantly improved performance over the current state of the art. This SBIR project demonstrated prototype, flight-like IMM PV IMBA panel assemblies specifically developed, designed, and optimized for NASA's high-voltage solar array missions.

  17. Safety handling of beryllium for fusion technology R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feasibility of beryllium use as a blanket neutron multiplier, first wall and plasma facing material has been studied for the D-T burning experiment reactors such as ITER. Various experimental work of beryllium and its compounds will be performed under the conditions of high temperature and high energy particle exposure simulating fusion reactor conditions. Beryllium is known as a hazardous substance and its handling has been carefully controlled by various health and safe guidances and/or regulations in many countries. Japanese regulations for hazardous substance provide various guidelines on beryllium for the protection of industrial workers and environment. This report was prepared for the safe handling of beryllium in a laboratory scale experiments for fusion technology R and D such as blanket development. Major items in this report are; (1) Brief review of guidances and regulations in USA, UK and Japan. (2) Safe handling and administration manuals at beryllium facilities in INEL, LANL and JET. (3) Conceptual design study of beryllium handling facility for small to mid-scale blanket R and D. (4) Data on beryllium toxicity, example of clinical diagnosis of beryllium disease, and environmental occurence of beryllium. (5) Personnel protection tools of Japanese Industrial Standard for hazardous substance. (author) 61 refs

  18. A graphics based remote handling control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control and simulation system with an interactive graphic man-machine interface is proposed for the articulated boom in JET. The system shall support 1. the study of boom movements in the planning phase, 2. the training of operators by appropriate simulations, 3. the programming of boom movements, and 4. the on-line control of the boom. A combination of computer graphic display and TV-images is proposed for providing optimum recognition of the actual situation and for echoing to the operator actions. (orig.)

  19. Review: BNL graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) minimum activity graphite blanket designs is made. Three designs are identified and discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a thick graphite screen (typically 30 cm or greater, depending on type as well as application-experimental power reactor or commercial reactor). Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy. This energy is then either radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or is removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the structural material of the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude by the graphite screen, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma, whatever the degree of radiation damage

  20. 47 CFR 22.353 - Blanketing interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements § 22.353 Blanketing interference. Licensees of...: ER17NO94.007 where d is the radial distance to the boundary, in kilometers p is the radial effective radiated power, in kilowatts The maximum effective radiated power in the pertinent direction,...

  1. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  2. Advanced Polymer For Multilayer Insulating Blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighat, R. Ross; Shepp, Allan

    1996-01-01

    Polymer resisting degradation by monatomic oxygen undergoing commercial development under trade name "Aorimide" ("atomic-oxygen-resistant imidazole"). Intended for use in thermal blankets for spacecraft in low orbit, useful on Earth in outdoor applications in which sunlight and ozone degrades other plastics. Also used, for example, to make threads and to make films coated with metals for reflectivity.

  3. ITER driver blanket, European Community design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbolotti, G. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Zampaglione, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Ferrari, M. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Gallina, M. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Mazzone, G. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Nardi, C. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Petrizzi, L. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Rado, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Violante, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Daenner, W. (NET Team, Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)); Lorenzetto, P. (NET Team, Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)); Gierszewski, P. (CFFTP, Mississauga, ON (Canada)); Gratt

    1993-07-01

    Depending on the final decision on the operation time of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the Driver Blanket might become a basic component of the machine with the main function of producing a significant fraction (close to 0.8) of the tritium required for the ITER operation, the remaining fraction being available from external supplies. The Driver Blanket is not required to provide reactor relevant performance in terms of tritium self-sufficiency. However, reactor relevant reliability and safety are mandatory requirements for this component in order not to significantly afftect the overall plant availability and to allow the ITER experimental program to be safely and successfully carried out. With the framework of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities (CDA, 1988-1990), a conceptual design of the ITER Driver Blanket has been carried out by ENEA Fusion Dept., in collaboration with ANSALDO S.p.A. and SRS S.r.l., and in close consultation with the NET Team and CFFTP (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project). Such a design has been selected as EC (European Community) reference design for the ITER Driver Blanket. The status of the design at the end of CDA is reported in the present paper. (orig.)

  4. Fidget Blankets: A Sensory Stimulation Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustos, Kelly Reilly; Trautwein, Heidi; Kerns, Rachel; Sobota, Kristen Finley

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) include behaviors such as aberrant motor behavior, agitation, anxiety, apathy, delusions, depression, disinhibition, elation, hallucinations, irritability, and sleep or appetite changes. A student-led project to provide sensory stimulation in the form of "fidget blankets" developed into a community outreach program. The goal was to decrease the use of antipsychotics used for BPSD.

  5. Blanket design study for a Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of a study on two blanket design concepts for application in a Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). Both blankets operate on the U-Pu cycle and are designed to achieve tritium self-sufficiency while maximizing the fissile fuel production within thermal and mechanical design constraints. The two blanket concepts that were evaluated were: (1) a UC fueled, stainless steel clad and structure, helium cooled blanket; and (2) a UO2 fueled, zircaloy clad, stainless steel structure, boiling water cooled blanket. Two different tritium breeding media, Li2O and LiH, were evaluated for use in both blanket concepts. The use of lead as a neutron multiplier or reflector and graphite as a reflector was also considered for both blankets

  6. Water-cooled blanket concepts for the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) was to select a limited number of blanket concepts for fusion power reactors, to serve as the focus for the U.S. Department of Energy blanket research and development program. The concepts considered most seriously by the BCSS can be grouped for discussion purposes by coolant: liquid metals and alloys, pressurized water, helium, and nitrate salts. Concepts using pressurized water as the coolant are discussed. Water-cooled concepts using liquid breeders-lithium and 17Li-83Pb (LiPb)-have severe fundamental safety problems. The use of lithium and water in the blanket was considered unacceptable. Initial results of tests at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory using steam injected into molten LiPb indicate that use of LiPb and water together in a blanket is a very serious concern from the safety standpoint. Key issues for water-cooled blankets with solid tritium breeders (Li2O, or a ternary oxide such as LiAlO2) were identified and examined: reliability against leaks, control of tritium permeation into the coolant, retention of breeder physical integrity, breeder temperature predictability, determination of allowable temperature limits for breeders, and 6Li burnup effects (for LiAlO2). The BCSS's final rankings and associated rationale for all water-cooled concepts are examined. Key issues and factors for tokamak and tandem mirror reactor versions of water-cooled solid breeder concepts are discussed. The reference design for the top-ranked concept-LiAlO2 breeder, ferritic steel structure, and beryllium neutron multiplier-is presented. Finally, some general conclusions for water-cooled blanket concepts are drawn based on the study's results

  7. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author)

  8. A Precambrian proximal ejecta blanket from Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Kenneth; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Porcelli, Don; Thackrey, Scott; Parnell, John

    2008-04-01

    Ejecta blankets around impact craters are rarely preserved onEarth. Although impact craters are ubiquitous on solid bodiesthroughout the solar system, on Earth they are rapidly effaced,and few records exist of the processes that occur during emplacementof ejecta. The Stac Fada Member of the Precambrian Stoer Groupin Scotland has previously been described as volcanic in origin.However, shocked quartz and biotite provide evidence for high-pressureshock metamorphism, while chromium isotope values and elevatedabundances of platinum group metals and siderophile elementsindicate addition of meteoritic material. Thus, the unit isreinterpreted here as having an impact origin. The ejecta blanketreaches >20 m in thickness and contains abundant dark green,vesicular, devitrified glass fragments. Field observations suggestthat the deposit was emplaced as a single fluidized flow thatformed as a result of an impact into water-saturated sedimentarystrata. The continental geological setting and presence of groundwatermake this deposit an analogue for Martian fluidized ejecta blankets.

  9. Water-cooled lithium-lead blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is an appendix to a study of the reactor relevance of the NET design concept. The present study examines whether the water-cooled lithium-lead blanket designed for NET can be directly extrapolated to a demonstration (DEMO) reactor. A fundamental requirement of the exercise is that the DEMO design should have a tritium breeding ratio which is higher than that in NET. The water-cooled lithium-lead blanket is discussed with respect to: neutronics design, design parameter survey and thermohydraulics, and engineering design. Results are reported of three-dimensional calculations using the Monte Carlo code MORSE-H to investigate possible neutron leakage between the poloidally disposed breeder tubes, and to determine the global tritium breeding ratio for the final double null machine design. (U.K.)

  10. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  11. Economic evaluation of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic impact of employing the highly ranked blankets in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) was evaluated in the context of both a tokamak and a tandem mirror power reactor (TMR). The economic evaluation criterion was determined to be the cost of electricity. The influencing factors that were considered are the direct cost of the blankets and related systems; the annual cost of blanket replacement; and the performance of the blanket, heat transfer, and energy conversion systems. The technical and cost bases for comparison were those of the STARFIRE and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study conceptual design power plants. The economic evaluation results indicated that the nitrate-salt-cooled blanket concept is an economically attractive concept for either reactor type. The water-cooled, solid breeder blanket is attractive for the tokamak and somewhat less attractive for the TMR. The helium-cooled, liquidlithium breeder blanket is the least economically desirable of higher ranked concepts. The remaining self-cooled liquid-metal and the helium-cooled blanket concepts represent moderately attractive concepts from an economic standpoint. These results are not in concert with those found in the other BCSS evaluation areas (engineering feasibility, safety, and research and development (R and D) requirements). The blankets faring well economically had generally lower cost components, lower pumping power requirements, and good power production capability. On the other hand, helium- and lithium-cooled systems were preferred from the standpoints of safety, engineering feasibility, and R and D requirements

  12. Analysis of Consistency of Printing Blankets using Correlation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalitha Jayaraman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of an analytical tool to quantify material consistency of offset printing blankets. Printing blankets are essentially viscoelastic rubber composites of several laminas. High levels of material consistency are expected from rubber blankets for quality print and for quick recovery from smash encountered during the printing process. The present study aims at determining objectively the consistency of printing blankets at three specific torque levels of tension under two distinct stages; 1. under normal printing conditions and 2. on recovery after smash. The experiment devised exhibits a variation in tone reproduction properties of each blanket signifying the levels of inconsistency also in thicknessdirection. Correlation technique was employed on ink density variations obtained from the blanket on paper. Both blankets exhibited good consistency over three torque levels under normal printing conditions. However on smash the recovery of blanket and its consistency was a function of manufacturing and torque levels. This study attempts to provide a new metrics for failure analysis of offset printing blankets. It also underscores the need for optimizing the torque for blankets from different manufacturers.

  13. Detection of Breeding Blankets Using Antineutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Bernadette; Huber, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement between the United States and Russia makes arrangements for the disposal of 34 metric tons of excess weapon-grade plutonium. Under this agreement Russia plans to dispose of its excess stocks by processing the plutonium into fuel for fast breeder reactors. To meet the disposition requirements this fuel would be burned while the fast reactors are run as burners, i.e., without a natural uranium blanket that can be used to breed plutonium surrounding the core. This talk discusses the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the verification of the presence or absence of a breeding blanket. It is found that a 36 kg antineutrino detector, exploiting coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering and made of silicon, could determine the presence of a breeding blanket at a liquid sodium cooled fast reactor at the 95% confidence level within 90 days. Such a detector would be a novel non-intrusive verification tool and could present a first application of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering to a real-world challenge.

  14. TCT hybrid preconceptual blanket design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aase, D.T.; Bampton, M.C.C.; Doherty, T.J.; Leonard, B.R.; McCann, R.A.; Newman, D.F.; Perry, R.T.; Stewart, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    The conceptual design of a tokamak fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor, which produces electric power and fissile material, has been performed in a cooperative effort between Princeton's Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). PPPL, who had overall project lead responsibility, designed the fusion driver system. Its core consists of a tokamak plasma maintained in the two-component torus (TCT) mode by both D and T beams and having a single null poloidal divertor. The blanket concept selected by PPPL consists of a neutron multiplying converter region, containing natural Uranium Molybdenum (U-Mo) slugs followed by a fuel burning blanket region of molten salt containing PuF/sub 3/. PNL analyzed this concept to determine its structural, thermal and hydraulic performance characteristics. An adequate first wall cooling method was determined, utilizing low pressure water in a double wall design. A conceptual layout of the converter region tubes was performed, providing adequate helium cooling and the desired movement of U-Mo slugs. A thermal hydraulic analysis of the power-producing blanket regions indicated that either more helium coolant tubes are needed or the salt must be circulated to obtain adequate heat removal capability.

  15. Tokamak blanket design study, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cylindrical module concept was developed, analyzed, and incorporated in a tokamak blanket system that includes piping systems, vacuum boundary sealing, and support structures. The design is based on the use of state-of-the-art structural materials (20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel), lithium as the breeding material, and pressurized helium as the coolant. The module design consists of nested concentric cylinders (with an outer diameter of 10 cm) and features direct wall cooling by helium flowing between the outer (first-wall) cylinder and the inner (lithium-containing) cylinder. Each cylinder can withstand full coolant pressure, thus enhancing reliability. Results show that stainless steel is a viable material for a first wall subjected to a neutron wall loading of 4 MW/m2 and a particle heat flux of 1 MW/m2. Lifetime analysis shows that the first-wall design meets the goal of operating at 20-min cycles with 95% duty for 100,000 cycles. To reduce system complexity, a larger 20-cm-diam module also was analyzed for incorporation in the blanket assembly. Reliability assessment indicates that it may be possible to double the module in size from 10 to 20 cm in diameter. With a modest increase in coolant pumping power, a blanket assembly comprising 20-cm-diam modules can still achieve 100,000 operating cycles - equivalent to a 3.6-year design lifetime - with only one or two helium coolant leaks into the plasma

  16. INDRA: a program system for calculating the neutronics and photonics characteristics of a fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INDRA is a program system for calculating the neutronics and photonics characteristics of fusion reactor blankets. It incorporates a total of 19 different codes and 5 large data libraries. 10 of the codes are available from the code distribution organizations. Some of them, however, have been slightly modified in order to permit a convenient transfer of information from one program module to the next. The remaining 9 programs have been prepared by the authors to complete the system with respect to flexibility and to facilitate the handling of the results. (orig./WBU)

  17. The ITER Blanket System Design Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The blanket system is one of the most technically challenging components of the ITER machine, having to accommodate high heat fluxes from the plasma, large electromagnetic loads during off-normal events and demanding interfaces with many key components (in particular the vacuum vessel and in-vessel coils) and the plasma. Plasma scenarios impose demanding requirements on the blanket in terms of heat fluxes on various areas of the first wall during different phases of operation (inboard and outboard midplane for start-up/shut-down scenarios and the top region close to the secondary X-point during flat top) as well as large electro-magnetic (EM) loads and transient energy deposition during off-normal plasma events (such as disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDE)). The high heat fluxes resulting in some areas have necessitated the use of “enhanced heat flux” panels capable of accommodating an incident heat flux of up to 5 MW/m2 in steady state. The other regions utilize “normal heat flux” panels, which have been developed and tested for a heat flux of the order of 1 — 2 MW/m2. The FW shaping design requires a compromise between the conflicting requirements for accommodation of steady state and transient loads (energy deposition during off-normal events). A shaped surface increases the heat loads which are due to plasma particles following the field lines compared to a perfectly toroidal surface. The blanket provides a major contribution to the shielding of the vacuum vessel and coils. A challenging criterion is the need to limit the integrated heating in the toroidal field coil (TFC) to ∼ 14 kW. This is particularly severe on the inboard leg where approximately 80% of the total nuclear heat on the TFC is deposited. Several design modifications were considered and analyzed to help achieve this, including increasing the inboard blanket radial thickness and reducing the assembly gaps. This paper summarizes the latest progress in the

  18. Water-cooled, fire boom blanket, test and evaluation for system prototype development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial development of actively cooled fire booms indicated that water-cooled barriers could withstand direct oil fire for several hours with little damage if cooling water were continuously supplied. Despite these early promising developments, it was realized that to build reliable full-scale system for Navy host salvage booms would require several development tests and lengthy evaluations. In this experiment several types of water-cooled fire blankets were tested at the Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Test Tank (OHMSETT). After the burn test the blankets were inspected for damage and additional tests were conducted to determine handling characteristics for deployment, recovery, cleaning and maintenance. Test results showed that water-cooled fire boom blankets can be used on conventional offshore oil containment booms to extend their use for controlling large floating-oil marine fires. Results also demonstrated the importance of using thermoset rubber coated fabrics in the host boom to maintain sufficient reserve seam strength at elevated temperatures. The suitability of passively cooled covers should be investigated to protect equipment and boom from indirect fire exposure. 1 ref., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  19. Neutronic optimization of solid breeder blankets for STARFIRE design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive neutronic tradeoff studies were carried out to define and optimize the neutronic performance of the different solid breeder options for the STARFIRE blanket design. A set of criteria were employed to select the potential blanket materials. The basic criteria include the neutronic performance, tritium-release characteristics, material compatibility, and chemical stability. Three blanket options were analyzed. The first option is based on separate zones for each basic blanket function where the neutron multiplier is kept in a separate zone. The second option is a heterogeneous blanket type with two tritium breeder zones. In the first zone the tritium breeder is assembled in a neutron multiplier matrix behind the first wall while the second zone has a neutron moderator matrix instead of the neutron multiplier. The third blanket option is similar to the second concept except the tritium breeder and the neutron multiplier form a homogeneous mixture

  20. Fast-Breeder-Blanket Project: FBBF. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the final report for DOE contract DE-AC02-76ET37237 with the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Project. The Project was initiated to investigate the uncertainties in Fast Breeder Reactor blanket calculations. Absolute measurements of key neutron reaction rates, neutron spectra, and gamma-ray energy depositions were made in simulated FBF blankets in the Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF), a Cf-252 driven subcritical facility. Calculation of the spectra and integral reaction rates were made using methods, computer codes, and cross section data typical of those currently used in the design of FBR's. Comparisons of calculated to experimental integral neutron reaction rates give good agreement at the inner portions of the blanket by diverge to C/E ratios of about 0.65 at the outer edge of the blanket for reactions sensitive to the neutron density

  1. Contact handle decompositions

    OpenAIRE

    Özbağcı, Burak

    2009-01-01

    We review Giroux’s contact handles and contact handle attachments in dimension three and show that a bypass attachment consists of a pair of contact 1 and 2-handles. As an application we describe explicit contact handle decompositions of infinitely many pairwise non-isotopic overtwisted 3-spheres. We also give an alternative proof of the fact that every compact contact 3-manifold (closed or with convex boundary) admits a contact handle decomposition, which is a result originally due to Giroux.

  2. NET remote workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this NET study was to define the functionality of a remote handling workstation and its hardware and software architecture. The remote handling workstation has to fulfill two basic functions: (1) to provide the man-machine interface (MMI), that means the interface to the control system of the maintenance equipment and to the working environment (telepresence) and (2) to provide high level (task level) supporting functions (software tools) during the maintenance work and in the preparation phase. Concerning the man-machine interface, an important module of the remote handling workstation besides the standard components of man-machine interfacing is a module for graphical scene presentation supplementing viewing by TV. The technique of integrated viewing is well known from JET BOOM and TARM control using the GBsim and KISMET software. For integration of equipment dependent MMI functions the remote handling workstation provides a special software module interface. Task level support of the operator is based on (1) spatial (geometric/kinematic) models, (2) remote handling procedure models, and (3) functional models of the equipment. These models and the related simulation modules are used for planning, programming, execution monitoring, and training. The workstation provides an intelligent handbook guiding the operator through planned procedures illustrated by animated graphical sequences. For unplanned situations decision aids are available. A central point of the architectural design was to guarantee a high flexibility with respect to hardware and software. Therefore the remote handling workstation is designed as an open system based on widely accepted standards allowing the stepwise integration of the various modules starting with the basic MMI and the spatial simulation as standard components. (orig./HP)

  3. A review of fusion breeder blanket technology, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study of fusion breeder blanket technology. It reviews the role of the breeder blanket, the current understanding of the scientific and engineering bases of liquid metal and solid breeder blankets and the programs now underway internationally to resolve the uncertainities in current knowledge. In view of existing national expertise and experience, a solid breeder R and D program for Canada is recommended

  4. Advanced Acoustic Blankets for Improved Aircraft Interior Noise Reduction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project advanced acoustic blankets for improved low frequency interior noise control in aircraft will be developed and demonstrated. The improved...

  5. Analysis of deficiencies in fast reactor blanket physics predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis addresses a deviation between experimental measurements and fast reactor blanket physics predictions. A review of worldwide results reveals that reaction rates in the blanket are underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration into the blanket. The analysis of this discrepancy involves two parts: quantifying possible error reductions using the most advanced methods and investigating deficiencies in current methodology. The source of these discrepancies was investigated by application of ''state-of-the-art'' group constant generation and flux prediction methodology to flux calculations for the Purdue University Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF). Refined group constant generation methods yielded a significant reduction in the blanket deviations; however, only about half of the discrepancy can be accounted for in this manner. Transport theory calculations were used to predict the blanket neutron transmission problem. The surprising result is that transport theory predictions utilizing diffusion theory group constants did not improve the blanket results. Transport theory predictions exhibited blanket underpredictions similar to the diffusion theory results. The residual blanket discrepancies not explained using advanced methods require a refinement of the theory. For this purpose an analysis of deficiencies in current methodology was performed

  6. High power density self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Majumdar, S.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-01

    A self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket concept capable of operating with 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading has been developed. The blanket has liquid lithium as the tritium breeder and the coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because it can accommodate high heat loads. Also, it has good mechanical properties at high temperatures, high neutron fluence capability, low degradation under neutron irradiation, good compatibility with the blanket materials, low decay heat, low waste disposal rating, and adequate strength to accommodate the electromagnetic loads during plasma disruption events. Self-healing electrical insulator (CaO) is utilized to reduce the MHD pressure drop. A poloidal coolant flow with high velocity at the first wall is used to reduce the peak temperature of the vanadium structure and to accommodate high surface heat flux. The blanket has a simple blanket configuration and low coolant pressure to reduce the fabrication cost, to improve the blanket reliability, and to increase confidence in the blanket performance. Spectral shifter, moderator, and reflector are utilized to improve the blanket shielding capability and energy multiplication, and to reduce the radial blanket thickness. Natural lithium is used to avoid extra cost related to the lithium enrichment process.

  7. ITER solid breeder blanket materials database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dienst, W. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Material- und Festkoerperforschung; Flament, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Commissariat A L`Energie Atomique; Lorenzetto, P. [NET Team, Garching (Germany); Noda, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takai, Ibaraki, (Japan); Roux, N. [CEA Centre d`Etudes et de Recherches Les Materiaux (France). Commissariat a L`Energie Atomique

    1993-11-01

    The databases for solid breeder ceramics (Li{sub 2},O, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2}) and beryllium multiplier material are critically reviewed and evaluated. Emphasis is placed on physical, thermal, mechanical, chemical stability/compatibility, tritium, and radiation stability properties which are needed to assess the performance of these materials in a fusion reactor environment. Correlations are selected for design analysis and compared to the database. Areas for future research and development in blanket materials technology are highlighted and prioritized.

  8. Oxygen plasma damage to blanket and patterned ultralow-κ surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen plasma damage to blanket and patterned ultralow-κ (ULK) dielectric surfaces was investigated by examining the effect of plasma species and dielectric materials. Blanket ULK films and patterned structures were treated by O2 plasma in a remote plasma chamber where the ions and radicals from the plasma source can be separately controlled to study their respective roles in the damage process. The plasma damage was characterized by angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Studies of the angle dependence of oxygen plasma damage to blanket ULK films indicated that damage by ions was anisotropic while that by radicals was isotropic. Ions were found to play an important role in assisting carbon depletion by oxygen radicals on the blanket film surface. More plasma damage was observed with increasing porosity in ultralow-κ films. Probable reaction paths were proposed by analyzing the reaction by-products. Plasma damage to the sidewall of low-κ trenches was examined by electron energy loss (EELS) analysis. The depletion depth of carbon was found to be related to the penetration of radical species into the porous dielectric and the distribution at the sidewall and trench bottom was affected by the trench pattern geometry, i.e., the aspect ratio, which can be correlated with the electron potential distribution and subsequent trajectory of ions. Vapor silylation was applied for dielectric recovery of trench structure and the result was examined by EELS. The trimethylchlorosilane was found to be effective for recovery of the sidewall carbon loss. The recovery was better for loss induced by radical O2 than by hybrid O2 and the difference was attributed to the surface densification by ions limiting the mass transport of vapor chemicals.

  9. Systematic methodology for estimating direct capital costs for blanket tritium processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the methodology developed for estimating the relative capital costs of blanket processing systems. The capital costs of the nine blanket concepts selected in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study are presented and compared

  10. Helping Kids Handle Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Helping Kids Handle Worry KidsHealth > For Parents > Helping Kids Handle ... master life's challenges, big and small. What Do Kids Worry About? What kids worry about is often ...

  11. ITER blanket manifold system: Integration, assembly and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Alex, E-mail: alex.martin@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Dellopoulos, George [F4E, EU ITER Domestic Agency, Barcelona (Spain); Edwards, Paul; Furmanek, Andreas; Gicquel, Stefan; Macklin, Brian [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Martin, Patrick [RÜECKER LYPSA, Carretera del Prat, 65, Cornellá de Llobregat (Spain); Merola, Mario; Norman, Mark; Raffray, Rene [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The ITER in-vessel components have experienced a major redesign since the ITER Design Review of 2007. •-The blanket manifold system has been redesigned to improve leak detection and localization. •-The redesign of the blanket manifold system into a system based on individual pipes has proven to be a major engineering challenge. -- Abstract: The ITER Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) provides coolant for blankets and divertor. The blanket system consists of 440 blanket modules (BMs). The blanket manifold consists of a system of seamless pipes arranged in bundles and routed in poloidal direction from the upper ports of the Vacuum Vessel (VV) to the bottom of the machine. In each of the 18 upper ports there are 20 inlet and 20 outlet pipes, which split at the port exit in two directions, supplying cooling water to either the inboard or the outboard blanket modules. The manifold is routed between the VV and BMs. Branch pipes provide the connection between the manifold and the blanket cooling circuits through a coaxial connector welded to the shield block. A complex, sequential installation sequence has been developed in order to enable the assembly. Once installed the manifold is considered a semi-permanent component, but since failure would prevent ITER operation a maintenance strategy has been planned.

  12. An assessment of the base blanket for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.

    1991-12-31

    Ideally, the ITER base blanket would provide the necessary tritium for the reactor to be self-sufficient during operation, while having minimal impact on the overall reactor cost, reliability and safety. A solid breeder blanket has been developed in CDA phase in an attempt to achieve such objectives. The reference solid breeder base blanket configurations at the end of the CDA phase has many attractive features such as a tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 0.8--0.9 and a reasonably low tritium inventory. However, some concerns regarding the risk, cost and benefit of the base blanket have been raised. These include uncertainties associated with the solid breeder thermal control and the potentially high cost of the amount of Be used to achieve high TBR and to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the high temperature solid breeder and low temperature coolant. This work addresses these concerns. The basis for the selection of a breeding blanket is first discussed in light of the incremental risk, cost and benefits relative to a non-breeding blanket. Key issues associated with the CDA breeding blanket configurations are then analyzed. Finally, alternative schemes that could enhance the attractiveness and flexibility of a breeding blanket are explored.

  13. An assessment of the base blanket for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.

    1991-01-01

    Ideally, the ITER base blanket would provide the necessary tritium for the reactor to be self-sufficient during operation, while having minimal impact on the overall reactor cost, reliability and safety. A solid breeder blanket has been developed in CDA phase in an attempt to achieve such objectives. The reference solid breeder base blanket configurations at the end of the CDA phase has many attractive features such as a tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 0.8--0.9 and a reasonably low tritium inventory. However, some concerns regarding the risk, cost and benefit of the base blanket have been raised. These include uncertainties associated with the solid breeder thermal control and the potentially high cost of the amount of Be used to achieve high TBR and to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the high temperature solid breeder and low temperature coolant. This work addresses these concerns. The basis for the selection of a breeding blanket is first discussed in light of the incremental risk, cost and benefits relative to a non-breeding blanket. Key issues associated with the CDA breeding blanket configurations are then analyzed. Finally, alternative schemes that could enhance the attractiveness and flexibility of a breeding blanket are explored.

  14. Development of the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead blanket for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiello, G., E-mail: giacomo.aiello@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Aubert, J.; Jonquères, N. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LPEC, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Morin, A.; Rampal, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The HCLL blanket design has been modified to adapt it to the 2012 EFDA DEMO specifications. • The new design has been developed with the aim to capitalize on TBM experience in ITER. • A new attachment system for the modules has been proposed. - Abstract: The Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) blanket is one of the candidate European blanket concepts selected for the DEMOnstration fusion power plant that should follow ITER. In a fusion power plant, the blanket is one of the key components because of its impact on the plant performance, availability, safety and economics. In 2012, the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) agency issued new specifications for DEMO: this paper describes the work performed to adapt the previous 2007 HCLL-DEMO blanket design to those specifications. A new segmentation has been defined assuming straight surfaces for all blanket modules. Following the Multi Module Segment (MMS) option, all modules are attached to a common back supporting structure which also serves as manifold for Helium and PbLi distribution. A detailed CAD design of the central outboard module has been defined. Thermo-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analyses on of the First Wall and Breeder Zone have been carried out. For the attachment of the modules to the common backplate, a new solution based on the use of Tie Rods, derived from the design of the corresponding HCLL Test Blanket Module for ITER, has been proposed. This paper also identifies the priorities for further development of the HCLL blanket design.

  15. 75 FR 51482 - Woven Electric Blankets From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of March 11, 2010 (75 FR 11557). The hearing was held in... COMMISSION Woven Electric Blankets From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... United States is materially injured by reason of imports from China of woven electric blankets,...

  16. ITER blanket manifold system: Integration, assembly and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The ITER in-vessel components have experienced a major redesign since the ITER Design Review of 2007. •-The blanket manifold system has been redesigned to improve leak detection and localization. •-The redesign of the blanket manifold system into a system based on individual pipes has proven to be a major engineering challenge. -- Abstract: The ITER Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) provides coolant for blankets and divertor. The blanket system consists of 440 blanket modules (BMs). The blanket manifold consists of a system of seamless pipes arranged in bundles and routed in poloidal direction from the upper ports of the Vacuum Vessel (VV) to the bottom of the machine. In each of the 18 upper ports there are 20 inlet and 20 outlet pipes, which split at the port exit in two directions, supplying cooling water to either the inboard or the outboard blanket modules. The manifold is routed between the VV and BMs. Branch pipes provide the connection between the manifold and the blanket cooling circuits through a coaxial connector welded to the shield block. A complex, sequential installation sequence has been developed in order to enable the assembly. Once installed the manifold is considered a semi-permanent component, but since failure would prevent ITER operation a maintenance strategy has been planned

  17. Achievements of element technology development for breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing the development of breeding blanket for fusion power plant, as a leading institute of the development of solid breeder blankets, according to the long-term R and D program of the blanket development established by the Fusion Council of Japan in 1999. This report is an overview of development plan, achievements of element technology development and future prospect and plan of the development of the solid breeding blanket in JAERI. In this report, the mission of the blanket development activity in JAERI, key issues and roadmap of the blanket development have been clarified. Then, achievements of the element technology development were summarized and showed that the development has progressed to enter the engineering testing phase. The specific development target and plan were clarified with bright prospect. Realization of the engineering test phase R and D and completion of ITER test blanket module testing program, with universities/NIFS cooperation, are most important steps in the development of breeding blanket of fusion power demonstration plant. (author)

  18. Fuel handling machine and auxiliary systems for a fuel handling cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This working report is an update for as well as a supplement to an earlier fuel handling machine design (Kukkola and Roennqvist 2006). A focus in the earlier design proposal was primarily on the selection of a mechanical structure and operating principle for the fuel handling machine. This report introduces not only a fuel handling machine design but also auxiliary fuel handling cell equipment and its operation. An objective of the design work was to verify the operating principles of and space allocations for fuel handling cell equipment. The fuel handling machine is a remote controlled apparatus capable of handling intensely radiating fuel assemblies in the fuel handling cell of an encapsulation plant. The fuel handling cell is air tight space radiation-shielded with massive concrete walls. The fuel handling machine is based on a bridge crane capable of traveling in the handling cell along wall tracks. The bridge crane has its carriage provided with a carousel type turntable having mounted thereon both fixed and telescopic masts. The fixed mast has a gripper movable on linear guides for the transfer of fuel assemblies. The telescopic mast has a manipulator arm capable of maneuvering equipment present in the fuel handling cell, as well as conducting necessary maintenance and cleaning operations or rectifying possible fault conditions. The auxiliary fuel handling cell systems consist of several subsystems. The subsystems include a service manipulator, a tool carrier for manipulators, a material hatch, assisting winches, a vacuum cleaner, as well as a hose reel. With the exception of the vacuum cleaner, the devices included in the fuel handling cell's auxiliary system are only used when the actual encapsulation process is not ongoing. The malfunctions of mechanisms or actuators responsible for the motion actions of a fuel handling machine preclude in a worst case scenario the bringing of the fuel handling cell and related systems to a condition appropriate for

  19. Fuel handling machine and auxiliary systems for a fuel handling cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikki, M. [Optimik Oy, Turku (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    This working report is an update for as well as a supplement to an earlier fuel handling machine design (Kukkola and Roennqvist 2006). A focus in the earlier design proposal was primarily on the selection of a mechanical structure and operating principle for the fuel handling machine. This report introduces not only a fuel handling machine design but also auxiliary fuel handling cell equipment and its operation. An objective of the design work was to verify the operating principles of and space allocations for fuel handling cell equipment. The fuel handling machine is a remote controlled apparatus capable of handling intensely radiating fuel assemblies in the fuel handling cell of an encapsulation plant. The fuel handling cell is air tight space radiation-shielded with massive concrete walls. The fuel handling machine is based on a bridge crane capable of traveling in the handling cell along wall tracks. The bridge crane has its carriage provided with a carousel type turntable having mounted thereon both fixed and telescopic masts. The fixed mast has a gripper movable on linear guides for the transfer of fuel assemblies. The telescopic mast has a manipulator arm capable of maneuvering equipment present in the fuel handling cell, as well as conducting necessary maintenance and cleaning operations or rectifying possible fault conditions. The auxiliary fuel handling cell systems consist of several subsystems. The subsystems include a service manipulator, a tool carrier for manipulators, a material hatch, assisting winches, a vacuum cleaner, as well as a hose reel. With the exception of the vacuum cleaner, the devices included in the fuel handling cell's auxiliary system are only used when the actual encapsulation process is not ongoing. The malfunctions of mechanisms or actuators responsible for the motion actions of a fuel handling machine preclude in a worst case scenario the bringing of the fuel handling cell and related systems to a condition appropriate for

  20. LMFBR Blanket Physics Project progress report No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is summarized in experimental and analytical investigations of the neutronics and photonics of benchmark mockups of LMFBR blankets. During the reporting period work was devoted primarily to a wide range of analytical/numerical investigations, including blanket fuel management/economics studies, evaluation of improved blanket designs, and assessment of state-of-the-art methods for gamma heating calculations. Experimental work included preparations for resumption of MIT Reactor operations, primarily fabrication of improved steel reflector assemblies for blanket mockups, and development of an improved radiophotoluminescent readout device for LiF thermoluminescent detectors. The most significant finding was that the neutronic and economic performance of radial blanket assemblies are essentially independent of core size (rating) for radially-power-flattened cores. Hence the methodology and results of current experiments and calculations should be valid for the large commercial LMFBR's of the future

  1. LMFBR Blanket Physics Project progress report No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, M.J. (ed.)

    1975-06-30

    Progress is summarized in experimental and analytical investigations of the neutronics and photonics of benchmark mockups of LMFBR blankets. During the reporting period work was devoted primarily to a wide range of analytical/numerical investigations, including blanket fuel management/economics studies, evaluation of improved blanket designs, and assessment of state-of-the-art methods for gamma heating calculations. Experimental work included preparations for resumption of MIT Reactor operations, primarily fabrication of improved steel reflector assemblies for blanket mockups, and development of an improved radiophotoluminescent readout device for LiF thermoluminescent detectors. The most significant finding was that the neutronic and economic performance of radial blanket assemblies are essentially independent of core size (rating) for radially-power-flattened cores. Hence the methodology and results of current experiments and calculations should be valid for the large commercial LMFBR's of the future.

  2. MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, M.J.

    1983-08-01

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record.

  3. MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record

  4. LMFBR Blanket Physics Project progress report No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the second annual report of an experimental program for the investigation of the neutronics of benchmark mock-ups of LMFBR blankets. Work was devoted primarily to measurements on Blanket Mock-Up No. 2, a simulation of a typical large LMFBR radial blanket and its steel reflector. Activation traverses and neutron spectra were measured in the blanket; calculations of activities and spectra were made for comparison with the measured data. The heterogeneous self-shielding effect for 238U capture was found to be the most important factor affecting the comparison. Optimization and economic studies were made which indicate that the use of a high-albedo reflector material such as BeO or graphite may improve blanket neutronics and economics

  5. Manufacture of blanket shield modules for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzetto, P. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: Patrick.Lorenzetto@tech.efda.org; Boireau, B. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, BP181, F-71200 Le Creusot (France); Boudot, C. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, BP181, F-71200 Le Creusot (France); Bucci, P. [CEA, DTEN/S3ME/LMIC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Furmanek, A. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ioki, K. [ITER IT, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Liimatainen, J. [Metso Powdermet, P.O. Box 306, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland); Peacock, A. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sherlock, P. [NNC Ltd., Booths Hall, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Taehtinen, S. [VTT Industrial Systems, P.O. Box 1704, Espoo, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    A research and development programme for the ITER blanket shield modules has been implemented in Europe to provide input for the design and the manufacture of the full-scale production components. It involves in particular the fabrication and testing of mock-ups (small scale and medium scale) and full-scale prototypes of shield blocks (SB) and first wall (FW) panels. The manufacturing feasibility of FW panels has been demonstrated for two copper alloy candidates. Two designs have been developed for the manufacture of the SB, one for a conventional fabrication route and one for a fabrication route based on the hot isostatic press technology. This paper presents the fabrication routes developed in Europe for the manufacture of the ITER Shield modules.

  6. Simulation of sludge blanket height in clarifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhen; WU Zhi-chao; WANG Zhi-wei; GU Guo-wei

    2009-01-01

    Sludge blanket height (SBH) is an important parameter in the clarifier design,operation and control.Based on an overview and classification of SBH algorithms,a modifed SBH algorithm is proposed by incorporating a threshold concentration limit into a relative concentration sharp change algorithm to eliminate the disturbance of compression interfaces on the correct simulation of SBH.Pilot-scale test data are adopted to compare reliability of three SBH algorithms reported in literature and the modified SBH algorithm developed in this paper.Calculated results demonstrate that the three SBH algorithms give results with large deviation (>50%) from measured SBH,especially under low solid flux conditions.The modified algorithm is computationally efficient and reliable in matching the measured data.It is incorporated into a onedimensional clarifier model for stable simulation of pilot-scale experimental clarifier data and into dynamic simulation of a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) clarifier data.

  7. Spacecraft thermal blanket cleaning: Vacuum bake of gaseous flow purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1990-01-01

    The mass losses and the outgassing rates per unit area of three thermal blankets consisting of various combinations of Mylar and Kapton, with interposed Dacron nets, were measured with a microbalance using two methods. The blankets at 25 deg C were either outgassed in vacuum for 20 hours, or were purged with a dry nitrogen flow of 3 cu. ft. per hour at 25 deg C for 20 hours. The two methods were compared for their effectiveness in cleaning the blankets for their use in space applications. The measurements were carried out using blanket strips and rolled-up blanket samples fitting the microbalance cylindrical plenum. Also, temperature scanning tests were carried out to indicate the optimum temperature for purging and vacuum cleaning. The data indicate that the purging for 20 hours with the above N2 flow can accomplish the same level of cleaning provided by the vacuum with the blankets at 25 deg C for 20 hours, In both cases, the rate of outgassing after 20 hours is reduced by 3 orders of magnitude, and the weight losses are in the range of 10E-4 gr/sq cm. Equivalent mass loss time constants, regained mass in air as a function of time, and other parameters were obtained for those blankets.

  8. DEMO blanket testing in ITER. Influence on reaching DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatalov, G. E-mail: geshat@nfi.kiae.ru

    2001-10-01

    ITER goal was specified as one step between now and the DEMO fusion reactor. One of the major issues is the tritium breeding blankets test relevant to future reactors. The major objectives of blanket modules (TBM) experiments in ITER are reduced in comparison with proposed test objectives in ITER-FDR. Thus, results of DEMO blanket designs testing in ITER will provide limited (but still useful) information that will need strong support from non-fusion facilities testing. The role of non-fusion tests is increased now to provide additional data required for DEMO blanket construction and qualification. A strategy of testing steps to DEMO blanket qualifications has to include parallel testing in ITER and in non-fusion devices. Experiments in fission reactors are able to provide essential data on materials radiation properties; tritium release, inventory and permeation; and thermomechanical behavior of the blanket breeder/multiplier. However, the volume in fission reactors is rather small and neutron spectra differ from the fusion reactor one. Nonetheless in the near future one depends primarily on fission reactor irradiation. The powerful accelerator based neutron source IFMIF could also provide useful information on radiation material properties. Plasma based neutron sources of different fusion devices could be the best choice for testing DEMO materials and blanket mock-ups. Timetable and costs of these devices are not clear now.

  9. Design analyses of self-cooled liquid metal blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A trade-off study of liquid metal self-cooled blankets was carried out to define the performance of these blankets and to determine the potential to operate at the maximum possible values of the performance parameters. The main parameters considered during the course of the study were the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the blanket energy multiplication factor, the energy fraction lost to the shield, the lithium-6 enrichment in the breeder material, the total blanket thickness, the reflector material selection, and the compositions of the different blanket zones. Also, a study was carried out to assess the impact of different reactor design choices on the reactor performance parameters. The design choices include the impurity control system (limiter or divertor), the material choice for the limiter, the elimination of tritium breeding from the inboard section of tokamak reactors, and the coolant choice for the nonbreeding inboard blanket. In addition, tritium breeding benchmark calculations were performed using different transport codes and nuclear data libraries. The importance of the TBR in the blanket design motivated the benchmark calculations

  10. Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) blanket design study, December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work represents only the second iteration of the conceptual design of a DTHR blanket; consequently, a number of issues important to a detailed blanket design have not yet been evaluated. The most critical issues identified are those of two-phase flow maldistribution, flow instabilities, flow stratification for horizontal radial inflow of boiling water, fuel rod vibrations, corrosion of clad and structural materials by high quality steam, fretting and cyclic loads. Approaches to minimizing these problems are discussed and experimental testing with flow mock-ups is recommended. These implications on a commercial blanket design are discussed and critical data needs are identified

  11. Advanced Burner Reactor with Breed-and-Burn Thorium Blankets for Improved Economics and Resource Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-11-04

    This study assesses the feasibility of designing Seed and Blanket (S&B) Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) to generate a significant fraction of the core power from radial thorium fueled blankets that operate on the Breed-and-Burn (B&B) mode without exceeding the radiation damage constraint of presently verified cladding materials. The S&B core is designed to maximize the fraction of neutrons that radially leak from the seed (or “driver”) into the subcritical blanket and reduce neutron loss via axial leakage. The blanket in the S&B core makes beneficial use of the leaking neutrons for improved economics and resource utilization. A specific objective of this study is to maximize the fraction of core power that can be generated by the blanket without violating the thermal hydraulic and material constraints. Since the blanket fuel requires no reprocessing along with remote fuel fabrication, a larger fraction of power from the blanket will result in a smaller fuel recycling capacity and lower fuel cycle cost per unit of electricity generated. A unique synergism is found between a low conversion ratio (CR) seed and a B&B blanket fueled by thorium. Among several benefits, this synergism enables the very low leakage S&B cores to have small positive coolant voiding reactivity coefficient and large enough negative Doppler coefficient even when using inert matrix fuel for the seed. The benefits of this synergism are maximized when using an annular seed surrounded by an inner and outer thorium blankets. Among the high-performance S&B cores designed to benefit from this unique synergism are: (1) the ultra-long cycle core that features a cycle length of ~7 years; (2) the high-transmutation rate core where the seed fuel features a TRU CR of 0.0. Its TRU transmutation rate is comparable to that of the reference Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) with CR of 0.5 and the thorium blanket can generate close to 60% of the core power; but requires only one sixth of the reprocessing and

  12. 18 CFR 284.402 - Blanket marketing certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... effective for an affiliated marketer with respect to transactions involving affiliated pipelines when an affiliated pipeline receives its blanket certificate pursuant to § 284.284. (2) Should a marketer...

  13. Safety and personnel access aspects of low activation fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of silicon carbide and carbon materials for structural applications in fusion reactor first wall and blanket regions has been proposed and a continuing effort spent on the development of the ceramics technology. The advantages identified are an extremely low induced radioactivity inventory, a high temperature operating capability, abundant raw material resource availability, and minimized plasma impurity effects. One of the unique features of the applications of these materials to fusion reactor blanket designs is that no alloying element is needed in order to assure the specified mechanical properties such as occurs in metal alloys. The major source of long term radioactivity in these materials is impurities. The impurity elements and their concentrations carried over to the blanket structure during fabrication can be minimized by proper fabrication procedures and techniques. The safety and personnel access aspects of such fusion blankets in conjunction with the impurity element concentration are the main subjects of this paper

  14. Advanced Acoustic Blankets for Improved Aircraft Interior Noise Reduction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed Phase II research effort is to develop heterogeneous (HG) blankets for improved sound reduction in aircraft structures. Phase I...

  15. Lightweight IMM Multi-Junction Photovoltaic Flexible Blanket Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DSS's recently completed successful NASA SBIR Phase 1 program has established a TRL 3/4 classification for an innovative IMM PV Integrated Modular Blanket Assembly...

  16. Electrical connectors for blanket modules in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Analysis of static and cyclic strength for L-shaped and Z-shaped ES has been performed. • Analysis results do show that for L-shaped ES static and cyclic strength criteria are not satisfied. • Static and cyclic strength criteria are met well by ES with Z-shaped elastic elements. • ES with Z-shaped elastic elements has been adopted as a new baseline design for ITER. - Abstract: Blanket electrical connectors (E-straps, ES) are low-impedance electrical bridges crossing gaps between blanket modules (BMs) and vacuum vessel (VV). Similar ES are used between two parts on each BM: the first wall panel (FW) and shield block (SB). The main functions of E-straps are to: (a) conduct halo currents intercepting some rows of BM, (b) provide grounding paths for all BMs, and (c) operate as electrical shunts which protect water cooling pipes (branch pipes) from excessive halo and eddy currents. E-straps should be elastic enough to absorb 3-D imposed displacements of BM relative VV in a scale of ±2 mm and at the same time strong enough to not be damaged by EM loads. Each electrical strap is a package of flexible conductive sheets made of CuCrZr bronze. Halo current up to 137 kA and some components of eddy currents do pass through one E-strap for a few tens or hundreds milliseconds during the plasma vertical displacement events (VDE) and disruptions. These currents deposit Joule heat and cause rather high electromagnetic loads in a strong external magnetic field, reaching 9 T. A gradual failure of ES to conduct Halo and Eddy currents with low enough impedance gradually redistributes these currents into branch pipes and cause excessive EM loads. When branch pipes will be bent so much that will touch surrounding structures, the Joule heating in accidental electrical contact spots will cause local melting and may lead to a water leak. The paper presents and compares two design options of E-straps: with L-shaped and Z-shaped elastic elements. The latter option was

  17. Blankets for tritium catalyzed deuterium (TCD) fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TCD fusion fuel cycle - where the 3He from the D(D,n)3He reaction is transmuted, by neutron capture in the blanket, into tritium which is fed back to the plasma - was recently recognized as being potentially more promising than the Catalyzed Deuterium (Cat-D) fuel cycle for tokamak power reactors. It is the purpose of the present work to assess the feasibility of, and to identify promising directions for designing blankets for TCD fusion reactors

  18. Impact of prescribed burning on blanket peat hydrology

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, J; Palmer, SM; Johnston, K; Wearing, C.; Irvine, B; Brown, LE

    2015-01-01

    Fire is known to impact soil properties and hydrological flowpaths. However, the impact of prescribed vegetation burning on blanket peatland hydrology is poorly understood. We studied ten blanket peat headwater catchments. Five were subject to prescribed burning, while five were unburnt controls. Within the burnt catchments we studied plots where the last burn occurred ∼2 (B2), 4 (B4), 7 (B7) or greater than 10 years (B10+) prior to the start of measurements. These were compared with plots at...

  19. Studies on steps affecting tritium residence time in solid blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the self sustaining of CTR fuel cycle, the effective tritium recovery from blankets is essential. This means that not only tritium breeding ratio must be larger than 1.0, but also high recovering speed is required for the short residence time of tritium in blankets. Short residence time means that the tritium inventory in blankets is small. In this paper, the tritium residence time and tritium inventory in a solid blanket are modeled by considering the steps constituting tritium release. Some of these tritium migration processes were experimentally evaluated. The tritium migration steps in a solid blanket using sintered breeding materials consist of diffusion in grains, desorption at grain edges, diffusion and permeation through grain boundaries, desorption at particle edges, diffusion and percolation through interconnected pores to purging stream, and convective mass transfer to stream. Corresponding to these steps, diffusive, soluble, adsorbed and trapped tritium inventories and the tritium in gas phase are conceivable. The code named TTT was made for calculating these tritium inventories and the residence time of tritium. An example of the results of calculation is shown. The blanket is REPUTER-1, which is the conceptual design of a commercial reversed field pinch fusion reactor studied at the University of Tokyo. The experimental studies on the migration steps of tritium are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Axial blanket for 16NGF Angra 1 fuel type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadde, Luciano Martins; Faria, Eduardo Fernandes [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: sadde@inb.gov.br; faria@inb.gov.br; Sang-Keun You [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd. (KNFC), Taejon (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: skyou@knfc.co.kr

    2007-07-01

    Angra-1, Kori-2 and Krsko are nuclear power plants with the same design. However, the fuel assemblies have some differences in design due to the countries strategies and the differences in the fabrication process. The 16NGF (16x16 Next Generation Fuel) was developed by INB, KNFC and Westinghouse in order to be used in these three nuclear power plants and the 'Axial Blanket' is one of the new features for the 16NGF design. The main purpose of the Axial Blanket Optimization study is to determine which axial blanket enrichment and length would provide the better fuel cycle cost benefit. All of the calculations were performed using Gadolinium as Burnable Absorber and solid pellets type for Axial Blanket. The results indicate 1.8 w/o U235 enrichment and 8 inches length as the best option of Axial Blanket from the fuel cycle cost benefit standpoint. The economy is about 1.8%. The difference in the reload cost in the range between 1.5 and 2.6 w/o U235 enrichment and for the 6 and 8 inches length is not so significant. Due that, from the Fq limit standpoint and also for longer cycle length requirements, a higher axial blanket enrichment (2.6 w/o) and shorter length (6 inches) is recommended. (author)

  1. The integrated-blanket-coil concept applied to the poloidal field and blanket systems of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil'' (IBC) concept, is applied to the poloidal field and blanket systems of a tokamak reactor. An examination of resistive power losses in the IBC suggests that these losses can be limited to 10% of the fusion thermal power. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are shown to be modest and well below design limits. For the stainless steel reference case examined, the MHD-induced pressure drop was estimated to be about 1/3 MPa and the associated primary membrane stress was estimated to be about 47 MPa. The preliminary analyses indicate that the IBC concept offers promise as a means for making fusion reactors more compact by combining blanket and coil functions in a single component

  2. Safety Evaluation of the EVOLVE Blanket Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes the results of the safety evaluation of the Evaporation of Lithium and Vapor Extraction (EVOLVE) W-alloy first wall (FW) and blanket concept. We have analyzed the EVOLVE design response during a confinement bypass accident. A confinement bypass accident was chosen because, based on previous safety studies, this accident can produce environmental releases by breaching the primary radioactive confinement boundary of EVOLVE, which is the EVOLVE vacuum vessel (VV). As a consequence of a bypass accident, air from a room adjoining the reactor enters the plasma chamber by way of a failed VV port. This air reacts with the high temperature metals inside of the VV to release energy in the case of a lithium spill, or to mobilize radioactive material by oxidation, and then transport this material to the environment by natural convection airflow through the failed VV port. We use the MELCOR code to analyze the response of EVOLVE during this accident. Based on these results, the EVOLVE concept can meet the no-evacuation dose goal set by the DOE Fusion Safety Standard if the EVOLVE confinement building ventilation system is closed within two hours of the onset of this accident

  3. Current status of fusion reactor blanket thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies of liquid lithium have concentrated on its sorption characteristics for hydrogen isotopes and its interaction with common impurity elements. Hydrogen isotope sorption data (P-C-T relations, activity coefficients, Sieverts' constants, plateau pressures, isotope effects, free energies of formation, phase boundaries etc.) are presented in a tabular form that can be conveniently used to extract thermodynamic information for the α-phase of the Li-LiH, Li-LiD, and Li-LiT systems and to construct complete phase diagrams. Recent solubility data for Li3N, Li2O, and Li2C2 in liquid lithium are discussed with emphasis on the prospects for removing these species by cold-trapping methods. Current studies on the sorption of hydrogen in solid lithium alloys (e.g., Li--Al and Li--Pb), made using a new technique (the hydrogen titration method), have shown that these alloys should lead to smaller blanket-tritium inventories than are attainable with liquid lithium and that the P-C-T relationships for hydrogen in Li--M alloys can be estimated from lithium activity data for these alloys

  4. Flow characteristics of the Cascade granular blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of a single granule on a rotating cone shows that for the 350 half-angle, double-cone-shaped Cascade chamber, blanket granules will stay against the chamber wall if the rotational speed is 50 rpm or greater. The granules move axially down the wall with a slight (5-mm or less) sinusoidal oscillation in the circumferential direction. Granule chute-flow experiments confirm that two-layered flow can be obtained when the chute is inclined slightly above the granular material angle of repose. The top surface layer is thin and fast moving (supercritical flow). A thick bottom layer moves more slowly (subcritical flow controlled at the exit) with a velocity that increases with distance from the bottom of the chute. This is a desirable velocity profile because in the Cascade chamber about one-third of the fusion energy is deposited in the form of x rays and fusion-fuel-pellet debris in the top surface (inner-radius) layer

  5. Degrading the Plutonium Produced in Fast Breeder Reactor Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Kuno, Yusuke [Tokyo University, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Plutonium quality, defined as the plutonium isotopic composition, is an important measure for proliferation-resistance (PR) of a nuclear energy system. The quality of the plutonium produced in the blanket assemblies of a fast breeder reactor could be as good as or better than the weapons-grade (WG). The presence of such good quality plutonium is a proliferation concern. There are various options to degrade the plutonium produced in the breeder blanket. The obvious one is to blend the blanket plutonium with those produced from the reactor core during reprocessing. Other options try to prevent the generation of good quality plutonium (Pu). The Protected Plutonium Production (P{sup 3}) Project proposed by Tokyo Institute of Technology (TIT)1,2,3 advocates the doping of certain amount of neptunium (Np), or americium (Am) in fresh blanket fuel for irradiation. The increased production of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu by neutron capture in {sup 237}Np and Am would degrade the blanket plutonium. However, as {sup 237}Np is a controlled material according to IAEA, its use as doping material in fresh blanket fuel presents a concern for nuclear proliferation. In addition, the fabrication of fresh blanket fuel with inclusion of americium would be complicated due to the emission of intense low-energy gamma radiation from {sup 241}Am. Am is normally accompanied by Cm since the separation of those 2 elements is very difficult. Fuel containing both Am and Cm may make Safeguards measurement difficult. A variation would be doping the fresh blanket fuel with minor actinide (e.g., a group of neptunium, americium, and curium), or with separated reactor-grade (RG) plutonium. The drawback of such schemes would be the need for glove boxes in fresh blanket fuel fabrication. It is possible to fuel the breeder blankets with recycled (reprocessed) uranium oxide. The recycled uranium, recovered from reprocessing, contains {sup 236}U, which when irradiated in the blanket would

  6. Automated system for handling tritiated mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a semi system for handling, characterizing, processing, sorting, and repackaging hazardous wastes containing tritium. The system combines an IBM-developed gantry robot with a special glove box enclosure designed to protect operators and minimize the potential release of tritium to the atmosphere. All hazardous waste handling and processing will be performed remotely, using the robot in a teleoperational mode for one-of-a-kind functions and in an autonomous mode for repetitive operations. Initially, this system will be used in conjunction with a portable gas system designed to capture any gaseous-phase tritium released into the glove box. This paper presents the objectives of this development program, provides background related to LLNL's robotics and waste handling program, describes the major system components, outlines system operation, and discusses current status and plans

  7. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Helium-Gas Accident Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Helium Supply Rupture into Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    The model results are used to determine if beam power shutdown is necessary (or not) as a result of the LOHGA accident to maintain the blanket system well below any of the thermal-hydraulic constraints imposed on the design. The results also provide boundary conditions to the detailed bin model to study the detailed temperature response of the hot blanket module structure. The results for these two cases are documented in the report.

  8. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lata

    1996-09-26

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  9. Microbiological sampling of spacecraft cabling, antennas, solar panels and thermal blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukol, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Sampling procedures and techniques described resulted from various flight project microbiological monitoring programs of unmanned planetary spacecraft. Concurrent with development of these procedures, compatibility evaluations were effected with the cognizant spacecraft subsystem engineers to assure that degradation factors would not be induced during the monitoring program. Of significance were those areas of the spacecraft configuration for which special handling precautions and/or nonstandard sample gathering techniques were evolved. These spacecraft component areas were: cabling, high gain antenna, solar panels, and thermal blankets. The compilation of these techniques provides a historical reference for both the qualification and quantification of sampling parameters as applied to the Mariner Spacecraft of the late 1960's and early 1970's.

  10. Basic principles of lead and lead-bismuth eutectic application in blanket of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the main requirements of advanced nuclear-power engineering is inherent safety of power installations. It initiates R and D of heavy liquid metals (lead, lead- bismuth eutectic) application in fission reactors as substitute of sodium. The same requirement makes advisable R and D of the lead and lead-bismuth eutectic application in blanket of fusion reactors as substitute of lithium. High magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop is an important issue for liquid metal blanket concepts. To decrease MHD-resistance authors propose to form electro-insulating coatings on internal surface of blanket ducts at any moment of fusion reactor exploitation. It may be achieved easily if lead or lead-bismuth eutectic is used and technology of oxidative potential handling is applied. A number of experiments carried out in NNSTU show the availability of the proposed technology. It bases on formation of the insulating coatings that consist of the oxides of components of the structural materials and of the coolant components. In-situ value of the electro-insulating coatings characteristics rd (r - specific resistance of coatings, d - thickness) is ∼ 10-5Ω·m2 for steels and 5, 0x10-6 - 5, 0x10-5Ω·m2 for vanadium alloys. Thermal cycling is possible during exploitation of a blanket. The experimental research of the insulating coatings properties during thermal cycling have shown that the coatings formed into the lead and lead-bismuth coolants save there electro-insulating properties. Experience of many years is an undoubted advantage of the lead-bismuth coolant and less of the lead coolant in comparison with lithium. Russian Federation possesses of experience of exploitation of the research and industrial facilities, of experience of creation of the pumps, steam generators and another equipment with heavy liquid metal coolants. The unique experience of designing, assembling and exploitation of the fission reactors with lead-bismuth coolant is also available. The problem

  11. Handling Pyrophoric Reagents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Haynie, Todd O.

    2009-08-14

    Pyrophoric reagents are extremely hazardous. Special handling techniques are required to prevent contact with air and the resulting fire. This document provides several methods for working with pyrophoric reagents outside of an inert atmosphere.

  12. Ceramic helium-cooled blanket test module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leshukov, A. E-mail: leshu@entek.ru; Kovalenko, V.; Shatalov, G.; Goroshkin, G.; Obukhov, A

    2000-11-01

    The design of RF DEMO-relevant ceramic helium cooled blanket test module (CHC BTM) for testing in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) is under consideration. The RF concept of DEMO BTM is based upon the breeder inside tube (BIT)-concept. This concept suggests the use of solid breeding ceramic material, helium as coolant and tritium purge-gas, ferrite-martensite steel as structural material, and beryllium as neutron multiplier. The parameters of the primary circuit coolant are the following, pressure -8 MPa, inlet/outlet temperature -300/550 deg. C, respectively. Helium (0.1 MPa pressure) is used for tritium removal from ceramic breeder. The ITER water coolant is the secondary circuit coolant of DEMO BTM cooling system. Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) is used as tritium breeding material (pebbles-bed of diameter 0.5-1 mm spheres). It is planned to use the beryllium as neutron multiplier (spheres diameter 1 mm pebbles-bed or the porous beryllium). The 3-D neutronic calculations on Monte Carlo method, in accordance with FENDL-1 library of the nuclear data, have been performed for CHC BTM. To validate the CHC BTM concept, the thermal hydraulic analysis has been performed for the design elements and cooling system equipment. The preliminary stress analysis for BTM design elements has been carried out on the ASME-code and RF strength regulations. The four types of LOFA and LOCA accidents have been investigated. The parameters of cooling, coolant purification and tritium extraction systems have been determined.

  13. Handling Stability of Tractor Semitrailer Based on Handling Diagram

    OpenAIRE

    Ren Yuan-yuan; Zheng Xue-lian; Li Xian-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Handling instability is a serious threat to driving safety. In order to analyze the handling stability of a tractor semitrailer, a handling diagram can be used. In our research, considering the impact of multiple nonsteering rear axles and nonlinear characteristics of tires on vehicle handling stability, the handling equations are developed for description of stability of tractor semi-trailer. Then we obtain handling diagrams so as to study the influence of driving speed, loaded mass, and fif...

  14. Impact of blanket tritium against the tritium plant of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breeder blanket and the blanket tritium recovery system are tested using test blanket modules during ITER campaign. And then, these are integrated with the tritium plant for the first time at a prototype reactor after ITER. In this work, impact to the tritium plant by integration of the solid breeder blanket was discussed. The method of tritium extraction from the blanket and the choice of the process for breeder blanket interface should be discussed not only from the viewpoint of tritium release but also from the viewpoint of the load of processing. (author)

  15. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Luke [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-30

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  16. Direct Lit Electrolysis In A Metallic Lithium Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Babineau, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Vaquer, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-13

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed.  The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fission/fusion reactors is critical in order to maintained low concentrations.  This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket, extraction is complicated at the required low levels. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering the hydrogen and deuterium thru an electrolysis step at high temperatures. 

  17. TRANSPORT/HANDLING REQUESTS

    CERN Multimedia

    Groupe ST/HM

    2002-01-01

    A new EDH document entitled 'Transport/Handling Request' will be in operation as of Monday, 11th February 2002, when the corresponding icon will be accessible from the EDH desktop, together with the application instructions. This EDH form will replace the paper-format transport/handling request form for all activities involving the transport of equipment and materials. However, the paper form will still be used for all vehicle-hire requests. The introduction of the EDH transport/handling request form is accompanied by the establishment of the following time limits for the various services concerned: 24 hours for the removal of office items, 48 hours for the transport of heavy items (of up to 6 metric tons and of standard road width), 5 working days for a crane operation, extra-heavy transport operation or complete removal, 5 working days for all transport operations relating to LHC installation. ST/HM Group, Logistics Section Tel: 72672 - 72202

  18. Development of the water cooled lithium lead blanket for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, J., E-mail: julien.aubert@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Aiello, G.; Jonquères, N. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LPEC, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Morin, A.; Rampal, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/BCCR, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The WCLL blanket design has been modified to adapt it to the 2012 EFDA DEMO specifications. • Preliminary CAD design of the equatorial outboard module of the WCLL blanket has been developed for DEMO. • Finite elements analyses have been carried out in order to assess the module thermal behavior in the straight part of the module. - Abstract: The water cooled lithium lead (WCLL) blanket, based on near-future technology requiring small extrapolation from present-day knowledge both on physical and technological aspect, is one of the breeding blanket concepts considered as possible candidates for the EU DEMOnstration power plant. In 2012, the EFDA agency issued new specifications for DEMO: this paper describes the work performed to adapt the WCLL blanket design to those specifications. Relatively small modules with straight surfaces are attached to a common Back Supporting Structure housing feeding pipes. Each module features reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel as structural material, liquid Lithium-Lead as breeder, neutron multiplier and carrier. Water at typical Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) conditions is chosen as coolant. A preliminary design of the equatorial outboard module has been achieved. Finite elements analyses have been carried out in order to assess the module thermal behavior. Two First Wall (FW) concepts have been proposed, one favoring the thermal efficiency, the other favoring the manufacturability. The Breeding Zone has been designed with C-shaped Double-Walled Tubes in order to minimize the Water/Pb-15.7Li interaction likelihood. The priorities for further development of the WCLL blanket concept are identified in the paper.

  19. First wall and blanket concepts for experimental fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Biggio, M.; Cardella, A.; Daenner, W.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Ponti, C.; Rieger, M.; Vieider, G.

    1985-07-01

    The paper describes the progress of the studies on first wall and liquid breeder blankets for tritium production in the Next European Torus (NET). Two concepts of first wall/blanket segments are described, using 17Li83Pb as breeder and water as coolant. In both concepts the first wall is integrated in a steel box enveloping the breeder units which are cylindrical vessels with an inside heat transfer system. The thermomechanical and neutronics features of the two concepts are evaluated. Finally, the questions related to tritium permeation into coolant and tritium recovery from breeder are discussed on the basis of the analysis in progress in Europe.

  20. Maximizing fluence rate and field uniformity of light blanket for intraoperative PDT

    OpenAIRE

    LIANG, XING; Kundu, Palak; Finlay, Jarod; Goodwin, Michael; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2012-01-01

    A light blanket is designed with a system of cylindrically diffusing optical fibers, which are spirally oriented. This 25×30 cm rectangular light blanket is capable of providing uniform illumination during intraoperative photodynamic therapy. The flexibility of the blanket proves to be extremely beneficial when conforming to the anatomical structures of the patient being treated. Previous tests of light distribution from the blanket have shown significant loss of intensity with the length of ...

  1. Neutronic analysis of a dual He/LiPb coolant breeding blanket for DEMO

    OpenAIRE

    Catalán, J.P.; Ogando Serrano, Francisco; Sanz Gonzalo, Javier; Palermo, I.; Veredas, G.; Gómez Ros, J. M.; Sedano, L

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual design of a DEMO fusion reactor is being developed under the Spanish Breeding Blanket Technology Programme: TECNO_FUS based on a He/LiPb dual coolant blanket as reference design option. The following issues have been analyzed to address the demonstration of the neutronic reliability of this conceptual blanket design: power amplification capacity of the blanket, tritium breeding capability for fuel self-sufficiency, power deposition due to nuclear heating in superconducting coils ...

  2. APT Blanket Safety Analysis: Counter Current Flow Limitation for Cavity Spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal-hydraulic modeling aspects for the APT blanket system have been broken up into two basic modeling components: (1) the blanket system and (2) the cavity flood system. In most cases these systems are modeled separately. This separate study for the coolability of the blanket modules can also be used to establish/evaluate a functional design requirement on gap size between the blanket modules

  3. Safe handling of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this publication is to provide practical guidance and recommendations on operational radiation protection aspects related to the safe handling of tritium in laboratories, industrial-scale nuclear facilities such as heavy-water reactors, tritium removal plants and fission fuel reprocessing plants, and facilities for manufacturing commercial tritium-containing devices and radiochemicals. The requirements of nuclear fusion reactors are not addressed specifically, since there is as yet no tritium handling experience with them. However, much of the material covered is expected to be relevant to them as well. Annex III briefly addresses problems in the comparatively small-scale use of tritium at universities, medical research centres and similar establishments. However, the main subject of this publication is the handling of larger quantities of tritium. Operational aspects include designing for tritium safety, safe handling practice, the selection of tritium-compatible materials and equipment, exposure assessment, monitoring, contamination control and the design and use of personal protective equipment. This publication does not address the technologies involved in tritium control and cleanup of effluents, tritium removal, or immobilization and disposal of tritium wastes, nor does it address the environmental behaviour of tritium. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Improving coal handling effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, S.

    2003-10-01

    Appropriate coal handling systems are essential for successful coal utilisation. The paper looks at some of the options available, including crushers and hammer mills, wear-resistant liners for chutes and wagons, and dewatering systems. These are individual components within larger systems such as stockyard stacking and reclaiming installations. 5 photos.

  5. Colonic potassium handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Vaarby; Matos, Joana E.; Prætorius, Helle;

    2010-01-01

    Homeostatic control of plasma K+ is a necessary physiological function. The daily dietary K+ intake of approximately 100 mmol is excreted predominantly by the distal tubules of the kidney. About 10% of the ingested K+ is excreted via the intestine. K+ handling in both organs is specifically regul...

  6. 75 FR 60095 - Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... LNG Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY..., by Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC (Sempra), requesting blanket authorization to export up to a total of... Order No. 2795, which granted Cheniere Marketing, LLC (Cheniere) blanket authorization to...

  7. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  8. Fusion blanket testing in MFTF-α + T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility-α + T (MFTF-α + T) is an upgraded version of the current MFTF-B test facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and is designed for near-term fusion-technology-integrated tests at a neutron flux of 2 MW/m2. Currently, the fusion community is screening blanket and related issues to determine which ones can be addressed using MFTF-α + T. In this work, the minimum testing needs to address these issues are identified for the liquid-metal-cooled blanket and the solid-breeder blanket. Based on the testing needs and on the MFTF-α + T capability, a test plan is proposed for three options; each option covers a six to seven year testing phase. The options reflect the unresolved question of whether to place the research and development (R and D) emphasis on liquid-metal or solid-breeder blankets. In each case, most of the issues discussed can be addressed to a reasonable extent in MFTF-α+T

  9. 75 FR 11557 - Woven Electric Blankets From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... permitted by section 201.8 of the Commission's rules, as amended, 67 FR 68036 (November 8, 2002). Even where... specified in II (C) of the Commission's Handbook on Electronic Filing Procedures, 67 FR 68168, 68173... COMMISSION Woven Electric Blankets From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission....

  10. 18 CFR 33.1 - Applicability, definitions, and blanket authorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the outstanding voting securities; or (iii) Any security of a subsidiary company within the holding... company subsidiary in connection with such acquisition. (4) A holding company granted blanket... subsidiaries, or associate companies within the holding company system has captive customers in the...

  11. Bulk materials handling review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-02-15

    The paper provides details of some of the most important coal handling projects and technologies worldwide. It describes development by Aubema Crushing Technology GmbH, Bedeschi, Cimbria Moduflex, DBT, Dynamic Air Conveying Systems, E & F Services, InBulk Technologies, Nord-Sen Metal Industries Ltd., Pebco Inc, Primasonics International Ltd., R.J.S. Silo Clean (International) Ltd., Takraf GmbH, and The ACT Group. 17 photos.

  12. Remote Research

    CERN Document Server

    Tulathimutte, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Remote studies allow you to recruit subjects quickly, cheaply, and immediately, and give you the opportunity to observe users as they behave naturally in their own environment. In Remote Research, Nate Bolt and Tony Tulathimutte teach you how to design and conduct remote research studies, top to bottom, with little more than a phone and a laptop.

  13. Uranium hexafluoride handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF6 from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride

  14. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  15. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept applied to the poloidal field and blanket systems of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component. This concept, designated the integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept, is applied to the poloidal field and blanket systems of a Tokamak reactor. An examination of resistive power losses in the IBC suggests that these losses can be limited to less than or equal to 10% of the fusion thermal power. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls, MHD-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are shown to be modest and well below design limits. For the stainless steel reference case examined in this paper, the MHD-induced pressure drop was estimated to be approx. 1/3 MPa and the associated primary membrane stress was estimated to be approx. 47 MPa. The preliminary analyses presented in this paper indicate that the IBC concept offers promise as a means for making fusion reactors more compact by combining blanket and coils functions in a single component

  17. Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  18. Remote maintenance technology for ITER. Development of robots for in-vessel remote maintenance with large capacity and high precision and for welding, cutting, and inspection in pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constructions in vessels of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) are radiated by neutron formed at nuclear fusion reactions. Therefore, when requiring maintenance for the in-vessel components (IVCs) of ITER, remote maintenance using robots, is required. IVCs are set in vacuum vessel with shapes like doughnuts cooled by cooling water because of receiving high thermal loads. Representative of IVCs are blankets, which are constructed by about 400 pieces of independent module type blankets so as to enable to correspond with local maintenance, and are set in the vacuum vessel. A piece of the blanket has about 4 tons of weight and about 2 m (width) x 1 m (height) x 0.5 m (thickness) of size. The blankets are required to be set with high precision of less than plus and minus 2 mm. And, as they are jointed to cooling pipes, at their maintenance and exchanging, cutting, rewelding, and inspection of the pipes are required. Here were described robots for maintenance of the blankets and robots for welding, cutting and inspection of cooling pipes, as a representative case of remote maintenance robot technology of ITER. (G.K.)

  19. Conceptual design of a water cooled breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Pu, Yong; Cheng, Xiaoman [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Jia; Peng, ChangHong [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Ma, Xuebing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Chen, Lei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We proposed a water cooled ceramic breeder blanket with superheated steam. • Superheated steam is generated at the first wall and the front part of breeder zone. • Superheated steam has negligible impact on neutron absorption by coolant in FW and improves TBR. • The superheated steam at higher temperature can improve thermal efficiency. - Abstract: China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is an ITER-like superconducting tokamak reactor. Its major radius is 5.7 m, minor radius is 1.6 m and elongation ratio is 1.8. Its mission is to achieve 50–200 MW of fusion power, 30–50% of duty time factor, and tritium breeding ratio not less than 1.2 to ensure the self-sufficiency. As one of the breeding blanket candidates for CFETR, a water cooled breeder blanket with superheated steam is proposed and its conceptual design is being carried out. In this design, sub-cooling water at 265 °C under the pressure of 7 MPa is fed into cooling plates in breeding zone and is heated up to 285 °C with saturated steam generated, and then this steam is pre-superheated up to 310 °C in first wall (FW), final, the pre-superheated steam coming from several blankets is fed into the other one blanket to superheat again up to 517 °C. Due to low density of superheated steam, it has negligible impact on neutron absorption by coolant in FW so that the high energy neutrons entering into breeder zone moderated by water in cooling plate help enhance tritium breeding by {sup 6}Li(n,α)T reaction. Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles and Be{sub 12}Ti pebbles are chosen as tritium breeder and neutron multiplier respectively, because Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Be{sub 12}Ti are expected to have better chemical stability and compatibility with water in high temperature. However, Be{sub 12}Ti may lead to a reduction in tritium breeding ratio (TBR). Furthermore, a spot of sintered Be plate is used to improve neutron multiplying capacity in a multi-layer structure. As one alternative option

  20. Conceptual design of a water cooled breeder blanket for CFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We proposed a water cooled ceramic breeder blanket with superheated steam. • Superheated steam is generated at the first wall and the front part of breeder zone. • Superheated steam has negligible impact on neutron absorption by coolant in FW and improves TBR. • The superheated steam at higher temperature can improve thermal efficiency. - Abstract: China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is an ITER-like superconducting tokamak reactor. Its major radius is 5.7 m, minor radius is 1.6 m and elongation ratio is 1.8. Its mission is to achieve 50–200 MW of fusion power, 30–50% of duty time factor, and tritium breeding ratio not less than 1.2 to ensure the self-sufficiency. As one of the breeding blanket candidates for CFETR, a water cooled breeder blanket with superheated steam is proposed and its conceptual design is being carried out. In this design, sub-cooling water at 265 °C under the pressure of 7 MPa is fed into cooling plates in breeding zone and is heated up to 285 °C with saturated steam generated, and then this steam is pre-superheated up to 310 °C in first wall (FW), final, the pre-superheated steam coming from several blankets is fed into the other one blanket to superheat again up to 517 °C. Due to low density of superheated steam, it has negligible impact on neutron absorption by coolant in FW so that the high energy neutrons entering into breeder zone moderated by water in cooling plate help enhance tritium breeding by 6Li(n,α)T reaction. Li2TiO3 pebbles and Be12Ti pebbles are chosen as tritium breeder and neutron multiplier respectively, because Li2TiO3 and Be12Ti are expected to have better chemical stability and compatibility with water in high temperature. However, Be12Ti may lead to a reduction in tritium breeding ratio (TBR). Furthermore, a spot of sintered Be plate is used to improve neutron multiplying capacity in a multi-layer structure. As one alternative option, in spite of lower TBR, Pb is taken into

  1. Handling during neonatal intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Murdoch, D R; Darlow, B A

    1984-01-01

    The handling received by very low birthweight newborns undergoing intensive care in the first few days of life and the effects of this were studied. Infants were handled an average of 4.3 hours (18%) of the total 24 hour observation time and received a mean 234 handling procedures. Parental handling contributed 35% of the total time but was usually benign except in that it could interfere with the infant's rest. Many procedures were associated with undesirable consequences. Endotracheal sucti...

  2. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  3. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  4. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  5. MFTF-B Upgrade for blanket-technology testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on preliminary studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we believe the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) could be upgraded for operation in a hot-ion Kelley mode in a portion of the central cell to provide fusion nuclear engineering data, particularly blanket technology information, by the end of the decade. Cost of this mode of operation would be modest compared with that of the other fusion devices considered in the last few years for such purposes

  6. Helium-3 blankets for tritium breeding in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Don; Embrechts, Mark; Varsamis, Georgios; Vesey, Roger; Gierszewski, Paul

    1988-01-01

    It is concluded that He-3 blankets offers considerable promise for tritium breeding in fusion reactors: good breeding potential, low operational risk, and attractive safety features. The availability of He-3 resources is the key issue for this concept. There is sufficient He-3 from decay of military stockpiles to meet the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor needs. Extraterrestrial sources of He-3 would be required for a fusion power economy.

  7. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  8. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  9. Model problem of MHD flow in a lithium blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepanov, V.Y.

    1978-01-01

    A model problem is considered for a feasibility study concerning controlled MHD flow in the blanket of a Tokamak nuclear reactor. The fundamental equations for the steady flow of an incompressible viscous fluid in a uniform transverse magnetic field are solved in rectangular coordinates, in the zero-induction approximation and with negligible induced currents. A numerical solution obtained for a set of appropriate boundary constraints establishes the conditions under which no stagnation zones will be formed.

  10. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  11. Investigation of aqueous slurries as fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical and experimental studies were carried out to assess the feasibility of using an aqueous slurry, with lithium in its solid component, to meet the tritium breeding, cooling, and shielding requirements of a controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR). The numerical studies were designed to demonstrate the theoretical ability of a conceptual slurry blanket to breed adequate tritium to sustain the CTR. The experimental studies were designed to show that the tritium retention characteristics of likely solid components for the slurry were conducive to adequate tritium recovery without the need for isotopic separation. The numerical portion of this work consisted in part of using ANISN, a one-dimensional finite difference neutron transport code, to model the neutronic performance of the slurry blanket concept. The parameters governing tritium production and retention in a slurry were computed and used to modify the results of the ANISN computer runs. The numerical work demonstrated that the slurry blanket was only marginally capable of breeding sufficient tritium without the aid of a neutron multiplying region. The experimental portion of this work consisted of several neutron irradiation experiments, which were designed to determine the retention abilities of LiF particles

  12. Industrial applications for remote operation in a processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this article, J. Hermier covers the use of remote handling equipment in the UP2-400 plant at La Hague near Cherbourg, in which for the most part master/slave mechanism remote handling units are used with a number of these employed in daily processing operations. As regards this subject, it is useful to remember that, at the time of the designing of this plant (UP2-400), this was the only equipment available on the market with remote-controlled remote handling equipment. In the second part, before speaking about the development of remote operation equipment in the plants now under construction and attempting to project what might be the remote operation role in future plants, R. Le Guennec reviews the problems faced by engineering in designing industrial-sized processing plants and, consequently, the motivations of engineering when faced with a choice between several possible solutions

  13. APT Blanket Safety Analysis: Preliminary Analyses of Downflow Through a Lateral Row 1 Blanket Model Under Near RHR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    To address a concern about a potential maldistribution of coolant flow through an APT blanket module under low flow near RHR conditions, a scoping study of downflow mixed convection in parallel channels was conducted. Buoyancy will adversely effect the flow distribution in module bins with downflow and non-uniform power distributions. This study consists of two parts: a simple analytical model of flow in a two channel network, and a lumped eleven channel FLOWTRAN-TF model of a front lateral Row-1 blanket module bin. Results from both models indicate that the concern about coolant flow in a vertical model being diverted away from high power regions by buoyancy is warranted. The FLOWTRAN-TF model predicted upflow (i.e., a flow reversal) through several of the high power channels, under some low flow conditions. The transition from the regime with downflow in all channels to a regime with upflow in some channels was abrupt.

  14. Remote handling devices for use behind shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard applies to power manipulators used mostly inside hot cells. It shaft also be applied to lifting gears in such plants, to travelling support systems for electric parallel manipulators and extension arms for TV cameras. This include push-button keys, positioning elements for single movements of the manipulator, and joysticks for a series of movements. The type and arrangement of the operating devices and the designation of movements and directions of movements are given in full text and in symbols. Also, the movements of operating devices relative to the movements of the manpulators are given in order to avoid operating errors. (orig.)

  15. Remote handling devices for use behind shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standardized general dimensions as recommended in this standard will facilitate the planning and construction of shielding rooms in which master-slave manipulators as specified in this standard are to be used, as well as the interchangeability of these instruments. It will also help to shorten the time of delivery in the initial supply of master-slave manipulators for these rooms and in the supply of replacement parts. (orig.)

  16. Remote handling devices for use behind shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard is intended for power manipulators preferrably used in hot cells. It may also be applied to lifting gears in equipment for this kind, to movable carrier systems for electrical parallel manipulators, and to bracket arms of TV-cameras. Push-button contacts, actuators for various movements of the manipulator or joysticks for several movements are grouped under operating devices. Types and arrangement of the operating devices, the movements and the directions of movement are described in plain language and by means of graphical symbols. Furthermore, movements of the operating devices are unambiguously assigned to movements of the manipulators so as to avoid maloperation. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 HIS

  17. Pneubotics - Membrane-Based Robotics for Remote Material Handling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have invented a new class of robotics, called `Pneubotics', that rival current manipulators in payload and reach at 1/10th the weight. Our technology leverages...

  18. Remote handling of TEXTOR diagnostics using CORBA as communication architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemmerling, G.; Zwoll, K.; de Laat, C. T. A. M.; Kooijman, W.; Korten, M.; Lourens, W.; van der Meer, E.; Oomens, A. A. M.

    1999-01-01

    At the Forschungszentrum Julich, an upgrade of the existing distributed system for data acquisition (DAS) at the fusion experiment TEXTOR94 is under development. DAS is currently restricted to VAX/VMS and DECNET based communications, but it is planned to add UNIX based systems, and to open the local

  19. MFTF exception handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design of large experimental control systems, a major concern is ensuring that operators are quickly alerted to emergency or other exceptional conditions and that they are provided with sufficient information to respond adequately. This paper describes how the MFTF exception handling system satisfies these requirements. Conceptually exceptions are divided into one of two classes. Those which affect command status by producing an abort or suspend condition and those which fall into a softer notification category of report only or operator acknowledgement requirement. Additionally, an operator may choose to accept an exception condition as operational, or turn off monitoring for sensors determined to be malfunctioning. Control panels and displays used in operator response to exceptions are described

  20. Thermohydraulics design and thermomechanics analysis of two European breeder blanket concepts for DEMO. Pt. 1 and Pt. 2. Pt. 1: BOT helium cooled solid breeding blanket. Pt. 2: Dual coolant self-cooled liquid metal blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different breeding blanket concepts are being elaborated at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe within the framework of the DEMO breeding blanket development, the concept of a helium cooled solid breeding blanket and the concept of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The breeder material used in the first concept is Li4SiO4 as a pebble bed arranged separate from the beryllium pebble bed, which serves as multiplier. The breeder material zone is cooled by several toroidally-radially configurated helium cooling plates which, at the same time, act as reinforcements of the blanket structures. In the liquid metal blanket concept lead-lithium is used both as the breeder material and the coolant. It flows at low velocity in poloidal direction downwards and back in the blanket front zone. In both concepts the First Wall is cooled by helium gas. This report deals with the thermohydraulics design and thermomechanics analysis of the two blanket concepts. The performance data derived from the Monte-Carlo computations serve as a basis for the design calculations. The coolant inlet and outlet temperatures are chosen with the design criteria and the economics aspects taken into account. Uniform temperature distribution in the blanket structures can be achieved by suitable branching and routing of the coolant flows which contributes to reducing decisively the thermal stress. The computations were made using the ABAQUS computer code. The results obtained of the stresses have been evaluated using the ASME code. It can be demonstrated that all maximum values of temperature and stress are below the admissible limit. (orig.)

  1. Axial blanket fuel design and demonstration. First semi-annual progress report, January-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The axial blanket fuel design in this program, which is retrofittable in operating pressurized water reactors, involves replacing the top and bottom of the enriched fuel column with low-enriched (less than or equal to 1.0 wt % 235U) fertile uranium. This repositioning of the fissile inventory in the fuel rod leads to decreased axial leakage and increased discharge burnups in the enriched fuel. Various axial blanket fuel designs, with blanket thicknesses from 0 to 10 inches and blanket enrichments from 0.2 to 1.0 wt % 235U, were investigated to determine the relationship between uranium utilization and power peaking. Analyses were preformed to assess the nuclear, mechanical, and thermal-hydraulic effects arising from the use of axial blankets. Four axial blanket lead test assemblies are being fabricated for scheduled irradiation in cycle 5 of Sacramento Municipal Utility District's Rancho Seco pressurized water reactor. Analyses to support licensing cycle 5 are in progress

  2. Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    The Landsat Program became the major event of 1982 in geological remote sensing with the successful launch of Landsat 4. Other 1982 remote sensing accomplishments, research, publications, (including a set of Landsat worldwide reference system index maps), and conferences are highlighted. (JN)

  3. The ITER EC H and CD upper launcher: Design, analysis and testing of a bolted joint for the Blanket Shield Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessner, Robby, E-mail: robby.gessner@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Aiello, Gaetano; Grossetti, Giovanni; Meier, Andreas [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ronden, Dennis [DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Physics, P.O. Box 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Spaeh, Peter; Scherer, Theo; Schreck, Sabine; Strauss, Dirk; Vaccaro, Alessandro [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The BSM of the ECH Launcher is attached to the Launcher Main Frame by a bolted joint. ► The bolts were designed as “captive” in order to avoid their accidental removal from the joint. ► The bolted flange connection using two sets of 15 captive bolts (M22 × 2) placed along the sides. ► The captive bolt design is based on a concept that uses a dedicated spring ring, a standard spiral spring and a tensioning screw with two threads to secure the bolts in a form-locking stop. -- Abstract: The final design of the structural system for the ITER EC H and CD upper launcher is in progress. Many design features of the preliminary design are under revision with the aim to achieve the built-to-print-status. This paper deals with design and analysis of a bolted joint for the Blanket Shield Module with special perspective on Remote Handling capability. The BSM of the ECH Launcher is attached to the Launcher Main Frame by a bolted joint conceived so that in the Hot Cell Facility, RH maintenance can be performed on internal components. The joint must be capable to resist very high Electro-Magnetic loads from disruptions, while it has to sustain substantial thermal cycling during operation. Thus the need for a rigid and reliable design is essential. Beside the set of pre-stressed bolts the flanges were therefore equipped with additional shear keys to divert radial moments away from the bolts. Main focus of the work performed was the mechanical design of the joint and the assessment of the structural integrity with respect to the loads applied and its capability for maintenance by RH procedures. To fulfill a major aspect of the RH requirements, the bolts were designed as “captive” in order to avoid their accidental removal from the joint. The captive bolt design is based on a concept that uses a dedicated spring ring, a standard spiral spring and a tensioning screw with two threads to secure the bolts in a form-locking stop. The final approval phase of

  4. Head-end reprocessing equipment remote maintenance demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype equipment for reprocessing breeder reactor nuclear fuel was installed in the Remote Operation and Maintenance Demonstration (ROMD) area of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in order to evaluate the design of this equipment in a cold mock-up of a remotely maintained hot cell. This equipment included the Remote Disassembly System (RDS) and the Remote Shear System (RSS). These systems were disassembled and reassembled remotely by using the extensive remote handling systems that are installed in this simulated hot-cell environment. 5 refs., 5 figs

  5. Design and safety analysis of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhou, Guangming; Lv, Zhongliang; Jin, Cheng; Chen, Hongli [University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China). School of Nuclear Science and Technology

    2016-05-15

    This paper reports the design and safety analysis results of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket of the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Materials selection and basic structure of the blanket have been presented. Performance analysis including neutronics analysis and thermo-mechanical analysis has shown good results. And the safety analysis of the blanket under Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions has been described. Results showed the current design can deal well with the selected accident scenarios.

  6. Design and safety analysis of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the design and safety analysis results of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket of the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Materials selection and basic structure of the blanket have been presented. Performance analysis including neutronics analysis and thermo-mechanical analysis has shown good results. And the safety analysis of the blanket under Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions has been described. Results showed the current design can deal well with the selected accident scenarios.

  7. Remote maintenance of in-vessel components for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER in-vessel components must be remotely maintained due to neutron activation. Components that require maintenance include the blanket shield modules, divertor cassettes and ancillary systems mounted in the vacuum vessel (VV) ports. Maintenance is predominantly accomplished by component removal and transfer to the hot cell facility for repair or waste processing. Component transfer between the VV and the hot cell is performed in sealed casks that dock to the VV ports. An overview of the in-vessel remote maintenance requirements, techniques and equipment is presented. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of the separation of protium from blanket tritium-product streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case is considered in which the blanket product stream has been purified to the point where only protium, tritium, and a small quantity of deuterium remain. A cryogenic distillation cascade concept developed specifically to handle this enrichment problem is shown. The concept is based on a series of distillation columns and equilibrators capable of producing a protium-rich stream containing less than 1000 appm T and a tritium-rich stream containing less than 2000 appm H. It is envisioned that both of these streams could be blended with streams of comparable composition in the mainstream position of the fuel cycle without further processing. The computational analysis of the cascade was based on a fixed arrangement of columns and equilibrators and a fixed number of theoretical plates per columns, since these features are less easily varied in an actual system than reflux ratios and flow rates. In order to test the flexibility of this conceptual enruchment system to adjust to variations of the H/T ratio in the feed, H/T values of 0.333, 1.00, and 3.00 were investigated

  9. New transport and handling contract

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Department

    2008-01-01

    A new transport and handling contract entered into force on 1.10.2008. As with the previous contract, the user interface is the internal transport/handling request form on EDH: https://edh.cern.ch/Document/TransportRequest/ To ensure that you receive the best possible service, we invite you to complete the various fields as accurately as possible and to include a mobile telephone number on which we can reach you. You can follow the progress of your request (schedule, completion) in the EDH request routing information. We remind you that the following deadlines apply: 48 hours for the transport of heavy goods (up to 8 tonnes) or simple handling operations 5 working days for crane operations, transport of extra-heavy goods, complex handling operations and combined transport and handling operations in the tunnel. For all enquiries, the number to contact remains unchanged: 72202. Heavy Handling Section TS-HE-HH 72672 - 160319

  10. Unvented Drum Handling Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This drum-handling plan proposes a method to deal with unvented transuranic drums encountered during retrieval of drums. Finding unvented drums during retrieval activities was expected, as identified in the Transuranic (TRU) Phase I Retrieval Plan (HNF-4781). However, significant numbers of unvented drums were not expected until excavation of buried drums began. This plan represents accelerated planning for management of unvented drums. A plan is proposed that manages unvented drums differently based on three categories. The first category of drums is any that visually appear to be pressurized. These will be vented immediately, using either the Hanford Fire Department Hazardous Materials (Haz. Mat.) team, if such are encountered before the facilities' capabilities are established, or using internal capabilities, once established. To date, no drums have been retrieved that showed signs of pressurization. The second category consists of drums that contain a minimal amount of Pu isotopes. This minimal amount is typically less than 1 gram of Pu, but may be waste-stream dependent. Drums in this category are assayed to determine if they are low-level waste (LLW). LLW drums are typically disposed of without venting. Any unvented drums that assay as TRU will be staged for a future venting campaign, using appropriate safety precautions in their handling. The third category of drums is those for which records show larger amounts of Pu isotopes (typically greater than or equal to 1 gram of Pu). These are assumed to be TRU and are not assayed at this point, but are staged for a future venting campaign. Any of these drums that do not have a visible venting device will be staged awaiting venting, and will be managed under appropriate controls, including covering the drums to protect from direct solar exposure, minimizing of container movement, and placement of a barrier to restrict vehicle access. There are a number of equipment options available to perform the venting. The

  11. Designer's guidebook for first wall/blanket/shield assembly, maintenance, and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the initial issue of the guidebook. Since a guidebook of this type must incorporate information concerning a wide range of subjects, much additional data will eventually be included. The guidebook will document, in summary and easily referenceable form, data, designs, design concepts, design guidelines and background information useful to the FWBS and to the Maintenance System designer. In providing guidelines for the AMR of the FWBS, the guidebook must, of necessity, include guidelines for all aspects of maintenance associated with the FWBS. These include most maintenance operations within the reactor room necessary to gain access, identify faults, and handle equipment related to FWBS maintenance. In addition, the guidelines include those required to define facility requirements for handling and repair of FWBS and related reactor components external to the reactor room. Particular emphasis is given to remote maintenance design and operations

  12. Designer's guidebook for first wall/blanket/shield assembly, maintenance, and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-30

    This is the initial issue of the guidebook. Since a guidebook of this type must incorporate information concerning a wide range of subjects, much additional data will eventually be included. The guidebook will document, in summary and easily referenceable form, data, designs, design concepts, design guidelines and background information useful to the FWBS and to the Maintenance System designer. In providing guidelines for the AMR of the FWBS, the guidebook must, of necessity, include guidelines for all aspects of maintenance associated with the FWBS. These include most maintenance operations within the reactor room necessary to gain access, identify faults, and handle equipment related to FWBS maintenance. In addition, the guidelines include those required to define facility requirements for handling and repair of FWBS and related reactor components external to the reactor room. Particular emphasis is given to remote maintenance design and operations.

  13. Breeding blanket design for ITER and prototype (DEMO) fusion reactors and breeding materials issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsu, H.; Enoeda, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Current status of the designs of the ITER breeding blanket and DEMO blankets is introduced placing emphasis on the breeding materials selection and related issues. The former design is based on the up-to-date design activities, as of October 1997, being performed jointly by Joint Central Team (JCT) and Home Teams (HT`s), while the latter is based on the DEMO blanket test module designs being proposed by each Party at the TBWG (Test Blanket Working Group) meetings. (J.P.N.)

  14. Conceptual study on high performance blanket in a spherical tokamak fusion-driven transmuter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary conceptual design on high performance dual-cooled blanket of fusion-driven transmuter is presented based on neutronic calculation. The dual-cooled system has some attractive advantages when utilized in transmutation of HLW (High Level Wastes). The calculation results show that this kind of blanket could safely transmute about 6 ton minor actinides (produced by 170 GW(e) Year PWRs approximately) and 0.4 ton fission products per year, and output 12 GW thermal power. In addition, the variation of power and critical factor of this blanket is relatively little during its 1-year operation period. This blanket is also tritium self-sustainable

  15. Hazard report update. ECRI Institute revises its recommendation for temperature limits on blanket warmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    ECRI Institute now recommends that temperature settings on blanket warming cabinets be limited to 130 degrees F (54 degrees C). We had previously recommended a limit of 110 degrees F (43 degrees C) because solutions were often being warmed in the same cabinets as blankets, and the lower temperature eliminated the serious burn risk presented by excessively heated solutions. With increasing recognition in the healthcare community that solutions should be kept at lower temperatures than--and therefore heated separately from--blankets, we believe that our recommendation for blankets can be made less stringent. We continue to recommend that solution warming cabinets be limited to 110 degrees F. PMID:20848953

  16. Handling of injectable antineoplastic agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Knowles, R S; Virden, J E

    1980-01-01

    Although the clinical toxicity of antineoplastic drugs has been well documented there is little or no information on the problems that may arise on the handling and mishandling of such agents. This paper attempts to highlight the importance of taking precautions to prevent adverse effects resulting from contact with cytotoxic drugs during handling and to suggest a practical guide for the handling of such agents.

  17. Trends in Modern Exception Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kuta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Exception handling is nowadays a necessary component of error proof information systems. The paper presents overview of techniques and models of exception handling, problems connected with them and potential solutions. The aspects of implementation of propagation mechanisms and exception handling, their effect on semantics and general program efficiency are also taken into account. Presented mechanisms were adopted to modern programming languages. Considering design area, formal methods and formal verification of program properties we can notice exception handling mechanisms are weakly present what makes a field for future research.

  18. Safe Handling of Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under its Statute the International Atomic Energy Agency is empowered to provide for the application of standards of safety for protection against radiation to its own operations and to operations making use of assistance provided by it or with which it is otherwise directly associated. To this end authorities receiving such assistance are required to observe relevant health and safety measures prescribed by the Agency. As a first step, it has been considered an urgent task to provide users of radioisotopes with a manual of practice for the safe handling of these substances. Such a manual is presented here and represents the first of a series of manuals and codes to be issued by the Agency. It has been prepared after careful consideration of existing national and international codes of radiation safety, by a group of international experts and in consultation with other international bodies. At the same time it is recommended that the manual be taken into account as a basic reference document by Member States of the Agency in the preparation of national health and safety documents covering the use of radioisotopes.

  19. The impact of blanket design on activation and thermal safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation and thermal safety analyses for experimental and power reactors are presented. The effects of a strong neutron absorber, B4C, on activation and temperature response of experimental reactors to Loss-of-Cooling Accidents are investigated. Operational neutron fluxes, radioactivities of elements and thermal transients are calculated using the codes ONEDANT, REAC and THIOD, respectively. The inclusion of a small amount of B4C in the steel blanket of an experimental reactor reduces its activation and the post LOCA temperature escalation significantly. Neither the inclusion of excessive amounts of B4C nor enriched 10B in the first walls of an experimental reactor bring much advantage. The employment of a 2 cm graphite tile liner before the first wall helps to limit the post LOCA escalation of first wall temperature. The effect of replacing a 20 cm thick section of a steel shield of a fusion power reactor with B4C is also analyzed. The first wall temperature peak is reduced by 100 degree C in the modified blanket. The natural convection effect on thermal safety of a liquid lithium cooled blanket are investigated. Natural convection has no impact at all, unless the magnetic field can be reduced. If magnets can be shut off rapidly after the accident, then the temperature escalation of the first wall will be limited. Upflow of the coolant is better than the initial downflow design from a thermal safety point of view. Activities of three structural materials, OTR stainless steel, SS-316 and VCrTi are compared. Although VCrTi has higher activity for a period of two hours after the accident, it has one to two orders of magnitude less activity than those of the steels in the mid- and long-terms. 29 refs., 42 figs., 9 tabs

  20. The current status of fusion reactor blanket thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The available thermodynamic information is reviewed for three categories of materials that meet essential criteria for use as breeding blankets in D-T fuelled fusion reactors: liquid lithium, solid lithium alloys, and lithium-containing ceramics. The leading candidate, liquid lithium, which also has potential for use as a coolant, has been studied more extensively than have the solid alloys or ceramics. Recent studies of liquid lithium have concentrated on its sorption characteristics for hydrogen isotopes and its interaction with common impurity elements. Hydrogen isotope sorption data (P-C-T relations, activity coefficients, Sieverts' constants, plateau pressures, isotope effects, free energies of formation, phase boundaries, etc.) are presented in a tabular form that can be conveniently used to extract thermodynamic information for the α-phases of the Li-LiH, Li-LiD and Li-LiT systems and to construct complete phase diagrams. Recent solubility data for Li3N, Li2O, and Li2C2 in liquid lithium are discussed with emphasis on the prospects for removing these species by cold-trapping methods. Current studies on the sorption of hydrogen in solid lithium alloys (e.g. Li-Al and Li-Pb), made using a new technique (the hydrogen titration method), have shown that these alloys should lead to smaller blanket-tritium inventories than are attainable with liquid lithium and that the P-C-T relationships for hydrogen in Li-M alloys can be estimated from lithium activity data for these alloys. There is essentially no refined thermodynamic information on the prospective ceramic blanket materials. The kinetics of tritium release from these materials is briefly discussed. Research areas are pointed out where additional thermodynamic information is needed for all three material categories. (author)

  1. Impact of prescribed burning on blanket peat hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Joseph; Palmer, Sheila M.; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Wearing, Catherine; Irvine, Brian; Brown, Lee E.

    2015-08-01

    Fire is known to impact soil properties and hydrological flow paths. However, the impact of prescribed vegetation burning on blanket peatland hydrology is poorly understood. We studied 10 blanket peat headwater catchments. Five were subject to prescribed burning, while five were unburnt controls. Within the burnt catchments, we studied plots where the last burn occurred ˜2 (B2), 4 (B4), 7 (B7), or greater than 10 years (B10+) prior to the start of measurements. These were compared with plots at similar topographic wetness index locations in the control catchments. Plots subject to prescribed vegetation burning had significantly deeper water tables (difference in means = 5.3 cm) and greater water table variability than unburnt plots. Water table depths were significantly different between burn age classes (B2 > B4 > B7 > B10+) while B10+ water tables were not significantly different to the unburnt controls. Overland flow was less common on burnt peat than on unburnt peat, recorded in 9% and 17% of all runoff trap visits, respectively. Storm lag times and hydrograph recession limb periods were significantly greater (by ˜1 and 13 h on average, respectively) in the burnt catchments overall, but for the largest 20% of storms sampled, there was no significant difference in storm lag times between burnt and unburnt catchments. For the largest 20% of storms, the hydrograph intensity of burnt catchments was significantly greater than those of unburnt catchments (means of 4.2 × 10-5 and 3.4 × 10-5 s-1, respectively), thereby indicating a nonlinear streamflow response to prescribed burning. Together, these results from plots to whole river catchments indicate that prescribed vegetation burning has important effects on blanket peatland hydrology at a range of spatial scales.

  2. Recovery of tritium from a liquid lithium blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The sorption of tritium on yttrium from liquid lithium and the subsequent release of tritium from yttrium by thermal regeneration of the metal sorbent were investigated to study such a tritium-recovery process for a fusion reactor blanket of liquid lithium. Recent static sorption experiments have shown the effects of lithium temperature and possible impurities on the sorption of tritium. Diffusivity data, obtained from previous tritium recovery experiments, were evaluated to show the importance of the yttrium surface condition in controlling the release of tritium.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic research in fusion blanket engineering and metallurgical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of recent research activities in liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics (LM-MHDs) is presented in this article. Two major reserach areas are discussed. The first topic involves the thermomechanical design issues in a proposed tokamak fusion reactor. The primary concerns are in the magneto-thermal-hydraulic performance of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The second topic involves the application of MHD in material processing in the metallurgical and semiconductor industries. The two representative applications are electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of continuously cast steel and the Czochralski (CZ) method of crystal growth in the presence of a magnetic field. (author) 24 figs., 10 tabs., 136 refs

  4. DISPOSAL CONTAINER HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. F. Loros

    2000-06-30

    The Disposal Container Handling System receives and prepares new disposal containers (DCs) and transfers them to the Assembly Transfer System (ATS) or Canister Transfer System (CTS) for loading. The system receives the loaded DCs from ATS or CTS and welds the lids. When the welds are accepted the DCs are termed waste packages (WPs). The system may stage the WP for later transfer or transfer the WP directly to the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System. The system can also transfer DCs/WPs to/from the Waste Package Remediation System. The Disposal Container Handling System begins with new DC preparation, which includes installing collars, tilting the DC upright, and outfitting the container for the specific fuel it is to receive. DCs and their lids are staged in the receipt area for transfer to the needed location. When called for, a DC is put on a cart and sent through an airlock into a hot cell. From this point on, all processes are done remotely. The DC transfer operation moves the DC to the ATS or CTS for loading and then receives the DC for welding. The DC welding operation receives loaded DCs directly from the waste handling lines or from interim lag storage for welding of the lids. The welding operation includes mounting the DC on a turntable, removing lid seals, and installing and welding the inner and outer lids. After the weld process and non-destructive examination are successfully completed, the WP is either staged or transferred to a tilting station. At the tilting station, the WP is tilted horizontally onto a cart and the collars removed. The cart is taken through an air lock where the WP is lifted, surveyed, decontaminated if required, and then moved into the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System. DCs that do not meet the welding non-destructive examination criteria are transferred to the Waste Package Remediation System for weld preparation or removal of the lids. The Disposal Container Handling System is contained within the Waste Handling Building System

  5. Assessment of Issue Handling Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijten, B.; Visser, J.; Zaidman, A.

    2013-01-01

    We mined the issue database of GNOME to assess how issues are handled. How many issues are submitted and resolved? Does the backlog grow or decrease? How fast are issues resolved? Does issue resolution speed increase or decrease over time? In which subproject are issues handled most efficiently? To

  6. Waste Handling Building Conceptual Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the ''Waste Handling Building Conceptual Study'' is to develop proposed design requirements for the repository Waste Handling System in sufficient detail to allow the surface facility design to proceed to the License Application effort if the proposed requirements are approved by DOE. Proposed requirements were developed to further refine waste handling facility performance characteristics and design constraints with an emphasis on supporting modular construction, minimizing fuel inventory, and optimizing facility maintainability and dry handling operations. To meet this objective, this study attempts to provide an alternative design to the Site Recommendation design that is flexible, simple, reliable, and can be constructed in phases. The design concept will be input to the ''Modular Design/Construction and Operation Options Report'', which will address the overall program objectives and direction, including options and issues associated with transportation, the subsurface facility, and Total System Life Cycle Cost. This study (herein) is limited to the Waste Handling System and associated fuel staging system

  7. Beryllium usage in fusion blankets and beryllium data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing numbers of designers are choosing beryllium for fusion reactor blankets because it, among all nonfissile materials, produces the highest number (2.5 neutron in an infinite media) of neutrons per 14-MeV incident neutron. In amounts of about 20 cm of equivalent solid density, it can be used to produce fissile material, to breed all the tritium consumed in ITER from outboard blankets only, and in designs to produce Co-60. The problem is that predictions of neutron multiplication in beryllium are off by some 10 to 20% and appear to be on the high side, which means that better multiplication measurements and numerical methods are needed. The n,2n reactions result in two helium atoms, which cause radiation damage in the form of hardening at low temperatures (300/degree/C). The usual way beryllium parts are made is by hot pressing the powder. A lower cost method is to cold press and then sinter. There is no radiation damage data on this form of beryllium. The issues of corrosion, safety relative to the release of the tritium built-up inside beryllium, and recycle of used beryllium are also discussed. 10 figs

  8. Fission power flattening in hybrid blankets using mixed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a source-driven fissionable blanket, a flat fission power density (FPD) is achieved by using a mixed fuel (ThO2 and natural UO2) with the thoriumuranium ratio changing from front to back in the ten fuel rows along the radial direction. A straightforward graphic method is used. The temporal behavior of the FPD has been observed for an operation period of 6 months and for a plant load factor of 75% by applying a fusion driver neutron flux of 1014 14-MeV neutrons(cm2 . s) at the first wall, corresponding to --2.25 MWm2. To keep the power density flat, it is necessary to replace the fuel in rows 1, 2, and 3, close to the first wall. The time intervals for this operation increase, counting from initial start-up, typically, 2 months, 6 months, etc. One result of this study is that plutonium produced in such a hybrid blanket contains very low amounts of even isotopic components even over very long operation times of --3 yr. Hence, if fusion reactors are introduced into the energy market, special regulations are needed for international safeguarding

  9. Damage Identification of Continuum Structures Using Blanketing Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A damage identification method for the continuum structures with making use of the blanketing effect is proposed in this paper. The conventional damage indicator methods such as flexibility matrix method are difficult to deal with the damage identification of complex continuum structure such as multi-span beam. The presented method takes the change rates according to certain diagonal elements of the damaged structure flexibility matrix as identification indicator function. The 'blanketing effect' of the indicator function with respect to the damage factors makes it easy to identify the damage of multi-span beam and plate structures. Some useful formulas are derived and the sensitivity matrix of the identification indicator function is studied. The numerical simulation is performed and the identification results of several damage status are compared. Both beam and plate structures are used for numerical simulation. The results show that the presented indicator function method is very brevity and effective. It is especially suitable for the damage identification of the multi-span beam and plate structures such as bridges and floor

  10. Elevator mode convection in liquid metal blankets for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikanov, Oleg; Liu, Li

    2015-11-01

    The work is motivated by the design of liquid-metal blankets for nuclear fusion reactors. Mixed convection in a downward flow in a vertical duct with strong contant-rate heating of one wall (the Grashof number up to 1012) and strong transverse magnetic field (the Hartmann number up to 104) is considered. It is found that in an infinitely long duct the flow is dominated by exponentially growing elevator modes having the form of a combination of ascending and descending jets. An analytical solution approximating the growth rate of the modes is derived. Analogous flows in finite-length pipes and ducts are analyzed using the high-resolution numerical simulations. The results of the recent experiments are reproduced and explained. It is found that the flow evolves in cycles consisting of periods of exponential growth and breakdowns of the jets. The resulting high-amplitude fluctuations of temperature is a feature potentially dangerous for operation of a reactor blanket. Financial support was provided by the US NSF (Grant CBET 1232851).

  11. Fusion blanket materials development and recent R and D activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of structural materials plays an important role in the feasibility of fusion power plant. The candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors are Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, nano structured ODS Steel, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiCf composite etc. RAFM steel is presently considered as the structural material for Lead Lithium Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) Test Blanket Module (TBM) because of its high void swelling resistance and improved thermal properties compared to austenitic steel. Development of RAFM steel in India is being carried out in full swing in collaboration with various research laboratories and steel industries. This paper presents an overview of the Indian activities on fusion blanket materials and describes in brief the efforts made to develop IN-RAFM steel as structural material for the LLCB TBM. In future, due to enhanced properties of vanadium base alloy and nano structured materials like ODS RAFMS, RAFM steel may be replaced by these materials for its application in DEMO relevant fusion reactor. Future R and D activities will be specifically towards the development of these structural materials for fusion reactor

  12. Annual report of the CTR Blanket Engineering research facility in 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an annual report of the studies on Controlled Thermo-nuclear Reactor(CTR) Blanket Engineering which have been carried out in the Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo, in FY 1994. This research facility on the CTR Blanket Engineering is located in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, the Tokai-mura branch of the Faculty of Engineering. (author)

  13. Conceptual design of an electricity generating tritium breeding blanket sector for INTOR/NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of a fusion reactor power blanket and its associated equipment with the objective of producing a conceptual design for a blanket sector of INTOR, or one of its national variants (e.g. NET), from which electricity could be generated simultaneously with the breeding of tritium. (author)

  14. Development and analysis of fusion breeder blanket neutronics. Progress report, November 1, 1983-October 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following activities are briefly described: (a) the IBM versions of the computer codes FORSS, PUFF-II, ONETRAN, TWOTRAN-II, and DOT4.3 were obtained from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) and have been implemented on the UCLA local computer, the IBM 3033; (b) mathematical and computational models to describe the time-dependent transport and inventory of tritium in individual components of a fusion reactor system have been developed; (c) extensive cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was carried out to evaluate an estimate for the uncertainty associated with the TBR (both from 6Li and 7Li, individually) in four of the leading blanket concepts (the Li2O/HT-9 helium-cooled blanket, the 17Li-83Pb/PCA self-cooled blanket, the LiAlO2/He/FS/Be blanket, and the flibe/He/FS/Be blanket); (d) as far as the TBR obtain able in various blanket concepts is concerned, a comparative analysis was carried out to estimate the change in TBR in a particular blanket module when placed in a tokamak machine [R (first wall) approx. 2 m] as opposed to adopting the same blanket in a mirror machine [R (first wall) approx. 50 cm] with the same wall loading

  15. 77 FR 76013 - Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Previously Imported...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... LNG Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Previously Imported Liquefied.... 2885, which granted Sempra LNG Marketing authority to export a cumulative total of ] 250 Bcf of... Marketing requests blanket authorization to export LNG from the Cameron Terminal that has been...

  16. 75 FR 19954 - Cheniere Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Cheniere Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY... Cheniere Marketing, LLC (CMI), requesting blanket authorization to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) that... exported from the Sabine Pass LNG terminal owned by CMI's affiliate, Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., in...

  17. 78 FR 4400 - Eni USA Gas Marketing LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Previously Imported...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... USA Gas Marketing LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Previously Imported Liquefied... and order (Order No. 2923) that granted Eni USA Gas Marketing authority to export a cumulative total... Application, Eni USA Gas Marketing requests blanket authorization to export LNG from the Cameron Terminal...

  18. Development of port plug handling tractor for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron shield plug installed into the horizontal port of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) vacuum vessel is a heavy component, which mainly consists of stainless steel and cooling water. It has a typical size of 2.3 m x 1.9 m x 3.6 m, and its weight is assumed to be around 40 tons. Development of the remote handling system of the port plug is a key technology for ITER port maintenance because high positioning accuracy is required in spite of narrow handling space. In order to overcome this problem, design and manufacturing of a 1/2.5-scaled mockup of the handling machine has been performed. (author)

  19. On current US strategy and technologies for spent fuel handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has recently completed a topical safety analysis report outlining the design and operation of a Centralized Interim Storage Facility for spent commercial nuclear fuel. During the course of the design, dose assessments indicated the need for remote operation of many of the cask handling operations. Use of robotic equipment was identified as a desirable handling solution that is capable of automating many of the operations to maintain throughput, and sufficiently flexible to handle five or more different storage cask designs in varying numbers on a given day. This paper discusses the facility and the dose assessment leading to this choice, and reviews factors to be considered when choosing robotics or automation. Further, a new computer simulation tool to quantify dose to humans working in radiological environments, the Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS), is introduced. REMS has been developed to produce a more accurate estimate of dose to radiation workers in new activities with radiological hazards

  20. Wash resistance and repellent properties of Africa University mosquito blankets against mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lukwa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of permethrin-treated Africa University (AU mosquito blankets on susceptible female Anopheles gambiae sensu lato mosquitoes was studied under laboratory conditions at Africa University Campus in Mutare, Zimbabwe. Wash resistance (ability to retain an effective dose that kills ≥80% of mosquitoes after a number of washes and repellence (ability to prevent ≥80% of mosquito bites properties were studied. The AU blankets were wash resistant when 100% mortality was recorded up to 20 washes, declining to 90% after 25 washes. Untreated AU blankets did not cause any mortality on mosquitoes. However, mosquito repellence was 96%, 94%, 97.9%, 87%, 85% and 80.7% for treated AU blankets washed 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 times, respectively. Mosquito repellence was consistently above 80% from 0-25 washes. In conclusion, AU blankets washed 25 times were effective in repelling and killing An. gambiae sl mosquitoes under laboratory conditions.

  1. Resonance self-shielding in the blanket of a hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three sets of energy group cross sections were obtained using various approximations for resonance self shielding. The three models used in obtaining the cross sections were: (a) infinitely dilute model, (b) homogeneous-medium resonance self shielding, and (c) heterogeneous-medium resonance self shielding. The effects on the blanket performance of fusion--fission hybrid reactors, and in particular, on the performance of the current reference Westinghouse Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor blanket, were compared and analyzed for a variety of fuel-coolant combinations. It has been concluded that (1) the infinitely dilute cross sections can be used to produce preliminary crude estimates for beginning-of-life (BOL) only, (2) the resonance absorber finite dilution should be considered for BOL, poorly moderated blankets and well moderated blankets with low fissile material content situations, and (3) the spacial details should be considered in high fissile content, well moderated blanket situations

  2. Blanket design and performance for the LOTUS fusion-fission hybrid test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of studies performed during 1982 to design an optimized blanket for the initial series of experiments to be conducted in the LOTUS test facility at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). The experiments are expected to begin in early 1984. An Overview of different hybrid blanket design concepts proposed to date is first given. The technological and economic implications of the different blanket design philosophies are discussed to provide the basis and rationale for the thorium fast-fission blanket design concept selected for the first series of experiments. Detailed description, dimensions, and characteristics of the selected blanket design are given. The neutronic optimization studies on which the design is based are described in detail. Instrumentation and measurement techniques to be used in LOTUS are described elsewhere

  3. Remote viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C

    1988-04-15

    Remote viewing is the supposed faculty which enables a percipient, sited in a closed room, to describe the perceptions of a remote agent visiting an unknown target site. To provide convincing demonstration of such a faculty poses a range of experimental and practical problems, especially if feedback to the percipient is allowed after each trial. The precautions needed are elaborate and troublesome; many potential loopholes have to be plugged and there will be strong temptations to relax standards, requiring exceptional discipline and dedication by the experimenters. Most reports of remote viewing experiments are rather superficial and do not permit assessment of the experimental procedures with confidence; in many cases there is clear evidence of particular loopholes left unclosed. Any serious appraisal of the evidence would have to go beyond the reports. Meanwhile the published evidence is far from compelling, and certainly insufficient to justify overthrow of well-established scientific principles.

  4. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, J.T. [Monsanto Research Corp., Miamisburg, OH (United States). Mound Facility; Coffin, D.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  5. Handling device for stud tensioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The handling device for a stud tensioner machine used by example for fixing the reactor vessel head has an extension module, joining elements and means for displacement in vertical and horizontal axis

  6. Lunar Materials Handling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Materials Handling System (LMHS) is a method for transfer of lunar soil into and out of process equipment in support of in situ resource utilization...

  7. Order Handling in Convergent Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Vrtanoski, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of IT&T technology had big impact on the traditional telecommunications market, transforming it from monopolistic market to highly competitive high-tech market where new services are required to be created frequently. This paper aims to describe a design approach that puts order management process (as part of enterprise application integration) in function of rapid service creation. In the text we will present a framework for collaborative order handling supporting convergent services. The design splits the order handling processes in convergent environments in three business process groups: order capture, order management and order fulfillment. The paper establishes abstract framework for order handling and provides design guidelines for transaction handling implementation based on the checkpoint and inverse command strategy. The proposed design approach is based in a convergent telecommunication environment. Same principles are applicable in solving problems of collaboration in fun...

  8. Lunar Materials Handling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Materials Handling System (LMHS) is a method for transfer of bulk materials and products into and out of process equipment in support of lunar and Mars in...

  9. Preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis of ITER breeding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Shigeto; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1999-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical analysis has been conducted on ITER breeding blanket taking into account thermo-mechanical characteristics peculiar to pebble beds. The features of the analysis are to adopt an elasto-plastic constitutive model for pebble beds and to take into account spatially varying thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient, especially in the Be pebble bed, depending on the stress. ABAQUS code and COUPLED TEMPERATURE-DISPLACEMENT procedure of the code are selected so that thermal conductivity is automatically calculated in each calculation point depending on the stress. The modified DRUCKER-PRAGER/Cap plasticity model for granular materials of the code is selected so as to deal with such mechanical features of pebble bed as shear failure flow and hydrostatic plastic compression, and capability of the model is studied. The thermal property-stress correlation used in the analysis is obtained based on the experimental results at FZK and the results of additional thermo-mechanical analysis performed here. The thermo-mechanical analysis of an ITER breeding blanket module has been performed for four conditions: case A; nominal case with spatial distribution of thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient in Be pebble bed depending on the stress, case B; constant thermal conductivity, case C; thermal conductivity = -20% of nominal case, and case D; thermal conductivity = +20% of nominal case. In the nominal case the temperature of breeding material (Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}) ranges from 317degC to 554degC and the maximum temperature of Be pebble bed is 446degC. It is concluded that the temperature distribution is within the current design limits. Though the analyses performed here are preliminary, the results exhibit well the qualitative features of the pebble bed mechanical behaviors observed in experiments. For more detail quantitative estimates of the blanket performance, further investigation on mechanical properties of pebble beds by experiment

  10. Civilsamfundets ABC: H for Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anker Brink; Meyer, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Hvad er civilsamfundet? Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer fra CBS Center for Civil Society Studies gennemgår civilsamfundet bogstav for bogstav. Vi er nået til H for Handling.......Hvad er civilsamfundet? Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer fra CBS Center for Civil Society Studies gennemgår civilsamfundet bogstav for bogstav. Vi er nået til H for Handling....

  11. Neutral gas blanket effects in a gaseous divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gaseous divertor employs a neutral gas blanket to absorb the plasma heat flux in the divertor chamber. This novel method for resolving the heat loading problem in a conventional divertor system is simulated experimentally. In our operational range (nsub(e) 13 cm-3, Tsub(e) <= 5 eV) it is demonstrated that the localized plasma heat flux is scattered relatively uniformly with neutral pressures of a few microns. At large neutral pressures the plasma stream is neutralized without touching a material wall. Plasma pumping inhibits neutral backflow and can sustain a neutral pressure difference comparable to the plasma pressure. Effective divertor channel conductance is measured to be reduced by a factor of six. (orig.)

  12. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B. William [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chiu, Ing L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  13. Fusion Blanket Coolant Section Criteria, Methodology, and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMuth, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meier, W. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jolodosky, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frantoni, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reyes, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-02

    The focus of this LDRD was to explore potential Li alloys that would meet the tritium breeding and blanket cooling requirements but with reduced chemical reactivity, while maintaining the other attractive features of pure Li breeder/coolant. In other fusion approaches (magnetic fusion energy or MFE), 17Li- 83Pb alloy is used leveraging Pb’s ability to maintain high TBR while lowering the levels of lithium in the system. Unfortunately this alloy has a number of potential draw-backs. Due to the high Pb content, this alloy suffers from very high average density, low tritium solubility, low system energy, and produces undesirable activation products in particular polonium. The criteria considered in the selection of a tritium breeding alloy are described in the following section.

  14. Heating performances of a IC in-blanket ring array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosia, G.; Ragona, R.

    2015-12-01

    An important limiting factor to the use of ICRF as candidate heating method in a commercial reactor is due to the evanescence of the fast wave in vacuum and in most of the SOL layer, imposing proximity of the launching structure to the plasma boundary and causing, at the highest power level, high RF standing and DC rectified voltages at the plasma periphery, with frequent voltage breakdowns and enhanced local wall loading. In a previous work [1] the concept for an Ion Cyclotron Heating & Current Drive array (and using a different wave guide technology, a Lower Hybrid array) based on the use of periodic ring structure, integrated in the reactor blanket first wall and operating at high input power and low power density, was introduced. Based on the above concept, the heating performance of such array operating on a commercial fusion reactor is estimated.

  15. Heating performances of a IC in-blanket ring array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosia, G., E-mail: gbosia@to.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Turin (Italy); Ragona, R. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics-LPP-ERM/KMS, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-10

    An important limiting factor to the use of ICRF as candidate heating method in a commercial reactor is due to the evanescence of the fast wave in vacuum and in most of the SOL layer, imposing proximity of the launching structure to the plasma boundary and causing, at the highest power level, high RF standing and DC rectified voltages at the plasma periphery, with frequent voltage breakdowns and enhanced local wall loading. In a previous work [1] the concept for an Ion Cyclotron Heating & Current Drive array (and using a different wave guide technology, a Lower Hybrid array) based on the use of periodic ring structure, integrated in the reactor blanket first wall and operating at high input power and low power density, was introduced. Based on the above concept, the heating performance of such array operating on a commercial fusion reactor is estimated.

  16. Cosmetic wastewater treatment by upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic treatment of pre-settled cosmetic wastewater in batch and continuous experiments has been investigated. Biodegradability tests showed high COD and solid removal efficiencies (about 70%), being the hydrolysis of solids the limiting step of the process. Continuous treatment was carried out in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. High COD and TSS removal efficiencies (up to 95% and 85%, respectively) were achieved over a wide range of organic load rate (from 1.8 to 9.2 g TCOD L-1 day-1). Methanogenesis inhibition was observed in batch assays, which can be predicted by means of a Haldane-based inhibition model. Both COD and solid removal were modelled by Monod and pseudo-first order models, respectively.

  17. Cosmetic wastewater treatment by upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puyol, D.; Monsalvo, V.M.; Mohedano, A.F. [Seccion de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, C/ Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Sanz, J.L. [Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, C/ Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J.J., E-mail: juanjo.rodriguez@uam.es [Seccion de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, C/ Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-01-30

    Anaerobic treatment of pre-settled cosmetic wastewater in batch and continuous experiments has been investigated. Biodegradability tests showed high COD and solid removal efficiencies (about 70%), being the hydrolysis of solids the limiting step of the process. Continuous treatment was carried out in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. High COD and TSS removal efficiencies (up to 95% and 85%, respectively) were achieved over a wide range of organic load rate (from 1.8 to 9.2 g TCOD L{sup -1} day{sup -1}). Methanogenesis inhibition was observed in batch assays, which can be predicted by means of a Haldane-based inhibition model. Both COD and solid removal were modelled by Monod and pseudo-first order models, respectively.

  18. Stress analysis of an articulated boom for in-vessel-handling of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the high radioactivity levels, in-vessel maintenance work in the plasma chamber of a tokamak fusion machine can be done only by remote handling equipment, which is introduced into the torus-type plasma chamber by means of an articulated boom. The remote handling units have to be operated without any support provided for at the walls of the plasma chamber. A new articulated boom design is currently developed in the KfK for the NET project. This device is to bear at its tip working loads of up to 3900 kg (max. weight of remote handling equipment 2900 kg, of interchangeable components 1000 kg). In order to allow as precise manipulation as possible, the degree of sogging of the boom tip under its own load or under the working load has to be kept as small as possible. (orig./DG)

  19. JAERI/U.S. collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase IIa and IIb experiments of JAERI/U.S. Collaborative Program on Fusion Blanket Neutronics have been performed using the FNS facility at JAERI. The phase IIa experimental systems consist of the Li2O test region, the rotating neutron target and the Li2CO3 container. In phase IIb, a beryllium layer is added to the inner wall to investigate a multiplier effect. Measured parameters are source characteristics by a foil activation method and spectrum measurements using both NE-213 and proton recoil counters. The measurements inside the Li2O region included tritium production rates, reaction rate by foil activation and neutron spectrum measurements. Analysis for these parameters was performed by using two dimensional discrete ordinate codes DOT3.5 and DOT-DD, and a Monte Carlo code MORSE-DD. The nuclear data used were based on JENDL3/PR1 and PR2. ENDF/B-IV, V and the FNS file were used as activation cross sections. The configurations analysed for the test region were a reference, a beryllium front and a beryllium sandwiched systems in phase IIa, and a reference and a beryllium front with first wall systems in phase IIb. This document describes the results of analysis and comparison between the calculations and the measurements. The prediction accuracy of key parameters in a fusion reactor blanket are examined. The tritium production rates can be well predicted in the reference systems but are fairly underestimated in the system with a beryllium multiplier. Details of experiments and the experimental techniques are described separately in the another report. (author)

  20. Neutronic studies of fissile and fusile breeding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In light of the need of convincing motivation substantiating expensive and inherently applied research (nuclear energy), first a simple comparative study of fissile breeding economics of fusion fission hybrids, spallators and also fast breeder reactors has been carried out. As a result, the necessity of maximization of fissile production (in the first two ones, in fast breeders rather the reprocessing costs should be reduced) has been shown, thus indicating the design strategy (high support ratio) for these systems. In spite of the uncertainty of present projections onto further future and discrepancies in available data even quite conservative assumptions indicate that hybrids and perhaps even earlier - spallators can become economic at realistic uranium price increase and successfully compete against fast breeders. Then on the basis of the concept of the neutron flux shaping aimed at the correlation of the selected cross-sections with the neutron flux, the indications for the maximization of respective reaction rates has been formulated. In turn, these considerations serve as the starting point for the guidelines of breeding blanket nuclear design, which are as follows: 1) The source neutrons must face the multiplying layer (of proper thickness) of possibly low concentration of nuclides attenuating the neutron multiplication (i.e. structure materials, nongaseous coolants). 2) For the most effective trapping of neutrons within the breeding zone (leakage and void streaming reduction) it must contain an efficient moderator (not valid for fissile breeding blankets). 3) All regions of significant slow flux should contain 6Li in order to reduce parasite neutron captures in there. (orig./HP)

  1. Síndrome HaNDL / HaNDL Syndrome / Síndrome HaNDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Ernesto Barros-Gutiérrez, MD., Esp.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El Síndrome HaNDL (Headache and neurologic deficits with cerebroespinal fluid lymphocytosis por sus siglas en inglés, es una patología que cursa con cefalea, focalización neurológica y linfocitosis en el líquido cefalorraquídeo. Objetivo: este artículo busca presentar un caso de Síndrome de HaNDL, puesto que esta condición nosológica implica un reto diagnóstico. Resultados y conclusiones: Se presenta el caso de un paciente con diagnóstico de síndrome de HaNDL los hallazgos al examen físico y del líquido cefalorraquídeo. [Barros-Gutiérrez CE, Silva-Monsalve E, Gualtero-Trujillo S. Síndrome HaNDL. MedUNAB 2015; 17(3: xx-xx]. Introduction: The syndrome of transient Headache and Neurological Deficits with cerebrospinal fluid Lymphocytosis, is a pathology that presents cephalalgia, neurological focalization and lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid. Objective: This article presents a HaNDL Syndrome case, since this nosological condition implies a diagnostic challenge. Results and conclusions: A case of a patient with HaNDL syndrome diagnosis, physical examination findings and cerebrospinal fluid are presented. [Barros-Gutiérrez CE, Silva-Monsalve E, Gualtero-Trujillo S. HaNDL Syndrome. MedUNAB 2015; 17(3: xx-xx]. Introdução: A síndrome de HaNDL (Headache and neurologic déficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis por sua sigla em inglês é uma doença que causa dor de cabeça, foco neurológico e linfocitose no líquido cefalorraquidiano. Objetivo: Este artigo tem como objetivo apresentar um caso de Síndrome de HaNDL, uma vez que esta condição nosológica envolve um desafio diagnóstico. Resultados e conclusões: Apresenta-se o caso de um paciente diagnosticado com a síndrome de HaNDL, o encontrado no exame físico e o líquido cefalorraquidiano. [Barros-Gutiérrez CE, Silva-Monsalve E, Gualtero-Trujillo S. Síndrome HaNDL. MedUNAB 2015; 17(3: xx-xx].

  2. Eddy current induced electromagnetic loads on shield blankets during plasma disruptions in ITER: A benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to recent updates of ITER shield blanket design, electromagnetic loads during the plasma disruption are being evaluated to verify the mechanical confidence and reliability. As a course of such evaluations, a benchmark activity for the electromagnetic analysis, coordinated by ITER Organization, is underway between ITER parties to compare the calculation results for disruption loads on the blankets. In this paper, we present calculation results for the electromagnetic loads on the simplified but practical model of ITER shield blankets with respect to six representative disruption scenarios of which ITER distributes simulation results based on the DINA code as a reference of the design and analysis. Commercial finite element method software, ANSYS/EmagTM, was employed to evaluate the eddy current on the blanket modules with the 40o sector model for major conducting structure of the tokamak including double-walled vacuum vessel, triangular support, and vertical targets of divertors. An interface between ANSYS/EmagTM and plasma simulator was implemented with a conversion tool assigning the plasma current density on the ANSYS elements corresponding to the current filaments in DINA outputs. Discussions are made of the possible improvement of the blanket model taking more realistic blanket configuration into account at the cost of the moderate increase in computational time. A final remark is given of the possibility of incorporating halo currents into ANSYS disruption simulations, which are major sources of electromagnetic loads on in-vessel components including blankets.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Fibre Reinforced Silica Aerogel Blankets for Thermal Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS as the source of silica, fibre reinforced silica aerogels were synthesized via fast ambient pressure drying using methanol (MeOH, trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS, ammonium fluoride (NH4F, and hexane. The molar ratio of TEOS/MeOH/(COOH2/NH4F was kept constant at 1 : 38 : 3.73 × 10−5 : 0.023 and the gel was allowed to form inside the highly porous meta-aramid fibrous batting. The wet gel surface was chemically modified (silylation process using various concentrations of TMCS in hexane in the range of 1 to 20% by volume. The fibre reinforced silica aerogel blanket was obtained subsequently through atmospheric pressure drying. The aerogel blanket samples were characterized by density, thermal conductivity, hydrophobicity (contact angle, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The radiant heat resistance of the aerogel blankets was examined and compared with nonaerogel blankets. It has been observed that, compared to the ordinary nonaerogel blankets, the aerogel blankets showed a 58% increase in the estimated burn injury time and thus ensure a much better protection from heat and fire hazards. The effect of varying the concentration of TMCS on the estimated protection time has been examined. The improved thermal stability and the superior thermal insulation of the flexible aerogel blankets lead to applications being used for occupations that involve exposure to hazards of thermal radiation.

  4. Trade-off study of liquid-metal self-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A trade-off study of liquid-metal self-cooled blankets was carried out to define the performance of these blankets with respect to the main functions in a fusion reactor, and to determine the potential to operate at the maximum possible values of the performance parameters. The main purpose is to improve the reactor economics by maximizing the blanket energy multiplication factor, reduce the capital cost of the reactor, and satisfy the design requirements. The main parameters during the course of the study were the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the blanket energy multiplication factor, the energy fraction lost to the shield, the 6Li enrichment in the breeder material, the total blanket thickness, the reflector material selection, and the compositions of the different blanket zones. Also, the impact of different reactor design choices on the performance parameters was analyzed. The effect of the impurity control system (limiter or divertor), the material choice for the limiter, the elimination of tritium breeding from the inboard section of tokamak reactors, the coolant choice for the nonbreeding inboard blanket, and the neutron source distribution were part of the trade-off study. In addition, tritium breeding benchmark calculations were performed to study the impact of the use of different transport codes and nuclear data libraries. The importance and the negative effect of high TBR on the energy multiplication motivated the benchmark calculations

  5. A passively-safe fusion reactor blanket with helium coolant and steel structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helium is attractive for use as a fusion blanket coolant for a number of reasons. It is neutronically and chemically inert, nonmagnetic, and will not change phase during any off-normal or accident condition. A significant disadvantage of helium, however, is its low density and volumetric heat capacity. This disadvantage manifests itself most clearly during undercooling accident conditions such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a loss of flow accident (LOFA). This thesis describes a new helium-cooled tritium breeding blanket concept which performs significantly better during such accidents than current designs. The proposed blanket uses reduced-activation ferritic steel as a structural material and is designed for neutron wall loads exceeding 4 MW/m2. The proposed geometry is based on the nested-shell concept developed by Wong, but some novel features are used to reduce the severity of the first wall temperature excursion. These features include the following: (1) A ''beryllium-joint'' concept is introduced, which allows solid beryllium slabs to be used as a thermal conduction path from the first wall to the cooler portions of the blanket. The joint concept allows for significant swelling of the beryllium (10 percent or more) without developing large stresses in the blanket structure. (2) Natural circulation of the coolant in the water-cooled shield is used to maintain shield temperatures below 100 degrees C, thus maintaining a heat sink close to the blanket during the accident. This ensures the long-term passive safety of the blanket

  6. Attachment system for helium-cooled blanket of RF DEMO fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leshukov, A. E-mail: leshu@entek.ru; Blinov, Y.; Kovalenko, V.; Shatalov, G.; Strebkov, Y.; Strizhov, A

    2002-11-01

    The development of DEMO thermonuclear reactor is a part of Russian national program on the fusion process mastering. The DEMO-S (stationary thermonuclear reactor) should be the logic continuation of the ITER-type projects (pulse thermonuclear reactors) and the prototype for commercial power plants. DEMO reactor layout suggests to use the segmented blanket with mounting/dismounting procedure through the vacuum vessel vertical ports. Taking into account this layout the blanket attachment system has been developed and the present paper is devoted to this subject. The considered attachment system includes the lower and upper toroidal support assemblies which connect all the blanket segments in the enclosed ring. In it's turn the lower support assemblies attached to the vacuum vessel through the system of hinged support pillars. The heights of support pillars for inboard and outboard blankets are selected so that to indemnify the blanket massif thermal expansions in vertical and radial directions. The support pillars have been calculated on strength taking into account the electromagnetic loads from the plasma disruptions and blanket mass. The selection of high-strength chromium steel as a structural material for the support pillars could be considered as the results of strength analysis. The conclusions on the possibility to apply this attachment system for fusion reactor blanket and the critical issues are contained in this paper too.

  7. Development of the breeding blanket and shield model for the fusion power reactors system SYCOMORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li-Puma, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.lipuma@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: Jean-Charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martin, Brunella, E-mail: brunella.martin@gmail.com [Incka, 19-21 Rue du 8 mai 1945, F-94110 Arcueil (France)

    2014-10-15

    SYCOMORE, a fusion reactor system code based on a modular approach is under development at CEA. Within this framework, this paper describes the relevant sub-modules which have been implemented to model the main outputs of the breeding blanket and shield block of the system code: tritium breeding ratio, peak energy deposition in toroidal field coils, reactor layout and power deposition, blanket pressure drops and materials inventory. Blanket and shield requirements are calculated by several sub-modules: the blanket assembly and layout sub-module, the neutronic sub-module, the blanket design sub-module (thermal hydraulic and thermo-mechanic pre-design tool). A power flow module has also been developed which is directly linked to the blanket thermo-dynamic performances, which is not described in this paper. For the blanket assembly and layout and the blanket module design sub-modules, explicit analytic models have been developed and implemented; for the neutronic sub-module neural networks that replicate the results of appropriate simplified 1D and 2D neutronic simulations have been built. Presently, relevant model for the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead is available. Sub-modules have been built in a way that they can run separately or coupled into the breeding blanket and shield module in order to be integrated in SYCOMORE. In the paper, the objective and main input/output parameters of each sub-module are reported and relevant models discussed. The application to previous studied reactor models (PPCS model AB, DEMO-HCLL 2006–2007 studies) is also presented.

  8. Asthma, guides for diagnostic and handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper defines the asthma, includes topics as diagnostic, handling of the asthma, special situations as asthma and pregnancy, handling of the asthmatic patient's perioperatory and occupational asthma

  9. Preliminary Analysis of Liquid Metal MHD Pressure Drop in the Blanket for the FDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红艳; 吴宜灿; 何晓雄

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary analysis and calculation of liquid metal Li17Pb83 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the blanket for the FDS have been presented to evaluate the significance of MHD effects on the thermal-hydraulic design of the blanket. To decrease the liquid metal MHD pressure drop, Al2O3 is applied as an electronically insulated coating onto the inner surface of the ducts. The requirement for the insulated coating to reduce the additional leakage pressure drop caused by coating imperfections has been analyzed. Finally, the total liquid metal MHD pressure drop and magnetic pump power in the FDS blanket have been given.

  10. First adaptation of the European ceramic B. I. T. blanket design to the updated DEMO specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzidei, L.; Cecchi, P.; Cevolani, S.; Gallina, M.; Petrizzi, L.; Rado, V.; Talarico, C.; Violante, V.; Vettraino, V.; Zampaglione, V. (Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy)); Proust, E.; Giancarli, L.; Raepsaet, X.; Szczepanski, J.; Vallette, F.; Baraer, L.; Bielak, B.; Mercier, J. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DRN/DMT/SERMA, C.E.N. Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1991-12-01

    The DEMO specifications defined so as to ensure the consistency of the various blanket conceptual design studies performed within the framework of the European Test Blanket Programme have been recently updated. A very first attempt has been made to adapt the European Ceramic Breeder Inside-Tube DEMO blanket to these new specifications. Two solutions have been investigated. The first would ensure tritium self-sufficiency of the plant with a large safety margin. The other one, which fully preserves the design simplicity and reliability of the initial design, appears to be somewhat marginal from the tritium breeding capability point of view, but to offer good improvement prospects. (orig.).

  11. Beryllium data base for in-pile mockup test on blanket of fusion reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium has been used in the fusion blanket designs with ceramic breeder as a neutron multiplier to increase the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The properties of beryllium, that is physical properties, chemical properties, thermal properties, mechanical properties, nuclear properties, radiation effects, etc. are necessary for the fusion blanket design. However, the properties of beryllium have not been arranged for the fusion blanket design. Therefore, it is indispensable to check and examine the material data of beryllium reported previously. This paper is the first one of the series of papers on beryllium data base, which summarizes the reported material data of beryllium. (author)

  12. Realization of a flat fission power density in a hybrid blanket over long operation periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A straightforward numerical graphical method is applied to achieve a flat fission power density (FPD) in a hybrid blanket by using a mixed fuel (ThO2 and natural UO2) with variable fractions of the fuel components in the radial direction. The neutronic analysis is carried out on a blanket with a hard neutron spectrum in the fissionable zone by simply omitting the moderating beryllium neutron multiplier. Mainly due to this precaution in the blanket design, the FPD could be kept quasi-constant over a relatively long plant lifetime

  13. How Retailers Handle Complaint Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Wilke, Ricky; Zaichkowsky, Judy

    2009-01-01

    This article fills a gap in the literature by providing insight about the handling of complaint management (CM) across a large cross section of retailers in the grocery, furniture, electronic and auto sectors. Determinants of retailers’ CM handling are investigated and insight is gained...... as to the links between CM and redress of consumers’ complaints. The results suggest that retailers who attach large negative consequences to consumer dissatisfaction are more likely than other retailers to develop a positive strategic view on customer complaining, but at the same time an increase in perceived...

  14. The handling of chemical data

    CERN Document Server

    Lark, P D; Bosworth, R C L

    1968-01-01

    The Handling of Chemical Data deals with how measurements, such as those arrived at from chemical experimentation, are handled. The book discusses the different kinds of measurements and their specific dimensional characteristics by starting with the origin and presentation of chemical data. The text explains the units, fixed points, and relationships found between scales, the concept of dimensions, the presentation of quantitative data (whether in a tabular or graphical form), and some uses of empirical equations. The book also explains the relationship between two variables, and how equatio

  15. Safety Enhancements for TRU Waste Handling - 12258

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Curt N. [Perma-Fix Northwest Richland, Inc., Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    For years, proper Health Physics practices and 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable' (ALARA) principles have fostered the use of glove boxes or other methods of handling (without direct contact) high activities of radioactive material. The physical limitations of using glove boxes on certain containers have resulted in high-activity wastes being held in storage awaiting a path forward. Highly contaminated glove boxes and other remote handling equipment no longer in use have also been added to the growing list of items held for storage with no efficient method of preparation for proper disposal without creating exposure risks to personnel. This is especially true for wastes containing alpha-emitting radionuclides such as Plutonium and Americium that pose significant health risks to personnel if these Transuranic (TRU) wastes are not controlled effectively. Like any good safety program or root cause investigation PFNW has found that the identification of the cause of a negative change, if stopped, can result in a near miss and lessons learned. If this is done in the world of safety, it is considered a success story and is to be shared with others to protect the workers. PFNW believes that the tools, equipment and resources have improved over the past number of years but that the use of them has not progressed at the same rate. If we use our tools to timely identify the effect on the work environment and immediately following or possibly even simultaneously identify the cause or some of the causal factors, we may have the ability to continue to work rather than succumb to the start and stop-work mentality trap that is not beneficial in waste minimization, production efficiency or ALARA. (authors)

  16. Development of ITER shielding blanket prototype mockup by HIP bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype (∼900H x 1700W x 350T mm) of the ITER shielding blanket module has been fabricated following the previous successful fabrication of a small-scale (∼500H x 400W x 150T mm) and mid-scale (∼800H x 500W x 350T mm) mock-ups. This prototype incorporates most of key design features essential to the fabrication of the ITER shielding blanket module such as 1) the first wall heat sink made of Al2O3 dispersion strengthened Cu (DSCu) with built-in SS316L coolant tubes bonded to a massive SS316LN shield block, 2) toroidally curved first wall with a radius of 5106 mm while straight in poloidal direction, 3) coolant channels oriented in poloidal direction in the first wall and in toroidal direction in the shield block, 4) the first wall coolant channel routing to avoid the interference with the front access holes, 5) coolant channels drilled through the forged SS316LN-IG shield block, and 6) four front access holes of 30 mm in diameter penetrated through the first wall and the shield block. For the joining method, especially for the first wall/side wall parts and the shield block, the solid HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) process was applied. It is difficult to apply conventional joining methods such as field welding, brazing, explosion bonding and mechanical one-axial diffusion bonding to a wide area bonding because sufficient mechanical strengths can not be obtained and excessive deformations occurs. In order to solve these fabrication issues, HIP bonding was applied. The first wall stainless steel (SS) coolant tubes of 10 mm in inner diameter and l mm in thickness were sandwiched by semi-circular grooved DSCu plates at the first wall and the front region of the side wall, and by semi-circular grooved SS plates at the back region of the side wall. After assembling of these first wall/side wall parts with the shield block, they were simultaneously bonded by single step HIP in order to minimize thermal effects on the mechanical properties and to reduce the number

  17. The gas-cooled Li2O moderator/breeder canister blanket for fusion-synfuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new integrated power and breeding blanket is described. The blanket incorporates features that make it suitable for synthetic fuel production. It is matched to the thermal and electrical requirements of the General Atomic water-splitting process for producing hydrogen. The fusion reaction is the Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR) using Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) physics. The canister blanket is a high temperature, pressure balanced, crossflow heat exchanger contained within a low activity, independently cooled, moderate temperature, first wall structural envelope. The canister uses Li2O as the moderator/breeder and helium as the coolant. ''In situ'' tritium control, combined with slip stream processing and self-healing permeation barriers, assures a hydrogen product essentially free of tritium. The blanket is particularly adapted to synfuels production but is equally useful for electricity production or co-generation

  18. Fast Breeder Blanket Facility FBBF. Annual report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report contains a summmary of fission rate, spectra, and gamma-ray heating rate measurements made in the first blanket of the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility. The first blanket consisted of aluminum clad, natural UO2 fuel rods with a secondary cladding of stainless steel or aluminum. The blanket was arranged in two concentric regions around the neutron source and converter regions. A neutron diffusion code, 2DB, and a Monte Carlo code, VIM, both using homogeneous cross section groups have been used to calculate the reaction rates. Calculated to experimental values for a number of important reactions are presented. A modified method of applying Bondarenko self-shielding factors to correct for the self shielding of resonance energy neutrons in aluminum, stainless steel and UO2 has improved the agreement between the calculations and experiment, but does not account for all of the differences

  19. Integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept applied to the OH-coil for spherical tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This concept combines blanket and coil functions into a single component. The objectives of the concept are to: (1) provide design options, (2) simplify overall configuration, (3) enhance compactness, and (4) reduce costs. Some drawings of the system are given

  20. Main maintenance operations for Test Blanket Systems in ITER TBM port cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The Test Blanket System components layout in Port Cell room is described. • The maintenance of the two Test Blanket Systems in ITER port cell is addressed. • The overall replacement/maintenance strategy is defined. • The main maintenance tasks of the systems are discussed. • The maintenance strategy and required tools are presented. -- Abstract: Each Test Blanket System in ITER is formed by an in-vessel component, the Test Blanket Module, and several associated ancillary systems (coolant and Tritium systems, instrumentation and control systems). The paper describes the overall replacement/maintenance strategy and the main maintenance tasks that have to be considered in the design of the systems. It shows that there are no critical issues

  1. Acoustic contributions of a sound absorbing blanket placed in a double panel structure: Absorption Versus Transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Doutres, Olivier; 10.1121/1.3458845

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose a simple tool to estimate the absorption vs. transmission loss contributions of a multilayered blanket unbounded in a double panel structure and thus guide its optimization. The normal incidence airborne sound transmission loss of the double panel structure, without structure-borne connections, is written in terms of three main contributions; (i) sound transmission loss of the panels, (ii) sound transmission loss of the blanket and (iii) sound absorption due to multiple reflections inside the cavity. The method is applied to four different blankets frequently used in automotive and aeronautic applications: a non-symmetric multilayer made of a screen in sandwich between two porous layers and three symmetric porous layers having different pore geometries. It is shown that the absorption behavior of the blanket controls the acoustic behavior of the treatment at low and medium frequencies and its transmission loss at high frequencies. Acoustic treatment having poor sound ...

  2. An Analysis of Ripple and Error Fields Induced by a Blanket in the CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guanying; Liu, Xufeng; Liu, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    The Chinese Fusion Engineering Tokamak Reactor (CFETR) is an important intermediate device between ITER and DEMO. The Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) blanket whose structural material is mainly made of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel, is one of the candidate conceptual blanket design. An analysis of ripple and error field induced by RAFM steel in WCCB is evaluated with the method of static magnetic analysis in the ANSYS code. Significant additional magnetic field is produced by blanket and it leads to an increased ripple field. Maximum ripple along the separatrix line reaches 0.53% which is higher than 0.5% of the acceptable design value. Simultaneously, one blanket module is taken out for heating purpose and the resulting error field is calculated to be seriously against the requirement. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China (No. 2013GB108004)

  3. Normal Operation (NO) of APT Blanket System and its Components Based on Initial Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports documenting accident scenario simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal systems. The simulations were performed in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the APT.

  4. Proceedings of the fifteenth international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of 'the Fifteenth International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders Under the IEA Implementing Agreement on the Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors. This workshop was held in Sapporo, Japan on 3-4, Sept. 2009. Twenty six participants from EU, Japan, India, Russia and USA attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included 1) evolutions in ceramic breeder blanket design, 2) progress in ceramic breeder material development, 3) irradiation testing, 4) breeder material properties, 5) out-of-pile pebble bed experiment, 6) modeling of the thermal, mechanical and tritium transfer behavior of pebble beds and 7) interfacing issues of solid breeder blanket development. By this workshop, advance of key technologies for solid breeder blanket development was shared among the participants. Also, desired direction of further investigation and development was recognized. The 20 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. A high tritium breeding ratio (TBR) blanket concept and requirements for nuclear data relating to TBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significance of developing a blanket having a sufficiently larger tritium breeding ratio (TBR) than 1.0 is discussed. For this purpose, a high TBR blanket with a front breeder zone just before the multiplier is introduced together with conventional blankets. From discussion of TBR characteristics in these blankets, the necessity of improving on nuclear data, i.e. reducing uncertainties is presented as follows; σs, σnp and σnα of structural and coolant materials, and σn2n of the multiplier at higher energies above several MeV, and σnγ of these materials and σnαT of 6Li at energies from several hundred keV to thermal energy. (author)

  6. Resolution of proliferation issues for a SFR blanket with a specific application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauff, N.E. [31 rue baudelaire, voisins le bretonneux, 78960 (France); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Forget, B.; Driscoll, M.J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The Sodium Fast Reactor is seen as the most realistic Gen-IV reactor to be built in the near future. France and the US are still developing their designs; these will require improved safety, competitive economics, and also proliferation resistance. To meet this last requirement, both French and American designers show some concerns with the use of breeding blankets. France and the USA won't need breeding blankets to produce plutonium because they already have large amounts of plutonium bred from their LWR fleet to start a new SFR fleet, thus breeding blankets are mainly of interest for minor actinide burning. On the contrary, India and China express great interest in blankets for their SFR designs, to reach a positive breeding gain. For example, the Indian PFBR, a 500 MWe oxide-fueled SFR has a breeding ratio of 1.05. Blankets are used in a Fast Reactor to increase the breeding ratio of the core, by breeding a significant amount of plutonium. The Plutonium bred within these blankets, if these are loaded with Uranium only, is generally of a very high quality, which makes it easily used in a nuclear explosive device. Our research has shown that the plutonium in breeding blankets can be made less attractive to make a nuclear explosive device than LWR-bred plutonium with a burnup of 50 MWd/Kg. Minor actinide doping and moderator addition were the two options studied, as they increase Pu{sup 238} and Pu{sup 240} production. In the work reported here, the methodology developed for securing a breeding blanket was successfully applied to the Indian PFBR. The full paper will describe a design of the PFBR breeding proliferation resistant plutonium within its blankets. The blankets were rendered secure by adding a zirconium hydride moderator and a small volume of MAs. It was demonstrated that reducing the attractiveness of the blanket plutonium would require no external MA dependency by choosing an adequate fuel cycle. The characteristics and performance of this design

  7. Climate-driven expansion of blanket bogs in Britain during the Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Gallego-Sala

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Blanket bog occupies approximately 6 % of the area of the UK today. The Holocene expansion of this hyperoceanic biome has previously been explained as a consequence of Neolithic forest clearance. However, the present distribution of blanket bog in Great Britain can be predicted accurately with a simple model (PeatStash based on summer temperature and moisture index thresholds, and the same model correctly predicts the highly disjunct distribution of blanket bog worldwide. This finding suggests that climate, rather than land-use history, controls blanket-bog distribution in the UK and everywhere else. We set out to test this hypothesis for blanket bogs in the UK using bioclimate envelope modelling compared with a database of peat initiation age estimates. We used both pollen-based reconstructions and climate model simulations of climate changes between the mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP, 6 ka and modern climate to drive PeatStash and predict areas of blanket bog. We compiled data on the timing of blanket-bog initiation, based on 228 age determinations at sites where peat directly overlies mineral soil. The model predicts large areas of northern Britain would have had blanket bog by 6000 yr BP, and the area suitable for peat growth extended to the south after this time. A similar pattern is shown by the basal peat ages and new blanket bog appeared over a larger area during the late Holocene, the greatest expansion being in Ireland, Wales and southwest England, as the model predicts. The expansion was driven by a summer cooling of about 2 °C, shown by both pollen-based reconstructions and climate models. The data show early Holocene (pre-Neolithic blanket-bog initiation at over half of the sites in the core areas of Scotland, and northern England. The temporal patterns and concurrence of the bioclimate model predictions and initiation data suggest that climate change provides a parsimonious explanation for the early Holocene distribution and later

  8. Geospatial Big Data Handling Theory and Methods: A Review and Research Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Songnian; Dragicevic, Suzana; Anton, François;

    2016-01-01

    Big data has now become a strong focus of global interest that is increasingly attracting the attention of academia, industry, government and other organizations. Big data can be situated in the disciplinary area of traditional geospatial data handling theory and methods. The increasing volume...... for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Technical Commission II (TC II) revisits the existing geospatial data handling methods and theories to determine if they are still capable of handling emerging geospatial big data. Further, the paper synthesises problems, major issues and challenges with current...

  9. Wash resistance and repellent properties of Africa University mosquito blankets against mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Lukwa, N; A. Makuwaza; T. Chiwade; S.L. Mutambu; M. Zimba; P. Munosiyei

    2013-01-01

    The effect of permethrin-treated Africa University (AU) mosquito blankets on susceptible female Anopheles gambiae sensu lato mosquitoes was studied under laboratory conditions at Africa University Campus in Mutare, Zimbabwe. Wash resistance (ability to retain an effective dose that kills ≥80% of mosquitoes after a number of washes) and repellence (ability to prevent ≥80% of mosquito bites) properties were studied. The AU blankets were wash resistant when 100% mortality was recorded up t...

  10. Application Effect’s Research of Vetiver Eco Blanket in Pubugou Reservoir Fluctuating Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Lan Huijuan; Zheng Kaiyuan; Ni Fuquan; Deng Yu; Liu Dengyu; Yang Xinwei; Wang Tao

    2015-01-01

    To solve the ecological disasters in Pubugou Reservoir Fluctuating Zone, ecological blanket governance model is proposed in this paper, which may provide good early environment for plants’ survival in fluctuation zone, and then play the function of greening and sustainable development to ensure the slopes’ stability. Meanwhile, based on the result of vetiver ecological blanket in Hanyuan experimental zone, we find that three kinds of typical Fluctuating Zone slope’s greening effect is good, w...

  11. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  12. The State of the Art Report on the Development and Manufacturing Technology of Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Kim, K. H

    2006-07-15

    The main objective of the present R and D on breeder blanket is the development of test blanket modules (TBMs) to be installed and tested in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). In the program of the blanket development, a blanket module test in the ITER is scheduled from the beginning of the ITER operation, and the performance test of TBM in ITER is the most important milestone for the development of the DEMO blanket. The fabrication of TBMs has been required to test the basic performance of the DEMO blanket, i.e., tritium production/recovery, high-grade heat generation and radiation shielding. Therefore, the integration of the TBM systems into ITER has been investigated with the aim to check the safety, reliability and compatibility under nuclear fusion state. For this reason, in the Test Blanket Working Group (TBWG) as an activity of the International Energy Association (IEA), a variety of ITER TBMs have been proposed and investigated by each party: helium-cooled ceramic (WSG-1), helium-cooled LiPb (WSG-2), water-cooled ceramic (WSG-3), self-cooled lithium (WSG-4) and self-cooled molten salt (WSG-5) blanket systems. Because we are still deficient in investigation of TBM development, the need of development became pressing. In this report, for the development of TBM sub-module and mock-up, it is necessary to analyze and examine the state of the art on the development of manufacturing technology of TBM in other countries. And we will be applied as basic data to establish a manufacturing technology.

  13. Implementation of two-phase tritium models for helium bubbles in HCLL breeding blanket modules

    OpenAIRE

    Fradera, Jordi; Sedano, L.A.; Mas de les Valls Ortiz, Elisabet; Batet Miracle, Lluís

    2011-01-01

    Tritium self-sufficiency requirement of future DT fusion reactors involves large helium production rates in the breeding blankets; this might impact on the conceptual design of diverse fusion power reactor units, such as Liquid Metal (LM) blankets. Low solubility, long residence-times and high production rates create the conditions for Helium nucleation, which could mean effective T sinks in LM channels. A model for helium nano-bubble formation and tritium conjugate transport phen...

  14. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  15. The Dφ Data Handling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.White; D.Adams; 等

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we highlight strategies and choices that make the Dφ Data Handling system markedly different from many other experiments' systems,We emphasize how far the Dφ system has come in innovating and implementing a Dφ-specific Data Grid system.We discuss experiences during the first months of detector commissioning and give some future plans for the system.

  16. TNO reticle handling test platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crowcombe, W.E.; Hollemans, C.L.; Fritz, E.C.; Donck, J.C.J. van der; Koster, N.B.

    2014-01-01

    Particle free handling of EUV reticles is a major concern in industry. For reaching economically feasible yield levels, it is reported that Particle-per-Reticle-Pass (PRP) levels should be better than 0.0001 for particles larger than 18 nm. Such cleanliness levels are yet to be reported for current

  17. Software for handling MFME1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with SEMFIP, a computer code for determining magnetic field measurements. The program is written in FORTRAN and ASSEMBLER. The preparations for establishing SEMFIP, the actual measurements, data handling and the problems that were experienced are discussed. Details on the computer code are supplied in an appendix

  18. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy.

  19. Preliminary neutronics design and analysis of helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Zhongliang; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; Chen, Chong; Li, Min; Zhou, Guangming

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Neutronics design of a helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR was presented. • The breeding zones parallel to FW and perpendicular to FW were optimized. • A series of neutronics analyses for the proposed blanket were shown. - Abstract: Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a test tokamak reactor being designed in China to bridge the gap between ITER and future fusion power plant. Tritium self-sufficiency is one of the most important issues for CFETR and the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) is recommended not less than 1.2. As one of the candidates, a helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR superconducting tokamak option was proposed. In the concept, radial arranged U-shaped breeding zones are adopted for higher TBR and simpler structure. In this work, three-dimensional neutronics design and analysis of the blanket were performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP with IAEA data library FENDL-2.1. Tritium breeding capability of the proposed blanket was assessed and the breeding zones parallel to first wall (FW) and perpendicular to FW were optimized. Meanwhile, the nuclear heating analysis and shielding performance were also presented for later thermal and structural analysis. The results showed that the blanket could well meet the tritium self-sufficiency target and the neutron shield could satisfy the design requirements.

  20. Activation Characteristics of Fuel Breeding Blanket Module in Fusion Driven Subcritical System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qun-Ying; LI Jian-Gang; CHEN Yi-Xue

    2004-01-01

    @@ Shortage of energy resources and production of long-lived radioactivity wastes from fission reactors are among the main problems which will be faced in the world in the near future. The conceptual design of a fusion driven subcritical system (FDS) is underway in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. There are alternative designs for multi-functional blanket modules of the FDS, such as fuel breeding blanket module (FBB)to produce fuels for fission reactors, tritium breeding blanket module to produce the fuel, i.e. tritium, for fusion reactor and waste transmutation blanket module to try to permanently dispose of long-lived radioactivity wastes from fission reactors, etc. Activation of the fuel breeding blanket of the fusion driven subcritical system (FDS-FBB) by D-T fusion neutrons from the plasma and fission neutrons from the hybrid blanket are calculated and analysed under the neutron wall loading 0.5 MW/m2 and neutron fluence 15 MW. yr/m2. The neutron spectrum is calculated with the worldwide-used transport code MCNP/4C and activation calculations are carried out with the well known European inventory code FISPACT/99 with the latest released IAEA Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL-2.0 and the ENDF/B-V uranium evaluated data. Induced radioactivities, dose rates and afterheats, etc, for different components of the FDS-FBB are compared and analysed.

  1. Multiplier, moderator, and reflector materials for lithium-vanadium fusion blankets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.

    1999-10-07

    The self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has several attractive operational and environmental features. In this concept, liquid lithium works as the tritium breeder and coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because of its superior performance relative to other alloys for this application. However, this concept has poor attenuation characteristics and energy multiplication for the DT neutrons. An advanced self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has been developed to eliminate these drawbacks while maintaining all the attractive features of the conventional concept. An electrical insulator coating for the coolant channels, spectral shifter (multiplier, and moderator) and reflector were utilized in the blanket design to enhance the blanket performance. In addition, the blanket was designed to have the capability to operate at high loading conditions of 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading. This paper assesses the spectral shifter and the reflector materials and it defines the technological requirements of this advanced blanket concept.

  2. Helium-Cooled Refractory Alloys First Wall and Blanket Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Nygren, R.E.; Baxi, C.B.; Fogarty, P.; Ghoniem, N.; Khater, H.; McCarthy, K.; Merrill, B.; Nelson, B.; Reis, E.E.; Sharafat, S.; Schleicher, R.; Sze, D.K.; Ulrickson, M.; Willms, S.; Youssef, M.; Zinkel, S.

    1999-08-01

    Under the APEX program the He-cooled system design task is to evaluate and recommend high power density refractory alloy first wall and blanket designs and to recommend and initiate tests to address critical issues. We completed the preliminary design of a helium-cooled, W-5Re alloy, lithium breeder design and the results are reported in this paper. Many areas of the design were assessed, including material selection, helium impurity control, and mechanical, nuclear and thermal hydraulics design, and waste disposal, tritium and safety design. System study results show that at a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) gross thermal efficiency of 57.5%, a superconducting coil tokamak reactor, with an aspect ratio of 4, and an output power of 2 GWe, can be projected to have a cost of electricity at 54.6 mill/kWh. Critical issues were identified and we plan to continue the design on some of the critical issues during the next phase of the APEX design study.

  3. Detailed 3-D nuclear analysis of ITER blanket modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohm, T.D., E-mail: tdbohm@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Sawan, M.E.; Marriott, E.P.; Wilson, P.P.H. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ulrickson, M.; Bullock, J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In ITER, the blanket modules (BM) are arranged around the plasma to provide thermal and nuclear shielding for the vacuum vessel (VV), magnets, and other components. As a part of the BM design process, nuclear analysis is required to determine the level of nuclear heating, helium production, and radiation damage in the BM. Additionally, nuclear heating in the VV is also important for assessing the BM design. We used the CAD based DAG-MCNP5 transport code to analyze detailed models inserted into a 40-degree partially homogenized ITER global model. The regions analyzed include BM01, the neutral beam injection (NB) region, and the upper port region. For BM01, the results show that He production meets the limit necessary for re-welding, and the VV heating behind BM01 is acceptable. For the NBI region, the VV nuclear heating behind the NB region exceeds the design limit by a factor of two. For the upper port region, the nuclear heating of the VV exceeds the design limit by up to 20%. The results presented in this work are being used to modify the BM design in the cases where limits are exceeded.

  4. Vacuum Permeator Analysis for Extraction of Tritium from DCLL Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humrickhouse, Paul Weston [Idaho National Laboratory; Merrill, Brad Johnson [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-11-01

    It is envisioned that tritium will be extracted from DCLL blankets using a vacuum permeator. We derive here an analytical solution for the extraction efficiency of a permeator tube, which is a function of only two dimensionless numbers: one that indicates whether radial transport is limited in the PbLi or in the solid membrane, and another that is the ratio of axial and radial transport times in the PbLi. The permeator efficiency is maximized by decreasing the velocity and tube diameter, and increasing the tube length. This is true regardless of the mass transport correlation used; we review several here and find that they differ little, and the choice of correlation is not a source of significant uncertainty here. The PbLi solubility, on the other hand, is a large source of uncertainty, and we identify upper and lower bounds from the literature data. Under the most optimistic assumptions, we find that a ferritic steel permeator operating at 550 °C will need to be at least an order of magnitude larger in volume than previous conceptual designs using niobium and operating at higher temperatures.

  5. Physics aspects of metal fuelled fast reactors with thorium blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohapatra, D.K., E-mail: dina@igcar.gov.in; Singh, S.S.; Riyas, A.; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2013-12-15

    Metal fuelled fast breeder reactors (MFBR) with high breeding ratio will play a major role in meeting the high nuclear power growth envisaged in India. In this regard several conceptual reactor designs with alloys of U–Pu–Zr fuel have been suggested for commercial operations. This study focusses on the physics design aspects of a sodium cooled U–Pu–6%Zr fuelled 1000 MWe fast breeder reactor, which can attain a breeding ratio of nearly 1.5. The calculation results on reactor kinetics and safety parameters of the 1000 MWe MFBR are presented. The changes in the breeding ratio by introduction of thorium in the blankets of the MFBR are also investigated. Burnup analyses are carried out to compare the core burnup effects in MOX and metal fuelled FBRs. Since the MOX fuelled 500 MWe prototype fast breeder is getting constructed at IGCAR, for burnup comparisons a MFBR of similar design is considered. The results of this study indicate that the loss of reactivity in the metal core with burnup is less than half that of a MOX core and its breeding ratio remains nearly constant. It is also found that the isotopic composition of plutonium (Pu-vector composition) remains more steady with burnup in a metal core.

  6. Surface property variations in Venusian fluidized ejecta blanket craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Baker, Victor R.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive study of Magellan Cycles 1 and 2 radar data from Venus reveals surface roughness and dielectric variations associated with fluidized ejecta blanket (FEB) craters that help illuminate styles of flow ejecta emplacement. This study develops new procedures of digital unit mapping and polygon-filling algorithms using Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR), altimetry, and radiometry data. These techniques allow the extraction of radiophysical information for FEB crater materials, nearby plains, and lava flows. Backscatter curve slopes of the FEBs studied here are consistent with surface textures that are transitional between a'a and pahoehoe-like. Average surface property values of ejecta units are relatively similar for a given crater, but are discernibly different from other craters. Individual crater ejecta reflectivity and emissivity values are relatively similar to those for the surrounding plains, which may suggest a link between plains material and ejecta dielectric properties. Increasing FEB roughness downflow are interpreted to be associated with more lava-like flows, while decreasing roughness are more similar to trends typical of gravity (pyroclastic-like or debris-like) flows. Most commonly, FEB crater flow materials exhibit transitions from proximal, lava/melt-like flow styles to distal, gravity flow-like styles. Some FEBs show more complicated behavior, however, or appear to be more dominated by dielectric differences downflow, as inferred from correlations between the data sets. Such transitions may result from changes in local topography or from overlapping of flow lobes during FEB emplacement.

  7. Computer imaging of EBR-II fuel handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a three-dimensional graphics application used to visualize the positions of remotely operated fuel handling equipment in the EBR-II reactor. A three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique is necessary to simulate direct visual observation of the transfers of fuel and experiments into and out of the reactor because the fuel handling equipment is submerged in liquid sodium and therefore is not visible to the operator. The system described in this paper uses actual signals to drive a three-dimensional computer-generated model in real-time in response to movements of equipment in the plant This paper will present details on how the 3D model of the intank equipment was created and how real-time dynamic behavior was added to each of the moving components

  8. Computer imaging of EBR-II handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a three-dimensional graphics application used to visualize the positions of remotely operated fuel handling equipment in the EBR-II reactor. The system described in this paper uses actual signals to move a three-dimensional graphics model in real-time in response to movements of equipment in the plant. A three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique is necessary to simulate direct visual observation of the transfers of fuel and experiments into and out of the reactor because the fuel handling equipment is submerged in liquid sodium and therefore is not visible to the operator. This paper will present details on how the 3D model was created and how real-time dynamic behavior was added to each of the moving components

  9. Inter-process handling automating system; Koteikan handling jidoka system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H. [Meidensha Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-10-18

    This paper introduces automation of loading works in production site by using robots. Loading robots are required of complex movements, and are used for loading work in processing machines requiring six degrees of freedom and for relatively simple palletizing work that can be dealt with by four degrees of freedom. The `inter-machine handling system` is an automated system performed by a ceiling running robot in which different workpiece model determination and positional shift measurement are carried out by image processing. A robot uses the image information to exchange hands automatically as required, and clamp a workpiece; then runs to an M/C to replace the processed workpiece; and put the M/C processes workpiece onto a multi-axial dedicated machine. Five processing machines are operated in parallel with the cycle time matched with that of this handling process, and a processing machine finished of processing is given a handling work in preferential order. As a result, improvement in productivity and elimination of two workers were achieved simultaneously. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Optimization of General Arrangement for Fuel Handling Equipment in Fuel Handling Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sanggyoon; Choi, Taeksang [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Duckhee [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to provide an optimized general arrangement for fuel handling in fuel handling area for APR1400. The general arrangement for fuel handling area should be optimized in the viewpoints of safety functions for fuel handling, efficiency for operation and maintenance of fuel handling equipment during the fuel handling from receipt of new fuel to shipment of spent fuel. In this study, general arrangement for the fuel handling area was evaluated and proposed to ensure a safe and efficient operation and maintenance for the fuel handling equipment in the fuel handling area. The results of this study can be a beneficial suggestion regarding the general arrangement of the fuel handling areas and equipment. The general arrangement in the fuel handling area is optimized in the viewpoints of safety functions for fuel handling, efficiency for operation and maintenance for fuel handling equipment.

  11. Handling encapsulated spent fuel in a geologic repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the Spent Fuel Test-Climate at the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site, a spent-fuel canister handling system has been designed, deployed, and operated successfully during the past five years. This system transports encapsulated commercial spent-fuel assemblies between the packaging facility and the test site (approx. 100 km), transfers the canisters 420 m vertically to and from a geologic storage drift, and emplaces or retrieves the canisters from the storage holes in the floor of the drift. The spent-fuel canisters are maintained in a fully shielded configuration at all times during the handling cycle, permitting manned access at any time for response to any abnormal conditions. All normal operations are conducted by remote control, thus assuring as low as reasonably achievable exposures to operators; specifically, we have had no measurable exposure during 30 canister transfer operations. While not intended to be prototypical of repository handling operations, the system embodies a number of concepts, now demonstrated to be safe, reliable, and economical, which may be very useful in evaluating full-scale repository handling alternatives in the future. Among the potentially significant concepts are: Use of an integral shielding plug to minimize radiation streaming at all transfer interfaces. Hydraulically actuated transfer cask jacking and rotation features to reduce excavation headroom requirements. Use of a dedicated small diameter (0.5 m) drilled shaft for transfer between the surface and repository workings. A wire-line hoisting system with positive emergency braking device which travels with the load. Remotely activated grapples - three used in the system - which are insensitive to load orientation. Rail-mounted underground transfer vehicle operated with no personnel underground

  12. CARRIER PREPARATION BUILDING MATERIALS HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-28

    The Carrier Preparation Building Materials Handling System receives rail and truck shipping casks from the Carrier/Cask Transport System, and inspects and prepares the shipping casks for return to the Carrier/Cask Transport System. Carrier preparation operations for carriers/casks received at the surface repository include performing a radiation survey of the carrier and cask, removing/retracting the personnel barrier, measuring the cask temperature, removing/retracting the impact limiters, removing the cask tie-downs (if any), and installing the cask trunnions (if any). The shipping operations for carriers/casks leaving the surface repository include removing the cask trunnions (if any), installing the cask tie-downs (if any), installing the impact limiters, performing a radiation survey of the cask, and installing the personnel barrier. There are four parallel carrier/cask preparation lines installed in the Carrier Preparation Building with two preparation bays in each line, each of which can accommodate carrier/cask shipping and receiving. The lines are operated concurrently to handle the waste shipping throughputs and to allow system maintenance operations. One remotely operated overhead bridge crane and one remotely operated manipulator is provided for each pair of carrier/cask preparation lines servicing four preparation bays. Remotely operated support equipment includes a manipulator and tooling and fixtures for removing and installing personnel barriers, impact limiters, cask trunnions, and cask tie-downs. Remote handling equipment is designed to facilitate maintenance, dose reduction, and replacement of interchangeable components where appropriate. Semi-automatic, manual, and backup control methods support normal, abnormal, and recovery operations. Laydown areas and equipment are included as required for transportation system components (e.g., personnel barriers and impact limiters), fixtures, and tooling to support abnormal and recovery operations. The

  13. Incidence Handling and Response System

    CERN Document Server

    Kalbande, Prof Dhananjay R; Singh, Mr Manish

    2009-01-01

    A computer network can be attacked in a number of ways. The security-related threats have become not only numerous but also diverse and they may also come in the form of blended attacks. It becomes difficult for any security system to block all types of attacks. This gives rise to the need of an incidence handling capability which is necessary for rapidly detecting incidents, minimizing loss and destruction, mitigating the weaknesses that were exploited and restoring the computing services. Incidence response has always been an important aspect of information security but it is often overlooked by security administrators. in this paper, we propose an automated system which will handle the security threats and make the computer network capable enough to withstand any kind of attack. we also present the state-of-the-art technology in computer, network and software which is required to build such a system.

  14. Waste battery collection and handling

    OpenAIRE

    Degenek, Marko

    2010-01-01

    In the following thesis, we focused on waste battery collection and handling. Since batteries are known for their possible containing of dangerous substances, it seems sensible to collect and reuse them - not only from the perspective of economy, but also when it comes to regaining some valuable raw materials. That is why the battery issue is not only topical, but also in need of thorough analysis and discussion. Wrongly disposed batterries are a huge environmental issue, since they pollute g...

  15. Portable vacuum object handling device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G.H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object. 1 fig.

  16. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolodosky, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fratoni, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Lithium is often the preferred choice as breeder and coolant in fusion blankets as it offers excellent heat transfer and corrosion properties, and most importantly, it has a very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and exacerbates plant safety concerns. For this reason, over the years numerous blanket concepts have been proposed with the scope of reducing concerns associated with lithium. The European helium cooled pebble bed breeding blanket (HCPB) physically confines lithium within ceramic pebbles. The pebbles reside within a low activation martensitic ferritic steel structure and are cooled by helium. The blanket is composed of the tritium breeding lithium ceramic pebbles and neutron multiplying beryllium pebbles. Other blanket designs utilize lead to lower chemical reactivity; LiPb alone can serve as a breeder, coolant, neutron multiplier, and tritium carrier. Blankets employing LiPb coolants alongside silicon carbide structural components can achieve high plant efficiency, low afterheat, and low operation pressures. This alloy can also be used alongside of helium such as in the dual-coolant lead-lithium concept (DCLL); helium is utilized to cool the first wall and structural components made up of low-activation ferritic steel, whereas lithium-lead (LiPb) acts as a self-cooled breeder in the inner channels of the blanket. The helium-cooled steel and lead-lithium alloy are separated by flow channel inserts (usually made out of silicon carbide) which thermally insulate the self-cooled breeder region from the helium cooled steel walls. This creates a LiPb breeder with a much higher exit temperature than the steel which increases the power cycle efficiency and also lowers the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop [6]. Molten salt blankets with a mixture of lithium, beryllium, and fluorides (FLiBe) offer good tritium breeding

  17. Proceedings of the eleventh international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of 'the Eleventh International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders Under the IEA Implementing Agreement on the Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors, and the Japan-US Fusion Collaboration Framework. This workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan on December 15-17, 2003. About thirty experts from China, EU, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Russia and USA attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included 1) evolutions in ceramic breeder blanket design, 2) progress in ceramic breeder material development, 3) irradiation testing, 4) breeder material properties, 5) out-of-pile pebble bed experiment, 6) modeling of the thermal, mechanical and tritium transfer behavior of pebble beds and 7) interfacing issues of solid breeder blanket. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for designs of solid breeder blankets and test blankets in EU, Russia and Japan, recent results of irradiation tests, HICU, EXOTIC-8 and the irradiation tests by IVV-2M, modeling study on tritium release behavior of Li2TiO3 and so on, fabrication technology developments and characterization of the Li2TiO3 and Li4SiO4 pebbles, research on measurements and modeling of thermo-mechanical behaviors of Li2TiO3 and Li4SiO4 pebbles, and interfacing issues, such as, fabrication technology for blanket box structure, neutronics experiments of blanket mockups by fusion neutron source and tritium recovery system. The 26 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  18. Requirements for helium cooled pebble bed blanket and R and D activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carloni, D., E-mail: dario.carloni@kit.edu; Boccaccini, L.V.; Franza, F.; Kecskes, S.

    2014-10-15

    This work aims to give an outline of the design requirements of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket and its associated R and D activities. In DEMO fusion reactor the plasma facing components have to fulfill several requirements dictated by safety and process sustainability criteria. In particular the blanket of a fusion reactor shall transfer the heat load coming from the plasma to the cooling system and also provide tritium breeding for the fuel cycle of the machine. KIT has been investigating and developed a helium-cooled blanket for more than three decades: the concept is based on the adoption of separated small lithium orthosilicate (tritium breeder) and beryllium (neutron multiplier) pebble beds, i.e. the HCPB blanket. One of the test blanket modules of ITER will be a HCPB type, aiming to demonstrate the soundness of the concept for the exploitation in future fusion power plants. A discussion is reported also on the development of the design criteria for the blanket to meet the requirements, such as tritium environmental release, also with reference to the TBM. The selection of materials and components to be used in a unique environment as the Tokamak of a fusion reactor requires dedicated several R and D activities. For instance, the performance of the coolant and the tritium self-sufficiency are key elements for the realization of the HCPB concept. Experimental campaigns have been conducted to select the materials to be used inside the solid breeder blanket and R and D activities have been carried out to support the design. The paper discusses also the program of future developments for the realization of the HCPB concept, also focusing to the specific campaigns necessary to qualify the TBM for its implementation in the ITER machine.

  19. Requirements for helium cooled pebble bed blanket and R and D activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to give an outline of the design requirements of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket and its associated R and D activities. In DEMO fusion reactor the plasma facing components have to fulfill several requirements dictated by safety and process sustainability criteria. In particular the blanket of a fusion reactor shall transfer the heat load coming from the plasma to the cooling system and also provide tritium breeding for the fuel cycle of the machine. KIT has been investigating and developed a helium-cooled blanket for more than three decades: the concept is based on the adoption of separated small lithium orthosilicate (tritium breeder) and beryllium (neutron multiplier) pebble beds, i.e. the HCPB blanket. One of the test blanket modules of ITER will be a HCPB type, aiming to demonstrate the soundness of the concept for the exploitation in future fusion power plants. A discussion is reported also on the development of the design criteria for the blanket to meet the requirements, such as tritium environmental release, also with reference to the TBM. The selection of materials and components to be used in a unique environment as the Tokamak of a fusion reactor requires dedicated several R and D activities. For instance, the performance of the coolant and the tritium self-sufficiency are key elements for the realization of the HCPB concept. Experimental campaigns have been conducted to select the materials to be used inside the solid breeder blanket and R and D activities have been carried out to support the design. The paper discusses also the program of future developments for the realization of the HCPB concept, also focusing to the specific campaigns necessary to qualify the TBM for its implementation in the ITER machine

  20. Neutronic and thermomechanical analysis of the water-cooled lithium-lead blanket design for a DEMONET reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the European DEMO blanket study programme, CEA and the JRC of Ispra are jointly developing a water-cooled lithium-lead blanket concept. The new DEMONET reactor configuration released in Spring 1990 and currently specified in the EC programme is the basis of neutronic and thermomechanical studies for the proposed box-shaped blanket concept. Considering the high blanket coverage, it is now possible to reach tritium self-sufficiency without making use of beryllium (neutronic calculations indicate a global tritium breeding ratio of the order of 1.16). (orig.)

  1. Characterization of the effects of continuous salt processing on the performance of molten salt fusion breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several continuous salt processing options are available for use in molten salt fusion breeder blanket designs. The effects of processing on blanket performance have been assessed for three levels of processing and various equilibrium uranium concentrations in the salt. A one-dimensional model of the blanket was used in the neutronics analysis which incorporated transport calculations with time-dependent isotope generation and depletion calculations. The level of salt processing was found to have little effect on the behavior of the blanket during reactor operation; however, significant effects were observed during the decay period after reactor shutdown

  2. 7 CFR 1205.312 - Handle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1205.312 Handle. Handle means to harvest, gin, warehouse, compress, purchase, market, transport, or otherwise acquire ownership or control of cotton....

  3. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Handling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records for all handling and measurement of Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. Live seals are handled and measured during a variety of events...

  4. 7 CFR 983.14 - Handle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.14 Handle. Handle means to engage in: (a) Receiving pistachios; (b... of interstate or foreign commerce; and/or (d) Placing pistachios into the current of commerce...

  5. 7 CFR 1207.307 - Handle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.307 Handle. Handle means to grade, pack,...

  6. Development of the Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enoeda, Mikio, E-mail: enoeda.mikio@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hisashi; Hirose, Takanori; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Nakamichi, Masaru; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji; Yoshikawa, Akira; Tsuru, Daigo; Akiba, Masato [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    The development of a Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is being performed as one of the most important steps toward DEMO blanket in Japan. For the TBM testing and evaluation toward DEMO blanket, the module fabrication technology development by a candidate structural material, reduced activation martensitic/ferritic steel, F82H, is one of the most critical items from the viewpoint of realization of TBM testing in ITER. In Japan, fabrication of a real scale first wall, side walls, a breeder pebble bed box and assembling of the first wall and side walls have succeeded. Recently, the real scale partial mockup of the back wall was fabricated. The fabrication procedure of the back wall, whose thickness is up to 90 mm, was confirmed toward the fabrication of the real scale back wall by F82H. Important key technologies are almost clarified for the fabrication of the real scale TBM module mockup. From the view point of testing and evaluation, development of the technology of the blanket tritium recovery, development of advanced breeder and multiplier pebbles and the development of the blanket neutronics measurement technology are also performed. Also, tritium production and recovery test using D-T neutron in the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) facility has been started as the verification test of tritium production performance. This paper overviews the recent achievements of the development of the WCCB TBM in Japan.

  7. R and D status on Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enoeda, Mikio, E-mail: enoeda.mikio@jaea.go.jp; Tanigawa, Hisashi; Hirose, Takanori; Nakajima, Motoki; Sato, Satoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Nakamichi, Masaru; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Nishi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji; Yokoyama, Kenji

    2014-10-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is performing the development of a Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) Test Blanket Module (TBM) as one of the most important steps toward DEMO blanket. Regarding the blanket module fabrication technology development using F82H, the fabrication of a real scale mockup of the back wall of TBM was completed. In the design activity of the TBM, electromagnetic analysis under plasma disruption events and thermo-mechanical analysis under steady state and transient state of tokamak operation have been performed and showed bright prospect toward design justification. Regarding the development of advanced breeder and multiplier pebbles for DEMO blanket, fabrication technology development of Li rich Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble and BeTi pebble was performed. Regarding the research activity on the evaluation of tritium generation performance, the evaluation of tritium production and recovery test using D-T neutron in the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) facility has been performed. This paper overviews the recent achievements of the development of the WCCB Blanket in JAEA.

  8. Thermal Analysis on Conceptual K-DEMO Breeding Blanket on parallel flow configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility study consists the design guidelines and requirements for the K-DEMO(the Korean Fusion DEMOnstration reactor). It is possible to design flexible and realistic concepts of the demonstration fusion power plant. As a part of the NFRI research, Seoul National University (SNU) is conducting thermal design, evaluation and validation of the breeding blanket for the K-DEMO reactor. Recently, a new breeding blanket concept has been proposed for the K-DEMO reactor, and preliminary feasibility studies are actively ongoing. Design concept of parallel plate-type blanket of K-DEMO and thermal limits on components was identified, in this study. It was concluded that an acceptable thermal design was achieved in the proposed breeding blanket design. However, some design improvements in the geometry of the breeding blanket are ongoing. In aspect of pressure drop and outlet temperature, some analysis need to be conducted. Stage of study on the K-DEMO reactor is in the preliminary concept definition

  9. The integrated-blanket-coil concept applied to the spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of reactor embodiments based on the combination of two novel concepts, the integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept and the spherical torus (ST) concept. The IBC concept involves the combination of blanket and coil functions into a single component. The ST concept is based on the operation of the tokamak magnetic configuration at low aspect ratio. Two applications of the IBC concept to the ST are presented: (1) the IBC as the outer blanket and TF coil return legs (Application 1); and (2) the IBC as the inner blanket and OH solenoid coil set (Application 2). The application 1 IBC/ST yields reactor embodiments operating with high mass power density (≅500 kWe/MT) while, at the same time, yielding moderate neutron wall loading (≅5 MW/m/sup 2/) and modest electrical output (400-500 MWe). It is anticipated that fusion reactors operating in the above parameter space will exhibit attractive economic potential. When compared with a conventional ST design (copper TF coils and separate blanket), the Aplication 1 IBC/ST design exhibits a factor of two improvement in mass power density. The Application 2 IBC/ST provides an inductive current drive option which yields burn times in the range 3-4 minutes with no penalties in inboard breeding and energy recovery

  10. Remote technology applications in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel management has become a prospective area for application of remote technology in recent years with a steadily growing inventory of spent fuel arising from nuclear power production. A remark that could be made from the review of technical information collected from the IAEA meetings was that remote technology in spent fuel management has matured well through the past decades of industrial experiences. Various remote technologies have been developed and applied in the past for facility operation and maintenance work in spent fuel examination, storage, transportation, reprocessing and radioactive waste treatment, among others, with significant accomplishments in dose reduction to workers, enhancement of reliability, etc. While some developmental activities are continuing for more advanced applications, industrial practices have made use of simple and robust designs for most of the remote systems technology applications to spent fuel management. In the current state of affairs, equipment and services in remote technology are available in the market for applications to most of the projects in spent fuel management. It can be concluded that the issue of critical importance in remote systems engineering is to make an optimal selection of technology and equipment that would best satisfy the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) requirements in terms of relevant criteria like dose reduction, reliability, costs, etc. In fact, good selection methodology is the key to efficient implementation of remote systems applications in the modern globalized market. This TECDOC gives a review of the current status of remote technology applications for spent fuel management, based on country reports from some Member States presented at the consultancy meetings, of which updated reports are attached in the annex. The scope of the review covers the series of spent fuel handling operations involved in spent fuel management, from discharge from reactor to reprocessing or

  11. Multiple node remote messaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard (Esslingen, DE); Vranas, Pavlos (Danville, CA)

    2010-08-31

    A method for passing remote messages in a parallel computer system formed as a network of interconnected compute nodes includes that a first compute node (A) sends a single remote message to a remote second compute node (B) in order to control the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message. The method includes various steps including controlling a DMA engine at first compute node (A) to prepare the single remote message to include a first message descriptor and at least one remote message descriptor for controlling the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message, including putting the first message descriptor into an injection FIFO at the first compute node (A) and sending the single remote message and the at least one remote message descriptor to the second compute node (B).

  12. Lignite and conditioned ash handling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibolini, P.; Di Giacomo, L.; Ruga, A.M. [Techint (Italy)

    2001-10-01

    This article discusses Techint's latest contract for the engineering and supply of a lignite and conditioned ash handling system. Techint Italimpianti, the materials handling unit of Techint Technologies has served the market for over 40 years as a leading supplier of a range of systems for the handling of iron ore, pellets, coal, cement, bauxite, and aluminium. 6 figs.

  13. Remote possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact that wireless communications has had for gas and oil producers was discussed. Wireless communication, which has been replacing the traditional formats of radio and telephone data networks, has proved to be cheaper, smaller, and faster than creating privately owned communication networks. With highly developed supervisory control and data acquisition systems - combined with cellular or satellite technology - information from drill sites can be online at the corporate headquarters instantaneously. Eighty percent of Canada's land mass is beyond reach of traditional wireline and wireless services. Research into advanced communications, including telecommunication and mobile applications, yielded lucrative results for service providers such as BCTel, SaskTel, Bell Mobility and AGT. The latest data transmission technology is the cellular digital packet data (CDPD) which will operate over existing cellular networks. However, unlike circuit-switched cellular, CDPD technology provides an airlink where data is secure. It will be available to the marketplace over the course of the coming year. Among other advantages, CDPD will allow producers to remotely monitor production information and downtime alarms from wells and compressor stations. It will also provide fleet operators with the means to monitor operating vital signs on rolling stock

  14. Coal handling equipment and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds-Ely, L.

    2008-02-15

    A series of short articles highlights developments in the coal handling sector. These include contracts awarded to Sanvik Mining and Construction to supply equipment to ports in Greater Vancouver, Canada, Bulgaria, the UK and Australia. At the Profen mine near Leipzig, Germany, hydraulic excavators and a fleet of 12 Volvo A35D articulated haulers were employed and operated as a 'mobile coal team' by MIBRAG to recover lignite that would otherwise have been lost. Two floating terminals have recently been set up by the E-Crane - one on Venezuela and the other in the Congo. Inspectorate International has increased its inspection activities in the coal sector in Europe and Asia. Westmar Consultants increased capacity at Westshore Terminals LP (WTLP) coal exporting terminal in Roberts Bank, BC, Canada. Scantech International Pty specialises a real time analysis of minerals and coal on conveyors. Big Lift Trucks supplies stackers and open belt feeders for the coal mining industry. Takraf has supplied coal handling equipment to the new Wanino export harbor on Russia's east coast. Other developments are mentioned by Horizon Conveyor Equipment Ltd., Phoenix Yale Ltd., Martin Engineering, SGS and Bedeschi. 15 photos.

  15. Optimized mass flow rate distribution analysis for cooling the ITER Blanket System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Optimized water distribution in ITER blanket modules is presented. • All key challenging constraints are included. • The methodology and the successful result are presented. - Abstract: This paper presents the rationale to the optimization of water distribution in ITER blanket modules, meeting both Blanket System requirements and interface compliance requirements. The key challenging constraints include to: be compatible with the overall water allocation (3140 kg/s for 440 wall mounted BMs); meet the critical heat flux margin of 1.4 in the plasma facing units; meet a maximum temperature increase of 70 °C at the outlet of each single BM; and ensure that water velocity is less than 7 m/s in all manifolds, and that the pressure drops of all BMs can be equilibrated. The methodology and the successful result are presented

  16. High temperature blankets for non-electrical/electrical applications of fusion reactors: Annual report, [1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During FY '83 the Li2O solid-breeder, helium-cooled canister blanket emerged as the LLNL-UW choice for driving the low-temperature (2, high-temperature outer zone for driving the GA hydrogen synfuel process. Providing 3-dimensional neutronics analysis of power deposition and tritium breeding in both blankets was an important part of the UW-Rowe and Assoc. work. In both the LLNL-UW and MARS studies, the fusion driver as the Axi-Cell, A-cell version of the tandem mirror reactor (TMR). Physics parameters consistent with the synfuel interface were determined as part of the work. Defining and analyzing the thermal-electric interfaces between the TMR and the synfuel process continues to be of prime importance. The analysis of thermal transport and energy conversion in the interface, as well as thermal hydraulics analysis of the blanket, were part of the UW-Rowe Assoc. work

  17. Neutronics Analysis of Water-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingjun; Li, Jia; Liu, Songlin

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate the nuclear response to the water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket models for CFETR, a detailed 3D neutronics model with 22.5° torus sector was developed based on the integrated geometry of CFETR, including heterogeneous WCCB blanket models, shield, divertor, vacuum vessel, toroidal and poloidal magnets, and ports. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code MCNP5 and IAEA Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL2.1, the neutronics analyses were performed. The neutron wall loading, tritium breeding ratio, the nuclear heating, neutron-induced atomic displacement damage, and gas production were determined. The results indicate that the global TBR of no less than 1.2 will be a big challenge for the water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket for CFETR. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000, and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  18. Tritium processing for the European test blanket systems: current status of the design and development strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium processing technologies of the two European Test Blanket Systems (TBS), HCLL (Helium Cooled Lithium Lead) and HCPB (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed), play an essential role in meeting the main objectives of the TBS experimental campaign in ITER. The compliancy with the ITER interface requirements, in terms of space availability, service fluids, limits on tritium release, constraints on maintenance, is driving the design of the TBS tritium processing systems. Other requirements come from the characteristics of the relevant test blanket module and the scientific programme that has to be developed and implemented. This paper identifies the main requirements for the design of the TBS tritium systems and equipment and, at the same time, provides an updated overview on the current design status, mainly focusing onto the tritium extractor from Pb-16Li and TBS tritium accountancy. Considerations are also given on the possible extrapolation to DEMO breeding blanket. (authors)

  19. Tritium recovery in Pb17Li-water cooled blanket systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malara, C. [Safety Technology Inst., Ispra (Italy); Casini, G. [Systems Engineering & Information Inst., Ispra (Italy); Viola, A. [Univ. of Cagliari (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    The question of tritium recovery in Pb17Li, water cooled blankets is under investigation since several years at JRC Ispra. The method which has been more extensively analyzed is that of slowly circulating the breeder out from the blanket units and of extracting the tritium from it outside the plasma vacuum vessel by helium gas purging in a suited process apparatus. The design features of the process systems are related to: (1) the very low tritium solubility in Pb17Li which implies high permeation rates through the containment structures; (2) the need of keeping as low as possible the tritium concentration in the cooling water both for safety and economical reasons. A computerized model of the tritium behavior in the blanket units and in the extraction system has been developed.

  20. Tritium processing for the European test blanket systems: current status of the design and development strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricapito, I.; Calderoni, P.; Poitevin, Y. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Aiello, A.; Utili, M. [ENEA, Camugnano (Italy); Demange, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Tritium processing technologies of the two European Test Blanket Systems (TBS), HCLL (Helium Cooled Lithium Lead) and HCPB (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed), play an essential role in meeting the main objectives of the TBS experimental campaign in ITER. The compliancy with the ITER interface requirements, in terms of space availability, service fluids, limits on tritium release, constraints on maintenance, is driving the design of the TBS tritium processing systems. Other requirements come from the characteristics of the relevant test blanket module and the scientific programme that has to be developed and implemented. This paper identifies the main requirements for the design of the TBS tritium systems and equipment and, at the same time, provides an updated overview on the current design status, mainly focusing onto the tritium extractor from Pb-16Li and TBS tritium accountancy. Considerations are also given on the possible extrapolation to DEMO breeding blanket. (authors)