WorldWideScience

Sample records for blade cooling configuration

  1. Conjugate calculation of a film-cooled blade for improvement of the leading edge cooling configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Moritz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Great efforts are still put into the design process of advanced film-cooling configurations. In particular, the vanes and blades of turbine front stages have to be cooled extensively for a safe operation. The conjugate calculation technique is used for the three-dimensional thermal load prediction of a film-cooled test blade of a modern gas turbine. Thus, it becomes possible to take into account the interaction of internal flows, external flow, and heat transfer without the prescription of heat transfer coefficients. The focus of the investigation is laid on the leading edge part of the blade. The numerical model consists of all internal flow passages and cooling hole rows at the leading edge. Furthermore, the radial gap flow is also part of the model. The comparison with thermal pyrometer measurements shows that with respect to regions with high thermal load a qualitatively and quantitatively good agreement of the conjugate results and the measurements can be found. In particular, the region in the vicinity of the mid-span section is exposed to a higher thermal load, which requires further improvement of the cooling arrangement. Altogether the achieved results demonstrate that the conjugate calculation technique is applicable for reasonable prediction of three-dimensional thermal load of complex cooling configurations for blades.

  2. Film cooling adiabatic effectiveness measurements of pressure side trailing edge cooling configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Becchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays total inlet temperature of gas turbine is far above the permissible metal temperature; as a consequence, advanced cooling techniques must be applied to protect from thermal stresses, oxidation and corrosion the components located in the high pressure stages, such as the blade trailing edge. A suitable design of the cooling system for the trailing edge has to cope with geometric constraints and aerodynamic demands; state-of-the-art of cooling concepts often use film cooling on blade pressure side: the air taken from last compressor stages is ejected through discrete holes or slots to provide a cold layer between hot mainstream and the blade surface. With the goal of ensuring a satisfactory lifetime of blades, the design of efficient trailing edge film cooling schemes and, moreover, the possibility to check carefully their behavior, are hence necessary to guarantee an appropriate metal temperature distribution. For this purpose an experimental survey was carried out to investigate the film covering performance of different pressure side trailing edge cooling systems for turbine blades. The experimental test section consists of a scaled-up trailing edge model installed in an open loop suction type test rig. Measurements of adiabatic effectiveness distributions were carried out on three trailing edge cooling system configurations. The baseline geometry is composed by inclined slots separated by elongated pedestals; the second geometry shares the same cutback configuration, with an additional row of circular film cooling holes located upstream; the third model is equipped with three rows of in-line film cooling holes. Experiments have been performed at nearly ambient conditions imposing several blowing ratio values and using carbon dioxide as coolant in order to reproduce a density ratio close to the engine conditions (DR=1.52. To extend the validity of the survey a comparison between adiabatic effectiveness measurements and a prediction by

  3. Ambient air cooling arrangement having a pre-swirler for gas turbine engine blade cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J

    2015-01-06

    A gas turbine engine including: an ambient-air cooling circuit (10) having a cooling channel (26) disposed in a turbine blade (22) and in fluid communication with a source (12) of ambient air: and an pre-swirler (18), the pre-swirler having: an inner shroud (38); an outer shroud (56); and a plurality of guide vanes (42), each spanning from the inner shroud to the outer shroud. Circumferentially adjacent guide vanes (46, 48) define respective nozzles (44) there between. Forces created by a rotation of the turbine blade motivate ambient air through the cooling circuit. The pre-swirler is configured to impart swirl to ambient air drawn through the nozzles and to direct the swirled ambient air toward a base of the turbine blade. The end walls (50, 54) of the pre-swirler may be contoured.

  4. Integrated circuit cooled turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Um, Jae Y.; Holloman, Harry; Koester, Steven

    2017-08-29

    A turbine rotor blade includes at least two integrated cooling circuits that are formed within the blade that include a leading edge circuit having a first cavity and a second cavity and a trailing edge circuit that includes at least a third cavity located aft of the second cavity. The trailing edge circuit flows aft with at least two substantially 180-degree turns at the tip end and the root end of the blade providing at least a penultimate cavity and a last cavity. The last cavity is located along a trailing edge of the blade. A tip axial cooling channel connects to the first cavity of the leading edge circuit and the penultimate cavity of the trailing edge circuit. At least one crossover hole connects the penultimate cavity to the last cavity substantially near the tip end of the blade.

  5. Cooling of gas turbines IX : cooling effects from use of ceramic coatings on water-cooled turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Byron; Livingood, John N B

    1948-01-01

    The hottest part of a turbine blade is likely to be the trailing portion. When the blades are cooled and when water is used as the coolant, the cooling passages are placed as close as possible to the trailing edge in order to cool this portion. In some cases, however, the trailing portion of the blade is so narrow, for aerodynamic reasons, that water passages cannot be located very near the trailing edge. Because ceramic coatings offer the possibility of protection for the trailing part of such narrow blades, a theoretical study has been made of the cooling effect of a ceramic coating on: (1) the blade-metal temperature when the gas temperature is unchanged, and (2) the gas temperature when the metal temperature is unchanged. Comparison is also made between the changes in the blade or gas temperatures produced by ceramic coatings and the changes produced by moving the cooling passages nearer the trailing edge. This comparison was made to provide a standard for evaluating the gains obtainable with ceramic coatings as compared to those obtainable by constructing the turbine blade in such a manner that water passages could be located very near the trailing edge.

  6. Shape design of internal cooling passages within a turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Grzegorz; Nowak, Iwona

    2012-04-01

    The article concerns the optimization of the shape and location of non-circular passages cooling the blade of a gas turbine. To model the shape, four Bezier curves which form a closed profile of the passage were used. In order to match the shape of the passage to the blade profile, a technique was put forward to copy and scale the profile fragments into the component, and build the outline of the passage on the basis of them. For so-defined cooling passages, optimization calculations were carried out with a view to finding their optimal shape and location in terms of the assumed objectives. The task was solved as a multi-objective problem with the use of the Pareto method, for a cooling system composed of four and five passages. The tool employed for the optimization was the evolutionary algorithm. The article presents the impact of the population on the task convergence, and discusses the impact of different optimization objectives on the Pareto optimal solutions obtained. Due to the problem of different impacts of individual objectives on the position of the solution front which was noticed during the calculations, a two-step optimization procedure was introduced. Also, comparative optimization calculations for the scalar objective function were carried out and set up against the non-dominated solutions obtained in the Pareto approach. The optimization process resulted in a configuration of the cooling system that allows a significant reduction in the temperature of the blade and its thermal stress.

  7. Multidisciplinary design optimization of film-cooled gas turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Shashishekara S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with an upper bound constraint on the average blade temperature. In the third formulation, the blade average and maximum temperatures are chosen as objective functions. Shape optimization is performed using geometric parameters associated with film cooling and blade external shape. A quasi-three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver for turbomachinery flows is used to solve for the flow field external to the blade with appropriate modifications to incorporate the effect of film cooling. The heat transfer analysis for temperature distribution within the blade is performed by solving the heat diffusion equation using the finite element method. The multiobjective Kreisselmeier–Steinhauser function approach has been used in conjunction with an approximate analysis technique for optimization. The results obtained using both formulations are compared with reference geometry. All three formulations yield significant reductions in blade temperature with the multiobjective formulation yielding largest reduction in blade temperature.

  8. Aero-Thermo-Structural Design Optimization of Internally Cooled Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulikravich, G. S.; Martin, T. J.; Dennis, B. H.; Lee, E.; Han, Z.-X.

    1999-01-01

    A set of robust and computationally affordable inverse shape design and automatic constrained optimization tools have been developed for the improved performance of internally cooled gas turbine blades. The design methods are applicable to the aerodynamics, heat transfer, and thermoelasticity aspects of the turbine blade. Maximum use of the existing proven disciplinary analysis codes is possible with this design approach. Preliminary computational results demonstrate possibilities to design blades with minimized total pressure loss and maximized aerodynamic loading. At the same time, these blades are capable of sustaining significantly higher inlet hot gas temperatures while requiring remarkably lower coolant mass flow rates. These results suggest that it is possible to design internally cooled turbine blades that will cost less to manufacture, will have longer life span, and will perform as good, if not better than, film cooled turbine blades.

  9. Estimation of gas turbine blades cooling efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moskalenko, A.B.; Kozhevnikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of the evaluation of the most thermally stressed gas turbine elements, first stage power turbine blades, cooling efficiency. The calculations were implemented using a numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method. The volume average temperature of the blade

  10. Conjugate heat transfer investigation on the cooling performance of air cooled turbine blade with thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yongbin; Ma, Chao; Ge, Bing; Zang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    A hot wind tunnel of annular cascade test rig is established for measuring temperature distribution on a real gas turbine blade surface with infrared camera. Besides, conjugate heat transfer numerical simulation is performed to obtain cooling efficiency distribution on both blade substrate surface and coating surface for comparison. The effect of thermal barrier coating on the overall cooling performance for blades is compared under varied mass flow rate of coolant, and spatial difference is also discussed. Results indicate that the cooling efficiency in the leading edge and trailing edge areas of the blade is the lowest. The cooling performance is not only influenced by the internal cooling structures layout inside the blade but also by the flow condition of the mainstream in the external cascade path. Thermal barrier effects of the coating vary at different regions of the blade surface, where higher internal cooling performance exists, more effective the thermal barrier will be, which means the thermal protection effect of coatings is remarkable in these regions. At the designed mass flow ratio condition, the cooling efficiency on the pressure side varies by 0.13 for the coating surface and substrate surface, while this value is 0.09 on the suction side.

  11. Study of design and technology factors influencing gas turbine blade cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, I. V.; Garanin, I. V.; Rogalev, A. N.; Kindra, V. O.; Khudyakova, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    The knowledge of aerodynamic and thermal parameters of turbulators used in order to design an efficient blade cooling system. However, all experimental tests of the hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the turbulators were conducted on the rectangular shape channels with a strongly defined air flow direction. The actual blades have geometry of the channels that essentially differs from the rectangular shape. Specifically, the air flow in the back cavity of a blade with one and half-pass cooling channel changes its direction throughout the feather height. In most cases the ribs and pins are made with a tilt to the channel walls, which is determined by the moving element design of a mould for the ceramic rod element fabrication. All of the factors described above may result in the blade thermohydraulic model being developed failing to fully simulate the air flow and the heat exchange processes in some sections of the cooling path. Hence, the design temperature field will differ from the temperature field of an actual blade. This article studied the numerical data of design and technology factors influencing heat transfer in the cooling channels. The results obtained showed their substantial impact on the blade cooling efficiency.

  12. Multidisciplinary design optimization of film-cooled gas turbine blades

    OpenAIRE

    Shashishekara S. Talya; J. N. Rajadas; A. Chattopadhyay

    1999-01-01

    Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with ...

  13. Verification of Thermal Models of Internally Cooled Gas Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shevchenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of temperature field of cooled turbine blades is a required element of gas turbine engine design process. The verification is usually performed on the basis of results of test of full-size blade prototype on a gas-dynamic test bench. A method of calorimetric measurement in a molten metal thermostat for verification of a thermal model of cooled blade is proposed in this paper. The method allows obtaining local values of heat flux in each point of blade surface within a single experiment. The error of determination of local heat transfer coefficients using this method does not exceed 8% for blades with radial channels. An important feature of the method is that the heat load remains unchanged during the experiment and the blade outer surface temperature equals zinc melting point. The verification of thermal-hydraulic model of high-pressure turbine blade with cooling allowing asymmetrical heat removal from pressure and suction sides was carried out using the developed method. An analysis of heat transfer coefficients confirmed the high level of heat transfer in the leading edge, whose value is comparable with jet impingement heat transfer. The maximum of the heat transfer coefficients is shifted from the critical point of the leading edge to the pressure side.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of turbine blade cooling on the performance of gas turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabchi, K.; Shokri, M.

    2002-01-01

    Turbine inlet temperature strongly affects gas turbine performance. Today blade cooling technologies facilitate the use of higher inlet temperatures. Of course blade cooling causes some thermodynamic penalties that destroys to some extent the positive effect of higher inlet temperatures. This research aims to model and evaluate the performance of gas turbine cycle with air cooled turbine. In this study internal and transpiration cooling methods has been investigated and the penalties as the result of gas flow friction, cooling air throttling, mixing of cooling air flow with hot gas flow, and irreversible heat transfer have been considered. In addition, it is attempted to consider any factor influencing actual conditions of system in the analysis. It is concluded that penalties due to blade cooling decrease as permissible temperature of the blade surface increases. Also it is observed that transpiration method leads to better performance of gas turbine comparing to internal cooling method

  15. Analysis of Turbine Blade Relative Cooling Flow Factor Used in the Subroutine Coolit Based on Film Cooling Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer correlations of data on flat plates are used to explore the parameters in the Coolit program used for calculating the quantity of cooling air for controlling turbine blade temperature. Correlations for both convection and film cooling are explored for their relevance to predicting blade temperature as a function of a total cooling flow which is split between external film and internal convection flows. Similar trends to those in Coolit are predicted as a function of the percent of the total cooling flow that is in the film. The exceptions are that no film or 100 percent convection is predicted to not be able to control blade temperature, while leaving less than 25 percent of the cooling flow in the convection path results in nearing a limit on convection cooling as predicted by a thermal effectiveness parameter not presently used in Coolit.

  16. Aero-thermal optimization of film cooling flow parameters on the suction surface of a high pressure turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ayoubi, Carole; Hassan, Ibrahim; Ghaly, Wahid

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims to optimize film coolant flow parameters on the suction surface of a high-pressure gas turbine blade in order to obtain an optimum compromise between a superior cooling performance and a minimum aerodynamic penalty. An optimization algorithm coupled with three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes analysis is used to determine the optimum film cooling configuration. The VKI blade with two staggered rows of axially oriented, conically flared, film cooling holes on its suction surface is considered. Two design variables are selected; the coolant to mainstream temperature ratio and total pressure ratio. The optimization objective consists of maximizing the spatially averaged film cooling effectiveness and minimizing the aerodynamic penalty produced by film cooling. The effect of varying the coolant flow parameters on the film cooling effectiveness and the aerodynamic loss is analyzed using an optimization method and three dimensional steady CFD simulations. The optimization process consists of a genetic algorithm and a response surface approximation of the artificial neural network type to provide low-fidelity predictions of the objective function. The CFD simulations are performed using the commercial software CFX. The numerical predictions of the aero-thermal performance is validated against a well-established experimental database.

  17. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  18. Effect of an upstream bulge configuration on film cooling with and without mist injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Li, Qianqian; Sundén, Bengt; Ma, Ting; Cui, Pei

    2017-12-01

    To meet the economic requirements of power output, the increased inlet temperature of modern gas turbines is above the melting point of the material. Therefore, high-efficient cooling technology is needed to protect the blades from the hot mainstream. In this study, film cooling was investigated in a simplified channel. A bulge located upstream of the film hole was numerically investigated by analysis of the film cooling effectiveness distribution downstream of the wall. The flow distribution in the plate channel is first presented. Comparing with a case without bulge, different cases with bulge heights of 0.1d, 0.3d and 0.5d were examined with blowing ratios of 0.5 and 1.0. Cases with 1% mist injection were also included in order to obtain better cooling performance. Results show that the bulge configuration located upstream the film hole makes the cooling film more uniform, and enhanceslateral cooling effectiveness. Unlike other cases, the configuration with a 0.3d-height bulge shows a good balance in improving the downstream and lateral cooling effectiveness. Compared with the case without mist at M = 0.5, the 0.3d-height bulge with 1% mist injection increases lateral average effectiveness by 559% at x/d = 55. In addition, a reduction of the thermal stress concentration can be obtained by increasing the height of the bulge configuration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. TACT1- TRANSIENT THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A COOLED TURBINE BLADE OR VANE EQUIPPED WITH A COOLANT INSERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    As turbine-engine core operating conditions become more severe, designers must develop more effective means of cooling blades and vanes. In order to design reliable, cooled turbine blades, advanced transient thermal calculation techniques are required. The TACT1 computer program was developed to perform transient and steady-state heat-transfer and coolant-flow analyses for cooled blades, given the outside hot-gas boundary condition, the coolant inlet conditions, the geometry of the blade shell, and the cooling configuration. TACT1 can analyze turbine blades, or vanes, equipped with a central coolant-plenum insert from which coolant-air impinges on the inner surface of the blade shell. Coolant-side heat-transfer coefficients are calculated with the heat transfer mode at each station being user specified as either impingement with crossflow, forced convection channel flow, or forced convection over pin fins. A limited capability to handle film cooling is also available in the program. The TACT1 program solves for the blade temperature distribution using a transient energy equation for each node. The nodal energy balances are linearized, one-dimensional, heat-conduction equations which are applied at the wall-outer-surface node, at the junction of the cladding and the metal node, and at the wall-inner-surface node. At the mid-metal node a linear, three-dimensional, heat-conduction equation is used. Similarly, the coolant pressure distribution is determined by solving the set of transfer momentum equations for the one-dimensional flow between adjacent fluid nodes. In the coolant channel, energy and momentum equations for one-dimensional compressible flow, including friction and heat transfer, are used for the elemental channel length between two coolant nodes. The TACT1 program first obtains a steady-state solution using iterative calculations to obtain convergence of stable temperatures, pressures, coolant-flow split, and overall coolant mass balance. Transient

  20. Cooling of Gas Turbines. 6; Computed Temperature Distribution Through Cross Section of Water-Cooled Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingood, John N. B.; Sams, Eldon W.

    1947-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the cross-sectional temperature distribution of a water-cooled turbine blade was made using the relaxation method to solve the differential equation derived from the analysis. The analysis was applied to specific turbine blade and the studies icluded investigations of the accuracy of simple methods to determine the temperature distribution along the mean line of the rear part of the blade, of the possible effect of varying the perimetric distribution of the hot gas-to -metal heat transfer coefficient, and of the effect of changing the thermal conductivity of the blade metal for a constant cross sectional area blade with two quarter inch diameter coolant passages.

  1. Numerical investigation of mist/air impingement cooling on ribbed blade leading-edge surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qingfei; Wang, Jin; Chen, Yi-Tung; Wang, Qiuwang; Zeng, Min

    2017-12-01

    The working gas turbine blades are exposed to the environment of high temperature, especially in the leading-edge region. The mist/air two-phase impingement cooling has been adopted to enhance the heat transfer on blade surfaces and investigate the leading-edge cooling effectiveness. An Euler-Lagrange particle tracking method is used to simulate the two-phase impingement cooling on the blade leading-edge. The mesh dependency test has been carried out and the numerical method is validated based on the available experimental data of mist/air cooling with jet impingement on a concave surface. The cooling effectiveness on three target surfaces is investigated, including the smooth and the ribbed surface with convex/concave columnar ribs. The results show that the cooling effectiveness of the mist/air two-phase flow is better than that of the single-phase flow. When the ribbed surfaces are used, the heat transfer enhancement is significant, the surface cooling effectiveness becomes higher and the convex ribbed surface presents a better performance. With the enhancement of the surface heat transfer, the pressure drop in the impingement zone increases, but the incremental factor of the flow friction is smaller than that of the heat transfer enhancement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  3. Computational assessment of the DeepWind aerodynamic performance with different blade and airfoil configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedon, Gabriele; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2017-01-01

    An aerodynamic improvement of the DeepWind rotor is conducted adopting different rotor geometries and solutions with respect to the original configuration while keeping the comparison as fair as possible. The objective of this work is to find the most suitable configuration in order to maximize...... the power production and minimize the blade stress and the cost of energy. Different parameters are considered for the study. The DeepWind blade is characterized by a shape similar to the Troposkien geometry but asymmetric between the top and bottom parts. The blade shape is considered as a fixed parameter...

  4. A Two-Bladed Teetering Hub configuration for the DTU 10 MW RWT: loads considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Rasmussen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    study on an alternative downwind two-bladed rotor configuration. The study is based on a model representative of next generation multi-MW wind turbines: the DTU 10-MW Reference Wind Turbine (RWT). As a first design iteration, the aerodynamic characteristics of the original rotor are maintained......As the size of wind turbine rotors continuously grows, the need for innovative solutions that would yield to lighter rotor configurations becomes more urgent. Traditional wind turbine designs have favored the classic three-bladed upwind rotor configuration. This work presents instead a concept...... in load variations, and hence in fatigue damage, affects the turbine blades, shaft and tower, and originates from the aerodynamic unbalance on the rotor, as well as from aeroelastic interaction with the tower frequency. To mitigate the load amplification caused by the interaction between the tower...

  5. Coupling Network Computing Applications in Air-cooled Turbine Blades Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Yan, Peigang; Xie, Ming; Han, Wanjin

    2018-05-01

    Through establishing control parameters from blade outside to inside, the parametric design of air-cooled turbine blade based on airfoil has been implemented. On the basis of fast updating structure features and generating solid model, a complex cooling system has been created. Different flow units are modeled into a complex network topology with parallel and serial connection. Applying one-dimensional flow theory, programs have been composed to get pipeline network physical quantities along flow path, including flow rate, pressure, temperature and other parameters. These inner units parameters set as inner boundary conditions for external flow field calculation program HIT-3D by interpolation, thus to achieve full field thermal coupling simulation. Referring the studies in literatures to verify the effectiveness of pipeline network program and coupling algorithm. After that, on the basis of a modified design, and with the help of iSIGHT-FD, an optimization platform had been established. Through MIGA mechanism, the target of enhancing cooling efficiency has been reached, and the thermal stress has been effectively reduced. Research work in this paper has significance for rapid deploying the cooling structure design.

  6. Achieving better cooling of turbine blades using numerical simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Tikhonov, A. S.; Sendyurev, C. I.; Samokhvalov, N. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A new design of the first-stage nozzle vane for the turbine of a prospective gas-turbine engine is considered. The blade's thermal state is numerically simulated in conjugate statement using the ANSYS CFX 13.0 software package. Critical locations in the blade design are determined from the distribution of heat fluxes, and measures aimed at achieving more efficient cooling are analyzed. Essentially lower (by 50-100°C) maximal temperature of metal has been achieved owing to the results of the performed work.

  7. Design Of Cooling Configuration For Military Aeroengine V-Gutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batchu Suresh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Military aircraft engines employ afterburner system for increasing the thrust required during combat and take-off flight conditions. V-gutter is employed for stabilisation of the flame during reheat. For fifth generation aero engine the gas temperature at the start of the afterburner is be-yond the allowable material limits of the V-gutter so it is required to cool the V-gutter to obtain acceptable creep life. The design of cooling configuration for the given source pressure is worked out for different rib configurations to obtain the allowable metal temperature with minimum coolant mass flow.1D network analysis is used to estimate the cooling mass flow and metal temperature for design flight condition. CFD analysis is carried out for four cooling configurations with different rib orientations. Out of four configurations one configuration is selected for the best cooling configuration.

  8. Performance evaluation of extractor cutting blade configuration in Inulin extraction process from Dahlia sp. L tuber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundari, E.; Praputri, E.; Marthiana, W.; Jaya, M.

    2018-03-01

    Inulin, a polysaccharide plant-based nutrient, can be isolated from dahlia flower tubers by liquid-solid extraction processes and is generally carried out in an extractor tank equipped with an agitator. To accelerate the diffusion rate of solute from the solid phase (bulk phase) to the external surface (boundary layer) in order to increase yield of inulin, the size reduction of material is required. The purpose of this research was to design the cutting blade needed for dahlia tuber size reduction and investigate the effect of blade types, agitator speed (350, 700, 1050, and 1400 rpm), and configuration of cutting blade to material fineness at 90 minutes of contacting time. The results showed that higher cutting blade speed results in higher cut material fineness rate. The best conditions was achieved by the configuration of two four-blade turbine combined with one three-blade turbine with fineness rate more than 90% in 30 minutes of contacting time at every variation of agitator speed. The cutting blade designed in this study can be used for size reduction purpose of tubers other than dahlia tubers.

  9. blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashishekara S. Talya

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with an upper bound constraint on the average blade temperature. In the third formulation, the blade average and maximum temperatures are chosen as objective functions. Shape optimization is performed using geometric parameters associated with film cooling and blade external shape. A quasi-three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver for turbomachinery flows is used to solve for the flow field external to the blade with appropriate modifications to incorporate the effect of film cooling. The heat transfer analysis for temperature distribution within the blade is performed by solving the heat diffusion equation using the finite element method. The multiobjective Kreisselmeier–Steinhauser function approach has been used in conjunction with an approximate analysis technique for optimization. The results obtained using both formulations are compared with reference geometry. All three formulations yield significant reductions in blade temperature with the multiobjective formulation yielding largest reduction in blade temperature.

  10. Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer results and operating data from a natural-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Freche, John C

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer data and operating data were obtained with a natural-convection water-cooled turbine over range of turbine speeds and inlet-gas temperatures. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for natural-convection heat transfer. The turbine data were displaced from a theoretical equation for natural convection heat transfer in the turbulent region and from natural-convection data obtained with vertical cylinders and plates; possible disruption of natural convection circulation within the blade coolant passages was thus indicated. Comparison of non dimensional temperature-ratio parameters for the blade leading edge, midchord, and trailing edge indicated that the blade cooling effectiveness is greatest at the midchord and least at the trailing edge.

  11. Configurable Crossbar Switch for Deterministic, Low-latency Inter-blade Communications in a MicroTCA Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamooz, Saeed [Vadatech Inc. (United States); Breeding, John Eric [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Justice, T Alan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    As MicroTCA expands into applications beyond the telecommunications industry from which it originated, it faces new challenges in the area of inter-blade communications. The ability to achieve deterministic, low-latency communications between blades is critical to realizing a scalable architecture. In the past, legacy bus architectures accomplished inter-blade communications using dedicated parallel buses across the backplane. Because of limited fabric resources on its backplane, MicroTCA uses the carrier hub (MCH) for this purpose. Unfortunately, MCH products from commercial vendors are limited to standard bus protocols such as PCI Express, Serial Rapid IO and 10/40GbE. While these protocols have exceptional throughput capability, they are neither deterministic nor necessarily low-latency. To overcome this limitation, an MCH has been developed based on the Xilinx Virtex-7 690T FPGA. This MCH provides the system architect/developer complete flexibility in both the interface protocol and routing of information between blades. In this paper, we present the application of this configurable MCH concept to the Machine Protection System under development for the Spallation Neutron Sources's proton accelerator. Specifically, we demonstrate the use of the configurable MCH as a 12x4-lane crossbar switch using the Aurora protocol to achieve a deterministic, low-latency data link. In this configuration, the crossbar has an aggregate bandwidth of 48 GB/s.

  12. Film cooling effects on the tip flow characteristics of a gas turbine blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of the tip flow characteristics between a gas turbine blade tip and the shroud was conducted by a pressure-test system and a particle image velocimetry (PIV system. A three-times scaled profile of the GE-E3 blade with five film cooling holes was used as specimen. The effects on flow characteristics by the rim width and the groove depth of the squealer tip were revealed. The rim widths were (a 0.9%, (b 2.1%, and (c 3.0% of the axial chord, and the groove depths were (a 2.8%, (b 4.8%, and (c 10% of the blade span. Several pressure taps on the top plate above the blades were connected to pressure gauges. By a CCD camera the PIV system recorded the velocity field around the leading edge zone including the five cooling holes. The flow distributions both in the tip clearance and in the passage were revealed, and the influence of the inlet velocity was determined. In this work, the tip flow characteristics with and without film cooling were investigated. The effects of different global blowing ratios of M=0.5, 1.0, 1.3 and 2.5 were established. It was found that decreasing the rim width resulted in a lower mass flow rate of the leakage flow, and the pressure distributions from the leading edge to the trailing edge showed a linearly increasing trend. It was also found that if the inlet velocity was less than 1.5 m/s, the flow field in the passage far away from the suction side appeared as a stagnation zone.

  13. Multi-scale simulation of single crystal hollow turbine blade manufactured by liquid metal cooling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metal cooling (LMC process as a powerful directional solidification (DS technique is prospectively used to manufacture single crystal (SC turbine blades. An understanding of the temperature distribution and microstructure evolution in LMC process is required in order to improve the properties of the blades. For this reason, a multi-scale model coupling with the temperature field, grain growth and solute diffusion was established. The temperature distribution and mushy zone evolution of the hollow blade was simulated and discussed. According to the simulation results, the mushy zone might be convex and ahead of the ceramic beads at a lower withdrawal rate, while it will be concave and laggard at a higher withdrawal rate, and a uniform and horizontal mushy zone will be formed at a medium withdrawal rate. Grain growth of the blade at different withdrawal rates was also investigated. Single crystal structures were all selected out at three different withdrawal rates. Moreover, mis-orientation of the grains at 8 mm/min reached ~30°, while it was ~5° and ~15° at 10 mm/min and 12 mm/min, respectively. The model for predicting dendritic morphology was verified by corresponding experiment. Large scale for 2D dendritic distribution in the whole sections was investigated by experiment and simulation, and they presented a well agreement with each other. Keywords: Hollow blade, Single crystal, Multi-scale simulation, Liquid metal cooling

  14. Influence of different means of turbine blade cooling on the thermodynamic performance of combined cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjay; Singh, Onkar; Prasad, B.N.

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study of the influence of different means of turbine blade cooling on the thermodynamic performance of combined cycle power plant is presented. Seven schemes involving air and steam as coolants under open and closed loop cooling techniques have been studied. The open loop incorporates the internal convection, film and transpiration cooling techniques. Closed loop cooling includes only internal convection cooling. It has been found that closed loop steam cooling offers more specific work and consequently gives higher value of plant efficiency of about 60%, whereas open loop transpiration steam cooling, open loop steam internal convection cooling, transpiration air cooling, film steam cooling, film air, and internal convection air cooling have been found to yield lower values of plant efficiency in decreasing order as compared to closed loop steam cooling

  15. Estimation of Efficiency of the Cooling Channel of the Nozzle Blade of Gas-Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikulin, A. V.; Yaroslavtsev, N. L.; Zemlyanaya, V. A.

    2018-02-01

    The main direction of improvement of gas-turbine plants (GTP) and gas-turbine engines (GTE) is increasing the gas temperature at the turbine inlet. For the solution of this problem, promising systems of intensification of heat exchange in cooled turbine blades are developed. With this purpose, studies of the efficiency of the cooling channel of the nozzle blade in the basic modification and of the channel after constructive measures for improvement of the cooling system by the method of calorimetry in a liquid-metal thermostat were conducted. The combined system of heat-exchange intensification with the complicated scheme of branched channels is developed; it consists of a vortex matrix and three rows of inclined intermittent trip strips. The maximum value of hydraulic resistance ξ is observed at the first row of the trip strips, which is connected with the effect of dynamic impact of airflow on the channel walls, its turbulence, and rotation by 117° at the inlet to the channels formed by the trip strips. These factors explain the high value of hydraulic resistance equal to 3.7-3.4 for the first row of the trip strips. The obtained effect was also confirmed by the results of thermal tests, i.e., the unevenness of heat transfer on the back and on the trough of the blade is observed at the first row of the trip strips, which amounts 8-12%. This unevenness has a fading character; at the second row of the trip strips, it amounts to 3-7%, and it is almost absent at the third row. At the area of vortex matrix, the intensity of heat exchange on the blade back is higher as compared to the trough, which is explained by the different height of the matrix ribs on its opposite sides. The design changes in the nozzle blade of basic modification made it possible to increase the intensity of heat exchange by 20-50% in the area of the vortex matrix and by 15-30% on the section of inclined intermittent trip strips. As a result of research, new criteria dependences for the

  16. Implementation of creep-fatigue model into finite-element code to assess cooled turbine blade.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dedekind, MO

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blades which are designed with airfoil cooling are subject to thermo-mechanical fatigue as well as creep damage. These problems arise due to thermal cycling and high operating temperatures in service. An implementation of fatigue and creep...

  17. Determination of blade-to-coolant heat-transfer coefficients on a forced-convection, water-cooled, single-stage turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freche, John C; Schum, Eugene F

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained on a forced-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine over a large laminar flow range and over a portion of the transition range between laminar and turbulent flow. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for forced-convection heat transfer with laminar flow. Natural-convection heat transfer was negligible for this turbine over the Grashof number range investigated. Comparison of turbine data with stationary tube data for the laminar flow of heated liquids showed good agreement. Calculated average midspan blade temperatures using theoretical gas-to-blade coefficients and blade-to-coolant coefficients from stationary-tube data resulted in close agreement with experimental data.

  18. Optimizing parameters of GTU cycle and design values of air-gas channel in a gas turbine with cooled nozzle and rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kler, A. M.; Zakharov, Yu. B.

    2012-09-01

    The authors have formulated the problem of joint optimization of pressure and temperature of combustion products before gas turbine, profiles of nozzle and rotor blades of gas turbine, and cooling air flow rates through nozzle and rotor blades. The article offers an original approach to optimization of profiles of gas turbine blades where the optimized profiles are presented as linear combinations of preliminarily formed basic profiles. The given examples relate to optimization of the gas turbine unit on the criterion of power efficiency at preliminary heat removal from air flows supplied for the air-gas channel cooling and without such removal.

  19. Rotational effects on turbine blade cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govatzidakis, G.J.; Guenette, G.R.; Kerrebrock, J.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the influence of rotation on the heat transfer in a smooth, rectangular passage rotating in the orthogonal mode is presented. The passage simulates one of the cooling channels found in gas turbine blades. A constant heat flux is imposed on the model with either inward or outward flow. The effects of rotation and buoyancy on the Nusselt number were quantified by systematically varying the Rotation number, Density Ratio, Reynolds number, and Buoyancy parameter. The experiment utilizes a high resolution infrared temperature measurement technique in order to measure the wall temperature distribution. The experimental results show that the rotational effects on the Nusselt number are significant and proper turbine blade design must take into account the effects of rotation, buoyancy, and flow direction. The behavior of the Nusselt number distribution depends strongly on the particular side, axial position, flow direction, and the specific range of the scaling parameters. The results show a strong coupling between buoyancy and Corollas effects throughout the passage. For outward flow, the trailing side Nusselt numbers increase with Rotation number relative to stationary values. On the leading side, the Nusselt numbers tended to decrease with rotation near the inlet and subsequently increased farther downstream in the passage. The Nusselt numbers on the side walls generally increased with rotation. For inward flow, the Nusselt numbers generally improved relative to stationary results, but increases in the Nusselt number were relatively smaller than in the case of outward flow. For outward and inward flows, increasing the density ratio generally tended to decrease Nusselt numbers on the leading and trailing sides, but the exact behavior and magnitude depended on the local axial position and specific range of Buoyancy parameters.

  20. Coupled calculation of external heat transfer and material temperatures of convection-cooled turbine blades. Final report; Gekoppelte Berechnung des aeusseren Waermeuebergangs und der Materialtemperaturen konvektionsgekuehlter Turbinenschaufeln. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heselhaus, A.

    1997-05-01

    In this work a hybrid program system consisting of a 3D finite-volume Navier-Stokes flow solver and a 3D finite-element heat conduction solver has been developed. It enables the coupled calculation of structure temperatures in diabatic solid/fluid configurations. The grids of both the finite element and the finite volume computational domain may be completely independent. The coupled program fully resolves the thermal interaction between heat transfer and the resulting material temperatures. The developed coupling algorithm is numerically stable, conservative and works without the need to define ambient temperatures in the flowfield. This allows for the simulation of any solid/fluid configuration. When simulating combined blade/endwall cooling or filmcooling, only a coupled procedure is capable to completely account for the interaction between all relevant thermal parameters. It is found that the coupled calculation of convective cooling in a realistic guide vane leads locally to 45 K higher and 107 K lower blade temperatures than the uncoupled calculation. This shows that accounting for the thermal interaction between the flow and the structure offers both potential to save cooling air and a lower margin of safety when designing cooling systems close to the thermal limits of the blade material. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde ein Verfahren zur Berechnung der Temperaturverteilung in diabat umstroemten Koerpern entwickelt, bei dem ein 3D-Finite Volumen Navier-Stokes Stroemungsloeser und ein 3D-Finite Elemente Waermeleitungsloeser zu einem hybriden Programmsystem gekoppelt werden. Dabei besteht die Moeglichkeit, voellig unabhaengige Rechennetze fuer Stroemung und Struktur zu verwenden. Mit dem gekoppelten Verfahren kann die Wechselwirkung zwischen resultierenden Materialtemperaturen und dem davon rueck-beeinflussten Waermeuebergang beruecksichtigt werden. Weiterhin ist der hier entwickelte, stabile und konservative Kopplungsalgorithmus nicht

  1. Performance investigation of solid desiccant evaporative cooling system configurations in different climatic zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Muzaffar; Vukovic, Vladimir; Sheikh, Nadeem Ahmed; Ali, Hafiz M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Five configurations of a DEC system are analyzed in five climate zones. • DEC system model configurations are developed in Dymola/Modelica. • Performance analysis predicted a suitable DEC system configuration for each climate zone. • Results show that climate of Vienna, Sao Paulo, and Adelaide favors the ventilated-dunkle cycle. • While ventilation cycle configuration suits the climate of Karachi and Shanghai. - Abstract: Performance of desiccant evaporative cooling (DEC) system configurations is strongly influenced by the climate conditions and varies widely in different climate zones. Finding the optimal configuration of DEC systems for a specific climatic zone is tedious and time consuming. This investigation conducts performance analysis of five DEC system configurations under climatic conditions of five cities from different zones: Vienna, Karachi, Sao Paulo, Shanghai, and Adelaide. On the basis of operating cycle, three standard and two modified system configurations (ventilation, recirculation, dunkle cycles; ventilated-recirculation and ventilated-dunkle cycles) are analyzed in these five climate zones. Using an advance equation-based object-oriented (EOO) modeling and simulation approach, optimal configurations of a DEC system are determined for each climate zone. Based on the hourly climate data of each zone for its respective design cooling day, performance of each system configuration is estimated using three performance parameters: cooling capacity, COP, and cooling energy delivered. The results revealed that the continental/micro-thermal climate of Vienna, temperate/mesothermal climate of Sao Paulo, and dry-summer subtropical climate of Adelaide favor the use of ventilated-dunkle cycle configuration with average COP of 0.405, 0.89 and 1.01 respectively. While ventilation cycle based DEC configuration suits arid and semiarid climate of Karachi and another category of temperate/mesothermal climate of Shanghai with average COP of

  2. A Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer and Effectiveness on Film Cooled Turbine Blade Tip Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A. A.; Rigby, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study has been performed to predict the distribution of convective heat transfer coefficient on a simulated blade tip with cooling holes. The purpose of the examination was to assess the ability of a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver to predict the rate of tip heat transfer and the distribution of cooling effectiveness. To this end, the simulation of tip clearance flow with blowing of Kim and Metzger was used. The agreement of the computed effectiveness with the data was quite good. The agreement with the heat transfer coefficient was not as good but improved away from the cooling holes. Numerical flow visualization showed that the uniformity of wetting of the surface by the film cooling jet is helped by the reverse flow due to edge separation of the main flow.

  3. Numerical study on film cooling and convective heat transfer characteristics in the cutback region of turbine blade trailing edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbine blade trailing edge is easy to burn out under the exposure of high-temperature gas due to its thin shape. The cooling of this area is an important task in gas turbine blade design. The structure design and analysis of trailing edge is critical because of the complexity of geometry, arrangement of cooling channels, design requirement of strength, and the working condition of high heat flux. In the present paper, a 3-D model of the trailing edge cooling channel is constructed and both structures with and without land are numerically investigated at different blowing ratio. The distributions of film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient on cutback and land surface are analyzed, respectively. According to the results, it is obtained that the distributions of film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient both show the symmetrical characteristics as a result of the periodic structure of the trailing edge. The increase of blowing ratio significantly improves the film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient on the cutback surface, which is beneficial to the cooling of trailing edge. It is also found that the land structure is advantageous for enhancing the streamwise film cooling effectiveness of the trailing edge surface while the film cooling effectiveness on the land surface remains at a low level. Convective heat transfer coefficient exhibits a strong dependency with the blowing ratio, which suggests that film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient must be both considered and analyzed in the design of trailing edge cooling structure.

  4. Turbine airfoil with an internal cooling system having vortex forming turbulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels having a plurality of turbulators protruding from an inner surface and positioned generally nonorthogonal and nonparallel to a longitudinal axis of the airfoil cooling channel. The configuration of turbulators may create a higher internal convective cooling potential for the blade cooling passage, thereby generating a high rate of internal convective heat transfer and attendant improvement in overall cooling performance. This translates into a reduction in cooling fluid demand and better turbine performance.

  5. Simulation Analysis of the Four Configurations of Solar Desiccant Cooling System Using Evaporative Cooling in Tropical Weather in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. S. Dezfouli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A high demand for air conditioning systems exists in hot and humid regions because of the warm climate during the year. The high energy consumption of conventional air conditioning system is the reason for our investigation of the solar desiccant cooling system as an energy-efficient cooling system. Four model configurations were considered to determine the best configuration of a solar desiccant cooling system: one-stage ventilation, one-stage recirculation, two-stage ventilation, and two-stage recirculation. These models were stimulated for 8,760 hr of operation under hot and humid weather in Malaysia. Several parameters (i.e., coefficient of performance or COP, room temperature and humidity ratio, and the solar fraction of each system were evaluated by detecting the temperature and humidity ratio of the different points of each configuration by TRNSYS simulation. The latent and sensible loads of the test room were 0.875 kW and 2.625 kW, respectively. By investigating the simulation results of the four systems, the ventilation modes were found to be higher than the recirculation modes in the one- and two-stage solar desiccant cooling systems. The isothermal dehumidification COP of the two-stage ventilation was higher than that of the two-stage recirculation. Hence, the two-stage ventilation mode desiccant cooling system in a hot and humid area has higher efficiency than the other configurations.

  6. Structural design of the toroidal configuration of the HTS SMES cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, H.K.; Koh, D.Y.; Ko, J.S.; Kim, H.B.; Hong, Y.J.; Kim, S.H.; Seong, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is working on around 30 K, because the magnet is made of high temperature superconductor. To maintain the cryogenic temperature, the superconducting coil is cooled by cryogen, helium gas or liquid neon. But there are some weak points in the cryogen cooling system. For example periodic charge of the cryogen and size is big and so on. So, we have designed the conduction cooling system for toroidal configuration HTS SMES. The toroidal type HTS SMES has some merits, so it is very small magnetic field leakage, and magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tape surface can be reduced. Our system has 28 numbers of HTS double pancake coils and they are arrayed toroidal configuration. The toroidal inner radius is 162 mm, and outer radius is 599 mm, and height is about 162 mm. In this study, we have designed the cooling structure and analyzed temperature distribution of cooling path, thermal stress and deformation of the cooling structure.

  7. The heat transfer analysis of the first stage blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Choi, Bum Seog; Park, Byung Gyu; Yoon, Eui Soo

    2001-01-01

    To get higher efficiency of gas turbine, the designer should have more higher Turbine Inlet Temperature(TIT). Today, modern gas turbine having sophisticated cooling scheme has TIT above 1,700 .deg. C. In the Korea, many gas turbine having TIT above 1,300 .deg. C was imported and being operated, but the gas with high TIT above 1,300 .deg. C in the turbine will give damage to liner of combustor, and blade of turbine and etc. So frequently maintenance for parts enduring high temperature was performed. In this study, the heat transfer analysis of cooling air in the internal cooling channel (network analysis) and temperature analysis of the blade (Finite Element Analysis) in the first stage rotor was conducted for development of the optimal cooling passage design procedure. The results of network analysis and FEM analysis of blade show that the high temperature spot are occurred at the leading edge, trailing edge near tip, and platform. So to get more reliable performance of gas turbine, the more efficient cooling method should be applied at the leading edge and tip section and the thermal barrier coating on the blade surface has important role in cooling blade

  8. Parametric analysis of blade configurations for a small-scale nitrogen axial expander with hybrid open-Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Khalil M.; Mahmoud, S.; Al- Dadah, R.K.; AL-Mousawi, Fadhel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Develop cryogenic energy storage and efficient recovery technologies. • Integrate small scale closed and cryogenic open-Rankine cycles. • Investigate blade configuration on small-scale axial expander performance. • Use mean line and 3D CFD simulation for expander robust design procedure. • Predict effects of expander efficiency on hybrid open-Rankine cycle efficiency. - Abstract: During the last few decades, low-grade energy sources such as solar energy and wind energy have enhanced the efficiency of the advanced renewable technologies such as the combined Rankine. Furthermore, these heat sources have contributed to a reduction in CO2 emissions. To address the problem of the intermittent nature of such renewable sources, energy storage technologies have been used to balance the power demand and smooth out energy production. In this study, the direct expansion cycle (open Rankine cycle) is combined with a closed loop Rankine cycle to generate power more efficiently and address the problem of discontinuous renewable sources. The topping cycle of this system is a closed looped Rankine cycle and propane is used as a hydrocarbon fluid, while the direct expansion cycle is considered to be the bottoming cycle utilizing nitrogen as cryogen fluid. Small-scale expanders are the most important parts in many thermal power cycles, such as the Rankine cycle, due to the significant impact on the overall cycle’s efficiency. This work investigated the effect of using a number of blade configurations on the cycle’s performance using a small-scale axial expander. A three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulation was used to examine four proposed blade configurations (lean, sweep, twist, bowl) with three hub- tip ratios (0.83, 0.75, 0.66). In addition, a numerical simulation model of the hybrid open expansion- Rankine cycle was designed and modeled in order to estimate the cycle’s performance. The results show that when the expander

  9. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2014-09-23

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is described. The adaptor assembly includes a turbine blade having a blade root and an adaptor body having an adaptor root. The adaptor body defines a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root of the turbine blade such that the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are adjacent to one another when the blade root of the turbine blade is positioned within the slot. Both the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are configured to be received within the root slot of the rotor disk.

  10. A scaled experimental study of control blade insertion dynamics in Pebble-Bed Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buster, Grant C., E-mail: grant.buster@gmail.com; Laufer, Michael R.; Peterson, Per F.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • A granular dynamics scaling methodology is discussed. • Control blade insertion in a representative pebble-bed core is experimentally studied. • Control blade insertion forces and pebble displacements are experimentally measured. • X-ray tomography techniques are used to observe pebble displacement distributions. - Abstract: Direct control element insertion into a pebble-bed reactor core is proposed as a viable control system in molten-salt-cooled pebble-bed reactors. Unlike helium-cooled pebble-bed reactors, this reactor type uses spherical fuel elements with near-neutral buoyancy in the molten-salt coolant, thus reducing contact forces on the fuel elements. This study uses the X-ray Pebble Bed Recirculation Experiment facility to measure the force required to insert a control element directly into a scaled pebble-bed. The required control element insertion force, and therefore the contact force on fuel elements, is measured to be well below recommended limits. Additionally, X-ray tomography is used to observe how the direct insertion of a control element physically displaces spherical fuel elements. The tomography results further support the viability of direct control element insertion into molten-salt-cooled pebble-bed reactor cores.

  11. Cooling the APS storage ring radio-frequency accelerating cavities: Thermal/stress/fatigue analysis and cavity cooling configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primdahl, K.; Kustom, R.

    1995-01-01

    The 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source positron storage ring requires sixteen separate 352-MHz radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities. Cavities are installed as groups of four, in straight sections used elsewhere for insertion devices. They occupy the first such straight section after injection, along with the last three just before injection. Cooling is provided by a subsystem of the sitewide deionized water system. Pumping equipment is located in a building directly adjacent to the accelerator enclosure. A prototype cavity was fabricated and tested where cooling was via twelve 19-mm-diameter [3/4 in] brazed-on tubes in a series-parallel flow configuration. Unfortunately, the thermal contact to some tubes was poor due to inadequate braze filler. Here, heat transfer studies, including finite-element analysis and test results, of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring 352-MHz rf accelerating cavities are described. Stress and fatigue life of the copper are discussed. Configuration of water cooling is presented

  12. Analytical Modelling of the Effects of Different Gas Turbine Cooling Techniques on Engine Performance =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Selcuk Can

    In this research, MATLAB SimulinkRTM was used to develop a cooled engine model for industrial gas turbines and aero-engines. The model consists of uncooled on-design, mean-line turbomachinery design and a cooled off-design analysis in order to evaluate the engine performance parameters by using operating conditions, polytropic efficiencies, material information and cooling system details. The cooling analysis algorithm involves a 2nd law analysis to calculate losses from the cooling technique applied. The model is used in a sensitivity analysis that evaluates the impacts of variations in metal Biot number, thermal barrier coating Biot number, film cooling effectiveness, internal cooling effectiveness and maximum allowable blade temperature on main engine performance parameters of aero and industrial gas turbine engines. The model is subsequently used to analyze the relative performance impact of employing Anti-Vortex Film Cooling holes (AVH) by means of data obtained for these holes by Detached Eddy Simulation-CFD Techniques that are valid for engine-like turbulence intensity conditions. Cooled blade configurations with AVH and other different external cooling techniques were used in a performance comparison study. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  13. Investigation of Water-spray Cooling of Turbine Blades in a Turbojet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freche, John C; Stelpflug, William J

    1953-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was made with a J33-A-9 engine to determine the effectiveness of spray cooling as a means of increasing thrust by permitting engine operation at inlet-gas temperatures and speeds above rated. With the assumption of adequate spray cooling at a coolant-to-gas flow ratio of 3 percent, calculations for the sea-level static condition indicated a thrust may be achieved by engine operation at an inlet-gas temperature of 2000 degrees F and an overspeed of 10 percent. Of the water-injection configurations investigated experimentally, those located in the inner ring of the stator diaphragm provided the best cooling at rated engine speed.

  14. Mach number scaling of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Kenneth P.; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of model helicopter rotor blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) was conducted in a 5 by 7.5-foot anechoic wind tunnel using model helicopter rotors with two, three, and four blades. The results were compared with a previously developed Mach number scaling theory. Three- and four-bladed rotor configurations were found to show very good agreement with the Mach number to the sixth power law for all conditions tested. A reduction of conditions for which BVI blade slap is detected was observed for three-bladed rotors when compared to the two-bladed baseline. The advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotor exhibited an angular dependence not present for the two-bladed configuration. The upper limits for the advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotors increased with increasing rotational speed.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis and economical evaluation of two 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configurations for helium refrigeration and liquefaction cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z. G.; Zhuang, M.; Jiang, Q. F.; Y Zhang, Q.; Feng, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    In 310-80 K pre-cooling stage, the temperature of the HP helium stream reduces to about 80 K where nearly 73% of the enthalpy drop from room temperature to 4.5 K occurs. Apart from the most common liquid nitrogen pre-cooling, another 310-80 K pre-cooling configuration with turbine is employed in some helium cryoplants. In this paper, thermodynamic and economical performance of these two kinds of 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configurations has been studied at different operating conditions taking discharge pressure, isentropic efficiency of turbines and liquefaction rate as independent parameters. The exergy efficiency, total UA of heat exchangers and operating cost of two configurations are computed. This work will provide a reference for choosing 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configuration during design.

  16. Cooling system with compressor bleed and ambient air for gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Marra, John J.

    2017-11-21

    A cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine blade cooling fluid supply and from an ambient air source to the turbine blade cooling fluid supply to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The cooling system may include a compressor bleed conduit extending from a compressor to the turbine blade cooling fluid supply that provides cooling fluid to at least one turbine blade. The compressor bleed conduit may include an upstream section and a downstream section whereby the upstream section exhausts compressed bleed air through an outlet into the downstream section through which ambient air passes. The outlet of the upstream section may be generally aligned with a flow of ambient air flowing in the downstream section. As such, the compressed air increases the flow of ambient air to the turbine blade cooling fluid supply.

  17. Parametric Blade Study Test Report Rotor Configuration. Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    Figure 2. The rotor shaft is mounted on an oil-damped roller bearing at the forward location and a ball bearing at the aft location; radial runout does...thermodynamic properties. 22 d. Corrections were made to measured compressor temperatures and pressures, facility flowrate, and rotor wheel speed to...1152 .Z660 .1024 STRM- BLADE BLADE WHEEL LINE SECT. LEAN SPEED NUMBER ANGLE ANGLE 1 -55.15 7.32 1497.9 2 -53.85 8.09 1434.7 3 -52.96 7.11 1372.1 4

  18. Parametric Blade Study Test Report Rotor Configuration. Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    location and a ball bearing at the aft location; radial runout does not exceed 0.001 inch. Forward and aft buffer controlled gap carbon seals were used...made to measured compressor temperatures and pressures, facility flowrate, and rotor wheel speed to correspond to standard inlet conditions of...0662 .1034 STRM- BLADE BLADE WHEEL LINE SECT. LEAN SPEED NUMBER ANGLE ANGLE I -53.96 7.35 1497.5 2 -52.68 8.11 1434.6 3 -51.88 7.15 1372.5 4 -50.49

  19. Blade runner. Blade server and virtualization technology can help hospitals save money--but they are far from silver bullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Daphne

    2009-03-01

    Blade servers and virtualization can reduce infrastructure, maintenance, heating, electric, cooling and equipment costs. Blade server technology is evolving and some elements may become obsolete. There is very little interoperability between blades. Hospitals can virtualize 40 to 60 percent of their servers, and old servers can be reused for testing. Not all applications lend themselves to virtualization--especially those with high memory requirements. CIOs should engage their vendors in virtualization discussions.

  20. Effects of free-stream turbulence intensity and blowing ratio on film cooling of turbine blade leading edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. M.; Kim, Youn J.; Cho, H. H.

    2001-01-01

    We used a cylindrical model which simulates turbine blade leading edge to investigate the effects of free-stream turbulence intensity and blowing ratio on film cooling of turbine blade leading edge. Tests are carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel on a cylindrical model with three rows of injection holes. Mainstream Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter was 7.1x10 4 . Two types of turbulence grid are used to increase a free-stream turbulence intensity. The effect of coolant blowing ratio was studied for various blowing ratios. For each blowing ratios, wall temperatures around the surface of the test model are measured by thermocouples installed inside the model. Results show that blowing ratios have small effect on spanwise-averaged film effectiveness at high free-stream turbulence intensity. However, an increase in free-stream turbulence intensity enhances significantly spanwise-averaged film effectiveness at low blowing ratio

  1. Vortex Structure Effects on Impingement, Effusion, and Cross Flow Cooling of a Double Wall Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligrani, P. M.

    2018-03-01

    A variety of different types of vortices and vortex structures have important influences on thermal protection, heat transfer augmentation, and cooling performance of impingement cooling, effusion cooling, and cross flow cooling. Of particular interest are horseshoe vortices, which form around the upstream portions of effusion coolant concentrations just after they exit individual holes, hairpin vortices, which develop nearby and adjacent to effusion coolant trajectories, and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices which form within the shear layers that form around each impingement cooling jet. The influences of these different vortex structures are described as they affect and alter the thermal performance of effusion cooling, impingement cooling, and cross flow cooling, as applied to a double wall configuration.

  2. Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems and cooling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagepalli, Bharat [Niskayuna, NY; Barnes, Gary R [Delanson, NY; Gadre, Aniruddha D [Rexford, NY; Jansen, Patrick L [Scotia, NY; Bouchard, Jr., Charles G.; Jarczynski, Emil D [Scotia, NY; Garg, Jivtesh [Cambridge, MA

    2008-09-23

    A wind generator includes: a nacelle; a hub carried by the nacelle and including at least a pair of wind turbine blades; and an electricity producing generator including a stator and a rotor carried by the nacelle. The rotor is connected to the hub and rotatable in response to wind acting on the blades to rotate the rotor relative to the stator to generate electricity. A cooling system is carried by the nacelle and includes at least one ambient air inlet port opening through a surface of the nacelle downstream of the hub and blades, and a duct for flowing air from the inlet port in a generally upstream direction toward the hub and in cooling relation to the stator.

  3. Influence of internal channel geometry of gas turbine blade on flow structure and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Telega, Janusz; Doerffer, Piotr

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the study of the influence of channel geometry on the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on all the walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on the heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of internal cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include a corner fillets, ribs with fillet radii and a special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which has very realistic features.

  4. Preliminary Aerodynamic Investigation of Fan Rotor Blade Morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Various new technologies currently under development may enable controlled blade shape variability, or so-called blade morphing, to be practically employed in aircraft engine fans and compressors in the foreseeable future. The current study is a relatively brief, preliminary computational fluid dynamics investigation aimed at partially demonstrating and quantifying the aerodynamic potential of fan rotor blade morphing. The investigation is intended to provide information useful for near-term planning, as well as aerodynamic solution data sets that can be subsequently analyzed using advanced acoustic diagnostic tools, for the purpose of making fan noise comparisons. Two existing fan system models serve as baselines for the investigation: the Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan with a design tip speed of 806 ft/sec and a pressure ratio of 1.294, and the Source Diagnostic Test fan with a design tip speed of 1215 ft/sec and a pressure ratio of 1.470. Both are 22-in. sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle models that have undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The study, restricted to fan rotor blade morphing only, involves a fairly simple blade morphing technique. Specifically, spanwise-linear variations in rotor blade-section setting angle are applied to alter the blade shape; that is, the blade is linearly retwisted from hub to tip. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are made between morphed-blade and corresponding baseline configurations on the basis of equal fan system thrust, where rotor rotational speed for the morphed-blade fan is varied to change the thrust level for that configuration. The results of the investigation confirm that rotor blade morphing could be a useful technology, with the potential to enable significant improvements in fan aerodynamic performance. Even though the study is very limited in scope and confined to simple geometric perturbations of two existing fan

  5. Prediction of Film Cooling Effectiveness on a Gas Turbine Blade Leading Edge Using ANN and CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, J. O.; García, J. C.; Urquiza, G.; Huicochea, A.; De Santiago, O.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, the area-averaged film cooling effectiveness (AAFCE) on a gas turbine blade leading edge was predicted by employing an artificial neural network (ANN) using as input variables: hole diameter, injection angle, blowing ratio, hole and columns pitch. The database used to train the network was built using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on a two level full factorial design of experiments. The CFD numerical model was validated with an experimental rig, where a first stage blade of a gas turbine was represented by a cylindrical specimen. The ANN architecture was composed of three layers with four neurons in hidden layer and Levenberg-Marquardt was selected as ANN optimization algorithm. The AAFCE was successfully predicted by the ANN with a regression coefficient R2<0.99 and a root mean square error RMSE=0.0038. The ANN weight coefficients were used to estimate the relative importance of the input parameters. Blowing ratio was the most influential parameter with relative importance of 40.36 % followed by hole diameter. Additionally, by using the ANN model, the relationship between input parameters was analyzed.

  6. Application of additive laser technologies in the gas turbine blades design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, I. V.; Rogalev, A. N.; Osipov, S. K.; Bychkov, N. M.; Komarov, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    An emergence of modern innovative technologies requires delivering new and modernization existing design and production processes. It is especially relevant for designing the high-temperature turbines of gas turbine engines, development of which is characterized by a transition to higher parameters of working medium in order to improve their efficient performance. A design technique for gas turbine blades based on predictive verification of thermal and hydraulic models of their cooling systems by testing of a blade prototype fabricated using the selective laser melting technology was presented in this article. Technique was proven at the time of development of the first stage blade cooling system for the high-pressure turbine. An experimental procedure for verification of a thermal model of the blades with convective cooling systems based on the comparison of heat-flux density obtained from the numerical simulation data and results of tests in a liquid-metal thermostat was developed. The techniques makes it possible to obtain an experimentally tested blade version and to exclude its experimental adjustment after the start of mass production.

  7. A New Hoe Blade for Inter-Row Weeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, O.; Znova, L.; Melander, Bo

    2016-01-01

    and weeds are relatively small. The term ‘Ducksfoot’ covers a range of hoe blade configurations where all have some resemblance with the shape of a ducks foot. However, the ‘Ducksfoot’ blade is not an optimal solution for weed control in narrow inter-row spaces. Several disadvantages have been encountered...... and the draft forces needed to pull it were approx. half those measured for a ‘Ducksfoot’ blade. The weeding features of the new L-blade will be further studied under field conditions....

  8. Effect of cycle coupling-configuration on energy cascade utilization for a new power and cooling cogeneration cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Xuye; Zheng, Danxing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new power and cooling cogeneration cycle was proposed. • The thermophysical properties and the performance of the new cycle were calculated. • Different cycle coupling-configurations were analyzed. • The energy efficiency boosting mechanism of the new cycle was elucidated. - Abstract: To recover mid-low grade heat, a new power/cooling cogeneration cycle was proposed by combining the Kalina cycle and the double-effect ammonia–water absorption refrigeration (DAAR) cycle together, and the equivalent heat-to-power and exergy efficiencies of the cogeneration cycle reached 41.18% and 58.00%, respectively. To determine the effect of cycle coupling-configuration on energy cascade utilization for the new cycle, the cycle coupling-configuration of the Kalina and DAAR cycles were first analyzed, after which the cycle coupling-configuration of the new cycle was analyzed. Analysis results showed that the cycle coupling-configuration of the new cycle enhanced the energy cascade utilization. Furthermore, the energy efficiency boosting mechanism of the new cycle was elucidated

  9. Hot spot detection system for vanes or blades of a combustion turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twerdochlib, M.

    1999-02-02

    This invention includes a detection system that can determine if a turbine component, such as a turbine vane or blade, has exceeded a critical temperature, such as a melting point, along any point along the entire surface of the vane or blade. This system can be employed in a conventional combustion turbine having a compressor, a combustor and a turbine section. Included within this system is a chemical coating disposed along the entire interior surface of a vane or blade and a closed loop cooling system that circulates a coolant through the interior of the vane or blade. If the temperature of the vane or blade exceeds a critical temperature, the chemical coating will be expelled from the vane or blade into the coolant. Since while traversing the closed loop cooling system the coolant passes through a detector, the presence of the chemical coating in the coolant will be sensed by the system. If the chemical coating is detected, this indicates that the vane or blade has exceeded a critical temperature. 5 figs.

  10. Effect of jet nozzle geometry on flow and heat transfer performance of vortex cooling for gas turbine blade leading edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Changhe; Li, Liang; Wu, Xin; Feng, Zhenping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We establish a suitable vortex chamber model for gas turbine blade leading edge. • Mechanism of vortex cooling is further discussed and presented. • Influences of jet nozzle geometry on vortex cooling characteristics are researched. • This paper focuses on assessment of flow field and thermal performance for different jet nozzle aspect ratio and area. - Abstract: In this paper, 3D viscous steady Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations are utilized to investigate the influence of jet nozzle geometry on flow and thermal behavior of vortex cooling for gas turbine blades. Comparison between calculation with different turbulence models and the experimental data is conducted, and results show that the standard k-ω model provides the best accuracy. The grid independence analysis is performed to obtain the proper mesh number. First, the mechanism of vortex cooling is further discussed, and the pronounced impact of kinetic turbulence intensity, thin thermal boundary layer, violent radial convection and complex vortices on enhanced heat transfer performance is confirmed. Then, seven jet nozzle aspect ratios and seven jet nozzle to chamber cross section area ratios are selected to research the flow field and thermal characteristics of vortex cooling focusing on the streamline, static pressure ratio, total pressure loss ratio and Nusselt number. It is presented that the jet nozzle aspect ratio and jet nozzle to chamber cross section area ratio both impose a significant effect on the flow and thermal parameters. The averaged Nusselt number decreases at first and then increases with the increasing jet nozzle aspect ratio, reaching highest when aspect ratio equals to 1. The effect of area ratio on averaged Nusselt number is complex. Finally, the heat transfer results in this study are compared with other previous works. Results indicate that good agreement with previous data is achieved, and the enhanced thermal behavior may be acquired by

  11. Computational parametric study of an impinging jet in a cross-flow configuration for electronics cooling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larraona, Gorka S.; Rivas, Alejandro; Antón, Raúl; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Pastor, Ignacio; Moshfegh, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    A parametric study based on design of experiments (DoE) techniques was carried out by computational simulation in order to evaluate the effect that design parameters have on heat transfer and pressure loss of an impinging jet in a cross-flow configuration. The main effects of each parameter and the interactions between parameters were analyzed in detail through the Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Additionally, the potential of the impinging jet in a cross-flow configuration was assessed by calculating the optimal values of the parameters and comparing the cooling efficiency of the resulting configuration with the efficiency of the conventional cross-flow configuration. It was found that the degree to which the average heat transfer coefficient is enhanced as the result of adding an impinging jet depends on the height of the cooled component. Specifically, it was found that the higher the component, the more significant the enhancement. -- Highlights: ► Five design parameters of an impinging jet in a cross-flow (IJCF) have been considered. ► Channel and jet velocities are found to be the most influential parameters. ► Significant interactions exist between some of the parameters. ► Larger cooling efficiency is achieved with the IJCF compared to the cross-flow solely. ► The enhancement obtained with the IJCF depends on the height of the component

  12. Effect of Number of Blades on Performance of Ceiling Fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeeb Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of number of blades on ceiling fan performance is discussed. This approach helps to satisfy tradeoff between high air flow (performance and power consumption (energy efficiency. Specifically, variation from two to six blades is considered with nonlinear forward sweep profile. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS technique is used to model the flow field induced by the ceiling fan inside a generic room. The performance is gauged through response parameters namely volumetric flow rate, mass flow rate, torque and energy efficiency. The results indicate that mass and volumetric flow rates are maximized for six blade configuration and energy efficiency is maximized for two blade configuration. The study indicates the importance of tradeoff between high air flow through ceiling fan and associated energy efficiency.

  13. Slotted Blades Savonius Wind Turbine Analysis by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Alaimo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new bucket configuration for a Savonius wind generator is proposed. Numerical analyses are performed to estimate the performances of the proposed configuration by means of the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics® with respect to Savonius wind turbine with overlap only. Parametric analyses are performed, for a fixed overlap ratio, by varying the slot position; the results show that for slot positioned near the blade root, the Savonius rotor improves performances at low tip speed ratio, evidencing a better starting torque. This circumstance is confirmed by static analyses performed on the slotted blades in order to investigate the starting characteristic of the proposed Savonius wind generator configuration.

  14. The impact of inertial forces on morphing wind turbine blade in vertical axis configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butbul, Jonathan; MacPhee, David; Beyene, Asfaw

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel flexible VAWT has been experimentally tested alongside numerically simulations. • Using FEA and CFD, direction of blade bending was predicted from inertial and aerodynamic forces. • High-speed camera footage has been used to validate the model. • The flexible VAWT was found to self-start in the majority of tests, while the rigid one did not. • It is suggested that flexible VAWTs can have improved performance in part-load applications. - Abstract: A novel flexible blade concept with the ability to morph and geometrically adapt to changing flow conditions has been proposed to improve part-load performance of horizontal-axis wind turbines. The extension of these benefits to a vertical axis wind turbine would make wind technology a more competitive player in the energy market. Both flexible and rigid wind turbine rotor blades for vertical axis application were modeled, designed, manufactured and tested. Their performances were tested in a low speed wind tunnel. The predicted magnitude and direction of blade morph was validated using a high speed camera as well as finite element analysis. The comparative results of straight rigid and straight morphing blades show that the coefficient of performance greatly depends on the tip speed ratio. Overall, the morphing blade has better performance at low RPMs, but the rigid blade performed better at high RPMs. It was observed that the flexible blade self-started in the majority of the experiments. At high RPM, the centrifugal force overwhelmed the lift force, bending the flexible blade out of phase in an undesired direction increasing drag and therefore reducing the coefficient of performance

  15. Design of TFTR movable limiter blades for ohmic and neutral-beam-heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.W.; Ulrickson, M.A.; Cecchi, J.L.; Citrolo, J.C.; Weissenburger, D.; Bialek, J.

    1981-10-01

    A new set of movable limiter blades has been designed for TFTR that will meet both the requirements of the 4 MW ohmic heated and the 33 MW neutral beam heated plasmas. This is accomplished with three limiter blades each having and elliptical shape along the toroidal direction. Heat flux levels are acceptable for both ohmic heated and pre-strong compression plasmas. The construction consists of graphite tiles attached to cooled backing plates. The tiles have an average thickness of approx. 4.7 cm and are drawn against the backing plate with spring loaded fasteners that are keyed into the graphite. The cooled backing plate provides the structure for resisting disruption and fault induced loads. A set of rollers attached to the top and bottom blades allow them to be expanded and closed in order to vary the plasma surface for scaling experiments. Water cooling lines penetrate only the mid-plane port cover/support plate in such a way as to avoid bolted water connections inside the vacuum boundary and at the same time allow blade movement. Both the upper and lower blades are attached to the mid-plane limiter blade through pivots. Pivot connections are protected against arcing with an alumina coating and a shunt bar strap. Remote handling is considered throughout the design

  16. Numerical simulation on vacuum solution heat treatment and gas quenching process of a low rhenium-containing Ni-based single crystal turbine blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe-xin Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerical heat-transfer and turbulent flow model for an industrial high-pressure gas quenching vacuum furnace was established to simulate the heating, holding and gas fan quenching of a low rhenium-bearing Ni-based single crystal turbine blade. The mesh of simplified furnace model was built using finite volume method and the boundary conditions were set up according to the practical process. Simulation results show that the turbine blade geometry and the mutual shielding among blades have significant influence on the uniformity of the temperature distribution. The temperature distribution at sharp corner, thin wall and corner part is higher than that at thick wall part of blade during heating, and the isotherms show a toroidal line to the center of thick wall. The temperature of sheltered units is lower than that of the remaining part of blade. When there is no shelteration among multiple blades, the temperature distribution for all blades is almost identical. The fluid velocity field, temperature field and cooling curves of the single and multiple turbine blades during gas fan quenching were also simulated. Modeling results indicate that the loading tray, free outlet and the location of turbine blades have important influences on the flow field. The high-speed gas flows out from the nozzle is divided by loading tray, and the free outlet enhanced the two vortex flow at the end of the furnace door. The closer the blade is to the exhaust outlet and the nozzle, the greater the flow velocity is and the more adequate the flow is. The blade geometry has an effect on the cooling for single blade and multiple blades during gas fan quenching, and the effects in double layers differs from that in single layer. For single blade, the cooing rate at thin-walled part is lower than that at thick-walled part, the cooling rate at sharp corner is greater than that at tenon and blade platform, and the temperature at regions close to the internal position is

  17. Study of Pumping Capacity of Pitched Blade Impellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Fořt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was made of the pumping capacity of pitched blade impellers in a cylindrical pilot plant vessel with four standard radial baffles at the wall under a turbulent regime of flow. The pumping capacity was calculated from the radial profile of the axial flow, under the assumption of axial symmetry of the discharge flow. The mean velocity was measured using laser Doppler anemometry in a transparent vessel of diameter T = 400 mm, provided with a standard dished bottom. Three and six blade pitched blade impellers (the pitch angle varied within the interval a Îá24°; 45°ń of impeller/vessel diameter ratio D/T = 0.36, as well as a three blade pitched blade impeller with folded blades of the same diameter, were tested. The calculated results were compared with the results of experiments mentioned in the literature, above all in cylindrical vessels with a flat bottom. Both arrangements of the agitated system were described by the impeller energetic efficiency, i.e, a criterion including in dimensionless form both the impeller energy consumption (impeller power input and the impeller pumping effect (impeller pumping capacity. It follows from the results obtained with various geometrical configurations that the energetic efficiency of pitched blade impellers is significantly lower for configurations suitable for mixing solid-liquid suspensions (low impeller off bottom clearances than for blending miscible liquids in mixing (higher impeller off bottom clearances.

  18. Novel casting processes for single-crystal turbine blades of superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dexin

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the current casting techniques for single-crystal (SC) blades, as well as an analysis of the solidification process in complex turbine blades. A series of novel casting methods based on the Bridgman process were presented to illustrate the development in the production of SC blades from superalloys. The grain continuator and the heat conductor techniques were developed to remove geometry-related grain defects. In these techniques, the heat barrier that hinders lateral SC growth from the blade airfoil into the extremities of the platform is minimized. The parallel heating and cooling system was developed to achieve symmetric thermal conditions for SC solidification in blade clusters, thus considerably decreasing the negative shadow effect and its related defects in the current Bridgman process. The dipping and heaving technique, in which thinshell molds are utilized, was developed to enable the establishment of a high temperature gradient for SC growth and the freckle-free solidification of superalloy castings. Moreover, by applying the targeted cooling and heating technique, a novel concept for the three-dimensional and precise control of SC growth, a proper thermal arrangement may be dynamically established for the microscopic control of SC growth in the critical areas of large industrial gas turbine blades.

  19. Potentialities of a new sigma(+)-sigma(-)laser configuration for radiative cooling and trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalibard, J; Reynaud, S; Cohen-Tannoudji, C

    1984-11-28

    In the process of cooling and trapping neutral atoms, a new laser configuration is investigated which consists of two counterpropagating laser beams with orthogonal sigma(+) and sigma(-)polarizations. It is shown that such a configuration looks more promising than an ordinary standing wave (where the two counterpropagating waves have the same polarization), and this result is explained as being due to angular momentum conservation which prevents any coherent redistribution of photons between the two waves. The present conclusions are based on a quantitative calculation of the various parameters (potential depth, friction coefficient, diffusion coefficient) describing the mean value and the fluctuations of the radiative forces experienced, in such a laser configuration, by an atom with a J 0 ground state and a J 1 excited state. 30 references.

  20. Local measurement and numerical modeling of mass/heat transfer from a turbine blade in a linear cascade with tip clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peitong

    2000-11-01

    Local mass/heat transfer measurements from the turbine blade near-tip and the tip surfaces are performed using the naphthalene sublimation technique. The experiments are conducted in a linear cascade consisting of five high-pressure blades with a central test-blade configuration. The incoming flow conditions are close to those of the gas turbine engine environment (boundary layer displacement thickness is about 0.01 of chord) with an exit Reynolds number of 6.2 x 105. The effects of tip clearance level (0.86%--6.90% of chord), mainstream Reynolds number and turbulence intensity (0.2 and 12.0%) are investigated. Two methods of flow visualization---oil and lampblack, laser light sheet smoke wire---as well as static pressure measurement on the blade surface are used to study the tip leakage flow and vortex in the cascade. In addition, numerical modeling of the flow and heat transfer processes in the linear cascade with different tip clearances is conducted using commercial software incorporating advanced turbulence models. The present study confirms many important results on the tip leakage flow and vortex from the literature, contributes to the current understanding in the effects of tip leakage flow and vortex on local heat transfer from the blade near-tip and the tip surfaces, and provides detailed local and average heat/mass transfer data applicable to turbine blade tip cooling design.

  1. Energy and Exergy Analysis for Improving the Energy Performance of Air-Cooled Liquid Chillers by Different Condensing-Coil Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Shing Lee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study constructed a parameter analysis for improving the energy performance of air-cooled water chillers by altering the angle configuration of the condenser coils. The mathematical models for energy and exergy analyses of the individual components and overall system of air-cooled water chillers are presented. This study investigated the potential enhancement of performance efficiency in air-cooled chillers and the energy conversion efficiency of each component, in order to determine how the angle configuration of condenser coils influences chiller performance. This study found that the overall performance of an air-cooled chiller could be improved by approximately 3.4%, and the total irreversibility could be reduced by approximately 2.7%. With each 1% increase in average wind speed over the condenser coils, the overall performance of an air‑cooled chiller was found to be enhanced by approximately 0.43%, and its total irreversibility was reduced by approximately 0.35%. The results of this study can be effectively applied to air-cooled condenser units, and can provide an important basis of reference for developing and enhancing the energy efficiency of air-cooled chillers.

  2. Configuration analysis of pipe support for primary cooling using Ps + Caepipe code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitandung, Y. B.; Pustandyo, W.; Sujalmo, S.

    1998-01-01

    Pipe stress evaluation and support loads has been analyzed on piping segment of RSG-GAS primary cooling system. This paper describes an analysis method of piping system with the use of computer Code PS + CAEPIPE Version 3.4.05.W. From the selected pipe segment, the data of pipe characteristic, material properties, operation condition, equipment and supports were used input. The final evaluation result of primary cooling pipe segment show that actual stress dead weight and seismic load are less than allowable limits (stress ratio 0.101 for deadweight 0.35 for seismic load). From the above ratio, it can be concluded that ratio of pipe support configuration to stress distribution is acceptable, and based on analysis result, the Code used by INTERATOM was sufficiently accurate

  3. EFFECTS OF SLOTTED BLADING ON SECONDARY FLOW IN HIGHLY LOADED COMPRESSOR CASCADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAMZI MDOUKI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to increase allowable blade loadings and enlarge stable operating range in highly loaded compressor, this work is carried out in order to explore the potential of passive control via slotted bladings in linear cascade configurations under both design and stall conditions. Through an extensive 2D-numerical study, the effects of location, width and slope of slots were analysed and the best configuration was identified. Based on the optimal slot, the 3D aerodynamic performances of cascade were studied and the influence of slotted blading to control endwall flow was investigated. Both 2D and 3D calculations are performed on steady RANS solver with standard k-epsilon turbulence model and low Mach number regime. The total loss coefficient, turning angle and flow visualizations on the blade and end-wall surfaces are adopted to describe the different configurations. The obtained results show, for 2D situation, that a maximum of 28.3% reduction in loss coefficient had been reached and the flow turning was increased with approximately 5°. Concerning 3D flow fields the slots marked their benefit at large incoming flow angles which delays the separation on both end wall and blade suction surface at mid span. However, at design conditions, the slotted blades are not able to control secondary flows near the wall and so, lose their potential.

  4. Flow characteristics in nuclear steam turbine blade passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, H.J.; Yoon, W.H.; Kwon, S.B.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid expansion of condensable gas such as moist air or steam gives rise to nonequilibrium condensation. As a result of irreversibility of condensation process in the nuclear steam turbine blade passage, the entropy of the flow increases, and the efficiency of the turbine decreases. In the present study, in order to investigate the flow characteristics of moist air in two-dimensional turbine blade passage which is made from the configuration of the last stage tip section of the actual nuclear steam turbine moving blade, the static pressures along both pressure and suction sides of blade are measured by static pressure taps and the distribution of Mach number on both sides of the blade are obtained by using the measured static pressure. Also, the flow field is visualized by a Schlieren system. From the experimental results, the effects of the stagnation temperature and specific humidity on the flow properties in the two dimensional steam turbine blade passage are clearly identified

  5. Investigation of Advanced Counterrotation Blade Configuration Concepts for High Speed Turboprop Systems. Task 8: Cooling Flow/heat Transfer Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward J.; Topp, David A.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    The focus of this task was to validate the ADPAC code for heat transfer calculations. To accomplish this goal, the ADPAC code was modified to allow for a Cartesian coordinate system capability and to add boundary conditions to handle spanwise periodicity and transpiration boundaries. The primary validation case was the film cooled C3X vane. The cooling hole modeling included both a porous region and grid in each discrete hold. Predictions for these models as well as smooth wall compared well with the experimental data.

  6. Developments in blade shape design for a Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwill, T. D.; Leonard, T. M.

    1986-09-01

    A new computer program package has been developed that determines the troposkein shape for a Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade with any geometrical configuration or rotation rate. This package allows users to interact and develop a buildable blade whose shape closely approximates the troposkein. Use of this package can significantly reduce flatwise mean bending stresses in the blade and increase fatigue life.

  7. Design, evaluation, and fabrication of low-cost composite blades for intermediate-size wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, O.

    1981-01-01

    Low cost approaches for production of 60 ft long glass fiber/resin composite rotor blades for the MOD-OA wind turbine were identified and evaluated. The most cost-effective configuration was selected for detailed design. Subelement and subscale specimens were fabricated for testing to confirm physical and mechanical properties of the composite blade materials, to develop and evaluate blade fabrication techniques and processes, and to confirm the structural adequacy of the root end joint. Full-scale blade tooling was constructed and a partial blade for tool and process tryout was built. Then two full scale blades were fabricated and delivered to NASA-LeRC for installation on a MOD-OA wind turbine at Clayton, New Mexico for operational testing. Each blade was 60 ft. long with 4.5 ft. chord at root end and 2575 lbs weight including metal hub adapter. The selected blade configuration was a three cell design constructed using a resin impregnated glass fiber tape winding process that allows rapid wrapping of primarily axially oriented fibers onto a tapered mandrel, with tapered wall thickness. The ring winder/transverse filament tape process combination was used for the first time on this program to produce entire rotor blade structures. This approach permitted the complete blade to be wound on stationary mandrels, an improvement which alleviated some of the tooling and process problems encountered on previous composite blade programs.

  8. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  9. Real-Time Closed Loop Modulated Turbine Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Culley, Dennis E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Jones, Scott; Woike, Mark; Cuy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted by industry that in addition to dramatic variations of temperature over a given blade surface, blade-to-blade variations also exist despite identical design. These variations result from manufacturing variations, uneven wear and deposition over the life of the part as well as limitations in the uniformity of coolant distribution in the baseline cooling design. It is proposed to combine recent advances in optical sensing, actuation, and film cooling concepts to develop a workable active, closed-loop modulated turbine cooling system to improve by 10 to 20 the turbine thermal state over the flight mission, to improve engine life and to dramatically reduce turbine cooling air usage and aircraft fuel burn. A reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) can also be achieved by using the excess coolant to improve mixing in the combustor especially for rotorcraft engines. Recent patents filed by industry and universities relate to modulating endwall cooling using valves. These schemes are complex, add weight and are limited to the endwalls. The novelty of the proposed approach is twofold 1) Fluidic diverters that have no moving parts are used to modulate cooling and can operate under a wide range of conditions and environments. 2) Real-time optical sensing to map the thermal state of the turbine has never been attempted in realistic engine conditions.

  10. Resonant Vibrations Resulting from the Re-Engineering of a Constant-Speed 2-Bladed Turbine to a Variable-Speed 3-Bladed Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, P.; Wright, A. D.; Finersh, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    The CART3 (Controls Advanced Research Turbine, 3-bladed) at the National Wind Technology Center has recently been converted from a 2-bladed constant speed machine to a 3-bladed variable speed machine designed specically for controls research. The purpose of this conversion was to develop an advanced controls field-testing platform which has the more typical 3-bladed configuration. A result of this conversion was the emergence of several resonant vibrations, some of which initially prevented operation of the turbine until they could be explained and resolved. In this paper, the investigations into these vibrations are presented as 'lessons-learned'. Additionally, a frequency-domain technique called waterfall plotting is discussed and its usefulness in this research is illustrated.

  11. Silent cooling system with a double suction type centrifugal fan with backward blades; Ryosuikomi turbo fan wo mochiita teisoon engine reikyaku system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funabashi, S. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, K. [Hitachi Construction Machinery Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-04-25

    We have developed a new cooling system for the engine of construction machinery. This system produces two different air flow routes by a double suction type centrifugal fan with backward blades. We first measured aerodynamic performance and sound level of the double suction type fan, which consists of two single suction type fans of different design, and compared these measurements to those of single suction type fans. Next, we installed the fan in a scale model of the new cooling system. The performance of this double suction type fan was different to that of a single suction type. It is considered that the effect of interaction of the exit flows from the two different fans caused this performance change. The test model installed in an engine compartment showed that this cooling system reduced the area of air inlets and outlets around the engine and did not cause re-circulation of cooling air. (author)

  12. Demonstration of an elastically coupled twist control concept for tilt rotor blade application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, R. C.; Nixon, M. W.; Wilbur, M. L.; Singleton, J. D.; Mirick, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Note is to present results from an analytic/experimental study that investigated the potential for passively changing blade twist through the use of extension-twist coupling. A set of composite model rotor blades was manufactured from existing blade molds for a low-twist metal helicopter rotor blade, with a view toward establishing a preliminary proof concept for extension-twist-coupled rotor blades. Data were obtained in hover for both a ballasted and unballasted blade configuration in sea-level atmospheric conditions. Test data were compared with results obtained from a geometrically nonlinear analysis of a detailed finite element model of the rotor blade developed in MSC/NASTRAN.

  13. Ways of TPP and NPP powerful steam turbine blade erosion decreasing in low flow rate regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrabrov, P.V.; Khaimov, V.A.; Matveenko, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    A systematized approach to the problem of efficient cooling of flow passage and exhaust parts of TPP and NPP steam turbines and prevention of erosion wear of inlet and outlet edges of operating blades is presented. Methods for LP casing cooling and sources of erosion-hazard moisture as well as the main technological and design measures to decrease the erosion of blades are determined

  14. Study on dew point evaporative cooling system with counter-flow configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.; Thu, K.; Bui, T.D.; Wang, R.Z.; Ng, K.C.; Chua, K.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical model for a dew point evaporative cooler verified with experiments. • Saturation point of the working air is independent of the inlet air conditions. • The intensity of cooling capacity and water evaporation are studied. • The overall heat transfer coefficient for the working air is analyzed. • The conditions to achieve sub-wet bulb cooling are examined. - Abstract: Dew point evaporative cooling has great potential as a disruptive process for sensible cooling of air below its entering wet bulb temperature. This paper presents an improved mathematical model for a single-stage dew point evaporative cooler in a counter-flow configuration. Longitudinal heat conduction and mass diffusion of the air streams, channel plate and water film, as well as the temperature difference between the plate and water film, are accounted for in the model. Predictions of the product air temperature are validated using three sets of experimental data within a discrepancy of 4%. The cooler’s heat and mass transfer process is analyzed in terms of its cooling capacity intensity, water evaporation intensity, and overall heat transfer coefficient along the channel. Parametric studies are conducted at different geometric and operating conditions. For the conditions evaluated, the study reveals that (1) the saturation point of the working air occurs at a fixed point regardless of the inlet air conditions, and it is mainly influenced by the working air ratio and channel height; (2) the intensity of the water evaporation approaches a minimum at 0.2 to 0.3 m from the entrance; (3) the wet channel can be separated into two zones, and the overall heat transfer coefficient is above 100 W/(m"2·K) after the temperature of water film becomes higher than the working air temperature.

  15. Experimental Evaluation of Cermet Turbine Stator Blades for Use at Elevated Gas Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarito, Patrick T.; Johnston, James R.

    1959-01-01

    The suitability of cermets for turbine stator blades of a modified turbojet engine was determined at an average turbine-inlet-gas temperature of 2000 F. Such an increase in temperature would yield a premium in thrust from a service engine. Because the cermet blades require no cooling, all the available compressor bleed air could be used to cool a turbine made from conventional ductile alloys. Cermet blades were first run in 100-hour endurance tests at normal gas temperatures in order to evaluate two methods for mounting them. The elevated gas-temperature test was then run using the method of support considered best for high-temperature operation. After 52 hours at 2000 F, one of the group of four cermet blades fractured probably because of end loads resulting from thermal distortion of the spacer band of the nozzle diaphragm. Improved design of a service engine would preclude this cause of premature failure.

  16. Analytical study on different blade-shape design of HAWT for wasted kinetic energy recovery system (WKERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, J. B.; Jamaludin, Z.; Jafar, F. A.; Mat Ali, M.; Mokhtar, M. N. Ali; Tan, C. H.

    2017-06-01

    Wasted kinetic energy recovery system (WKERS) is a wind renewable gadget installed above a cooling tower outlet to harvest the discharged wind for electrical regeneration purpose. The previous WKERS is operated by a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) with delta blade design but the performance is still not at the optimum level. Perhaps, a better blade-shape design should be determined to obtain the optimal performance, as it is believed that the blade-shape design plays a critical role in HAWT. Hence, to determine a better blade-shape design for a new generation of WKERS, elliptical blade, swept blade and NREL Phase IV blade are selected for this benchmarking process. NREL Phase IV blade is a modern HAWT’s blade design by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) research lab. During the process of benchmarking, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was ran by using SolidWorks design software, where all the designs are simulated with linear flow simulation. The wind speed in the simulation is set at 10.0 m/s, which is compatible with the average wind speed produced by a standard size cooling tower. The result is obtained by flow trajectories of air motion, surface plot and cut plot of the applied blade-shape. Besides, the aspect ratio of each blade is calculated and included as one of the reference in the comparison. Hence, the final selection of the best blade-shape design will bring to the new generation of WKERS.

  17. Aerodynamic calculational methods for curved-blade Darrieus VAWT WECS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, R. J.

    1985-03-01

    Calculation of aerodynamic performance and load distributions for curved-blade wind turbines is discussed. Double multiple stream tube theory, and the uncertainties that remain in further developing adequate methods are considered. The lack of relevant airfoil data at high Reynolds numbers and high angles of attack, and doubts concerning the accuracy of models of dynamic stall are underlined. Wind tunnel tests of blade airbrake configurations are summarized.

  18. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  19. Rotational effects on impingement cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, A. H.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Koo, J. J.; Preiser, U. Z.

    1987-01-01

    The present consideration of rotation effects on heat transfer in a radially exhausted, impingement-cooled turbine blade model gives attention to experimental results for Reynolds and Rossby numbers and blade/coolant temperature ratio values that are representative of small gas turbine engines. On the basis of a model that encompasses the effects of Coriolis force and buoyancy on heat transfer, bouyancy is identified as the cause of an average Nusselt number that is 20-30 percent lower than expected from previous nonrotating data. A heuristic model is proposed which predicts that the impingement jets nearest the blade roots should deflect inward, due to a centripetal force generated by their tangential velocity counter to the blade motion. Potentially serious thermal stresses must be anticipated from rotation effects in the course of blade design.

  20. Straight-bladed Darrieus wind turbines - A protagonist's view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, P. G.

    The technology development and market penetration of Darrieus and propeller-type wind turbines is addressed. Important characteristics of competing configurations are compared, and it is claimed that aerodynamic efficiency is not a distinguishing feature. Advantages of the Darrieus machine include omni-directionality and self-limitation, but propeller types require less rotor length per unit swept area. It is argued that the straight-bladed Darrieus is much simpler than the curved-bladed and should be capable of comparable aerodynamic efficiency. Some of the problems of structural design, as well as blade induced drag losses and support-arm counter torque, diminish rapidly as machine size is increased. Taper ratio has similar beneficial effects.

  1. Comparison of central axis and jet ring coolant supply for turbine disk cooling on a SSME-HPOTP model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. W.; Metzger, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The test facility, test methods and results are presented for an experimental study modeling the cooling of turbine disks in the blade attachment regions with multiple impinging jets, in a configuration simulating the disk cooling method employed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine oxygen turbopump. The study's objective was to provide a comparison of detailed local convection heat transfer rates obtained for a single center-supply of disk coolant with those obtained with the present flight configuration where disk coolant is supplied through an array of 19 jets located near the disk outer radius. Specially constructed disk models were used in a program designed to evaluate possible benefits and identify any possible detrimental effects involved in employing an alternate disk cooling scheme. The study involved the design, construction and testing of two full scale rotating model disks, one plane and smooth for baseline testing and the second contoured to the present flight configuration, together with the corresponding plane and contoured stator disks. Local heat transfer rates are determined from the color display of encapsulated liquid crystals coated on the disk in conjunction with use of a computer vision system. The test program was composed of a wide variety of disk speeds, flowrates, and geometrical configurations, including testing for the effects of disk boltheads and gas ingestion from the gas path region radially outboard of the disk-cavity.

  2. Bottoming organic Rankine cycle configurations to increase Internal Combustion Engines power output from cooling water waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peris, Bernardo; Navarro-Esbrí, Joaquín; Molés, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    This work is focused on waste heat recovery of jacket cooling water from Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). Cooling water heat does not always find use due to its low temperature, typically around 90 °C, and usually is rejected to the ambient despite its high thermal power. An efficient way to take benefit from the ICE cooling water waste heat can be to increase the power output through suitable bottoming Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs). Thereby, this work simulates six configurations using ten non flammable working fluids and evaluates their performances in efficiency, safety, cost and environmental terms. Results show that the Double Regenerative ORC using SES36 gets the maximum net efficiency of 7.15%, incrementing the ICE electrical efficiency up to 5.3%, although requires duplicating the number of main components and high turbine size. A more rigorous analysis, based on the system feasibility, shows that small improvements in the basic cycle provide similar gains compared to the most complex schemes proposed. So, the single Regenerative ORC using R236fa and the Reheat Regenerative ORC using R134a seem suitable cycles which provide a net efficiency of 6.55%, incrementing the ICE electrical efficiency up to 4.9%. -- Highlights: • Suitable bottoming cycles for ICE cooling water waste heat recovery are studied. • Non flammable working fluids and various ORC configurations are evaluated. • Double regenerative cycle using SES36 is the most efficient configuration. • Regenerative and reheat regenerative ORCs seem feasible cycles. • Electrical efficiency of the ICE can be improved up to 5.3%

  3. Numerical investigation of turbulent flow past a four-bladed helicopter rotor using k - ω SST model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H.; Khalid, M.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous study of the laminar flow over a four-bladed helicopter rotor, abnormal Cp distributions were observed on the upper surfaces of the blades. To address this problem, the aerodynamic performance of the same rotor is investigated using the k - ω SST turbulence model, as contained in the WIND code. The rotor is configured as a Chimera moving grid in a quasi-steady flow field. The rotor rotation schedule and the blade twisting are implemented as specified in the wind tunnel testing of a RoBin generic helicopter. More realistic Cp distributions on the blade surfaces are thus obtained. The aerodynamic load distributions in the radial direction of the rotor plane are generated by integrating the pressure on each blade surfaces along the blade chordwise direction. The analyses of these load distributions in the azmuthal direction provide a critical insight into the rotor model, which is based on the actuator-disc assumption. Also, some preliminary results for the flow past a full helicopter configuration, including the rotor and the RoBin fuselage, are presented. The current paper demonstrates the Chimera grid topologies and the Chimera grid generation technique for both blade and fuselage configuration. This would provide a powerful tool to simulate flow past an entire helicopter and to study the rotor-fuselage flow interaction. (author)

  4. Study on dew point evaporative cooling system with counter-flow configuration

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, J.

    2015-12-18

    Dew point evaporative cooling has great potential as a disruptive process for sensible cooling of air below its entering wet bulb temperature. This paper presents an improved mathematical model for a single-stage dew point evaporative cooler in a counter-flow configuration. Longitudinal heat conduction and mass diffusion of the air streams, channel plate and water film, as well as the temperature difference between the plate and water film, are accounted for in the model. Predictions of the product air temperature are validated using three sets of experimental data within a discrepancy of 4%. The cooler’s heat and mass transfer process is analyzed in terms of its cooling capacity intensity, water evaporation intensity, and overall heat transfer coefficient along the channel. Parametric studies are conducted at different geometric and operating conditions. For the conditions evaluated, the study reveals that (1) the saturation point of the working air occurs at a fixed point regardless of the inlet air conditions, and it is mainly influenced by the working air ratio and channel height; (2) the intensity of the water evaporation approaches a minimum at 0.2 to 0.3m from the entrance; (3) the wet channel can be separated into two zones, and the overall heat transfer coefficient is above 100W/(m2·K) after the temperature of water film becomes higher than the working air temperature.

  5. Theoretical performance of cross-wind axis turbines with results for a catenary vertical axis configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraca, R. J.; Stephens, M. V.; Dagenhart, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A general analysis capable of predicting performance characteristics of cross-wind axis turbines was developed, including the effects of airfoil geometry, support struts, blade aspect ratio, windmill solidity, blade interference and curved flow. The results were compared with available wind tunnel results for a catenary blade shape. A theoretical performance curve for an aerodynamically efficient straight blade configuration was also presented. In addition, a linearized analytical solution applicable for straight configurations was developed. A listing of the computer program developed for numerical solutions of the general performance equations is included in the appendix.

  6. A combined piezoelectric composite actuator and its application to wing/blade tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kwangtae

    A novel combined piezoelectric-composite actuator configuration is proposed and analytically modeled in this work. The actuator is a low complexity, active compliant mechanism obtained by coupling a modified star cross sectional configuration composite beam with a helicoidal bimorph piezoelectric actuator coiled around it. This novel actuator is a good candidate as a hinge tension-torsion bar actuator for a helicopter rotor blade flap or blade tip and mirror rotational positioning. In the wing tip case, the tip deflection angle is different only according to the aerodynamic moment depending on the hinge position of the actuator along the chord and applied voltage because there is no centrifugal force. For an active blade tip subject to incompressible flow and 2D quasi steady airloads, its twist angle is related not only to aerodynamic moment and applied voltage but also to coupling terms, such as the trapeze effect and the tennis racquet effect. Results show the benefit of hinge position aft of the aerodynamic center, such that the blade tip response is amplified by airloads. Contrary to this effect, results also show that the centrifugal effects and inertial effect cause an amplitude reduction in the response. Summation of these effects determines the overall blade tip response. The results for a certain hinge position of Xh=1.5% chord aft of the quarter chord point proves that the tip deflection target design range of beta ∈ [-2,+2] can be achieved for all pitch angle configurations chosen.

  7. Experimental tests of the effect of rotor diameter ratio and blade number to the cross-flow wind turbine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, Sandi; Tjahjana, Dominicus Danardono Dwi Prija; Santoso, Budi

    2018-02-01

    Cross-flow wind turbine is one of the alternative energy harvester for low wind speeds area. Several factors that influence the power coefficient of cross-flow wind turbine are the diameter ratio of blades and the number of blades. The aim of this study is to find out the influence of the number of blades and the diameter ratio on the performance of cross-flow wind turbine and to find out the best configuration between number of blades and diameter ratio of the turbine. The experimental test were conducted under several variation including diameter ratio between outer and inner diameter of the turbine and number of blades. The variation of turbine diameter ratio between inner and outer diameter consisted of 0.58, 0.63, 0.68 and 0.73 while the variations of the number of blades used was 16, 20 and 24. The experimental test were conducted under certain wind speed which are 3m/s until 4 m/s. The result showed that the configurations between 0.68 diameter ratio and 20 blade numbers is the best configurations that has power coefficient of 0.049 and moment coefficient of 0.185.

  8. Cooling Tower Overhaul of Secondary Cooling System in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Chul; Lee, Young Sub; Jung, Hoan Sung; Lim, In Chul [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor of 30 MWth power in Korea, has been operating normally since its initial criticality in February, 1995. For the last about ten years, A cooling tower of a secondary cooling system has been operated normally in HANARO. Last year, the cooling tower has been overhauled for preservative maintenance including fills, eliminators, wood support, water distribution system, motors, driving shafts, gear reducers, basements, blades and etc. This paper describes the results of the overhaul. As results, it is confirmed that the cooling tower maintains a good operability through a filed test. And a cooling capability will be tested when a wet bulb temperature is maintained about 28 .deg. C in summer and the reactor is operated with the full power.

  9. Remote inspection of steam turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    During the past five years Reinhart and Associates, Inc. has been involved in remote examination of L-0 and L-1 steam turbine blade rows of in-place LP turbines using visual and eddy current techniques. These tests have concentrated on the trailing edge and blade-to-rotor attachment (Christmas tree) areas. These remote nondestructive examinations were performed through hand access ports of the inner shell. Since the remote scanning system was in a prototype configuration, the inspection was highly operator-dependent. Refinement of the scanning equipment would considerably improve the efficiency of the test; however, the feasibility of remote in-place inspection of turbine blades was established. To further improve this technology, and to provide for remote inspection of other areas of the blade and additional turbine designs, EPRI is funding a one-year project with Reinhart and Associates, Inc. This project will develop a new system that employs state-of-the-art multifrequency eddy current techniques, a miniature charged coupled device (CCD) television camera, and remote positioning equipment. Project results from the first six months are presented

  10. Axial Fan Blade Vibration Assessment under Inlet Cross-Flow Conditions Using Laser Scanning Vibrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Heinemann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In thermal power plants equipped with air-cooled condensers (ACCs, axial cooling fans operate under the influence of ambient flow fields. Under inlet cross-flow conditions, the resultant asymmetric flow field is known to introduce additional harmonic forces to the fan blades. This effect has previously only been studied numerically or by using blade-mounted strain gauges. For this study, laser scanning vibrometry (LSV was used to assess fan blade vibration under inlet cross-flow conditions in an adapted fan test rig inside a wind tunnel test section. Two co-rotating laser beams scanned a low-pressure axial fan, resulting in spectral, phase-resolved surface vibration patterns of the fan blades. Two distinct operating points with flow coefficients of 0.17 and 0.28 were examined, with and without inlet cross-flow influence. While almost identical fan vibration patterns were found for both reference operating points, the overall blade vibration increased by 100% at the low fan flow rate as a result of cross-flow, and by 20% at the high fan flow rate. While numerically predicted natural frequency modes could be confirmed from experimental data as minor peaks in the vibration amplitude spectrum, they were not excited significantly by cross-flow. Instead, primarily higher rotation-rate harmonics were amplified; that is, a synchronous blade-tip flapping was strongly excited at the blade-pass frequency.

  11. CMC blade with pressurized internal cavity for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Goike, Jerome Walter

    2016-02-02

    A ceramic matrix composite blade for use in a gas turbine engine having an airfoil with leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction side surfaces, a blade shank secured to the lower end of each airfoil, one or more interior fluid cavities within the airfoil having inlet flow passages at the lower end which are in fluid communication with the blade shank, one or more passageways in the blade shank corresponding to each one of the interior fluid cavities and a fluid pump (or compressor) that provides pressurized fluid (nominally cool, dry air) to each one of the interior fluid cavities in each airfoil. The fluid (e.g., air) is sufficient in pressure and volume to maintain a minimum fluid flow to each of the interior fluid cavities in the event of a breach due to foreign object damage.

  12. Investigation of heat transfer and flow using ribs within gas turbine blade cooling passage: Experimental and hybrid LES/RANS modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sourabh

    Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land based power generation and various industrial applications. Developments in innovative gas turbine cooling technology enhance the efficiency and power output, with an increase in turbine rotor inlet temperatures. These advancements of turbine cooling have allowed engine design to exceed normal material temperature limits. For internal cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to hot stream are based on the increase of heat transfer areas and on promotion of turbulence of the cooling flow. In this study, it is obtained by casting repeated continuous V and broken V shaped ribs on one side of the two pass square channel into the core of blade. Despite extensive research on ribs, only few papers have validated the numerical data with experimental results in two pass channel. In the present study, detailed experimental investigation is carried out for two pass square channels with 180° turn. Detailed heat transfer distribution occurring in the ribbed passage is reported for steady state experiment. Four different combinations of 60° and Broken 60° V ribs in channel are considered. Thermocouples are used to obtain the temperature on the channel surface and local heat transfer coefficients are obtained for various Reynolds numbers, within the turbulent flow regime. Area averaged data are calculated in order to compare the overall performance of the tested ribbed surface and to evaluate the degree of heat transfer enhancement induced by the ribs with. Flow within the channels is characterized by heat transfer enhancing ribs, bends, rotation and buoyancy effects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out for the same geometries using different turbulence models such as k-o Shear stress transport (SST) and Reynolds stress model (RSM). These CFD simulations were based on advanced computing in order to improve the accuracy of three dimensional metal

  13. Equipment to separate liquid droplets from the cooling air stream of a liquid cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.E.; Schwinn, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to separate off liquid droplets from the air stream of a cooling tower, one uses separator blades that are secured to the supporting construction. An improvement on this is proposed to make the repairs easier. According to the invention, the separator blades should be fabricated from springy material with self-supporting strength and can be fitted onto the supporting construction by means of slits and notches. (RW) [de

  14. CFD study of liquid-cooled heat sinks with microchannel flow field configurations for electronics, fuel cells, and concentrated solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Li Peiwen; Liu Hong; Hernandez-Guerrero, Abel

    2011-01-01

    A study of the heat transfer performance of liquid-cooled heat sinks with conventional and novel micro-channel flow field configurations for application in electronic devices, fuel cells, and concentrated solar cells is presented in this paper. The analyses were based on computations using the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT. The flow regime in heat sinks is constrained to laminar flow in the study. Details of the heat transfer performance, particularly, the uniformity of temperature distribution on the heating surface, as well as the pressure losses and pumping power in the operation of the studied heat sinks were obtained. Comparisons of the flow distribution uniformity in multiple flow channels, temperature uniformity on heating surfaces, and pumping power consumption of heat sinks with novel flow field configurations and conventional flow field configurations were conducted. It was concluded that the novel flow field configurations studied in this work exhibit appreciable benefits for application in heat sinks. - Highlights: → We present novel designs of flow channel configurations in liquid cooled heat sinks. → The flow and heat transfer in heat sinks were simulated using CFD tool. → The temperature and pressure loss in novel and conventional heat sinks were studied. → Figure of merit of heat sinks in different flow channel configurations was presented. → The heat sinks having our novel design of flow channel configurations are excellent.

  15. Multi-piece wind turbine rotor blades and wind turbines incorporating same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz,; Mieczyslaw, Emilian [San Diego, CA

    2008-06-03

    A multisection blade for a wind turbine includes a hub extender having a pitch bearing at one end, a skirt or fairing having a hole therethrough and configured to mount over the hub extender, and an outboard section configured to couple to the pitch bearing.

  16. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    This paper shows an example of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. The aerodynamic optimised geometry from PVOPT is the `real` optimum (up to the latest decimal). The most important conclusion from this study is, that it is worthwhile to investigate the behaviour of the objective function (in the present case the energy yield) around the optimum: If the optimum is flat, there is a possibility to apply modifications to the optimum configuration with only a limited loss in energy yield. It is obvious that the modified configurations emits a different (and possibly lower) noise level. In the BLADOPT program (the successor of PVOPT) it will be possible to quantify the noise level and hence to assess the reduced noise emission more thoroughly. At present the most promising approaches for noise reduction are believed to be a reduction of the rotor speed (if at all possible), and a reduction of the tip angle by means of low lift profiles, or decreased twist at the outboard stations. These modifications were possible without a significant loss in energy yield. (LN)

  17. Influence of precooling cooling air on the performance of a gas turbine combined cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ik Hwan; Kang, Do Won; Kang, Soo Young; Kim, Tong Seop [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Cooling of hot sections, especially the turbine nozzle and rotor blades, has a significant impact on gas turbine performance. In this study, the influence of precooling of the cooling air on the performance of gas turbines and their combined cycle plants was investigated. A state of the art F class gas turbine was selected, and its design performance was deliberately simulated using detailed component models including turbine blade cooling. Off design analysis was used to simulate changes in the operating conditions and performance of the gas turbines due to precooling of the cooling air. Thermodynamic and aerodynamic models were used to simulate the performance of the cooled nozzle and rotor blade. In the combined cycle plant, the heat rejected from the cooling air was recovered at the bottoming steam cycle to optimize the overall plant performance. With a 200K decrease of all cooling air stream, an almost 1.78% power upgrade due to increase in main gas flow and a 0.70 percent point efficiency decrease due to the fuel flow increase to maintain design turbine inlet temperature were predicted.

  18. A Comparison of Combustion Dynamics for Multiple 7-Point Lean Direct Injection Combustor Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, K. M.; Hicks, Y. R.

    2017-01-01

    The combustion dynamics of multiple 7-point lean direct injection (LDI) combustor configurations are compared. LDI is a fuel-lean combustor concept for aero gas turbine engines in which multiple small fuel-air mixers replace one traditionally-sized fuel-air mixer. This 7-point LDI configuration has a circular cross section, with a center (pilot) fuel-air mixer surrounded by six outer (main) fuel-air mixers. Each fuel-air mixer consists of an axial air swirler followed by a converging-diverging venturi. A simplex fuel injector is inserted through the center of the air swirler, with the fuel injector tip located near the venturi throat. All 7 fuel-air mixers are identical except for the swirler blade angle, which varies with the configuration. Testing was done in a 5-atm flame tube with inlet air temperatures from 600 to 800 F and equivalence ratios from 0.4 to 0.7. Combustion dynamics were measured using a cooled PCB pressure transducer flush-mounted in the wall of the combustor test section.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Wind Turbine Blade-Tower Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wang; Hu Zhou; Decheng Wan

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of wind turbine blade-tower interaction by using the open source OpenFOAM tools coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method were presented.The governing equations were the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) which were solved by the pimpleDyMFoam solver,and the AMI method was employed to handle mesh movements.The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase Ⅵ wind turbine in upwind configuration was selected for numerical tests with different incoming wind speeds (5,10,15,and 25 m/s) at a fixed blade pitch and constant rotational speed.Detailed numerical results of vortex structure,time histories of thrust,and pressure distribution on the blade and tower were presented.The findings show that the wind turbine tower has little effect on the whole aerodynamic performance of an upwind wind turbine,while the rotating rotor will induce an obvious cyclic drop in the front pressure of the tower.Also,strong interaction of blade tip vortices with separation from the tower was observed.

  20. Computational Investigation of Novel Tip Leakage Mitigation Methods for High Pressure Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Gupta, Abhinav; Shyam, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings on a possible approach to reducing tip leakage losses. In this paper a computational study was conducted on the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) High Pressure Turbine (HPT) rotor tip geometry using the commercial numerical solver ANSYS FLUENT. The flow solver was validated against aerodynamic data acquired in the NASA Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade facility. The scope of the ongoing study is to computationally investigate how the tip leakage and overall blade losses are affected by (1) injection from the tip near the pressure side, (2) injection from the tip surface at the camber line, and (3) injection from the tip surface into the tip separation bubble. The objective is to identify the locations on the tip surface at which to place appropriately configured blowing keeping in mind the film cooling application of tip blowing holes. The validation was conducted at Reynolds numbers of 85,000, 343,000, and 685,000 and at engine realistic flow conditions. The coolant injection simulations were conducted at a Reynolds number of 343,000 based on blade chord and inlet velocity and utilized the SST turbulence model in FLUENT. The key parameters examined are the number of jets, jet angle and jet location. A coolant to inlet pressure ratio of 1.0 was studied for angles of +30 deg, -30 deg, and 90 deg to the local free stream on the tip. For the 3 hole configuration, 3 holes spaced 3 hole diameters apart with length to diameter ratio of 1.5 were used. A simulation including 11 holes along the entire mean camber line is also presented (30 deg toward suction side). In addition, the effect of a single hole is also compared to a flat tip with no injection. The results provide insight into tip flow control methods and can be used to guide further investigation into tip flow control. As noted in past research it is concluded that reducing leakage flow is not necessarily synonymous with reducing losses due to leakage.

  1. WhalePower tubercle blade power performance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-15

    Toronto-based WhalePower Corporation has developed turbine blades that are modeled after humpback whale flippers. The blades, which incorporate tubercles along the leading edge of the blade, have been fitted to a Wenvor 25 kW turbine installed in North Cape, Prince Edward Island at a test site for the Wind Energy Institute of Canada (WEICan). A test was conducted to characterize the power performance of the prototype wind turbine. This report described the wind turbine configuration with particular reference to turbine information, power rating, blade information, tower information, control systems and grid connections. The test site was also described along with test equipment and measurement procedures. Information regarding power output as a function of wind speed was included along with power curves, power coefficient and annual energy production. The results for the power curve and annual energy production contain a level of uncertainty. While measurements for this test were collected and analyzed in accordance with International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards for performance measurements of electricity producing wind turbines (IEC 61400-12-1), the comparative performance data between the prototype WhalePower wind turbine blade and the Wenvor standard blade was not gathered to IEC data standards. Deviations from IEC-61400-12-1 procedures were listed. 6 tabs., 16 figs., 3 appendices.

  2. Wind tunnel study of helical and straight-bladed vertical-axis wind turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Maryam; Araya, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    It is hypothesized that blade curvature can serve as a passive means to control fluid entrainment and wake recovery in vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) arrays. We test this experimentally in a wind tunnel using two different VAWT configurations, one with straight blades and another with helical blades, keeping all other experimental parameters fixed. A small-scale, commercially available VAWT (15W max power) is used as the baseline wind tunnel model in each case. The commercial VAWT blades are replaced with either straight or helical blades that are 3D-printed extrusions of the same airfoil cross-section. Results from smoke flow visualization, three-component wake velocity measurements, and turbine power data are presented. These results give insight into the potential use of VAWTs with curved blades in utility-scale wind farms.

  3. Influence of water–air ratio on the heat transfer and creep life of a high pressure gas turbine blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshati, S.; Abu, A.; Laskaridis, P.; Khan, F.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical model to investigate the influence of Water–Air Ratio (WAR) on turbine blade heat transfer and cooling processes (and thus the blade creep life) of industrial gas turbines is presented. The effects of WAR are emphasised for the modelling of the gas properties and the subsequent heat transfer process. The approach considers convective/film cooling and includes the influence of a thermal barrier coating. In addition, the approach is based on the thermodynamic outputs of a gas turbine performance simulation, heat transfer model, as well as a method that accounts for the changes in the properties of moist air as a function of WAR. For a given off-design point, the variation of WAR (0.0–0.10) was investigated using the heat transfer model. Results showed that with increasing WAR the blade inlet coolant temperature reduced along the blade span. The blade metal temperature at each section was reduced as WAR increased, which in turn increased the blade creep life. The increase in WAR increased the specific heat of the coolant and increased the heat transfer capacity of the coolant air flow. The model can be implemented by using the thermodynamic cycle of the engine, without knowing the turbine cooling details in the conceptual design stage. Also, this generic method assists the end user to understand the effect of operating conditions and design parameter on the creep life of a high pressure turbine blade. -- Highlights: • The influence of WAR on gas turbine blade heat transfer and creep life is examined. • Coolant specific heat capacity is the key property affected by changes in WAR. • Increase in WAR reduces the coolant and metal temperature along the blade span. • Creep life increases with increase in WAR even if ambient temperature is increased

  4. Effect of Reynolds number, turbulence level and periodic wake flow on heat transfer on low pressure turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, D; Schulz, A; Wittig, S

    2001-05-01

    The development of effective cooling methods is of major importance for the design of new gas turbines blades. The conception of optimal cooling schemes requires a detailed knowledge of the heat transfer processes on the blade's surfaces. The thermal load of turbine blades is predominantly determined by convective heat transfer which is described by the local heat transfer coefficient. Heat transfer is closely related to the boundary layer development along the blade surface and hence depends on various flow conditions and geometrical parameters. Particularly Reynolds number, pressures gradient and turbulence level have great impact on the boundary layer development and the according heat transfer. Therefore, in the present study, the influence of Reynolds number, turbulence intensity, and periodic unsteady inflow on the local heat transfer of a typical low pressure turbine airfoil is experimentally examined in a plane cascade.

  5. Aeroelastic Analysis of Helicopter Rotor Blades Incorporating Anisotropic Piezoelectric Twist Actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    A simple aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor blade incorporating embedded piezoelectric fiber composite, interdigitated electrode blade twist actuators is described. The analysis consists of a linear torsion and flapwise bending model coupled with a nonlinear ONERA based unsteady aerodynamics model. A modified Galerkin procedure is performed upon the rotor blade partial differential equations of motion to develop a system of ordinary differential equations suitable for dynamics simulation using numerical integration. The twist actuation responses for three conceptual fullscale blade designs with realistic constraints on blade mass are numerically evaluated using the analysis. Numerical results indicate that useful amplitudes of nonresonant elastic twist, on the order of one to two degrees, are achievable under one-g hovering flight conditions for interdigitated electrode poling configurations. Twist actuation for the interdigitated electrode blades is also compared with the twist actuation of a conventionally poled piezoelectric fiber composite blade. Elastic twist produced using the interdigitated electrode actuators was found to be four to five times larger than that obtained with the conventionally poled actuators.

  6. An aerodynamic study on flexed blades for VAWT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Daniel; Farrugia, Russell; Sant, Tonio; Mollicone, Pierluigi

    2014-12-01

    There is renewed interest in aerodynamics research of VAWT rotors. Lift type, Darrieus designs sometimes use flexed blades to have an 'egg-beater shape' with an optimum Troposkien geometry to minimize the structural stress on the blades. While straight bladed VAWTs have been investigated in depth through both measurements and numerical modelling, the aerodynamics of flexed blades has not been researched with the same level of detail. Two major effects may have a substantial impact on blade performance. First, flexing at the equator causes relatively strong trailing vorticity to be released. Secondly, the blade performance at each station along the blade is influenced by self-induced velocities due to bound vorticity. The latter is not present in a straight bladed configuration. The aim of this research is to investigate these effects in relation to an innovative 4kW wind turbine concept being developed in collaboration with industry known as a self-adjusting VAWT (or SATVAWT). The approach used in this study is based on experimental and numerical work. A lifting line free-wake vortex model was developed. Wind tunnel power and hot-wire velocity measurements were performed on a scaled down, 60cm high, three bladed model in a closed wind tunnel. Results show a substantial axial wake induction at the equator resulting in a lower power generation at this position. This induction increases with increasing degree of flexure. The self-induced velocities caused by blade bound vorticity at a particular station was found to be relatively small.

  7. An aerodynamic study on flexed blades for VAWT applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micallef, Daniel; Farrugia, Russell; Sant, Tonio; Mollicone, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    There is renewed interest in aerodynamics research of VAWT rotors. Lift type, Darrieus designs sometimes use flexed blades to have an 'egg-beater shape' with an optimum Troposkien geometry to minimize the structural stress on the blades. While straight bladed VAWTs have been investigated in depth through both measurements and numerical modelling, the aerodynamics of flexed blades has not been researched with the same level of detail. Two major effects may have a substantial impact on blade performance. First, flexing at the equator causes relatively strong trailing vorticity to be released. Secondly, the blade performance at each station along the blade is influenced by self-induced velocities due to bound vorticity. The latter is not present in a straight bladed configuration. The aim of this research is to investigate these effects in relation to an innovative 4kW wind turbine concept being developed in collaboration with industry known as a self-adjusting VAWT (or SATVAWT). The approach used in this study is based on experimental and numerical work. A lifting line free-wake vortex model was developed. Wind tunnel power and hot-wire velocity measurements were performed on a scaled down, 60cm high, three bladed model in a closed wind tunnel. Results show a substantial axial wake induction at the equator resulting in a lower power generation at this position. This induction increases with increasing degree of flexure. The self-induced velocities caused by blade bound vorticity at a particular station was found to be relatively small

  8. Optimal Design and Acoustic Assessment of Low-Vibration Rotor Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernardini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimal procedure for the design of rotor blade that generates low vibratory hub loads in nonaxial flow conditions is presented and applied to a helicopter rotor in forward flight, a condition where vibrations and noise become severe. Blade shape and structural properties are the design parameters to be identified within a binary genetic optimization algorithm under aeroelastic stability constraint. The process exploits an aeroelastic solver that is based on a nonlinear, beam-like model, suited for the analysis of arbitrary curved-elastic-axis blades, with the introduction of a surrogate wake inflow model for the analysis of sectional aerodynamic loads. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to identify low vibratory hub loads rotor blades as well as to assess the robustness of solution at off-design operating conditions. Further, the aeroacoustic assessment of the rotor configurations determined is carried out in order to examine the impact of low-vibration blade design on the emitted noise field.

  9. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  10. Application of Computer Simulation to Identify Erosion Resistance of Materials of Wet-steam Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostelyov, D. A.; Dergachyov, K. V.

    2017-10-01

    A problem of identifying the efficiency of using materials, coatings, linings and solderings of wet-steam turbine rotor blades by means of computer simulation is considered. Numerical experiments to define erosion resistance of materials of wet-steam turbine blades are described. Kinetic curves for erosion area and weight of the worn rotor blade material of turbines K-300-240 LMP and atomic icebreaker “Lenin” have been defined. The conclusion about the effectiveness of using different erosion-resistant materials and protection configuration of rotor blades is also made.

  11. Pressure coefficient evolutions on the blades of a Savonius rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, A.; Guignard, S. [UMRR 7343, Marseilles (France). Lab. IUSTI; Kamoun, B. [Faculte des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia). Lab. de Physique

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of the pressure field distribution on the blades of a vertical axis Savonius wind machine are presented. The rotor used in the wind tunnel is a two blades cylindrical shape with a central gap. Pressure gauges are placed on each side of a blade, so the pressure jumps between intrados and extrados of a blade during a whole rotation are drawn. In the static configuration, the machine is disposed at various incidences. The determination of pressure jumps allows to calculate the static torque of the machine versus the incidence angle. In the dynamic situation the machine is rotating at various frequencies and gauges signals are varying dynamically of course with the incidence. The dynamic torque coefficient is calculated. Evolutions of the starting torque and starting conditions are then described and dynamic effects on torque evolution are presented. (orig.)

  12. Provisioning cooling elements for chillerless data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2018-02-13

    Systems and methods for cooling include one or more computing structure, an inter-structure liquid cooling system that includes valves configured to selectively provide liquid coolant to the one or more computing structures; a heat rejection system that includes one or more heat rejection units configured to cool liquid coolant; and one or more liquid-to-liquid heat exchangers that include valves configured to selectively transfer heat from liquid coolant in the inter-structure liquid cooling system to liquid coolant in the heat rejection system. Each computing structure further includes one or more liquid-cooled servers; and an intra-structure liquid cooling system that has valves configured to selectively provide liquid coolant to the one or more liquid-cooled servers.

  13. GUIDE BLADE FOR AN OVERFLOW STRUCTURE TO BE PLACED ON A VESSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    contact surface (4), the primary contact surface having an edge (2) configured for abutting an overflow structure (100) and at least one free edge, wherein the guide blade is configured for being attachable to a unit to be arrange on or in an inlet (109) of an overflow structure or directly...

  14. Research and development of cooled turbine for aircraft engines. Koku engine yo reikyaku turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maya, T; Yamawaki, S [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-05-01

    For the turbine which is one of the principal elements of aircraft engine, progress in turbine use material development and cooling performance further heightened for the turbine are needed to grapple with the required heightening of turbine inlet temperature. In the present paper based on the turbine inlet temperature designed to be 1600[degree]C as a target, a two-dimensional model used for the turbine cooling performance test was structurally given together with the result of the above test which aimed at confirming the design calculation. As a result of cooling design for the turbine which was about 1600[degree]C in inlet temperature, the highest gas temperature was 1890 and 1470[degree]C on the stator blade and rotor blade, respectively. Both those blades were 0.66 and 0.62, respectively in cooling efficiency. To test the cooling performance, a two-dimensional cascade was tested with a doubly amplified model of cooling blade, the use of which could set its Reynolds number near that of the actual one. As compared with the actual operation, the test was made at low temperatures of 400 to 500[degree]C and low pressures of 0.02 to 0.03MPa. The test agreed with the design calculation in result. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Wireless Inductive Power Device Suppresses Blade Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Min, James B.; Stefko, George L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Fougers, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration in turbomachinery can cause blade failures and leads to the use of heavier, thicker blades that result in lower aerodynamic efficiency and increased noise. Metal and/or composite fatigue in the blades of jet engines has resulted in blade destruction and loss of lives. Techniques for suppressing low-frequency blade vibration, such as gtuned circuit resistive dissipation of vibratory energy, h or simply "passive damping," can require electronics incorporating coils of unwieldy dimensions and adding unwanted weight to the rotor. Other approaches, using vibration-dampening devices or damping material, could add undesirable weight to the blades or hub, making them less efficient. A wireless inductive power device (WIPD) was designed, fabricated, and developed for use in the NASA Glenn's "Dynamic Spin Rig" (DSR) facility. The DSR is used to simulate the functionality of turbomachinery. The relatively small and lightweight device [10 lb (approx.=4.5 kg)] replaces the existing venerable and bulky slip-ring. The goal is the eventual integration of this technology into actual turbomachinery such as jet engines or electric power generators, wherein the device will facilitate the suppression of potentially destructive vibrations in fan blades. This technology obviates slip rings, which require cooling and can prove unreliable or be problematic over time. The WIPD consists of two parts: a remote element, which is positioned on the rotor and provides up to 100 W of electrical power to thin, lightweight piezoelectric patches strategically placed on/in fan blades; and a stationary base unit that wirelessly communicates with the remote unit. The base unit supplies inductive power, and also acts as an input and output corridor for wireless measurement, and active control command to the remote unit. Efficient engine operation necessitates minimal disturbance to the gas flow across the turbine blades in any effort to moderate blade vibration. This innovation makes it

  16. Unsteady, Cooled Turbine Simulation Using a PC-Linux Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Michael G.; Turner, Mark G.; Chen, Jen-Pimg; Remotigue, Michael G.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    The fist stage of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) of the GE90 engine was simulated with a three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Sokes solver, MSU Turbo, which uses source terms to simulate the cooling flows. In addition to the solver, its pre-processor, GUMBO, and a post-processing and visualization tool, Turbomachinery Visual3 (TV3) were run in a Linux environment to carry out the simulation and analysis. The solver was run both with and without cooling. The introduction of cooling flow on the blade surfaces, case, and hub and its effects on both rotor-vane interaction as well the effects on the blades themselves were the principle motivations for this study. The studies of the cooling flow show the large amount of unsteadiness in the turbine and the corresponding hot streak migration phenomenon. This research on the GE90 turbomachinery has also led to a procedure for running unsteady, cooled turbine analysis on commodity PC's running the Linux operating system.

  17. Four-Point Bending Strength Testing of Pultruded Fiberglass Composite Wind Turbine Blade Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musial, W.; Bourne, B; Hughes, S; Zuteck, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    The ultimate strength of the PS Enterprises pultruded blade section was experimentally determined under four-point bending at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Thirteen 8-foot long full-scale blade segments were individually tested to determine their maximum moment carrying capability. Three airfoil-bending configurations were tested: high- and low-pressure skin buckling, and low pressure skin buckling with foam interior reinforcement. Maximum strain was recorded for each sample on the compressive and tensile surfaces of each test blade. Test data are compared to the results of three analytical buckling prediction methods. Based on deviations from the linear strain versus load curve, data indicate a post-buckling region. High-pressure side buckling occurred sooner than low-pressure side buckling. The buckling analyses were conservative for both configurations, but high-pressure side buckling in particular was substantially under-predicted. Both high- and low-pressure buckling configurations had very similar failure loads. These results suggests that a redundant load path may be providing strength to the section in the post-buckling region, making the onset of panel buckling a poor predictor of ultimate strength for the PS Enterprises pultrusion

  18. Blade dynamic stress analysis of rotating bladed disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellner J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling of steady forced bladed disk vibrations and with dynamic stress calculation of the blades. The blades are considered as 1D kontinuum elastic coupled with three-dimensional elastic disk centrally clamped into rotor rotating with constant angular speed. The steady forced vibrations are generated by the aerodynamic forces acting along the blade length. By using modal synthesis method the mathematical model of the rotating bladed disk is condensed to calculate steady vibrations. Dynamic stress analysis of the blades is based on calculation of the time dependent reduced stress in blade cross-sections by using Hubert-Misses-Hencky stress hypothesis. The presented method is applied to real turbomachinery rotor with blades connected on the top with shroud.

  19. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  20. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  1. Parametric study of turbine NGV blade lean and vortex design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shaowen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of blade lean and vortex design on the aerodynamics of a turbine entry nozzle guide vane (NGV are considered using computational fluid dynamics. The aim of the work is to address some of the uncertainties which have arisen from previous studies where conflicting results have been reported for the effect on the NGV. The configuration was initially based on the energy efficient engine turbine which also served as the validation case for the computational method. A total of 17 NGV configurations were evaluated to study the effects of lean and vortex design on row efficiency and secondary kinetic energy. The distribution of mass flow ratio is introduced as an additional factor in the assessment of blade lean effects. The results show that in the turbine entry NGV, the secondary flow strength is not a dominant factor that determines NGV losses and therefore the changes of loading distribution due to blade lean and the associated loss mechanisms should be regarded as a key factor. Radial mass flow redistribution under different NGV lean and twist is demonstrated as an addition key factor influencing row efficiency.

  2. Experimental investigation of turbine blade-tip excitation forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Jaroux, Belgacem; Song, Seung Jin; Yoo, Soom-Yung; Palczynski, Taras

    1994-01-01

    Results of a program to investigate the magnitude and parametric variations of rotordynamic forces which arise in high power turbines due to blade-tip leakage effects are presented. Five different unshrouded turbine configurations and one configuration shrouded with a labyrinth seal were tested with static offsets of the turbine shaft. The forces along and perpendicular to the offset were measured directly with a rotating dynometer. Exploration of casing pressure and flow velocity distributions was used to investigate the force-generating mechanisms. For unshrouded turbines, the cross-forces originate mainly from the classical Alford mechanisms while the direct forces arise mainly from a slightly skewed pressure pattern. The Alford coefficient for cross-force was found to vary between 2.4 and 4.0, while the similar direct force coefficient varied from 1.5 to 3.5. The cross-forces are found to increase substantially when the gap is reduced from 3.0 to 1.9% of blade height, probably due to viscous blade-tip effects. The forces also increase when the hub gap between stator and rotor decreases. The force coefficient decreased with operating flow coefficient. In the case of the shrouded turbine, most of the forces arise from nonuniform seal pressures. This includes about 80% for the transverse forces. The rest appears to come from uneven work extraction. Their level is about 50% higher in the shrouded case.

  3. Thermal stress analysis and thermo-mechanical fatigue for gas turbine blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, J. S.; Kim, B. S.; Kang, M. S.; Ha, J. S.; Lee, Y. S.

    2002-01-01

    The numerical analysis for gas turbine blades were carried out under several conditions by compounding temperature field, velocity field, thermal conduction of blade, and cooling heat transfer. The three types of 1,100 deg. C class 1st-stage gas turbine blades were analyzed. The analysis results are applied to the study on evaluating the remaining life for thermo-mechanical fatigue life. The thermo-mechanical fatigue experiments under out-of-phase and in-phase have been performed. The physical-based life prediction models which considered the contribution of different damage mechanisms have been applied. These models were applied to the temperature and strain rate dependences of isothermal cycling fatigue lives, and the strain-temperature history effect on the thermo-mechanical fatigue lives

  4. Aerodynamics and Optimal Design of Biplane Wind Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Phillip

    In order to improve energy capture and reduce the cost of wind energy, in the past few decades wind turbines have grown significantly larger. As their blades get longer, the design of the inboard region (near the blade root) becomes a trade-off between competing structural and aerodynamic requirements. State-of-the-art blades require thick airfoils near the root to efficiently support large loads inboard, but those thick airfoils have inherently poor aerodynamic performance. New designs are required to circumvent this design compromise. One such design is the "biplane blade", in which the thick airfoils in the inboard region are replaced with thinner airfoils in a biplane configuration. This design was shown previously to have significantly increased structural performance over conventional blades. In addition, the biplane airfoils can provide increased lift and aerodynamic efficiency compared to thick monoplane inboard airfoils, indicating a potential for increased power extraction. This work investigates the fundamental aerodynamic aspects, aerodynamic design and performance, and optimal structural design of the biplane blade. First, the two-dimensional aerodynamics of biplanes with relatively thick airfoils are investigated, showing unique phenomena which arise as a result of airfoil thickness. Next, the aerodynamic design of the full biplane blade is considered. Two biplane blades are designed for optimal aerodynamic loading, and their aerodynamic performance quantified. Considering blades with practical chord distributions and including the drag of the mid-blade joint, it is shown that biplane blades have comparable power output to conventional monoplane designs. The results of this analysis also show that the biplane blades can be designed with significantly less chord than conventional designs, a characteristic which enables larger blade designs. The aerodynamic loads on the biplane blades are shown to be increased in gust conditions and decreased under

  5. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow using V and broken V ribs within gas turbine blade cooling passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sourabh; Amano, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land-based power generation, and various industrial applications. With an increase in turbine rotor inlet temperatures, developments in innovative gas turbine cooling technology enhance the efficiency and power output; these advancements of turbine cooling have allowed engine designs to exceed normal material temperature limits. For internal cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to hot stream of gas are based on an increase in the heat transfer areas and on the promotion of turbulence of the cooling flow. In this study, an improvement in performance is obtained by casting repeated continuous V- and broken V-shaped ribs on one side of the two pass square channels into the core of the blade. A detailed experimental investigation is done for two pass square channels with a 180° turn. Detailed heat transfer distribution occurring in the ribbed passage is reported for a steady state experiment. Four different combinations of 60° V- and broken 60° V-ribs in a channel are considered. A series of thermocouples are used to obtain the temperature on the channel surface and local heat transfer coefficients are obtained for Reynolds numbers 16,000, 56,000 and 85,000 within the turbulent flow regime. Area averaged data are calculated in order to compare the overall performance of the tested ribbed surface and to evaluate the degree of heat transfer enhancement induced by the rib. Flow within the channels is characterized by heat transfer enhancing ribs, bends, rotation and buoyancy effects. A series of experimental measurements is performed to predict the overall performance of the channel. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the Nusselt number, the pressure drop and the overall performance of the eight different ribbed ducts at the specified Reynolds number. The main contribution of this study is to evaluate the best combination of rib arrangements

  6. An aeroelastic analysis of helicopter rotor blades incorporating piezoelectric fiber composite twist actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Park, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    A simple aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor blade incorporating embedded piezoelectric fiber composite, interdigitated electrode blade twist actuators is described. The analysis consist of a linear torsion and flapwise bending model coupled with a nonlinear ONERA based unsteady aerodynamics model. A modified Galerkin procedure is performed upon the rotor blade partial differential equations of motion to develop a system of ordinary differential equations suitable for numerical integration. The twist actuation responses for three conceptual full-scale blade designs with realistic constraints on blade mass are numerically evaluated using the analysis. Numerical results indicate that useful amplitudes of nonresonant elastic twist, on the order of one to two degrees, are achievable under one-g hovering flight conditions for interdigitated electrode poling configurations. Twist actuation for the interdigitated electrode blades is also compared with the twist actuation of a conventionally poled piezoelectric fiber composite blade. Elastic twist produced using the interdigitated electrode actuators was found to be four to five times larger than that obtained with the conventionally poled actuators.

  7. Thermodynamic assessment of impact of inlet air cooling techniques on gas turbine and combined cycle performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, Alok Ku; Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The article is focused on the comparison of impact of two different methods of inlet air cooling (vapor compression and vapor absorption cooling) integrated to a cooled gas turbine based combined cycle plant. Air-film cooling has been adopted as the cooling technique for gas turbine blades. A parametric study of the effect of compressor pressure ratio, compressor inlet temperature (T i , C ), turbine inlet temperature (T i , T ), ambient relative humidity and ambient temperature on performance parameters of plant has been carried out. Optimum T i , T corresponding to maximum plant efficiency of combined cycle increases by 100 °C due to the integration of inlet air cooling. It has been observed that vapor compression cooling improves the efficiency of gas turbine cycle by 4.88% and work output by 14.77%. In case of vapor absorption cooling an improvement of 17.2% in gas cycle work output and 9.47% in gas cycle efficiency has been observed. For combined cycle configuration, however, vapor compression cooling should be preferred over absorption cooling in terms of higher plant performance. The optimum value of compressor inlet temperature has been observed to be 20 °C for the chosen set of conditions for both the inlet air cooling schemes. - Highlights: • Inlet air cooling improves performance of cooled gas turbine based combined cycle. • Vapor compression inlet air cooling is superior to vapor absorption inlet cooling. • For every turbine inlet temperature, there exists an optimum pressure ratio. • The optimum compressor inlet temperature is found to be 293 K

  8. Design of a Tapered and Twisted Blade for the NREL Combined Experiment Rotor; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A tapered/twisted blade was designed to operate on the Combined Experiment Rotor (CER) of the National Renewable Energy Lab., which is a stall-regulated downwind wind turbine having a rated power of 20 kilowatt. The geometry of the new blade set was optimized based on annual energy production subject to the constraints imposed on the design. These constraints were mainly related to scientific needs for fundamental research in rotor aerodynamics. A trade-off study was conducted to determine the effect of the different design constraints. Based on the results of this study, which considered nonlinear twist and taper distributions as well as the NREL S809, S814, S822 and S823 airfoils, a blade having a linear taper and a nonlinear twist distribution that uses the S809 airfoil from root to tip was selected. This blade configuration is the logical continuation of the previous constant-chord twisted and untwisted blade sets and will facilitate comparison with those earlier blades. Despite th e design constraints based on scientific needs, the new blade is more representative of commercial blades than the previous blade sets

  9. Contrastive experimental study on heat transfer and friction characteristics in steam cooled and air cooled rectangular channels with rib turbulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jianying; Li, Guojun; Gao, Tieyu [Xian Jiaotong University, Xian (China)

    2014-09-15

    The present experiment compares the heat transfer and friction characteristics in steam cooled and air cooled rectangular channels (simulating a gas turbine blade cooling passage) with two opposite rib-roughened walls. The Reynolds number (Re) whose length scale is the hydraulic diameter of the passage is set within the range of 10000-60000. The channel length is 1000 mm. The pitch-to-rib height ratio, the channel aspect ratio and the channel blockage ratio is 10, 0.5 and 0.047, respectively. It is found that the average Nu, the average friction coefficient, and the heat transfer performance of both steam and air in the ribbed channels show almost the same change trend with the increase of Re. Under the same test conditions, the average Nu of steam is 30.2% higher than that of air, the average friction coefficient is 18.4% higher, and the heat transfer performances of steam on the ribbed and the smooth walls are 8.4% and 7.3% higher than those of air, respectively. In addition, semi-empirical correlations for the two test channels are developed, which can predict the Nu under the given test condition. The correlations can be used in the design of the internal cooling passage of new generation steam cooled gas turbine blade/vane.

  10. Numerical analysis of flow in ultra micro centrifugal compressor -influence of meridional configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masanao; Tsujita, Hoshio; Hirano, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-01

    A single stage ultra micro centrifugal compressor constituting ultra micro gas turbine is required to operate at high rotational speed in order to achieve the pressure ratio which establishes the gas turbine cycle. As a consequence, the aerodynamic losses can be increased by the interaction of a shock wave with the boundary layer on the blade surface. Moreover, the centrifugal force which exceeds the allowable stress of the impeller material can act on the root of blades. On the other hand, the restrictions of processing technology for the downsizing of impeller not only relatively enlarge the size of tip clearance but also make it difficult to shape the impeller with the three-dimensional blade. Therefore, it is important to establish the design technology for the impeller with the two-dimensional blade which possesses the sufficient aerodynamic performance and enough strength to bear the centrifugal force caused by the high rotational speed. In this study, the flow in two types of impeller with the two-dimensional blade which have different meridional configuration was analyzed numerically. The computed results clarified the influence of the meridional configuration on the loss generations in the impeller passage.

  11. Effect of rotor configuration on guyed tower and foundation designs and estimated costs for intermediate site horizontal axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, G. R.; Winemiller, J. R.; Savino, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Three designs of a guyed cylindrical tower and its foundation for an intermediate size horizontal axis wind turbine generator are discussed. The primary difference in the three designs is the configuration of the rotor. Two configurations are two-blade rotors with teetering hubs - one with full span pitchable blades, the other with fixed pitch blades. The third configuration is a three-bladed rotor with a rigid hub and fixed pitch blades. In all configurations the diameter of the rotor is 38 meters and the axis of rotation is 30.4 meters above grade, and the power output is 200 kW and 400 kW. For each configuration the design is based upon for the most severe loading condition either operating wind or hurricane conditions. The diameter of the tower is selected to be 1.5 meters (since it was determined that this would provide sufficient space for access ladders within the tower) with guy rods attached at 10.7 meters above grade. Completing a design requires selecting the required thicknesses of the various cylindrical segments, the number and diameter of the guy rods, the number and size of soil anchors, and the size of the central foundation. The lower natural frequencies of vibration are determined for each design to ensure that operation near resonance does not occur. Finally, a cost estimate is prepared for each design. A preliminary design and cost estimate of a cantilever tower (cylindrical and not guyed) and its foundation is also presented for each of the three configurations.

  12. Research and development of asymmetrical heat transfer augmentation method in radial channels of blades for high temperature gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, I. V.; Rogalev, A. N.; Garanin, I. V.; Vegera, A. N.; Kindra, V. O.

    2017-11-01

    The serpentine-like one and half-pass cooling channel systems are primarily used in blades fabricated by the lost-wax casting process. The heat transfer turbulators like cross-sectional or angled ribs used in channels of the midchord region failed to eliminate the temperature irregularity from the suction and pressure sides, which is reaching 200°C for a first stage blade of the high-pressure turbine for an aircraft engine. This paper presents the results of a numerical and experimental test of an advanced heat transfer augmentation system in radial channels developed for alignment of the temperature field from the suction and pressure sides. A numerical simulation of three-dimensional coolant flow for a wide range of Reynolds numbers was carried out using ANSYS CFX software. Effect of geometrical parameters on the heat removal asymmetry was determined. The test results of a blade with the proposed intensification system conducted in a liquid-metal thermostat confirmed the accuracy of calculations. Based on the experimental data, the dependencies for calculation of heat transfer coefficients to the cooling air in the blade studied were obtained.

  13. Computational Analysis of Droplet Mass and Size Effect on Mist/Air Impingement Cooling Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impingement cooling has been widely employed to cool gas turbine hot components such as combustor liners, combustor transition pieces, turbine vanes, and blades. A promising technology is proposed to enhance impingement cooling with water droplets injection. However, previous studies were conducted on blade shower head film cooling, and less attention was given to the transition piece cooling. As a continuous effort to develop a realistic mist impingement cooling scheme, this paper focuses on simulating mist impingement cooling under typical gas turbine operating conditions of high temperature and pressure in a double chamber model. Furthermore, the paper presents the effect of cooling effectiveness by changing the mass and size of the droplets. Based on the heat-mass transfer analogy, the results of these experiments prove that the mass of 3E – 3 kg/s droplets with diameters of 5–35 μm could enhance 90% cooling effectiveness and reduce 122 K of wall temperature. The results of this paper can provide guidance for corresponding experiments and serve as the qualification reference for future more complicated studies with convex surface cooling.

  14. Numerical simulation of turbulent flows past the RoBin helicopter with a four-bladed rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.; Mamou, M.; Khalid, M. [National Research Council, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Hongyi.Xu@nrc.ca

    2003-07-01

    The current paper presents a turbulent flow simulation study past a generic helicopter RoBin with a four-bladed rotor using the Chimera moving grid approach. The aerodynamic performance of the rotor blades and their interactions with the RoBin fuselage are investigated using the k - {omega} SST turbulence model contained in the WIND code. The rotor is configured as a Chimera moving grid in a quasisteady flow field. The rotor blades are rectangular, untapered, linearly twisted and are made from NACA 0012 airfoil profile. The blade motion (rotation and cyclic pitching) schedule is specified in the NASA wind tunnel testing of a generic helicopter RoBin. The aerodynamic radial load distributions in the rotor plane are generated by integrating the pressure on each blade surfaces along the blade chordwise direction. The rotor flow interacts strongly with the flow coming off from the fuselage and thus has a significant impact on helicopter aerodynamic performance. (author)

  15. Computational study of a High Pressure Turbine Nozzle/Blade Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopriva, James; Laskowski, Gregory; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    A downstream high pressure turbine blade has been designed for this study to be coupled with the upstream uncooled nozzle of Arts and Rouvroit [1992]. The computational domain is first held to a pitch-line section that includes no centrifugal forces (linear sliding-mesh). The stage geometry is intended to study the fundamental nozzle/blade interaction in a computationally cost efficient manner. Blade/Nozzle count of 2:1 is designed to maintain computational periodic boundary conditions for the coupled problem. Next the geometry is extended to a fully 3D domain with endwalls to understand the impact of secondary flow structures. A set of systematic computational studies are presented to understand the impact of turbulence on the nozzle and down-stream blade boundary layer development, resulting heat transfer, and downstream wake mixing in the absence of cooling. Doing so will provide a much better understanding of stage mixing losses and wall heat transfer which, in turn, can allow for improved engine performance. Computational studies are performed using WALE (Wale Adapted Local Eddy), IDDES (Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation), SST (Shear Stress Transport) models in Fluent.

  16. Numerical studies on the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the first wall inserted with the screw blade for water cooled ceramic breeder blanket of CFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Kecheng; Ma, Xuebin; Cheng, Xiaoman; Liu, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Enhanced heat transfer and friction characteristics of the FW inserted with screw blade is investigated. • The screw blade structure optimization was done on the screw pitch and diameter. • Decreasing screw pitch and increasing screw diameter could further enhance heat transfer accompanied with increasing flow resistance. • Evaluate the overall enhanced heat performance by using the PEC value. - Abstract: The Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) blanket based on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) condition is one of the blanket candidates for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). The first wall (FW) which plays an important part in the blanket design must remove the high heat flux radiated from plasma and nuclear heat deposition on the structure in any operating conditions. In this paper, the characteristics of enhanced heat transfer and friction for the FW with the inserted screw blade are studied by the numerical method. After the comparison between the numerical and experimental results, the standard k–ε turbulent model is selected to do the numerical calculation. The numerical results show that the peak temperature of RAFM steel could be reduced by decreasing screw pitch or increasing screw diameter, while accompanied with ascending flow resistance. Besides, among all of the chosen calculation cases compared with the smooth channel, the maximum value of temperature reduction is 10 °C under the conditions of heat flux of 0.5 MW/m"2 as well as screw pitch of 18 mm and screw diameter of 6 mm. The maximum increment ratio of the friction factor is 257% under the conditions of screw pitch of 10 mm and screw diameter of 4 mm. Furthermore, screw blade of 74 mm pitch and 4 mm diameter presents the highest overall performance evaluation criterion (PEC) value of 0.93 under Reynolds number of 270 000 conditions, and shows the best overall heat transfer enhancement performance.

  17. Numerical studies on the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the first wall inserted with the screw blade for water cooled ceramic breeder blanket of CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Kecheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230037 (China); Ma, Xuebin; Cheng, Xiaoman [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Enhanced heat transfer and friction characteristics of the FW inserted with screw blade is investigated. • The screw blade structure optimization was done on the screw pitch and diameter. • Decreasing screw pitch and increasing screw diameter could further enhance heat transfer accompanied with increasing flow resistance. • Evaluate the overall enhanced heat performance by using the PEC value. - Abstract: The Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) blanket based on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) condition is one of the blanket candidates for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). The first wall (FW) which plays an important part in the blanket design must remove the high heat flux radiated from plasma and nuclear heat deposition on the structure in any operating conditions. In this paper, the characteristics of enhanced heat transfer and friction for the FW with the inserted screw blade are studied by the numerical method. After the comparison between the numerical and experimental results, the standard k–ε turbulent model is selected to do the numerical calculation. The numerical results show that the peak temperature of RAFM steel could be reduced by decreasing screw pitch or increasing screw diameter, while accompanied with ascending flow resistance. Besides, among all of the chosen calculation cases compared with the smooth channel, the maximum value of temperature reduction is 10 °C under the conditions of heat flux of 0.5 MW/m{sup 2} as well as screw pitch of 18 mm and screw diameter of 6 mm. The maximum increment ratio of the friction factor is 257% under the conditions of screw pitch of 10 mm and screw diameter of 4 mm. Furthermore, screw blade of 74 mm pitch and 4 mm diameter presents the highest overall performance evaluation criterion (PEC) value of 0.93 under Reynolds number of 270 000 conditions, and shows the best overall heat transfer enhancement performance.

  18. Numerical simulations of unsteady flows past two-bladed rotors in forward-flight conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.; Mamou, M.; Khalid, M. [National Research Council, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Hongyi.Xu@nrc.ca

    2004-07-01

    The current paper presents time-accurate numerical simulations of compressible flows past two-bladed rotor configurations using a Chimera moving grid approach. The simulations are performed for a variety of flow conditions and various blade aspect ratios. The rotor blades are rectangular, untapered and untwisted planforms. Their cross-sections are built using the NACA 0012 airfoil profile. The aerodynamic performance of the rotor is investigated using the Euler equations. The CFD-FASTRAN code was used for the computations. The pressure distributions are benchmarked against the experimental data from Caradonna and Tung and a number of previous Euler calculations by Agarwal and Deese and Chen et al. The comparisons indicate that the current simulations for the forward flight conditions can reproduce the pressure distributions on the blade surfaces and the prediction of shockwave locations with reasonably good accuracy. (author)

  19. Numerical simulations of unsteady flows past two-bladed rotors in forward-flight conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H.; Mamou, M.; Khalid, M.

    2004-01-01

    The current paper presents time-accurate numerical simulations of compressible flows past two-bladed rotor configurations using a Chimera moving grid approach. The simulations are performed for a variety of flow conditions and various blade aspect ratios. The rotor blades are rectangular, untapered and untwisted planforms. Their cross-sections are built using the NACA 0012 airfoil profile. The aerodynamic performance of the rotor is investigated using the Euler equations. The CFD-FASTRAN code was used for the computations. The pressure distributions are benchmarked against the experimental data from Caradonna and Tung and a number of previous Euler calculations by Agarwal and Deese and Chen et al. The comparisons indicate that the current simulations for the forward flight conditions can reproduce the pressure distributions on the blade surfaces and the prediction of shockwave locations with reasonably good accuracy. (author)

  20. Methods and Algorithms for Computer-aided Engineering of Die Tooling of Compressor Blades from Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaimovich, A. I.; Khaimovich, I. N.

    2018-01-01

    The articles provides the calculation algorithms for blank design and die forming fitting to produce the compressor blades for aircraft engines. The design system proposed in the article allows generating drafts of trimming and reducing dies automatically, leading to significant reduction of work preparation time. The detailed analysis of the blade structural elements features was carried out, the taken limitations and technological solutions allowed to form generalized algorithms of forming parting stamp face over the entire circuit of the engraving for different configurations of die forgings. The author worked out the algorithms and programs to calculate three dimensional point locations describing the configuration of die cavity.

  1. Mesh sensitivity in the thermal analysis of a gas turbine a blade with internal cooling; Sensibilidad de malla en el analisis termico de un alabe de turbina de gas con enfriamiento interno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro Ayala, Jorge Arturo; Gallegos Munoz, Armando [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica, Electrica y Electronica (FIMEE), Universidad de Guanajuato (Mexico); Campos Amezcua, Alfonso [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    This article presents the methodology to generate the mesh model of the computer model of a blade by means of commands in the software of CFD Fluent, mainly in the fluid zone, since a mesh sensitivity analysis becomes too expensive in terms of human and computer resources. When geometry is too irregular, modifications are required in the mesh to avoid problems such as the divergence, instability in the solution and the dependency on the results of temperature, pressure, velocity, etc. Such is the case of a blade with internal cooling of the first stage of a gas turbine. The results are included of the generated mesh as well as of the thermal analysis of the blade. Additionally the results of temperature, pressure and velocity of the combustion gases and of the cooling air are shown. [Spanish] Este articulo presenta la metodologia para generar el mallado del modelo computacional de un alabe por medio de comandos en el software de CFD Fluent, principalmente en la zona del fluido, ya que un analisis de sensibilidad de malla se vuelve demasiado costoso en terminos de recursos humanos y computacionales. Cuando la geometria es demasiado irregular, se requiere de modificaciones en la malla para evitar problemas como son la divergencia, inestabilidad en la solucion y la dependencia de los resultados de temperatura, presion, velocidad, etc. Tal es el caso de un alabe con enfriamiento interno de la primera etapa de una turbina de gas. Se incluyen los resultados tanto de la malla generada como del analisis termico del alabe. Adicionalmente se muestran los resultados de temperatura, presion y velocidad de los gases de la combustion y del aire de enfriamiento.

  2. An Approximate Model for the Performance and Acoustic Predictions of Counterrotating Propeller Configurations. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denner, Brett William

    1989-01-01

    An approximate method was developed to analyze and predict the acoustics of a counterrotating propeller configuration. The method employs the analytical techniques of Lock and Theodorsen as described by Davidson to predict the steady performance of a counterrotating configuration. Then, a modification of the method of Lesieutre is used to predict the unsteady forces on the blades. Finally, the steady and unsteady loads are used in the numerical method of Succi to predict the unsteady acoustics of the propeller. The numerical results are compared with experimental acoustic measurements of a counterrotating propeller configuration by Gazzaniga operating under several combinations of advance ratio, blade pitch, and number of blades. In addition, a constant-speed commuter-class propeller configuration was designed with the Davidson method and the acoustics analyzed at three advance ratios. Noise levels and frequency spectra were calculated at a number of locations around the configuration. The directivity patterns of the harmonics in both the horizontal and vertical planes were examined, with the conclusion that the noise levels of the even harmonics are relatively independent of direction whereas the noise levels of the odd harmonics are extremely dependent on azimuthal direction in the horizontal plane. The equations of Succi are examined to explain this behavior.

  3. Report on the achievements in fiscal 1998. Hydrogen utilizing international clean energy system technology (WE-NET). Subtask 8. Development of hydrogen combustion turbine (development of major components such as turbine blades and rotors); 1998 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET). 8. Suiso nensho turbine no kaihatsu (turbine yoku, rotor nado shuyo kosei kiki no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The present research and development is intended to establish the fundamental technologies required to develop a pilot plant, by investigating development of such major component devices as turbine blades and rotors in a hydrogen combustion turbine. In the turbine moving and stator blade cooling technology, it is intended to achieve the power plant efficiency of 60% (based on HHV) as established in the interim evaluation performed in fiscal 1996. Therefore, the necessary element tests, detailed blade design, and partial fabrication were moved forward on the three kinds of the selected blade cooling systems as the cooling systems that can deal with the steam temperature condition as high as 1,700 degrees C. Fiscal 1998 will execute the design and fabrication of test blades and testing devices for blade cooling evaluation tests to be performed at Tashiro Township in Akita Prefecture. At the same time, evaluation and selection will be made on the three kinds of the cooling blades. In the rotor cooling technology, for the purpose of analyzing the rolling-in phenomenon of steam in the main turbine flow, a method will be developed to analyze rotor disk cavity temperatures based on CFD, the basic sealing conditions based thereon will be discussed, and generalization will be made on the rotor cooling technology. (NEDO)

  4. Base excitation testing system using spring elements to pivotally mount wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrell, Jason; Hughes, Scott; Butterfield, Sandy; Lambert, Scott

    2013-12-10

    A system (1100) for fatigue testing wind turbine blades (1102) through forced or resonant excitation of the base (1104) of a blade (1102). The system (1100) includes a test stand (1112) and a restoring spring assembly (1120) mounted on the test stand (1112). The restoring spring assembly (1120) includes a primary spring element (1124) that extends outward from the test stand (1112) to a blade mounting plate (1130) configured to receive a base (1104) of blade (1102). During fatigue testing, a supported base (1104) of a blad (1102) may be pivotally mounted to the test stand (1112) via the restoring spring assembly (1120). The system (1100) may include an excitation input assembly (1140) that is interconnected with the blade mouting plate (1130) to selectively apply flapwise, edgewise, and/or pitch excitation forces. The restoring spring assemply (1120) may include at least one tuning spring member (1127) positioned adjacent to the primary spring element (1124) used to tune the spring constant or stiffness of the primary spring element (1124) in one of the excitation directions.

  5. Blade number impact on pressure and performance of archimedes screw turbine using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Syuhada, Ahmad; Nawawi, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Many rivers in Indonesia can be used as source of mini/micro hydro power plant using low head turbine. The most suitable type of turbine used in fluid flow with low head is the Archimedes screw turbine. The Archimedes screw hydro turbine is a relative newcomer to the small-scale hydropower that can work efficiently on heads as low as 10 meter. In this study, the performance of Archimedes water turbines that has different blade numbers that are thoroughly evaluated to obtain proper blade configuration. For this purpose, numerical simulations are used to predict the pressure changes that occur along the turbine. The simulation results show that turbines with an amount of two blades have more sloping pressure distribution so that it has better stability.

  6. Plate-fin array cooling using a finger-like piezoelectric fan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, Jin-Cherng; Syu, Jhih-Zong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the heat transfer of a plate-fin array cooled by a vibrating finger-like piezoelectric fan comprising four flexible rectangular blades was investigated. The results indicated that the heat transfer enhancement of the fin array cooled by a vibrating piezoelectric fan at x/L = 0.5 and H = 5 mm ranged between 1.5 and 3.3, regardless of the fin array orientation. However, the heat transfer enhancement caused by a fan being placed at either edge of the fin array yielded a dissimilar result between both of the fin array orientations because of the superimposed effects of the boundary layer development and the air flow induced by the fan. This dissimilarity was especially noticeable when the piezoelectric fan was composed of aluminum blades to accommodate the moderate Reynolds number. In addition to the Reynolds number, the ratio of the fan blade vibration envelope to the source area determined the Nu number of the piezoelectric fan-cooled fin array. This design enhanced the fin array heat transfer and reduced cooler volume by embedding multiple vibrating beams into the fin array. -- Highlights: • Heat transfer of a piezoelectric fan-cooled plate-fin array was investigated. • Effects of fan position, fan height and fan material on heat transfer were examined. • Similar heat transfer enhancement range was shown for both fin array orientations. • Fin heat transfer with a running Al fan at x = 0 was higher than that at x = 0.25L. • Besides fan Reynolds number, the area ratio also determined Nu of the fin array

  7. EB-PVD process management for highly productive zirconia thermal barrier coating of turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhold, E.; Botzler, P.; Deus, C.

    1999-01-01

    Zirconia thermal barrier coatings are well used in the turbine manufacturing industry because they ensure extended lifetimes of turbine blades. Compared with other techniques, EB-PVD processes are best suited for the deposition on turbine blades with regard to the layer properties. Therefore EB-PVD coaters for turbine blades are becoming increasingly interesting. The coating costs per component are mainly dependent on a highly productive solution for the deposition task. Thus the EB-PVD process management has to be optimized in order to meet the productivity requirements of the manufacturers. This includes the requirement of high deposition rates, large deposition areas, long time stable production cycles as well as a matched duration of preheating, deposition and cooling down per charge. Modern EB-PVD solutions to be introduced allow deposition rates on blades up to 7 μm/min. The consequences for the technological process management and plant design concerning long time stable coating cycles with high productivity will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. Hydrogen utilization international clean energy system technology (WE-NET). Subtask 8. Development of hydrogen combustion turbines (development of the main component devices such as turbine blades and rotors); Suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET). Subtask 8. Suiso nensho turbine no kaihatsu (turbine yoku, rotor nado shuyo kosei kiki no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The paper described the result of the fiscal 1996 development relating to hydrogen combustion turbines, as one of the hydrogen utilization technologies, which have excellent environmentality and are expected of remarkably high efficiency. In the film cooling system of first-stage moving/stationary blades, the smaller the pitch of film pore is, the higher the mean cooling efficiency becomes, indicating 0.7 at maximum. As compared with the conventional shower head type, the metal temperature can be reduced 30-40degC. In the recovery type inner (convection) cooling system, by reducing the blade number, the consumption amount of coolant can be reduced 6% in stationary blade and 13% in moving blade, as compared with the result of the preceding year. In the element test of the hybrid cooling system, film cooling efficiency was actually measured by the porous module test equipment, and the result well agreed with the calculation result. In the water cooling system, studied were water (stationary blade) and vapor (moving blade) of the closed cooling structure for realization of a cycle efficiency of 60%. In rotor/disk cooling, analyses were made of seal characteristic grasp tests and characteristics of the rotor. The effect of deflection in the mainstream was small. Besides, proper value of the seal overlapping amount could be obtained. 6 refs., 368 figs., 55 tabs.

  9. A smart segmented blade system for reducing weight of the wind turbine rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Hongya; Zeng, Pan; Lei, Liping; Yang, Yabin; Xu, Yuejie; Qian, Lingyun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A segmented blade system to light the wind turbine rotor is proposed. • The experiments in the wind tunnel and the numerical calculation are combined to validate the effectiveness of the design. • The moment of the blade below the hinged location are alleviated. • The mounting locations of the hinged rods significantly affect the moment distribution on the blade. • The gross weight of the blade can be reduced by 35.4%. - Abstract: The paper proposes a novel design concept for the wind turbine rotors. The design is composed of the segmented blades and a hinged-rods support structure (SBHR) as a means of reducing weight through alleviating the moment on the blade. A prototype of the design is manufactured. Focusing on the hinged-rods support structure (HRSS), a method combining the experiments and numerical calculation is developed to analyze its feasibility. The experiments in the wind tunnel platform were conducted to measure the loads at the root of the isolated blade and in the rods. A numerical model was developed to describe the designed wind turbine rotor using the measured loads in experiments. In the model, the mounting locations of the hinged rods significantly affected the moment distribution on the blade. Thus, two dimensionless indexes were determined to analyze its influences. The model perfectly explain the characteristics of the novel structure under different configurations. The results demonstrated that the moment of the blade below the hinged location were alleviated, which reduced the requirements for the material. A 43.1% reduction of the maximum moment can be achieved in the design. In addition, the gross reduced weight of the blade was estimated to be 35.4% based on the blade mass distribution along the span

  10. Air cooled turbine component having an internal filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeck, Alexander R [Orlando, FL

    2012-05-15

    A centrifugal particle separator is provided for removing particles such as microscopic dirt or dust particles from the compressed cooling air prior to reaching and cooling the turbine blades or turbine vanes of a turbine engine. The centrifugal particle separator structure has a substantially cylindrical body with an inlet arranged on a periphery of the substantially cylindrical body. Cooling air enters centrifugal particle separator through the separator inlet port having a linear velocity. When the cooling air impinges the substantially cylindrical body, the linear velocity is transformed into a rotational velocity, separating microscopic particles from the cooling air. Microscopic dust particles exit the centrifugal particle separator through a conical outlet and returned to a working medium.

  11. Selection of a turbine cooling system applying multi-disciplinary design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, B

    2001-05-01

    The presented paper describes a multi-disciplinary cooling selection approach applied to major gas turbine engine hot section components, including turbine nozzles, blades, discs, combustors and support structures, which maintain blade tip clearances. The paper demonstrates benefits of close interaction between participating disciplines starting from early phases of the hot section development. The approach targets advancements in engine performance and cost by optimizing the design process, often requiring compromises within individual disciplines.

  12. Non-trivial self-dual gluon configurations in lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilson-Thompson, S.; Bowman, P.; Bonnet, F.; Leinweber, D.; Williams, A.; Dunne, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have investigated the smoothing of gauge fields in SU(3) using a variety of cooling algorithms. A topic of particular interest to such investigations is the behaviour of self-dual field configurations over a large number of cooling sweeps. It is well known that cooling based upon the standard Wilson action is affected by excessively large discretisation errors, leading in the long-term to trivial configurations. This has shifted the research emphasis onto improved actions, which are designed to minimise the discretisation errors that arise on the lattice. The cooling schemes we have investigated have been designed to eliminate O(a 2 ) and O(a 4 ) discretization errors producing an action accurate to order O(a 6 ). An analogously defined improved topological charge operator is used to investigate vacuum instanton dynamics. We used these operators to construct self-dual gluon configurations by cooling until the duality condition S/S 0 |Q| (where S 0 is the single instanton action and Q is the topological charge) is reached. As it is expected from theoretical grounds that Q is always an integer, a range of different actions and topological charge operators are assessed to determine which combination produced a result closest to what we would expect in the continuum. As our lattices have (untwisted) periodic boundary conditions we are particularly interested in investigating the relevance of the Nahm transformation to our results. This is a duality transformation which maps a self-dual SU(N) configuration with topological charge Q on the 4-torus to a self-dual SU(Q) configuration with topological charge N on the dual 4-torus. As there are no instanton solutions in SU(1), the Nahm transformation appears to preclude the existence of a |Q| = 1 self-dual solution on the 4-torus. We have investigated this on the lattice by finding |Q| = 1 configurations and assessing the behaviour of the action and the stability of the topological charge as they cool towards

  13. Performance of Savonius Blade Waterwheel with Variation of Blade Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, L.; Rompas, P. T. D.

    2018-02-01

    The utilization of water energy source is mainly used as a provider of electrical energy through hydroelectric power. The potential utilization of water flow energy is relatively small. The objective of this study is to know the best blade of Savonius waterwheel with various variables such as water discharge, blade number, and loading. The data used the efficiency of waterwheel, variation of blade number, variable water discharge, and loading in the shaft. The test results have shown that the performances of a top-water mill with the semicircular curve where the variation in the number of blades are 4, 6, and 8 at discharge and loading of 0.01587 m3/s and 1000 grams respectively were 9.945%, 13.929%, and 17.056% respectively. The blades number of 8 obtained the greatest performance. The more number of blades the greater the efficiency of the waterwheel Savonius.

  14. Film Cooling Optimization Using Numerical Computation of the Compressible Viscous Flow Equations and Simplex Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Elsayed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling is vital to gas turbine blades to protect them from high temperatures and hence high thermal stresses. In the current work, optimization of film cooling parameters on a flat plate is investigated numerically. The effect of film cooling parameters such as inlet velocity direction, lateral and forward diffusion angles, blowing ratio, and streamwise angle on the cooling effectiveness is studied, and optimum cooling parameters are selected. The numerical simulation of the coolant flow through flat plate hole system is carried out using the “CFDRC package” coupled with the optimization algorithm “simplex” to maximize overall film cooling effectiveness. Unstructured finite volume technique is used to solve the steady, three-dimensional and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The results are compared with the published numerical and experimental data of a cylindrically round-simple hole, and the results show good agreement. In addition, the results indicate that the average overall film cooling effectiveness is enhanced by decreasing the streamwise angle for high blowing ratio and by increasing the lateral and forward diffusion angles. Optimum geometry of the cooling hole on a flat plate is determined. In addition, numerical simulations of film cooling on actual turbine blade are performed using the flat plate optimal hole geometry.

  15. Structural Testing of the Blade Reliability Collaborative Effect of Defect Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hughes, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Paquette, J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Two 8.3-meter (m) wind turbine blades intentionally constructed with manufacturing flaws were tested to failure at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) south of Boulder, Colorado. Two blades were tested; one blade was manufactured with a fiberglass spar cap and the second blade was manufactured with a carbon fiber spar cap. Test loading primarily consisted of flap fatigue loading of the blades, with one quasi-static ultimate load case applied to the carbon fiber spar cap blade. Results of the test program were intended to provide the full-scale test data needed for validation of model and coupon test results of the effect of defects in wind turbine blade composite materials. Testing was part of the Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) led by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The BRC seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the causes of unexpected blade failures (Paquette 2012), and to develop methods to enable blades to survive to their expected operational lifetime. Recent work in the BRC includes examining and characterizing flaws and defects known to exist in wind turbine blades from manufacturing processes (Riddle et al. 2011). Recent results from reliability databases show that wind turbine rotor blades continue to be a leading contributor to turbine downtime (Paquette 2012).

  16. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  17. Optimization of the breeder zone cooling tubes of the DEMO Water-Cooled Lithium Lead breeding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maio, P.A.; Arena, P.; Bongiovì, G. [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Palermo (Italy); Chiovaro, P., E-mail: pierluigi.chiovaro@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Palermo (Italy); Del Nevo, A. [ENEA Brasimone, Camugnano, BO (Italy); Forte, R. [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Palermo (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Determination of an optimal configuration for the breeder zone cooling tubes. • Attention has been focused on the toroidal–radial breeder zone cooling tubes lay out. • A theoretical-computational approach based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) has been followed, adopting a qualified commercial FEM code. • Five different configurations have been investigated to optimize the breeder zone cooling tubes arrangement fulfilling all the rules prescribed by safety codes. - Abstract: The determination of an optimal configuration for the breeder zone (BZ) cooling tubes is one of the most important issues in the DEMO Water-Cooled Lithium Lead (WCLL) breeding blanket R&D activities, since BZ cooling tubes spatial distribution should ensure an efficient heat power removal from the breeder, avoiding hotspots occurrence in the thermal field. Within the framework of R&D activities supported by the HORIZON 2020 EUROfusion Consortium action on the DEMO WCLL breeding blanket design, a campaign of parametric analyses has been launched at the Department of Energy, Information Engineering and Mathematical Models of the University of Palermo (DEIM), in close cooperation with ENEA-Brasimone, in order to assess the potential influence of BZ cooling tubes number on the thermal performances of the DEMO WCLL outboard breeding blanket equatorial module under the nominal steady state operative conditions envisaged for it, optimizing their geometric configuration and taking also into account that a large number of cooling pipes can deteriorate the tritium breeding performances of the module. In particular, attention has been focused on the toroidal-radial option for the BZ tube bundles lay-out and a parametric study has been carried out taking into account different tube bundles arrangement within the module. The study has been carried out following a numerical approach, based on the finite element method (FEM), and adopting a qualified commercial FEM code. Results

  18. The evolution of US helium-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R.; Cheng, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews and compares four helium-cooled fusion reactor blanket designs. These designs represent generic configurations of using helium to cool fusion reactor blankets that were studied over the past 20 years in the United States of America (US). These configurations are the pressurized module design, the pressurized tube design, the solid particulate and gas mixture design, and the nested shell design. Among these four designs, the nested shell design, which was invented for the ARIES study, is the simplest in configuration and has the least number of critical issues. Both metallic and ceramic-composite structural materials can be used for this design. It is believed that the nested shell design can be the most suitable blanket configuration for helium-cooled fusion power and experimental reactors. (orig.)

  19. Bladed wheels damage detection through Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis improved algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, P.

    2017-05-01

    Recent papers introduced the Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis for bladed wheels damage detection. This technique showed its potential in estimating the frequency of sinusoidal signals even when the acquisition time is short with respect to the vibration period, provided that some hypothesis are fulfilled. Anyway, previously proposed algorithms showed severe limitations in cracks detection at their early stage. The present paper proposes an improved algorithm which allows to detect a blade vibration frequency shift due to a crack whose size is really small compared to the blade width. Such a technique could be implemented for condition-based maintenance, allowing to use non-contact methods for vibration measurements. A stator-fixed laser sensor could monitor all the blades as they pass in front of the spot, giving precious information about the wheel health. This configuration determines an acquisition time for each blade which become shorter as the machine rotational speed increases. In this situation, traditional Discrete Fourier Transform analysis results in poor frequency resolution, being not suitable for small frequency shift detection. Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis instead showed high reliability in vibration frequency estimation even with data samples collected in a short time range. A description of the improved algorithm is provided in the paper, along with a comparison with the previous one. Finally, a validation of the method is presented, based on finite element simulations results.

  20. Structural investigation of composite wind turbine blade considering various load cases and fatigue life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, C.; Bang, J.; Sugiyama, Y.

    2005-01-01

    This study proposes a structural design for developing a medium scale composite wind turbine blade made of E-glass/epoxy for a 750 kW class horizontal axis wind turbine system. The design loads were determined from various load cases specified at the IEC61400-1 international specification and GL regulations for the wind energy conversion system. A specific composite structure configuration, which can effectively endure various loads such as aerodynamic loads and loads due to accumulation of ice, hygro-thermal and mechanical loads, was proposed. To evaluate the proposed composite wind turbine blade, structural analysis was performed by using the finite element method. Parametric studies were carried out to determine an acceptable blade structural design, and the most dominant design parameters were confirmed. In this study, the proposed blade structure was confirmed to be safe and stable under various load conditions, including the extreme load conditions. Moreover, the blade adapted a new blade root joint with insert bolts, and its safety was verified at design loads including fatigue loads. The fatigue life of a blade that has to endure for more than 20 years was estimated by using the well-known S-N linear damage theory, the service load spectrum, and the Spera's empirical equations. With the results obtained from all the structural design and analysis, prototype composite blades were manufactured. A specific construction process including the lay-up molding method was applied to manufacturing blades. Full-scale static structural test was performed with the simulated aerodynamic loads. From the experimental results, it was found that the designed blade had structural integrity. In addition, the measured results of deflections, strains, mass, and radial center of gravity agreed well with the analytical results. The prototype blade was successfully certified by an international certification institute, GL (Germanisher Lloyd) in Germany

  1. Design and Evaluation of Glass/epoxy Composite Blade and Composite Tower Applied to Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunbum

    2018-02-01

    In the study, the analysis and manufacturing of small class wind turbine blade was performed. In the structural design, firstly the loading conditions are defined through the load case analysis. The proposed structural configuration of blade has a sandwich type composite structure with the E-glass/Epoxy face sheets and the Urethane foam core for lightness, structural stability, low manufacturing cost and easy manufacturing process. And also, this work proposes a design procedure and results of tower for the small scale wind turbine systems. Structural analysis of blade including load cases, stress, deformation, buckling, vibration and fatigue life was performed using the finite element method, the load spectrum analysis and the Miner rule. Moreover, investigation on structural safety of tower was verified through structural analysis by FEM. The manufacturing of blade and tower was performed based on structural design. In order to investigate the designed structure, the structural tests were conducted and its results were compared with the calculated results. It is confirmed that the final proposed blade and tower meet the design requirements.

  2. Wind Turbine Blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a blade for a wind turbine, particularly to a blade that may be produced by an advanced manufacturing process for producing a blade with high quality structural components. Particularly, the structural components, which are preferably manufactured from fibre reinforced...

  3. Aeroelastically coupled blades for vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Joshua; Barone, Matthew F.

    2016-02-23

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a vertical axis wind turbine blade configured to rotate about a rotation axis. The vertical axis wind turbine blade includes at least an attachment segment, a rear swept segment, and optionally, a forward swept segment. The attachment segment is contiguous with the forward swept segment, and the forward swept segment is contiguous with the rear swept segment. The attachment segment includes a first portion of a centroid axis, the forward swept segment includes a second portion of the centroid axis, and the rear swept segment includes a third portion of the centroid axis. The second portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced ahead of the first portion of the centroid axis and the third portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced behind the first portion of the centroid axis in the direction of rotation about the rotation axis.

  4. Bladed disc crack diagnostics using blade passage signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanachi, Houman; Liu, Jie; Banerjee, Avisekh; Koul, Ashok; Liang, Ming; Alavi, Elham

    2012-12-01

    One of the major potential faults in a turbo fan engine is the crack initiation and propagation in bladed discs under cyclic loads that could result in the breakdown of the engines if not detected at an early stage. Reliable fault detection techniques are therefore in demand to reduce maintenance cost and prevent catastrophic failures. Although a number of approaches have been reported in the literature, it remains very challenging to develop a reliable technique to accurately estimate the health condition of a rotating bladed disc. Correspondingly, this paper presents a novel technique for bladed disc crack detection through two sequential signal processing stages: (1) signal preprocessing that aims to eliminate the noises in the blade passage signals; (2) signal postprocessing that intends to identify the crack location. In the first stage, physics-based modeling and interpretation are established to help characterize the noises. The crack initiation can be determined based on the calculated health monitoring index derived from the sinusoidal effects. In the second stage, the crack is located through advanced detrended fluctuation analysis of the preprocessed data. The proposed technique is validated using a set of spin rig test data (i.e. tip clearance and time of arrival) that was acquired during a test conducted on a bladed military engine fan disc. The test results have demonstrated that the developed technique is an effective approach for identifying and locating the incipient crack that occurs at the root of a bladed disc.

  5. Intubation of prehospital patients with curved laryngoscope blade is more successful than with straight blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Scott M; Haim, Eithan D; Sullivan, Alex H; Clayton, Lisa M

    2018-02-17

    Direct laryngoscopy can be performed using curved or straight blades, and providers usually choose the blade they are most comfortable with. However, curved blades are anecdotally thought of as easier to use than straight blades. We seek to compare intubation success rates of paramedics using curved versus straight blades. Design: retrospective chart review. hospital-based suburban ALS service with 20,000 annual calls. prehospital patients with any direct laryngoscopy intubation attempt over almost 9years. First attempt and overall success rates were calculated for attempts with curved and straight blades. Differences between the groups were calculated. 2299 patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy. 1865 had attempts with a curved blade, 367 had attempts with a straight blade, and 67 had attempts with both. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. First attempt success was 86% with a curved blade and 73% with a straight blade: a difference of 13% (95% CI: 9-17). Overall success was 96% with a curved blade and 81% with a straight blade: a difference of 15% (95% CI: 12-18). There was an average of 1.11 intubation attempts per patient with a curved blade and 1.13 attempts per patient with a straight blade (2% difference, 95% CI: -3-7). Our study found a significant difference in intubation success rates between laryngoscope blade types. Curved blades had higher first attempt and overall success rates when compared to straight blades. Paramedics should consider selecting a curved blade as their tool of choice to potentially improve intubation success. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental validation of radial reconstructed pin-power distributions in full-scale BWR fuel assemblies with and without control blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giust, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.giust@axpo.c [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Axpo Kernenergie AG, Parkstrasse 23, CH-5401 Baden (Switzerland); Grimm, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    Total fission rate measurements have been performed on full-size BWR fuel assemblies of type SVEA-96+ in the zero power reactor PROTEUS at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This paper presents comparisons of reconstructed 2D pin fission rates from nodal diffusion calculations to the experimental results in two configurations: one 'regular' (I-1A) and the other 'controlled' (I-2A). Both configurations consist of an array of 3 x 3 SVEA-96+ fuel assemblies moderated with light water at 20 {sup o}C. In configuration I-2A, an L-shaped hafnium control blade (half of a real cruciform blade) is inserted adjacent to the north-west corner of the central fuel assembly. To minimise the impact of the surroundings, all measurements were done in fuel pins belonging to the central assembly. The 3 x 3 experimental configuration (test zone) was modelled using the core monitoring and design tools that are applied at the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL). These are the 2D transport code HELIOS, used for the cross-section generation, and the 3D, 2-group nodal diffusion code PRESTO-2. The exterior is represented, in the axial and radial directions, by 2-group partial current ratios (PCRs) calculated at the test zone boundary using a 3D Monte Carlo (MCNPX) model of the whole PROTEUS reactor. Sensitivity cases are analysed to show the impact of changes in the 2D lattice modelling on the calculated fission rate distribution and reactivity. Further, the effects of variations in the test zone boundary PCRs and their behaviour in energy are investigated. For the test zone configuration without control blade, the pin-power reconstruction methodology delivers the same level of accuracy as the 2D transport calculations. On the other hand, larger deviations that are inherent to the use of reflected geometry in the lattice calculations are observed for the configuration with the control blade inserted. In the basic (reference) simulation cases, the calculated-to-experimental (C

  7. Turbomachine blade reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system having a turbomachine blade segment including a blade and a mounting segment coupled to the blade, wherein the mounting segment has a plurality of reinforcement pins laterally extending at least partially through a neck of the mounting segment.

  8. Hot gas path component cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  9. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  10. Calculation of blade-data for the Hamilton standard structural analysis of the composite blade for the 18 meter diameter rotor and a comparison with FFA-calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundemo, C

    1979-04-01

    Section property data for the composite blade manufactured by Karlskronavarvet was calculated for the analysis performed by Hamilton Standard. The HS investigation was carried out for various operating conditions, including dynamic response loads, stresses, frequencies and dynamic stability. The Hamilton Standard results has been compared with the FFA (The Aeronautical Research Institute of Sweden) calculation. The results show that the stresses and moments calculated by HS never exceed the allowable levels for the hinged hub configuration. The natural frequencies seem to agree quite well with the measured frequencies. In the input data of the Hamilton Standard dynamic response analysis a too far aft position of the cordwise center of gravity of the outher third of the blade was used. Correct position will give lower stresses.

  11. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines. However, to quantify steam as a coolant, there exists practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  12. Pink-Beam, Highly-Accurate Compact Water Cooled Slits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Jayne, Richard; Waterman, Dave; Caletka, Dave; Steadman, Paul; Dhesi, Sarnjeet

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Design Consulting, Inc. (ADC) has designed accurate compact slits for applications where high precision is required. The system consists of vertical and horizontal slit mechanisms, a vacuum vessel which houses them, water cooling lines with vacuum guards connected to the individual blades, stepper motors with linear encoders, limit (home position) switches and electrical connections including internal wiring for a drain current measurement system. The total slit size is adjustable from 0 to 15 mm both vertically and horizontally. Each of the four blades are individually controlled and motorized. In this paper, a summary of the design and Finite Element Analysis of the system are presented

  13. Model predictive control of trailing edge flaps on a wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castaignet, Damien Bruno

    of the wind turbine fatigue and extreme loads. This potential was confirmed with wind tunnel tests made on blade sections with trailing edge flaps and on a scaled two-bladed wind turbine in a wind tunnel. The work presented in this thesis includes a full-scale test run on a Vestas V27 wind turbine equipped...... fatigue loads by 23%, but also the main shaft and the tower fatigue loads by up to 32%. Extreme loads during normal production also benefit from the trailing edge flaps. At last, the same controller was run on the Vestas V27 wind turbine located at the Risø Campus of the Technical University of Denmark......Trailing edge flaps on wind turbine blades have been investigated for several years. Aero-servoelastic simulations carried out with different simulation tools, trailing edge flaps configurations and controller designs proved that trailing edge flaps are a suitable solution for reducing some...

  14. Experimental investigation of cross-over jets in a rib-roughened trailing-edge cooling channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei

    Increasing the rotor inlet temperature can dramatically increase the efficiency and power output of the gas turbine engine. However, the melting point of turbine blade material limits the realistic upper bound of the rotor inlet temperature. As a result, the development of high temperature turbine blade material and advanced turbine blade cooling technology determines the future of turbine blade engine. Adding impingement jet holes and rib turbulators in the inner cooling channel of the gas turbine blades are two effective ways to enhance the cooling effects. The purpose of this study is to figure out the influence of different combinations of jet holes and rib turbulators on the heat transfer efficiency. A tabletop scale test model is used in the study to simulate the cooling cavity of trailing edge and its feed channel in a real gas turbine blade. The Dimensional Analysis Theory is used in the study to eliminate the influence of scaling. Two different crossover slots are tested with 5 different rib arrangements, and each of the test geometries is tested for 6 jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,000 to 36,000. The two different crossover slots are the crossover slots with 0 and 5 degree tilt angles. The four different rib arrangements are ribs with 0 degree, 45 degree, 90 degree and 135 degree angles of attack with respect to the flow direction. Furthermore, a smooth test section (no ribs) was also tested. The steady state liquid crystal thermography is used to quantify the heat transfer performance of the target areas. The variation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number is plotted for each of the 10 geometries. Also, the variation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number are compared for different rib angles of attack with the same crossover slot tilt angle, and between different crossover slots tilt angles with the same rib angle. The results show that, the area-weighted average Nusselt number increases monotonically with the Reynolds number; the target

  15. Turbomachine blade assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-11-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system comprising a turbomachine blade assembly having a blade portion, a shank portion, and a mounting portion, wherein the blade portion, the shank portion, and the mounting portion comprise a first plurality of plies extending from a tip of the airfoil to a base of the dovetail.

  16. Metallurgy of gas turbine blades with integral shroud and its influence on blades performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Z.; Marino, C.; Kubiak, J.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the microstructure of the gas turbine blades with integral shroud on the blades performance is presented. The analysis of the solidification process of the gas turbine blades during conventionally casting process (equiaxed grains) with all elements which has influence on the mode of its solidification and variation of the microstructure is carried out. Also, the evaluation of the failure of the gas turbine blade is present. A detailed analysis of the blade tip shroud microstructure (presence of the equiaxed and columnar grains) and its influence on the failure initiation and propagation is carried out. Finally, conclusions and some necessary improvements of the blades casting process to prevent blades failures are presented. (Author) 2 refs

  17. Design of an Advanced Wood Composite Rotor and Development of Wood Composite Blade Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebel, Thomas; Dechow, Curtis; Zuteck, Michael

    1984-01-01

    In support of a program to advance wood composite wind turbine blade technology, a design was completed for a prototype, 90-foot diameter, two-bladed, one-piece rotor, with all wood/epoxy composite structure. The rotor was sized for compatibility with a generator having a maximum power rating of 4000 kilowatts. Innovative features of the rotor include: a teetering hub to minimize the effects of gust loads, untwisted blades to promote rotor power control through stall, joining of blades to the hub structure via an adhesive bonded structural joint, and a blade structural design which was simplified relative to earlier efforts. The prototype rotor was designed to allow flexibility for configuring the rotor upwind or downwind of the tower, for evaluating various types of teeter dampers and/or elastomeric stops, and with variable delta-three angle settings of the teeter shaft axis. The prototype rotor was also designed with provisions for installing pressure tap and angle of attack instrumentation in one blade. A production version rotor cost analysis was conducted. Included in the program were efforts directed at developing advanced load take-off stud designs for subsequent evaluation testing by NASA, development of aerodynamic tip brake concepts, exploratory testing of a wood/epoxy/graphite concept, and compression testing of wood/epoxy laminate, with scarf-jointed plies.

  18. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennard, M W [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Pleasantville, NY (United States); Harbottle, J E [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Thornbury, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B{sub 4}C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  19. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B 4 C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  20. Aeromechanical stability of helicopters with composite rotor blades in forward flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward C.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1992-01-01

    The aeromechanical stability, including air resonance in hover, air resonance in forward flight, and ground resonance, of a helicopter with elastically tailored composite rotor blades is investigated. Five soft-inplane hingeless rotor configurations, featuring elastic pitch-lag, pitch-flap and extension-torsion couplings, are analyzed. Elastic couplings introduced through tailored composite blade spars can have a powerful effect on both air and ground resonance behavior. Elastic pitch-flap couplings (positive and negative) strongly affect body, rotor and dynamic inflow modes. Air resonance stability is diminished by elastic pitch-flap couplings in hover and forward flight. Negative pitch-lag elastic coupling has a stabilizing effect on the regressive lag mode in hover and forward flight. The negative pitch-lag coupling has a detrimental effect on ground resonance stability. Extension-torsion elastic coupling (blade pitch decreases due to tension) decreases regressive lag mode stability in both airborne and ground contact conditions. Increasing thrust levels has a beneficial influence on ground resonance stability for rotors with pitch-flap and extension-torsion coupling and is only marginally effective in improving stability of rotors with pitch-lag coupling.

  1. Achievement report for fiscal 1993. International clean energy system technology to utilize hydrogen - WE-NET (Sub-task 8. Development of hydrogen burning turbines - Development of main components including turbine blades and rotors); 1993 nendo seika hokokusho. Suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) (Sub tusk 8: Suiso nensho tabin no kaihatsu - tabin yoku rota tou shuyou kosei kiki no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    Among the research and development items in relation with the 'development of hydrogen burning turbines' based on the WE-NET project, surveys have been performed on developing the main components including turbine blades and rotors. The current fiscal year has surveyed the latest trends in the existing gas turbine and rotor cooling technologies, and the technological problems were extracted from the viewpoint of application to the hydrogen fueled turbines. Since the hydrogen fueled turbines have the entrance temperature higher than that of power generation gas turbines, development of the blade cooling technology is important. Main cooling methods available are the film cooling and transpiration cooling, whose technological development is necessary in the advanced forms. Cooling method for the inner side of blades includes the impingement cooling and the pin fin cooling, whereas the V-letter shaped turbulence accelerating rib and the serpentine flow path structure are considered promising. Increasing the anti-heat temperature of blades may be realized by utilizing ceramics. As a technology close to putting it into practical use, application of heat shield coating is promising. (NEDO)

  2. Efficient cooling of quantized vibrations using a four-level configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei-Lei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2016-12-01

    Cooling vibrational degrees of freedom down to ground states is essential to observation of quantum properties of systems with mechanical vibration. We propose two cooling schemes employing four internal levels of the systems, which achieve the ground-state cooling in an efficient fashion by completely deleting the carrier and first-order blue-sideband transitions. The schemes, based on quantum interference and Stark-shift gates, are robust to fluctuations of laser intensity and frequency. The feasibility of the schemes is justified using current laboratory technology. In practice, our proposal readily applies to a nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy center levitated in an optical trap or attached to a cantilever.

  3. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic hip screw (DHS is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC, superior-centre (SC, inferior-center (IC, centre-anterior (CA, and centre-posterior (CP. All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups.

  4. Relevance of aerodynamic modelling for load reduction control strategies of two-bladed wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, B.; Cheng, P. W.

    2014-06-01

    A new load reduction concept is being developed for the two-bladed prototype of the Skywind 3.5MW wind turbine. Due to transport and installation advantages both offshore and in complex terrain two-bladed turbine designs are potentially more cost-effective than comparable three-bladed configurations. A disadvantage of two-bladed wind turbines is the increased fatigue loading, which is a result of asymmetrically distributed rotor forces. The innovative load reduction concept of the Skywind prototype consists of a combination of cyclic pitch control and tumbling rotor kinematics to mitigate periodic structural loading. Aerodynamic design tools must be able to model correctly the advanced dynamics of the rotor. In this paper the impact of the aerodynamic modelling approach is investigated for critical operational modes of a two-bladed wind turbine. Using a lifting line free wake vortex code (FVM) the physical limitations of the classical blade element momentum theory (BEM) can be evaluated. During regular operation vertical shear and yawed inflow are the main contributors to periodic blade load asymmetry. It is shown that the near wake interaction of the blades under such conditions is not fully captured by the correction models of BEM approach. The differing prediction of local induction causes a high fatigue load uncertainty especially for two-bladed turbines. The implementation of both cyclic pitch control and a tumbling rotor can mitigate the fatigue loading by increasing the aerodynamic and structural damping. The influence of the time and space variant vorticity distribution in the near wake is evaluated in detail for different cyclic pitch control functions and tumble dynamics respectively. It is demonstrated that dynamic inflow as well as wake blade interaction have a significant impact on the calculated blade forces and need to be accounted for by the aerodynamic modelling approach. Aeroelastic simulations are carried out using the high fidelity multi body

  5. Design and initial testing of a one-bladed 30-meter-diameter rotor on the NASA/DOE mod-O wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Ensworth, C. B. F.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of a one-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine has been of interest to wind turbine designers for many years. Many designs and economic analyses of one-bladed wind turbines have been undertaken by both United States and European wind energy groups. The analyses indicate significant economic advantages but at the same time, significant dynamic response concerns. In an effort to develop a broad data base on wind turbine design and operations, the NASA Wind Energy Project Office has tested a one-bladed rotor at the NASA/DOE Mod-O Wind Turbine Facility. This is the only known test on an intermediate-sized one-bladed rotor in the United States. The 15.2-meter-radius rotor consists of a tip-controlled blade and a counterweight assembly. A rigorous test series was conducted in the Fall of 1985 to collect data on rotor performance, drive train/generator dynamics, structural dynamics, and structural loads. This report includes background information on one-bladed rotor concepts, and Mod-O one-bladed rotor test configuration, supporting design analysis, the Mod-O one-blade rotor test plan, and preliminary test results.

  6. Efficient two-dimensional subrecoil Raman cooling of atoms in a tripod configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir S.; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri V.; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method for subrecoil cooling of neutral atoms by applying Raman cooling in two dimensions to a four-level tripod system. The atoms can be cooled simultaneously in two directions using only three laser beams. We describe the cooling process with a simple model showing that the momentum distribution can be rapidly narrowed to velocity spread down to 0.1v rec , corresponding to effective temperature equal to 0.01T rec . This method opens new possibilities for cooling of neutral atoms.

  7. Numerical Investigations on the Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine:Downwind Versus Upwind Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhou; Decheng Wan

    2015-01-01

    Although the upwind configuration is more popular in the field of wind energy, the downwind one is a promising type for the offshore wind energy due to its special advantages. Different configurations have different aerodynamic performance and it is important to predict the performance of both downwind and upwind configurations accurately for designing and developing more reliable wind turbines. In this paper, a numerical investigation on the aerodynamic performance of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI wind turbine in downwind and upwind configurations is presented. The open source toolbox OpenFOAM coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method is applied to tackle rotating problems of wind turbines. Two 3D numerical models of NREL phase VI wind turbine with downwind and upwind configurations under four typical working conditions of incoming wind velocities are set up for the study of different unsteady characteristics of the downwind and upwind configurations, respectively. Numerical results of wake vortex structure, time histories of thrust, pressure distribution on the blade and limiting streamlines which can be used to identify points of separation in a 3D flow are presented. It can be concluded that thrust reduction due to blade-tower interaction is small for upwind wind turbines but relatively large for downwind wind turbines and attention should be paid to the vibration at a certain frequency induced by the cyclic reduction for both configurations. The results and conclusions are helpful to analyze the different aerodynamic performance of wind turbines between downwind and upwind configurations, providing useful references for practical design of wind turbine.

  8. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. (au)

  10. Optimization of Savonius turbines using an obstacle shielding the returning blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, M.H.; Janiga, G.; Pap, E.; Thevenin, D. [Lab. of Fluid Dynamics and Technical Flows, University of Magdeburg ' ' Otto von Guericke' ' (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Due to the worldwide energy crisis, research and development activities in the field of renewable energy have been considerably increased in many countries. In Germany, wind energy is becoming particularly important. Although considerable progress has already been achieved, the available technical design is not yet adequate to develop reliable wind energy converters for conditions corresponding to low wind speeds and urban areas. The Savonius turbine appears to be particularly promising for such conditions, but suffers from a poor efficiency. The present study considers a considerably improved design in order to increase the output power of a Savonius turbine with either two or three blades. In addition, the improved design leads to a better self-starting capability. To achieve these objectives, the position of an obstacle shielding the returning blade of the Savonius turbine and possibly leading to a better flow orientation toward the advancing blade is optimized. This automatic optimization is carried out by coupling an in-house optimization library (OPAL) with an industrial flow simulation code (ANSYS-Fluent). The optimization process takes into account the output power coefficient as target function, considers the position and the angle of the shield as optimization parameters, and relies on Evolutionary Algorithms. A considerable improvement of the performance of Savonius turbines can be obtained in this manner, in particular a relative increase of the power output coefficient by more than 27%. It is furthermore demonstrated that the optimized configuration involving a two-blade rotor is better than the three-blade design. (author)

  11. Blade attachment assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  12. CAD system of design and engineering provision of die forming of compressor blades for aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaimovich, I. N.

    2017-10-01

    The articles provides the calculation algorithms for blank design and die forming fitting to produce the compressor blades for aircraft engines. The design system proposed in the article allows generating drafts of trimming and reducing dies automatically, leading to significant reduction of work preparation time. The detailed analysis of the blade structural elements features was carried out, the taken limitations and technological solutions allowed forming generalized algorithms of forming parting stamp face over the entire circuit of the engraving for different configurations of die forgings. The author worked out the algorithms and programs to calculate three dimensional point locations describing the configuration of die cavity. As a result the author obtained the generic mathematical model of final die block in the form of three-dimensional array of base points. This model is the base for creation of engineering documentation of technological equipment and means of its control.

  13. Heat Load and Cooling Configurations of the PEFP DTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2012-01-01

    A 100 MeV proton linac is under development for Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP). It consists of a 50 keV injector, 3 MeV RFQ and 100 MeV DTL. The accelerated proton beam can be extracted at 20 MeV and 100 MeV by using bending magnets. Therefore, the DTL for PEFP can be divided into two sections; one for 20 MeV DTL and the other is 100 MeV DTL. The 20 MeV DTL is composed of 4 tanks and driven by a single klystron. Duty factor of the 20 MeV section is 24%. To accelerate the beam from 20 MeV to 100 MeV, we use 7 tanks, which are driven by 7 independent RF sources. Duty factor of the 100 MeV section is reduced to 8%. From the viewpoint of the heat load, there are several differences between the 20 MeV section and 100 MeV section. First, as mentioned before, the duty factors are different. Second, the accelerating gradient is changed from 1.3 MV/m for 20 MeV section to 2.58 MV/m for 100 MeV section. Third, the types of the electroquadrupole magnets inside each drift tube are different. For the 20 MeV section, we used the pool type quadrupole magnets made of enamel wires due to the limited space. The hollow conductor type quadrupole magnets are used for 100 MeV section. The heat generations of each quadrupole magnet are 1.5 kW and 0.4 kW for 20 MeV section and 100 MeV section, respectively. Detailed heat load of DTL and the configuration of cooling loop are presented in this paper

  14. Heat Load and Cooling Configurations of the PEFP DTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A 100 MeV proton linac is under development for Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP). It consists of a 50 keV injector, 3 MeV RFQ and 100 MeV DTL. The accelerated proton beam can be extracted at 20 MeV and 100 MeV by using bending magnets. Therefore, the DTL for PEFP can be divided into two sections; one for 20 MeV DTL and the other is 100 MeV DTL. The 20 MeV DTL is composed of 4 tanks and driven by a single klystron. Duty factor of the 20 MeV section is 24%. To accelerate the beam from 20 MeV to 100 MeV, we use 7 tanks, which are driven by 7 independent RF sources. Duty factor of the 100 MeV section is reduced to 8%. From the viewpoint of the heat load, there are several differences between the 20 MeV section and 100 MeV section. First, as mentioned before, the duty factors are different. Second, the accelerating gradient is changed from 1.3 MV/m for 20 MeV section to 2.58 MV/m for 100 MeV section. Third, the types of the electroquadrupole magnets inside each drift tube are different. For the 20 MeV section, we used the pool type quadrupole magnets made of enamel wires due to the limited space. The hollow conductor type quadrupole magnets are used for 100 MeV section. The heat generations of each quadrupole magnet are 1.5 kW and 0.4 kW for 20 MeV section and 100 MeV section, respectively. Detailed heat load of DTL and the configuration of cooling loop are presented in this paper

  15. Standard practice for examination of fiberglass reinforced plastic fan blades using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) fan blades of the type used in industrial cooling towers and heat exchangers. 1.2 This practice uses simulated service loading to determine structural integrity. 1.3 This practice will detect sources of acoustic emission in areas of sensor coverage that are stressed during the course of the examination. 1.4 This practice applies to examinations of new and in-service fan blades. 1.5 This practice is limited to fan blades of FRP construction, with length (hub centerline to tip) of less than 3 m [10 ft], and with fiberglass content greater than 15 % by weight. 1.6 AE measurements are used to detect emission sources. Other nondestructive examination (NDE) methods may be used to evaluate the significance of AE sources. Procedures for other NDE methods are beyond the scope of this practice. 1.7 Units—The values stated in either SI units or inch-pound units are to be regarded separately as sta...

  16. Aeroelastic response and stability of tiltrotors with elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    There is a potential for improving the performance and aeroelastic stability of tiltrotors through the use of elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. To study the characteristics of tiltrotors with these types of rotor blades it is necessary to formulate a new analysis which has the capabilities of modeling both a tiltrotor configuration and an anisotropic rotor blade. Background for these formulations is established in two preliminary investigations. In the first, the influence of several system design parameters on tiltrotor aeroelastic stability is examined for the high-speed axial flight mode using a newly-developed rigid-blade analysis with an elastic wing finite element model. The second preliminary investigation addresses the accuracy of using a one-dimensional beam analysis to predict frequencies of elastically-coupled highly-twisted rotor blades. Important aspects of the new aeroelastic formulations are the inclusion of a large steady pylon angle which controls tilt of the rotor system with respect to the airflow, the inclusion of elastic pitch-lag coupling terms related to rotor precone, the inclusion of hub-related degrees of freedom which enable modeling of a gimballed rotor system and engine drive-train dynamics, and additional elastic coupling terms which enable modeling of the anisotropic features for both the rotor blades and the tiltrotor wing. Accuracy of the new tiltrotor analysis is demonstrated by a comparison of the results produced for a baseline case with analytical and experimental results reported in the open literature. Two investigations of elastically tailored blades on a baseline tiltrotor are then conducted. One investigation shows that elastic bending-twist coupling of the rotor blade is a very effective means for increasing the flutter velocity of a tiltrotor, and the magnitude of coupling required does not have an adverse effect on performance or blade loads. The second investigation shows that passive blade twist control via

  17. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of the static stability and control characteristics of an advanced turboprop configuration with the propellers placed over the tail. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Graham Scott

    1990-01-01

    An exploratory wind tunnel investigation was performed in the 30 x 60 foot wind tunnel to determine the low speed static stability and control characteristics into the deep stall regime of an advanced turboprop aircraft with the propellers located over the horizontal tail. By this arrangement, the horizontal tail could potentially provide acoustic shielding to reduce the high community noise caused by the propeller blades. The current configuration was a generic turboprop model equipped with 1 foot diameter single rotating eight bladed propellers that were designed for efficient cruise operation at a Mach number of 0.8. The data presented is static force data. The effects of power on the configuration characteristics were generally favorable. An arrangement with the propellers rotating with the outboard blades moving down was found to have significantly higher installed thrust than an arrangement with the propellers rotating with the inboard blades moving down. The primary unfavorable effect was a large pitch trim change which occurred with power, but the trim change could be minimized with a proper configuration design.

  18. Air and ground resonance of helicopters with elastically tailored composite rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward C.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1993-01-01

    The aeromechanical stability, including air resonance in hover, air resonance in forward flight, and ground resonance, of a helicopter with elastically tailored composite rotor blades is investigated. Five soft-inplane hingeless rotor configurations, featuring elastic pitch-lag, pitch-flap and extension-torsion couplings, are analyzed. Elastic couplings introduced through tailored composite blade spars can have a powerful effect on both air and ground resonance behavior. Elastic pitch-flap couplings (positive and negative) strongly affect body, rotor and dynamic inflow modes. Air resonance stability is diminished by elastic pitch-flap couplings in hover and forwrad flight. Negative pitch-lag elastic coupling has a stabilizing effect on the regressive lag mode in hover and forward flight. The negative pitch-lag coupling has a detrimental effect on ground resonance stability. Extension-torsion elastic coupling (blade pitch decreases due to tension) decreases regressive lag mode stability in both airborne and ground contact conditions. Increasing thrust levels has a beneficial influence on ground resonance stability for rotors with pitch-flap and extension-torsion coupling and is only marginally effective in improving stability of rotors with pitch-lag coupling.

  19. The SNL100-03 Blade: Design Studies with Flatback Airfoils for the Sandia 100-meter Blade.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-09-01

    A series of design studies were performed to inv estigate the effects of flatback airfoils on blade performance and weight for large blades using the Sandi a 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. As part of the study, the effects of varying the blade slenderness on blade structural performance was investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of blad e slenderness with respect to tip deflection, flap- wise & edge-wise fatigue resistance, panel buckling capacity, flutter speed, manufacturing labor content, blade total weight, and aerodynamic design load magn itude are quantified. Following these design studies, a final blade design (SNL100-03) was prod uced, which was based on a highly slender design using flatback airfoils. The SNL100-03 design with flatback airfoils has weight of 49 tons, which is about 16% decrease from its SNL100-02 predecessor that used conventional sharp trailing edge airfoils. Although not systematically optimized, the SNL100 -03 design study provides an assessment of and insight into the benefits of flatback airfoils for la rge blades as well as insights into the limits or negative consequences of high blade slenderness resulting from a highly slender SNL100-03 planform as was chosen in the final design definition. This docum ent also provides a description of the final SNL100-03 design definition and is intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-03, which are made publicly available. A summary of the major findings of the Sandia 100-meter blade development program, from the initial SNL100-00 baseline blade through the fourth SNL100-03 blade study, is provided. This summary includes the major findings and outcomes of blade d esign studies, pathways to mitigate the identified large blade design drivers, and tool development that were produced over the course of this five-year research program. A summary of large blade tec hnology needs and research opportunities is also presented.

  20. Three-dimensional cooling of muons

    CERN Document Server

    Vsevolozhskaya, T A

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous ionization cooling of muon beams in all three - the longitudinal and two transverse - directions is considered in a scheme, based on bent lithium lenses with dipole constituent of magnetic field in them, created by a special configuration of current-carrying rod. An analysis of three-dimensional cooling is performed with the use of kinetic equation method. Results of numerical calculation for a specific beam line configuration are presented together with results of computer simulation using the Moliere distribution to describe the Coulomb scattering and the Vavilov distribution used to describe the ionization loss of energy.

  1. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  2. Airfoil, platform, and cooling passage measurements on a rotating transonic high-pressure turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickol, Jeremy B.

    An experiment was performed at The Ohio State University Gas Turbine Laboratory for a film-cooled high-pressure turbine stage operating at design-corrected conditions, with variable rotor and aft purge cooling flow rates. Several distinct experimental programs are combined into one experiment and their results are presented. Pressure and temperature measurements in the internal cooling passages that feed the airfoil film cooling are used as boundary conditions in a model that calculates cooling flow rates and blowing ratio out of each individual film cooling hole. The cooling holes on the suction side choke at even the lowest levels of film cooling, ejecting more than twice the coolant as the holes on the pressure side. However, the blowing ratios are very close due to the freestream massflux on the suction side also being almost twice as great. The highest local blowing ratios actually occur close to the airfoil stagnation point as a result of the low freestream massflux conditions. The choking of suction side cooling holes also results in the majority of any additional coolant added to the blade flowing out through the leading edge and pressure side rows. A second focus of this dissertation is the heat transfer on the rotor airfoil, which features uncooled blades and blades with three different shapes of film cooling hole: cylindrical, diffusing fan shape, and a new advanced shape. Shaped cooling holes have previously shown immense promise on simpler geometries, but experimental results for a rotating turbine have not previously been published in the open literature. Significant improvement from the uncooled case is observed for all shapes of cooling holes, but the improvement from the round to more advanced shapes is seen to be relatively minor. The reduction in relative effectiveness is likely due to the engine-representative secondary flow field interfering with the cooling flow mechanics in the freestream, and may also be caused by shocks and other

  3. Effect of linear and non-linear blade modelling techniques on simulated fatigue and extreme loads using Bladed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsell, Alec; Collier, William; Han, Tao

    2016-09-01

    There is a trend in the wind industry towards ever larger and more flexible turbine blades. Blade tip deflections in modern blades now commonly exceed 10% of blade length. Historically, the dynamic response of wind turbine blades has been analysed using linear models of blade deflection which include the assumption of small deflections. For modern flexible blades, this assumption is becoming less valid. In order to continue to simulate dynamic turbine performance accurately, routine use of non-linear models of blade deflection may be required. This can be achieved by representing the blade as a connected series of individual flexible linear bodies - referred to in this paper as the multi-part approach. In this paper, Bladed is used to compare load predictions using single-part and multi-part blade models for several turbines. The study examines the impact on fatigue and extreme loads and blade deflection through reduced sets of load calculations based on IEC 61400-1 ed. 3. Damage equivalent load changes of up to 16% and extreme load changes of up to 29% are observed at some turbine load locations. It is found that there is no general pattern in the loading differences observed between single-part and multi-part blade models. Rather, changes in fatigue and extreme loads with a multi-part blade model depend on the characteristics of the individual turbine and blade. Key underlying causes of damage equivalent load change are identified as differences in edgewise- torsional coupling between the multi-part and single-part models, and increased edgewise rotor mode damping in the multi-part model. Similarly, a causal link is identified between torsional blade dynamics and changes in ultimate load results.

  4. Cooling as a method of finding topological dislocations in lattice models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomberoff, K.

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that the O(3) two-dimensional model has configurations with topological charge Q=1 and action S/sub min/=6.69. Since the exponent characterizing the renormalization-group behavior of this model is 4π such configurations invalidate the standard scaling behavior of the topological susceptibility. The analog exponent for the four-dimensional lattice SU(2) gauge model is 10.77. If there would exist configurations with Q=1 and S<10.77 in this model, they would invalidate the standard scaling behavior of its topological susceptibility. Kremer et al. have calculated the action of different configurations during cooling runs. They report that they do not find any configuration with S<12.7 and Q=1. I show that in the O(3) two-dimensional model cooling runs fail to uncover the well-known configurations with S<8. We conclude that the cooling method is not effective in uncovering the smallest action configurations in the Q=1 sector

  5. Active Blade Pitch Control for Straight Bladed Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine of New Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    in a previous publication. Further, it is well know that the variation of the blade pitch angle during the rotation improves the power efficiency. A blade pitch variation is implemented by active blade pitch control, which operates as per wind speed and position of the blade with respect to the rotor. A double...

  6. Numerical Investigation on the Effects of Self-Excited Tip Flow Unsteadiness and Blade Row Interactions on the Performance Predictions of Low Speed and Transonic Compressor Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel H.

    The impact blade row interactions can have on the performance of compressor rotors has been well documented. It is also well known that rotor tip clearance flows can have a large effect on compressor performance and stall margin and recent research has shown that tip leakage flows can exhibit self-excited unsteadiness at near stall conditions. However, the impact of tip leakage flow on the performance and operating range of a compressor rotor, relative to other important flow features such as upstream stator wakes or downstream potential effects, has not been explored. To this end, a numerical investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of self-excited tip flow unsteadiness, upstream stator wakes, and downstream blade row interactions on the performance prediction of low speed and transonic compressor rotors. Calculations included a single blade-row rotor configuration as well as two multi-blade row configurations: one where the rotor was modeled with an upstream stator and a second where the rotor was modeled with a downstream stator. Steady-state and time accurate calculations were performed using a RANS solver and the results were compared with detailed experimental data obtained in the GE Low Speed Research Compressor and the Notre Dame Transonic Rig at several operating conditions including near stall. Differences in the performance predictions between the three configurations were then used to determine the effect of the upstream stator wakes and the downstream blade row interactions. Results obtained show that for both the low speed and transonic research compressors used in this investigation time-accurate RANS analysis is necessary to accurately predict the stalling character of the rotor. Additionally, for the first time it is demonstrated that capturing the unsteady tip flow can have a larger impact on rotor performance predictions than adjacent blade row interactions.

  7. Comparative Study on Uni- and Bi-Directional Fluid Structure Coupling of Wind Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Belayneh Ageze

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The current trends of wind turbine blade designs are geared towards a longer and slender blade with high flexibility, exhibiting complex aeroelastic loadings and instability issues, including flutter; in this regard, fluid-structure interaction (FSI plays a significant role. The present article will conduct a comparative study between uni-directional and bi-directional fluid-structural coupling models for a horizontal axis wind turbine. A full-scale, geometric copy of the NREL 5MW blade with simplified material distribution is considered for simulation. Analytical formulations of the governing relations with appropriate approximation are highlighted, including turbulence model, i.e., Shear Stress Transport (SST k-ω. These analytical relations are implemented using Multiphysics package ANSYS employing Fluent module (Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD-based solver for the fluid domain and Transient Structural module (Finite Element Analysis-based solver for the structural domain. ANSYS system coupling module also is configured to model the two fluid-structure coupling methods. The rated operational condition of the blade for a full cycle rotation is considered as a comparison domain. In the bi-directional coupling model, the structural deformation alters the angle of attack from the designed values, and by extension the flow pattern along the blade span; furthermore, the tip deflection keeps fluctuating whilst it tends to stabilize in the uni-directional coupling model.

  8. Model predictive control of trailing edge flaps on a wind turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaignet, D.B.

    2011-11-15

    Trailing edge flaps on wind turbine blades have been investigated for several years. Aero-servoelastic simulations carried out with different simulation tools, trailing edge flaps configurations and controller designs proved that trailing edge flaps are a suitable solution for reducing some of the wind turbine fatigue and extreme loads. This potential was confirmed with wind tunnel tests made on blade sections with trailing edge flaps and on a scaled two-bladed wind turbine in a wind tunnel. The work presented in this thesis includes a full-scale test run on a Vestas V27 wind turbine equipped with three trailing edge flaps on one blade, located on DTU's Risoe Campus in Roskilde, Denmark. This thesis is divided into three parts: the controller design, results from simulations, and results from the experiments. The trailing edge flaps controller designed for this project is based on a frequency-weighted model predictive control, tuned in order to target only the flapwise blade root loads at the frequencies contributing the most to blade root fatigue damage (the 1P, 2P and 3P frequencies), and to avoid unnecessary wear and tear of the actuators at high frequencies. A disturbance model consisting in periodic disturbances at the rotor speed harmonic frequencies and a quasi-steady input disturbance is aggregated to an analytical model of a spinning blade with trailing edge flaps. Simulations on a multi-megawatt wind turbine show the potential of the trailing edge flaps to reduce the flapwise blade root fatigue loads by 23%, but also the main shaft and the tower fatigue loads by up to 32%. Extreme loads during normal production also benefit from the trailing edge flaps. At last, the same controller was run on the Vestas V27 wind turbine located at the Risoe Campus of the Technical University of Denmark, in Roskilde, Denmark. One blade of the turbine was equipped with three independent trailing edge flaps. In spite of the failure of several sensors and actuators, the

  9. Load consequences when sweeping blades - A case study of a 5 MW pitch controlled wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verelst, D.R.S.; Larsen, Torben J.

    2010-08-15

    The generic 5 MW NREL wind turbine model is used in Risoe's aeroelastic simulator HAWC2 to investigate 120 different swept blade configurations (forward and backward sweep). Sensitivity for 2 different controllers is considered as well. Backward sweep results in a pitch to feather torsional moment of the blade, effectively reducing blade twist angles under increased loading. This behaviour results in decreased flap-wise fatigue and extreme loads, an increase for edge-wise fatigue loading and status quo or slight decrease in extreme loads (depending on the controller). Tower base and shaft-end bending moments are reduced as well. Forward sweep leads to an increase in angle of attack under loading. For a pitch controlled turbine this leads to an increase in fatigue and extreme loading in all cases. A controller inflicted instability is present for the more extreme forward swept cases. Due to the shape of considered sweep curves, an inherent and significant increase in torsional blade root bending moment is noted. A boomerang shaped sweep curve is proposed to counteract this problematic increased loading. Controller sensitivity shows that adding sweep affects some loadings differently. Power output is reduced for backward sweep since the blade twist is optimized as a rigid structure, ignoring the torsional deformations which for a swept blade can be significant. (author)

  10. Adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation in a smart rotor configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, L.

    2013-08-15

    The work investigates the development of an active smart rotor concept from an aero-servo-elastic perspective. An active smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators, is able to alleviate the fluctuating part of the aerodynamic loads it has to withstand. The investigation focuses on a specific actuator type: the Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), which introduces a continuous deformation of the aft part of the airfoil camber-line. An aerodynamic model that accounts for the steady and unsteady effects of the flap deflection on a 2D airfoil section is developed, and, considering both attached and separated flow conditions, is validated by comparison against Computational Fluid Dynamic solutions and a panel code method. The aerodynamic model is integrated in the BEM-based aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2, thus providing a tool able to simulate the response of a wind turbine equipped with ATEF. A load analysis of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine in its baseline configuration reveals that the highest contribution to the blade flapwise fatigue damage originates from normal operation above rated wind speed, and from loads characterized by frequencies below 1 Hz. The analysis also reports that periodic load variations on the turbine blade account for nearly 11 % of the blade flapwise lifetime fatigue damage, while the rest is ascribed to load variations from disturbances of stochastic nature. The study proposes a smart rotor configuration with flaps laid out on the outer 20 % of the blade span, from 77 % to 97% of the blade length. The configuration is first tested with a simplified cyclic control approach, which gives a preliminary indication of the load alleviation potential, and also reveals the possibility to enhance the rotor energy capture below rated conditions by using the flaps. Two model based control algorithms are developed to actively alleviate the fatigue loads on the smart rotor with ATEF. The first

  11. Experimental investigation on performance of crossflow wind turbine as effect of blades number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawati, Diniar Mungil; Tjahjana, Dominicus Danardono Dwi Prija; Santoso, Budi

    2018-02-01

    Urban living is one of the areas with large electrical power consumption that requires a power supply that is more than rural areas. The number of multi-storey buildings such as offices, hotels and several other buildings that caused electricity power consumption in urban living is very high. Therefore, energy alternative is needed to replace the electricity power consumption from government. One of the utilization of renewable energy in accordance with these conditions is the installation of wind turbines. One type of wind turbine that is now widely studied is a crossflow wind turbines. Crossflow wind turbine is one of vertical axis wind turbine which has good self starting at low wind speed condition. Therefore, the turbine design parameter is necessary to know in order to improve turbine performance. One of wind turbine performance parameter is blades number. The main purpose of this research to investigate the effect of blades number on crossflow wind turbine performance. The design of turbine was 0.4 × 0.4 m2 tested by experimental method with configuration on three kinds of blades number were 8,16 and 20. The turbine investigated at low wind speed on 2 - 5 m/s. The result showed that best performance on 16 blade number.

  12. Heat transfer and friction characteristics in steam cooled rectangular channels with rib turbulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jianying; Gao, Tieyu; Li, Guojun [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-01-15

    We studied the heat transfer and friction characteristics in steam-cooled rectangular channels with rib turbulators on W side or H side walls in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 10000-80000. Each of the test channels was welded by four stainless steel plates to simulate the actual geometry and heat transfer structure of blade/vane internal cooling passage. The length of the channel L was 1000 mm, the cross section of the channel was 40 mm X 80 mm, and the pitch-to-rib height ratio p/e was kept at 10. The channel blockage ratio (W/H) was 0.047. Results showed that the Nusselt number (Nu) distributions displayed different trends at the entrance region with the increase of Re for the rib turbulators on the W side walls. The heat transfer performance of the rib turbulators on the H side walls was about 24- 27% higher than that on the W side walls at the same pumping power. In addition, semi-empirical correlations for the two cases, rib turbulators on W side walls and rib turbulators on H side walls, were developed based on the heat transfer results, which could be used in the design of the internal cooling passage of new generation steam-cooled gas turbine blade/vane.

  13. Investigation on heat transfer enhancement and pressure loss of double swirl chambers cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available By merging two standard swirl chambers, an alternative cooling configuration named double swirl chambers (DSC has been developed. In the DSC cooling configuration, the main physical phenomena of the swirl flow in swirl chamber and the advantages of swirl flow in heat transfer augmentation are maintained. Additionally, three new physical phenomena can be found in DSC cooling configuration, which result in a further improvement of the heat transfer: (1 impingement effect has been observed, (2 internal heat exchange has been enhanced between fluids in two swirls, and (3 “∞” shape swirl has been generated because of cross effect between two chambers, which improves the mixing of the fluids. Because of all these improvements, the DSC cooling configuration leads to a higher globally-averaged thermal performance parameter (Nu¯¯/Nu∞/(f/f01/3 than standard swirl chamber. In particular, at the inlet region, the augmentation of the heat transfer is nearly 7.5 times larger than the fully developed non-swirl turbulent flow and the circumferentially averaged Nusselt number coefficient is 41% larger than the standard swirl chamber. Within the present work, a further investigation on the DSC cooling configuration has been focused on the influence of geometry parameters e.g. merging ratio of chambers and aspect ratio of inlet duct on the cooling performance. The results show a very large influence of these geometry parameters in heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop ratio. Compared with the basic configuration of DSC cooling, the improved configuration with 20% to 23% merging ratio shows the highest globally-averaged thermal performance parameter. With the same cross section area in tangential inlet ducts, the DSC cooling channel with larger aspect ratio shows larger heat transfer enhancement and at the same time reduced pressure drop ratio, which results in a better globally-averaged thermal performance parameter.

  14. Peripheral mowing blade. Final report ending 08/24/00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darden, John A.

    2000-08-24

    The first prototype built for the peripheral mower blade was the nineteen foot batwing mower. It features twelve-inch blades, three-sixteenth thick. The configuration of the mower is three individual rotor gangs housed in separate housing all mounted to a centrally located housing. Each outer gang is driven by power being diverted through the center rotor. The power is supplied to each wing through means of a disconnect mechanism which allows the outer gangs to stop in the event that particular housing is raised by hydraulic power. This unit has given us unlimited information in the drive and power applications needed to drive the peripheral blade gangs. The nineteen foot unit has not changed much from the beginning, but information received from its performance has been applied to the building of a preproduction unit that is now in progress. Another prototype unit we have work with is the seven foot mounted mower. This unit consisted of a standard ASAE category I three-point hitch. The hitch was made by using an "A" frame which formed the attaching points for the mower and two back straps that gives support to the hitch assembly. The deck allowed for one-inch blade clearance at the top and featured a slanted deck extension at both the front and rear. The extension were formed by means of two breaks that run parallel to the blade gang and angled down at one hundred thirty degrees at the front and one hundred fifteen degrees at the rear. A roller is mounted across the back of the deck. This roller offers support to the deck while on the ground and is adjustable for height of cut control. This unit was made with a small roller, and too lighter hitch. After only a few hours of test proved that both items would have to be beefed up. The rear roller was increased to a four-inch diameter. The hitch was changed to a two-sided solid metal hitch three-eighths of an inch thick on the next machines.

  15. Finalized configuration of magnetic shielding for LEReC cooling section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); De Monte, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Di Lieto, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mahler, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Weiss, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-11-20

    In the LEReC Cooling Section (CS) the RHIC ions are traveling together with and getting cooled by the LEReC electrons. The required cooling rate sets the limit of 150 urad on tolerable angles of the electrons in the CS. One of the components of overall electron angle is the angle of the e-beam trajectory with respect to the ion beam trajectory. We set the limit for electron trajectory angle to 100 urad. It is critical for preserving small trajectory angle to keep the transverse magnetic field inside the CS drifts within +/- 2.3 mG. The drifts in the CS must be shielded from the ambient magnetic fields of the RHIC tunnel, which can be as high as 0.5 G, to minimize the transverse field inside the CS vacuum chamber. In this paper we present the final design of the magnetic shielding of the LEReC CS and discuss the results of tests dedicated to studies of the shielding effectiveness.

  16. Test Rig for Evaluating Active Turbine Blade Tip Clearance Control Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2003-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor and high pressure turbine can provide dramatic improvements in specific fuel consumption, time-on-wing, compressor stall margin and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities of both military and commercial gas turbine engines. The preliminary design of a mechanically actuated active clearance control (ACC) system for turbine blade tip clearance management is presented along with the design of a bench top test rig in which the system is to be evaluated. The ACC system utilizes mechanically actuated seal carrier segments and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. The purpose of this active clearance control system is to improve upon current case cooling methods. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, re-burst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). The active turbine blade tip clearance control system design presented herein will be evaluated to ensure that proper response and positional accuracy is achievable under simulated high-pressure turbine conditions. The test rig will simulate proper seal carrier pressure and temperature loading as well as the magnitudes and rates of blade tip clearance changes of an actual gas turbine engine. The results of these evaluations will be presented in future works.

  17. Experimental comparison between different configurations of PCM based heat sinks for cooling electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharbi, Salma; Harmand, Souad; Jabrallah, Sadok Ben

    2015-01-01

    The thermal control of electronic components is aimed at ensuring their use in a temperature range compatible with their performances. This paper presents an experimental study of the behavior of phase change materials (PCMs) as the cooling system for electronic devices. Four configurations are used to control the increase in the system temperature: pure PCM, PCM in a silicone matrix, PCM in a graphite matrix and pure PCM in a system of fins. Thermo-physical properties of different PCMs are determined and found to be desirable for application in this study. Solid liquid interface visualization and temperature evolution are employed to understand the mechanism of heat transfer during the different stages. Results indicated that the inclusion of PCM can lower component increase temperature and extends twice the critical time of the heat sink. The use of Graphite matrix filled by PCM showed more improvement on system thermal performance than silicon matrix. Also, for the same fraction of copper, it was found that incorporating long copper fins with suitable spacing into PCM, can enhance heat distribution into PCM leading to longer remain component temperature below the critical limit. This work therefore shows that the combination of PCM and long, well-spaced fins presents an effective means for thermal control of electronic devices. - Highlights: • Study on thermal performance of different PCM based heat sink in electronic cooling. • Examination of heat transfer mechanism into heat sink for different conditions. • Graphite matrix shows more efficiency than silicon. • Inclusion PCM can reduce temperature increasing. • Heat sink with longer well spaced fins can extend longer the critical time

  18. The SNL100-01 blade :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    A series of design studies to investigate the effect of carbon on blade weight and performance for large blades was performed using the Sandia 100-meter All-glass Baseline Blade design as a starting point. This document provides a description of the final carbon blade design, which is termed as SNL100-01. This report includes a summary of the design modifications applied to the baseline all-glass 100-meter design and a description of the NuMAD model files that are made publicly available. This document is intended primarily to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-01.

  19. Chiral symmetry breaking and cooling in lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloshyn, R.M.; Lee, F.X.

    1995-08-01

    Chiral symmetry breaking is calculated as a function of cooling in quenched lattice QCD. A non-zero signal is found for the chiral condensate beyond one hundred cooling steps, suggesting that there is chiral symmetry breaking associated with instantons. Quantitatively, the chiral condensate in cooled gauge field configurations is small compared to the value without cooling. (author) 7 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  20. Thermal Management of Power Semiconductor Packages - Matching Cooling Technologies with Packaging Technologies (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, K.; Moreno, G.

    2010-04-27

    Heat removal for power semiconductor devices is critical for robust operation. Because there are different packaging options, different thermal management technologies, and a range of applications, there is a need for a methodology to match cooling technologies and package configurations to target applications. To meet this need, a methodology was developed to compare the sensitivity of cooling technologies on the overall package thermal performance over a range of power semiconductor packaging configurations. The results provide insight into the trade-offs associated with cooling technologies and package configurations. The approach provides a method for comparing new developments in power semiconductor packages and identifying potential thermal control technologies for the package. The results can help users select the appropriate combination of packaging configuration and cooling technology for the desired application.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Study on Performance of Ducted Hydrokinetic Turbines with Pre-Swirl Stator Blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Ducts (also called shrouds) have been shown to improve performance of hydrokinetic turbines in some situations, bringing the power coefficient (Cp) closer to the Betz limit. Here we investigate optimization of the duct design as well as the addition of stator blades upstream of the turbine rotor to introduce pre-swirl in the flow. A small scale three-bladed turbine was tested in a towing tank. Three cases (bare turbine, with duct, and with duct and stators) were tested over a range of flow speeds. Important parameters include duct cross-sectional shape, blade-duct gap, stator cross-sectional shape, and stator angle. For each test, Cp was evaluated as a function of tip speed ratio (TSR). Experimental results were compared with numerical simulations. Results indicate that ducts and stators can improve performance at slower flow speeds and lower the stall speed compared to a bare turbine, but may degrade performance at higher speeds. Ongoing efforts to optimize duct and stator configurations will be discussed.

  2. New morphing blade section designs and structural solutions for smart blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakalas, Anargyros A.; Machairas, Theodore; Solomou, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    Within INNWIND.EU new concepts are investigated having the ultimate goal to reduce the cost per kilowatt-hour of the produced energy. With increasing size of wind turbines, new approaches to load control are required to reduce the stresses in blades. Experimental and numerical studies in the fields...... of helicopter and wind turbine blade research have shown the potential of shape morphing in reducing blade loads. Morphing technologies, along with other control concepts, are investigated under Task 2.3 of WP “Lightweight Rotor”, against aerodynamic compliance and requirements of the complete wind turbine...... the efforts performed within Task 2.2 “Lightweight structural design” of INNWIND.Eu work-package WP2 “Lightweight Rotor” regarding the structural solutions necessary to accommodate the requirements of smart blades developed within work-package WP2 Task 2.3 “Active and passive loads control and alleviation...

  3. Ceramic blade attachment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, G.A.; Jimenez, O.D.

    1996-12-03

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed between them. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. A pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade. 4 figs.

  4. EFFECT OF GEOMETRIC CONFIGURATIONS ON HYDRODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF A MARINE PROPELLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir. E. Belhenniche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the effect of the geometric characteristics on the propeller hydrodynamic performances. Several propeller configurations are created by changing number of blades, expanded area and pitch ratios. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations are solved using the commercial code FLUENT 6.3.26. The standard

  5. Flapping inertia for selected rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John D.; May, Matthew J.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamics of helicopter rotor systems cannot be investigated without consideration for the dynamics of the rotor. One of the principal properties of the rotor which affects the rotor dynamics is the inertia of the rotor blade about its root attachment. Previous aerodynamic investigation have been performed on rotor blades with a variety of planforms to determine the performance differences due to blade planform. The blades tested for this investigation have been tested on the U.S. Army 2 meter rotor test system (2MRTS) in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic tunnel for hover performance. This investigation was intended to provide fundamental information on the flapping inertia of five rotor blades with differing planforms. The inertia of the bare cuff and the cuff with a blade extension were also measured for comparison with the inertia of the blades. Inertia was determined using a swing testing technique, using the period of oscillation to determine the effective flapping inertia. The effect of damping in the swing test was measured and described. A comparison of the flapping inertials for rectangular and tapered planform blades of approximately the same mass showed the tapered blades to have a lower inertia, as expected.

  6. New blades shape up for dozers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chironis, N.P.

    1985-05-01

    This article discusses the design of blades used on dozers for the reclamation work following surface mining. Two blades are described which have led to a 50% reduction in reclamation costs and a 20% reduction in fuel requirements over conventional equipment. These results are from work carried out at the Kayenta mine in Arizona, USA. Design considerations in the development of the blades are described. Descriptions of both the centre flow blades and the universal blades are given.

  7. Development of a structure-dependent material model for complex, high-temperature environments and stresses. Example: turbine blades, turbine discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, F.

    1988-01-01

    For the optimum use of new high-temperature superalloys for turbine discs and blades, it is necessary to develop new design concepts which, on the one hand, permit a quantitative allocation of the structural characteristics to the deformation behaviour and damage mechanisms and, on the other hand, take into account the real course of stress. It is planned to use PM-Udinet 700 as material for turbine discs and IN 738 LC with supplementary tests of IN 100 for turbine blades. For turbine discs, a probabilistic model is developed, for turbine blades, cooled at the interior, first a deterministic model is developed and then a probabilistic model is prepared. The concept for the development of the models is dealt with in detail. The project started in April 1987, therefore only first investigation results can be reported. (orig.) [de

  8. Experimental investigation on ultimate strength and failure response of composite box beams used in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jing; Chen, Xiao

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the ultimate strength and failure response of composite box beams under three-point bending. The box beams consist of spar caps and shear webs and they are typically used in wind turbine blades as load-carrying members. Different spar cap configurations and loading directions...

  9. Development of High Performance Cooling Modules in Notebook PC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Kosei

    The CPU power consumption in Notebook PCs is increasing every year. Video chips and HDDs are also continually using larger power for higher performance. In addition, since miniaturization is desired, the mounting of components is becoming more and more dense. Accordingly, the cooling mechanisms are increasingly important. The cooling modules have to dissipate larger amounts of heat in the same environmental conditions. Therefore, high capacity cooling capabilities is needed, while low costs and high reliability must be retained. Available cooling methods include air or water cooling systems and the heat conduction method. The air cooling system is to transmit heat by a cooling fan often using a heat pipe. The water cooling one employs the water to carry heat to the back of the display, which offers a comparatively large cooling area. The heat conduction method is to transfer the heat by thermal conduction to the case. This article describes the development of new and comparatively efficient cooling devices offering low cost and high reliability for air cooling system. As one of the development techniques, the heat resistance and performance are measured for various parts and layouts. Each cooling system is evaluated in the same measurement environment. With regards to the fans, an optimal shape of the fan blades to maximize air flow is found by using CFD simulation, and prototypes were built and tested.

  10. A blade deflection monitoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A wind turbine blade comprising a system for monitoring the deflection of a wind turbine blade is described. The system comprises a wireless range-measurement system, having at least one wireless communication device located towards the root end of the blade and at least one wireless communication...

  11. Turbine airfoil having near-wall cooling insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jr., Nicholas F.; Wiebe, David J.

    2017-09-12

    A turbine airfoil is provided with at least one insert positioned in a cavity in an airfoil interior. The insert extends along a span-wise extent of the turbine airfoil and includes first and second opposite faces. A first near-wall cooling channel is defined between the first face and a pressure sidewall of an airfoil outer wall. A second near-wall cooling channel is defined between the second face and a suction sidewall of the airfoil outer wall. The insert is configured to occupy an inactive volume in the airfoil interior so as to displace a coolant flow in the cavity toward the first and second near-wall cooling channels. A locating feature engages the insert with the outer wall for supporting the insert in position. The locating feature is configured to control flow of the coolant through the first or second near-wall cooling channel.

  12. Design Procedure of 4-Bladed Propeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research Vol.8 No.1 September 2013 ..... Number of blades. 5. Taylor's wake friction (w). The speed of ship (Vs), the number of propeller revolution (n), the blade number (Z) and the blade area ratio.... .... moment of inertia of a blade, the approximate.

  13. Simulated Measurements of Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohayai, Tanaz [IIT, Chicago; Rogers, Chris [Rutherford; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Cooled muon beams set the basis for the exploration of physics of flavour at a Neutrino Factory and for multi-TeV collisions at a Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) measures beam emittance before and after an ionization cooling cell and aims to demonstrate emittance reduction in muon beams. In the current MICE Step IV configuration, the MICE muon beam passes through low-Z absorber material for reducing its transverse emittance through ionization energy loss. Two scintillating fiber tracking detectors, housed in spectrometer solenoid modules upstream and downstream of the absorber are used for reconstructing position and momentum of individual muons for calculating transverse emittance reduction. However, due to existence of non-linear effects in beam optics, transverse emittance growth can be observed. Therefore, it is crucial to develop algorithms that are insensitive to this apparent emittance growth. We describe a different figure of merit for measuring muon cooling which is the direct measurement of the phase space density.

  14. Analysis of impact resistance of composite fan blade. Fukugozai fan blade no taishogekisei no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyachi, T; Okumura, H; Otake, K; Sofue, Y [Japan Society for Aeronautical and Space Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    1992-01-05

    Numerical analysis of impact response was carried out when a bird strike was simulated to study the applicability of fiber reinforced composite material to fan blades for turbo-fan engines. The validity of the numerical analysis was verified by comparing the analyzed results with impact tested results of a fan-blade model of Ti-alloy. The impact resistance was studied by applying this method to fan blades of composite materials such as carbon fiber, epoxy resin and carbon-silicate fiber reinforced Ti-alloy. The finite element method was used for the analysis by dividing the model into triangular flat elements. The relation between the impact load, the deformation of blade and the strain, the natural frequency characteristics, the elastic modulus and hetrogeneity of blade were considered to analyze the impact response. The impact load by the strike of 1.5 lbs bird is very severe to the fan blades for turbo-fan engines having the thrust of 5 ton class. 23 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Development and validation of a full-range performance analysis model for a three-spool gas turbine with turbine cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yin; Gu, Chun-wei; Ji, Xing-xing

    2015-01-01

    The performance analysis of a gas turbine is important for both its design and its operation. For modern gas turbines, the cooling flow introduces a noteworthy thermodynamic loss; thus, the determination of the cooling flow rate will clearly influence the accuracy of performance calculations. In this paper, a full-range performance analysis model is established for a three-spool gas turbine with an open-circuit convective blade cooling system. A hybrid turbine cooling model is embedded in the analysis to predict the amount of cooling air accurately and thus to remove the errors induced by the relatively arbitrary value of cooling air requirements in the previous research. The model is subsequently used to calculate the gas turbine performance; the calculation results are validated with detailed test data. Furthermore, multistage conjugate heat transfer analysis is performed for the turbine section. The results indicate that with the same coolant condition and flow rate as those in the performance analysis, the blade metal has been effectively cooled; in addition, the maximum temperature predicted by conjugate heat transfer analysis is close to the corresponding value in the cooling model. Hence, the present model provides an effective tool for analyzing the performance of a gas turbine with cooling. - Highlights: • We established a performance model for a gas turbine with convective cooling. • A hybrid turbine cooling model is embedded in the performance analysis. • The accuracy of the model is validated with detailed test data of the gas turbine. • Conjugate heat transfer analysis is performed for the turbine for verification

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) investigation onto passenger car disk brake design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munisamy, Kannan M.; Kanasan Moorthy, Shangkari K.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the flow and heat transfer in ventilated disc brakes using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). NACA Series blade is designed for ventilated disc brake and the cooling characteristic is compared to the baseline design. The ventilated disc brakes are simulated using commercial CFD software FLUENTTM using simulation configuration that was obtained from experiment data. The NACA Series blade design shows improvements in Nusselt number compared to baseline design.

  17. Stress analysis of advanced attack helicopter composite main rotor blade root end lug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Stress analysis of the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) composite main rotor blade root end lug is described. The stress concentration factor determined from a finite element analysis is compared to an empirical value used in the lug design. The analysis and test data indicate that the stress concentration is primarily a function of configuration and independent of the range of material properties typical of Kevlar-49/epoxy and glass epoxy.

  18. Study on fundamental features of helium turbomachine for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2004-01-01

    The High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with helium turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. The HTGR helium turbine cycle was analyzed and optimized. Then the focal point of investigation was concentrated on the fundamental thermodynamic and aerodynamic features of helium turbomachine. As a result, a helium turbomachine is different from a general combustion gas turbine in two main design features, that is a helium turbomachine has more blade stages and shorter blade length, which are caused by the helium property and the high pressure of a closed cycle, respectively. (authors)

  19. The SNL100-02 blade :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A series of design studies are performed to investigate the effects of advanced core materials and a new core material strategy on blade weight and performance for large blades using the Sandia 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. The initial core material design studies were based on the SNL100-01 100- meter carbon spar design. Advanced core material with improved performance to weight was investigated with the goal to reduce core material content in the design and reduce blade weight. A secondary element of the core study was to evaluate the suitability of core materials from natural, regrowable sources such as balsa and recyclable foam materials. The new core strategy for the SNL100-02 design resulted in a design mass of 59 tons, which is a 20% reduction from the most recent SNL100-01 carbon spar design and over 48% reduction from the initial SNL100-00 all-glass baseline blade. This document provides a description of the final SNL100-02 design, includes a description of the major design modifications, and summarizes the pertinent blade design information. This document is also intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-02 that are made publicly available.

  20. Effect of number of blades on aerodynamic forces on a straight-bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qing'an; Maeda, Takao; Kamada, Yasunari; Murata, Junsuke; Furukawa, Kazuma; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Small wind turbine performance and safety standard for straight-bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) have not been developed in the world because of the lack of fundament experimental data. This paper focuses on the evaluation of aerodynamic forces depending on several numbers of blades in wind tunnel experiment. In the present study, the test airfoil of blade is symmetry airfoil of NACA 0021 and the number of blades is from two to five. Pressure acting on the surface of rotor blade is measured during rotation by multiport pressure devices and transmitted to a stationary system through wireless LAN. And then, the aerodynamic forces (tangential force, normal force et al.) are discussed as a function of azimuth angle, achieving a quantitative analysis of the effect of numbers of blades. Finally, the loads are compared with the experimental data of six-component balance. As a result, it is clarified that the power coefficient decreases with the increase of numbers of blades. Furthermore, the power which is absorbed from wind by wind turbine mainly depends on upstream region of azimuth angle of θ = 0°∼180°. In this way, these results are very important for developing the simple design equations and applications for straight-bladed VAWT. - Highlights: • Aerodynamic forces are measured by not only torque meter but also six-component balance. • The pressure distribution on the surface of rotor blade is directly measured by multiport pressure devices. • The power coefficient decreases with the increase of numbers of blades. • The fluctuation amplitudes from six-component balance show larger value than the results of pressure distribution.

  1. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  2. Distribution of defects in wind turbine blades and reliability assessment of blades containing defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard Toft, Henrik; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    2009-01-01

    on the assumption that one error in the production process tends to trigger several defects. For both models additional information about number, type and size of the defects is included as stochastic variables. The probability of failure for a wind turbine blade will not only depend on variations in the material......In the present paper two stochastic models for the distribution of defects in wind turbine blades are proposed. The first model assumes that the individual defects are completely randomly distributed in the blade. The second model assumes that the defects occur in clusters of different size based...... properties and the load but also on potential defects in the blades. As a numerical example the probability of failure is calculated for the main spar both with and without defects in terms of delaminations. The delaminations increase the probability of failure compared to a perfect blade, but by applying...

  3. Reducing water consumption of an industrial plant cooling unit using hybrid cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezaei, Ebrahim; Shafiei, Sirous; Abdollahnezhad, Aydin

    2010-01-01

    Water consumption is an important problem in dry zones and poor water supply areas. For these areas use of a combination of wet and dry cooling towers (hybrid cooling) has been suggested in order to reduce water consumption. In this work, wet and dry sections of a hybrid cooling tower for the estimation of water loss was modeled. A computer code was also written to simulate such hybrid cooling tower. To test the result of this simulation, a pilot hybrid tower containing a wet tower and 12 compact air cooled heat exchangers was designed and constructed. Pilot data were compared with simulation data and a correction factor was added to the simulation. Ensuring that the simulation represents the actual data, it was applied to a real industrial case and the effect of using a dry tower on water loss reduction of this plant cooling unit was investigated. Finally feasibility study was carried out to choose the best operating conditions for the hybrid cooling tower configuration proposed for this cooling unit.

  4. Fabrication development for ODS-superalloy, air-cooled turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moracz, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    MA-600 is a gamma prime and oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy made by mechanical alloying. At the initiation of this program, MA-6000 was available as an experimental alloy only and did not go into production until late in the program. The objective of this program was to develop a thermal-mechanical-processing approach which would yield the necessary elongated grain structure and desirable mechanical properties after conventional press forging. Forging evaluations were performed to select optimum thermal-mechanical-processing conditions. These forging evaluations indicated that MA-6000 was extremely sensitive to die chilling. In order to conventionally hot forge the alloy, an adherent cladding, either the original extrusion can or a thick plating, was required to prevent cracking of the workpiece. Die design must reflect the requirement of cladding. MA-6000 was found to be sensitive to the forging temperature. The correct temperature required to obtain the proper grain structure after recrystallization was found to be between 1010-1065 C (1850-1950 F). The deformation level did not affect subsequent crystallization; however, sharp transition areas in tooling designs should be avoided in forming a blade shape because of the potential for grain structure discontinuities. Starting material to be used for forging should be processed so that it is capable of being zone annealed to a coarse elongated grain structure as bar stock. This conclusion means that standard processed bar materials can be used.

  5. Large-eddy simulation analysis of turbulent flow over a two-blade horizontal wind turbine rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Young [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh (United States); You, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Unsteady turbulent flow characteristics over a two-blade horizontal wind turbine rotor is analyzed using a large-eddy simulation technique. The wind turbine rotor corresponds to the configuration of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI campaign. The filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a non-inertial reference frame fixed at the centroid of the rotor, are solved with centrifugal and Coriolis forces using an unstructured-grid finite-volume method. A systematic analysis of effects of grid resolution, computational domain size, and time-step size on simulation results, is carried out. Simulation results such as the surface pressure coefficient, thrust coefficient, torque coefficient, and normal and tangential force coefficients are found to agree favorably with experimental data. The simulation showed that pressure fluctuations, which produce broadband flow-induced noise and vibration of the blades, are especially significant in the mid-chord area of the suction side at around 70 to 95 percent spanwise locations. Large-scale vortices are found to be generated at the blade tip and the location connecting the blade with an airfoil cross section and the circular hub rod. These vortices propagate downstream with helical motions and are found to persist far downstream from the rotor.

  6. Influence of thermal gradient on gas turbine combustor wall using impingement/effusion cooling techniques: CHT CFD predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. El-jummah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Internal wall heat transfer relevant to impingement/effusion cooling techniques was investigated using conjugate heat transfer (CHT computational fluid dynamics (CFD with ANSYS Fluent and ICEM commercial software. This work concentrates on the development of CHT CFD design procedures that are applicable to combustor wall and turbine blade heat transfer optimisation in gas turbine (GT. It specifically modelled and compares two configuration which are specifically relevant to the impingement and effusion holes density n (m-2 and is the ratio of the hole pitch X2. The configurations investigated are equal and unequal impingement and effusion holes density n (m-2, respectively, whereby in each case the variation in the number of cooling holes were carried out. The ratio of impingement and effusion number of holes/m2 (or hole density n, investigated were impingement/effusion: 4306/4306 and 1076/4306, respectively. The geometries were for impingement wall, hole pitch X to diameter D, X/D ratio of ~ 11 but different number of holes N for both n geometries, at a constant offset effusion wall, hole X/D of 4.7 of the same N for both the two configurations. The model geometries have a constant impingement gap of 8 mm with both impingement and effusion walls at 6.35 mm thick Nimonic - 75 material and were computed for varied air mass flux G from 0.1 - 0.94 kg/sm2. Symmetrical applications were employed in modelling each of the geometry, whereby for the impingement hole, only quarter of one hole was modelled, while for the effusion side the holes were either quarter or half modelled. The two n geometries were computed with k - ɛ turbulence model using standard wall functions, which also applies to all G. The predicted locally surface X2 (or hole square area average heat transfer coefficient (HTC h values compared with with previously published experimental data showed good agreement. The reduced internal gap flow recirculation with reduced heat transfer to

  7. Aerodynamic analysis of potential use of flow control devices on helicopter rotor blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejero, F; Doerffer, P; Szulc, O

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the application of flow control devices has been rising in the last years. Recently, several passive streamwise vortex generators have been analysed in a configuration of a curved wall nozzle within the framework of the UFAST project (Unsteady Effects of Shock Wave Induced Separation, 2005 – 2009). Experimental and numerical results proved that the technology is effective in delaying flow separation. The numerical investigation has been extended to helicopter rotor blades in hover and forward flight applying the FLOWer solver (RANS approach) implementing the chimera overlapping grids technique and high performance computing. CFD results for hover conditions confirm that the proposed passive control method reduces the flow separation increasing the thrust over power consumption. The paper presents the numerical validation for both states of flight and the possible implementation of RVGs on helicopter rotor blades.

  8. Hot gas path component cooling system having a particle collection chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Carlos Miguel; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2018-02-20

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component includes a substrate having an outer surface and an inner surface. The inner surface defines at least one interior space. A passage is formed in the substrate between the outer surface and the inner surface. An access passage is formed in the substrate and extends from the outer surface to the inner space. The access passage is formed at a first acute angle to the passage and includes a particle collection chamber. The access passage is configured to channel a cooling fluid to the passage. Furthermore, the passage is configured to channel the cooling fluid therethrough to cool the substrate.

  9. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schepers, J.G.

    1997-06-01

    The Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) has often been involved in industrial projects, in which blade geometries are created automatic by means of numerical optimisation. Usually, these projects aim at the determination of the aerodynamic optimal wind turbine blade, i.e. the goal is to design a blade which is optimal with regard to energy yield. In other cases, blades have been designed which are optimal with regard to cost of generated energy. However, it is obvious that the wind turbine blade designs which result from these optimisations, are not necessarily optimal with regard to noise emission. In this paper an example is shown of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the ECN-program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. 11 figs., 8 refs

  10. Simulation and analysis of different adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage plant configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Niklas; Vöhringer, O.; Kruck, C.; Eltrop, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We modeled several configurations of an adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) plant. ► We analyzed changes in efficiency of these configurations under varying operating conditions. ► The efficiency of the adiabatic CAES plant can reach about 70% for the isentropic configuration. ► In the polytropic case, the efficiency is about 10% lower (at about 60%) than in the isentropic configuration. ► The efficiency is highest for a two-stage CAES configuration and highly dependent on the cooling and heating demand. - Abstract: In this paper, the efficiency of one full charging and discharging cycle of several adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) configurations are analyzed with the help of an energy balance. In the second step main driving factors for the efficiency of the CAES configurations are examined with the help of sensitivity analysis. The results show that the efficiency of the polytropic configuration is about 60%, which is considerable lower than literature values of an adiabatic CAES of about 70%. The high value of 70% is only reached for the isentropic (ideal) configuration. Key element to improve the efficiency is to develop high temperature thermal storages (>600 °C) and temperature resistant materials for compressors. The highest efficiency is delivered by the two-stage adiabatic CAES configuration. In this case the efficiency varies between 52% and 62%, depending on the cooling and heating demand. If the cooling is achieved by natural sources (such as a river), a realistic estimation of the efficiency of adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storages (without any greenhouse gas emissions due to fuel consumption) is about 60%.

  11. The use of platform dampers to reduce turbine blade vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jareland, Martin H.

    2001-07-01

    Friction damping is commonly used in jet engines to reduce the vibration level of the blades and thereby increase the reliability of the engine. This thesis deals with a specific type of friction damper denoted platform damper, which is frequently used in turbine stages. A platform damper is a piece of metal located in a cavity underneath two adjacent blade platforms. It is pressed against the platforms by centrifugal force and friction forces arise in the contacts when a relative motion between the platforms occurs. In this thesis, a number of phenomena regarding platform dampers are investigated and discussed. This is performed both experimentally and theoretically. In the simulations, friction interface models valid for both macroslip and microslip are used. Macroslip means that slipping occurs in the whole contact interface and microslip means that slipping occurs in only part of the interface. The latter is most likely in the contacts between the platform damper and the blade platforms due to the high normal force and the small motions. The first paper deals with mistuning of bladed disks due to variations in the properties of the platform dampers and the closely related topic wear of the dampers. This study indicates that damper mistuning can greatly affect the blade vibrations and that damper and blade mistuning constitutes a more severe case than blade mistuning alone. It is also found that wear of the contact areas can lead either to an increase or decrease in the resonance amplitude of the blades in the studied configuration. In the second paper, so-called cottage-roof dampers are studied. Cottage-roof dampers are a type of platform damper with inclined contact surfaces. The inclination leads to a varying normal load, which complicates the analysis. A model including this effect is presented and simulations are performed both in the time and frequency domain. A parametric study is performed with the aim of finding the optimal damper design with respect to

  12. Ceramic blade with tip seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, B.; Bhardwaj, N.K.; Jones, R.B.

    1997-08-05

    The present gas turbine engine includes a disc assembly defining a disc having a plurality of blades attached thereto. The disc has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc. A shroud assembly is attached to the gas turbine engine and is spaced from the plurality of blades a preestablished distance forming an interface there between. Positioned in the interface is a seal having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades. 4 figs.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) investigation onto passenger car disk brake design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munisamy, Kannan M; Moorthy, Shangkari K Kanasan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the flow and heat transfer in ventilated disc brakes using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). NACA Series blade is designed for ventilated disc brake and the cooling characteristic is compared to the baseline design. The ventilated disc brakes are simulated using commercial CFD software FLUENT TM using simulation configuration that was obtained from experiment data. The NACA Series blade design shows improvements in Nusselt number compared to baseline design.

  14. Structural experiment of wind turbine blades; Fushayo blade no zairyo rikigakuteki jikken kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, K; Shimizu, Y; Kuroyanagi, H [Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Aluminum, GFRP and composite of aluminum coated with carbon as structural materials for wind turbine blades were bending-tested, to improve blade bending stiffness, understand stress conditions at each position, and clarify structural dynamic strength by the bending-failure test. It is possible to estimate stress conditions at each position from the test results of displacement and strain at each load. The test results with GFRP are well explained qualitatively by the boundary theory, known as a theory for composite materials. The test gives reasonable material strength data, useful for designing wind turbines of high functions and safety. The results of the blade bending-failure test are in good agreement with the calculated structural blade strength. It is also found that GFRP is a good material of high structural strength for wind turbines. 8 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. Design optimization for active twist rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ji Won

    This dissertation introduces the process of optimizing active twist rotor blades in the presence of embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. Optimum design of active twist blades is a complex task, since it involves a rich design space with tightly coupled design variables. The study presents the development of an optimization framework for active helicopter rotor blade cross-sectional design. This optimization framework allows for exploring a rich and highly nonlinear design space in order to optimize the active twist rotor blades. Different analytical components are combined in the framework: cross-sectional analysis (UM/VABS), an automated mesh generator, a beam solver (DYMORE), a three-dimensional local strain recovery module, and a gradient based optimizer within MATLAB. Through the mathematical optimization problem, the static twist actuation performance of a blade is maximized while satisfying a series of blade constraints. These constraints are associated with locations of the center of gravity and elastic axis, blade mass per unit span, fundamental rotating blade frequencies, and the blade strength based on local three-dimensional strain fields under worst loading conditions. Through pre-processing, limitations of the proposed process have been studied. When limitations were detected, resolution strategies were proposed. These include mesh overlapping, element distortion, trailing edge tab modeling, electrode modeling and foam implementation of the mesh generator, and the initial point sensibility of the current optimization scheme. Examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this process. Optimization studies were performed on the NASA/Army/MIT ATR blade case. Even though that design was built and shown significant impact in vibration reduction, the proposed optimization process showed that the design could be improved significantly. The second example, based on a model scale of the AH-64D Apache blade, emphasized the capability of this framework to

  16. Bingham plastic fluid flow model in tape casting of ceramics using two doctor blades – analytical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common processes used in manufacturing of multilayer ceramic packages, multilayer capacitors and large scale integration circuits is tape casting. In this process, the wet tape thickness is one of the single most determining parameters affecting the final properties of the product......, and it is therefore of great interest to be able to control it. One way to control the tape thickness is to use a two doctor blade configuration in the tape casting machine. In this case, it becomes important to fix the height of the slurry in front of both doctor blades according to the desired tape thickness...... and casting speed (belt velocity). In the present work, the flow in both doctor blade regions of a slurry is described with a steady state momentum equation in combination with a Bingham plastic constitutive equation, and this is integrated to a closed form analytical solution for both reservoirs based...

  17. A reverse engineering methodology for nickel alloy turbine blades with internal features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gameros, A.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Siller, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this work is to present a reverse engineering (RE) methodology for freeform surfaces, based on a case study of a turbine blade made of Inconel, including the reconstruction of its internal cooling system. The methodology uses an optical scanner and X-ray computed tomography (CT......) equipment. Traceability of the measurements was obtained through the use of a Modular Freeform Gage (MFG). An uncertainty budget is presented for both measuring technologies and results show that the RE methodology presented is promising when comparing uncertainty values against common industrial tolerances....

  18. A Non-Uniformly Under-Sampled Blade Tip-Timing Signal Reconstruction Method for Blade Vibration Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-speed blades are often prone to fatigue due to severe blade vibrations. In particular, synchronous vibrations can cause irreversible damages to the blade. Blade tip-timing methods (BTT have become a promising way to monitor blade vibrations. However, synchronous vibrations are unsuitably monitored by uniform BTT sampling. Therefore, non-equally mounted probes have been used, which will result in the non-uniformity of the sampling signal. Since under-sampling is an intrinsic drawback of BTT methods, how to analyze non-uniformly under-sampled BTT signals is a big challenge. In this paper, a novel reconstruction method for non-uniformly under-sampled BTT data is presented. The method is based on the periodically non-uniform sampling theorem. Firstly, a mathematical model of a non-uniform BTT sampling process is built. It can be treated as the sum of certain uniform sample streams. For each stream, an interpolating function is required to prevent aliasing in the reconstructed signal. Secondly, simultaneous equations of all interpolating functions in each sub-band are built and corresponding solutions are ultimately derived to remove unwanted replicas of the original signal caused by the sampling, which may overlay the original signal. In the end, numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the reconstructed signal depends on the sampling frequency, the blade vibration frequency, the blade vibration bandwidth, the probe static offset and the number of samples. In practice, both types of blade vibration signals can be particularly reconstructed by non-uniform BTT data acquired from only two probes.

  19. Sound attenuations of axial fan blade tones using flow-driven tunable resonator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorny, Lee James

    attained and BPF tones were reduced to less than 5 dB from the broadband noise floor for each case discussed above. In parallel with experimental work, analytical models were developed to effectively model and predict optimal resonator configurations for a given fan in operation. Interactions between resonators and the driving pressure field from the rotor blades are modeled using transmission line (TL) theory. Blade tone acoustic pressure is obtained using a finite element method (FEM) propagation code. By combining of these two methods, a resonator configuration that achieves optimal attenuation can be numerically obtained. The use of resonators has been shown to significantly attenuate fan noise in the conditions explored in the considered experiments. Numerical modeling has shown consistency in the response of flow driven resonators and their. These results indicate a strong potential for active control of fan noise using resonators and an approach to applying this control is presented.

  20. Operational Characteristics of Four Commercially Available Personal Cooling Vests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Lee, Hank C.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide chest cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of two passive and two active cooling vests, and to measure the body temperature and circulatory changes produced by each cooling vest configuration. The MicroClimate Systems and the Life Enhancement Tech(LET) lightweight liquid cooling vests, the Steele Vest and LET's Zipper Front Garment were used to cool the chest region of 11 male and 10 female subjects (25 to 55 yr.) in this study. Calf, forearm and finger blood flows were measured using a tetrapolar impedance rheograph. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx.21 C), were tested for 60 min. with the cooling system operated at its maximum cooling capacity. Blood flows were recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. Oral, right and left ear temperatures and cooling system parameters were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; respiration; and an activity index were recorded continuously on a URI Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. In general, the male and female subjects' rectal and ear temperature responses to cooling were similar for all vest configurations tested. Oral temperatures during the recovery period were significantly (Pcooling and recovery periods. These results show that all vest configurations elicit a similar thermal response in both male and female subject groups. However, subject population variance was rather large and may have masked differences between the vests. One vest may prove more effective than another for a given individual, and experience is the only means of determining this.

  1. Nonlinear aeroelastic modelling for wind turbine blades based on blade element momentum theory and geometrically exact beam theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Xiongwei; Renevier, Nathalie; Stables, Matthew; Hall, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing size and flexibility of large wind turbine blades, accurate and reliable aeroelastic modelling is playing an important role for the design of large wind turbines. Most existing aeroelastic models are linear models based on assumption of small blade deflections. This assumption is not valid anymore for very flexible blade design because such blades often experience large deflections. In this paper, a novel nonlinear aeroelastic model for large wind turbine blades has been developed by combining BEM (blade element momentum) theory and mixed-form formulation of GEBT (geometrically exact beam theory). The nonlinear aeroelastic model takes account of large blade deflections and thus greatly improves the accuracy of aeroelastic analysis of wind turbine blades. The nonlinear aeroelastic model is implemented in COMSOL Multiphysics and validated with a series of benchmark calculation tests. The results show that good agreement is achieved when compared with experimental data, and its capability of handling large deflections is demonstrated. Finally the nonlinear aeroelastic model is applied to aeroelastic modelling of the parked WindPACT 1.5 MW baseline wind turbine, and reduced flapwise deflection from the nonlinear aeroelastic model is observed compared to the linear aeroelastic code FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). - Highlights: • A novel nonlinear aeroelastic model for wind turbine blades is developed. • The model takes account of large blade deflections and geometric nonlinearities. • The model is reliable and efficient for aeroelastic modelling of wind turbine blades. • The accuracy of the model is verified by a series of benchmark calculation tests. • The model provides more realistic aeroelastic modelling than FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence)

  2. A smart rotor configuration with linear quadratic control of adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a smart rotor configuration where adaptive trailing edge flaps (ATEFs) are employed for active alleviation of the aerodynamic loads on the blades of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine. The flaps extend for 20% of the blade length and are controlled by a linear quadratic (LQ....... The effects of active flap control are assessed with aeroelastic simulations of the turbine in normal operation conditions, as prescribed by the International Electrotechnical Commission standard. The turbine lifetime fatigue damage equivalent loads provide a convenient summary of the results achieved...

  3. Vibration analysis of gas turbine blade using FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.J.; Chohan, G.Y.; Khusnood, S.; Khan, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In a typical turbo-machine, there is a stator row of blades, which guide the gases onto a rotor row of blades, to extract the mechanical power from the machine. A typical rotor blade was sees upstream disturbance from the stator row and as it rotates, receive a corresponding number of increasing and decreasing lift and moment forces alternating periodically, depending on the number of stator blades/nozzles/guide vanes. Thus all the blades in a turbo-machine receiver their major periodic excitation at a frequency equal to nozzle passing frequency. Since these forces are periodic, one has to consider several number of these harmonics in determining whether resonance takes place, when one of these harmonics coincides with any of the natural frequencies of the blades. Turbine blades have a variety of natural modes of vibration, predominantly as blade alone but also in combination with flexing of the disc rim. These mode occur at characteristic frequencies, which are determined by the distribution of mass and stiffness (in bending or torsion), resulting from the variable thickness over the blade area. Since the advent of steam turbines and their application in various sectors of industry, it is a common experience that a blade failure is a major cause of breakdown in these machines. Blade failures due to fatigue are predominantly vibration related. The dynamic loads on the blading can arise from many sources, the predominant being the source of the operation principles on which the machine is designed. This work deals with vibration analysis of a gas turbine blade using a finite element package ANSYS. Determined the natural frequencies and mode shapes for a turbine blade and a rectangular blade. Results have been validated experimentally using a rectangular blade. ANSYS results have also been compared against published results. (author)

  4. Aerodynamic Analysis of Morphing Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Caleb; Macphee, David; Carlisle, Madeline

    2016-11-01

    Interest in morphing blades has grown with applications for wind turbines and other aerodynamic blades. This passive control method has advantages over active control methods such as lower manufacturing and upkeep costs. This study has investigated the lift and drag forces on individual blades with experimental and computational analysis. The goal has been to show that these blades delay stall and provide larger lift-to-drag ratios at various angles of attack. Rigid and flexible airfoils were cast from polyurethane and silicone respectively, then lift and drag forces were collected from a load cell during 2-D testing in a wind tunnel. Experimental data was used to validate computational models in OpenFOAM. A finite volume fluid-structure-interaction solver was used to model the flexible blade in fluid flow. Preliminary results indicate delay in stall and larger lift-to-drag ratios by maintaining more optimal angles of attack when flexing. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  5. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed

    1998-01-01

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

  6. Wind turbine blade shear web disbond detection using rotor blade operational sensing and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrent, Noah; Adams, Douglas E; Griffith, D Todd

    2015-02-28

    A wind turbine blade's structural dynamic response is simulated and analysed with the goal of characterizing the presence and severity of a shear web disbond. Computer models of a 5 MW offshore utility-scale wind turbine were created to develop effective algorithms for detecting such damage. Through data analysis and with the use of blade measurements, a shear web disbond was quantified according to its length. An aerodynamic sensitivity study was conducted to ensure robustness of the detection algorithms. In all analyses, the blade's flap-wise acceleration and root-pitching moment were the clearest indicators of the presence and severity of a shear web disbond. A combination of blade and non-blade measurements was formulated into a final algorithm for the detection and quantification of the disbond. The probability of detection was 100% for the optimized wind speed ranges in laminar, 30% horizontal shear and 60% horizontal shear conditions. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Wind blade spar cap and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mansour H [Raleigh, NC

    2008-05-27

    A wind blade spar cap for strengthening a wind blade including an integral, unitary three-dimensional woven material having a first end and a second end, corresponding to a root end of the blade and a tip end of the blade, wherein the material tapers in width from the first to the second end while maintaining a constant thickness and decreasing weight therebetween, the cap being capable of being affixed to the blade for providing increased strength with controlled variation in weight from the root end to the tip end based upon the tapered width of the material thereof. The present inventions also include the method of making the wind blade spar cap and a wind blade including the wind blade spar cap.

  8. Composite ceramic blade for a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossmann, A; Hoffmueller, W; Krueger, W

    1980-06-26

    The gas turbine blade consists of a supporting metal core which has at its lower end a modelled root and a profile blade made of ceramics enclosing it at some distance. The invention deals with a reliable connection between these two parts of the rotor blade: from the top end of the blade core a head protrudes supporting the thin-walled profile blade from below with a projection each pointing into the interior. The design of the projections and supporting surfaces is described and illustrated by drawings.

  9. Development of Wind Operated Passive Evaporative Cooling Structures for Storage of Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Sunmonu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A Wind operated passive evaporative cooler was developed. Two cooling chambers were made with clay container (cylindrical and square shapes. These two containers were separately inserted inside bigger clay pot inter- spaced with clay soil of 7 cm (to form pot-in-pot and wall-in wall with the outside structure wrapped with jute sack. The soil and the jute sacks were wetted with salt solution. Five blades were constructed inside the cooling chambers with aluminium material which were connected with a shaft to a vane located on a wooden cover outside the cooling chamber. The vanes (made of aluminium were to be powered by the wind which in turn rotates the blades inside the cooling chamber. The total volume of 40500cm3 and storage capacity of 31500cm3 were recorded for the square structures while total volume of 31792.5cm3 and storage capacity of 24727.5cm3 were recorded for the cylindrical structures. During the test period, the average temperatures of 27.07oC, 27.09oC and 33.6oC were obtained for the pot-in-pot (cylindrical, wall-in-wall (square and the ambient respectively. The average relative humidity of 92.27%, 91.99% and 69.41% were obtained for the pot-in-pot (cylindrical, wall-in-wall (square and the ambient respectively. The average minimum and maximum wind speed recorded for the month of October was 2.5m/s and 2.6m/s respectively

  10. The effect of internal ribbing on forced convective heat transfer in circular-sectioned tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadi Rahmat-Abadi, K.; Morris, W. D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental examination of the effect of internal circumferential ribs on forced convection in circular-sectioned tubes. The work is relevant to the internal cooling of gas turbine rotor blades. The influence of rib geometry is investigated for three different rib configurations and simple design-type, empirical equations are developed for estimating heat transfer at rib and mid-rib locations. It is demonstrated that heat transfer may be improved by up to three fold in relation to fully developed forced convection in smooth-walled tubes. The geometric parameters which have been used for the experiments are typical of those currently applied to gas turbine blade cooling designs

  11. Impact of the use of a hybrid turbine inlet air cooling system in arid climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansary, Hany A.; Orfi, Jamel A.; Ali, Mohamed E.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Cooling the air entering the compressor section of a gas turbine is a proven method of increasing turbine power output, especially during peak summer demand, and it is increasingly being used in powerplants worldwide. Two turbine inlet air cooling (TIAC) systems are widely used: evaporative cooling and mechanical chilling. In this work, the prospects of using a hybrid turbine inlet air cooling (TIAC) system are investigated. The hybrid system consists of mechanical chilling followed by evaporative cooling. Such a system is capable of achieving a significant reduction in inlet air temperature that satisfies desired power output levels, while consuming less power than conventional mechanical chilling and less water than conventional evaporative cooling, thus combining the benefits of both approaches. Two hybrid system configurations are studied. In the first configuration, the first stage of the system uses water-cooled chillers that are coupled with dry coolers such that the condenser cooling water remains in a closed loop. In the second configuration, the first stage of the system uses water-cooled chillers but with conventional cooling towers. An assessment of the performance and economics of those two configurations is made by comparing them to conventional mechanical chilling and using realistic data. It was found that the TIAC systems are capable of boosting the power output of the gas turbine by 10% or more (of the power output of the ISO conditions). The cost operation analysis shows clearly the hybrid TIAC method with wet cooling has the advantage over the other methods and It would be profitable to install it in the new gas turbine power plants. The figure below shows a comparison of the water consumption for the three different cases. - Highlights: • New hybrid system for the turbine inlet air cooling is studied. • Hybrid system of mechanical chilling followed by evaporative cooling is used. • Hybrid turbine inlet air cooling

  12. Performance of a Low Speed Axial Compressor Rotor Blade Row under Different Inlet Distortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Taghavi Zenouz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Responses of an axial compressor isolated rotor blade row to various inlet distortions have been investigated utilizing computational fluid dynamic technique. Distortions have been imposed by five screens of different geometries, but with the same blockage ratio. These screens were embedded upstream of the rotor blade row. Flow fields are simulated in detail for compressor design point and near stall conditions. Performance curves for distorted cases are extracted and compared to the undisturbed case. Flow simulations and consequent performance characteristics show that the worst cases belong to non-symmetric blockages, i.e., those of partial circumferential configurations. These cases produce the largest wakes which can disturb the flow, considerably. Superior performances correspond to the inner and outer continuous circumferential distortion screens. Since, they produce no significant disturbances to the main flow in comparison to the non-symmetric screens.

  13. A homogeneous cooling scheme investigation for high power slab laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianguo; Lin, Weiran; Fan, Zhongwei; Chen, Yanzhong; Ge, Wenqi; Yu, Jin; Liu, Hao; Mo, Zeqiang; Fan, Lianwen; Jia, Dan

    2017-10-01

    The forced convective heat transfer with the advantages of reliability and durability is widely used in cooling the laser gain medium. However, a flow direction induced temperature gradient always appears. In this paper, a novel cooling configuration based on longitudinal forced convective heat transfer is presented. In comparison with two different types of configurations, it shows a more efficient heat transfer and more homogeneous temperature distribution. The investigation of the flow rate reveals that the higher flow rate the better cooling performance. Furthermore, the simulation results with 20 L/min flow rate shows an adequate temperature level and temperature homogeneity which keeps a lower hydrostatic pressure in the flow path.

  14. Identification and management of cracking in 410 stainless turbine blade roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, M.A.; Lehockey, E.M.; Thompson, I.; Massey, R.

    2003-01-01

    amine (this case morpholine), and ingress of cooling water by way of condenser leaks. All these materials and by-products can ultimately accumulate in the turbine. The latter example demonstrates the importance of considering the implications of excursions in secondary side chemistry, condenser leaks, or other chronic mechanical and chemical factors that impact steam chemistry to ongoing turbine maintenance. This is particularly relevant in turbines containing older blades fabricated to specifications that permit wider than desirable variations in hardness which may render them susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in aggressive environments. A comprehensive inspection program based on in-situ hardness testing was instituted to identify and discard these high hardness blades. (author)

  15. Modelization of cooling system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copete, Monica; Ortega, Silvia; Vaquero, Jose Carlos; Cervantes, Eva [Westinghouse Electric (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    In the site evaluation study for licensing a new nuclear power facility, the criteria involved could be grouped in health and safety, environment, socio-economics, engineering and cost-related. These encompass different aspects such as geology, seismology, cooling system requirements, weather conditions, flooding, population, and so on. The selection of the cooling system is function of different parameters as the gross electrical output, energy consumption, available area for cooling system components, environmental conditions, water consumption, and others. Moreover, in recent years, extreme environmental conditions have been experienced and stringent water availability limits have affected water use permits. Therefore, modifications or alternatives of current cooling system designs and operation are required as well as analyses of the different possibilities of cooling systems to optimize energy production taking into account water consumption among other important variables. There are two basic cooling system configurations: - Once-through or Open-cycle; - Recirculating or Closed-cycle. In a once-through cooling system (or open-cycle), water from an external water sources passes through the steam cycle condenser and is then returned to the source at a higher temperature with some level of contaminants. To minimize the thermal impact to the water source, a cooling tower may be added in a once-through system to allow air cooling of the water (with associated losses on site due to evaporation) prior to returning the water to its source. This system has a high thermal efficiency, and its operating and capital costs are very low. So, from an economical point of view, the open-cycle is preferred to closed-cycle system, especially if there are no water limitations or environmental restrictions. In a recirculating system (or closed-cycle), cooling water exits the condenser, goes through a fixed heat sink, and is then returned to the condenser. This configuration

  16. Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

    2011-09-02

    Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

  17. Numerical analysis of turbine blade tip treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, Nath S.; Whitaker, Kevin W.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a turbine blade with a turning angle of 180 degrees have been computed, including blade tip treatments involving cavities. The geometry approximates a preliminary design for the GGOT (Generic Gas Oxidizer Turbine). The data presented here will be compared with experimental data to be obtained from a linear cascade using original GGOT blades. Results have been computed for a blade with 1 percent clearance, based on chord, and three different cavity sizes. All tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 4 x 10 exp 7. The grid contains 39,440 points with 10 spanwise planes in the tip clearance region of 5.008E-04 m. Streamline plots and velocity vectors together with velocity divergence plots reveal the general flow behavior in the clearance region. Blade tip temperature calculations suggest placement of a cavity close to the upstream side of the blade tip for reduction of overall blade tip temperature. The solutions do not account for the relative motion between the endwall and the turbine blade. The solutions obtained are generally consistent with previous work done in this area,

  18. Wind turbine blade waste in 2050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pu; Barlow, Claire Y

    2017-04-01

    Wind energy has developed rapidly over the last two decades to become one of the most promising and economically viable sources of renewable energy. Although wind energy is claimed to provide clean renewable energy without any emissions during operation, but it is only one side of the coin. The blades, one of the most important components in the wind turbines, made with composite, are currently regarded as unrecyclable. With the first wave of early commercial wind turbine installations now approaching their end of life, the problem of blade disposal is just beginning to emerge as a significant factor for the future. This paper is aimed at discovering the magnitude of the wind turbine blade waste problem, looking not only at disposal but at all stages of a blade's lifecycle. The first stage of the research, the subject of this paper, is to accurately estimate present and future wind turbine blade waste inventory using the most recent and most accurate data available. The result will provide a solid reference point to help the industry and policy makers to understand the size of potential environmental problem and to help to manage it better. This study starts by estimating the annual blade material usage with wind energy installed capacity and average blade weight. The effect of other waste contributing factors in the full lifecycle of wind turbine blades is then included, using industrial data from the manufacturing, testing and in-service stages. The research indicates that there will be 43 million tonnes of blade waste worldwide by 2050 with China possessing 40% of the waste, Europe 25%, the United States 16% and the rest of the world 19%. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Take Stock of Turbine Blades Failure Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhijit

    2018-02-01

    Turbine Blade design and engineering is one of the most complicated and important aspects of turbine technology. Experiments with blades can be simple or very complicated, depending upon parameters of analysis. Turbine blades are subjected to vigorous environments, such as high temperatures, high stresses, and a potentially high vibration environment. All these factors can lead to blade failures, which can destroy the turbine, and engine, so careful design is the prime consideration to resist those conditions. A high cycle of fatigue of compressor and turbine blades due to high dynamic stress caused by blade vibration and resonance within the operating range of machinery is common failure mode for turbine machine. Continuous study and investigation on failure of turbine blades are going on since last five decades. Some review papers published during these days aiming to present a review on recent studies and investigations done on failures of turbine blades. All the detailed literature related with the turbine blades has not been described but emphasized to provide all the methodologies of failures adopted by various researches to investigate turbine blade. This paper illustrate on various factors of failure.

  20. Effects of duct configuration on flow and temperature structure in sodium-cooled 19-rod simulated LMFBR fuel bundles with helical wire-wrap spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wantland, J.L.; Fontana, M.H.; Gnadt, P.A.; Hanus, N.; MacPherson, R.E.; Smith, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal-hydrodynamic testing of sodium-cooled 19-rod simulated LMFBR fuel bundles is being conducted at the O ak Ridge National Laboratory in the Fuel Failure Mockup (FFM), an engineering-scale high-temperature sodium facility which provides prototypic flows, temperatures and power densities. Electrically heated bundles have been tested with two scalloped and two hexagonal duct configurations. Peripheral helical flows, attributed to the spacers, have been observed with strengths dependent upon the evenness and relative sizes of the peripheral flow areas. Diametral sodium temperature profiles are more uniform with smaller peripheral flow areas

  1. Wind Turbine Blade with Angled Girders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a reinforced blade for a wind turbine, particularly to a blade having a new arrangement of two or more girders in the blade, wherein each of the girders is connected to the upper part and the lower part of the shell and forms an angle with another girder thereby...

  2. Research on flow characteristics of supercritical CO2 axial compressor blades by CFD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Kazuhisa; Muto, Yasushi; Ishizuka, Takao; Kikura, Hiroshige; Aritomi, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    A supercritical CO 2 gas turbine of 20MPa is suitable to couple with the Na-cooled fast reactor since Na - CO 2 reaction is mild at the outlet temperature of 800K, the cycle thermal efficiency is relatively high and the size of CO 2 gas turbine is very compact. In this gas turbine cycle, a compressor operates near the critical point. The property of CO 2 and then the behavior of compressible flow near the critical point changes very sharply. So far, such a behavior is not examined sufficiently. Then, it is important to clarify compressible flow near the critical point. In this paper, an aerodynamic design of the axial supercritical CO 2 compressor for this system has been carried out based on the existing aerodynamic design method of Cohen. The cycle design point was selected to achieve the maximum cycle thermal efficiency of 43.8%. For this point, the compressor design conditions were determined. They are a mass flow rate of 2035kg/s, an inlet temperature of 308K, an inlet static pressure of 8.26MPa, an outlet static pressure of 20.6MPa and a rotational speed of 3600rpm. The mean radius was constant through axial direction. The design point was determined so as to keep the diffusion factor and blade stress within the allowable limits. Number of stages and an expected adiabatic efficiency was 14 and 87%, respectively. CFD analyses by FLUENT have been done for this compressor blade. The blade model consists of one set of a guide vane, a rotor blade and a stator blade. The analyses were conducted under the assumption both of the real gas properties and also of the modified ideal gas properties. Using the real gas properties, analysis was conducted for the 14th blade, whose condition is remote from the critical point and the possibility of divergence is very small. Then, the analyses were conducted for the blade whose conditions are nearer to the critical point. Gradually, divergence of calculation was encountered. Convergence was relatively easy for the modified

  3. Advances in wind turbine blade design and materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind energy is gaining critical ground in the area of renewable energy, with wind energy being predicted to provide up to 8% of the world’s consumption of electricity by 2021. Advances in wind turbine blade design and materials reviews the design and functionality of wind turbine rotor blades...... as well as the requirements and challenges for composite materials used in both current and future designs of wind turbine blades. Part one outlines the challenges and developments in wind turbine blade design, including aerodynamic and aeroelastic design features, fatigue loads on wind turbine blades......, and characteristics of wind turbine blade airfoils. Part two discusses the fatigue behavior of composite wind turbine blades, including the micromechanical modelling and fatigue life prediction of wind turbine blade composite materials, and the effects of resin and reinforcement variations on the fatigue resistance...

  4. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (CPopt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger CPopt or AEP (CPopt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same CPopt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum Cpopt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and Cpopt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project.

  5. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (C Popt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger C Popt or AEP (C Popt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same C Popt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum C popt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and C popt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project. PMID:26528815

  6. KNOW-BLADE Task-2 report: Aerodynamic accessories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik

    2004-01-01

    In the EC project KNOW-BLADE a work package has been defined to investigate the possibility to numerically model aerodynamic accessories in existing Navier-Stokes solvers. Four different aerodynamic accessories have been investigated. Firstly, thepotential of applying active flow control by means...... of the stall strip. Finally, the effect of surface roughness was modelled by either modifying the boundary condition of the turbulence model or by modifying the airfoil geometry. Using the roughness model gave relatively good agreement withmeasurements and it must be concluded that the effect of using...... to increase the oscillation amplitude, which is not very attractive for load control on wind turbines. Secondly, the effect of vortex generators hasbeen modelled using two phenomenological vortex generator models. The models have been applied to three airfoil configurations. For all cases investigated...

  7. Contactless Diagnostics of Turbine Blade Vibration and Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, Pavel; Vanek, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    The study deals with the contactless diagnostic method used for the identification of steam turbine blade strain, vibration and damage. The tip-timing method based on the evaluation of time differences of blade passages in different rotor revolutions has been modified and improved to provide more precise and reliable results. A new approach to the analysis of the amplitude and time differences of impulse signals generated by a blade passage has been applied. Amplitudes and frequencies of vibrations and static position of blades ascertained by the diagnostic process are used to establish the state of blade damage. A contactless diagnostic system VDS-UT based on magneto-resistive sensors was developed in the Institute of Thermomechanics Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The system provides on-line monitoring of vibration amplitudes and frequencies of all blades and notification of possible blade damage. Evaluation of the axial and circumferential components of the deflections by measuring the amplitude of blade impulse signals results in an overall improvement of the method. Using magneto-resistive sensors, blade elongation and untwisting can be determined as well.

  8. Doctor Blade-Coated Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Nam Chul

    2016-10-25

    In this work, we report polymer solar cells based on blade-coated P3HT:PC71BM and PBDTTT-EFT:PC71BM bulk heterojunction photoactive layers. Enhanced power conversion efficiency of 2.75 (conventional structure) and 3.03% (inverted structure) with improved reproducibility was obtained from blade-coated P3HT:PC71BM solar cells, compared to spin-coated ones. Furthermore, by demonstrating 3.10% efficiency flexible solar cells using blade-coated PBDTTT-EFT:PC71BM films on the plastic substrates, we suggest the potential applicability of blade coating technique to the high throughput roll-to-roll fabrication systems.

  9. Design configuration of GCFR core assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBar, M.P.; Lee, G.E.; Meyer, R.J.

    1980-05-01

    The current design configurations of the core assemblies for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant reactor core conceptual design are described. Primary emphasis is placed upon the design innovations that have been incorporated in the design of the core assemblies since the establishment of the initial design of an upflow GCFR core. A major feature of the design configurations is that they are prototypical of core assemblies for use in commercial plants; a larger number of the same assemblies would be used in a commercial plant

  10. Characteristics of unsteady flow field and flow-induced noise for an axial cooling fan used in a rack mount server computer Characteristics of unsteady flow field and flow-induced noise for an axial cooling fan used in a rack mount server computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae Gyun; Jeon, Wan Ho [Technical Research Lab., CEDIC Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Minorikawa, Gaku [Dept. of f Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Hosei University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    The recent development of small and lightweight rack mount servers and computers has resulted in the decrease of the size of cooling fans. However, internal fans still need to achieve a high performance to release the heat generated from interior parts, and they should emit low noise. On the contrary, measurement data, such as flow properties and flow visualizations, cannot be obtained easily when cooling fans are small. Thus, a numerical analysis approach is necessary for the performance evaluation and noise reduction of small cooling fans. In this study, the noise of a small cooling fan used for computers or servers was measured and then compared with the aeroacoustic noise result based on a numerical analysis. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved to predict the unsteady flow field and surface pressure fluctuation according to the blades and casing surface used. The simplified Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation was used to predict aeroacoustic noise by assuming that a dipole is the major cause of fan noise. Results of the aeroacoustic noise analysis agreed well with that of the experiment, and a tonal noise whose frequency was lower than the first blade passing frequency could be identified in the noise spectrum. This phenomenon is caused by the shape of the bell mouth. A coherence analysis was performed to examine the correlation between the shape of the cooling fan and the noise.

  11. Characteristics of unsteady flow field and flow-induced noise for an axial cooling fan used in a rack mount server computer Characteristics of unsteady flow field and flow-induced noise for an axial cooling fan used in a rack mount server computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tae Gyun; Jeon, Wan Ho; Minorikawa, Gaku

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of small and lightweight rack mount servers and computers has resulted in the decrease of the size of cooling fans. However, internal fans still need to achieve a high performance to release the heat generated from interior parts, and they should emit low noise. On the contrary, measurement data, such as flow properties and flow visualizations, cannot be obtained easily when cooling fans are small. Thus, a numerical analysis approach is necessary for the performance evaluation and noise reduction of small cooling fans. In this study, the noise of a small cooling fan used for computers or servers was measured and then compared with the aeroacoustic noise result based on a numerical analysis. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved to predict the unsteady flow field and surface pressure fluctuation according to the blades and casing surface used. The simplified Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation was used to predict aeroacoustic noise by assuming that a dipole is the major cause of fan noise. Results of the aeroacoustic noise analysis agreed well with that of the experiment, and a tonal noise whose frequency was lower than the first blade passing frequency could be identified in the noise spectrum. This phenomenon is caused by the shape of the bell mouth. A coherence analysis was performed to examine the correlation between the shape of the cooling fan and the noise

  12. Wind-tunnel development of an SR-71 aerospike rocket flight test configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen C.; Shirakata, Norm; Moes, Timothy R.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Conners, Timothy H.

    1996-01-01

    A flight experiment has been proposed to investigate the performance of an aerospike rocket motor installed in a lifting body configuration. An SR-71 airplane would be used to carry the aerospike configuration to the desired flight test conditions. Wind-tunnel tests were completed on a 4-percent scale SR-71 airplane with the aerospike pod mounted in various locations on the upper fuselage. Testing was accomplished using sting and blade mounts from Mach 0.6 to Mach 3.2. Initial test objectives included assessing transonic drag and supersonic lateral-directional stability and control. During these tests, flight simulations were run with wind-tunnel data to assess the acceptability of the configurations. Early testing demonstrated that the initial configuration with the aerospike pod near the SR-71 center of gravity was unsuitable because of large nosedown pitching moments at transonic speeds. The excessive trim drag resulting from accommodating this pitching moment far exceeded the excess thrust capability of the airplane. Wind-tunnel testing continued in an attempt to find a configuration suitable for flight test. Multiple configurations were tested. Results indicate that an aft-mounted model configuration possessed acceptable performance, stability, and control characteristics.

  13. Numerical simulation on a straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine with auxiliary blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, Y. F.; Feng, F.; He, Q. B.; Wang, N. X.

    2016-08-01

    To improve the starting performance of the straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (SB-VAWT) at low wind speed, and the output characteristics at high wind speed, a flexible, scalable auxiliary vane mechanism was designed and installed into the rotor of SB-VAWT in this study. This new vertical axis wind turbine is a kind of lift-to-drag combination wind turbine. The flexible blade expanded, and the driving force of the wind turbines comes mainly from drag at low rotational speed. On the other hand, the flexible blade is retracted at higher speed, and the driving force is primarily from a lift. To research the effects of the flexible, scalable auxiliary module on the performance of SB-VAWT and to find its best parameters, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical calculation was carried out. The calculation result shows that the flexible, scalable blades can automatic expand and retract with the rotational speed. The moment coefficient at low tip speed ratio increased substantially. Meanwhile, the moment coefficient has also been improved at high tip speed ratios in certain ranges.

  14. Vibration and flutter of mistuned bladed-disk assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kielb, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model for investigating vibration and flutter of mistuned bladed disk assemblies is presented. This model accounts for elastic, inertial and aerodynamic coupling between bending and torsional motions of each individual blade, elastic and inertial couplings between the blades and the disk, and aerodynamic coupling among the blades. The disk was modeled as a circular plate with constant thickness and each blade was represented by a twisted, slender, straight, nonuniform, elastic beam with a symmetric cross section. The elastic axis, inertia axis, and the tension axis were taken to be noncoincident and the structural warping of the section was explicitly considered. The blade aerodynamic loading in the subsonic and supersonic flow regimes was obtained from two-dimensional unsteady, cascade theories. All the possible standing wave modes of the disk and traveling wave modes of the blades were included. The equations of motion were derived by using the energy method in conjunction with the assumed mode shapes for the disk and the blades. Continuities of displacement and slope at the blade-disk junction were maintained. The equations were solved to investigate the effects of blade-disk coupling and blade frequency mistuning on vibration and flutter. Results showed that the flexibility of practical disks such as those used for current generation turbofans did not have a significant influence on either the tuned or mistuned flutter characteristics. However, the disk flexibility may have a strong influence on some of the system frequencies and on forced response.

  15. Energy efficient engine high pressure turbine test hardware detailed design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halila, E. E.; Lenahan, D. T.; Thomas, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    The high pressure turbine configuration for the Energy Efficient Engine is built around a two-stage design system. Moderate aerodynamic loading for both stages is used to achieve the high level of turbine efficiency. Flowpath components are designed for 18,000 hours of life, while the static and rotating structures are designed for 36,000 hours of engine operation. Both stages of turbine blades and vanes are air-cooled incorporating advanced state of the art in cooling technology. Direct solidification (DS) alloys are used for blades and one stage of vanes, and an oxide dispersion system (ODS) alloy is used for the Stage 1 nozzle airfoils. Ceramic shrouds are used as the material composition for the Stage 1 shroud. An active clearance control (ACC) system is used to control the blade tip to shroud clearances for both stages. Fan air is used to impinge on the shroud casing support rings, thereby controlling the growth rate of the shroud. This procedure allows close clearance control while minimizing blade tip to shroud rubs.

  16. Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Study for Rotating Composite Fan Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrations of aircraft engine blades cause blade fatigue problems in engines, which can lead to thicker and aerodynamically lower performing blade designs, increasing engine weight, fuel burn, and maintenance costs. In order to mitigate undesirable blade vibration levels, active piezoelectric vibration control has been investigated, potentially enabling thinner blade designs for higher performing blades and minimizing blade fatigue problems. While the piezoelectric damping idea has been investigated by other researchers over the years, very little study has been done including rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. The particular objectives of this study were: (a) to develop and analyze a multiphysics piezoelectric finite element composite blade model for harmonic forced vibration response analysis coupled with a tuned RLC circuit for rotating engine blade conditions, (b) to validate a numerical model with experimental test data, and (c) to achieve a cost-effective numerical modeling capability which enables simulation of rotating blades within the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. A numerical and experimental study for rotating piezoelectric composite subscale fan blades was performed. It was also proved that the proposed numerical method is feasible and effective when applied to the rotating blade base excitation model. The experimental test and multiphysics finite element modeling technique described in this paper show that piezoelectric vibration damping can significantly reduce vibrations of aircraft engine composite fan blades.

  17. Development of Standard Approach for Sickle Blade Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Noordin, M. N. A; Hudzari, R. M; Azuan, H. N; Zainon, M. S; Mohamed, S. B; Wafi, S. A

    2016-01-01

    The sickle blade used in the motorised palm cutter known as “CANTAS” provides fast, easy and safe pruning and harvesting for those hard to reach applications. Jariz Technologies Company is experiencing problem in the consistency of sickle blade which was supplied by various blade manufacturers. Identifying the proper blade material with a certain hardness value would produce a consistent as well as long lasting sickle blade. A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) in the manufacturing of the sic...

  18. Deflection estimation of a wind turbine blade using FBG sensors embedded in the blade bonding line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Kang, Woo-Ram; Jeong, Min-Soo; Lee, In; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the deflection of flexible composite wind turbine blades is very important to prevent the blades from hitting the tower. Several researchers have used fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors—a type of optical fiber sensor (OFS)—to monitor the structural behavior of the blades. They can be installed on the surface and/or embedded in the interior of composites. However, the typical installation positions of OFSs present several problems, including delamination of sensing probes and a higher risk of fiber breakage during installation. In this study, we proposed using the bonding line between the shear web and spar cap as a new installation position of embedded OFSs for estimating the deflection of the blades. Laboratory coupon tests were undertaken preliminarily to confirm the strain measuring capability of embedded FBG sensors in adhesive layers, and the obtained values were verified by comparison with results obtained by electrical strain gauges and finite element analysis. We performed static loading tests on a 100 kW composite wind turbine blade to evaluate its deflections using embedded FBG sensors positioned in the bonding line. The deflections were estimated by classical beam theory considering a rigid body rotation near the tip of the blade. The evaluated tip deflections closely matched those measured by a linear variable differential transformer. Therefore, we verified the capability of embedded FBG sensors for evaluating the deflections of wind turbine blades. In addition, we confirmed that the bonding line between the shear web and spar cap is a practical location to embed the FBG sensors. (paper)

  19. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  20. Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-25

    In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints. 3 figs.

  1. Advanced grid-stiffened composite shells for applications in heavy-lift helicopter rotor blade spars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan Nampy, Sreenivas

    Modern rotor blades are constructed using composite materials to exploit their superior structural performance compared to metals. Helicopter rotor blade spars are conventionally designed as monocoque structures. Blades of the proposed Heavy Lift Helicopter are envisioned to be as heavy as 800 lbs when designed using the monocoque spar design. A new and innovative design is proposed to replace the conventional spar designs with light weight grid-stiffened composite shell. Composite stiffened shells have been known to provide excellent strength to weight ratio and damage tolerance with an excellent potential to reduce weight. Conventional stringer--rib stiffened construction is not suitable for rotor blade spars since they are limited in generating high torsion stiffness that is required for aeroelastic stability of the rotor. As a result, off-axis (helical) stiffeners must be provided. This is a new design space where innovative modeling techniques are needed. The structural behavior of grid-stiffened structures under axial, bending, and torsion loads, typically experienced by rotor blades need to be accurately predicted. The overall objective of the present research is to develop and integrate the necessary design analysis tools to conduct a feasibility study in employing grid-stiffened shells for heavy-lift rotor blade spars. Upon evaluating the limitations in state-of-the-art analytical models in predicting the axial, bending, and torsion stiffness coefficients of grid and grid-stiffened structures, a new analytical model was developed. The new analytical model based on the smeared stiffness approach was developed employing the stiffness matrices of the constituent members of the grid structure such as an arch, helical, or straight beam representing circumferential, helical, and longitudinal stiffeners. This analysis has the capability to model various stiffening configurations such as angle-grid, ortho-grid, and general-grid. Analyses were performed using an

  2. Fatigue lifespan of a mobile blade gas turbine with ceramic coating; Vida util por fatiga de un alabe movil de turbina de gas con recubrimiento ceramico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Illescas, Rafael; Z. Mazur Czerwiec, Zdzislaw; Islas Mungarro, Ricardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: rgi@iie.org.mx; mazur@iie.org.mx; rick_iie@terra.com.mx

    2010-11-15

    Fatigue analysis of a gas turbine moving blade made of IN738LC was carried out in order to evaluate useful life time. The life estimation was done from a previous 3D linear finite element analysis where thermal and mechanical stress calculation at high temperatures was done during steady and transient state i.e. normal start ups and shutdowns. Several load histories with different stresses and strains in the blade were used for different cooling conditions including a thermal barrier coating in comparison with to simple blade without such coating. The important effect of high temperatures on the blade material and stress calculations is shown. The analysis is focused on two different critical zones in the blade: the leading edge at the middle of the height and a cooling channel surface, where high stresses were found in numerical analysis as well as in reality. Finally, the benefit of the presence of a thermal barrier coating in the blade life is shown. [Spanish] Se realizo el analisis de fatiga de un alabe movil de turbina de gas fabricado de IN738LC a fin de evaluar su vida util. La estimacion de vida fue realizada a partir de simulaciones lineales de esfuerzos termomecanicos por elemento finito en 3D a altas temperaturas y durante el arranque y paro normal. Se utilizaron diversos historiales de carga, esfuerzos y deformaciones del alabe para diferentes configuraciones de enfriamiento incluyendo el recubrimiento ceramico tipo barrera termica en comparacion con los resultados sin incluir dicho recubrimiento. Se presenta el efecto importante de las temperaturas elevadas en las propiedades de fatiga del material del alabe y en sus esfuerzos. El analisis se centra en dos puntos de interes identificados como criticos: borde de entrada y un canal de enfriamiento, en donde esfuerzos elevados fueron encontrados tanto numericamente como en la realidad. Finalmente se muestra el beneficio del recubrimiento tipo barrera termica en la vida del alabe.

  3. Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POORE, ROBERT Z.

    1999-08-01

    The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

  4. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its

  5. Korean experience with steam turbine blade inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Kyu; Park, D.Y.; Park, Hyung Jin; Chung, Min Hwa

    1990-01-01

    Several turbine blade accidents in Korea have emphasized the importance of their adequate periodic inspection. As a typical example, a broken blade was found in the Low Pressure (LP) turbine at the 950 MWe KORI unit 3 during the 1986 overhaul after one year commercial operation. Since then the Manufacturer and the Utility company (KEPCO) have been concerned about the need of blade root inspection. The ultrasonic testing was applied to detect cracks in the blade roots without removing the blades from rotor. Due to the complex geometry of the roots, the test results could not be evaluated easily. We feel that the currently applied UT technique seems to be less reliable and more effective method of inspection must be developed in the near future. This paper describes the following items: The causes and analysis of blade damage The inspection techniques and results The remedial action to be taken (Repair and Replacement) The future plan

  6. Lightning transient analysis in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Holbøll, Joachim; Madsen, Søren Find

    2013-01-01

    The transient behavior of lightning surges in the lightning protection system of wind turbine blades has been investigated in this paper. The study is based on PSCAD models consisting of electric equivalent circuits with lumped and distributed parameters involving different lightning current...... waveforms. The aim of the PSCAD simulations is to study the voltages induced by the lightning current in the blade that may cause internal arcing. With this purpose, the phenomenon of current reflections in the lightning down conductor of the blade and the electromagnetic coupling between the down conductor...... and other internal conductive elements of the blade is studied. Finally, several methods to prevent internal arcing are discussed in order to improve the lightning protection of the blade....

  7. Methodology for wind turbine blade geometry optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfiliev, D.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the upwind three bladed horizontal axis wind turbine is the leading player on the market. It has been found to be the best industrial compromise in the range of different turbine constructions. The current wind industry innovation is conducted in the development of individual turbine components. The blade constitutes 20-25% of the overall turbine budget. Its optimal operation in particular local economic and wind conditions is worth investigating. The blade geometry, namely the chord, twist and airfoil type distributions along the span, responds to the output measures of the blade performance. Therefore, the optimal wind blade geometry can improve the overall turbine performance. The objectives of the dissertation are focused on the development of a methodology and specific tool for the investigation of possible existing wind blade geometry adjustments. The novelty of the methodology presented in the thesis is the multiobjective perspective on wind blade geometry optimization, particularly taking simultaneously into account the local wind conditions and the issue of aerodynamic noise emissions. The presented optimization objective approach has not been investigated previously for the implementation in wind blade design. The possibilities to use different theories for the analysis and search procedures are investigated and sufficient arguments derived for the usage of proposed theories. The tool is used for the test optimization of a particular wind turbine blade. The sensitivity analysis shows the dependence of the outputs on the provided inputs, as well as its relative and absolute divergences and instabilities. The pros and cons of the proposed technique are seen from the practical implementation, which is documented in the results, analysis and conclusion sections. (orig.)

  8. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, Joel; Jarriand, Paul.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns a fast neutron nuclear reactor cooled by a liquid metal driven through by a primary pump of the vertical drive shaft type fitted at its lower end with a blade wheel. To each pump is associated an exchanger, annular in shape, fitted with a central bore through which passes the vertical drive shaft of the pump, its wheel being mounted under the exchanger. A collector placed under the wheel comprises an open upward suction bell for the liquid metal. A hydrostatic bearing is located above the wheel to guide the drive shaft and a non detachable diffuser into which at least one delivery pipe gives, envelopes the wheel [fr

  9. Sensitivity-Based Simulation Software for Optimization of Turbine Blade Cooling Strategies, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In recent years, there has been a tendency to use ever-higher gas turbine inlet temperatures, resulting in ever-higher heat loads necessitating efficient cooling....

  10. The effect of cooling conditions on convective heat transfer and flow in a steam-cooled ribbed duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shui, Linqi; Gao, Jianmin; Shi, Xiaojun; Liu, Jiazeng; Xu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a numerical and experimental investigation on the heat transfer and turbulent flow of cooling steam in a rectangular duct with 90 .deg. ribs and studies the effect of cooling conditions on the heat transfer augmentation of steam. In the calculation, the variation range of Reynolds is from 10,000 to 190,000, the inlet temperature varies from 300 .deg. C to 500 .deg. C and the outlet pressure is from 0.5MPa to 6MPa. The aforementioned wide ranges of flow parameters cover the actual operating condition of coolant used in the gas turbine blades. The computations are carried with four turbulence models (the standard k-ε, the renormalized group (RNG) k-ε, the Launder-Reece-Rodi (LRR) and the Speziale-Sarkar-Gatski (SSG) turbulence models). The comparison of numerical and experimental results reveals that the SSG turbulence model is suitable for steam flow in the ribbed duct. Therefore, adopting the conjugate calculation technique, further study on the steam heat transfer and flow characteristics is performed with SSG turbulence model. The results show that the variation of cooling condition strongly impacts the forced convection heat transfer of steam in the ribbed duct. The cooling supply condition of a relative low temperature and medium pressure could bring a considerable advantage on steam thermal enhancement. In addition, comparing the heat transfer level between steam flow and air flow, the performance advantage of using steam is also influenced by the cooling supply condition. Changing Reynolds number has little effect on the performance superiority of steam cooling. Increasing pressure would strengthen the advantage, but increasing temperature gives an opposite result.

  11. The effect of cooling conditions on convective heat transfer and flow in a steam-cooled ribbed duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Linqi; Gao, Jianmin; Shi, Xiaojun; Liu, Jiazeng; Xu, Liang [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-01-15

    This work presents a numerical and experimental investigation on the heat transfer and turbulent flow of cooling steam in a rectangular duct with 90 .deg. ribs and studies the effect of cooling conditions on the heat transfer augmentation of steam. In the calculation, the variation range of Reynolds is from 10,000 to 190,000, the inlet temperature varies from 300 .deg. C to 500 .deg. C and the outlet pressure is from 0.5MPa to 6MPa. The aforementioned wide ranges of flow parameters cover the actual operating condition of coolant used in the gas turbine blades. The computations are carried with four turbulence models (the standard k-ε, the renormalized group (RNG) k-ε, the Launder-Reece-Rodi (LRR) and the Speziale-Sarkar-Gatski (SSG) turbulence models). The comparison of numerical and experimental results reveals that the SSG turbulence model is suitable for steam flow in the ribbed duct. Therefore, adopting the conjugate calculation technique, further study on the steam heat transfer and flow characteristics is performed with SSG turbulence model. The results show that the variation of cooling condition strongly impacts the forced convection heat transfer of steam in the ribbed duct. The cooling supply condition of a relative low temperature and medium pressure could bring a considerable advantage on steam thermal enhancement. In addition, comparing the heat transfer level between steam flow and air flow, the performance advantage of using steam is also influenced by the cooling supply condition. Changing Reynolds number has little effect on the performance superiority of steam cooling. Increasing pressure would strengthen the advantage, but increasing temperature gives an opposite result.

  12. Crack of a first stage blade in a steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nurbanasari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The failure of the first stage blade in a steam turbine of 55 MW was investigated. The blade was made of 17-4 PH stainless steel and has been used for 12 years before failure. The current work aims to find out the main cause of the first stage blade failure. The methods for investigation were metallurgical analysis, chemical composition test, and hardness measurement. The result showed that there was no evidence the blade failure was due to material. The damage found on the blade namely crack on the blade root. Two locations of the crack observed at the blade root, which was at the tang and the fillet, with different failure modes. In general, the damage of the blade was started by the corrosion occurred on the blade root. The crack at the blade root tang was due to corrosion fatigue and the crack occurred at the blade root fillet owing to stress corrosion cracking.

  13. Modal characteristics and fatigue strength of compressor blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Kook; Lee, Young Shin

    2014-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue (HCF) has been identified as one of the primary causes of gas turbine engine failure. The modal characteristics and endurance strength of a 5 MW gas turbine engine blade developed by Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd. in HCF fracture were verified through analysis and tests to determine the reliability of the compressor blade. A compressor blade design procedure that considers HCF life was performed in the following order: airfoil and blade profile design, modal analysis, stress distribution test, stress endurance limit test, and fatigue life verification. This study analyzed the Campbell diagram and estimated resonance risk on the basis of the natural frequency analysis and modal test of the compressor blade to guarantee safe and operational reliability. In addition, the maximum stress point of the compressor blade was determined through stress distribution analysis and test. The bonding point of the strain gage was determined by using fatigue test. Stress endurance limit test was performed based on the results of these tests. This research compared and verified the modal characteristics and endurance strengths of the compressor blades to prevent HCF fracture, which is among the major causes of gas turbine engine damage. A fatigue life design procedure of compressor blades was established. The 5 MW class gas turbine compressor blade is well designed in terms of resonance stability and fatigue endurance limit.

  14. Modal characteristics and fatigue strength of compressor blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Kook [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Shin [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    High-cycle fatigue (HCF) has been identified as one of the primary causes of gas turbine engine failure. The modal characteristics and endurance strength of a 5 MW gas turbine engine blade developed by Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd. in HCF fracture were verified through analysis and tests to determine the reliability of the compressor blade. A compressor blade design procedure that considers HCF life was performed in the following order: airfoil and blade profile design, modal analysis, stress distribution test, stress endurance limit test, and fatigue life verification. This study analyzed the Campbell diagram and estimated resonance risk on the basis of the natural frequency analysis and modal test of the compressor blade to guarantee safe and operational reliability. In addition, the maximum stress point of the compressor blade was determined through stress distribution analysis and test. The bonding point of the strain gage was determined by using fatigue test. Stress endurance limit test was performed based on the results of these tests. This research compared and verified the modal characteristics and endurance strengths of the compressor blades to prevent HCF fracture, which is among the major causes of gas turbine engine damage. A fatigue life design procedure of compressor blades was established. The 5 MW class gas turbine compressor blade is well designed in terms of resonance stability and fatigue endurance limit.

  15. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  16. Failure analysis of turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Two 20 MW gas turbines suffered damage in blades belonging to the 2nd. stage of the turbine after 24,000 hours of duty. From research it arises that the fuel used is not quite adequate to guarantee the blade's operating life due to the excess of SO 3 , C and Na existing in combustion gases which cause pitting to the former. Later, the corrosion phenomenon is presented under tension produced by working stress enhanced by pitting where Pb is its main agent. A change of fuel is recommended thus considering the blades will reach the operational life they were designed for. (Author) [es

  17. Integrity assessment of stationary blade ring for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Yong; Chung, Yong Keun; Park, Jong Jin; Kang, Yong Ho

    2004-01-01

    The inner side between HP stationary blades in no.1 turbine of nuclear power plant A is damaged by the FAC(Flow Assisted Corrosion) which is exposed to moisture. For many years the inner side is repaired by welding the damaged part, however, the FAC continues to deteriorate the original material of the welded blade ring. In this study, we have two stages to verify the integrity of stationary blade ring in nuclear power plant A. In the stage I, replication of blade ring is performed to survey the microstructure of blade ring. In the stage II, the stress analysis of blade ring is performed to verify the structural safety of blade ring. Throughout the two stages analysis of blade ring, the stationary blade ring had remained undamaged

  18. Structural Analysis of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Plastic Wind Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengal Ali Nawaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Basalt fiber reinforced plastic (BFRP wind turbine blade was analyzed and compared with Glass fiber reinforced plastic blade (GFRP. Finite element analysis (FEA of blade was carried out using ANSYS. Data for FEA was obtained by using rule of mixture. The shell element in ANSYS was used to simulate the wind turbine blade and to conduct its strength analysis. The structural analysis and comparison of blade deformations proved that BFRP wind turbine blade has better strength compared to GFRP wind turbine blade.

  19. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Composite Turbine Vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Parikh, Ankur H.; Nagpal, VInod K.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop design concepts for a cooled ceramic vane to be used in the first stage of the High Pressure Turbine(HPT). To insure that the design concepts were relevant to the gas turbine industry needs, Honeywell International Inc. was subcontracted to provide technical guidance for this work. The work performed under this contract can be divided into three broad categories. The first was an analysis of the cycle benefits arising from the higher temperature capability of Ceramic Matrix Composite(CMC) compared with conventional metallic vane materials. The second category was a series of structural analyses for variations in the internal configuration of first stage vane for the High Pressure Turbine(HPT) of a CF6 class commercial airline engine. The third category was analysis for a radial cooled turbine vanes for use in turboshaft engine applications. The size, shape and internal configuration of the turboshaft engine vanes were selected to investigate a cooling concept appropriate to small CMC vanes.

  20. Study of blade-tower interaction using a 2D Navier-Stokes solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this work is to model and study the dynamic interaction of the fluid flow with the structure which occurs when the blades of a wind turbine are passing in front of (or possibly behind) the tower. In order to capture the whole complexity of this phenomenon, the full unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid are used as a model. A new computational technique is described. For the sake of simplicity, we restrict ourselves to two-dimensional cases. The present methodology is illustrated by the computation of a wind turbine-like configuration in a periodic domain. (au)

  1. Applied modal analysis of wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H.B.; Kristensen, O.J.D.

    2003-01-01

    In this project modal analysis has been used to determine the natural frequencies, damping and the mode shapes for wind turbine blades. Different methods to measure the position and adjust the direction of the measuring points are discussed. Differentequipment for mounting the accelerometers...... is investigated by repeated measurement on the same wind turbine blade. Furthermore the flexibility of the test set-up is investigated, by use ofaccelerometers mounted on the flexible adapter plate during the measurement campaign. One experimental campaign investigated the results obtained from a loaded...... and unloaded wind turbine blade. During this campaign the modal analysis are performed on ablade mounted in a horizontal and a vertical position respectively. Finally the results obtained from modal analysis carried out on a wind turbine blade are compared with results obtained from the Stig Øyes blade_EV1...

  2. Computational method for the design of wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale, A.J. [Instituto Argentino de Oceanografia, Camino La Carrindanga Km. 7.5, CC 804, B8000FWB Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Facultad Regional Bahia Blanca, GESE, 11 de Abril 461, B8000LMI Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Universidad Nacional del Sur, Dpto. de Ing. Electrica y de Computadoras, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Rossi, A.P. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Facultad Regional Bahia Blanca, GESE, 11 de Abril 461, B8000LMI Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Universidad Nacional del Sur, Dpto. de Ing. Electrica y de Computadoras, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    Zeus Disenador was developed to design low-power, horizontal-axis wind turbine blades, by means of an iterative algorithm. With this software, it is possible to obtain the optimum blade shape for a wind turbine to satisfy energy requirements of an electric system with optimum rotor efficiency. The number of blades, the airfoil curves and the average wind velocity can be specified by the user. The user can also request particular edge conditions for the width of the blades and for the pitch angle. Results are provided in different windows. Two- and three-dimensional graphics show the aspect of the resultant blade. Numerical results are displayed for blade length, blade surface, pitch angle variation along the blade span, rotor angular speed, rotor efficiency and rotor output power. Software verifications were made by comparing rotor power and rotor efficiency for different designs. Results were similar to those provided by commercial wind generator manufacturers. (author)

  3. Repairing methods of steam turbine blades using welding procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Z.; Cristalinas, V.; Kubiak, J.

    1995-01-01

    The steam turbine blades are subjected to the natural permanent wear or damage, which may be of mechanical or metallurgical origin. The typical damage occurring during the lifetime of turbine blading may be erosion, corrosion, foreign objects damage, rubbing and cracking caused by high cycle fatigue and creep crack growth. The nozzle and diaphragm vanes (stationary blades) of the steam turbine are elements whose damage is commonly occurring and they require special repair processes. The damage of the blade trailing edge of nozzle and diaphragm vanes, due to the former causes, may be refurbished by welding deposits or stainless steel inserts welded to the blades. Both repair methods of the stationary steam turbine blades are presented. The results of the blades refurbishment are an increase of the turbine availability, reliability and efficiency, and a decrease of the risk that failure will occur. Also, the repair cost versus the spare blades cost represent significant reduction of expenditure. 7 refs

  4. Determination of Turbine Blade Life from Engine Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2013-01-01

    It is probable that no two engine companies determine the life of their engines or their components in the same way or apply the same experience and safety factors to their designs. Knowing the failure mode that is most likely to occur minimizes the amount of uncertainty and simplifies failure and life analysis. Available data regarding failure mode for aircraft engine blades, while favoring low-cycle, thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) as the controlling mode of failure, are not definitive. Sixteen high-pressure turbine (HPT) T-1 blade sets were removed from commercial aircraft engines that had been commercially flown by a single airline and inspected for damage. Each set contained 82 blades. The damage was cataloged into three categories related to their mode of failure: (1) TMF, (2) Oxidation/erosion (O/E), and (3) Other. From these field data, the turbine blade life was determined as well as the lives related to individual blade failure modes using Johnson-Weibull analysis. A simplified formula for calculating turbine blade life and reliability was formulated. The L10 blade life was calculated to be 2427 cycles (11 077 hr). The resulting blade life attributed to O/E equaled that attributed to TMF. The category that contributed most to blade failure was Other. If there were no blade failures attributed to O/E and TMF, the overall blade L(sub 10) life would increase approximately 11 to 17 percent.

  5. Free cooling potential of a PCM-based heat exchanger coupled with a novel HVAC system for simultaneous heating and cooling of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarini, Alessandro; Hultmark, Göran; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    2018-01-01

    . In particular, a model of a PCM-based heat exchanger was developed in this work by using the programming language Modelica. This device was designed to store cold energy during night-time and release it during daytime through the water circuit. Results for a typical office building model showed...... that the integration of free cooling devices can significantly reduce the primary energy use of the novel HVAC system. In particular, the thermal plant configuration including the PCM-based heat exchanger made it possible to almost completely avoid the use of mechanical cooling, leading to annual primary energy......This article presents a simulation-based study that estimates the primary energy use of a novel HVAC system for different configurations of a thermal plant. The main characteristic of the system is its ability to provide simultaneous heating and cooling to buildings by using a single hydronic...

  6. Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-02-01

    Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

  7. Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of a Wind Turbine Blade in Flapwise Direction and Examining the Effect of Crack Propagation on the Blade Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Al-Khudairi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the sensitivity of the structural integrity of wind turbine blades to debonding of the shear web from the spar cap was investigated. In this regard, modal analysis, static and fatigue testing were performed on a 45.7 m blade for three states of the blade: (i as received blade (ii when a crack of 200 mm was introduced between the web and the spar cap and (iii when the crack was extended to 1000 mm. Calibration pull-tests for all three states of the blade were performed to obtain the strain-bending moment relationship of the blade according to the estimated target bending moment (BM which the blade is expected to experience in its service life. The resultant data was used to apply appropriate load in the fatigue tests. The blade natural frequencies in flapwise and edgewise directions over a range of frequency domain were found by modal testing for all three states of the blade. The blade first natural frequency for each state was used for the flapwise fatigue tests. These were performed in accordance with technical specification IEC TS 61400-23. The fatigue results showed that, for a 200 mm crack between the web and spar cap at 9 m from the blade root, the crack did not propagate at 50% of the target BM up to 62,110 cycles. However, when the load was increased to 70% of target BM, some damages were detected on the pressure side of the blade. When the 200 mm crack was extended to 1000 mm, the crack began to propagate when the applied load exceeded 100% of target BM and the blade experienced delaminations, adhesive joint failure, compression failure and sandwich core failure.

  8. Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of a Wind Turbine Blade in Flapwise Direction and Examining the Effect of Crack Propagation on the Blade Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khudairi, Othman; Hadavinia, Homayoun; Little, Christian; Gillmore, Gavin; Greaves, Peter; Dyer, Kirsten

    2017-10-03

    In this paper, the sensitivity of the structural integrity of wind turbine blades to debonding of the shear web from the spar cap was investigated. In this regard, modal analysis, static and fatigue testing were performed on a 45.7 m blade for three states of the blade: (i) as received blade (ii) when a crack of 200 mm was introduced between the web and the spar cap and (iii) when the crack was extended to 1000 mm. Calibration pull-tests for all three states of the blade were performed to obtain the strain-bending moment relationship of the blade according to the estimated target bending moment (BM) which the blade is expected to experience in its service life. The resultant data was used to apply appropriate load in the fatigue tests. The blade natural frequencies in flapwise and edgewise directions over a range of frequency domain were found by modal testing for all three states of the blade. The blade first natural frequency for each state was used for the flapwise fatigue tests. These were performed in accordance with technical specification IEC TS 61400-23. The fatigue results showed that, for a 200 mm crack between the web and spar cap at 9 m from the blade root, the crack did not propagate at 50% of the target BM up to 62,110 cycles. However, when the load was increased to 70% of target BM, some damages were detected on the pressure side of the blade. When the 200 mm crack was extended to 1000 mm, the crack began to propagate when the applied load exceeded 100% of target BM and the blade experienced delaminations, adhesive joint failure, compression failure and sandwich core failure.

  9. Spacer grid with mixing blades for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noailly, J.

    1986-01-01

    The spacer grid for nuclear fuel assembly has two sets of intersecting metal plates provided with blades and defining cells. The plates are fitted only with half-blades associated with a single grid opening. The half-blades of adjacent cells are arranged at 90deg C to each other and each plate has at most one half-blade at each corner of a cell. The invention concerns fuel assemblies of pressurized water reactors. The blades arranged on a single side of the plate provide a good hydraulic uniformity. The invention provides a uniform distribution of blades (and thus of absorbing material in each hydraulic cell) [fr

  10. Simple method for thick blade calculation. Part 2. Application to a thin blade; Kanbenna ichiatsuyoku keisanho (zokuho). Usui tsubasa eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maita, S; Ando, J; Nakatake, K [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-04-10

    A source and QCM (SQCM) method has been developed, by which the blade performance can be calculated in a short time with satisfying the Kutta`s condition without repeating calculations even for the three-dimensional blade. Performances were calculated for the two-dimensional and three-dimensional blades. The SQCM has provided appropriate results. However, it was found that there are some problems for thin blades. In this study, the SQCM has been applied to a thin blade. The conventional eddy model equation of SQCM is not a continuous distribution in the strict sense. In this study, this problem has been modified. When point eddies with constant strength are in line continuously within the interval, the induced velocity at an arbitrary position can be expressed by the integral equation using a position of marginal point of the interval. This equation can be analyzed by the integral of influence coefficient. The position of marginal point of the interval is a position of control point determined by the QCM theory. As a result of the modification, it was found that the SQCM in response to a thin blade has provided precise calculation results stably even for an ultra thin blade with the blade thickness ratio of 0.001. 1 ref., 8 figs.

  11. Applied modal analysis of wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broen Pedersen, H.; Dahl Kristensen, O.J.

    2003-02-01

    In this project modal analysis has been used to determine the natural frequencies, damping and the mode shapes for wind turbine blades. Different methods to measure the position and adjust the direction of the measuring points are discussed. Different equipment for mounting the accelerometers are investigated and the most suitable are chosen. Different excitation techniques are tried during experimental campaigns. After a discussion the pendulum hammer were chosen, and a new improved hammer was manufactured. Some measurement errors are investigated. The ability to repeat the measured results is investigated by repeated measurement on the same wind turbine blade. Furthermore the flexibility of the test set-up is investigated, by use of accelerometers mounted on the flexible adapter plate during the measurement campaign. One experimental campaign investigated the results obtained from a loaded and unloaded wind turbine blade. During this campaign the modal analysis are performed on a blade mounted in a horizontal and a vertical position respectively. Finally the results obtained from modal analysis carried out on a wind turbine blade are compared with results obtained from the Stig Oeyes blade{sub E}V1 program. (au)

  12. Blade profile optimization of kaplan turbine using cfd analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjua, A.B.; Khalil, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Utilization of hydro-power as renewable energy source is of prime importance in the world now. Hydropower energy is available in abundant in form of falls, canals rivers, dams etc. It means, there are various types of sites with different parameters like flow rate, heads, etc. Depending upon the sites, water turbines are designed and manufactured to avail hydro-power energy. Low head turbines on runof-river are widely used for the purpose. Low head turbines are classified as reaction turbines. For runof-river, depending upon the variety of site data, low head Kaplan turbines are selected, designed and manufactured. For any given site requirement, it becomes very essential to design the turbine runner blades through optimization of the CAD model of blades profile. This paper presents the optimization technique carried out on a complex geometry of blade profile through static and dynamic computational analysis. It is used through change of the blade profile geometry at five different angles in the 3D (Three Dimensional) CAD model. Blade complex geometry and design have been developed by using the coordinates point system on the blade in PRO-E /CREO software. Five different blade models are developed for analysis purpose. Based on the flow rate and heads, blade profiles are analyzed using ANSYS software to check and compare the output results for optimization of the blades for improved results which show that by changing blade profile angle and its geometry, different blade sizes and geometry can be optimized using the computational techniques with changes in CAD models. (author)

  13. Blade Profile Optimization of Kaplan Turbine Using CFD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijaz Bashir Janjua

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of hydro-power as renewable energy source is of prime importance in the world now. Hydropower energy is available in abundant in form of falls, canals rivers, dams etc. It means, there are various types of sites with different parameters like flow rate, heads, etc. Depending upon the sites, water turbines are designed and manufactured to avail hydro-power energy. Low head turbines on runof-river are widely used for the purpose. Low head turbines are classified as reaction turbines. For runof river, depending upon the variety of site data, low head Kaplan turbines are selected, designed and manufactured. For any given site requirement, it becomes very essential to design the turbine runner blades through optimization of the CAD model of blades profile. This paper presents the optimization technique carried out on a complex geometry of blade profile through static and dynamic computational analysis. It is used through change of the blade profile geometry at five different angles in the 3D (Three Dimensional CAD model. Blade complex geometry and design have been developed by using the coordinates point system on the blade in PRO-E /CREO software. Five different blade models are developed for analysis purpose. Based on the flow rate and heads, blade profiles are analyzed using ANSYS software to check and compare the output results for optimization of the blades for improved results which show that by changing blade profile angle and its geometry, different blade sizes and geometry can be optimized using the computational techniques with changes in CAD models.

  14. Piezoelectric actuation of helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieven, Nicholas A. J.

    2001-07-01

    The work presented in this paper is concerned with the application of embedded piezo-electric actuators in model helicopter rotor blades. The paper outlines techniques to define the optimal location of actuators to excite particular modes of vibration whilst the blade is rotating. Using composite blades the distribution of strain energy is defined using a Finite Element model with imposed rotor-dynamic and aerodynamics loads. The loads are specified through strip theory to determine the position of maximum bending moment and thus the optimal location of the embedded actuators. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated on a 1/4 scale fixed cyclic pitch rotor head. Measurement of the blade displacement is achieved by using strain gauges. In addition a redundant piezo-electric actuator is used to measure the blades' response characteristics. The addition of piezo-electric devices in this application has been shown to exhibit adverse aeroelastic effects, such as counter mass balancing and increased drag. Methods to minimise these effects are suggested. The outcome of the paper is a method for defining the location and orientation of piezo-electric devices in rotor-dynamic applications.

  15. Individual blade pitch for yaw control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navalkar, S T; Van Wingerden, J W; Van Kuik, G A M

    2014-01-01

    Individual pitch control (IPC) for reducing blade loads has been investigated and proven successful in recent literature. For IPC, the multi-blade co-ordinate (MBC) transformation is used to process the blade load signals from the rotating to a stationary frame of reference. In the stationary frame of reference, the yaw error of a turbine can be appended to generate IPC actions that are able to achieve turbine yaw control for a turbine in free yaw. In this paper, IPC for yaw control is tested on a high-fidelity numerical model of a commercially produced wind turbine in free yaw. The tests show that yaw control using IPC has the distinct advantage that the yaw system loads and support structure loading are substantially reduced. However, IPC for yaw control also shows a reduction in IPC blade load reduction potential and causes a slight increase in pitch activity. Thus, the key contribution of this paper is the concept demonstration of IPC for yaw control. Further, using IPC for yaw as a tuning parameter, it is shown how the best trade-off between blade loading, pitch activity and support structure loading can be achieved for wind turbine design

  16. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This project demonstrated that higher temperature capabilities of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can be used to reduce emissions and improve fuel consumption in gas turbine engines. The work involved closely coupling aerothermal and structural analyses for the first-stage vane of a high-pressure turbine (HPT). These vanes are actively cooled, typically using film cooling. Ceramic materials have structural and thermal properties different from conventional metals used for the first-stage HPT vane. This project identified vane configurations that satisfy CMC structural strength and life constraints while maintaining vane aerodynamic efficiency and reducing vane cooling to improve engine performance and reduce emissions. The project examined modifications to vane internal configurations to achieve the desired objectives. Thermal and pressure stresses are equally important, and both were analyzed using an ANSYS® structural analysis. Three-dimensional fluid and heat transfer analyses were used to determine vane aerodynamic performance and heat load distributions.

  17. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo; Kadi, Y; Vlachoudis, V

    2006-01-01

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more ...

  18. Active Piezoelectric Vibration Control of Subscale Composite Fan Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Min, James B.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are investigating new technologies supporting the development of lighter, quieter, and more efficient fans for turbomachinery applications. High performance fan blades designed to achieve such goals will be subjected to higher levels of aerodynamic excitations which could lead to more serious and complex vibration problems. Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing engine blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. To investigate this idea, spin testing was performed on two General Electric Aviation (GE) subscale composite fan blades in the NASA GRC Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. The first bending mode (1B) was targeted for vibration control. Because these subscale blades are very thin, the piezoelectric material was surface-mounted on the blades. Three thin piezoelectric patches were applied to each blade two actuator patches and one small sensor patch. These flexible macro-fiber-composite patches were placed in a location of high resonant strain for the 1B mode. The blades were tested up to 5000 rpm, with patches used as sensors, as excitation for the blade, and as part of open- and closed-loop vibration control. Results show that with a single actuator patch, active vibration control causes the damping ratio to increase from a baseline of 0.3% critical damping to about 1.0% damping at 0 RPM. As the rotor speed approaches 5000 RPM, the actively controlled blade damping ratio decreases to about 0.5% damping. This occurs primarily because of centrifugal blade stiffening, and can be observed by the decrease in the generalized electromechanical coupling with rotor speed.

  19. Conceptual design and simulation investigation of an electronic cooling device powered by hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Guozhen; Zhang, Yanchao; Cai, Ling; Su, Shanhe; Chen, Jincan

    2015-01-01

    Most electronic cooling devices are powered by an external bias applied between the cold and the hot reservoirs. Here we propose a new concept of electronic cooling, in which cooling is achieved by using a reservoir of hot electrons as the power source. The cooling device incorporates two energy filters with the Lorentzian transmission function to respectively select low- and high-energy electrons for transport. Based on the proposed model, we analyze the performances of the device varying with the resonant levels and half widths of two energy filters and establish the optimal configuration of the cooling device. It is believed that such a novel device may be practically used in some nano-energy fields. - Highlights: • A new electronic cooling device powered by hot electrons is proposed. • Two energy filters are employed to select the electrons for transport. • The effects of the resonant levels and half widths of two filters are discussed. • The maximum cooling power and coefficient of performance are calculated. • The optimal configuration of the cooling device is determined.

  20. Experimental wind tunnel study of a smart sensing skin for condition evaluation of a wind turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Austin; Laflamme, Simon; Ubertini, Filippo

    2017-12-01

    Condition evaluation of wind turbine blades is difficult due to their large size, complex geometry and lack of economic and scalable sensing technologies capable of detecting, localizing, and quantifying faults over a blade’s global area. A solution is to deploy inexpensive large area electronics over strategic areas of the monitored component, analogous to sensing skin. The authors have previously proposed a large area electronic consisting of a soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC). The SEC is highly scalable due to its low cost and ease of fabrication, and can, therefore, be used for monitoring large-scale components. A single SEC is a strain sensor that measures the additive strain over a surface. Recently, its application in a hybrid dense sensor network (HDSN) configuration has been studied, where a network of SECs is augmented with a few off-the-shelf strain gauges to measure boundary conditions and decompose the additive strain to obtain unidirectional surface strain maps. These maps can be analyzed to detect, localize, and quantify faults. In this work, we study the performance of the proposed sensing skin at conducting condition evaluation of a wind turbine blade model in an operational environment. Damage in the form of changing boundary conditions and cuts in the monitored substrate are induced into the blade. An HDSN is deployed onto the interior surface of the substrate, and the blade excited in a wind tunnel. Results demonstrate the capability of the HDSN and associated algorithms to detect, localize, and quantify damage. These results show promise for the future deployment of fully integrated sensing skins deployed inside wind turbine blades for condition evaluation.

  1. Corrosion fatigue in LP steam turbine blading - experiences, causes and appropriate measures; Korrosionsutmattning i aangturbinskovlar - Erfarenheter, inverkande faktorer och moejliga aatgaerder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavast, J [ABB STAL AB, Finspaang (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Corrosion fatigue in LP steam turbine blading was reviewed together with result of tests performed in order to find blade materials with improved resistance against this. According to international experience, corrosion fatigue of 12Cr steam turbine blades in the transition zone between dry and wet steam, is one of the major causes, if not the major cause, for unavailability of steam turbines. Corrosion fatigue in LP blading is a frequent problem also in Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants, especially in turbines of type D54 in BWR-plants. Corrosion fatigue has also been discovered in at least one type of nuclear turbine. Initiation times have been very long and the varying experiences in different types of turbines may simply reflect differing initiation times. Corrosion fatigue may therefore become more frequent in other types of turbines in the future. The type of water treatment (BWR/PWR) and possibly temperature after reheating seem to influence the risk for corrosion fatigue. Influence of inleakage of cooling water is less clear for these nuclear plants. The long initiation times together with the fact that very few of the cracked blades have actually failed, indicate that the cracks initiate and/or propagate during transients. Extensive laboratory tests show that there are alternative blade materials available with improved resistance against corrosion fatigue, with the most promising being 15/5 PH and A905, together with Ti6Al4V. The Ti alloy shows the best resistance against corrosion fatigue in most environments and is already used in some turbines. Disadvantage is a higher cost and possible need for redesign of the blades. The alternative materials are recommended for use for blades in the transition zone between dry and wet steam in LP turbines. The main disadvantage is a lack of references, even if 15%5 PH has been used to a very limited extent. 40 refs, 24 figs, 12 tabs, 9 appendices

  2. Effect of Blade Pitch Angle on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Straight-bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Based on Experiments and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhao Yang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The blade pitch angle has a significant influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines. However, few research results have revealed its impact on the straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (Sb-VAWT. In this paper, wind tunnel experiments and CFD simulations were performed at the Sb-VAWT to investigate the effect of different blade pitch angles on the pressure distribution on the blade surface, the torque coefficient, and the power coefficient. In this study, the airfoil type was NACA0021 with two blades. The Sb-VAWT had a rotor radius of 1.0 m with a spanwise length of 1.2 m. The simulations were based on the k-ω Shear Stress Transport (SST turbulence model and the wind tunnel experiments were carried out using a high-speed multiport pressure device. As a result, it was found that the maximum pressure difference on the blade surface was obtained at the blade pitch angle of β = 6° in the upstream region. However, the maximum pressure coefficient was shown at the blade pitch angle of β = 8° in the downstream region. The torque coefficient acting on a single blade reached its maximum value at the blade pitch angle of β = 6°. As the tip speed ratio increased, the power coefficient became higher and reached the optimum level. Subsequently, further increase of the tip speed ratio only led to a quick reversion of the power coefficient. In addition, the results from CFD simulations had also a good agreement with the results from the wind tunnel experiments. As a result, the blade pitch angle did not have a significant influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the Sb-VAWT.

  3. Research overview on vibration damping of mistuned bladed disk assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bladed disk assemblies are very important parts in auto engine and gas turbine, and is widely used in practical engineering. The mistuning existing commonly in the bladed disk assemblies can destroy the vibration characteristics of the bladed disk assemblies, which is one of the reasons for the high cycle fatigue failure of bladed disk assemblies, so it is necessary to research how to reduce the vibration of the bladed disk assemblies. On the basis of the review of relevant research at home and abroad, the mistuning vibration mechanism of the bladed disk assemblies is introduced, and the main technical methods of the vibration damping of bladed disk assemblies are reviewed, such as artificially active mistuning, collision damping, friction damping and optimization of the blade position. Some future research directions are presented.

  4. Methodology for Structural Integrity Analysis of Gas Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago de Oliveira Vale

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major sources of stress arising in turbomachinery blades are the centrifugal loads acting at any section of the airfoil. Accounting for this phenomenon stress evaluation of the blade attachment region in the disc has to be performed in order to avoid blade failure. Turbomachinery blades are generally twisted, and the cross section area varies from the root of the blade to the tip. The blade root shape at the attachment region is of great concern. Stress concentrations are predictable at this contact region. In this paper, a finite element model has been created for the purpose of assessing stress at the joint region connecting the blade to the disc slot. Particular attention was paid to the geometric modeling of the "fir-tree" fixing, which is now used in the majority of gas turbine engines. This study has been performed using the commercial software ANSYS 13.0. The disc and blade assembly are forced to move with a certain rotational velocity. Contact connections are predicted on the common faces of the blade and on the disc at the root. Solutions can be obtained to allow the evaluation of stresses. Results can be compared with the mechanical properties of the adopted material.

  5. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvan, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; proper operation of all display data on the operator's console; proper operation of all required alarms; and proper operation of all required interlocks. The MICON A/S control system is configured to replace all the control, indication, and alarm panels now located in the Power Control Room. Nine systems are covered by this control configuration, 2736-ZB HVAC, 234-5Z HVAC, Process Vacuum, Dry Air, 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling, Building Accelerometer, Evacuation Siren, Stack CAMs, and Fire. The 2736-ZB HVAC system consists of the ventilation controls for 2736-ZB and 2736-Z as well as alarms for the emergency generators and 232-Z. The 234-5Z HVAC system is the ventilation controls for 235-5Z and 236-Z buildings. Process Vacuum covers the controls for the 26 inch vacuum system. Dry Air covers the controls for the steam and electric air dryers. The 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling system consists of the status indications and alarms for the 291-Z compressor and vacuum pump closed loop cooling system. The rest of closed loop cooling was tested earlier. The Building Accelerometer system consists of the status indications for the two seismic system accelerometers. The Evacuation Siren system includes the controls for the evacuation and take cover sirens. Stack CAMs cover the alarms for the various building ventilation stack continuous air monitors. Finally, the Fire system covers the various fire alarms now located in Room 321-A

  6. Modeling of uncertainties for wind turbine blade design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Toft, Henrik Stensgaard

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine blades are designed by a combination of tests and numerical calculations using finite element models of the blade. The blades are typically composite structures with laminates of glass-fiber and/or carbon-fibers glued together by a matrix material. This paper presents a framework...

  7. Blade size and weight effects in shovel design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freivalds, A; Kim, Y J

    1990-03-01

    The shovel is a basic tool that has undergone only nominal systematic design changes. Although previous studies found shovel-weight and blade-size effects of shovelling, the exact trade-off between the two has not been quantified. Energy expenditure, heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion and shovelling performance were measured on five subjects using five shovels with varying blade sizes and weights to move sand. Energy expenditure, normalised to subject weight and load handled, varied quadratically with the blade-size/shovel-weight (B/W) ratio. Minimum energy cost was at B/W = 0.0676 m2/kg, which for an average subject and average load would require an acceptable 5.16 kcal/min of energy expenditure. Subjects, through the ratings of perceived exertion, also strongly preferred the lighter shovels without regard to blade size. Too large a blade or too heavy a shovel increased energy expenditure beyond acceptable levels, while too small a blade reduced efficiency of the shovelling.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations as a part of the configuration for neutron instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, P.; Lefmann, K.; Theil Kuhn, L.; Willendrup, P.K.; Farhi, E.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of simulations in the process of determining the optimal instrument setup by virtual experiments using the simulation package McStas. The focus of the analysis is the optimization of the multi-blade analyzer present at the RITA-II spectrometer at PSI for a test experiment with powder diffraction. The agreement in resolution and signal-to-background ratio between measurements and simulations shows the validity of the approach. For a sample with broadened Bragg peaks, the optimal instrument configuration could be established only on careful consideration. This shows that in general instrument simulations are approaching a state where they can assist users in selecting the optimal configuration and possibly demonstrate the feasibility of their experiments prior to allocated beamtime

  9. Lamination cooling system formation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E [Altadena, CA; Kobayashi, Daryl M [Monrovia, CA

    2009-05-12

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  10. 49 CFR 236.707 - Blade, semaphore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Blade, semaphore. 236.707 Section 236.707 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Blade, semaphore. The extended part of a semaphore arm which shows the position of the arm. ...

  11. Non-invasive dynamic measurement of helicopter blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, J.; Bernardini, G.; Mattioni, L.; Vezzari, V.; Ficuciello, C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the development and the application on helicopter blades of a measurement system based on FBG strain gauges. Here, the main goal is the structural characterization of the main rotor blades, with the aim of showing the potentialities of such a system in blades quality check applications, as well as in the development of structural health monitoring and rotor state feedback devices. The device has been used in both non-rotating and rotating tests, and does not require the presence of slip rings or optical joint since it is completely allocated in the rotating system. It has been successfully applied to characterize the frequency response of blades lead-lag, flap and torsion deformations, up to 250 Hz.

  12. Laser-based gluing of diamond-tipped saw blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigs, Christian; Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hustedt, Michael; Brand, Helmut; Wloka, Richard; Zobel, Frank; Dültgen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    To process natural stone such as marble or granite, saw blades equipped with wear-resistant diamond grinding segments are used, typically joined to the blade by brazing. In case of damage or wear, they must be exchanged. Due to the large energy input during thermal loosening and subsequent brazing, the repair causes extended heat-affected zones with serious microstructure changes, resulting in shape distortions and disadvantageous stress distributions. Consequently, axial run-out deviations and cutting losses increase. In this work, a new near-infrared laser-based process chain is presented to overcome the deficits of conventional brazing-based repair of diamond-tipped steel saw blades. Thus, additional tensioning and straightening steps can be avoided. The process chain starts with thermal debonding of the worn grinding segments, using a continuous-wave laser to heat the segments gently and to exceed the adhesive's decomposition temperature. Afterwards, short-pulsed laser radiation removes remaining adhesive from the blade in order to achieve clean joining surfaces. The third step is roughening and activation of the joining surfaces, again using short-pulsed laser radiation. Finally, the grinding segments are glued onto the blade with a defined adhesive layer, using continuous-wave laser radiation. Here, the adhesive is heated to its curing temperature by irradiating the respective grinding segment, ensuring minimal thermal influence on the blade. For demonstration, a prototype unit was constructed to perform the different steps of the process chain on-site at the saw-blade user's facilities. This unit was used to re-equip a saw blade with a complete set of grinding segments. This saw blade was used successfully to cut different materials, amongst others granite.

  13. Study of the stall delay phenomenon and of wind turbine blade dynamics using numerical approaches and NREL's wind tunnel tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, Simon-Philippe

    2008-06-15

    the modeling of the stall phenomenon which involves very complex aerodynamics. The NREL wind tunnel results were further scrutinized in term of the root flapwise and edgewise bending moments. This allowed to study the dynamics of the NREL blades, at the same time as verifying the consistency between these moments and different loads measured in these tests. Measurements of these moments at the root of the rigid NREL blades in head-on flow showed vibrations corresponding to the two first oscillation modes of the blades, in respectively the flapwise and edgewise directions. These features observed in both an upwind and a downwind configuration were presumed to follow from the presence of the tower. In the downwind configuration, dynamic effects affecting one blade when going through the shadow of the tower were found to be transmitted to the other blade in both the teetered and the rigid configurations. Modelling of the root edgewise and flapwise bending moments was performed by calculating two dynamic estimates based on forces measured respectively along the blade and in the hub region. The simulations generally reproduced the dynamic effects well, and they suggested a systematic error in the measurement of the root flapwise bending moment in the upwind configuration. Inaccuracies in measuring the tangential forces on the blade at high wind speeds were also detected. Offshore wind energy, that is expected to soon lead the development of the wind energy technology, was thereafter studied, where downwind turbines that were given special attention in the dynamic analysis above might reveal themselves as a more adapted solution. The many advantages as well as challenges related to this technology were acknowledged. The status of this technology was investigated in both Europe and North America, and it revealed that Europe is in advance regarding all aspects of wind energy over North America, where it still is at a planning stage. Important plans were however found to exist

  14. Super titanium blades for advanced steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    In 1986, the Alsthom Steam Turbines Department launched the manufacture of large titanium alloy blades: airfoil length of 1360 mm and overall length of 1520 mm. These blades are designed for the last-stage low pressure blading of advanced steam turbines operating at full speed (3000 rpm) and rating between 300 and 800 MW. Using titanium alloys for steam turbine exhaust stages as substitutes for chrome steels, due to their high strength/density ratio and their almost complete resistance to corrosion, makes it possible to increase the length of blades significantly and correspondingly that steam passage section (by up to 50%) with a still conservative stresses level in the rotor. Alsthom relies on 8 years of experience in the field of titanium, since as early as 1979 large titanium blades (airfoil length of 1240 mm, overall length of 1430 mm) were erected for experimental purposes on the last stage of a 900 MW unit of the Dampierre-sur-Loire power plant and now totals 45,000 operating hours without problems. The paper summarizes the main properties (chemical, mechanical and structural) recorded on very large blades and is based in particular on numerous fatigue corrosion test results to justify the use of the Ti 6 Al 4 V alloy in a specific context of micrographic structure

  15. Effects of large bending deflections on blade flutter limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallesoee, Bjarne Skovmose; Hartvig Hansen, Morten

    2008-04-15

    The coupling of bending and torsion due to large blade bending are assumed to have some effects of the flutter limits of wind turbines. In the present report, the aeroelastic blade model suggested by Kallesoee, which is similar to a second order model, is used to investigate the aeroelastic stability limits of the RWT blade with and without the effects of the large blade deflection. The investigation shows no significant change of the flutter limit on the rotor speed due to the blade deflection,whereas the first edgewise bending mode becomes negatively damped due to the coupling with blade torsion which causes a change of the effective direction of blade vibration. These observations are confirmed by nonlinear aeroelastic simulations using HAWC2. This work is part of the UpWind project funded by the European Commission under the contract number SES6-CT-2005-019945 which is gratefully acknowledged. This report is the deliverable D2.3 of the UpWind project. (au)

  16. Experimental Investigation of Inter-Blade Vortices in a Model Francis Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, Demin; LIU, Xiaobing; ZHAO, Yongzhi

    2017-07-01

    The inter-blade vortex in a Francis turbine becomes one of the main hydraulic factors that are likely to cause blade erosion at deep part load operating conditions. However, the causes and the mechanism of inter-blade vortex are still under investigation according to present researches. Thus the causes of inter-blade vortex and the effect of different hydraulic parameters on the inter-blade vortex are investigated experimentally. The whole life cycle of the inter-blade vortex is observed by a high speed camera. The test results illustrate the whole life cycle of the inter-blade vortex from generation to separation and even to fading. It is observed that the inter-blade vortex becomes stronger with the decreasing of flow and head, which leads to pressure fluctuation. Meanwhile, the pressure fluctuations in the vane-less area and the draft tube section become stronger when inter-blade vortices exist in the blade channel. The turbine will be damaged if operating in the inter-blade vortex zone, so its operating range must be far away from that zone. This paper reveals the main cause of the inter-blade vortex which is the larger incidence angle between the inflow angle and the blade angle on the leading edge of the runner at deep part load operating conditions.

  17. Transverse confinement in stochastic cooling of trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, D; Wallentowitz, S

    2004-01-01

    Stochastic cooling of trapped atoms is considered for a laser-beam configuration with beam waists equal to or smaller than the extent of the atomic cloud. It is shown that various effects appear due to this transverse confinement, among them heating of transverse kinetic energy. Analytical results of the cooling in dependence on size and location of the laser beam are presented for the case of a non-degenerate vapour

  18. Development of 52 inches last stage blade for steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Atsuhide; Hisa, Shoichi; Nagao, Shinichiro; Ogata, Hisao

    1986-01-01

    The last stage blades of steam turbines are the important component controlling the power output and performance of plants. In order to realize a unit of large capacity and high efficiency, the proper exhaust area and the last stage blades having good performance are indispensable. Toshiba Corp. has completed the development of the 52 inch last stage blades for 1500 and 1800 rpm steam turbines. The 52 inch last stage blades are the longest in the world, which have the annular exhaust area nearly 1.5 times as much as that of 41 inch blades used for 1100 MW, 1500 rpm turbines in nuclear power stations. By adopting these 52 inch blades, the large capacity nuclear power plants up to 1800 MW can be economically constructed, the rate of heat consumption of 1350 MW plants is improved by 3 ∼ 4 % as compared with 41 inch blades, and in the plants up to 1100 MW, LP turbines can be reduced from three sets to two. The features of 52 inch blades, the flow pattern and blade form design, the structural strength analysis and the erosion withstanding property, and the verification by the rotation test of the actual blades, the performance test using a test turbine, the vibration analysis of the actually loaded blades and the analysis of wet steam behavior are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Development of 52 inch last stage blade for steam turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, Yoshiki; Harada, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Eiichiro

    1985-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. has developed the last stage blades with 1320 mm length for a 1800 rpm LP turbine, and the verification by rotating vibration test using actual blades was finished, thus the blades were completed. In a nuclear power plant with an A-PWR of 3800 MW thermal output, the 1350 MW steam turbine has one HP turbine and three LP turbines coupled in tandem, and the optimum last stage blades for the LP turbines became the 1320 mm blades. The completion of these blades largely contributes to the improvement of thermal efficiency and the increase of generator output in large nuclear power plants, and has the possibility to decrease three LP turbines to two in 900 MW plants, which reduces the construction cost. The velocity energy of steam coming out of last stage blades is abandoned as exhaust loss in a condenser, which is the largest loss in a turbine. The increase of exhaust area using long blades reduces this loss. The economy of the 1320 mm blades, the features of the 1320 mm blades, the aerodynamic design and its verification, the prevention of the erosion of the 1320 mm blades due to wet steam, the strength design, the anti-vibration design and its verification, and the CAD/CAM system are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. State machine operation of the MICE cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick

    2014-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The cooling channel for MICE has between 12 and 18 superconductnig solenoid coils in 3 to 7 magnets, depending on the staged development of the experiment. The magnets are coaxial and in close proximity which requires coordinated operation of the magnets when ramping, responding to quench conditions, and quench recovery. To reliably manage the operation of the magnets, MICE is implementing state machines for each magnet and an over-arching state machine for the magnets integrated in the cooling channel. The state machine transitions and operating parameters are stored/restored to/from the configuration database and coupled with MICE Run Control. Proper implementation of the state machines will not only ensure safe operation of the magnets, but will help ensure reliable data quality. A description of MICE, details of the state machines, and lessons learned from use of the state machines in recent magnet training tests will be discussed.

  1. Accelerated rain erosion of wind turbine blade coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong

    . There are four chapters in the thesis. In chapter 1, a literature survey provides background information to the field. Topics discussed are the global wind energy development, possible wind turbine constructions, blade structures and materials, blade coatings, and liquid erosion mechanisms. In chapter 2......During operation, the fast-moving blades of wind turbines are exposed to continuous impacts with rain droplets, hail, insects, or solid particles. This can lead to erosion of the blades, whereby the electrical efficiency is compromised and expensive repairs may be required. One possible solution...

  2. 3X-100 blade field test.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

    2008-03-01

    In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

  3. Mechanical characterization of composite repairs for fiberglass wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Tanveer Singh

    affects the propagation fracture toughness values of the repair. Repairs conducted on surfaces with partially ground top plies possess higher fracture toughness values than those conducted on surfaces with complete top plies ground off. The three top repair resin candidates were then evaluated against the base repair resin under fatigue loading. The specimen configuration and testing method were chosen so as to be able to test hand layup repairs under tension -- tension cyclic loading. It was observed that all three new repair resins perform better than the base repair resin. The selection of the optimum repair resin was based on results from mode I and fatigue testing. Global manufacturing regulations and standards were also of prime concern. The final new repair resin is being used by the company in all of its plants over the globe. The balance of this work involves study of the effect of mixed mode I -- mode II loading on the strength of repairs conducted on fiber reinforced composite parts using hand lay-up technique. The specimens for this part were similar to those manufactured for mode I testing but with different dimensions and layup. They were made and tested in accordance with ASTM D 6671 (Standard Test Method for Mixed Mode I -- Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites). Comparison was made between the fracture toughness of the above chosen optimum repair resin and the base repair resin. At least two levels of mode mixture GII/G (Mode II fracture toughness / Mode I and II fracture toughness) were examined. Also, two levels of grinding were considered (complete ply vs. partial ply ground off) in order to establish the influence of varying top-ply grinding depths on the strength of hand layup repairs conducted on fiberglass composite structures. The results of this work have the potential to improve the repair process for current fiberglass wind turbine blades.

  4. Structural optimization procedure of a composite wind turbine blade for reducing both material cost and blade weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weifei; Park, Dohyun; Choi, DongHoon

    2013-12-01

    A composite blade structure for a 2 MW horizontal axis wind turbine is optimally designed. Design requirements are simultaneously minimizing material cost and blade weight while satisfying the constraints on stress ratio, tip deflection, fatigue life and laminate layup requirements. The stress ratio and tip deflection under extreme gust loads and the fatigue life under a stochastic normal wind load are evaluated. A blade element wind load model is proposed to explain the wind pressure difference due to blade height change during rotor rotation. For fatigue life evaluation, the stress result of an implicit nonlinear dynamic analysis under a time-varying fluctuating wind is converted to the histograms of mean and amplitude of maximum stress ratio using the rainflow counting algorithm Miner's rule is employed to predict the fatigue life. After integrating and automating the whole analysis procedure an evolutionary algorithm is used to solve the discrete optimization problem.

  5. Helicopter blades running elevation measurement using omnidirectional vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengtao CAI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Omnidirectional dynamic space parameters of high-speed rotating helicopter blades are precise 3D vector description of the blades. In particular, the elevation difference is directly related to the aerodynamic performance and maneuverability of the helicopter. The state of the art detection techniques based on optics and common vision have several drawbacks, such as high demands on devices but poor extensibility, limited measurement range and fixed measurement position. In this paper, a novel approach of helicopter blades running elevation measurement is proposed based on omnidirectional vision. With the advantages of panoramic visual imaging integration, 360° field of view and rotation in-variance, high-resolution images of all rotating blades positions are obtained at one time. By studying the non-linear calibration and calculation model of omnidirectional vision system, aiming at solving the problem of inaccurate visual space mapping model, the omnidirectional and full-scale measurement of the elevation difference are finalized. Experiments are carried out on our multifunctional simulation blades test system and the practical blades test tower, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and show that the proposed method can considerably reduce the complexity of measurement. Keywords: Full-scale measurement, Helicopter blades elevation, Non-linear calibration, Omnidirectional vision, Unified sphere model

  6. KNOW-BLADE task-3.2 report: Tip shape study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe; Conway, S.

    2005-01-01

    For modern rotor blades with their very large aspect ratio, the blade tip is a very limited part of the overall rotor, and as such of limited importance for the overall aerodynamics of the rotor. Even though they may not be very important for the overallpower production, the tip noise can be very...... important for the acoustics of the rotor [15], and the blade tips can as well be important for the aerodynamic damping properties of the rotor blades [13]. Unfortunately, not many options exists for predictingthe aerodynamic behavior of blade tips using computational methods. Experimentally it is di...

  7. New Design of Blade Untwisting Device of Cyclone Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Misiulia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new design of a blade untwisting device where blades are considered as a main element of the device. A profile of the blades corresponds to a circular arch. An inlet angle of  the blades is determined by stream aerodynamics in an exhaust pipe, and an exit angle is determined by rectilinear gas motion. Optimum geometrical parameters of the untwisting device have been determined and its application allows to reduce a pressure drop in the ЦН-15 cyclones by 28–30 % while screw-blade untwisting device recovers only 19–20 % of energy.

  8. Fundamental investigation on the impact strength of hollow fan blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, T; Miyachi, T; Sofue, Y

    1985-01-01

    Models of hollow fan blades were made and tested to prove that their strength is sufficient for use in real engines. The hollow blades were fabricated by diffusion bonding of two titanium alloy (6Al-4V-Ti) plates, one of which had three spanwise stiffners and the other being flat plate. The model as a nontwisted tapered blade. Impact tests were carried out on the hollow fan blade models in which the ingestion of a 1.5 pounds bird was simulated. Solid blades with the same external form were also tested by similar methods for comparison. The results of these tests show that properly designed hollow blades have sufficient stiffness and strength for use as fan blades in the turbo-fan engine.

  9. Conductor for a fluid-cooled winding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Walter J.

    1983-01-01

    A conductor and method of making the conductor are provided for use in winding electrical coils which are cooled by a fluid communicating with the conductor. The conductor is cold worked through twisting and reshaping steps to form a generally rectangular cross section conductor having a plurality of helical cooling grooves extending axially of the conductor. The conductor configuration makes it suitable for a wide variety of winding applications and permits the use of simple strip insulation between turns and perforated sheet insulation between layers of the winding.

  10. Family of airfoil shapes for rotating blades. [for increased power efficiency and blade stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, K. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An airfoil which has particular application to the blade or blades of rotor aircraft such as helicopters and aircraft propellers is described. The airfoil thickness distribution and camber are shaped to maintain a near zero pitching moment coefficient over a wide range of lift coefficients and provide a zero pitching moment coefficient at section Mach numbers near 0.80 and to increase the drag divergence Mach number resulting in superior aircraft performance.

  11. Blade Bearing Friction Estimation of Operating Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perisic, Nevena; Pedersen, Bo Juul; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2012-01-01

    Blade root bearing on a wind turbine (WTG) enables pitching of blades for power control and rotor braking and is a WTG critical component. As the size of modern WTGs is constantly increasing, this leads to relatively less rigid bearings, more sensitive to deformations, thus WTG operational...... reliability can be increased by continuous monitoring of blade bearing. High blade bearing friction is undesirable, as it may be associated with excessive heating of the surfaces, damage and/or inefficient operation. Thus, continuous observation of bearing friction level is crucial for blade bearing health...... monitoring systems. A novel algorithm for online monitoring of bearing friction level is developed combining physical knowledge about pitch system dynamics with state estimator, i.e. observer theory and signal processing assuming realistic sensor availability. Results show estimation of bearing friction...

  12. Development of tooling suitable for stall regulated blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, M.

    2001-07-01

    The objectives of the project were to make significant improvements in the production of stall regulated blades in the areas of (a) the tip box, its housing, its mechanism and small GRP parts; (b) mould technology; (c) resins and glues and (d) root tooling. Although wood composite had been identified as a competitive technology for blades, compared with GRP blades, production volumes had been lower; reasons are given. The way in which the four areas identified for investigation were tackled are discussed. The study showed that the mould cycle time can be reduced to two days for a stall regulated blade and the blade quality can be improved by using the composite tip box and new resins. The time required for replication of moulds can be reduced by 40%.

  13. Toward Cooling Uniformity: Investigation of Spiral, Sweeping Holes, and Unconventional Cooling Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Thurman, Douglas R.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali A.; Culley, Dennis E.

    2018-01-01

    Surface infrared thermography, hotwire anemometry, and thermocouple surveys were performed on two new film cooling hole geometries: spiral/rifled holes and fluidic sweeping holes. Ways to quantify the efficacy of novel cooling holes that are asymmetric, not uniformly spaced or that show variation from hole to hole are presented. The spiral holes attempt to induce large-scale vorticity to the film cooling jet as it exits the hole to prevent the formation of the kidney shaped vortices commonly associated with film cooling jets. The fluidic sweeping hole uses a passive in-hole geometry to induce jet sweeping at frequencies that scale with blowing ratios. The spiral hole performance is compared to that of round holes with and without compound angles. The fluidic hole is of the diffusion class of holes and is therefore compared to a 777 hole and square holes. A patent-pending spiral hole design showed the highest potential of the nondiffusion type hole configurations. Velocity contours and flow temperature were acquired at discreet cross-sections of the downstream flow field. The passive fluidic sweeping hole shows the most uniform cooling distribution but suffers from low span-averaged effectiveness levels due to enhanced mixing. The data was taken at a Reynolds number of 11,000 based on hole diameter and freestream velocity. Infrared thermography was taken for blowing ratios of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 at a density ratio of 1.05. The flow inside the fluidic sweeping hole was studied using 3D unsteady RANS. A section on ideas for future work is included that addresses issues of quantifying cooling uniformity and provides some ideas for changing the way we think about cooling such as changing the direction of cooling or coupling acoustic devices to cooling holes to regulate frequency.

  14. Turbulent flow in a vessel agitated by side entering inclined blade turbine with different diameter using CFD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathonah, N. N.; Nurtono, T.; Kusdianto; Winardi, S.

    2018-03-01

    Single phase turbulent flow in a vessel agitated by side entering inclined blade turbine has simulated using CFD. The aim of this work is to identify the hydrodynamic characteristics of a model vessel, which geometrical configuration is adopted at industrial scale. The laboratory scale model vessel is a flat bottomed cylindrical tank agitated by side entering 4-blade inclined blade turbine with impeller rotational speed N=100-400 rpm. The effect of the impeller diameter on fluid flow pattern has been investigated. The fluid flow patterns in a vessel is essentially characterized by the phenomena of macro-instabilities, i.e. the flow patterns change with large scale in space and low frequency. The intensity of fluid flow in the tank increase with the increase of impeller rotational speed from 100, 200, 300, and 400 rpm. It was accompanied by shifting the position of the core of circulation flow away from impeller discharge stream and approached the front of the tank wall. The intensity of fluid flow in the vessel increase with the increase of the impeller diameter from d=3 cm to d=4 cm.

  15. Influence of delayed excitation on vibrations of turbine blades couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the presented paper, the computational model of the turbine blade couple is investigated with the main attention to the influence two harmonic excitation forces, having the same frequency and amplitude but with moderate delay in time. Time delay between the exciting harmonic forces depends on the revolutions of bladed disk, on the number of blades on a rotating disk and on the number of stator blades. The reduction of resonance vibrations realized by means of dry friction between the shroud blade-heads increases roughly proportional to the difference of stator and rotor blade-numbers and also to the magnitude of dry friction force. From the analysis of blade couple with direct contact it was proved that the increase of friction forces causes decrease of resonance peaks, but the influence of elastic micro-deformations in the contact surfaces (modeled e.g. by the modified Coulomb dry friction law is rather small. Analysis of a blade couple with a friction element shows that the lower number of stator blades has negligible influence on the amplitudes of both blades, but decreases amplitudes of the friction element oscillations. Similarly the increase of friction forces causes a decrease of resonance peaks, but an increase of friction element amplitudes.

  16. Variable cooling circuit for thermoelectric generator and engine and method of control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Gregory P

    2012-10-30

    An apparatus is provided that includes an engine, an exhaust system, and a thermoelectric generator (TEG) operatively connected to the exhaust system and configured to allow exhaust gas flow therethrough. A first radiator is operatively connected to the engine. An openable and closable engine valve is configured to open to permit coolant to circulate through the engine and the first radiator when coolant temperature is greater than a predetermined minimum coolant temperature. A first and a second valve are controllable to route cooling fluid from the TEG to the engine through coolant passages under a first set of operating conditions to establish a first cooling circuit, and from the TEG to a second radiator through at least some other coolant passages under a second set of operating conditions to establish a second cooling circuit. A method of controlling a cooling circuit is also provided.

  17. Aerodynamic flow simulation of wind turbine: Downwind versus upwind configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janajreh, Isam; Qudaih, Rana; Talab, Ilham; Ghenai, Chaouki

    2010-01-01

    Large scale wind turbines and wind farms continue to grow mounting 94.1 GW of the electrical grid capacity in 2007 and expected to reach 160.0 GW in 2010. Wind energy plays a vital role in the quest for renewable and sustainable energy as well as in reducing carbon emission. Early generation wind turbines (windmills) were used mainly for water pumping and seed grinding, whereas today they generate 1/5 of the current Denmark's electricity and will double its grid capacity reaching 12.5% in 2010. Wind energy is plentiful (72 TW estimated to be commercially viable) and clean while its intensive capital cost still impede widespread deployment. However, there are technological challenges, i.e. high fatigue load, noise emission, and meeting stringent reliability and safety standards. Newer inventions, e.g., downstream wind turbines and flapping rotor blades, are sought to enhance their performance, i.e. lower turning moments and cut-in speed and to absorb portion of the cost due to the absent of yaw mechanisms. In this work, numerical analysis of the downstream wind turbine blade is conducted. In particular, the interaction between the tower and the rotor passage is investigated. Circular cross sectional tower and aerofoil shapes are considered in a staggered configuration and under cross-stream motion. The resulting blade static pressure and aerodynamic forces are computed at different incident wind angles and wind speeds. The computed forces are compared to the conventional upstream wind turbine. Steady state and transient, incompressible, viscous Navier-Stokes and turbulent flow analysis are employed. The k-epsilon model is utilized as the turbulence closure. The passage of the rotor blade is governed by ALE and is represented numerically as a sliding mesh against the upstream fixed tower domain.

  18. Lamination cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E.; Kobayashi, Daryl M.

    2005-10-11

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a lamination cooling system including a stack of laminations, each defining a plurality of apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define a plurality of cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack, and gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed to prevent a liquid cooling fluid in the passageways from escaping between the laminations. The gaps are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. The apertures of each lamination can be coincident with the same-sized apertures of adjacent laminations to form straight passageways, or they can vary in size, shape and/or position to form non-axial passageways, angled passageways, bidirectional passageways, and manifold sections of passageways that connect a plurality of different passageway sections. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  19. Unsteady potential flow past a propeller blade section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takallu, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to predict the effect of an oscillating stream on the time dependent sectional pressure and lift coefficients of a model propeller blade. The assumption is that as the blade sections encounter a wake, the actual angles of attack vary in a sinusoidal manner through the wake, thus each blade is exposed to an unsteady stream oscillating about a mean value at a certain reduced frequency. On the other hand, an isolated propeller at some angle of attack can experience periodic changes in the value of the flow angle causing unsteady loads on the blades. Such a flow condition requires the inclusion of new expressions in the formulation of the unsteady potential flow around the blade sections. These expressions account for time variation of angle of attack and total shed vortices in the wake of each airfoil section. It was found that the final expressions for the unsteady pressure distribution on each blade section are periodic and that the unsteady circulation and lift coefficients exhibit a hysteresis loop.

  20. Design and evaluation of low-cost laminated wood composite blades for intermediate size wind turbines: Blade design, fabrication concept, and cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieblein, S.; Gaugeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zueck, M.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a program to reduce wind turbine costs, an evaluation was conducted of a laminated wood composite blade for the Mod-OA 200 kW wind turbine. The effort included the design and fabrication concept for the blade, together with cost and load analyses. The blade structure is composed of laminated Douglas fir veneers for the primary spar and nose sections, and honeycomb cored plywood panels for the trailing edges sections. The attachment of the wood blade to the rotor hub was through load takeoff studs bonded into the blade root. Tests were conducted on specimens of the key structural components to verify the feasibility of the concept. It is concluded that the proposed wood composite blade design and fabrication concept is suitable for Mod-OA size turbines (125-ft diameter rotor) at a cost that is very competitive with other methods of manufacture.

  1. Environmental sustainability by adoption of alternate cooling media for condenser cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Jaymin; Patel, Nilesh

    2015-01-01

    Water having ability to dissolve most substances and to support biological life, every cooling water system in power plant is subjected to potential operational problems which are mainly corrosion, scaling and biological fouling. Control of cooling water chemistry is very critical in preventing above said problems. In view of scarcity of water and looking into the future trends in the environment protection, water media can be replaced with air. Having such concept in thermal and combined cycle power plants, use of Air-cooled condenser (ACC) for Nuclear power plant may be explored. During last decade number of installations with ACC also increased, largely in response to the growing attention being paid to environmental concerns as well of water scarcity. The rising importance of 'Save Water and Environment', calls for a broader understanding of the design and application principles involved for ACC. This paper identifies the basic configurations of air cooled condensers used in the power industry together with their merits and demerits when compared to those exhibited by traditional steam surface condensers including environmental and corrosion issues. Several factors that affect the performance of air-cooled condensers are described in detail, especially the consequences that result from the fouling of the finned-tubes. To rectify the degradations in performance that result from external tube fouling, a number of cleaning procedures are described. Due to relatively high cost of sweet water and large requirement of sea water, Air cooled condenser may become viable option in future. (author)

  2. Static Structural and Modal Analysis of Gas Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan Kumar, Ravi; Pandey, K. M., Prof.

    2017-08-01

    Gas turbine is one of the most versatile items of turbo machinery nowadays. It is used in different modes such as power generation, oil and gas, process plants, aviation, domestic and related small industries. This paper is based on the problems concerning blade profile selection, material selection and turbine rotor blade vibration that seriously impact the induced stress-deformation and structural functioning of developmental gas turbine engine. In this paper for generating specific power by rotating blade at specific RPM, blade profile and material has been decided by static structural analysis. Gas turbine rotating blade RPM is decided by Modal Analysis so that the natural frequency of blade should not match with the excitation frequency. For the above blade profile has been modeled in SOLIDWORKS and analysis has been done in ANSYS WORKBENCH 14. Existing NACA6409 profile has been selected as base model and then it is modified by bending it through 72.5° and 145°. Hence these three different blade profiles have been analyzed for three different materials viz. Super Alloy X, Nimonic 80A and Inconel 625 at three different speed viz. 20000, 40000 and 60000RPM. It is found that NACA6409 with 72.5° bent gives best result for all material at all speed. Among all the material Inconel 625 gives best result. Hence Blade of Inconel 625 having 72.5° bent profile is the best combination for all RPM.

  3. Damage detection in wind turbine blades using acoustic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juengert, A., E-mail: anne.juengert@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de [Univ. of Stuttgart, Materialpruefungsanstalt Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Facing climate change, the use of renewable energy gains importance. The wind energy sector grows very fast. Bigger and more powerful wind turbines will be built in the coming decades and the safety and reliability of the turbines will become more important. Wind turbine blades have to be inspected at regular intervals, because they are highly stressed during operation and a blade breakdown can cause big economic damages. The turbine blades consist of fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP/CFRP) and sandwich areas containing wood or plastic foam. The blades are manufactured as two halves and glued together afterwards. Typical damages are delaminations within the GFRP or the sandwich and missing adhesive or deficient bond at the bonding surfaces. The regular inspections of wind turbine blades are performed manually by experts and are limited to visual appraisals and simple tapping tests. To improve the inspections of wind turbine blades non-destructive testing techniques using acoustic waves are being developed. To detect delaminations within the laminates of the turbine blade, a local resonance spectroscopy was used. To detect missing bond areas from the outside of the blade the impulse-echo-technique was applied. This paper is an updated reprint of an article published on ndt.net in 2008. (author)

  4. Damage detection in wind turbine blades using acoustic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juengert, A.

    2013-01-01

    Facing climate change, the use of renewable energy gains importance. The wind energy sector grows very fast. Bigger and more powerful wind turbines will be built in the coming decades and the safety and reliability of the turbines will become more important. Wind turbine blades have to be inspected at regular intervals, because they are highly stressed during operation and a blade breakdown can cause big economic damages. The turbine blades consist of fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP/CFRP) and sandwich areas containing wood or plastic foam. The blades are manufactured as two halves and glued together afterwards. Typical damages are delaminations within the GFRP or the sandwich and missing adhesive or deficient bond at the bonding surfaces. The regular inspections of wind turbine blades are performed manually by experts and are limited to visual appraisals and simple tapping tests. To improve the inspections of wind turbine blades non-destructive testing techniques using acoustic waves are being developed. To detect delaminations within the laminates of the turbine blade, a local resonance spectroscopy was used. To detect missing bond areas from the outside of the blade the impulse-echo-technique was applied. This paper is an updated reprint of an article published on ndt.net in 2008. (author)

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of a Vibrating Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama N. Alshroof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI modelling of a vibrating turbine blade using the commercial software ANSYS-12.1. The study has two major aims: (i discussion of the current state of the art of modelling FSI in gas turbine engines and (ii development of a “tuned” one-way FSI model of a vibrating turbine blade to investigate the correlation between the pressure at the turbine casing surface and the vibrating blade motion. Firstly, the feasibility of the complete FSI coupled two-way, three-dimensional modelling of a turbine blade undergoing vibration using current commercial software is discussed. Various modelling simplifications, which reduce the full coupling between the fluid and structural domains, are then presented. The one-way FSI model of the vibrating turbine blade is introduced, which has the computational efficiency of a moving boundary CFD model. This one-way FSI model includes the corrected motion of the vibrating turbine blade under given engine flow conditions. This one-way FSI model is used to interrogate the pressure around a vibrating gas turbine blade. The results obtained show that the pressure distribution at the casing surface does not differ significantly, in its general form, from the pressure at the vibrating rotor blade tip.

  6. AERFORCE: Subroutine package for unsteady blade-element/momentum calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerck, Anders

    2000-05-01

    A subroutine package, called AERFORCE, for the calculation of aerodynamic forces of wind turbine rotors has been written. The subroutines are written in FORTRAN. AERFORCE requires the input of airfoil aerodynamic data via tables as function of angle of attack, the turbine blade and rotor geometry and wind and blade velocities as input. The method is intended for use in an aeroelastic code. Wind and blade velocities are given at a sequence of time steps and blade forces are returned. The aerodynamic method is basically a Blade-Element/Momentum method. The method is fast and coded to be used in time simulations. In order to obtain a steady state solution a time simulation to steady state conditions has to be carried out. The BEM-method in AERFORCE includes extensions for: Dynamic inflow: Unsteady modeling of the inflow for cases with unsteady blade loading or unsteady wind. Extensions to BEM-theory for inclined flow to the rotor disc (yaw model). Unsteady blade aerodynamics: The inclusion of 2D attached flow unsteady aerodynamics and a semi-empirical model for 2D dynamic stall.

  7. Multi-spectral temperature measurement method for gas turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Feng, Chi; Wang, Lixin; Li, Dong

    2016-02-01

    One of the basic methods to improve both the thermal efficiency and power output of a gas turbine is to increase the firing temperature. However, gas turbine blades are easily damaged in harsh high-temperature and high-pressure environments. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. There are unsolved problems in blade temperature measurement, relating to the emissivity of the blade surface, influences of the combustion gases, and reflections of radiant energy from the surroundings. In this study, the emissivity of blade surfaces has been measured, with errors reduced by a fitting method, influences of the combustion gases have been calculated for different operational conditions, and a reflection model has been built. An iterative computing method is proposed for calculating blade temperatures, and the experimental results show that this method has high precision.

  8. Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps for Active Load Alleviation in a Smart Rotor Configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo

    to withstand. The investigation focuses on a specific actuator type: the Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), which introduces a continuous deformation of the aft part of the airfoil camber-line. An aerodynamic model that accounts for the steady and unsteady effects of the flap deflection on a 2D airfoil...... section is developed, and, considering both attached and separated flow conditions, is validated by comparison against Computational Fluid Dynamic solutions and a panel code method. The aerodynamic model is integrated in the BEM-based aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2, thus providing a tool able...... with flaps laid out on the outer 20 % of the blade span, from 77 % to 97% of the blade length. The configuration is first tested with a simplified cyclic control approach, which gives a preliminary indication of the load alleviation potential, and also reveals the possibility to enhance the rotor energy...

  9. The Damaging Effects of Earthquake Excitation on Concrete Cooling Towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedi-Nik, Farhad; Sabouri-Ghomi, Saeid

    2008-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cooling towers of hyperbolic shell configuration find widespread application in utilities engaged in the production of electric power. In design of critical civil infrastructure of this type, it is imperative to consider all the possible loading conditions that the cooling tower may experience, an important loading condition in many countries is that of the earthquake excitation, whose influence on the integrity and stability of cooling towers is profound. Previous researches have shown that the columns supporting a cooling tower are sensitive to earthquake forces, as they are heavily loaded elements that do not possess high ductility, and understanding the behavior of columns under earthquake excitation is vital in structural design because they provide the load path for the self weight of the tower shell. This paper presents the results of a finite element investigation of a representative 'dry' cooling tower, using realistic horizontal and vertical acceleration data obtained from the recent and widely-reported Tabas, Naghan and Bam earthquakes in Iran. The results of both linear and nonlinear analyses are reported in the paper, the locations of plastic hinges within the supporting columns are identified and the ramifications of the plastic hinges on the stability of the cooling tower are assessed. It is concluded that for the (typical) cooling tower configuration analyzed, the columns that are instrumental in providing a load path are influenced greatly by earthquake loading, and for the earthquake data used in this study the representative cooling tower would be rendered unstable and would collapse under the earthquake forces considered

  10. A highly efficient Francis turbine designed for energy recovery in cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqing Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In China, cooling water entering cooling towers still retains surplus pressure between 39,240 and 147,150 Pa. In order to utilize this wasted energy, it is suggested that the surplus water energy can be harnessed to drive a type of hydroturbine installed in the inner platform of cooling tower and make the fan rotate via its coupled shafts. However, conventional hydroturbines are not suited for this job because of their low efficiency or unmatched rotating speed with that of the fan under the operating conditions of cooling towers. In this article, according to the requirements of turbine work environment in cooling towers, a new type of hydroturbine, Francis turbine with ultra-low specific speed (ns  = 50 m.kW, was designed to replace the fan motor in a cooling tower. Primarily, the shape, position, and number of runner blades were designed and optimized through theoretical analyses and computational fluid dynamics simulations. Additionally, metal elliptical volute and single-row ring guide vanes were applied to scale down the structural dimensions. Finally, the optimal scheme of the new Francis turbine was proven to have a high efficiency of 88% and good operation stability through testing of a physical model and can achieve the goal of harvesting renewable energy in the cooling tower.

  11. A novel folding blade of wind turbine rotor for effective power control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wei; Zeng, Pan; Lei, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel folding blade for wind turbine power control is proposed. • Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to analyze folding blade validity. • Folding blade is valid to control wind turbine power output. • Compared to pitch control, thrust was reduced by fold control in power regulation. • Optimum fold angles were found for wind turbine start up and aerodynamic brake. - Abstract: A concept of novel folding blade of horizontal axis wind turbine is proposed in current study. The folding blade comprises a stall regulated root blade section and a folding tip blade section with the fold axis inclined relative to blade span. By folding blade, lift force generated on the tip blade section changes and the moment arm also shortens, which leads to variations of power output. The blade folding actuation mechanism with servo motor and worm-gear reducer was designed. Wind turbine rotor control scheme and servo system with double feedback loops for blade fold angle control were proposed. In this study, a small folding blade model was tested in a wind tunnel to analyze its performance. The blade model performance was estimated in terms of rotation torque coefficient and thrust coefficient. Wind tunnel experiments were also conducted for pitch control using the same blade model in order to make a direct comparison. The power control, start up and aerodynamic brake performance of the folding blade were analyzed. According to the wind tunnel experiment results, fold angle magnitude significantly affected blade aerodynamic performance and the thrust characteristic together with the rotation torque characteristic of folding blade were revealed. The experiment results demonstrated that the folding blade was valid to control power output and had advantages in reducing thrust with maximum reduction of 51.1% compared to pitch control. Optimum fold angles of 55° and 90° were also found for start up and aerodynamic brake, respectively

  12. Study on Design of High Efficiency and Light Weight Composite Propeller Blade for a Regional Turboprop Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Changduk; Lee, Kyungsun

    2013-03-01

    In this study, aerodynamic and structural design of the composite propeller blade for a regional turboprop aircraft is performed. The thin and wide chord propeller blade of high speed turboprop aircraft should have proper strength and stiffness to carry various kinds of loads such as high aerodynamic bending and twisting moments and centrifugal forces. Therefore the skin-spar-foam sandwich structure using high strength and stiffness carbon/epoxy composite materials is used to improve the lightness. A specific design procedure is proposed in this work as follows; firstly the aerodynamic configuration design, which is acceptable for the design requirements, is carried out using the in-house code developed by authors, secondly the structure design loads are determined through the aerodynamic load case analysis, thirdly the spar flange and the skin are preliminarily sized by consideration of major bending moments and shear forces using both the netting rule and the rule of mixture, and finally, the stress analysis is performed to confirm the structural safety and stability using finite element analysis commercial code, MSC. NASTRAN/PATRAN. Furthermore the additional analysis is performed to confirm the structural safety due to bird strike impact on the blade during flight operation using a commercial code, ANSYS. To realize the proposed propeller design, the prototype blades are manufactured by the following procedure; the carbon/epoxy composite fabric prepregs are laid up for skin and spar on a mold using the hand lay-up method and consolidated with a proper temperature and vacuum in the oven. To finalize the structural design, the full-scale static structural test is performed under the simulated aerodynamic loads using 3 point loading method. From the experimental results, it is found that the designed blade has a good structural integrity, and the measured results agree well with the analytical results as well.

  13. Dynamic response characteristics of dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joseph A.; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Scott-Emuakpor, Onome E.; Cross, Charles J.; Slater, Joseph C.

    2015-02-01

    New turbine engine designs requiring secondary flow compression often look to dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors (DFIBRs) since these stages have the ability to perform work on the secondary, or bypassed, flow-field. While analogous to traditional integrally bladed rotor stages, DFIBR designs have many differences that result in unique dynamic response characteristics that must be understood to avoid fatigue. This work investigates these characteristics using reduced-order models (ROMs) that incorporate mistuning through perturbations to blade frequencies. This work provides an alternative to computationally intensive geometric-mistuning approaches for DFIBRs by utilizing tuned blade mode reductions and substructure coupling in cyclic coordinates. Free and forced response results are compared to full finite element model (FEM) solutions to determine if any errors are related to the reduced-order model formulation reduction methods. It is shown that DFIBRs have many more frequency veering regions than their single flow-path integrally blade rotor (IBR) counterparts. Modal families are shown to transition between system, inner-blade, and outer-blade motion. Furthermore, findings illustrate that while mode localization of traditional IBRs is limited to a single or small subset of blades, DFIBRs can have modal energy localized to either an inner- or outer-blade set resulting in many blades responding above tuned levels. Lastly, ROM forced response predictions compare well to full FEM predictions for the two test cases shown.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of a Full Stationary Wind-Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Adnan; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of flow past a full stationary wind-turbine blade is carried out at Reynolds number, Re = 10,000 placed at 0 and 5 (degree) angle of attack. The study is targeted to create a DNS database for verification of solvers and turbulent models that are utilized in wind-turbine modeling applications. The full blade comprises of a circular cylinder base that is attached to a spanwise varying airfoil cross-section profile (without twist). An overlapping composite grid technique is utilized to perform these DNS computations, which permits block structure in the mapped computational space. Different flow shedding regimes are observed along the blade length. Von-Karman shedding is observed in the cylinder shaft region of the turbine blade. Along the airfoil cross-section of the blade, near body shear layer breakdown is observed. A long tip vortex originates from the blade tip region, which exits the computational plane without being perturbed. Laminar to turbulent flow transition is observed along the blade length. The turbulent fluctuations amplitude decreases along the blade length and the flow remains laminar regime in the vicinity of the blade tip. The Strouhal number is found to decrease monotonously along the blade length. Average lift and drag coefficients are also reported for the cases investigated. Supported by funding under a KAUST OCRF-CRG grant.

  15. Modal analysis of wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, G.C.; Hansen, M.H.; Baumgart, A.; Carlen, I.

    2002-02-01

    The modal analysis technique has been used to identify essential dynamic properties of wind turbine blades like natural frequencies, damping characteristics and mode shapes. Different experimental procedures have been considered, and the most appropriate of these has been selected. Although the comparison is based on measurements on a LM 19 m blade, the recommendations given are believed to be valid for other wind turbine blades as well. The reliability of the selected experimental analysis has been quantified by estimating the unsystematic variations in the experimental findings. Satisfactory results have been obtained for natural frequencies, damping characteristics and for the dominating deflection direction of the investigated mode shapes. For the secondary deflection directions, the observed experimental uncertainty may be considerable - especially for the torsional deflection. The experimental analysis of the LM 19 m blade has been compared with results from a state-of-the-art FE-modeling of the same blade. For some of the higher modes substantial discrepancies between the natural frequencies originating from the FE-modeling and the modal analysis, respectively, are observed. In general the qualitative features of measured and computed modes shapes are in good agreement. However, for the secondary deflection directions, substantial deviations in the absolute values may occur (when normalizing with respect to the primary deflection direction). Finally, suggestions of potential future improvements of the experimental procedure are discussed. (au)

  16. Turbomachinery Design Quality Checks to Avoid Friction Induced Structural Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jerry H.

    1999-01-01

    contributed to the potential for these problems to occur by limiting the radial deflection from thermals and centrifugal loading. The cooled solid bore configuration was chosen to improve rotordynamic stability by limiting the length of rotor overhang while still protecting the roller bearing by maintaining zero slope under the inner race. During a start transient, the rim area of the disk heats rapidly and expands axially and circumferentially and requires corresponding radial and axial growth of the disk to maintain relative positioning of the disk, blades, spacers and retainer rings. The stiffness, large thermal mass, and bore cooling flow combine to severely limit the disk rim radial growth which results in the potential for relative movement between these parts. Friction then becomes a player in the determination of component stress.

  17. Advanced LP turbine blade design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, M.; Pfeiffer, R.; Termuehlen, H.

    1990-01-01

    In the 1960's and early 1970's, the development of steam turbines for the utility industry was mainly influenced by the demand for increasing unit sizes. Nuclear plants in particular, required the design of LP turbines with large annulus areas for substantial mass and volumetric steam flows. Since then the development of more efficient LP turbines became an ongoing challenge. Extensive R and D work was performed in order to build efficient and reliable LP turbines often exposed to severe corrosion, erosion and dynamic excitation conditions. This task led to the introduction of an advanced disk-type rotor design for 1800 rpm LP turbines and the application of a more efficient, reaction-type blading for all steam turbine sections including the first stages of LP turbines. The most recent developments have resulted in an advanced design of large LP turbine blading, typically used in the last three stages of each LP turbine flow section. Development of such blading required detailed knowledge of the three dimensional, largely transonic, flow conditions of saturated steam. Also the precise assessment of blade stressing from dynamic conditions, such as speed and torsional resonance, as well as stochastic and aerodynamic excitation is of extreme importance

  18. Resonant vibration control of three-bladed wind turbine rotors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Svendsen, Martin Nymann; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2012-01-01

    Rotors with blades, as in wind turbines, are prone to vibrations due to the flexibility of the blades and the support. In the present paper a theory is developed for active control of a combined set of vibration modes in three-bladed rotors. The control system consists of identical collocated...... to influence of other nonresonant modes. The efficiency of the method isdemonstrated byapplication to a rotor with 42 m blades, where the sensor/actuator system is implemented in the form of an axial extensible strut near the root of each blade. The load is provided by a simple but fully threedimensional...... correlated wind velocity field. It is shown by numerical simulations that the active damping system can provide a significant reduction in the response amplitude of the targeted modes, while applying control moments to the blades that are about 1 order of magnitude smaller than the moments from the external...

  19. ICOOL: A Simulation Code for Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernow, R. C.

    1999-01-01

    Current ideas [1,2] for designing a high luminosity muon collider require significant cooling of the phase space of the muon beams. The only known method that can cool the beams in a time comparable to the muon lifetime is ionization cooling [3,4]. This method requires directing the particles in the beam at a large angle through a low Z absorber material in a strong focusing magnetic channel and then restoring the longitudinal momentum with an rf cavity. We have developed a new 3-D tracking code ICOOL for examining possible configurations for muon cooling. A cooling system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of ∼50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary files can be generated for post-processing analysis by the user

  20. Effect of Blade Roughness on Transition and Wind Turbine Performance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrmann, Robert S. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); White, E. B. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The real-world effect of accumulated surface roughness on wind-turbine power production is not well understood. To isolate specific blade roughness features and test their effect, field measurements of turbine-blade roughness were made and simulated on a NACA 633-418 airfoil in a wind tunnel. Insect roughness, paint chips, and erosion were characterized then manufactured. In the tests, these roughness configurations were recreated as distributed roughness, a forward-facing step, and an eroded leading edge. Distributed roughness was tested in three heights and five densities. Chord Reynolds number was varied between 0:8 to 4:8 × 106. Measurements included lift, drag, pitching moment, and boundary-layer transition location. Results indicate minimal effect from paint-chip roughness. As distributed roughness height and density increase, the lift-curve slope, maximum lift, and lift-to-drag ratio decrease. As Reynolds number increases, natural transition is replaced by bypass transition. The critical roughness Reynolds number varies between 178 to 318, within the historical range. At a chord Reynolds number of 3:2 × 106, the maximum lift-to-drag ratio decreases 40% for 140 μm roughness, corresponding to a 2.3% loss in annual energy production. Simulated performance loss compares well to measured performance loss of an in-service wind turbine.

  1. Numerical study of aero-excitation of steam-turbine rotor blade self-oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaev, S. A.; Makhnov, V. Yu.; Ris, V. V.; Smirnov, E. M.

    2018-05-01

    Blade aero-excitation increment is evaluated by numerical solution of the full 3D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations governing wet steam flow in a powerful steam-turbine last stage. The equilibrium wet steam model was adopted. Blade surfaces oscillations are defined by eigen-modes of a row of blades bounded by a shroud. Grid dependency study was performed with a reduced model being a set of blades multiple an eigen-mode nodal diameter. All other computations were carried out for the entire blade row. Two cases are considered, with an original-blade row and with a row of modified (reinforced) blades. Influence of eigen-mode nodal diameter and blade reinforcing on aero-excitation increment is analyzed. It has been established, in particular, that maximum value of the aero-excitation increment for the reinforced-blade row is two times less as compared with the original-blade row. Generally, results of the study point definitely to less probability of occurrence of blade self-oscillations in case of the reinforced blade-row.

  2. Structural dynamics of shroudless, hollow fan blades with composite in-lays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, R. A.; Hirschbein, M. S.; Chamis, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Structural and dynamic analyses are presented for a shroudless, hollow titanium fan blade proposed for future use in aircraft turbine engines. The blade was modeled and analyzed using the composite blade structural analysis computer program (COBSTRAN); an integrated program consisting of mesh generators, composite mechanics codes, NASTRAN, and pre- and post-processors. Vibration and impact analyses are presented. The vibration analysis was conducted with COBSTRAN. Results show the effect of the centrifugal force field on frequencies, twist, and blade camber. Bird impact analysis was performed with the multi-mode blade impact computer program. This program uses the geometric model and modal analysis from the COBSTRAN vibration analysis to determine the gross impact response of the fan blades to bird strikes. The structural performance of this blade is also compared to a blade of similar design but with composite in-lays on the outer surface. Results show that the composite in-lays can be selected (designed) to substantially modify the mechanical performance of the shroudless, hollow fan blade.

  3. On the performance analysis of Savonius rotor with twisted blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, U.K.; Rajkumar, M. Jaya [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati-781 039 (India)

    2006-09-15

    The present investigation is aimed at exploring the feasibility of twisted bladed Savonius rotor for power generation. The twisted blade in a three-bladed rotor system has been tested in a low speed wind tunnel, and its performance has been compared with conventional semicircular blades (with twist angle of 0{sup o}). Performance analysis has been made on the basis of starting characteristics, static torque and rotational speed. Experimental evidence shows the potential of the twisted bladed rotor in terms of smooth running, higher efficiency and self-starting capability as compared to that of the conventional bladed rotor. Further experiments have been conducted in the same setup to optimize the twist angle. (author)

  4. Monte Carlo simulations as a part of the configuration for neutron instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Lefmann, K.; Kuhn, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of simulations in the process of determiningthe optimal instrument setup by virtual experiments usingthe simulation package McStas. The focus of the analysis is the optimization of the multi-blade analyzer present at the RITA-II spectrometer at PSI for a test experiment...... that in general instrument simulations are approaching a state where they can assist users in selectingthe optimal configuration and possibly demonstrate the feasibility of their experiments prior to allocated beamtime. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  5. Impact force identification for composite helicopter blades using minimal sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Carson N.

    In this research a method for online impact identification using minimal sensors is developed for rotor hubs with composite blades. Modal impact data and the corresponding responses are recorded at several locations to develop a frequency response function model for each composite blade on the rotor hub. The frequency response model for each blade is used to develop an impact identification algorithm which can be used to identify the location and magnitude of impacts. Impacts are applied in two experimental setups, including a four-blade spin test rig and a cantilevered full-sized composite blade. The impacts are estimated to have been applied at the correct location 92.3% of the time for static fiberglass blades, 97.4% of the time for static carbon fiber blades and 99.2% of the time for a full sized-static blade. The estimated location is assessed further and determined to have been estimated in the correct chord position 96.1% of the time for static fiberglass, 100% of the time for carbon fiber blades and 99.2% of the time for the full-sized blades. Projectile impacts are also applied statically and during rotation to the carbon fiber blades on the spin test rig at 57 and 83 RPM. The applied impacts can be located to the correct position 63.9%, 41.7% and 33.3% for the 0, 57 and 83 RPM speeds, respectively, while the correct chord location is estimated 100% of the time. The impact identification algorithm also estimates the force of an impact with an average percent difference of 4.64, 2.61 and 1.00 for static fiberglass, full sized, and carbon fiber blades, respectively. Using a load cell and work equations, the force of impact for a projectile fired from a dynamic firing setup is estimated at about 400 N. The average force measured for applied projectile impacts to the carbon fiber blades, rotating at 0, 57 and 83 RPM, is 368.8, 373.7 and 432.4 N, respectively.

  6. Configuration optimization of series flow double-effect water-lithium bromide absorption refrigeration systems by cost minimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussati, Sergio F.; Cignitti, Stefano; Mansouri, Seyed Soheil

    2018-01-01

    An optimal process configuration for double-effect water-lithium bromide absorption refrigeration systems with series flow – where the solution is first passed through the high-temperature generator – is obtained by minimization of the total annual cost for a required cooling capacity. To this end......) takes place entirely at the high-temperature zone, and the sizes and operating conditions of the other process units change accordingly in order to meet the problem specification with the minimal total annual cost. This new configuration was obtained for wide ranges of the cooling capacity (150–450 k.......9%, respectively. Most importantly, the obtained optimal solution eliminates the low-temperature solution heat exchanger from the conventional configuration, rendering a new process configuration. The energy integration between the weak and strong lithium bromide solutions (cold and hot streams, respectively...

  7. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C F; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-08-12

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1-5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally.

  8. Accelerated fatigue testing of LM 19.1 blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole Jesper Dahl; Jørgensen, E.

    2003-01-01

    A series of 19.1 metre wind turbine blades manufactured by LM Glasfiber A/S of Lunderskov, Denmark were subjected to a series of flapwise fatigue tests. The object of these fatigue tests is to evaluate the impact of an increased load on the blade in afatigue test and to give information...... if it is possible to increase the load in fatigue test to shorten test time. The tests were carried out as a part of a project financed by the Danish Energy Agency. During the fatigue tests the blades have beensurveyed with thermal imaging equipment to determine how an increase in fatigue load affects the blade...... material. In addition to the thermal imaging surveillance the blades were instrumented with strain gauges. This report presents the temperature duringtest, calibration test results, moment range measurements, strain statistics, thermal imaging registrations and a determination of the size and cause...

  9. Wind turbine blade testing system using base excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrell, Jason; Thresher, Robert; Lambert, Scott; Hughes, Scott; Johnson, Jay

    2014-03-25

    An apparatus (500) for fatigue testing elongate test articles (404) including wind turbine blades through forced or resonant excitation of the base (406) of the test articles (404). The apparatus (500) includes a testing platform or foundation (402). A blade support (410) is provided for retaining or supporting a base (406) of an elongate test article (404), and the blade support (410) is pivotally mounted on the testing platform (402) with at least two degrees of freedom of motion relative to the testing platform (402). An excitation input assembly (540) is interconnected with the blade support (410) and includes first and second actuators (444, 446, 541) that act to concurrently apply forces or loads to the blade support (410). The actuator forces are cyclically applied in first and second transverse directions. The test article (404) responds to shaking of its base (406) by oscillating in two, transverse directions (505, 507).

  10. Design of Single Stage Axial Turbine with Constant Nozzle Angle Blading for Small Turbojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra Adnan, F.; Hartono, Firman

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, an aerodynamic design of a single stage gas generator axial turbine for small turbojet engine is explained. As per design requirement, the turbine should be able to deliver power output of 155 kW at 0.8139 kg/s gas mass flow, inlet total temperature of 1200 K and inlet total pressure of 335330 Pa. The design phase consist of several steps, i.e.: determination of velocity triangles in 2D plane, 2D blading design and 3D flow analysis at design point using Computational Fluid Dynamics method. In the determination of velocity triangles, two conditions are applied: zero inlet swirl (i.e. the gas flow enter the turbine at axial direction) and constant nozzle angle design (i.e. the inlet and outlet angle of the nozzle blade are constant from root to tip). The 2D approach in cascade plane is used to specify airfoil type at root, mean and tip of the blade based on inlet and outlet flow conditions. The 3D approach is done by simulating the turbine in full configuration to evaluate the overall performance of the turbine. The observed parameters including axial gap, stagger angle, and tip clearance affect its output power. Based on analysis results, axial gap and stagger angle are positively correlated with output power up to a certain point at which the power decreases. Tip clearance, however, gives inversely correlation with output power.

  11. Numerical Investigation of the Tip Vortex of a Straight-Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine with Double-Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhao Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind velocity distribution and the vortex around the wind turbine present a significant challenge in the development of straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs. This paper is intended to investigate influence of tip vortex on wind turbine wake by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations. In this study, the number of blades is two and the airfoil is a NACA0021 with chord length of c = 0.265 m. To capture the tip vortex characteristics, the velocity fields are investigated by the Q-criterion iso-surface (Q = 100 with shear-stress transport (SST k-ω turbulence model at different tip speed ratios (TSRs. Then, mean velocity, velocity deficit and torque coefficient acting on the blade in the different spanwise positions are compared. The wind velocities obtained by CFD simulations are also compared with the experimental data from wind tunnel experiments. As a result, we can state that the wind velocity curves calculated by CFD simulations are consistent with Laser Doppler Velocity (LDV measurements. The distribution of the vortex structure along the spanwise direction is more complex at a lower TSR and the tip vortex has a longer dissipation distance at a high TSR. In addition, the mean wind velocity shows a large value near the blade tip and a small value near the blade due to the vortex effect.

  12. Subcooled compressed air energy storage system for coproduction of heat, cooling and electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabkoohsar, A.; Dremark-Larsen, M.; Lorentzen, R.; Andresen, G.B.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A new configuration of compressed air energy storage system is proposed and analyzed. •This system, so-called subcooled-CAES, offers cogeneration of electricity, heat and cooling. •A pseudo-dynamic energy, exergy and economic analysis of the system for an entire year is presented. •The annual power, cooling and heat efficiencies of the system are around 31%, 32% and 92%. •The overall energy and exergy performance coefficients of the system are 1.55 and 0.48, respectively. -- Abstract: Various configurations of compressed air energy storage technology have received attention over the last years due to the advantages that this technology offers relative to other power storage technologies. This work proposes a new configuration of this technology aiming at cogeneration of electricity, heat and cooling. The new system may be very advantageous for locations with high penetration of renewable energy in the electricity grid as well as high heating and cooling demands. The latter would typically be locations with district heating and cooling networks. A thorough design, sizing and thermodynamic analysis of the system for a typical wind farm with 300 MW capacity in Denmark is presented. The results show a great potential of the system to support the local district heating and cooling networks and reserve services in electricity market. The values of power-to-power, power-to-cooling and power-to-heat efficiencies of this system are 30.6%, 32.3% and 92.4%, respectively. The exergy efficiency values are 30.6%, 2.5% and 14.4% for power, cooling and heat productions. A techno-economic comparison of this system with two of the most efficient previous designs of compressed air energy storage system proves the firm superiority of the new concept.

  13. Moving blade for steam turbines with axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raschke, K.; Wehle, G.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the improvement of the production of moving blades for steam turbines with axial flow, especially of multi-blades produced by welding of the top plates. It is proposed to weld the top plates before the moving blades are fitted into the rotor. Welding is this made much easier and can be carried out under protective gas and with better results. (UWI) [de

  14. Investigating for failure of central ventilation fan blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Jae Raeyang; Ko Woo Sig; Kim, Yeon Hwan; Park, Kwang Ha

    2002-01-01

    During the operation, central ventilation fan stopped when switch 'on' condition. When central ventilation fan disassemble, ten blades of fan fractured. We have searched cause of failure. We had modeling one of the fan blades and analysis with computer programs. Thus we have find that fracture of central ventilation fan blades is alternative stress and vibration at hub. In this paper, we have described cause of failure

  15. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  16. Optimization design of spar cap layup for wind turbine blade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on the aerodynamic shape and structural form of the blade are fixed,a mathematical model of optimization design for wind turbine blade is established.The model is pursued with respect to minimum the blade mass to reduce the cost of wind turbine production.The material layup numbers of the spar cap are chosen as the design variables;while the demands of strength,stiffness and stability of the blade are employed as the constraint conditions.The optimization design for a 1.5 MW wind turbine blade is carried out by combing above objective and constraint conditions at the action of ultimate flapwise loads with the finite element software ANSYS.Compared with the original design,the optimization design result achieves a reduction of 7.2% of the blade mass,the stress and strain distribution of the blade is more reasonable,and there is no occurrence of resonance,therefore its effectiveness is verified.

  17. Antenna Gain Impact on UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Franek, Ondrej; Byskov, Claus

    2018-01-01

    effective (or equivalent) isotropic radiated power (EIRP), an HG tip antenna inside a blade gives stronger direct pulse amplitudes and better pulse waveforms for accurate and reliable distance estimations than the LG. Moreover, the direct pulse with the HG antenna is also closer to the blade surface, which...... in free space have similar realized gain when allocated inside blades, so that the emission power for the HG and LG antennas in blades can be the same. The antenna gain impacts on time-domain pulse waveforms and power distributions around a blade are carefully investigated (with the tip antenna inside...... a blade). Higher antenna gain enlarges both direct pulse and multipath but in different levels. To verify the simulations, time-domain measurements are performed with a full 37-meter blade. Pulse waveforms and power delay profiles are measured. From all the studies, it follows that: with the similar...

  18. Research on the nonintrusive measurement of the turbine blade vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi hai; Li, Lu-ping; Rao, Hong-de

    2008-11-01

    It's one of the important ways to monitor the change of dynamic characteristic of turbine blades for ensuring safety operation of turbine unit. Traditional measurement systems for monitoring blade vibration generally use strain gauges attached to the surface of turbine blades, each strain gauge gives out an analogue signal related to blade deformation, it's maximal defect is only a few blades could be monitored which are attached by strain gauge. But the noncontact vibration measurement will be discussed would solve this problem. This paper deals with noncontact vibration measurement on the rotor blades of turbine through experiments. In this paper, the noncontact vibration measurement - Tip Timing Measurement will be presented, and will be improved. The statistics and DFT will be used in the improved measurement. The main advantage of the improved measurement is that only two sensors over the top of blades and one synchronous sensor of the rotor are used to get the exact vibration characteristics of the each blade in a row. In our experiment, we adopt NI Company's DAQ equipment: SCXI1001 and PCI 6221, three optical sensors, base on the graphics program soft LabVIEW to develop the turbine blade monitor system. At the different rotational speed of the rotor (1000r/m and 1200r/m) we do several experiments on the bench of the Turbine characteristic. Its results indicated that the vibration of turbine blade could be real-time monitored and accurately measured by the improved Tip Timing Measurement.

  19. Rotor blade online monitoring and fault diagnosis technology research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesauro, Angelo; Pavese, Christian; Branner, Kim

    Rotor blade online monitoring and fault diagnosis technology is an important way to find blade failure mechanisms and thereby improve the blade design. Condition monitoring of rotor blades is necessary in order to ensure the safe operation of the wind turbine, make the maintenance more economical...... of the rotor, icing and lightning. Research is done throughout the world in order to develop and improve such measurement systems. Commercial hardware and software available for the described purpose is presented in the report....

  20. Investigation of potential extreme load reduction for a two-bladed upwind turbine with partial pitch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong; Larsen, Torben J.; Yde, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a wind turbine concept with an innovative design combining partial pitch with a two-bladed (PP-2B) turbine configuration. Special emphasis is on extreme load reduction during storm situations at standstill, but operational loads are also investigated. In order to compare...... loads are reduced by approximately 20% for the PP-2B and 18% for the PP-3B compared with the 3B turbine for the parked condition in a storm situation. Moreover, a huge potential of 60% is observed for the reduction of the extreme tower bottom bending moment for the PP-2B turbine, when the wind direction...... is from ±90° to the turbine, but this also requires that the turbine is parked in a T-configuration. © 2014 The Authors. Wind Energy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  1. Eddy current inspection of stationary blade rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzywosz, K.J.; Hastings, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary turbine blade rings in a US power plant have experienced chloride-induced cracking. Failure analysis determined two types of cracking mechanisms: corrosion fatigue cracking confined to the leading edge of the outer shroud; and stress corrosion cracking present all over the blade surface. Fluorescent dye penetrant is typically used to detect and size cracks. However, it requires cleaning the blade rings by sandblasting to obtain reliable inspection results. Sand blasting in turn requires sealing the lower half of the turbine housing to prevent sand from contaminating the rest of the power plant components. Furthermore, both the penetrant examination and the removal of the sand are time consuming and costly. An alternative NDE technique is desirable which requires no pre-cleaning of the blade and a quick go/no-go inspection with the capability of estimating the crack length. This paper presents an innovative eddy current technique which meets the desired objectives by incorporating the use of specially designed contoured scanners equipped with an array of pancake coils. A set of eddy current pancake coils housed in three different scanners is used to manually scan and inspect the convex side of the stationary blade rings. The pancake coils are operated in a transmit/receive mode using two separate eddy current instruments. This paper presents the inspection concept, including scanner and probe designs, and test results from the various stages of multiple blade rings

  2. Numerical investigations on axial and radial blade rubs in turbo-machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrhman, Ahmed M.; Tang, Eric Sang Sung; Salman Leong, M.; Al-Qrimli, Haidar F.; Rajamohan, G.

    2017-07-01

    In the recent years, the clearance between the rotor blades and stator/casing had been getting smaller and smaller prior improving the aerodynamic efficiency of the turbomachines as demand in the engineering field. Due to the clearance reduction between the blade tip and the rotor casing and between rotor blades and stator blades, axial and radial blade rubbing could be occurred, especially at high speed resulting into complex nonlinear vibrations. The primary aim of this study is to address the blade axial rubbing phenomenon using numerical analysis of rotor system. A comparison between rubbing caused impacts of axial and radial blade rubbing and rubbing forces are also aims of this study. Tow rotor models (rotor-stator and rotor casing models) has been designed and sketched using SOILDSWORKS software. ANSYS software has been used for the simulation and the numerical analysis. The rubbing conditions were simulated at speed range of 1000rpm, 1500rpm and 2000rpm. Analysis results for axial blade rubbing showed the appearance of blade passing frequency and its multiple frequencies (lx, 2x 3x etc.) and these frequencies will more excited with increasing the rotational speed. Also, it has been observed that when the rotating speed increased, the rubbing force and the harmonics frequencies in x, y and z-direction become higher and severe. The comparison study showed that axial blade rub is more dangerous and would generate a higher vibration impacts and higher blade rubbing force than radial blade rub.

  3. A deflection monitoring system for a wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A wind turbine blade comprising a system for monitoring the deflection of a wind turbine blade is described. The system comprises a wireless range-measurement system, having at least one wireless communication device located towards the root end of the blade and at least one wireless communication...

  4. Channel flow analysis. [velocity distribution throughout blade flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanis, T.

    1973-01-01

    The design of a proper blade profile requires calculation of the blade row flow field in order to determine the velocities on the blade surfaces. An analysis theory is presented for several methods used for this calculation and associated computer programs that were developed are discussed.

  5. Blade Vibration Measurement System for Unducted Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marscher, William

    2014-01-01

    With propulsion research programs focused on new levels of efficiency and noise reduction, two avenues for advanced gas turbine technology are emerging: the geared turbofan and ultrahigh bypass ratio fan engines. Both of these candidates are being pursued as collaborative research projects between NASA and the engine manufacturers. The high bypass concept from GE Aviation is an unducted fan that features a bypass ratio of over 30 along with the accompanying benefits in fuel efficiency. This project improved the test and measurement capabilities of the unducted fan blade dynamic response. In the course of this project, Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI) collaborated with GE Aviation to (1) define the requirements for fan blade measurements; (2) leverage MSI's radar-based system for compressor and turbine blade monitoring; and (3) develop, validate, and deliver a noncontacting blade vibration measurement system for unducted fans.

  6. Measurements of blade aerodynamics on a rotor in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, J.M.R. [Imperical College, Dept. of Aeronautics, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    This contribution describes the field test measurements undertaken on an instrumented rotor at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire, UK, during the period 1994 - 97. The programme was directed at improving the prediction of the steady and unsteady rotor blade loading, particularly the loads arising from the stalling of the blade. The measured data consisted of blade surface pressure distributions sampled at 50Hz at 6 sections along the span of one blade of the 17m diameter, 3 bladed, fixed pitch, upwind H.A.W.T., together with measurements of the incident velocity. (au)

  7. Near net shape forging of titanium alloy turbine blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Akiyasu; Hattori, Shigeo; Tani, Kazuhito; Takemura, Atsushi; Ashida, Yoshio

    1991-01-01

    The isothermal forging process has been developed to produce turbine blades made of near β Ti-alloy Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al. It is important to set the preform at the optimum position of the die in order to get a high precision product. The deformation analysis by using FEM is effective to determine the optimum position. And also it is necessary to avoid buckling induced by the restriction of axial elongation of the material. As a result, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al blades could be formed precisely by using only one stage of forging, and machining was needed only at the root. The thickness of the oxide layer induced on the surface of the forged blade was only 70μm. The mechanical properties of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al blades after forging and annealing were superior to those of Ti-6Al-4V blades and were nearly uniform across the length of the blades. (author)

  8. Oxygen mass transfer in a stirred tank bioreactor using different impeller configurations for environmental purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a miniature stirred tank bioreactor was designed for treatment of waste gas containing benzene, toluene and xylene. Oxygen mass transfer characteristics for various twin and single-impeller systems were investigated for 6 configurations in a vessel with 10 cm of inner diameter and working volume of 1.77L. Three types of impellers, namely, Rushton turbine, Pitched 4blades and Pitched 2blades impellers with downward pumping have been used. Deionized water was used as a liquid phase. With respect to other independent variables such as agitation speed, aeration rate, type of sparger, number of impellers, the relative performance of these impellers was assessed by comparing the values of (KLa) as a key parameter. Based on the experimental data, empirical correlations as a function of the operational conditions have been proposed, to study the oxygen transfer rates from air bubbles generated in the bioreactor. It was shown that twin Rushton turbine configuration demonstrates superior performance (23% to 77% enhancement in KLa) compared with other impeller compositions and that sparger type has negligible effect on oxygen mass transfer rate. Agitation speeds of 400 to 800 rpm were the most efficient speeds for oxygen mass transfer in the stirred bioreactor. PMID:23369581

  9. observer-based diagnostics and monitoring of vibrations in nuclear reactor core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siry, S.A K.

    2007-01-01

    analysis and diagnostics of vibration in industrial systems play a significant rule to prevent severe severe damages . drive shaft vibration is a complicated phenomenon composed of two independent forms of vibrations, translational and torsional. translational vibration measurements in case of the reactor core cooling system are introduced. the system under study consists of the three phase induction motor, flywheel, centrifugal pump, and two coupling between motor-flywheel, and flywheel-pump. this system structure is considered to be one where the blades are pegged into the discs fitting into the shafts. a non-linear model to simulate vibration in the reactor core cooling system will be introduced. simulation results of an operating reactor core cooling system using the actual parameters will be presented to validate the accuracy and reliability of the proposed analytical method the accuracy in analyzing the results depends on the system model. the shortcomings of the conventional model will be avoided through the use of that accurate nonlinear model which improve the simulation of the reactor core cooling system

  10. An Assessment of the Icing Blade and the SEA Multi-Element Sensor for Liquid Water Content Calibration of the NASA GRC Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Laura E.; Ide, Robert F.; Van Zante, Judith Foss

    2017-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn has recently switched to from using the Icing Blade to using the SEA Multi-Element Sensor (also known as the multi-wire) for its calibration of cloud liquid water content. In order to perform this transition, tests were completed to compare the Multi-Element Sensor to the Icing Blade, particularly with respect to liquid water content, airspeed, and drop size. The two instruments were found to compare well for the majority of Appendix C conditions. However, it was discovered that the Icing Blade under-measures when the conditions approach the Ludlam Limit. This paper also describes data processing procedures for the Multi-Element Sensor in the IRT, including collection efficiency corrections, mounting underneath a splitter plate, and correcting for a jump in the compensation wire power. Further data is presented to describe the repeatability of the IRT with the Multi-Element sensor, health-monitoring checks for the instrument, and a sensing-element configuration comparison.

  11. Development of a structure-dependent materials model for complex high-temperature loads: Turbine blades of IN 738 LC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In the framework of a material research programme of the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology a joint project of 10 institutes has started. It aims at developing new concepts for high-temperature components. A subtask is concerned with the internally cooled turbine blade of IN 738 LC for stationary gas turbines. The envisaged procedure for the development of the design conception and the level of knowledge concerning the influencing parameters of the structure and the mechanical behaviour at high operating temperatures are reported on. (orig.) [de

  12. Composite hub/metal blade compressor rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, S.

    1978-01-01

    A low cost compressor rotor was designed and fabricated for a small jet engine. The rotor hub and blade keepers were compression molded with graphite epoxy. Each pair of metallic blades was held in the hub by a keeper. All keepers were locked in the hub with circumferential windings. Feasibility of fabrication was demonstrated in this program.

  13. Measurement of Rotorcraft Blade Deformation Using Projection Moiré Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Fleming

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Projection Moiré Interferometry (PMI has been used to obtain near instantaneous, quantitative blade deformation measurements of a generic rotorcraft model at several test conditions. These laser-based measurements provide quantitative, whole field, dynamic blade deformation profiles conditionally sampled as a function of rotor azimuth. The instantaneous nature of the measurements permits computation of the mean and unsteady blade deformation, blade bending, and twist. The PMI method is presented, and the image processing steps required to obtain quantitative deformation profiles from PMI interferograms are described. Experimental results are provided which show blade bending, twist, and unsteady motion. This initial proof-of-concept test has demonstrated the capability of PMI to acquire accurate, full field rotorcraft blade deformation data.

  14. Digital radiographic technology; non-destructive testing of tubine blades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penumadu, P.S.

    2014-01-01

    Inspection of turbine blades has always been a big challenge. Any irregularities in the blade have a huge impact on the gas turbine, so these blades have to be manufactured and inspected in the most sophisticated way possible. The evolution of digital radiographic technology took a leap forward to

  15. Compressor blade setting angle accuracy study, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic test of a small, single stage, highly loaded, axial flow transonic compressor is covered. The stage was modified by fabricating a 24 blade rotor with mis-set blades in a repeating pattern - two degrees closed from nominal, two degrees open from nominal and nominal. The unit was instrumented to determine overall performance and average blade element data. High-response, dynamic pressure probes were installed to record pressure patterns at selected points in the flowpath. Testing was conducted at speeds from 70 to 94% of design equivalent speed with a conventional casing and also with circumferential grooves over the rotor tip. Testing indicated severe performance penalties were incurred as a result of the mis-set blading. Lower flow, pressure ratio, and efficiency were observed for the stage with or without casing treatment. Periodic pressure variations were detected at every location where high response pressure sensors were located and were directly related to blading geometry.

  16. Analysis of Different Blade Architectures on small VAWT Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, L.; Brighenti, A.; Benini, E.; Raciti Castelli, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper aims at describing and comparing different small Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) architectures, in terms of performance and loads. These characteristics can be highlighted by resorting to the Blade Element-Momentum (BE-M) model, commonly adopted for rotor pre-design and controller assessment. After validating the model with experimental data, the paper focuses on the analysis of VAWT loads depending on some relevant rotor features: blade number (2 and 3), airfoil camber line (comparing symmetrical and asymmetrical profiles) and blade inclination (straight versus helical blade). The effect of such characteristics on both power and thrusts (in the streamwise direction and in the crosswise one) as a function of both the blades azimuthal position and their Tip Speed Ratio (TSR) are presented and widely discussed.

  17. A Long-Period Grating Sensor for Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, Lars

    This PhD project concerns the applied research for providing a novel sensor for measurements on wind turbine blades, based on Long-Period Gratings. The idea is based on the utilization of a special asymmetrical optical fibre with Long-Period Gratings for directional sensitive bend sensing...... blade material, where a suitable process and recoating material were investigated. The sensor was implemented and tested on a full scale wind turbine blade placed on a test rig. This first prototype has demonstrated the capability of the sensor for wind turbine blade monitoring, particular...... the possibility to distinguish between the flap- and edge-wise bend directions on the wind turbine blade, providing a selective sensor. The sensor has proven to be very robust and suitable for this application....

  18. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  19. Numerical Predictions of Enhanced Impingement Jet Cooling with Ribs and Pins in Co-Flow and Cross-Flow Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. El-Jummah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerical calculations relevant to gas turbine internal wall heat transfer cooling were conducted using conjugate heat transfer (CHT computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD commercial codes. The CHT CFD predictions were carried out for impingement heat transfer with different types of obstacle walls (fins on the target surfaces. A 10 × 10 row of impingement air jet holes (or hole density n of 4306 m-2 was used, which gives ten rows of holes in the cross-flow direction and only one heat transfer enhancement obstacle per impingement jet was investigated. Previously, four different shaped obstacles were investigated experimentally and were used to validate the present predictions. The obstacle walls, which were equally spaced on the centreline between each impingement jet are of the co-flow and cross-flow configurations. The impingement jet pitch X to diameter D, X/D and gap Z to diameter, Z/D ratios were kept constant at 4.66 and 3.06 for X, Z and D of 15.24, 10.00 and 3.27 mm, respectively. The obstacles investigated were ribs and rectangular pin-fins shapes, using two obstacles height H to diameter, H/D ratio of 1.38 and 2.45. Computations were carried out for three different mass flux G of 1.08, 1.48 and 1.94 kg/sm2. Relative pressure loss ∆P/P and surface average heat transfer coefficient (HTC h predictions for the range of G, showed good agreement with the experimental results. The prediction also reveals that obstacles not only increases the turbulent flows, but also takes away most of the cooling heat transfer that produces the regions with highest thermal gradients. It also reduces the impingement gap downstream cross-flow.

  20. Coupling analysis of wind turbine blades based on aeroelastics and aerodynsmics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xudong; Chen, Jin; Zhang, Shigiang

    2010-01-01

    The structural dynamic equations of blades were constructed for blades of wind turbines. The vibration velocity of blades and the relative flow velocity were calculated using the structural dynamics model. Based on the BEM (Blade Element Momentum) theory and traditional areodynamics, the coupling...

  1. Construction of low-cost, Mod-OA wood composite wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Two sixty-foot, low-cost, wood composite blades for service on 200 kW Mod-OA wind turbines were constructed. The blades were constructed of epoxy resin-bonded Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge sections, and paper honeycombcored, birch plywood faced panels for the afterbody sections. The blades were joined to the wind turbine hub by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs embedded into the root end of the blades. The blades were installed on the 200 kW Mod-OA wind turbine facility at Kahuku, Hawaii, The blades completed nearly 8,000 hours of operation over an 18 month period at an average power of 150 kW prior to replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The blades were replaced because of a corrosion failure of the steel shank on one stud. Inspections showed that the wood composite structure remained in excellent condition.

  2. Force Measurements on a VAWT Blade in Parked Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Goude

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The forces on a turbine at extreme wind conditions when the turbine is parked is one of the most important design cases for the survivability of a turbine. In this work, the forces on a blade and its support arms have been measured on a 12 kW straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine at an open site. Two cases are tested: one during electrical braking of the turbine, which allows it to rotate slowly, and one with the turbine mechanically fixed with the leading edge of the blade facing the main wind direction. The force variations with respect to wind direction are investigated, and it is seen that significant variations in forces depend on the wind direction. The measurements show that for the fixed case, when subjected to the same wind speed, the forces are lower when the blade faces the wind direction. The results also show that due to the lower forces at this particular wind direction, the average forces for the fixed blade are notably lower. Hence, it is possible to reduce the forces on a turbine blade, simply by taking the dominating wind direction into account when the turbine is parked. The measurements also show that a positive torque is generated from the blade for most wind directions, which causes the turbine to rotate in the electrically-braked case. These rotations will cause increased fatigue loads on the turbine blade.

  3. Effects of Blade Boundary Layer Transition and Daytime Atmospheric Turbulence on Wind Turbine Performance Analyzed with Blade-Resolved Simulation and Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Tarak Nath

    Relevant to utility scale wind turbine functioning and reliability, the present work focuses on enhancing our understanding of wind turbine responses from interactions between energy-dominant daytime atmospheric turbulence eddies and rotating blades of a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine using a unique data set from a GE field experiment and computer simulations at two levels of fidelity. Previous studies have shown that the stability state of the lower troposphere has a major impact on the coherent structure of the turbulence eddies, with corresponding differences in wind turbine loading response. In this study, time-resolved aerodynamic data measured locally at the leading edge and trailing edge of three outer blade sections on a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine blade and high-frequency SCADA generator power data from a daytime field campaign are combined with computer simulations that mimic the GE wind turbine within a numerically generated atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow field which is a close approximation of the atmospheric turbulence experienced by the wind turbine in the field campaign. By combining the experimental and numerical data sets, this study describes the time-response characteristics of the local loadings on the blade sections in response to nonsteady nonuniform energetic atmospheric turbulence eddies within a daytime ABL which have spatial scale commensurate with that of the turbine blade length. This study is the first of its kind where actuator line and blade boundary layer resolved CFD studies of a wind turbine field campaign are performed with the motivation to validate the numerical predictions with the experimental data set, and emphasis is given on understanding the influence of the laminar to turbulent transition process on the blade loadings. The experimental and actuator line method data sets identify three important response time scales quantified at the blade location: advective passage of energy-dominant eddies (≈25 - 50 s), blade rotation (1P

  4. Manufacturing a 9-Meter Thermoplastic Composite Wind Turbine Blade: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Robynne [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Snowberg, David R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Berry, Derek S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beach, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rooney, Samantha A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Swan, Dana [Arkema Inc.

    2017-12-06

    Currently, wind turbine blades are manufactured from a combination of glass and/or carbon fiber composite materials with a thermoset resin such as epoxy, which requires energy-intensive and expensive heating processes to cure. Newly developed in-situ polymerizing thermoplastic resin systems for composite wind turbine blades polymerize at room temperature, eliminating the heating process and significantly reducing the blade manufacturing cycle time and embodied energy, which in turn reduces costs. Thermoplastic materials can also be thermally welded, eliminating the need for adhesive bonds between blade components and increasing the overall strength and reliability of the blades. As well, thermoplastic materials enable end-of-life blade recycling by reheating and decomposing the materials, which is a limitation of existing blade technology. This paper presents a manufacturing demonstration for a 9-m-long thermoplastic composite wind turbine blade. This blade was constructed in the Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology facility at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process. Johns Manville fiberglass and an Arkema thermoplastic resin called Elium were used. Additional materials included Armacell-recycled polyethylene terephthalate foam from Creative Foam and low-cost carbon- fiber pultruded spar caps (manufactured in collaboration with NREL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Huntsman, Strongwell, and Chomarat). This paper highlights the development of the thermoplastic resin formulations, including an additive designed to control the peak exothermic temperatures. Infusion and cure times of less than 3 hours are also demonstrated, highlighting the efficiency and energy savings associated with manufacturing thermoplastic composite blades.

  5. Bimetallic Blisks with Shrouded Turbine Blades for Gas Turbine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Magerramova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses prospects of using blisks with shrouded blades. Increasing an engine life and efficiency as well as mass reduction can also be achieved by increasing blade numbers and decreasing disk diameter. But design engineers are faced with the problem of blade placement because of the disk size and root dimensions.The problem of increasing life and cyclic durability, vibration strength, and lightweight design of the turbine gas turbine wheels, can be solved by an elimination of blade - disk locks.The technology of manufacturing one-piece blisks by connecting the blades with the disc part using hot isostatic pressing was developed. This technology allows us to use blades with shrouds. It is necessary to increase efficiency and to improve high cycle fatigue performance of rotor blades.One of the pressing problems is to ensure the necessary position of shrouds in relation to each other in the manufacturing process as well as in the service. Numerical studies of the influence of the shroud mounting position on blade strength during operation allowed us to develop a methodology of choosing a shroud mounting position.Based on the two turbine wheels (LPT and HPT calculations advantages of blisk design with respect to the lock-based design were shown. Application of bimetallic blisks with shrouded blades resulted in a lifespan increase and weight reduction.In addition, other advantages of blisk design are as follows: possible reduction in the number of parts, elimination of leaks and fretting that take place in the blade - disk locks, exception of expensive broaching operations and disk alloy saving. The shortcoming is elimination of damping in root connection. In addition, there are no widely used repair methods.Despite these disadvantages the usage of bimetallic turbine blisks with shrouded blades is very promising.

  6. Wind Turbine Blade Design System - Aerodynamic and Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Soumitr

    2011-12-01

    The ever increasing need for energy and the depletion of non-renewable energy resources has led to more advancement in the "Green Energy" field, including wind energy. An improvement in performance of a Wind Turbine will enhance its economic viability, which can be achieved by better aerodynamic designs. In the present study, a design system that has been under development for gas turbine turbomachinery has been modified for designing wind turbine blades. This is a very different approach for wind turbine blade design, but will allow it to benefit from the features inherent in the geometry flexibility and broad design space of the presented system. It starts with key overall design parameters and a low-fidelity model that is used to create the initial geometry parameters. The low-fidelity system includes the axisymmetric solver with loss models, T-Axi (Turbomachinery-AXIsymmetric), MISES blade-to-blade solver and 2D wing analysis code XFLR5. The geometry parameters are used to define sections along the span of the blade and connected to the CAD model of the wind turbine blade through CAPRI (Computational Analysis PRogramming Interface), a CAD neutral API that facilitates the use of parametric geometry definition with CAD. Either the sections or the CAD geometry is then available for CFD and Finite Element Analysis. The GE 1.5sle MW wind turbine and NERL NASA Phase VI wind turbine have been used as test cases. Details of the design system application are described, and the resulting wind turbine geometry and conditions are compared to the published results of the GE and NREL wind turbines. A 2D wing analysis code XFLR5, is used for to compare results from 2D analysis to blade-to-blade analysis and the 3D CFD analysis. This kind of comparison concludes that, from hub to 25% of the span blade to blade effects or the cascade effect has to be considered, from 25% to 75%, the blade acts as a 2d wing and from 75% to the tip 3D and tip effects have to be taken into account

  7. Optimization of distribution piping network in district cooling system using genetic algorithm with local search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Apple L.S.; Hanby, Vic I.; Chow, T.T.

    2007-01-01

    A district cooling system is a sustainable means of distribution of cooling energy through mass production. A cooling medium like chilled water is generated at a central refrigeration plant and supplied to serve a group of consumer buildings through a piping network. Because of the substantial capital investment involved, an optimal design of the distribution piping configuration is one of the crucial factors for successful implementation of the district cooling scheme. In the present study, genetic algorithm (GA) incorporated with local search techniques was developed to find the optimal/near optimal configuration of the piping network in a hypothetical site. The effect of local search, mutation rate and frequency of local search on the performance of the GA in terms of both solution quality and computation time were investigated and presented in this paper

  8. Structure of three Zlatoust bulats (Damascus-steel blades)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Gerasimov, V. Yu.; Rodionov, D. P.

    2008-08-01

    Chemical composition, structure, and hardness of samples of three Zlatoust bulats (Damascus steels), namely, an Anosov bulat blade (1841), Obukhov bulat blade (1859), and a Shvetsov forged bulat-steel blank (crucible steel) have been investigated. The Anosov bulat possesses all signs of the classical Damascus steel; this is a hypereutectoid carbon steel with a structure formed from chains of carbides against the background of fine pearlite (troostite). A banded pattern is revealed on the surface of the blade. The Obukhov blade cannot be referred to classical Damascus steel. The pattern on the surface of the blade is absent, despite the fact that the initial steel is hypereutectoid. The structure of the blade does not correspond to the structure of classical Damascus steel; this is bainite with numerous cementite particles. The Shvetsov sample cannot be regarded as Damascus steel since it is made from a hypereutectoid steel alloyed by managanese and tungsten. The pattern on the surface of the metal is a consequence of the dendritic structure of the ingot which is developed during forging. The structure of this pattern differs from classical damascene pattern, since the latter is formed due to a specific arrangement of a variety of carbide particles against the pearlitic or some other background obtained during heat treatment.

  9. Vibrational analysis of vertical axis wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Onur

    The goal of this research is to derive a vibration model for a vertical axis wind turbine blade. This model accommodates the affects of varying relative flow angle caused by rotating the blade in the flow field, uses a simple aerodynamic model that assumes constant wind speed and constant rotation rate, and neglects the disturbance of wind due to upstream blade or post. The blade is modeled as elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam under transverse bending and twist deflections. Kinetic and potential energy equations for a rotating blade under deflections are obtained, expressed in terms of assumed modal coordinates and then plugged into Lagrangian equations where the non-conservative forces are the lift and drag forces and moments. An aeroelastic model for lift and drag forces, approximated with third degree polynomials, on the blade are obtained assuming an airfoil under variable angle of attack and airflow magnitudes. A simplified quasi-static airfoil theory is used, in which the lift and drag coefficients are not dependent on the history of the changing angle of attack. Linear terms on the resulting equations of motion will be used to conduct a numerical analysis and simulation, where numeric specifications are modified from the Sandia-17m Darrieus wind turbine by Sandia Laboratories.

  10. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1–5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists...... is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics...

  11. Fracture analysis of adhesive joints in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eder, Martin Alexander; Bitsche, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modern wind turbine rotor blades are usually made from fibre-reinforced composite subcomponents. In the final assembly stage, these subcomponents are bonded together by several adhesive joints. One important adhesive joint is situated at the trailing edge, which refers to the downstream edge where...... the air-flow rejoins and leaves the blade. Maintenance inspections of wind turbine rotor blades show that among other forms of damage, local debonding of the shells along the trailing edge is a frequent failure type. The cause of trailing edge failure in wind turbine blades is complex, and detailed...

  12. Noise from Propellers with Symmetrical Sections at Zero Blade Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, A F

    1937-01-01

    A theory has been deduced for the "rotation noise" from a propeller with blades of symmetrical section about the chord line and set at zero blade angle. Owing to the limitation of the theory, the equations give without appreciable error only the sound pressure for cases where the wave lengths are large compared with the blade lengths. With the aid of experimental data obtained from a two-blade arrangement, an empirical relation was introduced that permitted calculation of higher harmonics. The generality of the final relation given is indicated by the fundamental and second harmonic of a four-blade arrangement.

  13. Analysis and improvement of gas turbine blade temperature measurement error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-01-01

    Gas turbine blade components are easily damaged; they also operate in harsh high-temperature, high-pressure environments over extended durations. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. In this study, measurement errors in turbine blade temperatures were analyzed, taking into account detector lens contamination, the reflection of environmental energy from the target surface, the effects of the combustion gas, and the emissivity of the blade surface. In this paper, each of the above sources of measurement error is discussed, and an iterative computing method for calculating blade temperature is proposed. (paper)

  14. Analysis and improvement of gas turbine blade temperature measurement error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-10-01

    Gas turbine blade components are easily damaged; they also operate in harsh high-temperature, high-pressure environments over extended durations. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. In this study, measurement errors in turbine blade temperatures were analyzed, taking into account detector lens contamination, the reflection of environmental energy from the target surface, the effects of the combustion gas, and the emissivity of the blade surface. In this paper, each of the above sources of measurement error is discussed, and an iterative computing method for calculating blade temperature is proposed.

  15. Fatigue strength ofcomposite wind turbine blade structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardila, Oscar Gerardo Castro

    Wind turbines are normally designed to withstand 20-30 years of life. During this period, the blades, which are the main rotating structures of a wind turbine, are subjected to high fluctuating load conditions as a result of a combination of gravity, inertia, and aeroelastic forces. For this reason......, fatigue is one of the foremost concerns during the design of these structures. However, current standard fatigue methods used for designing wind turbine blades seem not to be completely appropriate for these structures because they are still based on methods developed for metals and not for composite...... materials from which the blades are made. In this sense, the aim of this work is to develop more accurate and reliable fatigue-life prediction models for composite wind turbine blades. In this project, two types of fatigue models are implemented: fatigue-life models and damage mechanics models. In the first...

  16. Influence of Icing on the Modal Behavior of Wind Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Gantasala

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines installed in cold climate sites accumulate ice on their structures. Icing of the rotor blades reduces turbine power output and increases loads, vibrations, noise, and safety risks due to the potential ice throw. Ice accumulation increases the mass distribution of the blade, while changes in the aerofoil shapes affect its aerodynamic behavior. Thus, the structural and aerodynamic changes due to icing affect the modal behavior of wind turbine blades. In this study, aeroelastic equations of the wind turbine blade vibrations are derived to analyze modal behavior of the Tjaereborg 2 MW wind turbine blade with ice. Structural vibrations of the blade are coupled with a Beddoes-Leishman unsteady attached flow aerodynamics model and the resulting aeroelastic equations are analyzed using the finite element method (FEM. A linearly increasing ice mass distribution is considered from the blade root to half-length and thereafter constant ice mass distribution to the blade tip, as defined by Germanischer Lloyd (GL for the certification of wind turbines. Both structural and aerodynamic properties of the iced blades are evaluated and used to determine their influence on aeroelastic natural frequencies and damping factors. Blade natural frequencies reduce with ice mass and the amount of reduction in frequencies depends on how the ice mass is distributed along the blade length; but the reduction in damping factors depends on the ice shape. The variations in the natural frequencies of the iced blades with wind velocities are negligible; however, the damping factors change with wind velocity and become negative at some wind velocities. This study shows that the aerodynamic changes in the iced blade can cause violent vibrations within the operating wind velocity range of this turbine.

  17. Estimation of the energy loss at the blades in rowing: common assumptions revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmijster, Mathijs; De Koning, Jos; Van Soest, A J

    2010-08-01

    In rowing, power is inevitably lost as kinetic energy is imparted to the water during push-off with the blades. Power loss is estimated from reconstructed blade kinetics and kinematics. Traditionally, it is assumed that the oar is completely rigid and that force acts strictly perpendicular to the blade. The aim of the present study was to evaluate how reconstructed blade kinematics, kinetics, and average power loss are affected by these assumptions. A calibration experiment with instrumented oars and oarlocks was performed to establish relations between measured signals and oar deformation and blade force. Next, an on-water experiment was performed with a single female world-class rower rowing at constant racing pace in an instrumented scull. Blade kinematics, kinetics, and power loss under different assumptions (rigid versus deformable oars; absence or presence of a blade force component parallel to the oar) were reconstructed. Estimated power losses at the blades are 18% higher when parallel blade force is incorporated. Incorporating oar deformation affects reconstructed blade kinematics and instantaneous power loss, but has no effect on estimation of power losses at the blades. Assumptions on oar deformation and blade force direction have implications for the reconstructed blade kinetics and kinematics. Neglecting parallel blade forces leads to a substantial underestimation of power losses at the blades.

  18. Flutter of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, N. D.

    1978-01-01

    The testing of Darrieus wind turbines has indicated that under certain conditions, serious vibrations of the blades can occur, involving flatwise bending, torsion, and chordwise bending. A theoretical method of predicting the aeroelastic stability of the coupled bending and torsional motion of such blades with a view to determining the cause of these vibrations, and a means of suppressing them was developed.

  19. A CLINICAL ASSESSMENT OF MACINTOSH BLADE, MILLER BLADE AND KING VISIONTM VIDEOLARYNGOSCOPE FOR LARYNGEAL EXPOSURE AND DIFFICULTY IN ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Mahendera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Previous studies suggest glottic view is better achieved with straight blades while tracheal intubation is easier with curved blades and videolaryngoscope is better than conventional laryngoscope. AIMS Comparison of conventional laryngoscope (Macintosh blade and Miller blade with channelled videolaryngoscope (King Vision TM with respect to laryngeal visualisation and difficulty in endotracheal intubation. SETTINGS AND DESIGN This prospective randomised comparative study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital (in ASA I and ASA II patients after approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee. METHODS We compared Macintosh, Miller, and the King VisionTM videolaryngoscope for glottic visualisation and ease of tracheal intubation. Patients undergoing elective surgeries under general anaesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation were randomly divided into three groups (N=180. After induction of anaesthesia, laryngoscopy was performed and trachea intubated. We recorded visualisation of glottis (Cormack-Lehane grade-CL, ease of intubation, number of attempts, need to change blade, and need for external laryngeal manipulation. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Demographic data, Mandibular length, Mallampati classification were compared using ANOVA, Chi-square test, Kruskal-Wallis Test, where P value <0.005 is statically significant. RESULTS CL grade 1 was most often observed in King Vision -TM VL group (90% which is followed by Miller (28.33%, and Macintosh group (15%. We found intubation was to be easier (grade 1 with King Vision -TM VL group (73.33%, followed by Macintosh (38.33%, and Miller group (1.67%. External manipulation (BURP was needed more frequently in patients in Miller group (71.67%, followed by Macintosh (28.33% and in King Vision -TM VL group (6.67%. All (100% patients were intubated in the 1 st attempt with King Vision -TM VL group, followed by Macintosh group (90% and Miller group (58.33%. CONCLUSIONS In patients with normal airway

  20. Optimizing the multicycle subrotational internal cooling of diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroch, A.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.

    2018-05-01

    Subrotational cooling of the AlH+ ion to the miliKelvin regime, using optimally shaped pulses, is computed. The coherent electromagnetic fields induce purity-conserved transformations and do not change the sample temperature. A decrease in a sample temperature, manifested by an increase of purity, is achieved by the complementary uncontrolled spontaneous emission which changes the entropy of the system. We employ optimal control theory to find a pulse that stirs the system into a population configuration that will result in cooling, upon multicycle excitation-emission steps. The obtained optimal transformation was shown capable to cool molecular ions to the subkelvins regime.

  1. Retention system and method for the blades of a rotary machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Poul D.; Glynn, Christopher C.; Walker, Roger C.

    2002-01-01

    A retention system and method for the blades of a rotary machine for preventing forward or aft axial movement of the rotor blades includes a circumferential hub slot formed about a circumference of the machine hub. The rotor blades have machined therein a blade retention slot which is aligned with the circumferential hub slot when the blades are received in correspondingly shaped openings in the hub. At least one ring segment is secured in the blade retention slots and the circumferential hub slot to retain the blades from axial movement. A key assembly is used to secure the ring segments in the aligned slots via a hook portion receiving the ring segments and a threaded portion that is driven radially outwardly by a nut. A cap may be provided to provide a redundant back-up load path for the centrifugal loads on the key. Alternatively, the key assembly may be formed in the blade dovetail.

  2. Blade vortex interaction noise reduction techniques for a rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Bruce D. (Inventor); Hassan, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Tadghighi, Hormoz (Inventor); JanakiRam, Ram D. (Inventor); Sankar, Lakshmi N. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active control device for reducing blade-vortex interactions (BVI) noise generated by a rotorcraft, such as a helicopter, comprises a trailing edge flap located near the tip of each of the rotorcraft's rotor blades. The flap may be actuated in any conventional way, and is scheduled to be actuated to a deflected position during rotation of the rotor blade through predetermined regions of the rotor azimuth, and is further scheduled to be actuated to a retracted position through the remaining regions of the rotor azimuth. Through the careful azimuth-dependent deployment and retraction of the flap over the rotor disk, blade tip vortices which are the primary source for BVI noise are (a) made weaker and (b) pushed farther away from the rotor disk (that is, larger blade-vortex separation distances are achieved).

  3. CO_2-assisted compression-adsorption hybrid for cooling and desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Syed Muztuza; Chakraborty, Anutosh; Leong, Kai Choong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Amalgamation of vapour compression and adsorption. • Thermodynamic frameworks of compression-adsorption hybrid. • 60% improvement in COP as compared with conventional CO_2 cooling system. • Energy recovery from CO_2 is used for cooling and desalination. • Energy from gas cooler accelerates the desalination process. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel compression-adsorption hybrid that symbiotically combines adsorption and CO_2 compression cooling devices. The seemingly low efficiency of each cycle individually is overcome by an amalgamation with the other. Hence, both heat and water vapour refrigerant mass are recovered for continuous cooling and desalination. Two different configurations are presented. The first configuration deals with a two-stage heat recovery system. At the first stage, heat is recovered from the compressed carbon dioxide to drive the adsorption device. The second stage heat recovery system internally exchanges heat between the low pressure and high pressure refrigerants of the CO_2 cycle. The second configuration is proposed with an additional third-stage heat recovery from the gas cooler to the high pressure evaporator of the adsorption cycle. The water vapour mass is recovered from bed-to-bed adsorption at relatively higher pressure. A detailed thermodynamic framework is presented to simulate the performances in terms of COP (coefficient of performance), SCP (specific cooling power), SDWP (specific daily water production), PR (performance ratio) and OCR (overall conversion ratio). It is found that the overall COP is improved by more than 60% as compared to the conventional CO_2 cycle, and in addition, the system generates 12.7 m"3 of desalinated water per tonne of silica gel per day as extra benefits. Furthermore, both the heat and mass recoveries improve the overall conversion ratio, which is almost double as compared to the conventional CO_2 cycle.

  4. Huge opportunity for solar cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    's Charlestown Square Shopping Centre and Echuca Hospital. These systems join a number of others already in operation at the large commercial and industrial scale, as well as a smaller number of systems providing cooling to cafes and offices. The development in this area is being supported by CSIRO's Solar Cooling research team which provides development, modelling and design expertise across the spectrum of solar cooling variants, sizes and applications - from remote community food preservation in India, to large commercial and residential systems in Australia. The group also has industry test facilities to support the development and testing of solar air conditioning systems as well as conventional air conditioning technologies. The Australian Institute of Refrigeration Air Conditioning and Heating (AIRAH's) Solar Cooling Special Technical Group is also involved in developing the solar cooling industry in Australia with the aim of combating climate change by reducing greenhouse emissions from the residential and commercial building sectors. The group coordinates industry and research efforts and organises information exchange, educational and training events for interested technical and business representatives. Fact file- Solar cooling systems are essentially comprised of two parts - solar thermal collectors and a sorption chiller which convert the heat into useful cooling. Though a number of collector and chiller combinations exist, no one single approach has yet dominated. Corresponding with the type of chiller used, solar cooling systems are often grouped into three categories: absorption, adsorption and desiccant. During design, an appropriate collector technology will be chosen, typically either a parabolic, flat plate or evacuated tube collector. The optimal configuration is also determined in design, to align equipment characteristics with the conditions, environment and requirements presented by each application. Thus solar cooling has a number of variants

  5. Gas turbine engine turbine blade damaging estimate in maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ель-Хожайрі Хусейн

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  The factors determining character and intensity of corrosive damages of gas turbine blades are analyzed in the article. The classification of detrimental impurities polluting gas turbine airflow duct and injuring blade erosion damages are given. Common features of the method of turbine blade corrosive damage estimation are shown in the article.

  6. Information technology equipment cooling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  7. Structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Mark A.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2008-03-01

    As electric utility wind turbines increase in size, and correspondingly, increase in initial capital investment cost, there is an increasing need to monitor the health of the structure. Acquiring an early indication of structural or mechanical problems allows operators to better plan for maintenance, possibly operate the machine in a de-rated condition rather than taking the unit off-line, or in the case of an emergency, shut the machine down to avoid further damage. This paper describes several promising structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques that were recently exercised during a fatigue test of a 9 meter glass-epoxy and carbon-epoxy wind turbine blade. The SHM systems were implemented by teams from NASA Kennedy Space Center, Purdue University and Virginia Tech. A commercial off-the-shelf acoustic emission (AE) NDT system gathered blade AE data throughout the test. At a fatigue load cycle rate around 1.2 Hertz, and after more than 4,000,000 fatigue cycles, the blade was diagnostically and visibly failing at the out-board blade spar-cap termination point at 4.5 meters. For safety reasons, the test was stopped just before the blade completely failed. This paper provides an overview of the SHM and NDT system setups and some current test results.

  8. Effect of steady deflections on the aeroelastic stability of a turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Bjarne Skovmose

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with effects of geometric non-linearities on the aeroelastic stability of a steady-state defl ected blade. Today, wind turbine blades are long and slender structures that can have a considerable steady-state defl ection which affects the dynamic behaviour of the blade. The fl...... apwise blade defl ection causes the edgewise blade motion to couple to torsional blade motion and thereby to the aerodynamics through the angle of attack. The analysis shows that in the worst case for this particular blade, the edgewise damping can be decreased by half. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons......, Ltd....

  9. Study on Determination Method of Fatigue Testing Load for Wind Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Gaohua; Wu, Jianzhong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the load calculation method of the fatigue test was studied for the wind turbine blade under uniaxial loading. The characteristics of wind load and blade equivalent load were analyzed. The fatigue property and damage theory of blade material were studied. The fatigue load for 2MW blade was calculated by Bladed, and the stress calculated by ANSYS. Goodman modified exponential function S-N curve and linear cumulative damage rule were used to calculate the fatigue load of wind turbine blades. It lays the foundation for the design and experiment of wind turbine blade fatigue loading system.

  10. KNOW-BLADE, task-3.2 report, tip shape study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, N.N.; Johansen, J.; Conway, S.; Voutsinas, S.; Hansen, M.O.L.; Stuermer, A.

    2005-01-01

    For modern rotor blades with their very large aspect ratio, the blade tip is a very limited part of the overall rotor, and as such of limited importance for the overall aerodynamics of the rotor. Even though they may not be very important for the overall power production, the tip noise can be very important for the acoustics of the rotor [15], and the blade tips can as well be important for the aerodynamic damping properties of the rotor blades [13]. Unfortunately, not many options exists for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of blade tips using computational methods. Experimentally it is dicult to perform detailed measurements in the form of pressure and velocity measurements in natural wind conditions on modern large scale turbines due to the inherent unsteadiness in the natural wind. The present study describes the application of four different Navier-Stokes solvers to tip shape studies, and shows that these codes are well suited to study the flow around different tip shape geometries, and can predict the pressure distributions at the blade tip quite accurately. (au)

  11. Microstructure Based Material-Sand Particulate Interactions and Assessment of Coatings for High Temperature Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Muthuvel; Ghoshal, Anindya; Walock, Michael; Nieto, Andy; Bravo, Luis; Barnett, Blake; Pepi, Marc; Swab, Jeffrey; Pegg, Robert Tyler; Rowe, Chris; hide

    2017-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for military/commercial fixed-wing and rotary wing aircraft use thermal barrier coatings in the high-temperature sections of the engine for improved efficiency and power. The desire to further make improvements in gas turbine engine efficiency and high power-density is driving the research and development of thermal barrier coatings and the effort of improving their tolerance to fine foreign particulates that may be contained in the intake air. Both commercial and military aircraft engines often are required to operate over sandy regions such as in the Middle-East nations, as well as over volcanic zones. For rotorcraft gas turbine engines, the sand ingestion is adverse during take-off, hovering near ground, and landing conditions. Although, most of the rotorcraft gas turbine engines are fitted with inlet particle separators, they are not 100 percent efficient in filtering fine sand particles of size 75 microns or below. The presence of these fine solid particles in the working fluid medium has an adverse effect on the durability of turbine blade thermal barrier coatings and overall performance of the engine. Typical turbine blade damages include blade coating wear, sand glazing, Calcia-Magnesia-Alumina-Silicate (CMAS) attack, oxidation, plugged cooling holes, all of which can cause rapid performance deterioration including loss of aircraft. The objective of this research is to understand the fine particle interactions with typical ceramic coatings of turbine blades at the microstructure level. A finite-element based microstructure modeling and analysis has been performed to investigate particle-surface interactions, and restitution characteristics. Experimentally, a set of tailored thermal barrier coatings and surface treatments were down-selected through hot burner rig tests and then applied to first stage nozzle vanes of the Gas Generator Turbine of a typical rotorcraft gas turbine engine. Laser Doppler velocity measurements were performed

  12. Performance improvement of small-scale rotors by passive blade twist control

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Peng; Prothin, Sebastien; Mohd Zawawi, Fazila; Bénard, Emmanuel; Morlier, Joseph; Moschetta, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    A passive twist control is proposed as an adaptive way to maximize the overall efficiency of the small-scale rotor blade for multifunctional aircrafts. Incorporated into a database of airfoil characteristics, Blade Element Momentum Theory is implemented to obtain the blade optimum twist rates for hover and forward flight. In order to realize the required torsion of blade between hover and forward flight, glass/epoxy laminate blade is proposed based on Centrifugal Force Induced Twist concept. ...

  13. Gas Turbine Blade Damper Optimization Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Giridhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction damping concept is widely used to reduce resonance stresses in gas turbines. A friction damper has been designed for high pressure turbine stage of a turbojet engine. The objective of this work is to find out effectiveness of the damper while minimizing resonant stresses for sixth and ninth engine order excitation of first flexure mode. This paper presents a methodology that combines three essential phases of friction damping optimization in turbo-machinery. The first phase is to develop an analytical model of blade damper system. The second phase is experimentation and model tuning necessary for response studies while the third phase is evaluating damper performance. The reduced model of blade is developed corresponding to the mode under investigation incorporating the friction damper then the simulations were carried out to arrive at an optimum design point of the damper. Bench tests were carried out in two phases. Phase-1 deals with characterization of the blade dynamically and the phase-2 deals with finding optimal normal load at which the blade resonating response is minimal for a given excitation. The test results are discussed, and are corroborated with simulated results, are in good agreement.

  14. Guidelines to Interpret Results of Mechanical Blade Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias Vega, F.; Sanz Martin, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    This report shows the interpretation of full scale rotor blade test results and describes the engineering testing models and coefficients for any feasible rotor blade design, in order to accept and to certify any final manufactured blade as an allowable product, fit for use and working with a completely security during all the wind turbines lifetime. This work was carried out at the Wind Energy Division of the CIEMAT.DER and it is based on the authors technical experience in this field, after many years working on testing blades. Also, this paper contains results of the European wind turbine Standards II relevant to the European Project: JOULE III R.D. where the Wind Energy Division took part as participant too. (Author)

  15. Guidelines to Interpret Results of Mechanical Blade Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias Vega, F.; Sanz Martin, J. C. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This report shows the interpretation of full scale rotor blade test results and describes the engineering testing models and coefficients for any feasible rotor blade design, in order to accept and to certify any final manufactured blades as an allowable product, fit for use and working with a completely security during all the windturbine's lifetime. This work was carried out at the Wind Energy Division of the CIEMAT.DER and it is based on the author's technical experience in this field, after many years working on testing blades. Also, this paper contains results of the European wind turbine Standards II relevant to the European Project: JOULE III R.D. where the Wind Energy Division took part as participant too. (Author)

  16. Implicit geometric representations for optimal design of gas turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, T.; Ghaly, W.

    2004-01-01

    Shape optimization requires a proper geometric representation of the blade profile; the parameters of such a representation are usually taken as design variables in the optimization process. This implies that the model must possess three specific features: flexibility, efficiency, and accuracy. For the specific task of aerodynamic optimization for turbine blades, it is critical to have flexibility in both the global and local design spaces in order to obtain a successful optimization. This work is concerned with the development of two geometric representations of turbine blade profiles that are appropriate for aerodynamic optimization: the Modified Rapid Axial Turbine Design (MRATD) model where the blade is represented by five low-order curves that satisfy eleven designer parameters; this model is suitable for a global search of the design space. The second model is NURBS parameterization of the blade profile that can be used for a local refinement. The two models are presented and are assessed for flexibility and accuracy when representing several typical turbine blade profiles. The models will be further discussed in terms of curve smoothness and blade shape representation with a multi-NURBS curve versus one curve and its effect on the flow field, in particular the pressure distribution along the blade surfaces, will be elaborated. (author)

  17. Sub-scale Inverse Wind Turbine Blade Design Using Bound Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Christopher; Berg, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    A goal of the National Rotor Testbed project at Sandia is to design a sub-scale wind turbine blade that has similitude to a modern, commercial size blade. However, a smaller diameter wind turbine operating at the same tip-speed-ratio exhibits a different range of operating Reynolds numbers across the blade span, thus changing the local lift and drag coefficients. Differences to load distribution also affect the wake dynamics and stability. An inverse wind turbine blade design tool has been implemented which uses a target, dimensionless circulation distribution from a full-scale blade to find the chord and twist along a sub-scale blade. In addition, airfoil polar data are interpolated from a few specified span stations leading to a smooth, manufacturable blade. The iterative process perturbs chord and twist, after running a blade element momentum theory code, to reduce the residual sum of the squares between the modeled sub-scale circulation and the target full-scale circulation. It is shown that the converged sub-scale design also leads to performance similarity in thrust and power coefficients. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. TPX heating and cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kungl, D.J.; Knutson, D.S.; Costello, J.; Stoenescu, S.; Yemin, L.

    1995-01-01

    TPX, while having primarily super-conducting coils that do not require water cooling, still has very significant water cooling requirements for the plasma heating systems, vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, diagnostics, an