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Sample records for bladder

  1. Bladder Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  2. Neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your bladder at all Have signs of a bladder infection (fever, burning when you urinate, frequent urination) Urinate small amounts, frequently Alternative Names Neurogenic detrusor overactivity; NDO; Neurogenic bladder sphincter dysfunction; NBSD ...

  3. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  4. Bladder Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  5. Neurogenic Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Dorsher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented.

  6. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bladder cancer care at Mayo Clinic Symptoms Bladder cancer signs and symptoms may include: Blood in urine (hematuria) Painful urination Pelvic pain If you have hematuria, your urine may appear bright red or cola colored. Sometimes, urine may not look any different, ...

  7. [Bladder lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, C; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A; Diao, B; Diallo, A B; Gueye, S M; Ba, M; Diagne, B A

    2001-01-01

    to study the particularities of the bladder lithiasis in our countries. This was a retrospective study of 94 cases (62 men and 32 women) of bladder lithiasis over a period of 13 years. The lithogenic factors; clinic, paraclinic and therapeutic aspects have been studied. Morphoconstitutional analysis has been carded out in collaboration with Cristal Laboratory (St Cloud hospital center in France). mean age was 24.2+/-20.7 years old. The principals mains of consultation were: dysuria (n =36), mictionnal pain (n = 28), hematuria (n = 15). Facilitating factors have been found in 27% of cases. In 10 cases, there was an association bladdder lithiasis and bladdder-vaginal fistula. Radiologic test was dominated by intraveinous urographic (53.19 of cases). The metabolic test showed hypercalcemia and cristalluria in 2 cases. In 7,45 % of cases, we have founding a renal failure. An urinary tract infection have been noticed in 42 % of cases. Open surgery has been the main treatement (96 %) associating in 15 % of cases the treatement of an uropathy. In one case the bladder lithiasis weighed 1120 g. The morphologic and spectrophotometric analysis of the lithiasis have been achieved in 13 % of cases showing the predominance of struvite. the bladder lithiasis is still common in our countries; it could be good for us to access endoorporeals and extracorporeals therapeutic equipements in orderto reduce the indications of open surgery.

  8. Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bladder Control Problems in Women (Urinary Incontinence) Kegel Exercises Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) What ... a vaginal pessary, or surgery. Pelvic floor, or Kegel, exercises involve strengthening pelvic floor muscles. Strong pelvic ...

  9. The paediatric neuropathic bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A neurogenic bladder can be defined as a dysfunctinal urinary bladder caused by disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves involved in the control of micturition (urination). In pathophysiological terms, a neurogenic bladder is caused by a spinal reflex arc that occurs when the bladder becomes autonomous.

  10. Bladder sensation measures and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, David E; Neil, Nancy J; Govier, Fred E; Kobashi, Kathleen C

    2009-09-01

    We performed a prospective multicomponent study to determine whether subjective and objective bladder sensation instruments may provide data on sensory dysfunction in patients with overactive bladder. We evaluated 70 prospectively enrolled patients with urodynamics and questionnaires on validated urgency (Urgency Perception Score), general overactive bladder (Urogenital Distress Inventory) and quality of life (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire). We first sought a correlation between sensory specific (Urgency Perception Score) and quality of life questionnaire scores. We then assessed a correlation between sensory questionnaire scores and urodynamic variables, exploring the hypothesis that certain urodynamic parameters may be bladder sensation measures. We evaluated 2 urodynamic derivatives (first sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity) to increase sensory finding discrimination. We noted a moderate correlation between the Urgency Perception Score (0.56) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (0.74) vs the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (each p Perception Score and bladder capacity (-0.25, p sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity statistically significantly correlated with the Urgency Perception Score despite the lesser or absent correlation associated with the individual components of these derivatives. Bladder sensation questionnaires may be valuable to identify patients with sensory dysfunction and provide additional data not obtained in generalized symptom questionnaires. Urodynamic variables correlated with bladder sensation questionnaire scores and may be an objective method to assess sensory dysfunction.

  11. Bladder outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002238.htm Bladder outlet obstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base ...

  12. Giant bladder diverticulum : A rare cause of bladder outlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant bladder diverticula are rare causes of bladder outlet obstruction in children and have rarely been reported. In this paper, we present three children with giant bladder diverticula who presented with bladder outlet obstruction within a year. Micturating cystourethrogram is important for investigating bladder outlet ...

  13. Exstrophy of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollohan, J

    1999-03-01

    Exstrophy of the bladder is a rare congenital defect that occurs when the abdominal wall and underlying structures, including the ventral wall of the bladder, fail to fuse in utero. As a result, the lower urinary tract is exposed, and the everted bladder appears through the abdominal opening. Various surgical interventions have been employed with variable success in the hope of achieving complete dryness, full control over delivery of urine, freedom from catheters and external appliances, and a protected upper urinary tract. The most popular surgical approach is the primary bladder closure with secondary bladder neck reconstruction. Comprehensive nursing, medical, and surgical care are necessary to preserve renal and sexual function. The many complex problems experienced by these infants and their families call for a multidisciplinary approach. This article reviews occurrence, clinical presentation, and management of exstrophy of the bladder.

  14. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has ex...... can be challenging, and misdiagnosis as a psychological problem, overactive bladder, or chronic urinary infection has plagued patients with the problem....

  15. Bladder necrosis: 'A man without a bladder'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosschieter, Judith; Oudshoorn, Frederik H K; Meuleman, Eric J H; Nieuwenhuijzen, Jakko A

    2018-02-17

    Since the use of antibiotics, bladder necrosis has become a rare condition. We report a case of bladder necrosis in a 90-year-old man following urinary retention. After insertion of a transurethral catheter (TUC), 2 L of urine was evacuated. In the following days, the TUC became intermittently blocked. Adequate bladder drainage could not be obtained despite intensive rinsing and placement of a suprapubic catheter. On surgical exploration necrosis of almost the entire bladder wall, except for the trigone, was encountered. Surgical debridement of the non-viable bladder wall without opening the abdominal cavity was conducted, and a TUC was placed in the Retzius cavity to ensure evacuation of urine. Since the patient was haemodynamically unstable, construction of a urinary diversion was waived and urinary drainage of the Retzius cavity by the TUC was accepted, resulting in adequate urinary drainage without compromising renal function. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...

  17. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If You Have Questions Print en español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that ... Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) Urinary ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  18. Long neglected neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnani, Pooja; Gupta, Ruchi; Kedia, Nikhil; Pattewar, Sainath; Bahadur, Madan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI) post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  19. Long neglected neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Pooja Binnani; Ruchi Gupta; Nikhil Kedia; Sainath Pattewar; Madan Mohan Bahadur

    2011-01-01

    Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI) post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  20. Developments in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, L.; Niijima, T.; Prout, G.; Schroder, F.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Guidelines for Radiation Therapy in Clinical Research on Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma in Situ; Policy on Monitoring and Reporting Results; Standardization of Protocol Formnd The Role of Cytology in the Diagnosis, Detection and Follow-up of Bladder Cancer

  1. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    Stem cells;. Bladder tissue engineering;. Decellularization;. Bladder acellular matrix. Abstract. A wide range of injuries could affect the bladder and lead to eventual loss ... Tissue engineering relies upon three essential pillars; the scaffold, the cells seeded on scaffolds and lastly ..... Clinical trials in bladder tissue engineering.

  2. Paraganglioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder are tumors of chromaffin tissue originating from the sympathetic innervations of the urinary bladder wall and are extremely rare. Being functional, in most of the cases they are recognized by their characteristic presentation of hypertensive crisis and postmicturition syncope. A silent presentation of a bladder paraganglioma is very unusual but quite dangerous as they are easily misdiagnosed and adequate peri-operative attention is not provided. Here, we are presenting one such silent paraganglioma in adult women who presented with only a single episode of hematuria and severe hypertensive crisis occur during its trans-urethral resection.

  3. Bladder Diseases - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Bladder Diseases: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Enfermedades de la vejiga: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National ...

  4. Isolated Inguinal Bladder Hernia

    OpenAIRE

    BAYSAL, Tamer; SOYLU, Ahmet; ERDOĞAN, Özgül

    2010-01-01

    Isolated urinary bladder herniation into the inguinal canal is rare. It is often diagnosed intraoperatively during surgery or is identified after intraoperative injury. Early diagnosis with radiologic imaging is important to avoid complications during repair surgery. Computed tomography seems the best imaging choice to outline the details of herniation. We report an incidentally discovered case of inguinal bladder herniation with intravenous pyelography and computed tomography findings. ...

  5. Long neglected neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Binnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  6. Engineering functional bladder tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Maya; Madduri, Srinivas; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Milleret, Vinzent; Hall, Heike; Atala, Anthony; Eberli, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    End stage bladder disease can seriously affect patient quality of life and often requires surgical reconstruction with bowel tissue, which is associated with numerous complications. Bioengineering of functional bladder tissue using tissue-engineering techniques could provide new functional tissues for reconstruction. In this review, we discuss the current state of this field and address different approaches to enable physiologic voiding in engineered bladder tissues in the near future. In a collaborative effort, we gathered researchers from four institutions to discuss the current state of functional bladder engineering. A MEDLINE® and PubMed® search was conducted for articles related to tissue engineering of the bladder, with special focus on the cells and biomaterials employed as well as the microenvironment, vascularisation and innervation strategies used. Over the last decade, advances in tissue engineering technology have laid the groundwork for the development of a biological substitute for bladder tissue that can support storage of urine and restore physiologic voiding. Although many researchers have been able to demonstrate the formation of engineered tissue with a structure similar to that of native bladder tissue, restoration of physiologic voiding using these constructs has never been demonstrated. The main issues hindering the development of larger contractile tissues that allow physiologic voiding include the development of correct muscle alignment, proper innervation and vascularization. Tissue engineering of a construct that will support the contractile properties that allow physiologic voiding is a complex process. The combination of smart scaffolds with controlled topography, the ability to deliver multiple trophic factors and an optimal cell source will allow for the engineering of functional bladder tissues in the near future. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Bladder cancer and schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer was believed, for several decades, to be a completely unique entity of disease, different from urothelial cancer. This was probably due to its distinct clinico pathologic and demographic features that varied from those of urothelial entity. The carcinogenesis is an extremely complex process resulting from the accumulation of many genetic and epigenetic changes leading to alterations in the cell proliferation regulation process. In bladder cancer, many of these carcinogenic cascades were not fully documented or somewhat conflicting. In spite of the efforts performed, much is still needed to explore the presence or absence of the carcinogenic difference with a different etiology. The control of schistosomiasis in certain countries and the subsequent decrease in the intensity of infestation showed changing of features approaching that of urothelial tumors. However the schistosoma-associated bladder cancer presented in more advanced stages than schistosoma-non associated urothelial cancer. More recently, data are gathered that, upon applying the same treatment protocol and management care, stage by stage comparison of the treatment end-results were found to be similar in bladder cancer patients with a different etiology. All treatment options; including radical cystectomy with or without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy or tri modality bladder preserving treatment seem to lead to similar end-results regardless of etiologic factor(s) implicated in bladder cancer development.

  8. Spontaneous Bladder Perforation in an Infant Neurogenic Bladder: Laparoscopic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cabezalí Barbancho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bladder perforation is an uncommon event in childhood. It is usually associated with bladder augmentation. We are presenting a case of bladder rupture in an infant with neurogenic bladder without prior bladder surgery. Three days after lipomyelomeningocele excision the patient showed signs and symptoms of acute abdomen. The ultrasound exploration revealed significant amount of intraperitoneal free fluid and therefore a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A posterior bladder rupture was diagnosed and repaired laparoscopically. Currently, being 3 years old, she keeps successfully dry with clean intermittent catheterization. Neurogenic bladder voiding function can change at any time of its evolution and lead to complications. Early diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture is of paramount importance, so it is essential to think about it in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen.

  9. Bladder activation: afferent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2002-05-01

    The major function of the lower urinary tract is to store and periodically evacuate urine from the bladder. This requires coordination of the smooth muscles of the bladder and urethra, and of the striated muscles of the outflow region and pelvic floor by a complex neural control system. Lumbosacral afferent fibers (pelvic afferents), but also afferents in the hypogastric and pudendal nerves, are of major importance for the regulation of the mechanisms for continence and micturition. In the bladder, afferent nerves have been identified suburothelially as well as in the detrusor muscle. Suburothelially, they form a plexus that lies immediately beneath the epithelial lining. This plexus is particularly dense in the bladder neck and the trigone. The most important afferents for the micturition process are myelinated Adelta-fibers and unmyelinated C-fibers. Immunocytochemical and tracing studies have revealed that numerous peptides, including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, enkephalins, and cholecystokinin are localized either alone, or in combination, in afferent pathways of the bladder and urethra. The receptors on these nerves include: vanilloid receptors, purinoceptors, tachykinin, and prostanoid receptors. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been found to mediate excitation of small-diameter sensory neurons via P2X3 receptors, and it has been proposed that in the bladder, distention causes release of ATP from the urothelium. ATP, in turn, can activate P2X3 receptors on suburothelial afferent nerve terminals to evoke a neural discharge. However, it is most likely that a cascade of inhibitory and stimulatory transmitters/mediators, as well as ATP, are involved in the transduction mechanisms underlying the activation of afferent fibers during bladder filling.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Malignant tumor of urinary bladder Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Bladder Cancer General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  11. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Avelumab Bavencio (Avelumab) Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Durvalumab ...

  12. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. The artificial bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgrandchamps, F; Griffith, D P

    1999-04-01

    An artificial bladder should provide adequate urine storage, allow volitional complete evacuation of urine and preserve renal function. Moreover, its structure has to be biocompatible, resistant to urinary encrustation and tolerant to bacterial infection. Various solutions have been proposed over the years to achieve these multiple requirements. However, most of these solutions and their corresponding prototypes did not advance beyond the stage of a preliminary report of experimental data. This review will bring out the 'proof of principal' in alloplastic prosthetic bladder, including type of alloplast and design concept and the recent development in tissue engineering approaches.

  14. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...... experienced the symptoms for at least 6 weeks in the absence of any confusable diseases that may give rise to the symptoms. Symptoms compatible with the diagnosis are now thought to affect up to 3% of the female population in the United States with a 5:1 female-to-male preponderance. Diagnosis and treatment...

  15. Leiomyoma of Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of leiomyoma of urinary bladder, a rare benign tumor, is presented. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with long duration history of dysuria. Intravenous urography (IVU, ultrasound (US, computed tomography (CT and biopsy diagnosed this case accurately. The clinical presentation, imaging findings and management of this benign tumor are discussed.

  16. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Tomaszewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, 3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and 3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future.

  17. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  18. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  19. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  20. Pathophysiology of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banakhar, Mai A; Al-Shaiji, Tariq F; Hassouna, Magdy M

    2012-08-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common disorder that negatively affects the quality of life of our patients and carries a large socioeconomic burden. According to the International Continence Society, it is characterized as urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually, with frequency and nocturia in the absence of causative infection. The pathophysiology of this disease entity varies between neurogenic, myogenic, or idiopathic factors. This paper provides a review of the contemporary theories behind the pathophysiology of OAB.

  1. Superficial Bladder Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Schenkman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer treatment remains a challenge despite significant improvements in preventing disease progression and improving survival. Intravesical therapy has been used in the management of superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder (i.e. Ta, T1, and carcinoma in situ with specific objectives which include treating existing or residual tumor, preventing recurrence of tumor, preventing disease progression, and prolonging survival. The initial clinical stage and grade remain the main determinant factors in survival regardless of the treatment. Prostatic urethral mucosal involvement with bladder cancer can be effectively treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG intravesical immunotherapy. Intravesical chemotherapy reduces short-term tumor recurrence by about 20%, and long-term recurrence by about 7%, but has not reduced progression or mortality. Presently, BCG immunotherapy remains the most effective treatment and prophylaxis for TCC (Ta, T1, CIS and reduces tumor recurrence, disease progression, and mortality. Interferons, Keyhole-limpet hemocyanin (KLH, bropirimine and Photofrin-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT are under investigation in the management of TCC and early results are encouraging. This review highlights and summarizes the recent advances in therapy for superficial TCC.

  2. Clinical implications of underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Jin Ko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB is a common urologic condition but a complex disease that causes troublesome lower urinary tract symptoms. Currently, management of UAB remains unsatisfactory. Also, many urological diseases can be combined with UAB. In these combined cases, the treatment results may be affected by UAB component. This review focuses on the clinical implications of UAB in patients with common urologic conditions, including bladder outlet obstruction, overactive bladder syndrome and stress urinary incontinence.

  3. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    R F Sholan; G Sh Garaev; G M Nasrullaeva

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 0...

  4. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  5. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  6. Permeability and ultrastructure of human bladder epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, J; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Nielsen, S L

    1983-01-01

    Leakage of tight junctions as observed with electron microscopy and demonstration of solute transport across bladder epithelium was investigated in 13 patients with different bladder diseases: urinary retention and infection, bladder tumours and interstitial cystitis. The latter group showed cons...

  7. Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Causes in Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder outlet obstruction: Causes in men? My doctor says I might have bladder outlet obstruction. What does that mean? Answers from Erik P. Castle, M.D. Bladder outlet obstruction in men is a blockage that slows ...

  8. OVERACTIVE BLADDER SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Vishnevskiy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder is a specific syndrome characterized by bladder dysfunction that is clinically manifested by imperative urination (pollakiuria, urgency, urgent incontinence and nocturia. This state is very widely spread among children: every fifth child aged 4 to 7 shows typical bladder dysfunction. Quite often if urinary distresses are not studied well enough such children are falsely diagnosed with monosymptom enuresis, which, according to our information, actually happens in only 3,9% of cases. When examining children with urinary disorders it is reasonable to be geared to the protocol of European urologist association. According to this protocol, treatment should be started with antimuscarinimedications. The only antimuscarinic medication for treating children with hyperactive bladder that is legal in Russia is oxybutinin (Driptane, that is presently considered to be the «golden standard» of pharmaceutical treatment of overactive bladder for patients of any age. This statement is based on the modern idea of overactive bladder pathogenesis, that presupposes detrusorhypersensibility to acetylcholine. However, in some cases it might be reasonable to use some other medications, physiotherapy, sometimes as part of complex therapy. If individual dosage is observed, which will enable preventing or significantly lowering possible side effects, oxybutinin will be still considered «the golden standard» for treating overactive bladder for years to come in cases when detrusor hypersensibility to acetylcholine is the key component of bladder dysfunction pathogenesis.Key words: overactive bladder, oxybutinin, urination disorder, children.

  9. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Susan K.; Birder, Lori A.; Chai, Toby C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology. PMID:24900993

  10. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Keay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC, feline interstitial cystitis (FIC, and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB. These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology.

  11. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Brendan R. [St George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Martin A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Bockenhauer, Detlef [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  12. Molecular Diagnosis in Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Zuiverloon (Tahlita)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEpidemiologyBladder cancer (BC) is the most prevalent type of urothelial cancer and is associated with thehighest costs of all cancer types due to intensive patient surveillance. Because bladder tumorsfrequently recur, patients need to be monitored extensively [1-4]. Incidence increases

  13. Vulvar Metastasis from Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is a very rare entity; few cases are reported in the English literature. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological characteristics, evolution, and treatment of a patient with vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder followed by a brief review of the reported cases in the literature.

  14. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Brendan R.; Weber, Martin A.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran

    2011-01-01

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  15. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuge O

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Oliver Fuge,1 Nikhil Vasdev,1 Paula Allchorne,2 James SA Green2 1Department of Urology, Lister Hospital, Stevenage, UK; 2Department of Urology, Bartshealth NHS Trust, Whipps Cross Rd, London, UK Abstract: It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest

  16. Basic bladder neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, J Quentin

    2010-11-01

    Maintenance of normal lower urinary tract function is a complex process that requires coordination between the central nervous system and the autonomic and somatic components of the peripheral nervous system. This article provides an overview of the basic principles that are recognized to regulate normal urine storage and micturition, including bladder biomechanics, relevant neuroanatomy, neural control of lower urinary tract function, and the pharmacologic processes that translate the neural signals into functional results. Finally, the emerging role of the urothelium as a sensory structure is discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased bladder wall thickness is associated with severe symptoms and reduced bladder capacity in patients with bladder pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Wu

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: There are obvious differences in bladder CT scans of patients with symptoms of bladder pain due to different etiology. Increased BWT was associated with increased pain scores and decreased bladder capacity in patients with KC and IC. BWT on a CT scan might be considered a marker for the severity of bladder inflammation.

  18. Bladder stones after bladder augmentation are not what they seem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Konrad M; Misseri, Rosalia; Whittam, Benjamin; Lingeman, James E; Amstutz, Sable; Ring, Joshua D; Kaefer, Martin; Rink, Richard C; Cain, Mark P

    2016-04-01

    Bladder and renal calculi after bladder augmentation are thought to be primarily infectious, yet few studies have reported stone composition. The primary aim was to assess bladder stone composition after augmentation, and renal stone composition in those with subsequent nephrolithiasis. The exploratory secondary aim was to screen for possible risk factors for developing infectious stones. Patients treated for bladder stones after bladder augmentation at the present institution between 1981 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected on demographics, surgeries and stone composition. Patients without stone analysis were excluded. Stones containing struvite, carbonate apatite or ammonium acid ureate were classified as infectious. The following variables were analyzed for a possible association with infectious bladder stone composition: gender, history of cloacal exstrophy, ambulatory status, nephrolithiasis, recurrent urea-splitting urinary tract infections, first vs recurrent stones, timing of presentation with a calculus, history of bladder neck procedures, catheterizable channel and vesicoureteral reflux. Fisher's exact test was used for analysis. Of the 107 patients with bladder stones after bladder augmentation, 85 met inclusion criteria. Median age at augmentation was 8.0 years (follow-up 10.8 years). Forty-four patients (51.8%) recurred (14 multiple recurrences, 143 bladder stones). Renal calculi developed in 19 (22.4%) patients with a bladder stone, and 10 (52.6%) recurred (30 renal stones). Overall, 30.8% of bladder stones were non-infectious (Table). Among patients recurring after an infectious bladder stone, 30.4% recurred with a non-infectious one. Among patients recurring after a non-infectious stone, 84.6% recurred with a non-infectious one (P = 0.005). Compared with bladder stones, renal stones were more likely to be non-infectious (60.0%, P = 0.003). Of patients with recurrent renal calculi after an infectious stone, 40.0% recurred with

  19. Effect of Naftopidil on Bladder Microcirculation in a Rat Model of Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majima, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Takai, Shun; Matsukawa, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Masaki; Gotoh, Momokazu

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of naftopidil on bladder capillary blood flow using bladder outlet obstruction model rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control group, bladder-outlet-obstruction group, and bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group. Bladder-outlet-obstruction surgery was performed in the bladder-outlet-obstruction and bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil groups. The control group received sham-operation. The bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group were treated with naftopidil (30 mg/kg) for 14 days after bladder-outlet-obstruction operation, while the control and bladder-outlet-obstruction groups were treated with vehicle. Continuous cystometry was performed 14 days after the surgery. Bladder blood flow was measured after 14 days using a pencil lens charge-coupled device microscopy system. The bladder was then harvested for histology and measuring 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine tissue level by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In cystometry, the bladder-outlet-obstruction rats showed bladder overactivity, while naftopidil treatment improved the cystometric pattern. The blood flow through the submucosal capillaries of the bladder base in the bladder-outlet-obstruction group was lesser than that in the control, whereas the bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group showed significantly greater blood flow than the bladder-outlet-obstruction group. The bladder tissue in the bladder-outlet-obstruction group showed a tendency to contain more hypertrophic detrusor muscle and inflammatory cells compared to those in the control group, while naftopidil treatment suppressed these histological changes. The 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels in the bladder tissue significantly differed among the three groups (the bladder-outlet-obstruction group > the bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group > the control group). Naftopidil improved bladder overactivity as well as the impaired bladder

  20. Giant bladder diverticulum in a boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Ozcakir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the bladder diverticula in children are seen commonly which is association with infravesical obstruction or neurogenic bladder function, the case of giant congenital bladder diverticula are rare. In this paper, an 11 years old boy with giant bladder diverticula presenting urinary infections is evaluated in terms of diagnosis and management by current literature.

  1. Urethral morphology and bladder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausegger, K A; Fotter, R; Sorantin, E; Schmidt, P

    1991-01-01

    In order to calculate the relationship between Spinning top urethra (STU) and bladder instability 160 voiding cystourethrogramms (VCU), performed in 102 girls, have been analysed retrospectively. 28 girls had STU, 16 of those had bladder instability as well (57%). We could not find the highly positive correlation between unstable bladder and STU as reported by other authors, although there was a statistically positive correlation between STU and bladder instability. However the confidence interval was very broad (38%-75%). We conclude that bladder instability may contribute to STU but cannot render the etiological explanation for all cases. STU seems to be a polyetiological sign. In our opinion only the combination of STU and bladder instability has a diagnostic impact, since several therapeutical concepts are available in cases of bladder instability. The finding of STU in the VCU should alert the examiner's attention to functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. If no instability can be found, STU should be considered to be a normal variant.

  2. Urethral morphology and bladder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Fotter, R.; Sorantin, E. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Radiologische Klinik); Schmidt, P. (Rehabilitationszentrum, Schallerbach (Austria))

    1991-05-01

    In order to calculate the relationship between Spinning top urethra (STU) and bladder instability 160 voiding cystourethrogramms (VCU), performed in 102 girls, have been analysed retrospectively. 28 girls had STU, 16 of those had bladder instability as well (57%). We could not find the highly positive correlation between unstable bladder and STU as reported by other authors, although there was a statistically positive correlation between STU and bladder instability. However the confidence interval was very broad (38%-75%). We conclude that bladder instability may contribute to STU but cannot render the etiological explanation for all cases. STU seems to be a polyetiological sign. In our opinion only the combination of STU and bladder instability has a diagnostic impact, since several therapeutical concepts are available in cases of bladder instability. The finding of STU in the VCU should alert the examiner's attention to functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. If no instability can be found, STU should be considered to be a normal variant. (orig.).

  3. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  4. Bladder Diverticulitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Silberman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  5. Bladder Capacity is a Biomarker for a Bladder Centric versus Systemic Manifestation in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen J; Zambon, João; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Langefeld, Carl D; Matthews, Catherine A; Badlani, Gopal; Bowman, Heather; Evans, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome presents a significant clinical challenge due to symptom heterogeneity and the myriad associated comorbid medical conditions. We recently reported that diminished bladder capacity may represent a specific interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome subphenotype. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between anesthetic bladder capacity, and urological and nonurological clinical findings in a cohort of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had undergone therapeutic urinary bladder hydrodistention. This is a retrospective chart review of prospectively collected data on women diagnosed with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome between 2011 and 2015 who underwent bladder hydrodistention. Assessments in each patient included a detailed history and physical examination, ICPI (Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index), ICSI (Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index) and PUF (Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency Patient Symptom Scale). Bladder capacity was determined during bladder hydrodistention with the patient under general anesthesia. Mean age was 45.8 years and mean bladder capacity was 857 ml in the 110 enrolled patients. We found a significant inverse correlation between bladder capacity and scores on 3 gold standard interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome metrics, including ICPI (p = 0.0014), ICSI (p = 0.0022) and PUF (p = 0.0009) as well as urination frequency (p = 0.0025). Women with higher bladder capacity were significantly more likely to report depression (p = 0.0059) and irritable bowel syndrome (p = 0.022). Low bladder capacity while under anesthesia was significantly associated with high symptom scores on 3 validated interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome questionnaires as well as with urinary frequency. However, it was not associated with depression or other common systemic pain problems. These results suggest that low bladder capacity is a marker for a bladder

  6. Dose Distribution in Bladder and Surrounding Normal Tissues in Relation to Bladder Volume in Conformal Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, Wojciech; Wesolowska, Iwona; Urbanczyk, Hubert; Hawrylewicz, Leszek; Schwierczok, Barbara; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate bladder movements and changes in dose distribution in the bladder and surrounding tissues associated with changes in bladder filling and to estimate the internal treatment margins. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with bladder cancer underwent planning computed tomography scans with 80- and 150-mL bladder volumes. The bladder displacements associated with the change in volume were measured. Each patient had treatment plans constructed for a 'partially empty' (80 mL) and a 'partially full' (150 mL) bladder. An additional plan was constructed for tumor irradiation alone. A subsequent 9 patients underwent sequential weekly computed tomography scanning during radiotherapy to verify the bladder movements and estimate the internal margins. Results: Bladder movements were mainly observed cranially, and the estimated internal margins were nonuniform and largest (>2 cm) anteriorly and cranially. The dose distribution in the bladder worsened if the bladder increased in volume: 70% of patients (11 of 16) would have had bladder underdosed to 70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 23%, 20%, and 15% for the rectum and 162, 144, 123 cm 3 for the intestines, respectively) than with a 'partially full' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 28%, 24%, and 18% for the rectum and 180, 158, 136 cm 3 for the intestines, respectively). The change in bladder filling during RT was significant for the dose distribution in the intestines. Tumor irradiation alone was significantly better than whole bladder irradiation in terms of organ sparing. Conclusion: The displacements of the bladder due to volume changes were mainly related to the upper wall. The internal margins should be nonuniform, with the largest margins cranially and anteriorly. The changes in bladder filling during RT could influence the dose distribution in the bladder and intestines. The dose distribution in the rectum and bowel was slightly better with

  7. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  8. Invasive bladder cancer: Our experience with bladder sparing approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervek, Jozica; Cufer, Tanja; Zakotnik, Branko; Kragelj, Borut; Borstnar, Simona; Matos, Tadeja; Zumer-Pregelj, Mirjana

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is a disease associated with several unresolved therapeutic questions. Radical cystectomy still represents the most frequent treatment approach. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of bladder-sparing treatment by transurethral resection (TUR) and sequential chemoradiotherapy in patients with biopsy-proven invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: After maximal TUR, 105 patients were treated with two to four cycles of methotrexate, cisplatinum, and vinblastine polychemotherapy. In complete responders, the treatment was continued by radiotherapy (50 Gy to the bladder and 40 Gy to the regional lymph nodes), whereas in nonresponders, cystectomy was performed when feasible. Results: Complete response after TUR and chemotherapy was achieved in 52% of patients. After a median follow-up of 42 months, 52 of 75 patients (69%) selected for bladder preservation were without evidence of disease in the bladder. Freedom from local failure in complete responders to chemotherapy was 80% [95% confidence interval (CI), 69-91%) at 4 years. The actuarial survival of the entire group was 58% (95% CI, 47-69%), whereas the survival rate with the bladder intact was 45% (95% CI, 34-56%) at 4 years. Survival was significantly better in patients who responded to chemotherapy (79%) than in nonresponders (35%, p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in survival between nonresponders who underwent cystectomy and nonresponders who completed treatment with radiotherapy (approximately 30% at 3 years). Conclusion: The present study confirms that MIBC is a heterogeneous disease, and that in more than half of patients who are affected, a bladder-sparing approach is safe. Our study has also demonstrated that in nonresponders, radical cystectomy as the treatment of choice is questionable

  9. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vesicoureteral Reflux The Urinary Tract & How It Works Interstitial Cystitis (Painful Bladder Syndrome) View or Print All Sections Definition & Facts Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, or long-lasting, condition ...

  10. Inhibition of HIF Reduces Bladder Hypertrophy and Improves Bladder Function in Murine Model of Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Nao; Malykhina, Anna P; Wilcox, Duncan T

    2016-04-01

    Posterior urethral valves are the most common cause of partial bladder outlet obstruction in the pediatric population. However, to our knowledge the etiology and the detailed mechanisms underlying pathological changes in the bladder following partial bladder outlet obstruction remain to be elucidated. Recent findings suggest that hypoxia and associated up-regulation of HIFs (hypoxia-inducible factors) have a key role in partial bladder outlet obstruction induced pathology in the bladder. We examined the effects of pharmacological inhibition of HIF pathways by 17-DMAG (17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) in pathophysiological phenotypes after partial bladder outlet obstruction. Partial bladder outlet obstruction was surgically created in male C57BL/6J mice. The animals received oral administration of 17-DMAG or vehicle daily starting from the initiation of obstruction up to 5 days. Sham operated mice served as controls. Bladders were harvested from each group 2, 4 and 7 days postoperatively, and analyzed for histological and biochemical changes. Bladder function was assessed by in vitro muscle contractility recordings. Partial bladder outlet obstruction caused a significant increase in the bladder mass accompanying enhanced collagen deposition in the bladder wall while 17-DMAG treatment suppressed those increases. Treatment with 17-DMAG attenuated the degree of up-regulation of HIFs and their target genes involving the development of tissue fibrosis in obstructed bladders. Treatment with 17-DMAG improved the decreased responses of obstructed bladder strips to electrical field stimulation and KCl. In vivo 17-DMAG treatment decreased partial bladder outlet obstruction induced pathophysiological changes in the bladder. HIF pathway inhibition has a potential clinical implication for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat bladder pathology associated with partial bladder outlet obstruction. Copyright © 2016 American Urological

  11. Intraspinal schwannoma and neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K S; Ho, C S; Tai, P A; Kung, W M

    2018-04-01

    Most lumbar intradural schwannomas present initially as radiculopathies with sensory disturbances. However, neurogenic bladder dysfunction may be one of the earliest manifestations and can cause long-term disability. We present the case of a patient with a L3-4 schwannoma (newly diagnosed owing to recurrent urinary retention and urinary tract infection) who finally underwent surgical resection. Improvement of bladder sensation was documented by urodynamic study and the patient was subsequently weaned off her Foley catheter with satisfactory outcome.

  12. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  13. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  14. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R F Sholan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 000 women are diagnosed with interstitial cystitis. Diagnosis of the disease is difficult and is substantially based on clinical symptoms. Pelvic pain, urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia are the basic complaints in this pathology. The diagnosis requires exclusion of diseases with similar manifestations. So interstitial cystitis is frequently misdiagnosed as urinary tract infection, overactive bladder, urethral obstruction or diverticulosis, chronic prostatitis, bladder cancer, vulvodynia, endometriosis, and chronic pelvic pain. Etiopathogenesis of the disease is uncertain, which makes etiologic treatment impossible. Currently scientific discussions on the causes of disease continue as well as different treatment regimens are offered, but are often ineffective, palliative and temporary. The treatment for intersticial cystitis should focus on restoring normal bladder function, prevention of relapse of symptoms and improvement of patients’ quality of life. The literature review presents current view on the terminology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  15. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Sillén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB and the dysfunctional voiding (DV, have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome, most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB, with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed.

  16. Mitomycin C Intravesical Chemotherapy in Conjunction With Synergo® Radiofrequency-Induced Hyperthermia for Treatment of Carcinoma in Situ Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Unresponsive to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, With or Without Papillary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-20

    Bladder Cancer; Bladder Neoplasm; Bladder Tumors; Cancer of Bladder; Cancer of the Bladder; Malignant Tumor of Urinary Bladder; Neoplasms, Bladder; Urinary Bladder Cancer; Carcinoma in Situ of Bladder; Papillary Carcinoma of Bladder (Diagnosis); BCG-Unresponsive Bladder Cancer

  17. Bladder preservation using chemoradiation therapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toyofumi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Sato, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Ken-Ichiro; Itatani, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the long-term results and molecular markers of outcome with selective organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer using chemoradiation therapy. We examined locally invasive bladder cancer in 32 patients (30 men, 2 women; mean age at treatment 68.1 years) who underwent bladder-sparing protocols in the Department of Urology at Sumitomo Hospital between 2000 and 2005. The clinical stage was T2, T3, and T4 in 13, 16, and 3 patients, respectively. Our protocol includes aggressive transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) and 46 Gy radiotherapy (2 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the pelvis with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy (20 mg/body/day, 5 days/week, the first and fourth week, intravenously). The initial evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), urine cytology, and cystoscopy with a biopsy. During follow-up, if the patients developed superficial recurrence, they was treated with TURBT and intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), while patients with invasive recurrence were advised to undergo a salvage cystectomy. We examined the association between the expression of the Bcl-2 family in pretreatment TUR specimens and patient outcome. The mean follow-up was 54.6 months. The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that bladder preservation was achieved in 27 patients (84.4%). The actuarial local control rate with an intact bladder was 56.3% (18 patients) at 3 years. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 90.6, 84.0, and 66.9%, respectively. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 75.0, 67.2, and 33.3% in T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Bcl-x positivity was significantly associated with a poor cancer-specific survival rate (log-rank test, p=0.038). Chemoradiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer can achieve survival rates similar to those in patients treated with radical cystectomy, with successful bladder preservation. Our results suggest that the expression of Bcl-x is a

  18. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  19. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is

  20. Medical management of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvpreet S Ubee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB, as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat.

  1. Bladder hernia: Multidetector computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Gadodia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of bladder in inguinal hernia is rare, with most cases diagnosed intraoperatively. Preoperative diagnosis is even rarer. We report a case of bladder as content of inguinal hernia diagnosed using multidetector computed tomography.

  2. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  3. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplas...

  4. Pathophysiology of the underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Aizawa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB, which has been described as a symptom complex suggestive of detrusor underactivity, is usually characterized by prolonged urination time with or without a sensation of incomplete bladder emptying, usually with hesitancy, reduced sensation on filling, and slow stream often with storage symptoms. Several causes such as aging, bladder outlet obstruction, diabetes mellitus, neurologic disorders, and nervous injury to the spinal cord, cauda equine, and peripheral pelvic nerve have been assumed to be responsible for the development of UAB. Several contributing factors have been suggested in the pathophysiology of UAB, including myogenic failure, efferent and/or afferent dysfunctions, and central nervous system dysfunction. In this review article, we have described relationships between individual contributing factors and the pathophysiology of UAB based on previous reports. However, many pathophysiological uncertainties still remain, which require more investigations using appropriate animal models.

  5. Trigonalgia: An overlooked cause of bladder pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Aminu

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... has shown a mean prevalence of 61% due to bladder pain syndrome excluding pregnancy and cancer [2]. E-mail address: sani aminu@hotmail.com. Peer review under responsibility of Pan African Urological Surgeons'. Association. Bladder pain denotes painful experience arising from the bladder.

  6. Tumour cell expansion in bladder epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.J. Rebel (Annemarie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBladder cancer is common in western society. The major problem of patients with superficial bladder cancer is the high recurrence rate and multifocality of these tumours. In 70 % of the patients superficial bladder cancer recurs after local resection of the tumour within 15 years. The

  7. Bladder Dysfunction and Urinary Incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    F. faizi

    2009-01-01

      "nIn the name of God. Dear colleagues, ladies and gentlemen, it is a great honor to be here. Bladder dysfunction is serious enough to seek serious help. If you may know I am working in a private clinic which it is impossible to follow the patients so this lecture is based on unusual and rare cases who came to me. Bladder dysfunction (BD) is common among 30% of young and old people who are suffering from it, however it is more common in old ages. According to a research, women ...

  8. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  9. Leiomyoma of the bladder and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabbaj, N.; Dafiri, R.; Imani, F.; Benslimane, L.; Benchekroun, A.

    1998-01-01

    Unlike epithelial tumors, connective tissue tumors are uncommon, representing only 3 % of all bladder tumors. Leiomyoma of the bladder is the most frequent non-epithelial benign tumor of the bladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MIR) is highly useful for diagnostic purposes and to determine the degree of extension. Only few reports of sonographic findings have been reported for leiomyoma of the bladder. The tumor usually develops within the bladder. Extra-vesicular formations have also been reported as well as a few intramural localizations. The characteristic feature is the absence of mucosal involvement. We analyzed the MRI findings in a case of leiomyoma of the bladder with intra and extra-vesicular development inflammatory reaction of the bladder wall and uterine adherences in a woman with a past history of chronic cystitis. The role of diagnostic MRI is discussed. (author)

  10. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  11. Bladder-type hydropneumatic accumulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anigas, F.

    1985-01-01

    Hydropneumatic pressure accumulators allow liquids to be stored under pressure, their operating principle being based on the inherent compressibility of elements in a liquid and gaseous state. A wide range of fluids can be covered by means of the appropriate choice of the material for the body and bladder. Their main applications are: energy accumulation, safety reserve, suspension. (author)

  12. Bladder carcinoma. Apport MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.; Spittler, G.; Jacqmin, D.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the second most commun cause of urogenital tumor. It is suspected by abdominal ultrasound and prouved by cystoscopy with biopsy. At present, MR Imaging is the most accurate diagnostic modality for loco-regional staging. Urography is still useful to appreciate urinary tract [fr

  13. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    promote angiogenesis and neurogenesis of the regenerated organs. The choice of the scaffold and the type of cells is a crucial and fundamental step in regenerative medicine. In this review article, we demonstrated these three crucial factors of bladder tissue engineering, with the pros and cons of each scaffold type and.

  14. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia) is found to be a preneoplastic lesion of the rat urinary bladder. Therefore, the promoting and inhibitory effects of various chemicals in two-stage urinary bladder carcinogenesis were judged by measuring PN hyperplasia in rats. Dose-dependent and organ-specific effects of the urinary bladder promoter, saccharin, in the induction of PN hyperplasia were shown in rats after initiation by BBN. The promoting effect of saccharin was seen more clearly in the urinary bladder of rats after potent initiation. A strain difference in susceptibility of the urinary bladder to the promoter was also shown. These results suggest that the above various factors may also have modifying activities on urinary bladder carcinogenesis in man. PMID:6832095

  15. Management of vesicoureteral reflux in neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Q. Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is a significant risk factor for pyelonephritis and renal scarring. VUR can occur through a defective ureterovesical junction (UVJ or an overwhelmed normal UVJ mechanism such as in bladder dysfunction of congenital, acquired, or behavioral etiology. There are numerous causes for the development of a neurogenic bladder from spinal dysraphisms to spinal cord trauma and even centrally based abnormalities in children with apparently normal motor function (inappropriately termed nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder. The foundation of managing reflux in these neurogenic bladders is to maintain low bladder pressures which will commonly mean that compliance will be normal as well. There have been several publications that have shown that if bladder pressures are lowered simply with clean intermittent catheterization and medications that the reflux can resolve spontaneously. Alternatively, the patients that are in need of bladder augmentation can have spontaneous resolution of their reflux with the resulting increase in capacity. Surgical intervention is called for when bladder capacity is adequate and the reflux persists or if it is part of a larger operation to increase capacity and to manage outlet resistance. In some instances, reimplantation is necessary because the ureters interfere with the bladder neck procedure. Aside from open and robotic surgical intervention the use of endoscopic injectable agents is beginning to become more popular especially when combined with intravesical botulinum toxin A injections. Great strides are being made in the management of patients with neurogenic bladders and we are seeing more choices for the urologist to be able to manage these patients.

  16. Exogenous glycosaminoglycans coat damaged bladder surfaces in experimentally damaged mouse bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstital cystitis is often treated with exogenous glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, chondroitin sulphate (Uracyst, hyaluronate (Cystistat or the semi-synthetic pentosan polysulphate (Elmiron. The mechanism of action is presumed to be due to a coating of the bladder surface to replace the normally present chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate lost as a result of the disease. This study used fluorescent labelled chondroitin sulphate to track the distribution of glycosaminoglycans administered intravesically to mouse bladder that had been damaged on the surface. Methods The surfaces of mouse bladders were damaged by 3 mechanisms – trypsin, 10 mM HCl, and protamine sulphate. Texas Red-labeled chondroitin sulphate was instilled into the bladders of animals with damaged bladders and controls instilled only with saline. Bladders were harvested, frozen, and sectioned for examination by fluorescence. Results The normal mouse bladder bound a very thin layer of the labelled chondroitin sulphate on the luminal surface. Trypsin- and HCl-damaged bladders bound the labelled chondroitin sulphate extensively on the surface with little penetration into the bladder muscle. Protamine produced less overt damage, and much less labelling was seen, presumably due to loss of the label as it complexed with the protamine intercalated into the bladder surface. Conclusion Glycosaminoglycan administered intravesically does bind to damaged bladder. Given that the changes seen following bladder damage resemble those seen naturally in interstitial cystitis, the mechanisms proposed for the action of these agents is consistent with a coating of damaged bladder.

  17. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  18. Bladder injuries frequently missed in polytrauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanweer Karim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tanweer Karim, Margaret Topno, Vinod Sharma, Raymond Picardo, Ankur HastirSurgery, MGM Medical College, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, IndiaAbstract: Bladder injuries are very common in patients who have had road traffic accidents. The method of diagnosis and management of such injuries is well established and accepted. However, trauma to the bladder can be associated with other life-threatening injuries which are frequently missed, and often diagnosed during laparotomy for other reasons. The aim of this study was to diagnose bladder injury in polytrauma patients as early as possible, taking into consideration the fact that these patients are hemodynamically unstable and require rapid evaluation and management. In order to achieve our objective, we used bedside sonography with retrograde instillation of normal saline to diagnose bladder injury in addition to use of the conventional retrograde cystogram.Keywords: bladder injury, bladder rupture, retrograde cystogram

  19. UTIs in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Mona S; Mure, Amanda; Gomez, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) remain one of the most prevalent and frustrating morbidities for neurogenic bladder patients, and death attributed to urosepsis in the spinal cord injury (SCI) patient is higher when compared to the general population. Risk factors include urinary stasis, high bladder pressures, bladder stones, and catheter use. While classic symptoms of UTI include dysuria, increased frequency and urgency, neurogenic bladder patients present differently with increased spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary incontinence, and vague pains. Multiple modalities have been assessed for prevention including catheter type, oral supplements, bladder irrigation, detrusor injections and prophylactic antimicrobials. Of these, bladder inoculation with E. coli HU2117, irrigation with iAluRil(®), detrusor injections, and weekly prophylaxis with alternating antibiotics appear to have a positive reduction in UTI but require further study. Ultimately, treatment for symptomatic UTI should account for the varied flora and possible antibiotic resistances including relying on urine cultures to guide antibiotic therapy.

  20. SOX4 expression in bladder carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Mads; Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Wiuf, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    The human transcription factor SOX4 was 5-fold up-regulated in bladder tumors compared with normal tissue based on whole-genome expression profiling of 166 clinical bladder tumor samples and 27 normal urothelium samples. Using a SOX4-specific antibody, we found that the cancer cells expressed...... in the clinical bladder material and a small subset of the genes showed a high correlation to SOX4 expression. The present data suggest a role of SOX4 in the bladder cancer disease....... the SOX4 protein and, thus, did an evaluation of SOX4 protein expression in 2,360 bladder tumors using a tissue microarray with clinical annotation. We found a correlation (P bladder cell line HU609, SOX4...

  1. Scrotal Herniation of Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hamidi Madani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inguinal bladder hernia is a rare clinical condition, with 1–3% of all inguinal hernias involving the bladder. Any portion of the bladder may herniate, from a small portion or a diverticulum to most of the bladder. We present a 55-year-old male with an intermittent right scrotal mass of 6 months’ duration. The mass lesion protruded through the right inguinal canal before voiding and reduced after that. Scrotal sonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion in the scrotum that stretched cranially to the intra-abdominal portion of the bladder. Excretory urography showed a duplicated system in the left kidney and deviation of the left orifice to the right side of the trigon. Finally, cystography illustrated herniation of the bladder to the right scrotum. Surgical repair of the hernia was done with mesh. Follow-up cystography one month postoperatively revealed no herniation.

  2. Analysis of intravesical recurrence after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, Mizuki; Miyanaga, Naoto; Hinotsu, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The subjects were 77 patients with T2-3N0M0 bladder cancer whose bladder was preserved by intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation. The patterns of the first recurrences were retrospectively analyzed. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, 17 patients (22.1%) experienced intravesical recurrence without metastasis, 14 (82.4%) of which were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence and 3 (17.6%) of which were muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrences. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at the same site as the initial tumor site in all three cases, whereas non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at different sites in 64% of the patients in that group. The peak hazard of the non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence was observed at around a year after treatment. Recurrent non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer was of a significantly lower histological grade with lower Ki-67-labeling indices than the initial muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Twelve (85.7%) of 14 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence achieved disease-free status. The multivariate analysis revealed that multiplicity, grade and tumor size were significantly correlated with the recurrence (P=0.0001, 0.0442 and 0.0412, respectively). Most of the recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The recurrence pattern and characteristics of the tumors did not differ from those of primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk factors would be candidates for prophylactic intravesical therapy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence. (author)

  3. Epitheloid hemangioendothelioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitheloid hemangioendothelioma is an uncommon vascular neoplasm and has an unpredictable clinical behavior. It is characterized by round or spindle-shaped endothelial cells with cytoplasmic vacuolation. Most often, epitheloid hemangioendothelioma arise from the soft tissues of the upper and lower extremities and it has borderline malignant potential. We describe the first reported case of epitheloid hemangioendothelioma in the urinary bladder, which was treated by transurethral resection. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry.

  4. Dog Ear-Like Bladder Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Cuce

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The hernia content involving a bladder segment occurs in 1-4 % of cases of the inguinal hernias. Inguinoscrotal bladder hernias are usually found incidentally on radiological examinations or at the time of herniorrhaphy. We present an adult case that has a left inguinal bladder hernia detected and evaluated by sonography, intravenous pyelography (IVP, and computerized tomography (CT. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(3.000: 187-189

  5. Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoyama, Kuniko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Chiharu; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Osamu; Sugiyama, Megumi; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina

    2011-03-01

    Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation is not well known. Hence, we systematically investigated the frequency of reduced or increased bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. We analyzed 911 patients who were referred from within our hospital. Data registries included a diagnosis, a lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire, a urodynamic study, and neurological examinations. Reduced bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation >300 ml. Increased bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation sensation (33.3-43.8% in diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Myelopathies are the second most common cause (17.4-25.0% in multiple sclerosis, etc.). Less common is brain diseases (9.6% in multiple system atrophy, etc.). In contrast, myelopathies are the most common cause of increased bladder sensation without DO (25.0-40.0% in spinal forms of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, etc.). Neuropathies are the second most common (17.3-22.2% in post-pelvic organ surgery, diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Less common is brain/mental diseases (20.0% in psychogenic bladder dysfunction, 8.1% in Parkinson's disease, etc.). The present study revealed that neuropathies are the most common cause of reduced bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. Increased bladder sensation without DO occurs mainly in peripheral and central sensory pathway lesions, as well as in basal ganglia lesions and psychogenic bladder dysfunction. Reduced and increased bladder sensation should be a major treatment target for maximizing patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Bladder Management in Children: Intermittent Catheterization Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Suzanne Marie; Korcal, Layna; Thomas, Ginger

    2018-03-01

    Clean intermittent catheterization (IC) of the bladder is one example of advanced medical care required by students with special health care needs. The success of a child's intermittent catheterization program in a community setting such as a school is dependent on an educated team. This article discusses indications and problems that arise with IC bladder management in the pediatric population. The article also provides information about current best practice for IC management to assist school nurses in the optimization of bladder health.

  7. Occupational exposure to solvents and bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between exposure to selected solvents and the risk of bladder cancer. This study is based on the Nordic Occupational Cancer (NOCCA) database and comprises 113,343 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed in Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden...... of occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, aromatic hydrocarbon solvents, benzene and toluene and the risk of bladder cancer....

  8. Bladder wash cytology, quantitative cytology, and the qualitative BTA test in patients with superficial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, H. G.; van Balken, M. R.; Schamhart, D. H.; Peelen, P.; de Reijke, T.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.; Witjes, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Two new methods for the detection of transitional tumor cells in bladder wash (karyometry: QUANTICYT) and voided urine material (BARD BTA test) were compared with bladder wash cytology for the prediction of histology and tumor recurrence. Bladder wash material and voided urine were sampled from 138

  9. A bladder diverticulum model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Süleyman; Kuzdan, Özgür; Özaydın, Seyithan; Başdaş, Cemile Beşik; Özaydın, İpek; Erdoğan, Cankat; Sander, Serdar

    2016-10-01

    Shuttling of some of the bladder volume into the bladder diverticulum (BD) can cause urinary retention, lower urinary tract dysfunction, infection, and stone formation. This experimental study is the first to create a rabbit BD to study micturition physiology (urodynamics and pathology) that mimics clinical findings. The study included 16 New Zealand adult male rabbits in the BD group and 16 sham-operated controls. BD creation consisted of a lower midline laparotomy and bladder entry via the spacing between the detrusor muscle fibers and the mucosa, posterolaterally from the bladder wall. The detrusor was excised to provide a mucosal prolapsus, creating a narrow BD neck (Figure). The sham group underwent bladder exposure with a midline incision. All rabbits underwent urodynamic study preoperatively and postoperatively, consisting of postmicturition residue (PMR), maximum bladder capacity (MBC), voiding detrusor pressure (VPdet), filling detrusor pressure (FPdet), compliance, and urine flow (Qflow). The animals were then sacrificed and their bladders assessed for pathology and stone formation. Preoperative MBC, Pdet, and Qmax were within reference ranges. No animals had PMR or urinary tract infections (UTIs). The BD group showed urodynamic and pathologic bladder changes, including decreased (28%) cystometric bladder capacity and compliance (Sham: 26.8 ± 0.4; BD: 4.46 ± 1.08, p = 0.0001) and increased post-void residual PMR (8.3 ± 2.4 mL). Pathology revealed increased bladder detrusor thickness correlated with urodynamic findings of increased filling detrusor pressures (Sham: 1.58 ± 0.2; BD: 4.89 ± 0.93, p = 0.0001). Urodynamics revealed intermittent BD bladder contraction during the filling phases. Eight BD group rabbits had UTIs; five had stone formation (4-9 mm). In the literature, it has not been determined whether lower urinary tract disorders (LUTD) could cause diverticula, or if a congenital diverticula could be reason for LUTD. Anatomical

  10. Bladder Control Problems and Bedwetting in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Clinical Trials Hematuria: Blood in the Urine Interstitial Cystitis (Painful Bladder Syndrome) Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Kidney Infection Definition & ...

  11. Enhanced angiogenesis and relaxation of bladder as early response to bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun; Doo, Seung Whan; An, Jin; Kim, Seung U

    2013-01-01

    To provide insights into the pathogenesis of bladder insult secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Six-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 80) were divided into eight groups, 10 rats each, according to the duration of bladder outlet obstruction, including 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h and 1 week. Cystometric parameters were evaluated at 72 h and 1 week after bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder tissues were harvested and Masson's trichrome staining was carried out. Each slide was inspected microscopically and the mean percent collagen area was examined. Changes of collagen deposition and pathological expression of several factors including hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1 and nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid of bladders were evaluated. A significant time-dependent increase in the bladder weight after 6 h and the percent of collagen area after 24 h of bladder outlet obstruction were found. Increase in hypoxia inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β1, inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression, time-dependent increase in vascular endothelial growth factor, neuronal nitric oxide synthase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression after 6 h of bladder outlet obstruction was found. The intercontraction interval decreased significantly after 72 h of bladder outlet obstruction. Cellular remodeling in the bladder secondary to bladder outlet obstruction starts in the early hours and it includes enhanced angiogenesis and bladder relaxation. Early relief from bladder outlet obstruction is helpful to preserve bladder structure and function. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Giant bladder lithiasis: case report and bibliographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Vilar, Daniel; Beltran Persiva, José; Pérez Mestre, Mateo; Povo Martin, Iván José; Miralles Aguado, Jaume; Garau Perelló, Carmen; De Francia, Jose Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Urinary lithiasis is a very frequent urological disease but bladder lithiasis is very uncommon.Patients usually refer voiding symptoms and hematuria. The diagnosis is made after imaging tests. We report a clinical case describing a giant bladder stone and perform a bibliographic review. A 43 year old man with the diagnosis of giant bladder stone (more than 10 cm diameter). We searched Medline using the terms: giant bladder stone, giant bladder lithiasis, bladder lithiasis, giant bladder lithiasis. We made the diagnosis of giant bladder stone after a simple kidney, ureter and bladder (KUB) X Ray. The treatment for this patient was a cystolithotomy. We found more than 230 reports at Medline and chose the most referred ones and the last 10 years reports. Giant bladder lithiasis is a very rare pathology. The gold standard for diagnosis is cystoscopy but sometimes with a KUB Xray or an ultrasound is enough. Because of its size, cistolitotomy is the correct treatment for giant bladder stone.

  13. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.E. Mensah

    ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication: Bladder can be augmented with dorsal urethral mucosa. J.E. Mensaha,∗. , K.N. Ampadua, M.Y. Kyeia, B. Edusieb.

  14. Suprapubic prostatectomy with and without continuous bladder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... without continuous bladder irrigation is simple to perform, safe and easy to learn. This procedure permits patient ambulation as soon as spinal anesthesia wears out, reducing the risk of the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis. With the radical removal of bladder infusion solutions and reduced need for nursing attention ...

  15. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Agrawal, Sachin; Bläckberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has evolved from the first reports on bladder endoscopy and transurethral resection to the introduction of adjuvant intravesical treatment. However, disease recurrence and progression remain an ongoing risk, placing a heavy burden on he...

  16. Bladder diverticulitis on PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Wosnitzer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Diverticula are commonly seen in hollow viscous organs. One common complication of diverticula is infection, known as diverticulitis. Although diverticulitis has been extensively described with respect to the colon, not many cases describe diverticulitis of the urinary bladder. We report a case of diverticulitis of the bladder to emphasize the imaging findings on PET/CT and to discuss management and possible complications.

  17. Bladder pressure sensors in an animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koldewijn, E. L.; van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Schaafsma, E.; Wijkstra, H.; Debruyne, F. M.; Brindley, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    Urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia might be inhibited on demand if changes in bladder pressure could be detected by sensors and transferred into pudendal nerve electrostimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate how the bladder wall reacts on different sensor implants.

  18. NEOADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY FOR BLADDER CARCINOMA IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate the impact of preoperative accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of bladder carcinoma in Egyptian patients. Patients and Methods Between December 1996 and February 2000, 104 Egyptian patients with pathologically proven infiltrative bladder carcinoma were enrolled in ...

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma in bladder extrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral-Ribeiro, J; Silva, C; Sousa, L; Pérez García, D; Ribeiro dos Santos, A

    2005-01-01

    Bladder extrophy is a rare congenital malformation that nowadays is surgically corrected in neonatal period. We present a case report of a 71-year-old male with a verrucous squamous cell carcinoma arising in a classical uncorrected form of bladder extrophy.

  20. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  1. Bladder dysfunction in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Kristian; Nielsen, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often have lower urinary tract symptoms. Seventy-four percent of patients with early-to-moderate disease report more than one bladder disturbance symptom. Severe bladder symptoms are reported in 27-39% of PD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  2. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  3. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-21

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  4. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xiangfei; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan; Van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja

    2012-01-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  5. Overactive bladder syndrome - management and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Janine; McLeod, Nicholas; Thani-Gasalam, Ruban; Rashid, Prem

    2012-11-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is a symptom-based clinical diagnosis. It is characterised by urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia, with or without urge urinary incontinence. These symptoms can often be managed in the primary care setting. This article provides a review on overactive bladder syndrome and provides advice on management for the general practitioner. Overactive bladder syndrome can have a significant effect on quality of life, and affects 12-17% of the population. Prevalence increases with age. The management of overactive bladder syndrome involves exclusion of underlying pathology. First line treatment includes lifestyle interventions, pelvic floor exercises, bladder training and antimuscarinic agents. Failure of conservative management necessitates urology referral. Second line therapies are more invasive, and include botulinum toxin, neuromodulation or surgical interventions such as augmentation cystoplasty or urinary diversion.

  6. [Etiology and pathogenesis of overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bschleipfer, T; Wagenlehner, F; Weidner, W

    2011-04-01

    The symptom complex"overactive bladder" (OAB) affects more than 10% of adult individuals. The etiopathology is complex and multifactorial. Foremost, urinary tract infection, bladder cancer, foreign bodies, and history of radiation or intravesical instillation of chemotherapeutics must be excluded. In many cases, OAB is caused by neurogenic disorders that activate involuntary detrusor contractions (detrusor overactivity, DO). Also, non-neurogenic disorders such as bladder outlet obstruction or dysfunctions of the female pelvic floor/slack ligaments that affect the urothelium, suburothelium, detrusor and bladder afferents are substantially involved in the pathogenesis of OAB. Until now, circulatory disorders have not been adequately taken into consideration but seem to be another etiological factor that causes OAB. Henceforth, molecular changes of bladder afferents and circulatory disorders in patients suffering from OAB have to be investigated in more detail.

  7. Occupational variation in incidence of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; MacLeod, Jill; Demers, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare occupational variation of the risk of bladder cancer in the Nordic countries and Canada. Methods: In the Nordic Occupational Cancer study (NOCCA), 73 653 bladder cancer cases were observed during follow-up of 141.6 million person......: Elevated risks of bladder cancer were observed among hairdressers, printers, sales workers, plumbers, painters, miners and laundry workers. Teachers and agricultural workers had reduced risk of bladder cancer in both cohorts. Chimney-sweeps, tobacco workers and waiters had about 1.5-fold risk in the Nordic...... countries; no risk estimates for these categories were given from the CanCHEC cohort. Conclusion: We observed different occupational patterns in risk of bladder cancer in Nordic countries and Canada. The only occupation with similarly increased risk was observed among sales workers. Differences in smoking...

  8. Non-bladder conditions in female Taiwanese patients with interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu-Hua; Lin, Alex T L; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2014-08-01

    To detect non-bladder conditions in patients with interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome. A total of 122 female interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome patients and a control group of 122 age-matched female patients with stress urinary incontinence completed screening questionnaires for irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, multiple chemical sensitivities, tension and migraine headache, localized myofascial pain disorder, and fibromyalgia. Interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome patients also completed questionnaires on interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome symptom severity, including the O'Leary-Sant symptom index, and the visual analog scale for pain and urgency. Interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome patients were more likely to meet diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome than controls (37.5% vs 11.5%), and tension/migraine headache (38.7% vs 15.7%; all P interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome symptoms as measured by the visual analog scale of pain (P = 0.008) and O'Leary-Sant bother index (P = 0.035). Interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome patients are more likely to have multiple non-bladder conditions. These conditions correlate with the severity of interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome symptoms. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi Jeanet; Nørgaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results......-intended radiation therapy. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: One-year mortality was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15-21). One-year cancer-specific mortality was 25% (95% CI: 22-27%). One-year mortality after cystectomy was 14% (95% CI: 10-18). Ninety-day mortality after cystectomy was 3% (95% CI: 1-5) in 2013. One......-year mortality following curative-intended radiation therapy was 32% (95% CI: 24-39) and 1-year cancer-specific mortality was 23% (95% CI: 16-31) in 2013. CONCLUSION: This preliminary DaBlaCa-data report showed that the treatment of MIBC in Denmark overall meet high international academic standards. The database...

  10. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18(q21: 21. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment.

  11. Complex bladder-exstrophy-epispadias management: Causes of failure of initial bladder closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouame Dibi Bertin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of the initial closure of the complex bladder-exstrophy remains a challenge in pediatric surgery. This study describes a personal experience of the causes of failure of the initial closure and operative morbidity during the surgical treatment of bladder-exstrophy complex. From April 2000 to March 2014, four patients aged 16 days to 7 years and 5 months underwent complex exstrophy-epispadias repair with pelvic osteotomies. There were three males and one female. Three of them had posterior pelvic osteotomy, one had anterior innominate osteotomy. Bladder Closure: Bladder closure was performed in three layers. Our first patient had initial bladder closure with polyglactin 4/0 (Vicryl ® 4/0, concerning the last three patients, initial bladder closure was performed with polydioxanone 4/0 (PDS ® 4/0. The bladder was repaired leaving the urethral stent and ureteral stents for full urinary drainage for three patients. In one case, only urethral stent was left, ureteral drainage was not possible, because stents sizes were more important than the ureteral diameter. Out of a total of four patients, initial bladder closure was completely achieved for three patients. At the immediate postoperative follow-up, two patients presented a complete disunion of the abdominal wall and bladder despite an appropriate postoperative care. The absorbable braided silk (polyglactin used for the bladder closure was considered as the main factor in the failure of the bladder closure. The second cause of failure of the initial bladder closure was the incomplete urine drainage, ureteral catheterisation was not possible because the catheters sizes were too large compared with the diameters of the ureters. The failure of the initial bladder-exstrophy closure may be reduced by a closure with an absorbable monofilament silk and efficient urine drainage via ureteral catheterisation.

  12. Complex bladder-exstrophy-epispadias management: causes of failure of initial bladder closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Kouame Dibi; Serge, Kouame Yapo Guy; Moufidath, Sounkere; Maxime, Koffi; Hervé, Odehouri Koudou Thierry; Baptiste, Yaokreh Jean; Samba, Tembely; Gaudens, Dieth Atafi; Ossenou, Ouattara; Ruffin, Dick

    2014-01-01

    The success of the initial closure of the complex bladder-exstrophy remains a challenge in pediatric surgery. This study describes a personal experience of the causes of failure of the initial closure and operative morbidity during the surgical treatment of bladder-exstrophy complex. From April 2000 to March 2014, four patients aged 16 days to 7 years and 5 months underwent complex exstrophy-epispadias repair with pelvic osteotomies. There were three males and one female. Three of them had posterior pelvic osteotomy, one had anterior innominate osteotomy. Bladder Closure: Bladder closure was performed in three layers. Our first patient had initial bladder closure with polyglactin 4/0 (Vicryl ® 4/0), concerning the last three patients, initial bladder closure was performed with polydioxanone 4/0 (PDS ® 4/0). The bladder was repaired leaving the urethral stent and ureteral stents for full urinary drainage for three patients. In one case, only urethral stent was left, ureteral drainage was not possible, because stents sizes were more important than the ureteral diameter. Out of a total of four patients, initial bladder closure was completely achieved for three patients. At the immediate postoperative follow-up, two patients presented a complete disunion of the abdominal wall and bladder despite an appropriate postoperative care. The absorbable braided silk (polyglactin) used for the bladder closure was considered as the main factor in the failure of the bladder closure. The second cause of failure of the initial bladder closure was the incomplete urine drainage, ureteral catheterisation was not possible because the catheters sizes were too large compared with the diameters of the ureters. The failure of the initial bladder-exstrophy closure may be reduced by a closure with an absorbable monofilament silk and efficient urine drainage via ureteral catheterisation.

  13. Sensory Hyperinnervation Distinguishes Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis from Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regauer, Sigrid; Gamper, Marianne; Fehr, Mathias K; Viereck, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Pain is the key symptom that distinguishes bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis from overactive bladder syndrome but overlap occurs. To find a discriminating marker for these bladder diseases we examined sensory hyperinnervation and neurotrophin receptor expression in bladder biopsies as well as nerve growth factor levels in urine. Bladder biopsies from patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, including 12 with and 19 without Hunner lesions, 13 with overactive bladder syndrome and 12 healthy controls, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry with antibodies to the nerve cell marker PGP9.5 (neuron-specific protein gene product 9.5), p75 NTR (p75 neurotrophin receptor), the B-lymphocyte marker CD20 and mast cell tryptase. Urinary nerve growth factor was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Subepithelial sensory hyperinnervation on PGP9.5 staining had 97% sensitivity and 76% specificity, increased lymphocytic infiltration had 90% sensitivity and 80% specificity, and urothelial defects had 97% sensitivity and 76% specificity to distinguish bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with and without Hunner lesions from overactive bladder syndrome and healthy controls. Increased sensory innervation was associated with submucosal mast cell localization. Staining of p75 NTR in basal urothelial cells was indicative of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Urinary nerve growth factor levels were below the detection level and did not differentiate bladder diseases from healthy controls. Sensory hyperinnervation and basal urothelial p75 NTR staining together with assessment of inflammatory lymphocytes and urothelial integrity allow for the differentiation of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and overactive bladder syndrome even in the absence of Hunner lesions. Furthermore, these histopathological criteria enable the identification of early disease stages or oligosymptomatic/asymptomatic cases and may permit timely treatment

  14. Polyps in continent catheterizable bladder channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Travis W; Mitchell, Michael E; Balcom, Anthony H

    2013-02-01

    We describe our experience with polyps encountered in bladder continent catheterizable channels. An IRB-approved retrospective study was conducted on all patients at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin with continent catheterizable channels managed by a single physician over a 16-year time period. Fifty-five patients were identified with bladder channels. During a median follow-up of 7 years (range 3-16 years), 20% (11/55) of bladder channels developed polyps. The time to diagnosis of a polyp in bladder channels from initial surgery ranged from 3 months to 8 years (median of 29 months). Fifty-five percent (6/11) of patients who developed bladder polyps were symptomatic. All patients' symptoms resolved after treatment by endoscopic resection. Forty-five percent (5/11) of polyps recurred after resection. The time of recurrence ranged from 4 months to 7 years (median of 19 months). Polyps were universally benign inflammatory granulomatous tissue. This is the first series reporting the incidence of polyps in bladder catheterizable channels. Patients with continent catheterizable bladder channels can develop symptomatic polyps in their channels, of unknown long-term significance and risk. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. "Hair in the Bladder": An Unusual Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cindolo, Luca; Bada, Maida; Bellocci, Roberto; De Francesco, Piergustavo; Castellan, Pietro; Berardinelli, Francesco; Neri, Fabio; Schips, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare condition whereby a hairball is found in the human stomach or gastrointestinal tract, most frequently in young women, mainly in association with a psychiatric disorder. Trichobezoar cases have also been reported in the bladder and represent a rare complication of foreign bodies, called "hair nidus or hair ball," in patients with chronic catheter. Approximately 10% to 15% of patients on long-term urethral catheter or clean intermittent self-catheterization develop urinary tract stones. In a small minority of cases, bladder stones can develop around a foreign body that was introduced into the bladder. In the literature, there are few cases of foreign bladder bodies that formed stones over a hair nidus. Recognizing this condition can optimize the patient's quality of life. Herein, we present a case of a 71-year-old Caucasian male with a long-term catheter in hypocontractile urinary bladder secondary to injury of pelvic plexus after rectal surgery. He had a bladder stone caused by hair encrusted together. Hair is introduced into the bladder either by adherence to the catheter directly or by overlying the urethral meatus and being pushed internally. Regular hygiene and shaving of pubic area represent effective preventive measures to reduce this kind of complications in patients with chronic indwelling catheter or under a self-catheterization regimen.

  16. Thrombomodulin expression regulates tumorigenesis in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Te; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Lin, Paul- Yang; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potential tumor markers will help improve therapeutic planning and patient management. Thrombomodulin (TM) is a sensitive urothelial marker. TM was reported to be one of the endogenous anti-metastatic factors and has diagnostic and prognostic values for the progression of carcinoma. In the present study, we examine the role of TM in bladder cancer. We studied the role of TM in tumor behavior and related signaling pathways in vitro using the human bladder cancer cell lines HT1376, HT1197, J82 and T24, and in vivo using animal models. We also selected clinical specimens from 100 patients with bladder cancer for immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the predictive capacity of TM in tumor invasiveness. The data revealed that positive immunoreactivity for TM was inversely correlated with clinical stage and DNA methyltransferase 1 immunoreactivity. Decreased TM expression could predict the aggressive tumor growth and advanced clinical stage in bladder cancer. When TM was inhibited, tumor growth rate and invasion ability were augmented in vitro and in vivo. The underlying changes included increased cell proliferation, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB activation significantly increased TM expression and attenuated tumor aggressiveness in bladder cancer. TM plays an important role in bladder cancer tumor aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo and is a clinically significant predictor that may represent a suitable therapeutic target for bladder cancer

  17. Urinary bladder cancer: role of MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sadhna; Rajesh, Arumugam; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Gaitonde, Krishnanath; Lall, Chandana G; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Aeron, Gunjan; Bracken, Robert B; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2012-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variety of pathologic features, cytogenetic characteristics, and natural histories. It is the fourth most common cancer in males and the tenth most common cancer in females. Urinary bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate, necessitating long-term surveillance after initial therapy. Early detection is important, since up to 47% of bladder cancer-related deaths may have been avoided. Conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are only moderately accurate in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer, with cystoscopy and pathologic staging remaining the standards of reference. However, the role of newer MR imaging sequences (eg, diffusion-weighted imaging) in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer is still evolving. Substantial advances in MR imaging technology have made multiparametric MR imaging a feasible and reasonably accurate technique for the local staging of bladder cancer to optimize treatment. In addition, whole-body CT is the primary imaging technique for the detection of metastases in bladder cancer patients, especially those with disease that invades muscle. © RSNA, 2012.

  18. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.

  19. Experimental electrical stimulation of the bladder using a new device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T; Christiansen, P; Nielsen, B

    1986-01-01

    Repeated bladder contractions were evoked during a six month period in three unanaesthetized female minipigs by using unipolar carbon fiber electrodes embedded in the bladder wall adjacent to the ureterovesical junction. In contrast to bipolar and direct bladder muscle stimulation unipolar...... electrodes at each ureterovesical junction evoked bladder pressure increase similar to those produced in previous investigations in dogs. Sacral nerve stimulation of S2 evoked bladder contraction at a minimal current. Microscopic examination revealed no cellular reactions to the carbon fibers...

  20. Evaluating Variations of Bladder Volume Using an Ultrasound Scanner in Rectal Cancer Patients during Chemoradiation: Is Protocol-Based Full Bladder Maintenance Using a Bladder Scanner Useful to Maintain the Bladder Volume?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong In Yoon

    Full Text Available The maintenance of full bladder is important to reduce radiation-induced toxicities and maintain the therapeutic consistency in locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of protocol-based full bladder maintenance by assessing bladder volume variation using an ultrasound bladder scanner to maintain bladder volume.From March 2011 to May 2011, twenty consecutive rectal cancer patients receiving external beam RT participated in this prospective study. Protocol-based full bladder maintenance consisted of education, training and continuous biofeedback by measuring bladder volume. Bladder volume was measured by bladder scan immediately before simulation CT scan and before each treatment three times weekly during the RT period. The relative bladder volume change was calculated. Intra-patient bladder volume variations were quantified using interquartile range (IQR of relative bladder volume change in each patient. We compared intra-patient bladder volume variations obtained (n=20 with data from our previous study patients (n=20 performing self-controlled maintenance without protocol.Bladder volumes measured by bladder scan highly correlated with those on simulation CT scan (R=0.87, p<0.001. Patients from this study showed lower median IQR of relative bladder volume change compared to patients of self-controlled maintenance from our previous study, although it was not statistically significant (median 32.56% vs. 42.19%, p=0.058. Upon logistic regression, the IQR of relative bladder volume change was significantly related to protocol-based maintenance [relative risk 1.045, 95% confidence intervals (CI 1.004-1.087, p=0.033]. Protocol-based maintenance included significantly more patients with an IQR of relative bladder volume change less than 37% than self-controlled maintenance (p=0.025.Our findings show that bladder volume could be maintained more consistently during

  1. Bladder exstrophy: current management and postoperative imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, Ketsia [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Borer, Joseph [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Phelps, Andrew [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Pediatric Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chow, Jeanne S. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Bladder exstrophy is a rare malformation characterized by an infra-umbilical abdominal wall defect, incomplete closure of the bladder with mucosa continuous with the abdominal wall, epispadias, and alterations in the pelvic bones and muscles. It is part of the exstrophy-epispadias complex, with cloacal exstrophy on the severe and epispadias on the mild ends of the spectrum. Bladder exstrophy is the most common of these entities and is more common in boys. The goal of this paper is to describe common methods of repair and to provide an imaging review of the postoperative appearances. (orig.)

  2. Primary signet cell adenocarcinoma of bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Kinra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary signet cell cancer of the urinary bladder is a relatively rare entity. Since there is no mucinous epithelium in the bladder, It is proposed that the tumor arises from metaplastic urothelium. Two thirds of the tumours are mucin secreting, in most of which the site of the deposition is either extracellular or intracellular displacing the nucleus to a peripheral crescent, giving the cells a signet ring appearance. The tumours are most often infiltrative and diffusely involving the majority of the bladder akin to its name sake in stomach. It is essential to distinguish this carcinoma from gastrointestinal metastases as different therapeutic strategies are often necessary.

  3. Modelling Creep (Relaxation of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravkovic Nebojsa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We first present the results of an experiment in which the passive properties of the urinary bladder were investigated using strips of rabbit bladder. Under the assumption that the urinary bladder had orthopaedic characteristics, the strips were taken in the longitudinal and in the circumferential directions. The material was subjected to uniaxial tension, and stress-stretch curves were generated for various rates of deformation. We found that the rates did not have a significantly effect on the passive response of the material. Additionally, the stress-stretch dependence during relaxation of the material when exposed to isometric conditions was determined experimentally.

  4. Full-thickness endometriosis of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Jens Jørgen; Kristensen, Jens; Hartwell, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To draw attention to the rare condition of endometriosis in the bladder. This is correlated with symptoms not normally connected to endometriosis and therefore often remains underdiagnosed for years. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study in a university teaching hospital, one of two...... and March 2011. We included only patients with symptomatic full-thickness bladder detrusor endometriosis and mucosal involvement. All patients had had bladder symptoms for two to seven years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms after surgery and recurrence rate. RESULTS: The main preoperative symptom...

  5. Correlation of gene expression with bladder capacity in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc; Koslov, David S; Keys, Tristan; Evans, Robert J; Badlani, Gopal H; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Walker, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Interstitial cystitis and bladder pain syndrome are terms used to describe a heterogeneous chronic pelvic and bladder pain disorder. Despite its significant prevalence, our understanding of disease etiology is poor. We molecularly characterized interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and determined whether there are clinical factors that correlate with gene expression. Bladder biopsies from female subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and female controls without signs of the disease were collected and divided into those with normal and low anesthetized bladder capacity, respectively. Samples then underwent RNA extraction and microarray assay. Data generated by these assays were analyzed using Omics Explorer (Qlucore, Lund, Sweden), GeneSifter® Analysis Edition 4.0 and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis to determine similarity among samples within and between groups, and measure differentially expressed transcripts unique to each phenotype. A total of 16 subjects were included in study. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clear separation between gene expression in tissues from subjects with low compared to normal bladder capacity. Gene expression in tissue from patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had normal bladder capacity did not significantly differ from that in controls without interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Pairwise analysis revealed that pathways related to inflammatory and immune response were most involved. Microarray analysis provides insight into the potential pathological condition underlying interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. This pilot study shows that patients with this disorder who have low compared to normal bladder capacity have significantly different molecular characteristics, which may reflect a difference in disease pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc

  6. Researchers studying alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new phase I clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is evaluating the safety and tolerability, or the degree to which any side effects can be tolerated by patients, of a two-drug combination as a potential alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients. The trial targets patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) whose cancers have stopped responding to traditional therapies. Read more...

  7. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sithamparam, S; Ahmad, R; Sabarudin, A; Othman, Z; Ismail, M

    2017-01-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients. (paper)

  8. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  9. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Marcel R; van Lin, Emile N J Th; van der Vight, Lisette P; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Visser, Andries G

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 SD = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  10. [A case of bladder hemangioma showing bladder tamponade during late pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, S; Okubo, K; Aoki, Y; Okada, T; Maeda, H; Arai, Y

    2000-07-01

    We report a case of bladder hemangioma manifesting bladder tamponade during pregnancy. A 25-year-old woman at 36 weeks of gestation was admitted with a two-week history of gross hematuria and clot retention. Blood hemoglobin concentration was 6.3 g/dl. After blood transfusion and Caesarian section, cystoscopy was performed. Bleeding was noticed from a strawberry-like tumor 5 mm in diameter near the right ureteral orifice, which was easily resected endoscopically. Histopathological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma of the urinary bladder. This is the first report of a case of bladder hemangioma during pregnancy.

  11. Clinical observation of radiation urinary bladder disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuke; Liu Libo; Zhang Haiying; Liang Shuo; Chen Dawei; Wu Zhenfeng; Dong Lihua; Lu Xuejun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Clinical characteristic, diagnosis and treatment of radiation urinary bladder disease induced by radiation therapy for cancers in the pelvis were inquired into for providing diagnostic basis. Methods: Statistical analysis for the clinical cases was carried out. Results: The incidence of radiation bladder diseases induced by radiation therapy of cervix cancer are about 0.8%-2.96%, with an average of 2.14%. Radiation bladder disease is divided into acute radiation cystitis, chronic radiation cystitis and radiation vesical fistula. Chronic radiation cystitis is seen most often in the clinic and its main clinical symptom is painless macroscopic hematuria, which is again subdivided into slight and severe degrees. Diagnosis should include history of exposure to radiation, which dose exceed the dose threshold, and typical clinical characteristics. Conclusion: The characteristics, types and diagnostic basis of radiation urinary bladder disease analyzed in this study can provide the reference for drawing up diagnostic standard

  12. Epidemiology of bladder cancer. A second look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynder, E.L.; Goldsmith, R.

    1977-09-01

    A case-control study among 574 male and 158 female bladder cancer patients and equal numbers of matched controls was conducted between 1969 and 1974 in 17 hospitals in six United States cities. We determined that cigarette smokers of both sexes were at higher relative risk than nonsmokers. Cigarette smoking was responsible for about one-half of male and one-third of female bladder cancer. There was an excess of bladder cancer patients with some previous occupational exposure, such as rubber, chemicals, and textiles. A weak association with coffee drinking, which appeared to be independent of smoking, was found for males. Users of artificial sweetners were not over-represented among the cases. The authors conclude that the epidemiologic pattern of bladder cancer cannot be fully accounted for by cigarette smoking and occupational exposure and suggest a series of metabolic studies to assess the role of additional factors, such as nutrition.

  13. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a disorder of the lower urinary tract created by damage to or diseases of the nervous system. Found in many patients with neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, and spina bifida among others, neurogenic bladder can lead to problematic symptoms and complications including urinary incontinence, frequency, and urgency, along with risk for infection and involvement of the upper urinary tract and kidney disease. The disorder can also create substantial embarrassment resulting in social isolation for affected patients. Healthcare utilization may be excessive in patients with neurogenic bladder, including office and emergency department visits and subsequent hospitalizations. Because of its significant effects on quality of life, it is important to reassess the epidemiology and physiology of neurogenic bladder, its diagnosis and assessment, and the impact of the symptoms and complications associated with it to better manage patients with this disorder and improve outcomes.

  14. Tetrachloroethylene exposure and bladder cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Straif, Kurt; Ruder, Avima

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified tetrachloroethylene, used in the production of chemicals and the primary solvent used in dry cleaning, as "probably carcinogenic to humans" based on limited evidence of an increased risk of bladder cancer in dry...... cleaners. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the epidemiological evidence for the association between tetrachloroethylene exposure and bladder cancer from published studies estimating occupational exposure to tetrachloroethylene or in workers in the dry-cleaning industry. METHODS: Random-effects meta-analyses were......-analysis demonstrates an increased risk of bladder cancer in dry cleaners, reported in both cohort and case-control studies, and some evidence for an exposure-response relationship. Although dry cleaners incur mixed exposures, tetrachloroethylene could be responsible for the excess risk of bladder cancer because...

  15. SMP Bladder Tooling for Manufacturing Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG's shape memory polymer (SMP) Bladder Tooling is a cutting-edge manufacturing technology that can meet the manufacturing needs of the Ares launch vehicles. This...

  16. Asymptomatic Bladder Metastasis from Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Cormio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Breast cancer is the most common nondermatologic cancer in women. Common metastatic sites include lymph nodes, lung, liver, and bone. Metastases to the bladder are extremely rare, with all reported cases presenting with urinary symptoms. Case Report. Herein, we report the first case of completely asymptomatic bladder metastasis from breast cancer, occasionally revealed, 98 months after the initial diagnosis of lobular breast carcinoma, by a follow-up computed tomography scanning showing thickening of left bladder wall and grade II left hydronephrosis. A positive staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Discussion. The reported case confirms that bladder metastases from breast cancer tend to occur late after the diagnosis of the primary tumor and, for the first time, points out they can be asymptomatic. Conclusion. Such data support the need for careful follow-up and early intervention whenever such clinical situation is suspected.

  17. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    OpenAIRE

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete...

  18. Integrated irradiation and cystectomy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Planned pre-operative irradiation and cystectomy for selected patients with bladder cancer was initiated approximately 20 years ago by a number of centres on the basis of the disappointing end results of treatment of bladder cancer by either irradiation or surgery and the empirical hope that the combination might lead to better results. This is a brief review of the logical basis for integrated treatment and of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) experience with such therapy. (author)

  19. Selective bladder preservation with curative intent for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. A contemporary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Fumitaka; Kihara, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    Radical cystectomy plus urinary diversion, the reference standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, associates with high complication rates and compromises quality of life as a result of long-term effects on urinary, gastrointestinal and sexual function, and changes in body image. As a society ages, the number of elderly patients unfit for radical cystectomy as a result of comorbidity will increase, and thus the demand for bladder-sparing approaches for muscle-invasive bladder cancer will also inevitably increase. Trimodality bladder-sparing approaches consisting of transurethral resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy (Σ55-65 Gy) yield overall survival rates comparable with those of radical cystectomy series (50-70% at 5 years), while preserving the native bladder in 40-60% of muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients, contributing to an improvement in quality of life for such patients. Limitations of the trimodality therapy include muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence in the preserved bladder, which most often arises in the original muscle-invasive bladder cancer site; potential lack of curative intervention for regional lymph nodes; and increased morbidity in the event of salvage radical cystectomy for remaining or recurrent disease as a result of high-dose pelvic irradiation. Consolidative partial cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by induction chemoradiotherapy at lower dose (exempli gratia (e.g.) 40 Gy) is a rational strategy for overcoming such limitations by strengthening locoregional control and reducing radiation dosage. Molecular profiling of the tumor and functional imaging might play important roles in optimal patient selection for bladder preservation. Refinement of radiation techniques, intensified concurrent or adjuvant chemotherapy, and novel sensitizers, including molecular targeting agent, are also expected to improve outcomes and consequently provide more muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients with favorable

  20. Neo bladder long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhr, I.; Mohamed, A. M.; Moustafa, A.; Al-Sherbiny, M.; Salama, M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the commonest forms of orthotopic bladder substitution for bladder cancer surivors, used in our institute, is the use of ileocecal segment. Sometimes, the need for Indiana pouch heterotropic continent diversion arises. Aim: To compare the long-term effect of orthotopic ileocecal bladder and heterotropic Indiana pouch following radical cystectomy in bladder cancer patients. Patients and methods: Between January 2008 and December 2011, 91 patients underwent radical cystectomy/anterior pelvic exentration and ortho topic ileocecal bladder reconstruction (61 patients) and Indiana pouch (30 patients), when orthotopic diversion could not be technically or oncologically feasible. Results: Convalescence was uneventful in most patients. All minor and major urinary leakage cases, in both diversions groups, where successfully conservatively treated. Only one patient in the ileocecal group with major urinary leak required re-exploration with successful revision of uretro-colonic anastomosis. Only one patient in the Indiana pouch group had accidentally discovered sub-centimetric stone, which was simply expelled. The overall survival proportion of ileocecal group was 100% compared to 80% in the Indiana pouch group (p < 0.001). The disease free survival proportion of ileocecal group was 90.8% compared to 80% in the Indiana pouch group (p = 0.076). Effective comparative daytime and nighttime urinary continence as well as renal function deterioration were not statistically significant between both reconstruction types. Conclusion: Both ileocecal bladder and Indiana pouch are safe procedures in regard to long-term effects over kidney function following radical cystectomy

  1. Bladder reconstruction--from cells to materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, J; Cross, W; Eardley, I; Thomas, D F M; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    2003-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the urinary bladder is performed on patients of all ages for a diverse range of conditions, including congenital abnormalities, bladder dysfunction, trauma and cancer. The most common material utilized to augment or replace the bladder during these procedures is a segment of the patient's own intestine. However, this procedure ('enterocytoplasty') is associated with significant clinical complications that arise due to the exposure of the epithelial lining of the intestine to urine. A number of alternative approaches are being actively developed to find a practical and functional substitute for native bladder tissue. These range from 'composite enterocystoplasty', where the de-epithelialized intestine wall is lined with bladder epithelial cells that have been propagated in vitro, to augmenting the urinary system with natural or synthetic biomaterials that may incorporate in vitro-propagated cells. However, if tissue-engineered products are to have therapeutic application in bladder reconstruction, a number of issues remain to be addressed; these issues are discussed briefly below.

  2. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, M.R.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Vight, L.P. van der; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Visser, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was

  3. Radiodiagnosis of anomalies, diseases and injuries of urinary bladder in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyul'ko, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of radiodiagnosis of such urinary bladder diseases as ureter and urinary bladder anomalies, congenital fistulae, urinary bladder calcicosis, calculuses, foreign bodies and injuries of urinary bladder tuberculosis and tumors neurogenic disorder of urination in children are considered

  4. Recurrent urinary tract infection and risk of bladder cancer in the Nijmegen bladder cancer study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, S.; Hanum, N.; Grotenhuis, A.J.; Castano-Vinyals, G.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Aben, K.K.H.; Mysorekar, I.U.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Controversy exists on whether urinary tract infection (UTI) is a risk factor for urinary bladder cancer (UBC). Here, the association is investigated using data from one of the largest bladder cancer case-control studies worldwide. METHODS: Information on (i) history and age at onset of

  5. Bladder biomechanics and the use of scaffolds for regenerative medicine in the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Lemon, Greg; Hilborn, Jöns

    2018-01-01

    in vitro and in vivo, including in the treatment of clinical conditions. The biomechanical properties of the native bladder can be investigated using a range of mechanical tests for standardized assessments, as well as mathematical and computational bladder biomechanics. Despite a large body of research...

  6. Can we improve transurethral resection of the bladder tumour for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, Esmee Iml; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review The recurrence rate in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer is high, and the quality of transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) tumour influences recurrence risk. We review new methods that aim to improve the effectiveness of TURB, and highlight studies of the past

  7. Promising long-term outcome of bladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eva Lund; Hvistendahl, Gitte Møller; Rawashdeh, Yazan F H; Olsen, L Henning

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of bladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Data were compiled from the records of 25 children with a median age of 9.3 years (range 0.9 to 14.2) who underwent detrusor myotomy between 1992 and 2008. All patients were diagnosed with small bladder capacity, low compliance and high end filling pressures, and were unresponsive to clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergics. Median followup was 6.8 years (range 0.1 to 15.6). Median postoperative bladder capacity was unchanged or decreased to 95 ml (range 25 to 274) during the first 3 months compared to a median preoperative capacity of 103 ml (14 to 250). At 5 months postoperatively median bladder capacity increased significantly to 176 ml (range 70 to 420, pbladder compliance doubled after 1 year to 10 ml/cm H2O (range 1 to 31, pBladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction offers, after a transient decrease in bladder capacity, a long lasting increase in capacity and compliance, while the end filling pressure decreases. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Finite element based bladder modeling for image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Remeijer, Peter; Lotz, Heidi T.; Bel, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A biomechanical model was constructed to give insight into pelvic organ motion as a result of bladder filling changes. Methods: The authors used finite element (FE) modeling to simulate bladder wall deformation caused by urine inflow. For ten volunteers, a series of MRI scans of the pelvic

  9. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    : The correlation between the relative bladder volume (RBV, defined as repeat scan volume/planning scan volume) and the margins required to account for internal motion was first studied using a series of 20 bladder cancer patients with weekly repeat CT scanning during treatment. Both conformal RT (CRT) and IGRT......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS...... these patients were given fluid intake restrictions on alternating weeks during treatment. RESULTS: IGRT gave the strongest correlation between the RBV and margin size (R(2)=0.75; p10mm were required in only 1% of the situations when the RBV1, whereas isotropic margins >10...

  10. Cone Beam CT Imaging Analysis of Interfractional Variations in Bladder Volume and Position During Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Rathee, Satyapal; Ghosh, Sunita; Ko, Lawrence; Murray, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm). The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (± standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm 3 (SD, 29.71 cm 3 ). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm 3 (SD, 21.64 cm 3 ). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm 3 (SD, 36.51 cm 3 ). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm 3 (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm 3 (SD, 3.97 cm 3 ). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.

  11. Work Capacity of the Bladder During Voiding: A Novel Method to Evaluate Bladder Contractile Function and Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work in voiding (WIV of the bladder may be used to evaluate bladder status throughout urination rather than at a single time point. Few studies, however, have assessed WIV owing to the complexity of its calculations. We have developed a method of calculating work capacity of the bladder while voiding and analyzed the associations of bladder work parameters with bladder contractile function and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 160 men and 23 women, aged >40 years and with a detrusor pressure at maximal flow rate (P det Q max of ≥40 cmH 2 O in men, who underwent urodynamic testing. The bladder power integration method was used to calculate WIV; WIV per second (WIV/t and WIV per liter of urine voided (WIV/v were also calculated. In men, the relationships between these work capacity parameters and P det Q max and Abrams-Griffiths (AG number were determined using linear-by-linear association tests, and relationships between work capacity parameters and BOO grade were investigated using Spearman′s association test. Results: The mean WIV was 1.15 ± 0.78 J and 1.30 ± 0.88 J, mean WIV/t was 22.95 ± 14.45 mW and 23.78 ± 17.02 mW, and mean WIV/v was 5.59 ± 2.32 J/L and 2.83 ± 1.87 J/L in men and women, respectively. In men, WIV/v showed significant positive associations with P det Q max (r = 0.845, P = 0.000, AG number (r = 0.814, P = 0.000, and Schafer class (r = 0.726, P = 0.000. Conversely, WIV and WIV/t showed no associations with P det Q max or AG number. In patients with BOO (Schafer class > II, WIV/v correlated positively with increasing BOO grade. Conclusions: WIV can be calculated from simple urodynamic parameters using the bladder power integration method. WIV/v may be a marker of BOO grade, and the bladder contractile function can be evaluated by WIV and WIV/t.

  12. The link between vascular dysfunction, bladder ischemia, and aging bladder dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Boedtkjer, Donna B.; Forman, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The vascular supply to the human bladder is derived mainly from the superior and inferior vesical arteries, the latter being directly connected to the internal iliac artery. Aging is associated with an impairment of blood vessel function and changes may occur in the vasculature at the molecular, cellular and functional level. Pelvic arterial insufficiency may play an important role in the development of bladder dysfunctions such as detrusor overactivity (DO) and the overactive bladder syndrome. Chronic ischemia-related bladder dysfunction may progress to bladder underactivity and it would be desirable to treat not only lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) induced by chronic ischemia, but also the progression of the morphological bladder changes. Studies in experimental models in rabbits and rats have shown that pelvic arterial insufficiency may result in significant bladder ischemia with reduced bladder wall oxygen tension. In turn, this will lead to oxidative stress associated with upregulation of oxidative stress-sensitive genes, increased muscarinic receptor activity, ultrastructural damage, and neurodegeneration. The phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor tadalafil, the α1-adrenoceptor (AR) blocker silodosin, the β3-AR agonist mirabegron, and the free radical scavenger melatonin, exerted a protecting effect on urodynamic parameters, and on functional and morphological changes of the bladder demonstrable in vitro. Since the agents tested are used clinically for relieving LUTS, the results from the animal models seem to have translational value, and may be of relevance for designing clinical studies to demonstrate if the drugs may prevent progression of ischemia-related functional and morphological bladder changes. PMID:28042309

  13. A case-control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Chun; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2013-03-15

    Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. This case-control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening.

  14. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  15. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  16. Effects of urinary bladder distention on location of the urinary bladder and urethra of healthy dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, G.R.; Osborne, C.A.; Jessen, C.R.; Feeney, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Evaluation of the anatomic location of the distended and empty urinary bladders and urethras of healthy adult male and female dogs and cats by retrograde urethrocystography revealed substantial variations. In 15 dogs in lateral recumbency with empty bladder lumens, the caudal portion of the urinary bladder was within the pelvic canal in 5 of 7 male and 5 of 8 female dogs. In female dogs examined in ventrodorsal recumbency, only 4 of 8 had the empty urinary bladders in part within the pelvic canal. After luminal distention, 3 of 7 male and 3 of 8 female dogs, while in lateral recumbency, had the urinary bladders in part intrapelvically. However, when female dogs were placed in ventrodorsal recumbency, only 1 of 7 urinary bladders was in part within the pelvis. The urinary bladders of 14 cats were consistently within the abdominal cavity, irrespective of whether the bladder lumen was distended or empty. Urethral flexures occurred in dogs with intrapelvic bladders that were distended or empty. Urethral flexures were not found in cats. The urethras of dogs and cats in lateral recumbency were generally closer to the floor of the pelvis after urinary bladder distention than when the bladder was empty. The urethra of the dogs and cats in ventrodorsal recumbency was to the left or right of or on the midsagittal plane, whether the urinary bladder was empty or distended. A greater degree of lateral displacement was encountered in ventrodorsal recumbency after urinary bladder distention

  17. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals - including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years.

  18. Overactive bladder [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Wallace

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder syndrome is highly prevalent, and increasingly so with aging. It is characterized by the presence of urinary urgency, and can be associated with incontinence, increased voiding frequency, and nocturia. Assessment needs to exclude serious medical disorders that might present with similar symptoms, and a bladder diary is an invaluable part of understanding the presentation. Initial management is conservative, comprising education, bladder training, and advice on fluid intake. Drug therapy options include antimuscarinic medications and beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonists. Persistent overactive bladder syndrome, despite initial therapy, requires a review of the patient’s understanding of conservative management and compliance, and adjustment of medications. For refractory cases, specialist review and urodynamic testing should be considered; this may identify detrusor overactivity or increased filling sensation, and needs to exclude additional factors, such as stress incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Botulinum neurotoxin-A bladder injections can be used in severe overactivity, provided the patient is able and willing to do intermittent self-catheterisation, which is necessary in about 5% of treated patients. Sacral nerve stimulation and tibial nerve stimulation are other approaches. Major reconstructive surgery, such as augmentation cystoplasty, is rarely undertaken in modern practice but remains a possibility in extreme cases.

  19. Radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Iizumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shosei; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Tomokazu; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper explained the current state of radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer, and discussed the role of radiotherapy in curative treatment and the future development. In the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer, it is important to judge the existence of pathological muscular layer invasion based on transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT). In surgical results in Japan, the U.S., and Switzerland, 5-year survival rate is about 60 to 70%. Standard treatment for bladder cancer with muscle layer invasion had been surgery, and radiotherapy had been applied to the cases without resistance to surgery. Three combined therapy with TUR-BT and simultaneous chemoradiotherapy is the current standard bladder conserving therapy. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 60%, which is superior to the treatment with irradiation alone. Radiotherapy for kidney cancer is most often used as perioperative treatment for locally advanced cancer or as symptomatic treatment for metastatic lesions. However, due to recent improvement in radiotherapy technology, correspondence to respiratory movement and high dose administration associated with improvement in dose concentration have been realized, and stereotactic irradiation using a high single dose for inoperable disease cases or surgery refusal disease cases has come to be clinically applied. (A.O.)

  20. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Linda M; Bhambore, Neelam

    2011-05-15

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome affects more than 1 million persons in the United States, but the cause remains unknown. Most patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome are women with symptoms of suprapubic pelvic and/or genital area pain, dyspareunia, urinary urgency and frequency, and nocturia. It is important to exclude other conditions such as infections. Tests and tools commonly used to diagnose interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome include specific questionnaires developed to assess the condition, the potassium sensitivity test, the anesthetic bladder challenge, and cystoscopy with hydrodistension. Treatment options include oral medications, intravesical instillations, and dietary changes and supplements. Oral medications include pentosan polysulfate sodium, antihistamines, tricyclic antidepressants, and immune modulators. Intravesical medications include dimethyl sulfoxide, pentosan polysulfate sodium, and heparin. Pentosan polysulfate sodium is the only oral therapy and dimethyl sulfoxide is the only intravesical therapy with U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. To date, clinical trials of individual therapies have been limited in size, quality, and duration of follow-up. Studies of combination or multimodal therapies are lacking.

  1. [Epidemiological investigation on bladder cancer and occupations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, K; Ohno, Y; Aoki, K

    1989-12-01

    A population-based case-control study was conducted in Boston, U.S.A., Manchester, U.K., and Nagoya, Japan to assess the associations of occupations with bladder cancer in men. In Nagoya, cancer cases were identified through Nagoya Bladder Cancer Registry, and controls were randomly selected from the general population using electoral registers. Study subjects, all males, analyzed were 430 cases and 397 controls in Boston; 339 and 493 in Manchester, and 220 and 443 in Nagoya, respectively. Occupations significantly related to an increased bladder cancer risk were those manufacturing or handling dyes, leather, paint or organic chemicals in Boston, and leather or medical workers in Manchester. Occupations significantly associated with bladder cancer development were not found in Nagoya. In general, risk related to occupations was relatively higher in the younger age group (less than 65 years old) than in the older age group (greater than or equal to 65 yrs old). Statistically significant differences in bladder cancer risk were not demonstrated between manufacturing workers and service workers.

  2. Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection - UTI) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Urinary Tract & How It Works Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection—UTI) in Adults View or Print All Sections ... Bladder infections are the most common type of urinary tract infection (UTI), but any part of your urinary tract ...

  3. [A Case of Emphysematous Cystitis with Bladder Diverticulum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Shinya; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Arase, Shigeki; Hori, Yasuhide; Tochigi, Hiromi; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    2016-08-01

    Emphysematous cystitis (EC) is a rare form of acute complicated urinary tract infection (UTI). We report a case of EC with bladder diverticulum. A 77-year-old man who had a medical history of diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of macrohematuria and pneumaturia. Based on the findings of an abdominal computed tomography and cystoscopy, the diagnosis of EC and bladder diverticulum was made with its characteristic feature being gas within the bladder wall and lumen and a cystic lesion from the bladder. His condition improved immediately with a combination of bladder drainage and appropriate antibiotics. The cystography revealed a very large diverticulum causing incomplete bladder emptying and stagnation of urine. We considered diabetes mellitus and a large amount of residual urine after urination due to bladder diverticulum and neurogenic bladder as the possible causal factors of EC in this case.

  4. Expression profiles of variation integration genes in bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J M; Wang, Y Q; Gao, Z L; Wu, J T; Shi, B K; Yu, C C

    2014-04-30

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide and its incidence continues to increase. There are approximately 261,000 cases of bladder cancer resulting in 115,000 deaths annually. This study aimed to integrate bladder cancer genome copy number variation information and bladder cancer gene transcription level expression data to construct a causal-target module network of the range of bladder cancer-related genomes. Here, we explored the control mechanism underlying bladder cancer phenotype expression regulation by the major bladder cancer genes. We selected 22 modules as the initial module network to expand the search to screen more networks. After bootstrapping 100 times, we obtained 16 key regulators. These 16 key candidate regulatory genes were further expanded to identify the expression changes of 11,676 genes in 275 modules, which may all have the same regulation. In conclusion, a series of modules associated with the terms 'cancer' or 'bladder' were considered to constitute a potential network.

  5. Transabdominal ultrasonography.of the bladder as a staging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transabdominal ultrasonography.of the bladder as a staging examination for cervical ... procedure by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, transabdominal bladder ultrasonography ... urologist, while the ultrasound examination was done by the ultrasonographer (S.M.). The transabdominal approach.

  6. Anterior colporrhaphy does not induce bladder outlet obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, M. M. E.; Hakvoort, R. A.; van de Weijer, E. P.; Emanuel, M. H.; Roovers, J. P. W. R.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate if anterior colporrhaphy causes incomplete voiding due to bladder outlet obstruction. Women scheduled for anterior colporrhaphy were asked to undergo multichannel urodynamic investigation before surgery and the first postoperative day. Bladder outlet obstruction was assessed

  7. Pattern and Risk Factors of Urinary Bladder Neoplasms in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It poses biologic and clinical challenges. ... Conclusion: There is significant relationship between urinary schistosomal infestation and the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder among Sudanese patients. Keywords: Urinary Bladder, Transitional Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. Ultrasound measurement of bladder wall thickness is associated with the overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayi, D C; Tekkis, P; Fernando, R; Hendricken, C; Khullar, V

    2010-09-01

    To assess the relationship between mean bladder wall thickness and components of the overactive bladder (OAB syndrome). Women attending urogynaecology clinic was categorized into overactive bladder syndrome, stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and mixed urinary continence (MUI) according to International Continence Society (ICS) definitions based on symptom history. Women completed a bladder diary, visual analog score (VAS) for urgency, and the mean bladder wall thickness (BWT) was determined. Comparison was made between the mean BWT and symptom history, daytime frequency, nocturia, VAS scores. Three hundred seventy-nine women were recruited to the study with a mean age of 56 years (range: 24-92 years). The mean bladder wall thickness did not show any age-related difference. Of these women 138/379 (36%) reported overactive bladder symptoms (mean BWT = 5.6 mm) 75/379 (20%) gave a history of stress urinary incontinence (mean BWT = 4.7 mm), and 166/379 (44%) had mixed urinary incontinence (mean BWT = 5.4). Women with nocturia >1 had mean BWT 5.6 mm, with nocturia 7 had mean BWT 5.7 mm and those 5 mm (P < 0.001). Mean BWT is associated with a symptom history of OAB and MUI, higher daytime and nightime frequency, and higher VAS scores. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Paediatric bladder augmentation and substitution: From diversions to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, John Grant

    2002-10-01

    To review the evolution of urinary diversion, bladder augmentation and bladder replacement in the paediatric population over the past century and to outline the possible direction of future management. Original and review articles obtained from a PubMed search of English language publications dating from 1970 to 2001. The search terms were "bladder augmentation", "bladder substitution", "bladder autoaugmentation", "ureterocystoplasty" and "bladder engineering". The age group was "all child 0-18". Articles selected were those with relevance to the scope of the topic. The articles were analyzed with the primary focus being the problems encountered with various forms of urinary diversion, bladder augmentation and bladder replacement, and the subsequent evolution of materials and techniques. Bladder tissue may need to be replaced in the paediatric population because of congenital malformation, disease or trauma. The unique structure and function of urothelium and bladder muscle make this a challenging task. Management has evolved from a mindset of attempting to divert urine from the bladder completely to that of trying to preserve what is salvageable of the organ. Historically and contemporarily, the gastrointestinal tract has provided the raw material for urinary diversion, bladder augmentation and bladder substitution. Experience, however, has highlighted the potential complications inherent in the use of the bowel in the urinary tract including mucus production, stone disease, metabolic abnormalities, growth retardation, spontaneous perforation and malignancy. However, despite these drawbacks, the bowel is the gold standard in terms of functional utility and longevity. In efforts to develop alternatives, research has focused on the use of both natural and synthetic materials. With these materials, a whole new list of potential problems has been characterized. Tissue engineering may hold promise in resolving the issues of bladder replacement or repair by providing

  10. Delayed Diagnosis of Iatrogenic Bladder Perforation in a Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette S. Birs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic bladder injuries have been reported in the neonate during umbilical artery/vein catheterization, voiding cystourethrogram, urinary catheterizations, and overwhelming hypoxic conditions. Patients with iatrogenic bladder perforations can present with acute abdomen indicating urinary peritonitis, septic-uremic shock, or subtle symptoms like abdominal distension, pain, hematuria, uremia, electrolyte imbalances, and/or difficulty urinating. The following neonatal case report of perforated bladder includes a review of the signs, symptoms, diagnostic tools, and management of bladder injury in neonates.

  11. Alexithymia and anesthetic bladder capacity in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chui-De; Lee, Ming-Huei; Chen, Wei-Chih; Ho, Hoi Lam; Wu, Huei-Ching

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to the inconsistent results of organic causes, it has been found that psychological risk factors are reliably related to functional somatic syndromes (FSSs), including interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). Compared to patients with acute cystitis, a subgroup of IC/BPS patients with a history of childhood relational trauma reported intensified unregulated affective states (i.e., anxiety and depression) and trauma-related psychopathology (i.e., dissociation). Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether psychosocial risk factors can be separated from bladder-centric factors. This study aimed to verify whether psychosocial factors such as alexithymia, which is a key psychological factor of FSSs, are less likely to be linked to a low bladder capacity in patients with IC/BPS. Ninety-four female IC/BPS patients were recruited from the outpatient departments of urology, obstetrics, and gynecology. Anxiety, depression, dissociation, childhood relational trauma, and alexithymia were assessed using standardized scales, and anesthetic bladder capacity was examined by cystoscopic hydrodistention. Positive correlations were found between anesthetic bladder capacity and the psychosocial variables, including alexithymia. An increased bladder capacity was associated with anxiety, dissociation, and childhood relational trauma, and a combination of high cognitive and low affective alexithymia mediated the correlations between bladder capacity and the psychosocial variables. Psychosocial variables that are associated with an aversive childhood relational environment and affect dysregulation may constitute a pathogenic trajectory that differs from bladder-centric defects such as a lower bladder capacity. The findings of this study support the notion that IC/BPS in some patients may be due to an FSS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nocturnal bladder emptying: a simple technique for reversing urinary tract deterioration in children with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koff, Stephen A; Gigax, Michael R; Jayanthi, Venkata R

    2005-10-01

    In this preliminary study we sought to determine the effect of instituting nocturnal bladder emptying (NBE) in children with neurogenic (NGB) or nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder (NNGNGB) in whom urinary tract deterioration developed despite optimal daytime clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) and urotropic medications. We hypothesize that a syndrome of nocturnal overdistention of the bladder (SNOB) can cause urinary tract deterioration through increased nighttime storage pressures manifested by recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), worsening incontinence, hydronephrosis and/or decreasing bladder compliance and capacity, and may be reversed by NBE. A total of 19 children with NGB (17) or NNGNGB (2) who displayed urinary tract deterioration while on CIC and urotropic medications were started on NBE. Of the patients 15 used a continuously draining nighttime catheter while 4 had scheduled awakenings during the night to perform CIC. The primary indications for NBE were recurrent symptomatic UTI in 5, new or progressive hydronephrosis in 7, and decreasing bladder capacity and compliance in 7. At a mean followup of 23 months 15 (79%) patients showed improvement or complete resolution of 1 or more signs or symptoms of hydronephrosis (7), increase in bladder capacity (5), recurrent UTI (6) and worsening incontinence (3). The remaining 4 patients had no response to NBE. No adverse effects were observed with 10 hours or less of nightly indwelling catheter time. Patients with NGB or NNGNGB on idealized daytime programs of CIC and urotropic drugs may have high intravesical pressures and experience urological deterioration because of an unrecognized SNOB. NBE is a simple technique for treating this condition and reversing the pathophysiological changes. The observation that NBE alone may increase bladder compliance and capacity sufficient to avoid bladder augmentation suggests that development of decreased bladder compliance and capacity in children with NGB may not

  13. Bladder cancer; Cancer de la Vessie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointreau, Y. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan CHU de Tours, Hpital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais de Tours, GICC, 37 - Tours (France); CNRS, UMR 6239 -Genetique, Immunotherapie, Chimie et Cancer-, 37 - Tours (France); CHRU de Tours, laboratoire de pharmacologie-toxicologie, 37 - Tours (France); Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, 72 - Le Mans (France); Klotz, S.; Durdux, C. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, 72 - Le Mans (France)

    2010-07-01

    Bladder cancer is an urologic common tumor after prostate carcinoma. Radical treatment of localized invasive tumor is based on cystectomy. Surgical mutilation could be important when Bricker's urinary derivation is performed. Moreover, delayed metastasis frequently appeared in spite of radical surgery. Thus, chemoradiotherapy is a valid alternative treatment to cystectomy for selected patients. Cisplatin or derivatives are usually concurrently administered to radiation therapy up to 60 - 65 Gy. Patients undergo control cystoscopy at mid-time of treatment in order to select responders from non responders. For majority of cases, the empty bladder should be entirely treated with added margins (about 20 mm) to build the PTV. Control assessment could be improved by echography, cone beam imaging as well as bladder fiduciaries implantation before treatment. From a case report, this review summarizes the technical aspects of radiation therapy (GTV, CTV and PTV, organs at risk, planning) and main acute and late related toxicities. (authors)

  14. Current and Emerging Bladder Cancer Urinary Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Parker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer continues to be one of the most common malignancies. Those who have been already diagnosed are at high risk for recurrence, especially if the pathology demonstrates high-grade disease. Diagnosis and surveillance is reliant on invasive evaluation with cystoscopy. Urinary cytology has been used to aid in diagnosis, but its use is limited. Other assays have been developed that may aid in clinical decision making. The ultimate goal will be the development of a highly sensitive and specific urinary marker for bladder cancer. This would provide a noninvasive means of diagnosing the disease and limit the number of unnecessary cystoscopies. This article will review the currently available urinary bladder cancer markers. It will also review new and investigational urinary markers that have shown promise for future clinical use.

  15. Current and Emerging Bladder Cancer Urinary Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Justin; Spiess, Philippe E.

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer continues to be one of the most common malignancies. Those who have been already diagnosed are at high risk for recurrence, especially if the pathology demonstrates high-grade disease. Diagnosis and surveillance is reliant on invasive evaluation with cystoscopy. Urinary cytology has been used to aid in diagnosis, but its use is limited. Other assays have been developed that may aid in clinical decision making. The ultimate goal will be the development of a highly sensitive and specific urinary marker for bladder cancer. This would provide a noninvasive means of diagnosing the disease and limit the number of unnecessary cystoscopies. This article will review the currently available urinary bladder cancer markers. It will also review new and investigational urinary markers that have shown promise for future clinical use. PMID:21623456

  16. Unusual presentation of metastatic gall bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To report the first case of rare isolated breast metastasis from carcinoma gall bladder. Single patient case report. A 35-year-old pre-menopausal female presented with 2 FNx01 2 cm right upper outer quadrant breast lump. Post-mastectomy, histology confirmed it to be metastatic adenocarcinoma positive for both Cytokeratin (CK 7 and CK20. Past history as told by the patient revealed that 2 years back, cholecystectomy was performed for gall stones, of which no histology reports were present; she had a port site scar recurrence which showed it to be adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy was advised which the patient did not complete. This is probably the first case reported of isolated breast metastasis from gall bladder carcinoma, diagnosed retrospectively. It also highlights the importance of adjuvant treatment in gall bladder malignancy.

  17. Bladder Involvement in Stage I Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Paula C; Missmer, Stacey A; Laufer, Marc R

    2017-08-01

    Endometriosis-the ectopic implantation of endometrial-like tissue-affects 10% of adolescent females and adults. Bladder involvement, causing dysuria and hematuria, occurs in a very small number of endometriosis patients. The patient presented at age 12 years with dysuria and pelvic pain. Laparoscopy revealed stage I endometriosis. Postoperatively, she reported persistent dysuria and passage of tissue in her urine. Cystoscopy showed diffuse erythema; urine cytology revealed glandular and spindle cells suggestive of endometriosis. She was transitioned from oral contraceptives to an intranasal gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, with symptom resolution. Intravesicular endometriosis coinciding with stage I disease supports a mechanism of endometriosis dissemination other than direct bladder infiltration. Patients with endometriosis who complain of urinary symptoms warrant assessment, because intravesicular bladder involvement cannot be excluded using pelviscopy. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibody conjugate radioimmunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Alan; Hopper, Melanie; Murray, Andrea; Frier, Malcolm; Bishop, Mike

    2002-01-01

    The administration of antibody conjugates for cancer therapy is now proving to be of clinical value. We are currently undertaking a programme of clinical studies using the monoclonal antibody C 595 (gG3) which reacts with the MUC1 glycoprotein antigen that is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of bladder tumours. Radio immuno conjugates of the C 595 antibody have been produced with high radiolabelling efficiency and immuno reactivity using Tc-99 m and In-111 for diagnostic imaging, and disease staging and the cytotoxic radionuclides Cu-67 and Re-188 for therapy of superficial bladder cancer. A Phase I/II therapeutic trail involving the intravesical administration of antibody directly into the bladder has now begun. (author)

  19. Progress in Personalizing Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum-based chemotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer. However, there are currently no methods to predict chemotherapy response in this disease setting. A better understanding of the biology of bladder cancer has led to developments of molecular biomarkers that may help guide clinical decision making. These biomarkers, while promising, have not yet been validated in prospective trials and are not ready for clinical applications. As alkylating agents, platinum drugs kill cancer cells mainly through induction of DNA damage. A microdosing approach is currently being tested to determine if chemoresistance can be identified by measuring platinum-induced DNA damage using highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry technology. The hope is that these emerging strategies will help pave the road towards personalized therapy in advanced bladder cancer.

  20. Brunn nests masquerading as bladder tumor: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Hee; Byun, Kyung Hwan; Jeon, Ji Min

    2005-01-01

    Brunn nests are the most common proliferative lesions of the bladder uroepithelium, but exuberant proliferation can mimic bladder tumor on radiologic imaging and cystoscopy. We describe a case of pathologically proven Brunn nests in a 34-year-old man, misdiagnosed as bladder tumor on preoperative imaging studies

  1. Cytotoxic and toxicogenomic effects of silibinin in bladder cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silibinin is a natural phenol found in the seeds of the milk thistle plant. Recent data have shown its effectiveness forpreventing/treating bladder tumours. Therefore, in this study we investigated the cytotoxic and toxicogenetic activityof silibinin in bladder cancer cells with different TP53 statuses. Two bladder urothelial ...

  2. Pathologic Pattern of Invasive Bladder Carcinoma: Impact of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pathologic pattern of invasive bladder carcinoma in cystectomy specimens in relation to bilharziasis. Patients and Methods: Between April 2002 and October 2006, 148 consecutive patients with invasive bladder cancer were subjected to radical cystectomy and orthotopic sigmoid bladder ...

  3. Cytotoxic and toxicogenomic effects of silibinin in bladder cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silibinin is a natural phenol found in the seeds of the milk thistle plant. Recent data have shown its effectiveness forpreventing/treating bladder tumours. Therefore, in this study we investigated the cytotoxic and toxicogenetic activityof silibinin in bladder cancer cells with different TP53 statuses. Two bladder urothelial ...

  4. Cytotoxic and toxicogenomic effects of silibinin in bladder cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-16

    Dec 16, 2016 ... Silibinin is a natural phenol found in the seeds of the milk thistle plant. Recent data have shown its effectiveness for preventing/treating bladder tumours. Therefore, in this study we investigated the cytotoxic and toxicogenetic activity of silibinin in bladder cancer cells with different TP53 statuses. Two bladder ...

  5. Adaptive radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten; Lebesque, Joos; Lotz, Heidi; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Moonen, Luc; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) in combination with a partial bladder irradiation. Twenty-one patients with solitary T1-T4 N0M0 bladder cancer were treated to the bladder tumor + 2 cm margin planning target volume (PTV(CONV)). During the first treatment week, five daily

  6. Contemporary management of low-risk bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer comprises a heterogeneous group of tumors, the majority of which are non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) at initial presentation. Low-risk bladder cancer--defined as pTa low-grade papillary tumors--is the type of NMIBC with the most favorable oncologic outcome. Although the

  7. CASE REPORT: A GIANT URINARY BLADDER STONE IN A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A vesical calculus weighing more than 100g is categorized as a giant urinary bladder stone. Male preponderance for urinary bladder calculi is well known. A rare case of a giant urinary bladder calculus weighing 1200g and occurring in a female patient is reported. The stone was removed by open vesicolithotomy.

  8. Giant urinary bladder calculus: Case report | Otieno | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A vertical calculus weighing more than 100 g is categorised as a giant urinary bladder stone. Giant urinary bladder stones are very rare and very few cases have been reported in English literature and only one case from Africa. This is a case report of a patient with a giant urinary bladder calculus presenting as a rectal ...

  9. Xenon tissue/blood partition coefficient for pig urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Bülow, J; Nielsen, S L

    1990-01-01

    In four landrace pigs the tissue/blood partition coefficient (lambda) for xenon (Xe) for the urinary bladder was calculated after chemical analysis for lipid, water and protein content and determination of the haematocrit. The coefficients varied from bladder to bladder owing to small differences...

  10. Cases of a Borderline Pathology That Can Mimic Bladder Cancer: Primary Amyloidosis of Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Selçuk İşoğlu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a disease characterised by accumulation of a fibrillar protein called amyloid in the extracellular space. The kidneys, ureters and the bladder can be affected in the urinary tract. However, primary amyloidosis of bladder is a rare entity. Macroscopic hematuria could be the first and only symptom of primary amyloidosis of the bladder; therefore, it has similar findings with urinary tract malignancies. Histopathological evaluation is mandatory for the diagnosis. Follow-up should always include cystoscopic evaluation as recurrence is expected in the natural course.

  11. [The treatment of bladder lithiasis with laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabal Martín, Miguel; Nogueras Ocaña, Mercedes; Arrabal Polo, Miguel Angel; Miján Ortiz, José Luís; Valle Díaz de la Guardia, Francisco; Zuluaga Gómez, Armando

    2008-11-01

    The use of laser for endoscopic lithotripsy started in 1968 when Mulvaney tried a ruby laser without success; Later on, the CO2 laser and the Nd:YAG were tried. With the pulsed dye and alexandrite lasers energetic performances between 30 and 200 mJ are obtained, their capacity of fragmentation is not universal and is limited to small stones, generally ureteral stones, so that it has not been a therapeutic alternative for bladder lithiasis. The holmium laser generates energy pulses of 400-2500 mJ, it is able to fragment every type of stone. The objective of this work is to analyze the results of endoscopic bladder lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser. In the period between 2006-2008 we treated 21 cases of bladder lithiasis, with a stone size between 1 and 4 cm in patients from 8-76 years, six women and 15 men, which correspond to: four cases of infantile lithiasis, 3 of uric acid, one case of cystine, seven cases of calcium oxalate and/or phosphate, five cases of bladder lithiasis growing around a double J catheter, and one case of lithiasis within on intravesical ureterocele. Treatment was performed with a 20W Dornier Medilas holmium-YAG equipment, applied using children/adult cystoscopes or 7-8.5 Ch ureteroscopes, both semirigid and flexible. Post operative control included KUB x-ray and ultrasound. We performed a study of lithogenic risk factors and stone fragments analysis. The 21 cases described are all secondary or type II bladder lithiasis. In all cases the absence of residual lithiasis was checked with imaging studies and the lithogenic risk factors were corrected with medical or surgical procedures. We consider that today bladder endoscopic lithotripsy with holmium laser is a therapeutic alternative. Despite there are multiple options for endoscopic treatment, transurethral lithotripsy with holmium laser offers good results with a low complication rate.

  12. Studies on radiosensitivity of bladder tumor, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ieda, Kazuo

    1982-01-01

    In vitro radiosensitivity of five different cell lines was determined. These cell lines were all derived from surgically excised bladder tumors and included KU-1 (gradeIII), KU-7 (gradeII), T-24 (gradeIII), MGH-U1 (grade IV) and NBT-2 (grade IV), all originated from transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and grade of the original tumor indicated in parenthesis. Cell lines maintained in exponential growth were radiated using 6MV Lineac x-ray at several dose rate (control, 1, 2,4,6,8 and 10 Gy). Radiosensitivity of cell lines was determined by counting at regular intervals adherent cells after each radiation exposure. Effect of radiation upon cell cycle, mutagenic potential and alteration in antigenecity was studied using cytofluorography and cell-mediated cytotoxicity test. Median leathal dose (D 0 =), quasi-threshold dose (Dsub(q)) and extrapolation number (n) were calculated and resulted as follows. T-24 (grade III); D 0 = 120, Dsub(q) = 20, n = 1.2. KU-1 (gradeIII); D 0 = 120, Dsub(q) = 90, n= 1.9. NBT-2 (grade IV); D 0 140, Dsub(q) = 120, n = 2.3. KU-7 (gradeII); D 0 = 150, Dsub(q) = 170, n = 2.7. It is shown that radiosensitivity of cell line derived from bladder tumor of low grade (KU-7) was low in comparison with those derived from bladder tumor of high grade (T-24, MGH-U1,KU-1, NBT-2) and radiosensitivity of the latter varied. On cytofluorography G2 block tended to become more marked with increasing dose of radiation as the degree of radiosensitivity of bladder tumor increased. Cell mediated cytotoxicity test showed alteration in antigenecity of cell line with increasing dose of radiation, the greatest change observed in the bladder tumor (T-24) with the highest radiosensitivity. (J.P.N.)

  13. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia Maria Tullia

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram...... (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive...

  14. Full-thickness endometriosis of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Jens Jørgen; Kristensen, Jens; Hartwell, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To draw attention to the rare condition of endometriosis in the bladder. This is correlated with symptoms not normally connected to endometriosis and therefore often remains underdiagnosed for years. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study in a university teaching hospital, one of two....... Complete surgical excision of all associated endometriotic lesions was carried out during the same surgical procedure. During the mean follow-up period of 59 months no long-term complications were diagnosed. CONCLUSION: Bladder endometriosis should be considered in patients who present with irritative...

  15. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). Participants The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Findings to date Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. Future plans The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding

  17. Current recommendations for bladder instillation therapy in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc A; Evans, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Bladder instillation therapy refers to the direct introduction of medication into the bladder and is a common treatment modality for patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) who have failed conservative and oral therapies. The current American Urological Association (AUA) recommendations list three medications as options for IC/BPS instillation therapy: dimethyl sulfoxide, heparin, and lidocaine. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence behind the recommendations for these medications. We also examine several historical or experimental therapies that do not hold recommendations but are still used on rare occasion. Finally, we discuss our bladder instillation strategies as well as potential future research and development in intravesicular therapy.

  18. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    with the use of Medline; additional cited works not detected on the initial search regarding neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer were reviewed. Evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management...... the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed......, as is chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. The conference panel consisted of 10 medical oncologists and urologists from 3 continents who are experts in this field and who reviewed the English-language literature through October 2004. Relevant English-language literature was identified...

  19. Modeling bladder cancer in mice: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Owczarek, Tomasz B.; McKiernan, James M.; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment of bladder cancer have hardly improved in the last 20 years. Bladder cancer remains a debilitating and often fatal disease, and among the most costly cancers to treat. The generation of informative mouse models has the potential to improve our understanding of bladder cancer progression, as well as impact its diagnosis and treatment. However, relatively few mouse models of bladder cancer have been described and particularly few that develop invasive cancer phenotypes. This review focuses on opportunities for improving the landscape of mouse models of bladder cancer. PMID:25533675

  20. Detection of bladder tumors using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yingtian; Xie, Tuqiang; Wang, Zhenguo

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes the engineering development of our lab for endoscopic optical coherence tomography toward the ultimate goal to image bladder micro architecture and to diagnose bladder cancers. To test the utility and potential limitations of OCT setups for bladder tumor diagnosis, we used a rat bladder cancer model to track the morphological changes following tumor growth. Image results are presented, suggesting that OCT is able to differentiate cancerous lesions from inflammatory lesions based on OCT characterizations of epithelial thickness and backscattering changes of bladder tissue.

  1. Voiding by Mandatory Position Changing: Giant Bladder Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Cicek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Voiding by Mandatory Position Changing: Giant Bladder Stone Bladder Stones frequently develops on the base of neurogenic micturation disorders, infection, bladder outlet disorders, spinal cord injury and foreign bodies. BPH for men and previous incontinans surgery in women are risk factors for bladder Stone development according to gender. In this case report a 49 years old man, who can void by mandatory position changing owing to a giant bladder stone is presented . [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 120-122

  2. A rat model with an isolated bladder in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Olsen, P S; Grevstad, J U

    1997-01-01

    to the proximal part of the descending colon. The animals were treated with antibiotics, and saline was infused daily into the bladder in order to prevent atrophy. This in situ model is considered to be useful in studies investigating the influence of specific compounds, such as carcinogens, on the bladder......This paper describes our method for producing a rat model with an isolated bladder in situ in which the bladder makes no contact with urine. First, the right kidney was removed, then an external catheter was placed in the right ureter for bladder infusions, and next the left ureter was anatomosed...

  3. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Krönig

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence.

  4. Preoperative balloon occluded arterial infusion chemotherapy for locally invasive bladder cancer. Accurate staging for bladder preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Norio; Arima, Kiminobu; Kawamura, Juichi; Tochigi, Hiromi

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of bladder preservation by preoperative balloon occluded arterial infusion (BOAI) chemotherapy was studied in 111 patients with locally invasive bladder cancer. BOAI was performed by blocking the blood flow of the internal iliac artery and by performing intra-arterial infusion of adriamycin (50 mg/body) and cisplatin (100 mg/body). Before BOAI the clinical diagnosis was T2 in 36, T3a in 29, T3b in 27, T4 in 11 and after BOAI it was T0 in 1, T1 in 27, T2 in 25, T3a in 20, T3b in 20, and T4 in 10. Down staging was observed on diagnostic images in 46.6%. Thirty patients (27.0%) received transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-Bt) and their bladder could be preserved. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 100% in pT0 (n=9), 97.5% in pT1 (n=47), 79.9% in pT2 (n=21), 80.0% in pT3a (n=6), 39.9% in pT3b (n=18) and 51.9% in pT4 cases (n=9). For the bladder preservation, accurate staging diagnosis is required. Since 1992, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used in addition to imaging diagnosis for improving the accuracy of staging diagnosis. The accuracies of staging diagnosis with and without endorectal MRI were 62.5% and 44.0%, respectively. BOAI as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy has the possibility of bladder-preserving therapy in locally invasive bladder cancer. Also, the endorectal MRI can improve the accuracy of staging diagnosis, which is important for the bladder preservation. (author)

  5. Long-term follow-up of sigmoid bladder augmentation for low-compliance neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Yong; Wu, Zhi-jin; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Chao-hua; Zhang, Xiao-dong

    2014-09-01

    To assess the clinical and urodynamic outcomes of patients with low-compliance neurogenic bladder who were treated with sigmoid bladder augmentation (SBA) over a long-term follow-up. We retrospectively reviewed 52 patients with low-compliance neurogenic bladder who underwent SBA alone or with antireflux techniques in our hospital from 2006 to 2014. Clinical outcomes regarding bladder function, incontinence, medications, catheterization schedules, subsequent interventions, bowel function, and patient satisfaction were addressed. The mean follow-up was 49 months. All patients experienced significant increases in safe cystometric capacity from 113.8 ± 65.9 mL to 373.1 ± 66.7 mL (P bladder compliance from 2.96 ± 1.55 mL/cm H2O to 14.07 ± 5.45 mL/cm H2O (P neurogenic detrusor overactivity, and 11 (21.1%) had recurrent febrile urinary tract infections after SBA. Among 47 prehydronephrosis patients (grade I-II in 10 and III-V in 37), 16 still had minor hydronephrosis after SBA, but the hydronephrosis had been improved significantly (all posthydronephroses were grade I-II instead). All patients reported significant improvements in constipation, and no patient had obvious metabolic acidosis or bladder perforation after SBA. All patients expressed extreme satisfaction with the operation. SBA provided durable clinical and urodynamic improvement for patients with low-compliance neurogenic bladder and constipation. SBA alone, without ureteral reimplantation, seemed sufficient for neurogenic bladder. Furthermore, there was a high level of patient satisfaction with SBA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Antimuscarinic Agent Tolterodine Regulates Bladder Extracellular Matrix in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Xin Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Antimuscarinic agents can delay the progression of bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. To date, the relationship between muscarinic receptor activity and the bladder extracellular matrix (ECM remains unclear. Thus, an animal model of partial BOO (PBOO in female rats was established to explore the variation in bladder wall ECM proteins under PBOO conditions with antimuscarinic agent administration. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham, PBOO, and PBOO plus tolterodine. Picrosirius red staining was used to examine the smooth muscle and collagen content of bladder samples. Gene microarray and RT-PCR were performed to survey the expression of ECM proteins, receptors, and metabolism regulators in the rat bladder. Positive results were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Picrosirius red staining showed that smooth muscle volume significantly increased in the PBOO and PBOO plus tolterodine groups (p < 0.05, while collagen significantly increased in the PBOO group (p < 0.05 but not in the PBOO plus tolterodine group. Gene microarray and RT-PCR revealed that none of the collagen subtypes exhibited significant changes after PBOO establishment and tolterodine administration. However, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs increased significantly in the PBOO plus tolterodine group (p < 0.05. Additionally, PBOO inhibited the expression of non-collagen ECM proteins in the rat bladder wall, while tolterodine induced the expression of non-collagen ECM proteins and ECM receptors. Conclusions: Tolterodine decreased the volume of collagen in PBOO rat bladder wall, possibly via MMPs, and regulated the expression of ECM proteins and receptors.

  7. Surgical Management of Anatomic Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Males with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordhoff, Toscane C; Groen, Jan; Scheepe, Jeroen R; Blok, Bertil F M

    2018-03-15

    Surgical treatment of anatomic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) may be indicated in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. A bothersome complication after surgery is urinary incontinence. To identify the optimal practice in the surgical treatment of anatomic BOO in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction, due to multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury (SCI), spina bifida, or cerebrovascular accident (CVA). A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. Medline, Embase, Cochrane controlled trial databases, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched for publications until January 2017. A total of 930 abstracts were screened. Eight studies were included. The types of anatomic BOO discussed were benign prostate obstruction, urethral stricture, and bladder neck sclerosis. The identified surgical treatments were transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in patients with Parkinson, CVA or SCI, endoscopic treatment of urethral stricture by laser ablation or urethrotomy (mainly in SCI patients), and bladder neck resection (BNR) in SCI patients. The outcome of TURP may be highly variable, and includes persistent or de novo urinary incontinence, regained normal micturition control, and urinary continence. Good results were seen in BNR and endoscopic urethrotomy studies. Laser ablation and cold knife urethrotomy resulted in restarting intermittent catheterization or adequate voiding. Overall, a high risk of bias was found. This systematic review provides an overview of the current literature on the outcome of several surgical approaches of different types of anatomic BOO in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Identifying the optimal practice was impossible due to limited availability of high-quality studies. The outcome of several surgical approaches in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction with benign prostate obstruction, urethral stricture

  8. Noninvasive Evaluation of Bladder Wall Mechanical Properties as a Function of Filling Volume: Potential Application in Bladder Compliance Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Nenadic

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method to monitor bladder wall mechanical properties as a function of filling volume, with the potential application to bladder compliance assessment. The proposed ultrasound bladder vibrometry (UBV method uses ultrasound to excite and track Lamb waves on the bladder wall from which its mechanical properties are derived by fitting measurements to an analytical model. Of particular interest is the shear modulus of bladder wall at different volumes, which we hypothesize, is similar to measuring the compliance characteristics of the bladder.Three experimental models were used: 1 an ex vivo porcine model where normal and aberrant (stiffened by formalin bladders underwent evaluation by UBV; 2 an in vivo study to evaluate the performance of UBV on patients with clinically documented compliant and noncompliant bladders undergoing UDS; and 3 a noninvasive UBV protocol to assess bladder compliance using oral hydration and fractionated voiding on three healthy volunteers.The ex vivo studies showed a high correlation between the UBV parameters and direct pressure measurement (R2 = 0.84-0.99. A similar correlation was observed for 2 patients with compliant and noncompliant bladders (R2 = 0.89-0.99 undergoing UDS detrusor pressure-volume measurements. The results of UBV on healthy volunteers, performed without catheterization, were comparable to a compliant bladder patient.The utility of UBV as a method to monitor changes in bladder wall mechanical properties is validated by the high correlation with pressure measurements in ex vivo and in vivo patient studies. High correlation UBV and UDS in vivo studies demonstrated the potential of UBV as a bladder compliance assessment tool. Results of studies on healthy volunteers with normal bladders demonstrated that UBV could be performed noninvasively. Further studies on a larger cohort are needed to fully validate the use of UBV as a clinical tool for bladder compliance assessment.

  9. Neurophysiological modeling of bladder afferent activity in the rat overactive bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Mahipal; van Asselt, Els; van Mastrigt, Ron; Clavica, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome-based urinary dysfunction characterized by "urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia". Earlier we developed a mathematical model of bladder nerve activity during voiding in anesthetized rats and found that the nerve activity in the relaxation phase of voiding contractions was all afferent. In the present study, we applied this mathematical model to an acetic acid (AA) rat model of bladder overactivity to study the sensitivity of afferent fibers in intact nerves to bladder pressure and volume changes. The afferent activity in the filling phase and the slope, i.e., the sensitivity of the afferent fibers to pressure changes in the post-void relaxation phase, were found to be significantly higher in AA than in saline measurements, while the offset (nerve activity at pressure ~0) and maximum pressure were comparable. We have thus shown, for the first time, that the sensitivity of afferent fibers in the OAB can be studied without cutting nerves or preparation of single fibers. We conclude that bladder overactivity induced by AA in rats is neurogenic in origin and is caused by increased sensitivity of afferent sensors in the bladder wall.

  10. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Aging: The Impact of Chronic Bladder Ischemia on Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camões, João; Coelho, Ana; Castro-Diaz, David; Cruz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is one of the most common and bothersome subsets of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), affecting predominantly the aged population, with a worldwide distribution. This syndrome has not been completely understood, yet the aging process and the decreased blood flow to the bladder have been highlighted as closely related to this phenomenon. We performed a search on the online database PubMed/MEDLINE with the following MESH terms: 'Overactive Bladder AND (Ischemia OR Aging OR Vascular Disease)'. We considered manuscripts written in English and published in the last 10 years (2004-2014, October). Additional manuscripts, such as referenced by reviews, were further included. The aging process and the structural and functional changes resulting from an ischemic process emerge as important features that contribute to OAB. The ischemic-induced molecular and structural modifications that occur in the bladder have only recently been the objective of thorough studies, which link cardiovascular risk factors, vascular lesions and OAB. New animal models are being created to test new areas of treatment or prevention of ischemic-induced bladder dysfunction. Recent data point out that several physiological and pathological modifications that occur in the bladder associated with OAB and aging are closely related to ischemia. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on refractory overactive bladder syndrome and bladder circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Murat; Ugurlucan, Funda Gungor; Yalcin, Onay

    2012-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate if posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) exerts its effects on overactive bladder symptoms through changes in bladder circulation. Eighteen women who applied to Istanbul Medical Faculty with symptoms of urgency, frequency±urge incontinence and did not respond to anticholinergic treatment and behavioral modification were enrolled in the study. Weekly PTNS in 30-min sessions for 12 weeks was performed. Urogynecologic symptom assessment, 1-h pad test, bladder diary, King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and transvaginal Doppler ultrasonography were performed before and after treatment. Ten patients (55.5%) were cured, five (27.8%) improved, and no effect was observed in three (16.7%). No significant change was observed in systolic and diastolic flow rate, pulsatility index, resistive index, systolic/diastolic ratio and average flow rate. Significant decrease in frequency, urgency, urge incontinence, pad test results and increase in fluid intake was observed. There was a significant improvement in physical limitations and sleeping/energy domains of KHQ. No significant change was observed in urodynamics. PTNS does not have any effect on the bladder circulation despite positive effects on bladder diary, pad test, and quality of life in overactive bladder syndrome.

  12. Aggressive bladder carcinoma in an HIV-positive man with tetraplegia and neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabdallah, Justin O; Collins, Clinton W; Carucci, Laura R; Moores, Kenneth E; Gater, David R; Klausner, Adam P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to spinal cord injury who are managed long term with an indwelling catheter are known to be at increased risk for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Immunosuppression is a known risk factor for malignancies that often are more aggresSive than those seen in normal populations. Case report and discussion of management recommendations. We summarize the case of a 44-year-old HIV-positive C5-C6 incomplete tetraplegic male (date of injury 1980), who was diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and succumbed to disease within 6 months of diagnosis. The patient was a non-smoker who was never managed with an indwelling catheter. There has been no such case reported in the literature. HIV infection in the presence of a neurogenic bladder may carry an increased risk of aggressive bladder malignancy. More studies are warranted to determine whether routine annual screening with cystoscopy in all patients with HIV and neurogenic bladder is indicated.

  13. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; Aşkar, Niyazi; Itil, Ismail Mete

    2012-01-01

    To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms.

  14. Overactive bladder syndrome in older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagg, A.S.; Cardozo, L.; Chapple, C.R.; Ridder, D. de; Kelleher, C.; Kirby, M.; Milsom, I.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The overactive bladder symptom complex (OAB) is the commonest cause of urinary incontinence in older people, and is usually due to underlying detrusor overactivity, and as such is a treatable condition. Older people are a heterogeneous group, which includes fit community-dwelling individuals and

  15. Neurotrophins as regulators of urinary bladder function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochodnicky, Peter; Cruz, Célia D; Yoshimura, Naoki; Cruz, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    Increased voiding frequency and urgency are among the most prevalent storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), often diagnosed as part of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). It has been suggested that these symptoms are caused by excessive sensory activation of the neural micturition circuit. It seems likely that sensory pathway remodelling is also responsible for pain perception upon bladder filling in patients with bladder pain syndrome (BPS). Neurotrophins-including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived nerve factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4)-represent master modulators of neural plasticity, both in peripheral and central nervous systems. Accumulating evidence points towards a role for neurotrophins in the control of neural sensory function during micturition and indicates their involvement in the emergence of OAB-related and BPS-related LUTS. Neurotrophins could potentially be used as urinary biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy for OAB and BPS and monitor therapy effectiveness. Proof-of-principle clinical evidence has confirmed that NGF is a potential target for treating human bladder overactivity.

  16. Definition and symptoms of underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D. Uren

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB is a symptom syndrome reflecting the urodynamic observation of detrusor underactivity (DU, a voiding contraction of reduced strength and/or duration, leading to prolonged or incomplete bladder emptying. An International Continence Society Working Group has described UAB as characterised by a slow urinary stream, hesitancy and straining to void, with or without a feeling of incomplete bladder emptying and dribbling, often with storage symptoms. Since DU often coexists with bladder outlet obstruction, or storage dysfunction (detrusor overactivity or incontinence, the exact contribution of the DU to the presenting complaints can be difficult to establish. The presence of voiding and post voiding lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS is implicitly expected in UAB, but a reduced sensation of fullness is reported by some patients, and storage LUTS are also an important factor in many affected patients. These may result from a postvoid residual, but often they do not. The storage LUTS are often the key driver in leading the patient to seek healthcare input. Nocturia is particularly common and bothersome, but what the role of DU is in all the range of influences on nocturia has not been established. Qualitative research has established a broad impact on everyday life as a result of these symptoms. In general, people appear to manage the voiding LUTS relatively well, but the storage LUTS may be problematic.

  17. Primary Lymphoma of the Gall Bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-29

    Jun 29, 1974 ... A patient with primary lymphocytic lymphoma of the gall bladder is presented, and cases of primary lymphoma of this organ reported in the English literature are reviewed. Primary lymphoma of the extrahepatic biliary drainage system is a rare cause of obstructive jaundice and has a poor prognosis. S. Air.

  18. Robotic Extramucosal Excision of Bladder Wall Leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid E. Al-Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple case reports and reviews have been described in the literature for bladder wall leiomyoma resection via different approaches. The minimally invasive partial cystectomy remains the most widely accepted technique; however, case reports for enucleation of bladder wall leiomyoma have also been described. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the robotic extramucosal excision of a bladder wall leiomyoma, without cystotomy, but with complete removal of the muscular layer. Materials and Methods: A 35-year old male present with lower urinary tract symptoms and imaging showed bladder wall mass with histopathology showed leiomyoma. The patient consented for mass excision with the possibility of a partial cystectomy. The patient was placed in the supine, 30-degree Trendelenburg position during the procedure. A total of 4 ports were inserted. A 3-arm da Vinci robotic surgical system was docked, and the arms were connected. Extramucosal excision was accomplished without cystotomy and muscle approximation was achieved by 2 0 Vicryle. Result: The operative time was 90 minutes, blood loss of approximately 50mL and the patient was discharged after 72 hours with no immediate complications and a 6 months follow-up showed no recurrence. Conclusion: Such a technique results in complete excision of the tumor, without cystotomy, and also maintains an intact mucosa. These steps, in addition to decreasing the risk of local recurrence, also shorten the period of postoperative catheterization and hospitalization.

  19. Primary Lymphoma of the Gall Bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-29

    Jun 29, 1974 ... textbooks of pathology.'" We have been able to find only. 11 cases documented in the world literature; and only 4 of these in the English literature..·• They have appeared as isolated case reports or are mentioned in reviews deal- ing with primary sarcomas of the gall bladder. To the best of our knowledge ...

  20. Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims of Study: The Bladder Pain Syndrome Committee of the International Consultation on Incontinence was assigned the task by the consultation of reviewing the syndrome, formerly known as interstitial cystitis, in a comprehensive fashion. This included the topics of definition, nomenclature...

  1. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  2. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the bladder: dramatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the bladder (IMT) in an adult male who presented with recurrent hematuria. He required partial cystectomy which revealed perivesical fat infiltration. In spite of this, the tumor was categorized as benign and the patient remained symptom- and tumor-free 18 months ...

  3. Intravesical Gemcitabine for Treatment of Superficial Bladder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is the mainstay of treatment and prophylaxis in superficial bladder cancer (SBC) as it reduces tumor recurrence and disease progression. About one-third of patients do not respond to BCG. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of intravesical ...

  4. Impact of proteomics on bladder cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromova, Irina; Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    Detecting bladder cancer at an early stage and predicting how a tumor will behave and act in response to therapy, as well as the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention, are among the main areas of research that will benefit from the current explosion in the number of powerful...

  5. Granular cell tumour of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph von Klot

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With only 16 cases reported in the literature, the mostly benign granular cell tumour of the urinary bladder is exceptionally rare. We present the case of a 68-year old patient with one of these lesions demonstrating our histological findings including several immunohistochemical stainings used to differentiate between other more common entities.

  6. 16. PRE-OPERATIVE BLADDER IRRIGATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ABSTRACT. Purpose: The aim of the study is to assess the effectiveness of using preoperative bladder irrigation with 1% povidone iodine in reducing post transvesical prostatectomy surgical site infections. Study design: This was a prospective randomized cohort study with blinding of patients and outcome adjudicator.

  7. Elevated Bladder Cancer Risk in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study has found that drinking water from private wells, particularly dug wells established during the first half of the 20th century, may have contributed to the elevated risk of bladder cancer that has been observed in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont for over 50 years.

  8. BLADDER NECK RESECTION WITH PRESERVATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion The complication of retrograde ejaculation in young patients who are in need of fertililty may be avoided by preservation of > 1 cm of the supramontanal part during bladder neck resection. La Résection du Col de Vessie avec Préservation de l'Ejaculation Antégrade Objectif Evaluer une nouvelle méthode de ...

  9. Maintenance by saccharin of membrane alterations of rat bladder cells induced by subcarcinogenic treatment with bladder carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizoe, T; Komatsu, H; Niijima, T; Kawachi, T; Sugimura, T

    1981-11-01

    Saccharin is known to have a tumor-promoting effect on bladder cancer in rats, but its mechanism of action is unknown. We demonstrated that the increased agglutinability of isolated epithelial cells of the bladder in the presence of concanavalin A caused by a subcarcinogenic dose of bladder carcinogens disappeared shortly after the end of their administration. However, saccharin maintained the increased agglutinability when given continuously after administration of carcinogen. Moreover, the agglutinability of bladder cells previously exposed to a subcarcinogenic dose of bladder carcinogens increased again when saccharin was given after the agglutinability had disappeared completely.

  10. Bladder sensory desensitization decreases urinary urgency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avelino António

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder desensitization has been investigated as an alternative treatment for refractory detrusor overactivity. Most open and controlled clinical trials conducted with intravesical RTX showed that desensitization delays the appearance of involuntary detrusor contractions during bladder filling and decreases the number of episodes of urgency incontinence. Urgency is being recognised as the fundamental symptom of overactive bladder (OAB, a symptomatic complex which recent epidemiological studies have shown to affect more than 10% of the Western population. As anti-muscarinic drugs, the first line treatment for OAB, are far from being able to fully control urgency, the opportunity to test other therapeutic approaches is created. The present work was, therefore, designed as an exploratory investigation to evaluate the effect of bladder desensitization on urinary urgency. Methods Twenty-three OAB patients with refractory urgency entered, after given informed consent, a 30 days run-in period in which medications influencing the bladder function were interrupted. At the end of this period patients filled a seven-day voiding chart where they scored, using a 0–4 scale, the bladder sensations felt before each voiding. Then, patients were instilled with 100 ml of 10% ethanol in saline (vehicle solution and 30 days later a second seven-day voiding chart was collected. Finally, patients were instilled with 100 ml of 50 nM RTX in 10% ethanol in saline. At 1 and 3 months additional voiding charts were collected. At the end of the vehicle and 3 months period patients were asked to give their subjective impression about the outcome of the treatment and about the willingness to repeat the previous instillation. Results At the end of the run-in period the mean number of episodes of urgency per week was 71 ± 12 (mean ± SEM. After vehicle instillation, the mean number of episodes of urgency was 56 ± 11, but only 4 patients (17% considered

  11. Bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients through clinical and laboratorial evaluation, ultrasonography, radiological and endoscopic examination. Methods: Thirty-nine patients, either outpatients or inpatients at the Department of Rheumatology of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina from Universidade de São Paulo were evaluated as to clinical and laboratorial data. All patients were submitted to ultrasonographic evaluation of the upper urinary tract, radiological and endoscopic examinations of the middle and lower urinary tracts. Rresults: Mean age of patients varied between 13 and 62 years (median = 29 years. Thirty-six were females and three were males. The disease varied from 6 months to 22 years (median three years and one month. Clinical and laboratory activity of the disease was present in 30 patients. Twenty-two patients had the diagnosis of lupus established for three years or more. Twenty-five patients were asymptomatic and all had received corticosteroids for treatment at least once. Twenty-three received antimalarial drugs; ten received cytostatics, and seven patients received non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Upper urinary tract ultrasonography was normal in all cases but one with staghorn calculus associated with neurogenic bladder secondary to neurological involvement by the disease. Vesicoureteral reflux was observed in two cases. Other two patients had significant post-voiding residual urine, both with neurogenic bladder secondary to nervous system involvement by lupus. The average bladder maximum capacity in an awaken patient was 342 mL, and was decreased in 18.9% of cases. This subgroup of patients presented a greater frequency of urinary symptoms and greater use of cytostatic drugs (Z > Z5%. A pathognomonic cystoscopic pattern of bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus could not be established. Cystoscopic aspects similar to those seen in the initial or minor

  12. Bladder perforation in a peritoneal dialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ounissi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysfunction of the catheter in peritoneal dialysis (PD is a frequent compli-cation. However, perforation of organs are rare, particularly that of the urinary bladder. This re-quires an early diagnosis and prompt treatment of patients. We report here the case of a 38-year-old woman having end-stage renal disease due to autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease treated by PD since November 2000. Three years later, she was treated for Staphylococcal peritonitis. Four months later, she presented with a severe urge to urinate at the time of the fluid exchanges. The biochemical analysis of the fluid from the bladder showed that it was dialysis fluid. Injection of contrast through the catheter demonstrated the presence of a fistula between the bladder and the peritoneal cavity. She underwent cystoscopic closure of the fistulous tract and the PD catheter was removed. Subsequently, the patient was treated by hemodialysis. One month later, a second catheter was implanted surgically after confirming the closure of the fistula. Ten days later, she presented with pain at the catheter site and along the tunnel, which was found to be swollen along its track. The injection of contrast produced swelling of the subcutaneous tunnel but without extravasation of the dye. PD was withdrawn and the patient was put back on hemodialysis. Bladder fistula is a rare complication in PD and diagnosis should be suspected when patient complains of an urge to pass urine during the exchanges, which can be confirmed by contrast study showing presence of dye in the bladder. PD may be possible after the closure of the fistula, but recurrence may occur.

  13. Change of Ultrasound Estimated Bladder Weight and Bladder Wall Thickness After Treatment of Bladder Outlet Obstruction With Dutasteride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Na; Lee, Young-Suk; Han, Deok Hyun; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the change of bladder wall hypertrophy to relieve bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) by treatment with 5α-reductase inhibitor. Men who have BOO confirmed by urodynamic study (BOO index ≥40) were treated with dutasteride 0.5 mg once a day for 6 months. We measured ultrasound estimated bladder weight (UEBW), UEBW divided by body surface area (UEBW/BSA), and bladder wall thickness (BWT) before and after treatment. Changes in LUTS parameters were assessed by using the International Prostate Symptom Score, uroflowmetry, residual urine volume, prostate volume, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and LUTS outcome scores (LOS). Correlation between the change of LUTS parameters and UEBW, UEBW/BSA, and BWT were evaluated. We assessed the changes of bladder wall hypertrophy according to the results of benefit, satisfaction, and willingness to continue (BSW) questionnaire. Thirty patients completed the 6-month study. The mean UEBW was 47.10 ± 7.79 g before and 50.07 ± 5.39 g after dutasteride treatment (P = 0.259). The mean UEBW/BSA was 26.47 ± 4.30 g/m 2 before and 28.2 ± 3.53 g/m 2 after treatment (P = 0.253), and there was no definite change in mean BWT after treatment (P = 0.301). Most LUTS parameters including LOS significantly improved. Increased BOO index value was related to decreased BWT (ρ = 0.361, P = 0.049). There was no definite change in mean UEBW, UEBW/BSA, and BWT according to the results of the BSW questionnaire. There was no change in UEBW, UEBW/BSA and BWT despite improving most clinical parameters suggesting BOO. The changes of bladder wall hypertrophy parameters still have limitations to directly reflect the relief of BOO. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. A bladder preservation regimen using intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyanaga, Naoto; Akaza, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to investigate combined treatment with intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation therapy for bladder preservation in locally invasive bladder cancer. Patients with invasive bladder cancer, stage T2-3N0M0, were included in the study. lntra-arterial chemotherapy was performed with three injections of methotrexate and cisplatin at 3-week intervals. Simultaneously, the patients underwent X-ray irradiation (40 Gy) of the small pelvic space. Where a post-treatment transurethral resection (TUR) biopsy showed no residual tumor, the tumor site was irradiated by a 30 Gy proton beam and the bladder was preserved. Where tumors remained, radical cystectomy was performed. Between 1990 and 1996, 42 patients were treated according to this protocol. Post-treatment TUR biopsy and urine cytology showed no residual tumors in 39 of 42 cases (93%). The bladder was preserved in accordance with the study protocol in 36 cases. A median follow-up of 38 months showed 3-year non-recurrence in 72% of bladder-preserved patients and the rate of bladder preservation was 84%. The nine recurrences included eight cases of superficial bladder recurrence. One cancer death occurred among the bladder-preservation patients, giving 3-year survival and cause-specific survival rates of 84% and 100%, respectively. Although bladder function decreased slightly in compliance, bladder capacity was retained in almost all cases. This regimen is useful for bladder preservation in T2-3 locally invasive bladder cancer. Information from more cases and the results of more long-term observations are needed, as is an evaluation of appropriate subject selection and factors associated with quality of life issues, particularly regarding bladder function. (author)

  15. Building tools for image-guided adaptive radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, X.

    2012-01-01

    From this thesis, we can conclude that the injection of lipiodol markers into the bladder wall is a feasible method to track bladder tumors for IGRT of partial bladder. We succeeded in developing a biomechanical bladder model and bladder segmentation methods for online CBCT, which are useful tools

  16. Pathophysiological studies of overactive bladder and bladder motor dysfunction in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Chia; Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chiang, Po-Hui; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2011-07-01

    We studied bladder motor dysfunction and searched for markers of neurogenic and myogenic alterations among fructose fed rats with or without abnormal voiding behavior. Female Wistar rats were fed with a fructose rich diet (60%) or a normal diet for 6 months. Based on cystometry and voiding behavior the fructose fed rats were divided into 3 groups, including a group with normal detrusor function with normal micturition frequency, a group with detrusor overactivity with increased micturition frequency and a group with acontractile detrusor with increased micturition frequency. Denuded bladder tissues were obtained to assess in vitro detrusor contractility, postsynaptic receptors, smoothelin, nitrosative products and the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Fructose fed rats with abnormal voiding behavior had obvious neurogenic and myogenic alterations, including increased expression of postsynaptic receptors, dysregulation of smoothelin and decreased expression of Bcl-2 with a subsequent increase in apoptotic cells in the bladder stroma, causing decreased carbachol induced contractility. Rats with detrusor overactivity were also insulted by nitrosative stress associated with nitrotyrosine up-regulation in the bladder tissue. Up-regulation of M(2) and M(3)-muscarinic receptors, and P2X(1) receptors appeared to be generalized alterations of fructose fed rats and not exclusive to those with detrusor overactivity. Up-regulation of postsynaptic receptors and dysregulation of smoothelin contribute to overactive bladder symptoms in rats with metabolic syndrome. Nitrosative stress and decreased Bcl-2 expression lead to bladder muscle cell loss via the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, which may further deteriorate bladder function. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  18. The bladder tumor antigen (BTA) test compared to voided urine cytology in the detection of bladder neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, W M; Rivera-Ramirez, I; Medina, C A; Wright, N J; Wajsman, Z

    1997-12-01

    Tests to detect recurrent bladder neoplasms are limited and none is consistently accurate. Recent studies suggest that the bladder tumor antigen (BTA) test, an agglutination reaction for basement membrane complexes, is superior to voided urine cytology in clinical practice. We compared BTA and voided urine cytology to bladder washings and cystoscopy, emphasizing diagnostic yield among patients with causes of basement membrane complexes other than bladder cancer. Random voided urine specimens from 67 patients with a history of bladder neoplasms were collected before cystoscopy and bladder washing. Urine also was obtained from 34 patients with inflammatory bladder conditions including 5 with a history of prostate cancer. Each urine was tested for BTA according to a commercial kit. Positive results were indicated by yellow on a test pad. Blinded to all other results, each urine and each bladder washing were examined microscopically, and a positive test had malignant/suspicious cells. Bladder biopsies were performed when endoscopic lesions were seen. Specimens were grouped into 4 categories: group 1--biopsy proved bladder neoplasm, group 2--history of bladder cancer but not biopsy proved, group 3--history of prostate cancer and group 4--no history of urological cancer. Voided urine cytology was positive in 54% of specimens from patients with biopsy proved bladder neoplasms compared to 29% for BTA. Relative yield for voided urine cytology versus BTA was not changed if all group 2 cases having a positive bladder washing and positive cystoscopy were assumed to have bladder cancer, nor was relative yield altered by subsequent short-term followup. Of voided urine specimens 14% from group 1 patients and 41% from group 2 patients had scant cells. Overall diagnostic yield was superior for bladder washing. False-positive BTA occurred in 7 of 34 patients with no history of urological or prostate cancer. There were no false-positive voided urine cytology interpretations in these

  19. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1. After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering.

  20. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering.

  1. Bladder preservation for locally advanced bladder cancer by transurethral resection, systemic chemotherapy and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Masahito; Satoh, Mototaka; Tujimoto, Yuichi; Takada, Tuyoshi; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Fujioka, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-three out of 31 patients with clinical T2-4a N0 M0 bladder cancer and given a trial of trimodality therapy including transurethral resection (TUR), systemic chemotherapy and radiation between 1991 and 2002 completed this therapy. The other 8 dropped out because of insufficient clinical effect. Local bladder recurrence was seen in 3 patients and the bladder preservation rate was 64.5%. Nineteen of the 23 patients showed a complete histological response on a subsequent TUR specimen, the other 4 were not examined for histological response. Thirteen of the 19 patients showed a complete histological response after maximal TUR and systemic chemotherapy, while 6 did after TUR, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Bladder cancer was T2 in, 15, T3 in 1, and T4a in 3 patients. The CR rate for T2 cancer was significantly higher than that for T3-4a cancer. The 5-year disease-specific survival of the 23 patients treated with preservation therapy was 67.1%. Some of the patients with locally advanced bladder cancer may benefit from this preservation therapy. (author)

  2. Combined therapy of urinary bladder radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaderin, V.P.; Polyanichko, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of therapy of radiation cystitis is suggested. It was developed on the basis of evaluation of literature data and clinical of 205 patients with radiation injury of the urinary bladder. The method is based on general and local therapy of damaged tissues by antiinflammatory drugs, anesthetics and stimulators of reparative regeneration. Severe ulcerative and incrustation cystites, refractory to conservative therapy, were treated by surgery, using antiseptics and reparation stimulators before, during and after operation. As a result, there were hardly any complications after reconstruction of the bladder with intestinal and peritoneal tissues. 104 patients (96.1%) were cured completely and ability to work was restored in 70 patients (76.9%) [ru

  3. Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims of Study: The Bladder Pain Syndrome Committee of the International Consultation on Incontinence was assigned the task by the consultation of reviewing the syndrome, formerly known as interstitial cystitis, in a comprehensive fashion. This included the topics of definition, nomenclature......, taxonomy, epidemiology, etiology, pathology, diagnosis, symptom scales, outcome assessment, principles of management, specific therapies, and future directions in research. Study Design, Materials, Methods: The emphasis was on new information developed since the last consultation 4 years previously. Where...... possible, existing evidence was assessed and a level of recommendation was developed according to the Oxford system of classification. Results: The consultation decided to refer to the condition as "bladder pain syndrome" (BPS) because the designation is more descriptive of the clinical condition...

  4. Carcinoma Gall Bladder: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Y

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma gall bladder is a very aggressive disease with poor outcomes. Despite achievements in the field of advanced imaging techniques, there is a very high mortality rate of the disease Cancer is the second most common disease in India responsible for maximum mortality with about 0.3 million deaths per year. The magnitude of cancer problem in the Indian Sub-continent (sheer numbers is increasing due to poor to moderate living standards and inadequate medical facilities. Women are more commonly affected than men. The peak incidence occurs in people in their 60s, but the disease age range is from 29 to 90 years of age and there is great geographic and ethnic variation. Carcinoma gall bladder, a disease of old age, is now found in the younger age group and presents with greater ferocity.

  5. [The biochemical carcinogenesis of selected heavy metals in bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorbach-Dolata, Anna; Marchewka, Zofia; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer takes the second place in the classification of morbidity of urinary system cancers. Many chemical factors take part in cancerogenesis. It is suggested that exposure to heavy metals such as arsenic, chromium, nickel and cadmium as well as its metabolites may trigger the bladder cancer through inducing excessive reactive oxygen species production and oxidative stress formation which are responsible for DNA damage. In patients with bladder cancer is observed the disorder of processes regulated by p-53, including apoptosis. There are many patients with bladder cancer with confirmed absence of retinoblastoma protein, which is responsible of holding on the process of coming up the cells with mutation into synthesis, where the replication process undergoes. It is mentioned that excessive expression of proto-oncogenes may also cause the bladder cancer. The article concerns biochemical effects of exposure to chosen heavy metals and their potential role in bladder cancer progression.

  6. Persistent neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to infantile botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-13

    We present a child, 5 months of age, diagnosed with infantile botulism, showing the signs of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The patient presented with progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia, suckling and swallowing problems and absent peripheral reflexes at clinical examination. Botulinum neurotoxin type A was detected in her serum, confirming the diagnosis. Starting at day 6, the girl presented with a urinary retention initially necessitating free bladder drainage and subsequently intermittent catheterisation. After 6 weeks in intensive care, the patient recovered but the bladder underactivity persisted. Four months following recovery, a urodynamic evaluation was performed, showing a near normal detrusor activity and normal bladder emptying, and the catheterisation was ceased. At 6 months, the girl was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and bladder emptying problems, which persisted, and clean intermittent catheterisation was started. The final urodynamic evaluation, a year and a half after her initial presentation, revealed a normal detrusor activity and an adequate bladder emptying.

  7. Oncolytic Viruses in the Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle G. Potts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder carcinoma is the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Up to 85% of patients with bladder cancer are diagnosed with a tumor that is limited to the bladder mucosa (Ta, T1, and CIS. These stages are commonly termed as non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Although the treatment of NMIBC has greatly improved in recent years, there is a need for additional therapies when patients fail bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that bladder cancer may be an ideal target for oncolytic viruses engineered to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells leaving normal cells unharmed. In support of this hypothesis, here we review current treatment strategies for bladder cancer and their shortcomings, as well as recent advancements in oncolytic viral therapy demonstrating encouraging safety profiles and antitumor activity.

  8. Primary posterior perineal herniation of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurumboor Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary perineal hernia is a rare clinical condition wherein herniation of viscera occurs through pelvic diaphragm. They are usually mistaken for sciatic hernia, rectal prolapse or other diseases in the perineum. Correct identification of the type of hernia by imaging is crucial for planning treatment. We present a case of primary posterior herniation of urinary bladder and rectal wall through levator ani repaired laparoscopically using a mesh repair.

  9. Bladder neck disease and kidney damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mudoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO was first described in men by Marion in 1933. The precise cause of PBNO has not been clearly elucidated. This paper review the theories on etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and treatments for PBNO. Also this paper focuses on management of patients with complications like acute urine retention, hydroureteronephrosis and severe renal failure. The treatment options for men and women with PBNO include careful clinical evaluation, pharmacotherapy with alpha-blockers and surgical intervention.

  10. Human bladder cancer diagnosis using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sushmita; Wysock, James S.; Ng, Casey K.; Akhtar, Mohammed; Perner, Sven; Lee, Ming-Ming; Rubin, Mark A.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Webb, Watt W.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2009-02-01

    At the time of diagnosis, approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive. Appropriate diagnosis and surgical resection at this stage improves prognosis dramatically. However, these lesions, being small and/or flat, are often missed by conventional white-light cystoscopes. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the surgical margin for negativity using conventional cystoscopes. Resultantly, the recurrence rates in patients with early bladder cancer are very high. This is currently addressed by repeat cystoscopies and biopsies, which can last throughout the life of a patient, increasing cost and patient morbidity. Multiphoton endoscopes offer a potential solution, allowing real time, noninvasive biopsies of the human bladder, as well as an up-close assessment of the resection margin. While miniaturization of the Multiphoton microscope into an endoscopic format is currently in progress, we present results here indicating that Multiphoton imaging (using a bench-top Multiphoton microscope) can indeed identify cancers in fresh, unfixed human bladder biopsies. Multiphoton images are acquired in two channels: (1) broadband autofluorescence from cells, and (2) second harmonic generation (SHG), mostly by tissue collagen. These images are then compared with gold standard hematoxylin/eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from the same specimen. Based on a "training set" and a very small "blinded set" of samples, we have found excellent correlation between the Multiphoton and histopathological diagnoses. A larger blinded analysis by two independent uropathologists is currently in progress. We expect that the conclusion of this phase will provide us with diagnostic accuracy estimates, as well as the degree of inter-observer heterogeneity.

  11. Computerized tomography of gall bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todua, F.I.; Karmazanovskij, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have summed up the experience in the use of computerized tomography (CT) in diagnosis of gall bladder cancer. The investigation of 17 patients with cancer of this site showed a high informative value of the method. A retrospective comparative study of the results of CT and surgical interventions was carried out. It has been concluded that CT makes it possible not only to diagnose malignant lesions of the bile ducts but also to assess a possible scope of a forthcoming operation

  12. Temporary metal stents in bladder outflow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachia, D

    1997-12-01

    The use of stents in the management of prostatic obstruction started in 1980 with the development of the "partial catheter" by Fabian in Germany. Since then, a variety of metals and biostable and biodegradable polymers have been made into temporary or permanent stents for the management of infravesical obstructions such as benign or malignant prostatic enlargement, bladder neck stenoses, or urethral strictures. This paper is an overview of two generations of temporary metal stents used in the patients with infravesical obstruction.

  13. Diuron-induced rat bladder epithelial cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli S; Arnold, Lora L; Pennington, Karen L; Muirhead, David; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Anwar, Muhammad M; Battalora, Michael; De Camargo, João Lauro V; Cohen, Samuel M

    2012-12-01

    Diuron, a substituted urea herbicide, is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels (2500 ppm). To further elucidate the mode of action, this study aimed to determine the time course and sequence of bladder cytotoxic and proliferative changes induced by diuron treatment of male Wistar rats. Rats were randomized into two groups (control and 2500 ppm diuron) and treated for 28 days. Ten rats from each group were terminated on each of study days 1, 3, 7, or 28. Scanning electron micro scopy (SEM) showed urothelial cell swelling beginning on day 1, and by day 28, showed extensive necrosis, exfoliation and piling up of cells suggestive of hyperplasia. No difference in the bromo deoxyuridine labeling index was detected. In a second experiment, rats were randomized into control and diuron-treated groups and treated for 7 days or 8 weeks. After 7 days, transmission electron microscopy showed cell degenerative changes and distention of the cytoplasm, organelles, and nuclei characteristic of cytolysis. This resulted in protrusion of the superficial cells into the lumen, corresponding to the cell swelling observed previously by SEM. After 8 weeks, bladders in the diuron-treated group showed an increased incidence of simple hyperplasia by light microscopy (6/10, p diuron exposure in rats.

  14. Chronic kidney disease in neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bong Mo; Oh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Moon Hee; Choi, Hye Min

    2018-03-01

    It was believed that neurogenic bladder (NB) might be a risk factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, data are limited regarding the real incidence or risk of CKD in NB. In addition, serum creatinine (sCr), a classical marker of renal function, is not reliable in NB patients because they present muscle wasting due to disuse or denervation. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of CKD in NB patients using serum Cystatin-C. Secondly, we aimed to identify the risk factors for CKD development in NB. This was a cross-sectional study in a public hospital, a specialized center for patients who were victims of industrial accidents. Serum Cystatin-C was checked at the regular laboratory test in the structured NB programme of the hospital, and 313 patients were included in the study. The overall prevalence of CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria were significantly associated with CKD in the multivariable analysis. Chronic kidney disease prevalence was more than three times higher in NB patients than in the general population despite recent progress in the medical care of NB. Co-morbid diabetes, small bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria seem to be the risk factors for CKD development in NB. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  15. [Urinary tract infection and neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, J; Gory, A; Bernard, L; Ruffion, A; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E

    2007-05-01

    One of the main complications of spinal cord injury is neurogenic bladder when the bladder fails to empty spontaneously. Urinary tract infection is the leading cause of morbidity and the second cause of mortality in these subjects. Patient education and personalized medical follow-up must ensure adapted management depending on the risk factors and the voiding mode. The risk of urinary tract infection can be decreased by perfect neurological control of detrusor activity combined with a method of drainage: intermittent self-catheterization. Despite these measures, many patients experience recurrent symptomatic urinary tract infections. Repeated antibiotic therapy increases the risk of selection of multiresistant bacteria without reducing either the incidence or the severity of symptomatic urinary tract infections. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is very frequent in patients treated by intermittent catheterization and does not justify antibiotic therapy, as antiseptics and urinary alkalinizers or acidifiers have been shown to be effective. "Antibiocycle" strategies could have a beneficial role by significantly decreasing the number of infections and hospitalizations with no major ecological risks, by using molecules that are well tolerated orally with a low selection pressure. All febrile urinary tract infections require rapid investigation and an urgent urological and infectious diseases opinion (abscess, severe sepsis, resistance). The SPILF-AFU 2002 consensus conference provided answers to major questions concerning the definition, treatment and prevention of nosocomial urinary tract infection, especially in a context of neurogenic bladder.

  16. Antiproliferative Factor Signaling and Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    A unique glycopeptide, antiproliferative factor (APF), has been suggested as a urinary biomarker and potential mediator of long-term bladder disorder Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome. There is no known cause for this disease. Several mechanistic approaches have been employed to address the underlying mechanism whereby APF regulates cellular responses in the bladder epithelium. A summary of recent literature is provided, and is focused on signal transduction pathways and networks that are responsive to APF. PMID:22259731

  17. An Implantable Neuroprosthetic Device to Normalize Bladder Function after SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    long term. Frequent urethral catheterization can cause low urinary tract infection (2). In addition, detrusor overactivity (DO) induces poor bladder ...management of neurogenic bladder and sexual dysfunction after spinal cord injury. Spine 2001;26:S129–S136. 3. van Kerrebroeck PEV, Koldewijn EL, Rosier PFWM...Wijkstra H, Debruyne FMJ. Results of the treatment of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in spinal cord injury by sacral posterior root rhizotomy and

  18. Renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    OLANDOSKI, Karen Previdi; KOCH, Vera; TRIGO-ROCHA, Flavio Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Preservation of renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder is an important goal of treatment for the disease. This study analyzed the evolution of renal function in patients with congenital neurogenic bladder. METHODS: We reviewed the records of 58 pediatric patients with respect to the following attributes: gender, age, etiology of neurogenic bladder, reason for referral, medical/surgical management, episodes of treated urinary tract infections, urodynamics, DMSA sci...

  19. Perioperative Challenges in Repeat Bladder Exstrophy Repair - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otu Enenyi Etta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital malformation. It presents as leakage of urine in the anterior abdominal wall following defects in midline anterior abdominal wall skin and bladder. We report the use of combined general anaesthesia and caudal epidural analgesia in a 4yr old boy for repeat bladder exstrophy repair. Problems of prolonged surgery and the challenges of pain and sedation management in the post operative period are discussed.

  20. Intra-fractional bladder motion and margins in adaptive radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Caroline; Vestergaard, Anne; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    and to estimate population-based and patient-specific intra-fractional margins, also relevant for a future re-optimisation strategy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients treated in a clinical phase II ART trial of daily plan selection for bladder cancer were included. In the library plans, 5 mm isotropic margins......BACKGROUND: The bladder is a tumour site well suited for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional changes, but it also displays considerable intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to assess target coverage with a clinically applied method for plan selection ART...... were added to account for intra-fractional changes. Pre-treatment and weekly repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series were acquired in which a full three-dimensional (3D) volume was scanned every second min for 10 min (a total of 366 scans in 61 series). Initially, the bladder clinical target...

  1. The overlap and distinction of self-reported symptoms between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and overactive bladder: a questionnaire based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H Henry; Vetter, Joel; Jain, Sanjay; Gereau, Robert W; Andriole, Gerald L

    2014-12-01

    We compared symptoms between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and overactive bladder based on patient self-reported symptoms on validated questionnaires. We prospectively recruited 26 patients diagnosed with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, 53 diagnosed with overactive bladder and 30 healthy controls to participate in a questionnaire based study that inquired about lower urinary tract symptoms. The questionnaires used were GUPI, ICSI, ICPI, ICIQ-OAB, ICIQ-UI, IUSS, numerical rating scales of the severity of bladder pain, pressure or discomfort, and numerical rating scale of the severity of urgency and frequency symptoms. On univariate analysis patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome reported significantly more severe pain symptoms than those with overactive bladder. Patients with overactive bladder reported significantly more severe urinary incontinence symptoms than those with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. There was no difference in frequency and urgency severity between the groups. Surprisingly, 33% of patients with overactive bladder reported pain or discomfort when the bladder filled and 46% with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome reported urgency incontinence. On multivariate analysis ICIQ-UI total scores (p = 0.01) and bladder pain severity on the numerical rating scale (p interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and overactive bladder. This overlap raises the possibility that the 2 conditions represent a continuum of a bladder hypersensitivity syndrome. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between anxiety and overactive bladder syndrome in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Aline Teixeira; Jácomo, Raquel Henriques; Gomide, Liana Barbaresco; Garcia, Patrícia Azevedo; Bontempo, Albênica Paulino dos Santos; Karnikoskwi, Margô Gomes de Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between overactive bladder syndrome and anxiety in older women. Of the 198 older women who were invited, 29 were excluded and 166 were then divided into two groups according to the Advanced Questionnaire of Overactive Bladder (OAB-V8): one group with overactive bladder symptoms (OAB-V8≥8) and the other without the symptoms of an overactive bladder (OAB-V8overactive bladder was present in 117 (70.5%) of the participants. The body mass index (BMI) of the group with overactive bladder symptoms was significantly higher than the BMI of those without these symptoms (p=0.001). A higher prevalence of mild, moderate and severe anxiety was observed among older women with overactive bladder symptoms. In addition, the overactive bladder symptoms group presented a positive low correlation with anxiety symptoms (r=0.345) and with BMI (r=0.281). There was a small correlation between BMI and anxiety symptoms (r=0.164). Overactive bladder syndrome was prevalent among older women and the existence of these symptoms was linked to the presence of mild, moderate and/or severe anxiety symptoms.

  3. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Mediates PAR-Induced Bladder Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios E Kouzoukas

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is constitutively expressed in urothelial cells that also express protease-activated receptors (PAR. Urothelial PAR1 receptors were shown to mediate bladder inflammation. We showed that PAR1 and PAR4 activator, thrombin, also mediates urothelial MIF release. We hypothesized that stimulation of urothelial PAR1 or PAR4 receptors elicits release of urothelial MIF that acts on MIF receptors in the urothelium to mediate bladder inflammation and pain. Thus, we examined the effect of activation of specific bladder PAR receptors on MIF release, bladder pain, micturition and histological changes.MIF release was measured in vitro after exposing immortalized human urothelial cells (UROtsa to PAR1 or PAR4 activating peptides (AP. Female C57BL/6 mice received intravesical PAR1- or PAR4-AP for one hour to determine: 1 bladder MIF release in vivo within one hour; 2 abdominal hypersensitivity (allodynia to von Frey filament stimulation 24 hours after treatment; 3 micturition parameters 24 hours after treatment; 4 histological changes in the bladder as a result of treatment; 5 changes in expression of bladder MIF and MIF receptors using real-time RT-PCR; 6 changes in urothelial MIF and MIF receptor, CXCR4, protein levels using quantitative immunofluorescence; 7 effect of MIF or CXCR4 antagonism.PAR1- or PAR4-AP triggered MIF release from both human urothelial cells in vitro and mouse urothelium in vivo. Twenty-four hours after intravesical PAR1- or PAR4-AP, we observed abdominal hypersensitivity in mice without changes in micturition or bladder histology. PAR4-AP was more effective and also increased expression of bladder MIF and urothelium MIF receptor, CXCR4. Bladder CXCR4 localized to the urothelium. Antagonizing MIF with ISO-1 eliminated PAR4- and reduced PAR1-induced hypersensitivity, while antagonizing CXCR4 with AMD3100 only partially prevented PAR4-induced hypersensitivity.Bladder

  4. Biomarkers for bladder cancer management: present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Wang, Li; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; McBride, Russell; Galsky, Matthew D; Zhu, Jun; Boffetta, Paolo; Zhang, David Y; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and sensitive detection of bladder cancer is critical to diagnose this deadly disease at an early stage, estimate prognosis, predict response to treatment, and monitor recurrence. In past years, laboratory diagnosis and surveillance of urinary bladder cancer have improved significantly. Although urine cytology remains the gold standard test, many new urinary biomarkers have been identified. Furthermore, recent advances in genomic studies of bladder cancer have helped to refine our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, the biological basis for outcome disparities, and to inform more efficient treatment and surveillance strategies. In this article, the established diagnostic tests, newly identified biomarkers and genomic landscape of bladder cancer will be reviewed. PMID:25374904

  5. NMR imaging of bladder tumors in males. Preliminary clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.; Rein, A.J.J.T.; Atlan, H.; Lanir, A.; Kedar, S.; Segal, S.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the normal and pathologic bladder was performed in 10 male subjects: 5 normal volunteers, 4 with bladder primary carcinoma, 1 with bladder metastasis. All scanning was done using a superconductive magnet operating at 0.5 T. Spin echo was used as pulse sequence. The diagnosis was confirmed in all cases by NMR imaging. The ability of the technique to provide images in axial, sagital and coronal planes allowed a precise assessment of the morphology and the size of the tumors. The lack of hazards and the quality of images may promote NMR imaging to a prominent role in the diagnosis of human bladder cancer [fr

  6. The hysterographic (empty bladder) view of the uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, R.; Gombergh, R.

    1986-01-01

    Technical improvements in transducer design permit a direct coronal view of the uterus (''hysterographic view'') to be obtained with the bladder empty as a valuable complement to the usual US study of the pelvis with the bladder distended. Good visualization of the uterine cavity and wall is possible in 95% of cases. More than 50 cases of endometrial and myometrial pathology (polyps, cancers, submucous fibroids) with abnormalities inapparent on standard US scans have hysterographic and/or pathologic proof confirming the empty-bladder US-based diagnosis. If tubal visualization is not necessary, empty-bladder US may often avoid hysterography. It is also the best way to demonstrate IUD position

  7. Transrectal bladder prolapse secondary to pelvic fracture in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellenti, L Z; Silveira, M P; Silva, A N; Borin-Crivellenti, S; Raposo, T M M; Honsho, D K

    2014-08-01

    This report describes the exteriorisation of the urinary bladder in two dogs as a result of a laceration of the rectum from a traumatic pelvic fracture. Clinical examination and contrast radiography of the bladder were used as diagnostic tools. Both patients were treated with exploratory laparotomy, where traction of the bladder was utilised to pull the bladder through the traumatic rectal laceration allowing the organ to return to its normal anatomical position. This procedure was followed by surgical reconstruction of the rectum, resulting in effective resolution of each case. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  8. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphisms at Familial Bladder Cancer: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Ceylan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the seventh most common cancer in men in the world, it is the second most seen cancer after lung cancer and the first in urogenital tumours in Turkey. Many molecular epidemiologic studies have been reported to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk. In this report, a family with transitional bladder cancer have also MTHFR A1298C heterozygosity which supports the association between MTHFR variants and bladder cancer. This %uFB01nding should be further validated by prospective and larger studies with more diverse ethnic groups.

  9. Placenta Percreta With Invasion into the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary L. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Placenta percreta is a rare condition, which can lead to significant morbidity and potentially mortality. We present a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented at 24 weeks gestation with vaginal bleeding and was found to have complete placenta previa with placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder. Her hospital course was complicated by bilateral pulmonary emboli. She underwent an exploratory laparotomy, repeat Caesarean section, and total abdominal hysterectomy. Because of placental invasion into the bladder, the procedure was complicated by bladder and ureteral injuries for which urology carried out repair. Postoperatively, the patient had a persistent bladder leak until postoperative day #39.

  10. Placenta Percreta With Invasion into the Urinary Bladder*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary L.; Sehgal, Shailen S.; Van Arsdalen, Keith N.; Goldstein, Irwin S.

    2014-01-01

    Placenta percreta is a rare condition, which can lead to significant morbidity and potentially mortality. We present a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented at 24 weeks gestation with vaginal bleeding and was found to have complete placenta previa with placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder. Her hospital course was complicated by bilateral pulmonary emboli. She underwent an exploratory laparotomy, repeat Caesarean section, and total abdominal hysterectomy. Because of placental invasion into the bladder, the procedure was complicated by bladder and ureteral injuries for which urology carried out repair. Postoperatively, the patient had a persistent bladder leak until postoperative day #39. PMID:26955539

  11. Portable bladder ultrasound: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound. TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Data from the National Population Health Survey indicate prevalence rates of urinary incontinence are 2.5% in women and 1.4 % in men in the general population. Prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women than men and prevalence increases with age. Identified risk factors for urinary incontinence include female gender, increasing age, urinary tract infections (UTI), poor mobility, dementia, smoking, obesity, consuming alcohol and caffeine beverages, physical activity, pregnancy, childbirth, forceps and vacuum-assisted births, episiotomy, abdominal resection for colorectal cancer, and hormone replacement therapy. For the purposes of this review, incontinence populations will be stratified into the following; the elderly, urology patients, postoperative patients, rehabilitation settings, and neurogenic bladder populations. Urinary incontinence is defined as any involuntary leakage of urine. Incontinence can be classified into diagnostic clinical types that are useful in planning evaluation and treatment. The major types of incontinence are stress (physical exertion), urge (overactive bladder), mixed (combined urge and stress urinary incontinence), reflex (neurological impairment of the central nervous system), overflow (leakage due to full bladder), continuous (urinary tract abnormalities), congenital incontinence, and transient incontinence (temporary incontinence). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, which is the amount of urine in the bladder immediately after urination, represents an important component in continence assessment and bladder management to provide quantitative feedback to the patient and continence care team regarding the effectiveness of the voiding technique. Although there is no standardized definition of normal PVR urine volume, measurements greater than 100 mL to 150 mL are considered an indication for urinary

  12. [Urodynamic changes after bladder augmentation surgery in paediatric patients with myelomeningocele due to neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza Torres, Raúl Ignacio; Galarza-Flores, Mario Eduardo; Gómez-Castellanos, Julio Cesar; Barrera-de León, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty is a successful surgical procedure for the management of neurogenic bladder in children in order to improve urodynamic parameters. The aim of this article is to describe urodynamic changes after augmentation cystoplasty in children with myelomeningocele. A descriptive cross-sectional study including children aged 8-16 years with a myelomeningocele operated on for augmentation cystoplasty surgery with sigmoid colon segments due to a neurogenic bladder from the years 2003-2013. A urodynamic study was conducted before and after the surgical procedure. Non-probabilistic sample of consecutive cases. Descriptive statistics with frequencies and percentages, medians, and ranges. Inferential intra-group comparison with the Wilcoxon test and inter-group with Mann-Whitney U. SPSS 20.0 statistical package. The study included 50 patients, of whom 25 were male and 25 were female, with a median age of 12 years (range, 6-15 years). Bladder capacity improved from 52.8% to 95.9% (p<0.001), uninhibited contractions 1.4-1.8, contraction intensity 47-8.5 (p<0.001), mean pre-surgical and post-surgical filling pressure 40.8cm H2O and 11.0cm H2O, respectively (p<0.001), mean emptying pressure 48.5 vs. 3.6cm H2O (p<0.001), and bladder accommodation 4.6 vs. 41.3cm H2O (p<0.001). Augmentation cystoplasty with sigmoid colon significantly improved urodynamic parameters, such as bladder accommodation and filling pressure in children with myelomeningocele-associated neurogenic bladder. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Radio-chemo-therapy with 5FU and cisplatin for bladder cancer after TUR-bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuchardt, U.; Birkenhake, S.; Leykam, S.; Martus, P.; Sauer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine toxicity and efficacy of radio-chemo-therapy (RCT) with 5FU and cisplatin in patients with bladder cancer. Endpoints are initial response, cystectomy-rates and overall-survival. Materials and Methods: From 11/93 to 1/95 13 patients suffering from bladder cancer were first treated with TUR-bladder (TURB). Patient characteristics were as follows: Within 6 weeks after operation the pelvis was irradiated with 54.0 Gy (median) in conventional fractionation (10 MV photons 4-field-box). The bladder was boosted up to 59.4 Gy (median) in isocentric rotation technique. 7 patients were treated with 45 Gy paraaortal. During the first and 5th treatment week chemotherapy (CT) was simultaneously given: 800 mg/m 2* d CISPLATIN as bolus-infusion 30 min prior to RT. 2 months later a further TURB was performed for restaging. Cystectomy was recommended, if invasive cancer was found at this time. Acute hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity was recorded according to the WHO-criteria. Results: At least 81% (e.g. 75% of 2nd course) of CT was applied in 10/13 patients. Median doses were 3500 mg/m 2 5FU and 200 mg/m 2 CISPLATIN. Acute toxicity to bladder and bowel reached grade 2 WHO only. Hematotoxicity (median values) and results ar shown in the following table. Conclusion: Concomitant RCT with 5FU and CISPLATIN seems to be a promising modality for organ-preserving therapy of bladder cancer. Preliminary results show sufficient effect and acceptable toxicity. Since patient number is still low, further investigation is recommended

  14. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Li, Dao-bing; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu-chun; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-jie

    2011-02-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study. This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition. The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90 ± 1.22)% vs. (93.14 ± 1.78)%, P > 0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41 ± 1.49)% vs. (92.61 ± 1.34)%, P > 0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane. This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder. Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells, resulting in

  15. Microwave regional coagulation and intracavitary whole bladder mucosal irradiation therapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, Hideki

    1993-01-01

    A survey was performed on 115 cases of superficial and 55 cases of invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. Microwave regional coagulation (MRC) and intracavitary whole bladder mucosal irradiation (IWI) therapies were evaluated. Comparing the MRC group (performed using only MRC, n=15) with the transurethral resection (TUR) group (n=13) for superficial, initial and solitary tumors, the recurrence rate of grade 1 patients of the MRC group was lower than that of the TUR group. The recurrence rate (total number of recurrences X 100/total months of follow up) for superficial, recurrent and multiple tumors (n=25) was 14.6 before IWI and 1.47 after IWI. The total group (those undergoing total cystectomy) and MRC and/or IWI therapies for invasive tumors were compared. The 5-year survival rates were 69.0% for the MRC and/or IWI group (n=29) and 50.8% for the total group (n=13), although these differences were not statistically significant. In the MRC and/or IWI group, 17 (81.0%) of the 21 living patients have retained functioning bladders without disease, at an average follow up of 50 months. Of the 11 patients who died of cancer in the total and MRC and/or IWI groups, 8 were grade 3. Prognosis of the grade 3 patients was poor despite treatment. These results demonstrate that MRC and IWI are efficient therapies for invasive bladder cancer from the viewpoint of bladder preservation, as well as for superficial bladder cancer. (author)

  16. Bladder wall dose from administered radiopharmaceuticals: the effects of variations in urine flow rate, voiding interval and initial bladder content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.; Veall, N.; Wootton, R.

    1982-01-01

    Equations are given for calculating the dose to the surface of the bladder wall for any values of the parameters, urine flow-rate, bladder voiding period and initial content, for any administered radiopharmaceutical with known biokinetics. The necessary relationships which describe the variation in dose to the bladder wall per unit of cumulated activity in contents with increasing volume of contents are given for 31 radionuclides. Two commonly used renal radiopharmaceuticals, 131 I Hippuran and 99 Tcsup(m) DTPA, are used to illustrate the effects of the above three physiological variables on the dose to the bladder wall and it may be concluded that, for radiopharmaceuticals which are rapidly transferred to the bladder, substantial dose reduction can be achieved by optimising these parameters. Thus, where possible, the patient should be well hydrated, the radiopharmaceutical should be administered when the bladder is partly filled and the voiding period should be about 1.5 h. (author)

  17. Diagnosis of Interstitial Cystitis/ Painful Bladder Syndrome in Patients With Overactive Bladder Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDiarmid, Scott A; Sand, Peter K

    2007-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) and interstitial cystitis (IC) have similar symptoms, including urinary urgency/frequency and nocturia, making them difficult to differentiate on the basis of clinical presentation alone. Both conditions may represent a clinical manifestation of a hypersensitive bladder and should be included in the differential diagnosis for patients who present with urgency/ frequency. It is especially important that IC be considered in patients with OAB that is refractory to treatment. The proposed diagnostic framework may be useful for differentiating IC from OAB and for facilitating appropriate treatment. PMID:17396167

  18. Effects of acute adult and early-in-life bladder inflammation on bladder neuropeptides in adult female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ness Timothy J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the present study was to determine how acute adult and/or prior early-in life (EIL; P14-P16 exposure to bladder inflammation affects bladder content of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP and substance P (SP. Estrous cycle influences were also studied in the adult-treatment conditions. Methods In Experiment 1, intravesical zymosan or isoflurane anesthesia alone was administered to adult female rats. Bladders and serum were collected 24 hours later during each phase of the estrous cycle. In Experiment 2, zymosan or anesthesia alone was administered EIL and as adults, with bladder tissue collection 24 h later. Results In general, Experiment 1 showed that bladder content of both CGRP and SP was increased by inflammation. This effect was significant when data were collapsed across all phases of the estrous cycle, but was only significant during proestrus when individual comparisons were made during each phase of estrous. Also, adult bladder inflammation significantly reduced estradiol levels. In Experiment 2, bladder content of CGRP and SP was significantly increased in rats receiving EIL and/or adult inflammation. Bladder weights were also significantly increased by inflammation. Conclusions These data indicate that bladder CGRP and SP are maximally increased during the proestrus phase of the estrous cycle in inflamed adult female rats. EIL exposure to bladder inflammation alone can also produce an increase in CGRP and SP lasting into adulthood. Therefore, EIL experience with bladder inflammation may predispose an organism to experience a painful bladder disorder as an adult by increasing primary afferent content of CGRP and/or SP.

  19. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-09-27

    To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding author. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  20. Hypersensitive bladder: a solution to confused terminology and ignorance concerning interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Yukio

    2014-04-01

    Taxonomy or nomenclature concerning interstitial cystitis and its related symptom syndromes is in a state of confusion. After analyzing the reasons for confusion in regard to three components (disease name, symptoms, Hunner's lesion), I would like to propose a new term, "hypersensitive bladder", taking after overactive bladder, as a solution. Hypersensitive bladder symptoms are defined as "increased bladder sensation, usually associated with urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without bladder pain." The proposal of hypersensitive bladder is based on: (i) it does not appear a symptom syndrome, but a disease by ending with an organ name, "bladder"; (ii) it does not contain confusable symptom terms (pain and urgency), but indicates irritative symptoms including pain and urgency; and (iii) it suggests pathophysiological hyperactivity of sensory nerves. Interstitial cystitis is defined by three requirements: (i) hypersensitive bladder symptoms; (ii) bladder pathology; and (iii) no other diseases, where bladder pathology should be clearly stated either as Hunner's lesion or glomerulations after hydrodistention. Hypersensitive bladder can be used for the condition with hypersensitive bladder symptoms, but no obvious disease explaining hypersensitive bladder symptoms identified. Interstitial cystitis is a representative disease causing hypersensitive bladder symptoms, most typically with pain, but might be painless and indistinguishable from overactive bladder. Introducing hypersensitive bladder as a counter concept of overactive bladder into bladder dysfunction taxonomy will facilitate clinical practice and research progress, and attract considerable attention from the medical world. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  1. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  2. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Truzzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder.

  3. Bladder exstrophy: An overview of the surgical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veereshwar Bhatnagar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The surgical management of urinary bladder exstrophy is challenging. This paper describes the personal experience in a tertiary care hospital over a period exceeding a quarter of a century. Methods: During the period 1984-2010, 248 patients of the epispadias-exstrophy complex have been treated. The cases of classical bladder exstrophy (n = 210 form the basis of this paper. The stages/procedures used in the surgical reconstruction of bladder exstrophy included bladder closure with anterior abdominal wall reconstruction, bladder neck repair, ureteric reimplantation, epispadias repair and augmentation colocystoplasty in various combinations. Some of these patients had their initial operations done prior to 1984 or in other hospitals. Evaluation methods included, amongst others, clinical evaluation and urodynamic assessment. Eight patients opted out of treatment; 15 patients underwent permanent urinary diversion by either ureterosigmoidostomy or colon conduit. The remaining 187 patients were treated with bladder reconstruction, and of these, 132 patients have had at least one attempt at bladder neck reconstruction with 56 of these patients having undergone an augmentation colocystoplasty. Results: A total of 105 patients had socially acceptable continence: 57 from the bladder neck reconstruction group and 48 from the bladder augmentation group. Further attempts at continence surgery have been offered to the inadequately continent patients. Conclusions: Surgical management of bladder exstrophy demands patience and perseverance. It is possible to provide all patients with socially acceptable continence with bladder neck division and catheterizable continent stoma as the last resort. Urodynamic assessment has emerged as an essential tool in the follow-up evaluation of these patients. Anticholinergic medication with imipramine or oxybutinin is a useful adjunct in the overall management.

  4. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Y; Zabbarova, I; Schaefer, C M; Bushnell, D; De Groat, W C; Kanai, A; Bates, C M

    2017-04-01

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (Fgfr2) is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. Our objective was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in bladder mesenchyme ( Fgfr2 BM -/- ). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblotting, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with controls, embryonic ( E ) day 16.5 ( E16.5 ) Fgfr2 BM -/- bladders have thin muscle layers with reduced α-smooth muscle actin levels and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen expression that intrudes into muscle. From postnatal ( P ) day 1 ( P1 ) to P30 , Fgfr2 BM -/- bladders demonstrate progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2 BM -/- bladder sheets exhibit decreased contractility and increased passive stretch tension compared with controls. In vivo cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2 BM -/- bladders compared with controls. Mechanistically, while Shh expression appears normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity are increased in E16.5 Fgfr2 BM -/- bladders compared with controls. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2 BM -/- bladders exhibit higher levels of Cdo and Boc , hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, than controls. Fgfr2 is critical for bladder mesenchyme patterning by virtue of its role in modulation of hedgehog signaling. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganglong Yang

    Full Text Available The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia, KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC, and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer.

  6. Prognostic markers for bladder cancer: International Consensus Panel on bladder tumor markers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habuchi, T.; Marberger, M.; Droller, M.J.; Hemstreet, G.P.; Grossman, H.B.; Schalken, J.A.; Schmitz-Drager, B.J.; Murphy, W.M.; Bono, A.V.; Goebell, P.; Getzenberg, R.H.; Hautmann, S.H.; Messing, E.; Fradet, Y.; Lokeshwar, V.B.

    2005-01-01

    The International Consensus Panel on cytology and bladder tumor markers evaluated markers that have the ability to predict tumor recurrence, progression, development of metastases, or response to therapy or patient survival. This article summarizes those findings. The panel mainly reviewed articles

  7. Bladder tumor markers beyond cytology: International Consensus Panel on bladder tumor markers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokeshwar, V.B.; Habuchi, T.; Grossman, H.B.; Murphy, W.M.; Hautmann, S.H.; Hemstreet, G.P.; Bono, A.V.; Getzenberg, R.H.; Goebell, P.; Schmitz-Drager, B.J.; Schalken, J.A.; Fradet, Y.; Marberger, M.; Messing, E.; Droller, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first of 2 articles that summarize the findings of the International Consensus Panel on cytology and bladder tumor markers. The objectives of our panel were to reach a consensus on the areas where markers are needed, to define the attributes of an ideal tumor marker, and to identify

  8. Bladder augmentation and urinary diversion in patients with neurogenic bladder: surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Raimund; Schröder, Annette; Thüroff, Joachim W

    2012-04-01

    In patients with a neurogenic bladder, the primary goal is preservation of renal function and prevention of urinary tract infection, with urinary continence as the secondary goal. After failure of conservative treatment (clean intermittent catheterisation and pharmacotherapy) urinary diversion should be considered. In this review, the surgical options with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In patients with a hyper-reflexive, small-capacity and/or low-compliance bladder with normal upper urinary tract, bladder augmentation (bowel segments/ureter) is an option. To those who are unable to perform clean intermittent catheterisation via urethra, a continent cutaneous stoma can be offered. In patients with irreparable sphincter defects a continent cutaneous diversion is an option. For patients who are not suitable for a continent diversion (incompliant±chronic renal failure), a colonic conduit for incontinent diversion is preferred. Surgical complications specific to urinary diversion include: ureterointestinal stenosis, stomal stenosis, stone formation, bladder perforation, and shunt infection and obstruction. Surgical revision is required in around one third of patients. Careful lifelong follow-up of these patients is necessary, as some of these complications can occur late. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Presumptive migrating gall bladder mucocoele in two dogs with gall bladder rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, R K; Thornton, L; Lim, C K; Murakami, M; Nakamura, Y; Gal, A

    2017-12-13

    A 10-year-old neutered female soft-coated wheaten terrier and a 10-year-old, entire female Pomeranian were presented for vomiting and anorexia. Using ultrasound, an oval structure with a stellate, kiwifruit-like appearance typical of a gall bladder mucocoele was observed in the caudal abdomen of the soft-coated wheaten terrier and adjacent to the liver in the Pomeranian. There was also a moderate volume of abdominal effusion in both dogs. Cytology of the peritoneal fluid indicated a sterile exudative process but varied between the two dogs, with an absence of bile pigment in the soft-coated wheaten terrier and marked bile peritonitis in the Pomeranian. An entire free-floating ectopic mucocoele was confirmed via exploratory laparotomy with concomitant gall bladder rupture and common bile duct obstruction. Both dogs recovered completely after surgery. This is the first report of cases of gall bladder rupture with entire free-floating gall bladder mucocoeles in dogs. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  10. Adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer using deformable image registration of empty and full bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Caine, H.; Hunt, P.

    2015-01-01

    A common objective of various adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies for bladder cancer is to reduce irradiation of normal tissue, thereby reduce the risk of radiation induced toxicity, and maintain or improve the target coverage. Bladder radiotherapy, typically involves generous margins (up to 20...... bladder cancer patients and a total of 100 fractions. It was found that the smaller a-PTV, a-PTV4 and a-PTV3, were appropriate in 87% of the fractions, while a-PTV2 and a-PTV1 were required in 12% of the fractions respectively. The use of the a-PTVs reduced the PTV volume by 32% (28-36%) as compared...... to conv-PTV. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study indicate that the use of a-PTVs could result in substantial decrease in the course averaged planning target volume. This reduction in the PTV is likely to decrease the radiation related toxicity and benefit bladder cancer patients. Currently...

  11. SU-F-J-05: The Effect of Air Pockets in the Urinary Bladder During Bladder Hyperthermia Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schooneveldt, G.; Kok, H.P.; Bakker, A.; Geijsen, E.D.; Reijke, T.M. de; Crezee, J. [Academisch Medisch Centrum / Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperthermia combined with Mitomycin C is used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), using a phased array system of microwave antennas for bladder heating. Often some air is present in the bladder, which effectively blocks the microwave radiation, potentially preventing proper treatment of that part of the bladder. Air can be a relevant fraction of the bladder content and large air pockets are expected to have a noticeable influence on achieved temperatures. Methods: We analysed 14 NMIBC patients treated at our institute with our AMC-4 hyperthermia device with four 70MHz antennas around the pelvis. A CT scan was made after treatment and a physician delineated the bladder on the CT scan. On the same scan, the amount of air present in the bladder was delineated. Using our in-house developed hyperthermia treatment planning system, we simulated the treatment using the clinically applied device settings. We did this once with the air pocket delineated on the CT scan, and once with the same volume filled with bladder tissue. Results: The patients had on average 4.2ml (range 0.8–10.1ml) air in the bladder. The bladder volume was delineated by the physician, that is including air pocket and bladder wall, was on average 253ml (range 93–452ml). The average volume in which changes exceeded 0.25°C was 22ml (range 0–108 ml), with the bladder being up to 2°C cooler when an air pocket was present. Except for extreme cases, there was no evident relation between the quantity of air and the difference in temperature. Conclusion: The effect of an air pocket in the bladder during bladder hyperthermia treatment varies strongly between patients. Generally, this leads to lower temperatures in the bladder, potentially affecting treatment quality, and suggesting that care need be taken to minimise the size of air pockets during hyperthermia treatments. The KWF Dutch Cancer Society financially supported this work, grant UVA 2012-5539.

  12. Bladder Calculus Following an Unusual Vesical Foreign Body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bladder calculus following vesical foreign bodies is uncommon. The usual presentation is presence of lower urinary symptoms. Most of these foreign bodies are either left inadvertently after open bladder operations or migrate from adjacent structures. This is a case report of an unusual self inserted foreign body in a female ...

  13. 1 The effectiveness of ultrasound in the diagnosis of bladder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    predictive value, and the negative predictive value (NPV) of ultrasound in detection of bladder tumour were 83%, 93%, 89% and 89%, respectively. In conclusion, ultrasound is an effective method for evaluating patients presenting with haematuria or suspected to have bladder tumours. It is cheap, available, affordable and ...

  14. Transitional Cell Carcinoma within a Portion of Inguinally Herniated Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Uhlman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder herniation within the inguinal canal is a relatively uncommon finding. We report an even less-common occurrence of transitional cell carcinoma located within a portion of inguinally herniated bladder. Fewer than 20 reports exist in the literature describing this scenario.

  15. Patterns of trematode infection in gall bladder from cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of gall-bladder of slaughtered cattle was carried out to determine variation pattern of trematode infection. A total of 1,240 gall-bladders of cattle were examined for trematode eggs and adult worms between August 2008 and March 2009. Fifty questionnaires were randomly administered to cattle handlers to ...

  16. Accidental Injuries to the Urinary Bladder: Enugu Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A few patients had intravenous urography (IVU) cystography or abdominal ultrasound. After resuscitation, repair of the bladder was in two layers with urethral catheter drainage of the bladder and wound drainage. One of the patients with spontaneous rupture died 72 hours post-operatively. All the other patients survived.

  17. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Ann M.; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology

  18. Myogenic conversion of bladder fibroblasts by construction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gene therapy of detrusor underactivity, by autologous cells transplantation, is limited by the number of primary myogenic. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Myod1 could induce primary bladder fibroblasts to undergo myogenic conversion. Primary bladder fibroblasts from Sprague-Daley rats were cultured ...

  19. Perioperative management of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The management of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is a challenge. Despite current guidelines, the treatment is suboptimal as illustrated by the high risk of recurrence and progression. Transurethral resection plays a pivotal role in the management of bladder cancer, but the

  20. Bladder stone formation over a partially migrated intrauterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of a 42-year-old woman with a forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) presenting with irritative bladder symptoms and cyclical haematuria is reported. The threads of the IUCD were seen in the vagina during speculum examination. Partial migration of the IUCD into the bladder and formation of a large ...

  1. Quantifying mast cells in bladder pain syndrome by immunohistochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.S.; Mortensen, S.; Nordling, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate a simple method for counting mast cells, thought to have a role in the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome (BPS, formerly interstitial cystitis, a syndrome of pelvic pain perceived to be related to the urinary bladder and accompanied by other urinary symptoms, e. g...

  2. Incidence of bladder cancer in a one-stop clinic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... scan and endometrial pipelle sampling. Where bladder pathology was detected, urine cytology was done before referral to the urologist. Results: In all, 753 women were referred. There were 17 cases of endometrial cancer detected. Three cases of bladder tumor (malignant transitional cell cancer) were ...

  3. DWI as an Imaging Biomarker for Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C.; Waseda, Yuma; Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    OBJECTIVE. DWI has been increasingly applied in the management of bladder cancer. In this article, we discuss the role of DWI as an imaging biomarker for bladder cancer. CONCLUSION. The DWI signal is derived from the motion of water molecules, which represents the physiologic characteristics of the

  4. Saving bladders with brachytherapy: implantation technique and results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen-Banasik, E.M. van der; Visser, A.G.; Reinders, J.G.; Heijbroek, R.P.; Idema, J.G.; Janssen, T.G.; Leer, J.W.H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze and report the treatment results of brachytherapy for solitary bladder cancer in the Arnhem Radiotherapy Institute. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 1983 and October 1998, 63 patients with a solitary bladder tumor were treated with a combination of transurethral resection,

  5. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Grace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bladder cancer is the commonest malignancy of the urinary tract. In this review, we look at the latest developments in the diagnosis and management of this condition. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are the most important tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of bladder cancer. Various alternatives have been investigated, either to reduce the frequency of cystoscopy, or improve its sensitivity for detection of tumors. These include urine-based markers and point-of-care tests. Narrow-band imaging and photodynamic diagnosis/blue-light cystoscopy have shown promise in improving detection and reducing recurrence of bladder tumors, by improving the completion of bladder resection when compared with standard resection in white light. The majority of patients with a new diagnosis of bladder cancer have non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, which requires adjuvant intravesical chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy. Recent developments in post-resection intravesical regimens are discussed. For patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, both laparoscopic radical cystectomy and robot-assisted radical cystectomy have been shown to reduce peri-operative morbidity, while being oncologically equivalent to open radical cystectomy in the medium term. Bladder-preserving strategies entail resection and chemoradiation, and in selected patients give equivalent results to surgery. The development, advantages, and disadvantages of these newer approaches are also discussed.

  6. non absorbable sutures in the urinary bladder resulting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The vesical calculus. Urol Clin North AM. 2000, 27:333-346. 3. Evans JW, Chapple CR, Ralph DJ, Millory EJ: Bladder calculus formation as a complication of the Stamey procedure. Br J Urol 1990,. 65:580-582. 4. Sheng-Tsun Su, He-Fu Haung, Shu-Fen. Chang. Encrusted Bladder stone on Non- absorbable sutures after a ...

  7. Bladder Tumours at Tikur Anbessa Hospital in Ethiopia. | Biluts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bladder cancer is the fourth to fifth most common cancer in men, and the eighth in women These t umors are commonest in the 50 to 70 year age group The aim of this study was to review the pattern and surgical management of bladder tumors at TAS in Ethiopia. Methods: A hospital based retrospective cross ...

  8. Experimental electrical stimulation of the bladder using a new device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T; Christiansen, P; Nielsen, B

    1986-01-01

    electrodes at each ureterovesical junction evoked bladder pressure increase similar to those produced in previous investigations in dogs. Sacral nerve stimulation of S2 evoked bladder contraction at a minimal current. Microscopic examination revealed no cellular reactions to the carbon fibers...

  9. The efficacy of Apaziquone in the treatment of bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caramés Masana, Francisco; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is nowadays a common tumor. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has still chances of recurrence and progression in spite of surgery and adjuvant treatments. New therapies are being developed to reduce these percentages with less adverse effects - Apaziquone (EO9) is an example.

  10. Bladder And Uterine Rupture At Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Section

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rupture of the uterus is still a major obstetric problem in developing countries. The urinary bladder is often affected especially when a lower segment Caesarean scar ruptures. We present a case of bladder rupture associated with uterine rupture in a patient who was attempting vaginal delivery after two previous Caesarean ...

  11. Muscarinic receptors of the urinary bladder: detrusor, urothelial and prejunctional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess-Williams, R

    2002-06-01

    1. The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for maintaining normal bladder function, contracting the bladder smooth muscle (detrusor) and relaxing the bladder outlet during micturition. 2. Contraction of the bladder involves direct contraction via M3 receptors and an indirect 're-contraction' via M2-receptors whereby a reduction in adenylate cyclase activity reverses the relaxation induced by beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. 3. Muscarinic receptors are also located on the epithelial lining of the bladder (urothelium) where they induce the release of a diffusible factor responsible for inhibiting contraction of the underlying detrusor smooth muscle. The factor remains unidentified but is not nitric oxide, a cyclooxygenase product or adenosine triphosphate. 4. Finally, muscarinic receptors are also located prejunctionally in the bladder on cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals, where M1-receptors facilitate transmitter release and M2 or M4-receptors inhibit transmitter release. 5. In pathological states, changes may occur in these receptor systems resulting in bladder dysfunction. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the main therapeutic agents available for treatment of the overactive bladder, but whether their therapeutic effect involves actions at all three locations (detrusor, prejunctional, urothelial) has yet to be established.

  12. Artificial intelligence and bladder cancer arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, P J; Catto, J W F; Abbod, M F; Linkens, D A; Herr, A; Pilarsky, C; Wissmann, C; Stoehr, R; Denzinger, S; Knuechel, R; Hamdy, F C; Hartmann, A

    2007-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is a heterogenous disease whose management is dependent upon the risk of progression to muscle invasion. Although the recurrence rate is high, the majority of tumors are indolent and can be managed by endoscopic means alone. The prognosis of muscle invasion is poor and radical treatment is required if cure is to be obtained. Progression risk in non-invasive tumors is hard to determine at tumor diagnosis using current clinicopathological means. To improve the accuracy of progression prediction various biomarkers have been evaluated. To discover novel biomarkers several authors have used gene expression microarrays. Various statistical methods have been described to interpret array data, but to date no biomarkers have entered clinical practice. Here, we describe a new method of microarray analysis using neurofuzzy modeling (NFM), a form of artificial intelligence, and integrate it with artificial neural networks (ANN) to investigate non-muscle invasive bladder cancer array data (n=66 tumors). We develop a predictive panel of 11 genes, from 2800 expressed genes, that can significantly identify tumor progression (average Logrank p = 0.0288) in the analyzed cancers. In comparison, this panel appears superior to those genes chosen using traditional analyses (average Logrank p = 0.3455) and tumor grade (Logrank, p = 0.2475) in this non-muscle invasive cohort. We then analyze panel members in a new non-muscle invasive bladder cancer cohort (n=199) using immunohistochemistry with six commercially available antibodies. The combination of 6 genes (LIG3, TNFRSF6, KRT18, ICAM1, DSG2 and BRCA2) significantly stratifies tumor progression (Logrank p = 0.0096) in the new cohort. We discuss the benefits of the transparent NFM approach with respect to other reported methods.

  13. Antibody conjugate radioimmunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Perkins

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The administration of antibody conjugates for cancer therapy is now proving to be of clinical value. We are currently undertaking a programme of clinical studies using the monoclonal antibody C595 (IgG3 which reacts with the MUC1 glycoprotein antigen that is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of bladder tumours. Radioimmunoconjugates of the C595 antibody have been produced with high radiolabelling efficiency and immunoreactivity using Tc-99m and In-111 for diagnostic imaging, and disease staging and the cytotoxic radionuclides Cu-67 and Re-188 for therapy of superficial bladder cancer. A Phase I/II therapeutic trail involving the intravesical administration of antibody directly into the bladder has now begun.A administração de anticorpos conjugados para o tratamento do câncer está agora provando ser de valor clínico. Nós estamos atualmente realizando um programa de estudos clínicos usando o anticorpo monoclonal C595 (IgG3 que reage com a glicoproteína MUC1 que está aberrantemente expressa numa alta proporção de tumores de bexiga. Tem sido produzidos radioimunoconjugados do anticorpo C595, com alta eficiência de radiomarcação e a imunoreatividade, usando-se o Tc-99m e In-111, para o diagnóstico por imagem e estagiamento de doenças. Tem sido produzidos, também, radionuclídeos citotóxicos (Cu-67 e Re-188 para o tratamento de cânceres superficiais de bexiga. A fase terapêutica I/II já se iniciou, envolvendo a administração intravesical do anticorpo diretamente na bexiga.

  14. Health-related quality of life after bladder preservation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Miura, Noriyoshi; Numata, Kousaku; Shirato, Akitomi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Kataoka, Masaaki

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess health-related quality of life (QOL) of bladder cancer patients following bladder preservation therapy (BPT). Eighty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer had been treated between January 1992 and July 2005 at our institutions with BPT consisting of transurethral resection, intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Among them, 48 were alive and free from recurrence at the time of survey and were asked to participate. A total of 168 patients who had been treated for superficial bladder cancer in the same period were used as a control group. Three questionnaires, namely the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the SF-36, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) were used. Thirty-three patients in the BPT group (68.8%) and 128 patients in the control group (76.2%) answered the QOL survey. There was no significant difference in age, gender and other clinical factors among these two groups. No significant difference was found between the groups according to IPSS. The QOL score of BPT was lower than that of the control group in the SF-36, but there was no significant difference without body pain (P=0.047). There was a tendency toward a diminished physical functioning (P=0.053) and role-physical (P=0.064) in BPT. The EPIC scores for urinary function, especially storage and voiding symptoms, and bowel function were significantly lower in the BPT group. At multivariable analysis, body pain and bowel function were associated with the type of treatment. Although some of the QOL outcome parameters after BPT were found to be lower than the control group, these differences were not significant. Overall, patients retaining their bladder had an acceptable health related QOL. (author)

  15. Serotonin Receptor 5-HT3A Affects Development of Bladder Innervation and Urinary Bladder Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Elaine Ritter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic and sensory nervous systems are required for proper function of all visceral organs, including the lower urinary tract (LUT. Despite the wide prevalence of bladder dysfunction, effective treatment options remain limited. Pelvic innervation regenerative strategies are promising, but surprisingly little is known about the molecular factors driving the development of bladder innervation. Given prior evidence that serotonin receptor 5-HT3A is expressed early in LUT development and is an important mediator of adult bladder function, we sought to determine if 5-HT3A is required for the development of autonomic innervation of the bladder. We found that 5-HT3A is expressed early in fetal mouse pelvic ganglia and is maintained through adulthood. Htr3a knockout male mice, but not females, exhibit increased urinary voiding frequency compared to wild type littermates. Analysis of LUT function via anesthetized cystometry revealed decreased voiding efficiency in male Htr3a mutants. Htr3a−/− mutant animals exhibit a transient disturbance of autonomic neuronal subtype markers (tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyl transferase within the fetal pelvic ganglia, although the imbalance of neuronal subtype markers assayed is no longer apparent in adulthood. Loss of 5-HT3A activity results in a higher density of autonomic and sensory neuronal fibers supplying bladder smooth muscle in both fetal and adult mice. Collectively, our findings highlight 5-HT3A as a critical component in the autonomic control of micturition and identify a novel role for this serotonin receptor in peripheral nervous system development.

  16. The concept of peripheral modulation of bladder sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Jane E; Gillespie, James I

    2013-01-01

    It is recognized that, as the bladder fills, there is a corresponding increase in sensation. This awareness of the volume in the bladder is then used in a complex decision making process to determine if there is a need to void. It is also part of everyday experience that, when the bladder is full and sensations strong, these sensations can be suppressed and the desire to void postponed. The obvious explanation for such altered perceptions is that they occur centrally. However, this may not be the only mechanism. There are data to suggest that descending neural influences and local factors might regulate the sensitivity of the systems within the bladder wall generating afferent activity. Specifically, evidence is accumulating to suggest that the motor-sensory system within the bladder wall is influenced in this way. The motor-sensory system, first described over 100 years ago, appears to be a key component in the afferent outflow, the afferent "noise," generated within the bladder wall. However, the presence and possible importance of this complex system in the generation of bladder sensation has been overlooked in recent years. As the bladder fills the motor activity increases, driven by cholinergic inputs and modulated, possibly, by sympathetic inputs. In this way information on bladder volume can be transmitted to the CNS. It can be argued that the ability to alter the sensitivity of the mechanisms generating the motor component of this motor-sensory system represents a possible indirect way to influence afferent activity and so the perception of bladder volume centrally. Furthermore, it is emerging that the apparent modulation of sensation by drugs to alleviate the symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB), the anti-cholinergics and the new generation of drugs the β 3 sympathomimetics, may be the result of their ability to modulate the motor component of the motor sensory system. The possibility of controlling sensation, physiologically and pharmacologically, by

  17. Effect of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Chughtai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aging men will experience lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5 inhibitors have shown promise in treating LUTS in these patients. PDE5 inhibitors mediate their effects through several pathways including cAMP, NO/cGMP, K-channel modulated pathways, and the l-cysteine/H2S pathway. PDE5 inhibitors exert their effect in muscle cells, nerve fibers, and interstitial cells (ICs. The use of PDE5 inhibitors led to improvement in LUTS. This included urodynamic parameters. PDE5 inhibitors may play a significant role in LUTS due to their effect on the bladder rather than the prostate.

  18. Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy: BCG and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Askeland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG has become the predominant conservative treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Its mechanism of action continues to be defined but has been shown to involve a T helper type 1 (Th1 immunomodulatory response. While BCG treatment is the current standard of care, a significant proportion of patients fails or do not tolerate treatment. Therefore, many efforts have been made to identify other intravesical and immunomodulating therapeutics to use alone or in conjunction with BCG. This paper reviews the progress of basic science and clinical experience with several immunotherapeutic agents including IFN-α, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-10.

  19. Placenta previa percreta with bladder invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šijanović

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A 43- year old woman, with ten previous deliveries and history of two cesarean sections was admitted to our Department at 32 weeks of gestation with massive vaginal hemorrhage from an ultrasound diagnosed placenta previa. An emergency cesarean section with vertical abdominal incision was performed. A healthy 2300 g female infant was delivered. Attempts to manually remove the placenta caused massive hemorrhage. The lower uterine segment was widened due to placenta previa with suspicious placental invasion of the posterior wall of the bladder. Persistent hemorrhage demanded bilateral anterior internal iliac artery ligation and suture ligation of the bleeding vessels with supracervical hysterectomy done.

  20. Artificial sweeteners and human bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, G R; Burch, J D; Miller, A B; Morrison, B; Gordon, P; Weldon, L; Chambers, L W; Fodor, G; Winsor, G M

    1977-09-17

    A positive association between the use of artificial sweetners, particularly saccharin, and risk of bladder cancer in males has been observed in a case-control study of 480 men and 152 women in three Provinces in Canada. The risk ratio for ever versus never used is 1-6 for males (P=0-009, one-tailed test), and a significant dose-response relationship was obtained for both duration and frequency of use. The population attributable risk for males is estimated at 7%, though for diabetics, who have a similar risk ratio for artificial sweetner use as non-diabetics, the attributable risk is 33%.

  1. Pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder is a rare tumor and presents less than 0.06% of all urinary bladder tumors. Case report. We presented a 49-year-old female patient with a history of daily paroxysmal hypertension accompanied with flushing of the face and upper chest, palpitations and excessive sweating prior to micturition. Ultrasonography reported a 3 cm bladder wall tumor. The 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG scan showed a pathological isotope accumulation in the projection of the bladder. The patient underwent a partial cystectomy. One year following the operation the patient was normotensive and without recurrence. Conclusion. The most efficient treatment option for bladder pheochromocytoma is surgical resection. The most important fact in the diagnostics is suspicion on this rare condition.

  2. Efficient intravesical therapy of bladder cancer with cationic doxorubicin nanoassemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xun; Zhang, Peilan; Luo, Li; Cheng, Hao; Li, Yunzu; Du, Ting; Zou, Bingwen; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have promising applications in drug delivery for cancer therapy. Herein, we prepared cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane/methoxypoly (ethyleneglycol) (DPP) nanoparticles to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) for intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. The DPP micelles have a mean dynamic diameter of 18.65 nm and a mean zeta potential of +19.6 mV. The DPP micelles could prolong the residence of Dox in the bladder, enhance the penetration of Dox into the bladder wall, and improve cellular uptake of Dox. The encapsulation by DPP micelles significantly improved the anticancer effect of Dox against orthotopic bladder cancer in vivo. This work described a Dox-loaded DPP nanoparticle with potential applications in intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. PMID:27660445

  3. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Yoshiki; Hayashi, Norio; Yamashita, Atsushi; Kinbara, Hiroyuki; Arima, Kiminobu; Tochigi, Hiromi; Kawamura, Juichi

    1994-01-01

    Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an endorectal surface coil has been evaluated basically and clinically. This new modality obtained increased resolution magnetic resonance images of the pathologic conditions of the prostate and bladder. Compared with images obtained with a body coil, the surface coil images clearly demonstrate prostatic intraglandular zonal anatomy. The clear images of prostatic capsule and neurovascular bundle seen on the surface coil may contribute to the local staging of prostate cancer. The staging diagnosis of bladder tumor located in the bladder neck will be the best candidate for endorectal MRI. Enhancement with gadolinium may improve the ability to differentiate superficial from deep bladder-wall tumors. We concluded that endorectal MRI is safely performed and is extremely useful for the local staging of prostate cancer and bladder neck tumor. Further studies will be required to evaluate the clinical significance of this new modality. (author)

  4. Angiogenesis in Schistosoma haematobium-associated urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematei, Anderson; Fernandes, Rúben; Soares, Raquel; Alves, Helena; Richter, Joachim; Botelho, Monica C

    2017-12-01

    Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic flatworm that infects more than 100 million people, mostly in the developing world, is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis, and is associated with a high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder. During infection, eggs are deposited in the bladder causing an intense inflammatory reaction. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones and is recognized as a key event in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis and spread of malignant lesions. A growing amount of evidence points to angiogenesis playing a key role in schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer. Thus, identifying biomarkers of this process plays an important role in the study of cancer. Here, we review recent findings on the role of angiogenesis in bladder cancer and the growth factors that induce and assist in their development, particularly SCC of the bladder associated to urogenital schistosomiasis. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Molecular profiling of ADAM12 in human bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frolich, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously found ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease, to be an interesting biomarker for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the gene and protein expression profiles of ADAM12 in different grades and stages of bladder cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: ADAM12...... gene expression was evaluated in tumors from 96 patients with bladder cancer using a customized Affymetrix GeneChip. Gene expression in bladder cancer was validated using reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization. Protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical...... staining on tissue arrays of bladder cancers. The presence and relative amount of ADAM12 in the urine of cancer patients were determined by Western blotting and densitometric measurements, respectively. RESULTS: ADAM12 mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in bladder cancer, as determined...

  6. Bladder Cancer Patient Advocacy: A Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quale, Diane Zipursky; Bangs, Rick; Smith, Monica; Guttman, David; Northam, Tammy; Winterbottom, Andrew; Necchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Edoardo; Demkiw, Stephanie

    2015-10-26

    Over the past 20 years, cancer patient advocacy groups have demonstrated that patient engagement in cancer care is essential to improving patient quality of life and outcomes. Bladder cancer patient advocacy only began 10 years ago in the United States, but is now expanding around the globe with non-profit organizations established in Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, and efforts underway in Australia. These organizations, at different levels of maturity, are raising awareness of bladder cancer and providing essential information and resources to bladder cancer patients and their families. The patient advocacy organizations are also helping to advance research efforts by funding research proposals and facilitating research collaborations. Strong partnerships between these patient advocates and the bladder cancer medical community are essential to ensuringsustainability for these advocacy organizations, increasing funding to support advances in bladder cancer treatment, and improving patient outcomes.

  7. Use of thiazolidinediones and risk of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; de Vries, Frank; Vestergaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pioglitazone, a drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with bladder cancer in observational studies. Diabetes mellitus itself has also been linked with bladder cancer. The objective was to estimate the risk of bladder cancer for diabetic patients using......) of bladder cancer were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Time-dependent adjustments were made for age, comorbidity, and drug use. Four different treatment stages were defined: current use of either a biguanide or a sulfonylureum (stage 1), current use of a biguanide and a sulfonylureum...... at the same time (stage 2), current use of TZDs (stage 3) and current use of insulin (stage 4). RESULTS: Compared with non-diabetic controls, patients using antidiabetic medication experienced a 1.3-fold increased risk of bladder cancer (adjusted HR 1.3 [95%CI 1.2-1.4]). No major differences were observed...

  8. Gynecological disorders in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervigni, Mauro; Natale, Franca

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, a chronic inflammatory condition of the bladder, is the source of pain in over 30% of female patients with chronic pelvic pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the most frequent associations between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and gynecological disorders. A literature review of the previous 10 years was carried out to evaluate the incidence of gynecological diseases in patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Hypertonic pelvic floor dysfunction with associated voiding dysfunction can be present in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients. It has been estimated that the prevalence ranges from 50% to 87%. Endometriosis affects 1-7% of the general population and up to 70% of women with endometriosis have some type of pain symptoms, a recent systematic review estimated the prevalence of bladder pain syndrome to be 61%, of endometriosis to be 70%, and coexisting bladder pain syndrome and endometriosis to be 48%. Vulvodynia is represented by pain, or an unpleasant altered sensation, in the vulva. Women with vestibulodynia are likely to have other additional pain conditions, such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome or chronic fatigue syndrome. Recent data reported that vestibulodynia affects 25% of women with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a complex pathology often associated with vulvodynia, endometriosis and pelvic floor dysfunctions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to obtain an accurate evaluation ruling out confusable disease, such as pudendal neuropathy. The optimal approach is a combined treatment oriented not only to treat the bladder, but also the other components responsible for the pain disorder. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Segmentation of urinary bladder in CT Urography (CTU) using CLASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Law, Yuen; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cho, Hyun-Chong; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun

    2012-03-01

    We are developing a computerized system for bladder segmentation on CTU, as a critical component for computer aided diagnosis of bladder cancer. A challenge for bladder segmentation is the presence of regions without contrast (NC) and filled with IV contrast (C). We are developing a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) specifically for this application. CLASS performs a series of image processing tasks: preprocessing, initial segmentation, and 3D and 2D level set segmentation and post-processing, designed according to the characteristics of the bladder in CTU. The NC and the C regions of the bladder were segmented separately in CLASS. The final contour is obtained in the post-processing stage by the union of the NC and C contours. Seventy bladders (31 containing lesions, 24 containing wall thickening, and 15 normal) were segmented. The performance of CLASS was assessed by rating the quality of the contours on a 5-point scale (1= "very poor", 3= "fair", 5 = "excellent"). For the 53 partially contrast-filled bladders, the average quality ratings for the 53 NC and 53 C regions were 4.0+/-0.7 and 4.0+/-1.0, respectively. 46 NC and 41 C regions were given quality ratings of 4 or above. Only 2 NC and 5 C regions had ratings under 3. The average quality ratings for the remaining 12 completely no contrast (NC) and 5 completely contrast-filled (C) bladder contours were 3.3+/-1.0 and 3.4+/-0.5, respectively. After combining the NC and C contours for each of the 70 bladders, 46 had quality ratings of 4 or above. Only 4 had ratings under 3. The average quality rating was 3.8+/-0.7. The results demonstrate the potential of CLASS for automated segmentation of the bladder.

  10. Histopathological characterization of a syngeneic orthotopic murine bladder cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daher C. Chade

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We developed and characterized by histopathology and immunohistochemistry a syngeneic murine bladder tumor model derived from the MB49 tumor cell line. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bladder tumor implantation was achieved by intravesical instillation of 5 x 10(5 MB49 tumor cells in C57BL/6 mice. A chemical lesion of the bladder was performed in order to promote intravesical tumor implantation. The bladder wall lesion was accomplished by transurethral instillation of silver nitrate (AgNO3. After 15 days, the animals were sacrificed, examined macroscopically for intravesical tumor and bladder weight. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed using cytokeratin 7 (CK7, carcinoembrionic antigen (Dako-CEA, p53 and c-erbB2 oncoprotein (Her2/neu. RESULTS: Twenty-nine out of 30 animals (96.7% developed intravesical tumors in a 15-day period. Macroscopically, the mean bladder weight was 0.196g (0.069-0.538g, 10 to 15 times the normal bladder weight. The immunohistochemical analysis showed significant membrane expression of CEA and CK7: a similar finding for human urothelial cancer. We also characterized absence of expression of p53 and anti-Her2/neu in the murine model. CONCLUSIONS: High tumor take rates were achieved by using the chemical induction of the bladder tumor. Although electric cauterization is widely described in the literature for syngeneic orthotopic animal models, the technique described in this study represents an alternative for intravesical bladder tumor implantation. Moreover, the histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis of the murine bladder tumor model derived from the MB49 cell line showed a resemblance to human infiltrating urothelial carcinoma, allowing clinical inference from experimental immunotherapy testing.

  11. Application of Bladder Acellular Matrix in Urinary Bladder Regeneration: The State of the Art and Future Directions

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    Marta Pokrywczynska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction of the urinary bladder de novo using tissue engineering technologies is the “holy grail” of reconstructive urology. The search for the ideal biomaterial for urinary bladder reconstruction has been ongoing for decades. One of the most promising biomaterials for this purpose seems to be bladder acellular matrix (BAM. In this review we determine the most important factors, which may affect biological and physical properties of BAM and its regeneration potential in tissue engineered urinary bladder. We also point out the directions in modification of BAM, which include incorporation of exogenous growth factors into the BAM structure. Finally, we discuss the results of the urinary bladder regeneration with cell seeded BAM.

  12. Metallothionein overexpression of bladder biopsies associated with tissue hypoxia in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jane-Dar; Lee, Ming-Huei

    2014-07-01

    To study the relationship between hypoxia and metallothionein expression in bladder biopsies of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome patients. The study group consisted of 41 patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, and the control group consisted of 12 volunteers without any interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome symptoms. All biopsy specimens were analyzed for both proteins of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and metallothionein expression by immunoblotting, immunostaining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. An increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and metallothionein was noted in the study group compared with the control group (P interstitial cystitis suggest that overexpression of metallothionein is associated with the bladder hypoxia related to this disease. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Calcifying nanoparticles associated encrusted urinary bladder cystitis

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    Tomislav M Jelic

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomislav M Jelic1, Rod Roque1, Uzay Yasar2, Shayna B Tomchin1, Jose M Serrato2, Samuel G Deem3, James P Tierney3, Ho-Huang Chang11Department of Pathology Charleston Area Medical Center, Charleston WV, USA; 2Urology Center of Charleston, Charleston WV, USA; 3Urologic-Surgical Assoc. of Charleston, Charleston WV, USAAbstract: Encrusted cystitis is a subtype of chronic cystitis characterized by multiple calcifications in the form of plaques located in the interstitium of the urinary bladder mucosa and frequently associated with mucosal ulcers. It is a very rare disease of controversial etiology. Our transmission electron microscopy of the calcified plaques of encrusted cystitis has revealed that the smallest formed particles (elementary units of these calcifications are electron-dense shells surrounding an electron lucent core, diagnostic of calcifying nanoparticles (previously called nanobacteria. We pioneer the notion that calcifying nanoparticles are the causative agents of encrusted urinary bladder cystitis.Keywords: calcifying nanoparticles, nanobacteria, encrusted cystitis

  14. Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuwei; Zhou, Jing; Mo, Qian; Wang, Yang; Yu, Jinna; Liu, Zhishun

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients’ health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. Methods: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. Results: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients’ quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. Conclusion: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB. PMID:29465566

  15. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholten, Astrid N.; Leer, Jan-Willem H.; Collins, C. David; Wondergem, Jan; Hermans, Jo; Timothy, Adrian

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The policy of the Radiotherapy Department of St. Thomas' Hospital in London for patients with invasive bladder cancer, used to be treatment with hypofractionated radiotherapy. The advantages of this fractionation scheme included reduction of the number of treatment sessions and better use of limited resources. Our results after hypofractionation were compared to series with more conventional radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between 1975 and 1985, 123 patients with a T2-T3 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were treated by a radical course of hypofractionated radiotherapy. Local control, survival and morbidity rates were analysed retrospectively. Results: The actuarial local control rates at 5 and 10 years were 31 and 29%, respectively. The actuarial cancer-specific 5- and 10-year survival rates were 48 and 39%, respectively. Acute side effects were observed in 87% of patients. The actuarial overall and severe late complication rates at 5 years were 33 and 9%, respectively. The local control, survival and early side effect rates we found, were in the same range as those reported in literature. Late radiation side effects however, were more common after hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy schedules. Conclusions: We conclude that the potential advantage of a reduced number of treatment sessions may be lost in the long term, because of the higher incidence of late morbidity after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Hypofractionation however, remains a valuable technique for palliation and deserves further investigation for radical treatment where access to equipment is difficult or resources are limited

  16. Creating Panoramic Images for Bladder Fluorescence Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behrens

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical diagnostic analysis and therapy of urinary bladder cancer based on endoscopes are state of the art in urological medicine. Due to the limited field of view of endoscopes, the physician can examine only a small part of the whole operating field at once. This constraint makes visual control and navigation difficult, especially in hollow organs. A panoramic image, covering a larger field of view, can overcome this difficulty. Directly motivated by a physician we developed an image mosaicing algorithm for endoscopic bladder fluorescence video sequences. In this paper, we present an approach which is capable of stitching single endoscopic video images to a combined panoramic image. Based on SIFT features we estimate a 2-D homography for each image pair, using an affine model and an iterative model-fitting algorithm. We then apply the stitching process and perform a mutual linear interpolation. Our panoramic image results show a correct stitching and lead to a better overview and understanding of the operation field. 

  17. Granular cell tumors of the urinary bladder

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    Kayani Naila

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granular cell tumors (GCTs are extremely rare lesions of the urinary bladder with only nine cases being reported in world literature of which one was malignant. Generally believed to be of neural origin based on histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural studies; they mostly follow a clinically benign course but are commonly mistaken for malignant tumors since they are solid looking, ulcerated tumors with ill-defined margins. Materials and methods We herein report two cases of GCTs, one benign and one malignant, presenting with gross hematuria in a 14- and a 47-year-old female, respectively. Results Histopathology revealed characteristic GCTs with positive immunostaining for neural marker (S-100 and negative immunostaining for epithelial (cytokeratin, Cam 5.2, AE/A13, neuroendocrine (neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and sarcoma (desmin, vimentin markers. The benign tumor was successfully managed conservatively with transurethral resection alone while for the malignant tumor, radical cystectomy, hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, anterior vaginectomy, plus lymph node dissection was done. Both cases show long-term disease free survival. Conclusion We recommend careful pathologic assessment for establishing the appropriate diagnosis and either a conservative or aggressive surgical treatment for benign or localized malignant GCT of the urinary bladder, respectively.

  18. Bladder Endometriosis Mimicking TCC - A Case Report.

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    Gupta, Asish; Bhatnagar, Atul; Seth, B N; Dang, Arbinder; Gupta, Vineeta

    2016-02-01

    Endometriosis is the ectopic presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus. Though on its own endometriosis is not a rare lesion, the involvement of the urinary tract is rare but with the bladder being the most commonly affected organ. Endometriosis is usually seen in females between the ages of 30-40 years and may occur due to fluctuating levels of oestrogen and progesterone. Clinically the patient maybe asymptomatic or show symptoms of dysmenorrhea, irregular or heavy periods, pain in the pelvic area, lower abdomen or in the back. It has been suggested that ultrasonography should be done either before or during menstruation as the lesion becomes more evident and a biopsy taken during this period is a strong aid in reaching a final diagnosis. We report here an unusual case of bladder endometriosis where the patient came with severe pelvic pain and an endoluminal mass seen on the ultrasonographic report. Based on these findings a differential of transitional cell carcinoma was given which was ruled out based on the cystoscopic findings.

  19. Pediatric kidney recipients with small capacity, defunctionalized urinary bladders receiving adult-sized kidney without prior bladder augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Sophoclis; Lightner, Amy; Concepcion, Waldo; Rose, Marilyn; Salcedo-Concepcion, Kathrine; Salvatierra, Oscar

    2011-02-27

    Children with small capacity, defunctionalized urinary bladders present unique operative challenges. Thus, traditional practice has included pretransplant bladder augmentation, but this has several adverse consequences. A single-institutional, retrospective review from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2008 was conducted. Twelve pediatric patients, whom had not undergone pretransplant bladder augmentation, did not have neurogenic bladders or require preoperative catheterization, and a small capacity defunctionalized bladders were included. All were managed by the same surgeon with a previously described ureteral implantation, and a 7F ureteral stent attached to a large diameter suprapubic catheter was removed in a joint manner without cystoscopy at 2 weeks. Data were collected on patient and graft survival, rejection episodes, urinary tract infection (UTI) requiring antibiotics, grade of vesicoureteral reflux, and posttransplant bladder capacity. One-year patient and graft survival rates were 100%. One patient experienced a clinical rejection episode, which was successfully treated. Five patients (41.7%) had a UTI requiring abx treatment within the first postoperative year, but at 1 year, all patients had sterile urinary tracts. After removal of suprapubic catheters and ureteral stents, all patients were able to void spontaneously. Seven patients had no posttransplant ureteral reflux, three had grade 1 reflux, and two had grade 3 reflux (both successfully treated). The average age estimated pretransplant bladder and 1 year posttransplant bladder capacity was 14.5% and 84% of expected, respectively. In pediatric end-stage renal disease patients with a small capacity defunctionalized bladder, it is reasonable to proceed with kidney transplantation without pretransplant bladder augmentation, thus avoiding an unnecessary surgery.

  20. Assessment of Bladder Motion for Clinical Radiotherapy Practice Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBain, Catherine A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Buckley, David L.; Sykes, Jonathan S.; Green, Melanie M.; Cowan, Richard A.; Hutchinson, Charles E.; Moore, Christopher J.; Price, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. Methods and Materials: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. Results: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. Conclusions: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.

  1. Overview of bladder heating technology: matching capabilities with clinical requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; van Rhoon, Gerard C.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate temperature hyperthermia (40–450°C for one hour) is emerging as an effective treatment to enhance best available chemotherapy strategies for bladder cancer. A rapidly increasing number of clinical trials have investigated the feasibility and efficacy of treating bladder cancer with combined intravesical chemotherapy and moderate temperature hyperthermia. To date, most studies have concerned treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) limited to the interior wall of the bladder. Following the promising results of initial clinical trials, investigators are now considering protocols for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). This paper provides a brief overview of the devices and techniques used for heating bladder cancer. Systems are described for thermal conduction heating of bladder wall via circulation of hot fluid, intravesical microwave antenna heating, capacitively coupled RF current heating, and radiofrequency phased array deep regional heating of the pelvis. Relative heating characteristics of the available technologies are compared based on published feasibility studies, and the systems correlated with clinical requirements for effective treatment of MIBC and NMIBC. PMID:26939993

  2. Epigenetics application in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb-de la Rosa, Alfredo; Acker, Matthew; Kumar, Raj A; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2015-10-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the Western world. Patients with bladder cancer require close monitoring, which may include frequent cystoscopy and urine cytology. Such monitoring results in significant health care cost. The application of epigenetics may allow for a risk adapted approach and more cost-effective method of monitoring. A number of epigenetic changes have been described for many cancer sites, including the urinary bladder. In this review, we discuss the use of epigenetics in bladder cancer and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A comprehensive search of the English medical literature was conducted in PubMed using the terms microRNA regulation, DNA methylation, histone modification and bladder cancer. The most important epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA regulation. Both DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation have been associated with higher rate of cancer. The association of epigenetic changes with bladder cancer has led to the research of its diagnostic and prognostic implications as well as to the development of novel drugs to target these changes with the aim of achieving a survival benefit. Recently, epigenetics has been shown to play a much greater role than previously anticipated in the initiation and propagation of many tumors. The use of epigenetics for the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer is an evolving and promising field. The possibility of reversing epigenetic changes may facilitate additional cancer treatment options in the future.

  3. Urology and nephrology update: bladder and kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, David C; Fox, Cara-Louise

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that bladder and kidney cancers would be diagnosed in approximately 140,000 Americans in 2013, with approximately 30,000 dying from these cancers. Urinary tract cancers affect men more commonly than they do women, and the median age at diagnosis is 65 years. Major risk factors for these cancers include tobacco smoking, certain chemical exposures, family history, age, and obesity. Unexplained hematuria in adults should be evaluated to exclude bladder and kidney cancer. Staging of bladder and kidney cancer should be based on the TNM staging system, which, along with tumor grade, provides important treatment and prognostic information. Urothelial cell carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer; it also can occur in the kidneys or ureters. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer. Treatment options for bladder cancer vary widely, depending on the grade of the cancer. Early non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer may be removed cystoscopically and/or treated with intravesical immunotherapy or chemotherapy, whereas patients with muscle-invasive bladder tumors typically require surgery. Management of kidney cancer is almost always surgical, unless the patient is too ill to undergo surgery or chooses palliative care. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  4. Development of an interstitial cystitis risk score for bladder permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Laura E.; Janicki, Joseph J.; Bartolone, Sarah N.; Peters, Kenneth M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC) is a multifactorial syndrome of severe pelvic and genitalia pain and compromised urinary function; a subset of IC patients present with Hunner’s lesions or ulcers on their bladder walls (UIC). UIC is diagnosed by cystoscopy, which may be quite painful. The objective of this study was to determine if a calculated Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score (BP-RS) based on non-invasive urinary cytokines could discriminate UIC patients from controls and IC patients without Hunner’s ulcers. Methods A national crowdsourcing effort targeted IC patients and age-matched controls to provide urine samples. Urinary cytokine levels for GRO, IL-6, and IL-8 were determined using a Luminex assay. Results We collected 448 urine samples from 46 states consisting of 153 IC patients (147 female, 6 male), of which 54 UIC patients (50 females, 4 male), 159 female controls, and 136 male controls. A defined BP-RS was calculated to classify UIC, or a bladder permeability defect etiology, with 89% validity. Conclusions The BP-RS Score quantifies UIC risk, indicative of a bladder permeability defect etiology in a subset of IC patients. The Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score is the first validated urine biomarker assay for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. PMID:29088231

  5. Development of an interstitial cystitis risk score for bladder permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Laura E; Janicki, Joseph J; Bartolone, Sarah N; Peters, Kenneth M; Chancellor, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC) is a multifactorial syndrome of severe pelvic and genitalia pain and compromised urinary function; a subset of IC patients present with Hunner's lesions or ulcers on their bladder walls (UIC). UIC is diagnosed by cystoscopy, which may be quite painful. The objective of this study was to determine if a calculated Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score (BP-RS) based on non-invasive urinary cytokines could discriminate UIC patients from controls and IC patients without Hunner's ulcers. A national crowdsourcing effort targeted IC patients and age-matched controls to provide urine samples. Urinary cytokine levels for GRO, IL-6, and IL-8 were determined using a Luminex assay. We collected 448 urine samples from 46 states consisting of 153 IC patients (147 female, 6 male), of which 54 UIC patients (50 females, 4 male), 159 female controls, and 136 male controls. A defined BP-RS was calculated to classify UIC, or a bladder permeability defect etiology, with 89% validity. The BP-RS Score quantifies UIC risk, indicative of a bladder permeability defect etiology in a subset of IC patients. The Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score is the first validated urine biomarker assay for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

  6. Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer in ex vivo urine cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, C. Y.; Ng, B. K.; Razul, S. Gulam; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Tan, P. H.; Chin, William

    2006-02-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth common malignant disease worldwide, accounting for 4% of all cancer cases. In Singapore, it is the ninth most common form of cancer. The high mortality rate can be reduced by early treatment following precancerous screening. Currently, the gold standard for screening bladder tumors is histological examination of biopsy specimen, which is both invasive and time-consuming. In this study ex vivo urine fluorescence cytology is investigated to offer a timely and biopsy-free means for detecting bladder cancers. Sediments in patients' urine samples were extracted and incubated with a novel photosensitizer, hypericin. Laser confocal microscopy was used to capture the fluorescence images at an excitation wavelength of 488 nm. Images were subsequently processed to single out the exfoliated bladder cells from the other cells based on the cellular size. Intensity histogram of each targeted cell was plotted and feature vectors, derived from the histogram moments, were used to represent each sample. A difference in the distribution of the feature vectors of normal and low-grade cancerous bladder cells was observed. Diagnostic algorithm for discriminating between normal and low-grade cancerous cells is elucidated in this paper. This study suggests that the fluorescence intensity profiles of hypericin in bladder cells can potentially provide an automated quantitative means of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  7. HPLC assisted Raman spectroscopic studies on bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, W. L.; Cheng, Y.; Yu, W.; Zhang, X. B.; Shen, A. G.; Hu, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    We applied confocal Raman spectroscopy to investigate 12 normal bladder tissues and 30 tumor tissues, and then depicted the spectral differences between the normal and the tumor tissues and the potential canceration mechanism with the aid of the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique. Normal tissues were demonstrated to contain higher tryptophan, cholesterol and lipid content, while bladder tumor tissues were rich in nucleic acids, collagen and carotenoids. In particular, β-carotene, one of the major types of carotenoids, was found through HPLC analysis of the extract of bladder tissues. The statistical software SPSS was applied to classify the spectra of the two types of tissues according to their differences. The sensitivity and specificity of 96.7 and 66.7% were obtained, respectively. In addition, different layers of the bladder wall including mucosa (lumps), muscle and adipose bladder tissue were analyzed by Raman mapping technique in response to previous Raman studies of bladder tissues. All of these will play an important role as a directive tool for the future diagnosis of bladder cancer in vivo.

  8. Genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer: An evolving hallmark

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    N Wadhwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is a major health-care concern. A successful treatment of bladder cancer depends on its early diagnosis at the initial stage. Genetic instability is an essential early step toward the development of bladder cancer. This instability is found more often at the chromosomal level than at the nucleotide level. Microsatellite and chromosomal instability markers can be used as a prognostic marker for screening bladder cancer. Bladder cancer can be distinguished in two different categories according to genetic instability: Cancers with chromosomal level instability and cancers with nucleotide level instability. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA mismatch repair (MMR system and its correlation with other biologic pathway, both are essential to understand the basic mechanisms of cancer development. Microsatellite instability occurs due to defects in DNA MMR genes, including human mutL homolog 1 and human mutL homolog 2. Chromosomal alterations including deletions on chromosome 3, 8, 9, 11, 13, 17 have been detected in bladder cancer. In the current review, the most recent literature of genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer has been summarized.

  9. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and 3 H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection. 3 H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  10. Urinary bladder adenocarcinoma arising in a spina bifida patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Mireille; Mandel, Edmund; Kirschenbaum, Alexander M; Unger, Pamela D

    2007-12-01

    Urinary bladder adenocarcinomas are rare malignancies accounting for approximately 2.5% of all urothelial neoplasms. Intestinal metaplasia of the urothelium indicates the presence of intestinal-type goblet cells and was generally observed to coexist with or to precede the diagnosis of bladder adenocarcinomas. Controversy continues of whether intestinal metaplasia is an acquired precancerous lesion, secondary to different insults to the urothelium, or a concomitant lesion in glandular carcinogenesis. Patients with neurogenic bladders are particularly at risk for developing bladder cancer, mostly squamous cell carcinoma and rarely adenocarcinoma. In these patients, chronic irritation of the urothelium as well as long-term indwelling urinary catheters were the most significant risk factors. Spina bifida is a congenital developmental abnormality that may result in neurogenic bladder. There is only one previously reported case of urothelial carcinoma with associated squamous metaplasia of the bladder occurring in a spina bifida patient. We report the first case of bladder adenocarcinoma associated with intestinal metaplasia occurring in a spina bifida occulta patient. The patient had a complicated clinical course and suffered recurrent urinary tract infections, renal calculi, and urinary incontinence and was managed with intermittent as well as indwelling catheterization.

  11. Development of an interstitial cystitis risk score for bladder permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Lamb

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC is a multifactorial syndrome of severe pelvic and genitalia pain and compromised urinary function; a subset of IC patients present with Hunner's lesions or ulcers on their bladder walls (UIC. UIC is diagnosed by cystoscopy, which may be quite painful. The objective of this study was to determine if a calculated Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score (BP-RS based on non-invasive urinary cytokines could discriminate UIC patients from controls and IC patients without Hunner's ulcers.A national crowdsourcing effort targeted IC patients and age-matched controls to provide urine samples. Urinary cytokine levels for GRO, IL-6, and IL-8 were determined using a Luminex assay.We collected 448 urine samples from 46 states consisting of 153 IC patients (147 female, 6 male, of which 54 UIC patients (50 females, 4 male, 159 female controls, and 136 male controls. A defined BP-RS was calculated to classify UIC, or a bladder permeability defect etiology, with 89% validity.The BP-RS Score quantifies UIC risk, indicative of a bladder permeability defect etiology in a subset of IC patients. The Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score is the first validated urine biomarker assay for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

  12. Thin-section CT with air insufflation technique for bladder carcinoma: CT findings of superficial bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun; Song, Ha Hun; Kim, Mi Hye; Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Young Sin; Kang, Si Won; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1994-01-01

    The staging of bladder carcinoma is a major determinant of operative management CT of bladder carcinoma has been widely used to diagnose external extension (pT3b and over), but tumors confined to the bladder wall (from pT1 to pT3a) are poorly delineated. The authors describe CT findings of the superficial bladder carcinoma (below T1, stage A) in thin-section CT with air insufflation technique (air insufflation-CT) to facilitate early detection and to aid correct staging of the superficial bladder carcinoma. The materials consisted of proved 24 cases (19 patients, single tumor: 16 patients, multiple tumors: 3 patients) of stage A bladder carcinomas. Air insufflation-CT was performed by the infusion of approximately 200 mL of air into the bladder via a Foley catheter. After the routine pelvic CT, bladder tumors were re-scanned with 1.5 to 5 mm thickness and intervals. The superficial bladder carcinoma were detected as nodular(5 cases, 20.8%), papillary(15 cases, 62.5%), pyramida(2 cases, 8.3%), and domed(2 cases, 8.3%) forms on air insufflation-CT. These tumors were classified into three types according to the size of the tumoral neck: type I(pedundulated polypoid tumor: 4 cases, 16.6%), type II(polypid tumor with short neck: 13 cases, 54.2%), and type III(sessile tumor: 7 cases, 29.2%). The mean size(tumoral width x height x base c neck/stalk) of the tumors was 22 x 20 x 16mm. The average tumoral sizes according to each type of the superficial tumors were type I: 22 x 25 x 6mm, type II: 23 x 22 x 18mm, and type III: 18 x 15 x 18mm. The mean width of the type I-II tumoral necks was 15mm. The mean length of the type I tumoral neck(pedicle) was 2.5mm. Papillary fronds of the tumors were seen in 10 cases(41.7%) of 24 superficial tumors. Outer margin of the involved bladder wall was smooth in all cases. Thin-section CT with air insufflation technique for bladder carcinoma was useful in tumoral demonstration, and characteristics of the superficial bladder carcinomas were

  13. Endoscopic gold fiducial marker placement into the bladder wall to optimize radiotherapy targeting for bladder-preserving management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: feasibility and initial outcomes.

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    Maurice M Garcia

    Full Text Available Bladder radiotherapy is a management option for carefully selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the inability to visualize the tumor site during treatment and normal bladder movement limits targeting accuracy and increases collateral radiation. A means to accurately and reliably target the bladder during radiotherapy is needed.Eighteen consecutive patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T1-T4 elected bladder-preserving treatment with maximal transurethral resection (TUR, radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. All underwent endoscopic placement of 24-K gold fiducial markers modified with micro-tines (70 [2.9×0.9 mm.]; 19 [2.1×0.7 mm. into healthy submucosa 5-10 mm. from the resection margin, using custom-made coaxial needles. Marker migration was assessed for with intra-op bladder-filling cystogram and measurement of distance between markers. Set-up error and marker retention through completion of radiotherapy was confirmed by on-table portal imaging.Between 1/2007 and 7/2012, a total of 89 markers (3-5 per tumor site were placed into 18 patients of mean age 73.6 years. Two patients elected cystectomy before starting treatment; 16/18 completed chemo-radiotherapy. All (100% markers were visible with all on-table (portal, cone-beam CT, fluoroscopy, plain-film, and CT-scan imaging. In two patients, 1 of 4 markers placed at the tumor site fell-out (voided during the second half of radiotherapy. All other markers (80/82, 98% were present through the end of radio-therapy. No intraoperative (e.g. uncontrolled bleeding, collateral injury or post-operative complications (e.g. stone formation, urinary tract infection, post-TUR hematuria >48 hours occurred. Use of micro-tined fiducial tumor-site markers afforded a 2 to 6-fold reduction in bladder-area targeted with high-dose radiation.Placement of the micro-tined fiducial markers into the bladder was feasible and associated with excellent retention-rate and no complications

  14. Urothelial Tight Junction Barrier Dysfunction Sensitizes Bladder Afferents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rued, Anna C.; Taiclet, Stefanie N.; Birder, Lori A.; Kullmann, F. Aura

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a chronic voiding disorder that presents with pain in the urinary bladder and surrounding pelvic region. A growing body of evidence suggests that an increase in the permeability of the urothelium, the epithelial barrier that lines the interior of the bladder, contributes to the symptoms of IC/BPS. To examine the consequence of increased urothelial permeability on pelvic pain and afferent excitability, we overexpressed in the urothelium claudin 2 (Cldn2), a tight junction (TJ)-associated protein whose message is significantly upregulated in biopsies of IC/BPS patients. Consistent with the presence of bladder-derived pain, rats overexpressing Cldn2 showed hypersensitivity to von Frey filaments applied to the pelvic region. Overexpression of Cldn2 increased the expression of c-Fos and promoted the activation of ERK1/2 in spinal cord segments receiving bladder input, which we conceive is the result of noxious stimulation of afferent pathways. To determine whether the mechanical allodynia observed in rats with reduced urothelial barrier function results from altered afferent activity, we examined the firing of acutely isolated bladder sensory neurons. In patch-clamp recordings, about 30% of the bladder sensory neurons from rats transduced with Cldn2, but not controls transduced with GFP, displayed spontaneous activity. Furthermore, bladder sensory neurons with tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) action potentials from rats transduced with Cldn2 showed hyperexcitability in response to suprathreshold electrical stimulation. These findings suggest that as a result of a leaky urothelium, the diffusion of urinary solutes through the urothelial barrier sensitizes bladders afferents, promoting voiding at low filling volumes and pain. PMID:28560313

  15. Transcriptome analysis of bladder biopsy from interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Walker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis and bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS are terms used to describe a heterogeneous chronic pelvic and bladder pain disorder. Despite its significant prevalence, the disease etiology is not well understood and providing diagnosis and treatment can be challenging. In our study, published recently in the Journal of Urology (Colaco et al., 2014, we describe the use of microarrays as a tool to characterize IC/BPS and to determine if there are clinical factors that correlate with gene expression. This data-in-brief article describes the methodology for that study, including data analysis, in further detail. Deposited data can be found in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database: GSE57560.

  16. Normal bladder wall thickness measurement in healthy Iranian children, a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Adibi, Atoosa; Kazemian, Afarin; Toghiani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Normal bladder function is necessary for micturition. Many causes such as urinary tract infection, bladder outlet obstruction, and neuropathic bladder can influence bladder wall thickness (BWT).This study was designed to determine normal BWT in Iranian children. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study done in Isfahan in 2012 comprising 82 children aged 2-14 years without any urinary complaint. We measured thickness of posterior and lateral walls of the bladder ...

  17. Overactive bladder syndrome and bladder wall thickness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Zahide; Voyvoda, Bekir; Şirinocak, Pinar Bekdik

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome, nocturia, urgency, and urge incontinence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and measure bladder wall thickness (BWT) in these patients. The patient group was composed of 38 patients with OSAS. The control group was composed of 15 healthy individuals. All patients were evaluated using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). The bladder wall thickness was measured by transabdominal ultrasound (US). The presence of nocturia, urinary urgency, and urge incontinence were also evaluated. The mean OABSS was significantly higher in the patient group compared with the control group (p=0.048). The minimum oxygen saturation (Min.SO2) of patients with urgency was found to be significantly lower (p=0.014). The time spent below 90% of oxygen saturation (SO2) was significantly longer in patients with urinary urgency (p=0.009). There was no difference in BWT measurements between the patient group and the control group. There was a significant relationship between BWT values and OABSS in patients with OSAS (p=0.002). The results of the present study suggest that OSAS is associated with OAB syndrome. As a key symptom of OAB, urgency correlates with hypoxia in cases with OSAS. Although the present study did not observe any difference in BWT measurements between the patients and the control group, there was a correlation between BWT measurements and OABSS in patients with OSAS. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  18. Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis: Aetiology, evaluation and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Rourke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis or bladder pain syndrome (BPS is often a chronic debilitating condition characterised by predominantly storage symptoms and associated frequently with pelvic pain that varies with bladder filling. The aetiology is uncertain as the condition occurs in the absence of a urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology. Resulting discomfort may vary and ranges from abdominal tenderness to intense bladder spasms. Diagnosis and management of this syndrome may be difficult and is often made by its typical cystoscopic features. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of interstitial cystitis according to the current available best evidence and advises a multimodal approach in its management.

  19. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder with pelvic metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Hung Geng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old male, diagnosed with paraganglioma of the urinary bladder, underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor 10 years ago. He was lost to follow-up after the operation but was recently admitted to our hospital for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer. However, refractory hypertension with palpitation was noted and a computed tomography scan revealed a round, well-defined mass at the right pelvic region. Retroperitoneal tumor excision surgery was performed and a subsequent pathological analysis revealed paraganglioma. The diagnosis of paraganglioma of the urinary bladder with pelvic metastasis was confirmed and his blood pressure returned to normal level without medication after the operation.

  20. Bladder carcinosarcoma: A case report with review of the literature

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    Ismail Basibuyuk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Carcinosarcoma of the urinary bladder is a rare neoplasm that is histologically composed of malignant epithelial and mesenchymal components. The etiology of sarcomatoid tumors is unclear, but smoking and history of previous radiotherapy or chemotherapy may lead to bladder disorders and to the formation of sarcomatoid carcinoma. These neoplasms behave as highly aggressive tumors and optimal treatment is uncertain. Herein, we report a case of sarcomatoid carcinoma of urinary bladder presenting as a giant intravesical mass in a 61-year-old man complaining of macroscopic hematuria.

  1. Carcinosarcoma of the bladder following local schistosomiasis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srougi, Victor; Gallucci, Fabio P; Mattedi, Romulo L; Srougi, Miguel

    2017-03-21

    A young patient from central Africa presented acute renal insufficiency due to extrinsic compression of the distal ureters by a pelvic mass. After initial medical management, a biopsy revealed poorly differentiated bladder cancer and Schistosoma haematobium eggs embedded in the bladder wall. The initial workup showed evidence of locoregional disease. Radical cystectomy with an incontinent urinary diversion was performed with no complications. Carcinosarcoma of the bladder was diagnosed by pathological analysis of the surgical specimen. After a short follow-up, the patient was readmitted presenting with lung and bone metastases. At 60 days after diagnosis, he died of respiratory insufficiency caused by pulmonary metastatic disease. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Left-sided gall bladder: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrungoo R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Left-sided gall bladder without situs inversus viscerum is a rare albeit recognized clinical entity. We report our experience of two cases of left-sided gall bladder in two women aged 36 and 48 who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for chronic calculous cholecystitis. Left-sided gall bladder may provide an unusual surprise to the surgeons during laparoscopy as routine pre-operative studies may not always detect the anomaly. Awareness of the unpredictable confluence of the cystic duct into the common bile duct (CBD and selective use of intraoperative cholangiography aid in the safe laparoscopic management of this unusual entity.

  3. Placenta paraaortic with bladder invasion: A plea for multidisciplinary approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawish, Fahmy M. I.; Hammad, Fayez T.; Kazim, Essa M.

    2007-01-01

    Placenta previa percreta with the urinary bladder invasion is a rare but potentially lethal condition. It has an increasing clinical significance due to its association with previous cesarean sections and uterine curettage. Herein, we report on a patient with placenta percreta and bladder invasion, who presented with hematuria and in whom delivery was delayed to almost full term highlighting the potential catastrophic results and the need for a multidisciplinary approach with the need to involve surgeons who are familiar with vascular and urologic surgery. We also present an elegant MRI of placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder, which shows that MRI is potentially an excellent diagnostic diagnostic modality in this difficult condition. (author)

  4. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Venkatramani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy.

  5. Bladder pain in an LL-37 interstitial cystitis and painful bladder syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wanjian; Schults, Austin J; Jensen, Mark Martin; Ye, Xiangyang; Alt, Jeremiah A; Prestwich, Glenn D; Oottamasathien, Siam

    2017-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the pain response in an LL-37 induced murine model for interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). In particular, we sought to characterize the dose dependence, time-course, and relationship of LL-37 induced bladder inflammation and pain. The IC/PBS model was induced in C57Bl/6 mice by instilling 50 μL of LL-37, an immunomodulatory human cathelicidin (anti-microbial peptide), in the bladder for 1 hr. Pain responses were measured using von Frey filaments (0.04 gm to 4.0 gm) before and after LL-37 instillation. Inflammation was evaluated using tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay, gross inspection, and microscopic histologic examination. The dose response experiment demonstrated a graded pain response, with higher concentrations of LL-37 challenge yielding higher pain responses across all stimuli tested. Statistical significance was seen when comparing 1.0 gm von Frey filament results at 320 μM (68 ± 8% response) vs. 0 μM (38 ± 6% response). Interestingly, pain responses did not attenuate across time but increased significantly after 5 (p=0.0012) and 7 days (p=0.0096). Comparison with MPO data suggested that pain responses could be independent of inflammation. We demonstrated within our LL-37 induced IC/PBS model pain occurs in a dose-dependent fashion, pain responses persist beyond the initial point of insult, and our dose response and time course experiments demonstrated that pain was independent of inflammation.

  6. Gentamicin bladder instillations decrease symptomatic urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladder patients on intermittent catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lindsey; He, Chang; Bevins, Jack; Clemens, J Quentin; Stoffel, John T; Cameron, Anne P

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine if gentamicin bladder instillations reduce the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) in neurogenic bladder (NGB) patients on intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) who have recurrent UTIs. Secondary aims were to examine the effects of intravesical gentamicin on the organism resistance patterns. We retrospectively reviewed our prospective NGB database. Inclusion criteria were NGB patients performing ISC exclusively for bladder drainage with clinical data available for six months before and six months after initiating prophylactic intravesical gentamicin instillations. Symptomatic UTIs were defined as symptoms consistent with UTI plus the need for antibiotic treatment. Twenty-two patients met inclusion criteria; etiology of NGB was 63.6% spinal cord injury, 13.6% multiple sclerosis. Median time since injury/diagnosis was 14 years and 6/22 (27.3%) had undergone urological reconstruction. Patients had fewer symptomatic UTI's (median 4 vs. 1 episodes; pbladder instillations decrease symptomatic UTI episodes and reduce oral antibiotics in patients with NGB on ISC who were suffering from recurrent UTIs. Antibiotic resistance decreased while on gentamicin instillations.

  7. Progressive bladder remodeling due to bladder outlet obstruction: a systematic review of morphological and molecular evidences in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Ferdinando; Creta, Massimiliano; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Iacovelli, Valerio; Mangiapia, Francesco; Li Marzi, Vincenzo; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2018-03-09

    Bladder outlet obstruction is a common urological condition. We aimed to summarize available evidences about bladder outlet obstruction-induced molecular and morphological alterations occurring in human bladder. We performed a literature search up to December 2017 including clinical and preclinical basic research studies on humans. The following search terms were combined: angiogenesis, apoptosis, bladder outlet obstruction, collagen, electron microscopy, extracellular matrix, fibrosis, hypoxia, histology, inflammation, innervation, ischemia, pressure, proliferation, remodeling, suburothelium, smooth muscle cells, stretch, urothelium. We identified 36 relevant studies. A three-stages model of bladder wall remodeling can be hypothesized involving an initial hypertrophy phase, a subsequent compensation phase and a later decompensation. Histological and molecular alterations occur in the following compartments: urothelium, suburothelium, detrusor smooth muscle cells, detrusor extracellular matrix, nerves. Cyclic stretch, increased hydrostatic and cyclic hydrodynamic pressure and hypoxia are stimuli capable of modulating multiple signaling pathways involved in this remodeling process. Bladder outlet obstruction leads to progressive bladder tissue remodeling in humans. Multiple signaling pathways are involved.

  8. Computerized tomography and staging of bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wozniak, A.; Luongo, A.; Nogueira, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has been employed in 13 patients with bladder tumors; 8 of them subsequently underwent surgery. Concordance between CT and pathological staging ranged in 90% of accurate results. Our data are discussed and compared to those of other authors in the literature. Staging was carried out according to the International Union Against Cancer. CT proved to be very accurate in the assessment of local and regional spread of tumor, limphatic progression and early detection of ureteral obstruction, as well as diagnosis of distant metastasis in selected patients. In poor candidates for surgery CT provided invaluable data to be used for localizing fields of radiation therapy. CT is a very well tolerated procedure, it is therefore suitable in subsequent treatment control. (Author) [pt

  9. Screw as a Bladder Foreign Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Hosseini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the bladder are among the strangest differential diagnoses in the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and may be missed in initial medical evaluations. We present a 63-year-old man who was visited in the emergency department because of obstructive and irritative lower urinary tract symptoms. Two months earlier, he had a pelvic fracture due to motor vehicle accident and underwent an open reduction and internal fixation of the pubic rami and right acetabulum by an anterior ilioinguinal approach. After initial evaluation, an abdominopelvic X-ray revealed a 3 cm screw in the suprapubic area. He underwent urethrocystoscopy and a 3 cm screw was extracted by forceps.

  10. Placenta percreta with urinary bladder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ojaimi, Eftekhar H.; Subramaniam, Balameenakshi V.

    2004-01-01

    A 37-years old Pakistani lady, who had previously undergone one cesarean delivery and one uterine curettage, was admitted to the labor ward at 29 weeks of gestation with history of sudden severe painless vaginal bleeding from a sonographically diagnosed placenta pervia. An immediate cesarean was performed and a live male infant was delivered. The placenta was morbidly adherent to the lower uterine segment and attempts at removal caused torrential bleeding, necesstiating cesarean hysterectomy. In addition, attempts to dissect the bldder from lower uterine segment was unsuccessful and, hence, the diagnosis of placenta percreta with involvement of urinary bladder was made. A modified posterior approach to the hyterectomy was carried out, with subsequent good recovery. (author)

  11. The distribution and function of chondroitin sulfate and other sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the human bladder and their contribution to the protective bladder barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.A.W.; van Wijk, X.M.; Jansen, K.C.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Glycosaminoglycan replenishment therapies are commonly applied to treat bladder inflammatory conditions such as bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Although there is evidence that these therapies are clinically effective, much is still unknown about the location and function of

  12. Intraoperative radiation therapy in patients with bladder cancer. A review of techniques allowing improved tumor doses and providing high cure rates without loss of bladder function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, W.U.; Kaufman, S.D.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional external beam irradiation, using modern megavoltage techniques and doses that do not harm bladder function, will permanently eradicate local bladder cancer in 30% to 50% of patients, compared with 70% to 90% with cystectomy. In appropriately chosen patients, open surgery can safely provide excellent exposure for the selective delivery of more radiant energy directly to the tumor and less to the uninvolved portion of the bladder. Intraoperative radiation therapy, by either a removable radium or iridium implant or a large single dose of electrons, has been reported to be safe and can permanently cure the bladder of cancer and also preserve bladder function in more than 75% of patients with solitary tumors that invade into but not beyond the bladder muscle. With the increasing interest in and availability of intraoperative radiation therapy in the US, this curative and bladder-sparing treatment for operable patients with bladder cancer invading the trigone is appropriate for careful clinical trial. 13 references

  13. Hemipelvic irradiation for superficial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Kazuya; Machida, Toyohei; Ooishi, Yukihiko; Ueda, Masataka; Kido, Akira; Wada, Tetsuro; Yoshigoe, Fukuo; Yamashita, Takashi; Mochizuki, Sachio

    1985-01-01

    In 15 patients with superficial bladder cancer hemipelvic irradiation was performed for prevention of relapse of cancer and decrease in side effects with following results. All patients received TUR-Bt at our department during the six years period from 1978 to 1983. As to stages, one was classified as Ta, 11 as T 1 and 3 as T 2, and pathologic diagnosis was transitional epithelial carcinoma of grade 1 in 1 case, grade 2 in 8 cases and grade 3 in 6 cases. Irradiation was started from the 7 th to 14 th day after TUR-Bt. At first, hemipelvic anterior and posterior field including the field from the affected pelvis to 1 to 2 cm beyond the midline toward the contralateral side and from the aortic bifurcation to the prostatic urethra were irradiated at a dose of 45 Gy. Then, whole bladder field was given an additional rotation irradiation of 20 Gy. The mean observation period was 43 months (ranging from 12 to 79 months) and relapse of cancer was observed in 6 cases out of 15 cases (40%). The site of relapse was in the irradiated site in 2 cases, contralateral site in 3 cases and both side in 1 cases. However, in all of the relapsed cases no aggravation in differential degree or progression in stage was observed. As the side effects, radiation cystitis developed as a delayed damage in 1 case. Thus, although no efficacy for prevention of relapse which we had expected was not seen, this irradiation method effectively inhibited the progression of lesion and development of delayed damage. (author)

  14. Hemipelvic irradiation for superficial bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashiro, Kazuya; Machida, Toyohei; Ooishi, Yukihiko; Ueda, Masataka; Kido, Akira; Wada, Tetsuro; Yoshigoe, Fukuo; Yamashita, Takashi; Mochizuki, Sachio

    1985-02-01

    In 15 patients with superficial bladder cancer hemipelvic irradiation was performed for prevention of relapse of cancer and decrease in side effects with following results. All patients received TUR-Bt at our department during the six years period from 1978 to 1983. As to stages, one was classified as Ta, 11 as T 1 and 3 as T 2, and pathologic diagnosis was transitional epithelial carcinoma of grade 1 in 1 case, grade 2 in 8 cases and grade 3 in 6 cases. Irradiation was started from the 7 th to 14 th day after TUR-Bt. At first, hemipelvic anterior and posterior field including the field from the affected pelvis to 1 to 2 cm beyond the midline toward the contralateral side and from the aortic bifurcation to the prostatic urethra were irradiated at a dose of 45 Gy. Then, whole bladder field was given an additional rotation irradiation of 20 Gy. The mean observation period was 43 months (ranging from 12 to 79 months) and relapse of cancer was observed in 6 cases out of 15 cases (40%). The site of relapse was in the irradiated site in 2 cases, contralateral site in 3 cases and both side in 1 cases. However, in all of the relapsed cases no aggravation in differential degree or progression in stage was observed. As the side effects, radiation cystitis developed as a delayed damage in 1 case. Thus, although no efficacy for prevention of relapse which we had expected was not seen, this irradiation method effectively inhibited the progression of lesion and development of delayed damage. (author).

  15. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  16. Vinflunine in the treatment of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bachner

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mark Bachner, Maria De Santis3rd Medical Department – Center for Oncology and Hematology, Kaiser Franz Josef-Spital der Stadt Wien, and Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute for Applied Cancer Research Vienna (LBI-ACR VIEnna, Cluster Translational Oncology, Kaiser Franz Josef-Spital der Stadt Wien, and Applied Cancer Research – Institution for Translational Research Vienna (ACR-ITR VIEnna/CEADDP, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Vinflunine (VFL is a third-generation bifluorinated semi-synthetic vinca alkaloid obtained by superacidic chemistry from its parent compound, vinorelbine. As with the other vinca alkaloids, the main antineoplastic effects of VFL arise from its interaction with tubulin, the major component of microtubules in mitotic spindles. In contrast to other vinca alkaloids, VFL shows some distinctive properties in terms of tubulin binding, possibly explaining its superior antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo compared with vinorelbine as well as its excellent safety profile. In transitional cell carcinoma (TCC, two single-agent phase II trials were performed testing VFL in platinum-pretreated patients, showing moderate response rates and promising disease control rates. Therefore, the first phase III trial in modern times for second-line TCC of the urothelium was designed in order to further investigate the activity of VFL. First results were presented at the 2008 ASCO conference. VFL appears to be a possible treatment option for patients with TCC progressing after first-line platinum-containing chemotherapy.Keywords: vinflunine, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder, bladder cancer, chemotherapy, second-line chemotherapy

  17. Preferences for antimuscarinic therapy for overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinburn, Paul; Lloyd, Andrew; Ali, Shehzad; Hashmi, Noreen; Newal, David; Najib, Hiba

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVE • To examine patient preferences and strength of preferences for treatment for the various symptoms of overactive bladder and adverse events associated with the use of antimuscarinic treatments. PATIENTS AND METHODS • A discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey was developed that detailed treatment choices in terms of attributes relating to their efficacy in reducing symptoms and the likelihood of experiencing typical adverse events. Levels for each attribute were based on a literature review, qualitative interviews and a meta-analysis of clinical trial data. • Attributes were combined into choice sets using a fractional orthogonal design that had been folded over. Pairs of choice sets were presented to overactive bladder (OAB) patients (n= 332), who indicated which treatment alternative they preferred. Data were analysed using the conditional logit model. RESULTS • Participants expressed the strongest preference for the avoidance of urgency incontinence episodes, followed by preference for a reduction in the experience of urinary urgency and the number of micturition episodes. The influence of the likelihood of experiencing an adverse event on treatment preference was also estimated. • Finally, marginal rates of substitution were calculated to demonstrate the relative value of trade-offs between the various attributes. • Treatment preferences were found to be broadly similar across two patient age groups (i.e. under 45 s and 45 and over). CONCLUSION • The study demonstrates that individuals with OAB place significant emphasis on the prospect of reduction in symptoms. Avoidance of incontinence episodes is particularly valued and equivalent to a much greater reduction in the frequency of micturition or experience of urgency. However, even a modest increase in the likelihood of experiencing an adverse event could easily motivate a change in treatment preference. © 2010 OXFORD OUTCOMES LTD.

  18. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  19. Mirabegron, a breakthrough in overactive bladder syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Maestro Nombela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Overactive bladder syndrome is a condition with high prevalence, which has a negative impact on patients’ quality of life. A drug with a novel mechanism of action has been recently approved: mirabegron. The objective of this study is to review the scientific evidence available on mirabegron, with the aim to analyze its efficacy, safety and cost, and thus estimate its role within current pharmacotherapy. Methods: The effectiveness and safety of mirabegron were analyzed through an evaluation of scientific evidence. The cost of different pharmacological alternatives was calculated based on their Defined Daily Dose (DDD and their manufacturer’s sale price. Results: The use of mirabegron in the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome is supported by three randomized clinical trials, controlled with placebo, at 12 weeks. All three share the same primary efficacy variables (number of incontinence episodes per 24 hours and number of micturitions per 24 hours. Long-term efficacy data are based on a 12-month study, where efficacy outcomes were measured as secondary variables. In all studies, mirabegron showed a significant but modest effect. Some of the most frequently detected adverse effects were: hypertension, increase of glucose in blood, headache, urinary tract infections, constipation and tachycardia. Special attention must be paid to cardiovascular events. Conclusions: The clinical efficacy of mirabegron is very modest and comparable to that achieved with the other drugs approved for this indication. Moreover, it is more expensive than other therapeutic options. Cardiac risks and urinary infections only allow to consider it as an alternative option to anticholinergic drugs, when these are contraindicated, show no clinical efficacy, or cause unacceptable adverse effects.

  20. Generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam CT using a patient-specific bladder shape model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoot, A. J. A. J. van de; Schooneveldt, G.; Wognum, S.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Bel, A.; Hoogeman, M. S.; Chai, X.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop and validate a generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), independent of gender and treatment position (prone or supine), using only pretreatment imaging data. Methods: Data of 20 patients, treated for tumors in the pelvic region with the entire bladder visible on CT and CBCT, were divided into four equally sized groups based on gender and treatment position. The full and empty bladder contour, that can be acquired with pretreatment CT imaging, were used to generate a patient-specific bladder shape model. This model was used to guide the segmentation process on CBCT. To obtain the bladder segmentation, the reference bladder contour was deformed iteratively by maximizing the cross-correlation between directional grey value gradients over the reference and CBCT bladder edge. To overcome incorrect segmentations caused by CBCT image artifacts, automatic adaptations were implemented. Moreover, locally incorrect segmentations could be adapted manually. After each adapted segmentation, the bladder shape model was expanded and new shape patterns were calculated for following segmentations. All available CBCTs were used to validate the segmentation algorithm. The bladder segmentations were validated by comparison with the manual delineations and the segmentation performance was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), surface distance error (SDE) and SD of contour-to-contour distances. Also, bladder volumes obtained by manual delineations and segmentations were compared using a Bland-Altman error analysis. Results: The mean DSC, mean SDE, and mean SD of contour-to-contour distances between segmentations and manual delineations were 0.87, 0.27 cm and 0.22 cm (female, prone), 0.85, 0.28 cm and 0.22 cm (female, supine), 0.89, 0.21 cm and 0.17 cm (male, supine) and 0.88, 0.23 cm and 0.17 cm (male, prone), respectively. Manual local adaptations improved the segmentation

  1. Generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam CT using a patient-specific bladder shape model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoot, A. J. A. J. van de, E-mail: a.j.schootvande@amc.uva.nl; Schooneveldt, G.; Wognum, S.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Chai, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Palo Alto, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop and validate a generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), independent of gender and treatment position (prone or supine), using only pretreatment imaging data. Methods: Data of 20 patients, treated for tumors in the pelvic region with the entire bladder visible on CT and CBCT, were divided into four equally sized groups based on gender and treatment position. The full and empty bladder contour, that can be acquired with pretreatment CT imaging, were used to generate a patient-specific bladder shape model. This model was used to guide the segmentation process on CBCT. To obtain the bladder segmentation, the reference bladder contour was deformed iteratively by maximizing the cross-correlation between directional grey value gradients over the reference and CBCT bladder edge. To overcome incorrect segmentations caused by CBCT image artifacts, automatic adaptations were implemented. Moreover, locally incorrect segmentations could be adapted manually. After each adapted segmentation, the bladder shape model was expanded and new shape patterns were calculated for following segmentations. All available CBCTs were used to validate the segmentation algorithm. The bladder segmentations were validated by comparison with the manual delineations and the segmentation performance was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), surface distance error (SDE) and SD of contour-to-contour distances. Also, bladder volumes obtained by manual delineations and segmentations were compared using a Bland-Altman error analysis. Results: The mean DSC, mean SDE, and mean SD of contour-to-contour distances between segmentations and manual delineations were 0.87, 0.27 cm and 0.22 cm (female, prone), 0.85, 0.28 cm and 0.22 cm (female, supine), 0.89, 0.21 cm and 0.17 cm (male, supine) and 0.88, 0.23 cm and 0.17 cm (male, prone), respectively. Manual local adaptations improved the segmentation

  2. Potential urine and serum biomarkers for patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-04-01

    There is a lack of consensus on the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. The chronic pain symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis refractory to local treatment could be a result of central nervous system sensitization and persisting abnormalities in the bladder wall, which activate the afferent sensory system. Evidence also shows that bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a heterogeneous syndrome and that the two subtypes, the ulcerative (classic) and non-ulcerative types, represent different disease entities. There is a need for non-invasive markers for the differential diagnoses of the subtypes of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, and between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and bladder sensory disorders, such as hypersensitive bladder syndrome or overactive bladder. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, but not overactive bladder, involves an aberrant differentiation program in the bladder urothelium that leads to altered synthesis of several proteoglycans, cell adhesion and tight junction proteins, and bacterial defense molecules. These findings have led to the rationale for identifying urinary biomarkers to detect bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis in patients with frequency urgency syndrome. Recently, the markers that have been the focus of the most research are antiproliferative factor, epidermal growth factor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, glycosaminoglycans and bladder nitric oxide. In addition, inflammatory proteins in the urine and serum play important roles in the pathogenesis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. The urinary proteome is an easily accessible source of biomarkers for differentiation between inflammatory bladder disorders. Analysis of multiple urinary proteins and serum cytokines could provide a diagnostic basis for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, and could be a tool for the differential diagnosis of bladder pain

  3. Accuracy of ultrasound-measured bladder wall thickness for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.M. Ali

    measured urinary bladder wall thickness. (BWT) in the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity (DO). Subjects and methods: Patients who had undergone urodynamic testing due to irritative lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were evaluated for ...

  4. Inflatable bladder to facilitate handling of heavy objects - A concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Goldrick, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Inflatable bladder facilitates the removal of heavy, highly finished metal parts from tote boxes or shipping containers. The proposed concept permits removal without danger of damage to the parts or injury to handling personnel.

  5. Hormonal Treatment for Severe Hydronephrosis Caused by Bladder Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Efe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of endometriosis cases involving the urinary system has recently increased, and the bladder is a specific zone where endometriosis is most commonly seen in the urinary system. In the case presented here, a patient presented to the emergency department with the complaint of side pain and was examined and diagnosed with severe hydronephrosis and bladder endometriosis was determined in the etiology. After the patient was pathologically diagnosed, Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System (LNG-IUS was administered to the uterine cavity. At the 12-month follow-up, endometriosis was not observed in the cystoscopy and symptoms had completely regressed. Hydronephrosis may be observed after exposure of the ureter, and silent renal function loss may develop in patients suffering from endometriosis with bladder involvement. For patients with moderate or severe hydronephrosis associated with bladder endometriosis, LNG-IUS application may be separately and successfully used after conservative surgery.

  6. SMP Bladder Tooling for Manufacturing Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG's shape memory polymer (SMP) Bladder Tooling is a cutting-edge manufacturing technology that can meet the manufacturing needs of the Ares launch vehicles. This...

  7. Carcinosarcoma of the Urinary Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limci Gupta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinosarcomas are rare tumours containing both malignant mesenchymal and epithelial elements. This reports presents a 70-year-old man with carcinosarcoma of the urinary bladder, which is proven histologically.

  8. The Role of Glomerulations in Bladder Pain Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennevik, Gjertrud E.; Meijlink, Jane M.; Hanno, Philip

    2016-01-01

    data to support the use of glomerulations as a marker for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Materials and Methods A systematic literature search of the PubMed® database in March 2014 using the search term "Cystitis, Interstitial/diagnosis" [MAJR] OR (glomerulations OR glomerulation...... not included in the search. A total of 29 publications were included in this review. Results There is no consistent relationship between glomerulations and the diagnosis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. In the reviewed studies we found evidence of the grade of glomerulations changing with time...... in an asymptomatic population. Conclusions We found no convincing evidence in the reviewed literature that glomerulations should be included in the diagnosis or phenotyping of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Glomerulations do not correlate with symptoms and are found in patients without bladder pain...

  9. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  10. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  11. Genomic Alterations in Liquid Biopsies from Patients with Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Nordentoft, Iver Kristiansen; Christensen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Background: At least half of the patients diagnosed with non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) experience recurrence and approximately 15% will develop progression to muscle invasive or metastatic disease. Biomarkers for disease surveillance are urgently needed. Objective: Development......-invasive or metastatic bladder cancer; t test for ddPCR data. Results and limitations: We developed from one to six personalised assays per patient. Patients with progressive disease showed significantly higher levels of tumour DNA in plasma and urine before disease progression, compared with patients with recurrent....... Patient summary: Tumour DNA can be detected in blood and urine in early and advanced stages of bladder cancer. Measurement of these highly tumour-specific biomarkers may represent a novel diagnostic tool to indicate the presence of residual disease or to discover aggressive forms of bladder cancer early...

  12. Trimodality therapy in bladder cancer: Who, what and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premo, Christopher; Apolo, Andrea B.; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Radical cystectomy is a standard treatment for non-metastatic, muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Treatment with trimodality therapy consisting of maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation has emerged as a method to preserve the native bladder in highly motivated patients. A number of factors can impact the likelihood of long term bladder preservation after trimodality therapy, and therefore should be taken into account when selecting patients. New radiation techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided radiation therapy may decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy in this setting, but remain an area of active study. Novel chemotherapy regimens may improve response rates and minimize toxicity. PMID:25882559

  13. Use of thiazolidinediones and risk of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; de Vries, Frank; Vestergaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pioglitazone, a drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with bladder cancer in observational studies. Diabetes mellitus itself has also been linked with bladder cancer. The objective was to estimate the risk of bladder cancer for diabetic patients using...... at the same time (stage 2), current use of TZDs (stage 3) and current use of insulin (stage 4). RESULTS: Compared with non-diabetic controls, patients using antidiabetic medication experienced a 1.3-fold increased risk of bladder cancer (adjusted HR 1.3 [95%CI 1.2-1.4]). No major differences were observed...... thialozidinediones (TZDs) compared with patients in other treatment stages of the disease. METHODS: We performed a population-based cohort study (1996-2007) in the Danish National Health Registers. Oral antidiabetic drug users (n=179,056) were matched 1:3 by sex and year of birth to non-users. Hazard ratios (HRs...

  14. Gall bladder infarction: A radiographic mimic of emphysematous cholecystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughran, C.F.; Thind, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    A case is reported in which the typical radiographic appearances of acute emphysematous cholecystitis were due to acute gall bladder infarction following thrombotic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. (orig.)

  15. Gall bladder infarction: A radiographic mimic of emphysematous cholecystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughran, C.F.; Thind, C.R.

    1985-05-01

    A case is reported in which the typical radiographic appearances of acute emphysematous cholecystitis were due to acute gall bladder infarction following thrombotic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery.

  16. Contemporary management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Era, Marc A; Cheng, Liang; Pan, Chong-Xian

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment for muscle-invasive nonmetastatic bladder cancer is neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. However, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not widely accepted even with level 1 evidence. Adjuvant chemotherapy should be discussed if patients have not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery and have high-risk pathologic features. Although not considered standard of care, bladder-sparing therapy can be considered for highly selected patients and for those medically unfit for surgery. Even though there are no level 1 data, the treatment outcomes for highly select patients given bladder-sparing therapy appear promising, with many patients retaining a functional bladder. Personalized chemotherapy is currently being actively pursued to target the underlying molecular changes and tailor to individual needs. PMID:22845409

  17. Radionuclide targeting with particular emphasis on urinary bladder carcinoma

    CERN Document Server

    Sjöström, A

    2001-01-01

    primary bladder carcinoma tumours was investigated. Both receptors were expressed in the majority of metastases and primary tumours. Targeting the EGF receptor and/or HER-2 in urinary bladder carcinoma is an exciting new concept The incidence of urinary bladder carcinoma is increasing and many patients die every year of this disease despite assumed radical therapy. Thus, there is a need for improved methods of diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide targeting is based on achieving specific delivery of radioactive nuclides to tumour cells with minimal damage to surrounding normal tissues. Two possible target structures are the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and the related receptor HER-2. Cellular binding and retention of sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 I-EGF-dextran conjugates was investigated in two bladder carcinoma cell lines. The conjugate bound specifically to the EGF receptor with delayed maximum binding, limited intracellular degradation and prolonged cellular retention compared to sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 I-EGF. EGF w...

  18. Segmental irradiation of the bladder with neodymium YAG laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPhee, M.S.; Mador, D.R.; Tulip, J.; Ritchie, B.; Moore, R.; Lakey, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Neodymium YAG laser energy source can be readily adapted for cystoscopic use by some simple modifications of existing urologic equipment. Both the fiberoptic resectoscope and a deflecting cystourethroscope have been adapted for this purpose. Fixation of the fiber tip 1 cm. from the target and use of a divergent beam of 36 degrees allows the delivery of standardized dosage to a relatively large bladder tissue volume. Animal experiments involving 35 mongrel dogs established that repetitive overlapping doses of 200 joules ech can successfully treat a large area of bladder resulting in a full thickness bladder wall injury. This technique has been used in 4 high risk patients with infiltrating bladder cancer without adverse sequelae. The ability to reliably produce a full thickness lesion may give this modality a therapeutic advantage over conventional cautery techniques especially for the treatment of residual infiltrative carcinoma

  19. Chronobiologic fluctuation of cyclophosphamide induced urinary bladder damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, M P; Ershler, W B; Newman, R A; Fagan, M A

    1983-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is the most widely used alkylating agent in clinical medicine. The usefulness of this drug is often limited by its propensity to produce hemorrhagic cystitis. To be active cyclophosphamide must be metabolized by the mixed function oxidase system. It has been previously demonstrated that the oncolytic activity and host lethality of cyclophosphamide are dependent upon circadian fluctuations. When cyclophosphamide is administered i.p. to male mice there is a dose dependent increase in urinary bladder weight. Histopathologic examination of these bladders revealed hemorrhage, edema, inflammation and stretching of the epithelial lining. When administered i.p. at 4-h intervals throughout a 24-h time period, cyclophosphamide produced maximum bladder damage when administered at 0500 and 1700 and little or no damage to the bladder when administered at 0100 or 1300. These studies suggest that cyclophosphamide induced cystitis, a toxicity resulting from the metabolic production of acrolein, may also be dependent upon chronobiologic fluctuations.

  20. Substance P dependence of endosomal fusion during bladder inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, T G; Saban, R; Bost, K L; Harris, H W; Kaysen, J H; Goda, F O; Wang, X C; Lewis, F C; Navar, G L; Campbell, W C; Bjorling, D E; Saban, M; Zeidel, M L

    2000-03-01

    Urinary bladder instillation of ovalbumin into presensitized guinea pigs stimulates rapid development of local bladder inflammation. Substance P is an important mediator of this inflammatory response, as substance P antagonists largely reverse the process. Vacuolization of the subapical endosomal compartment of the transitional epithelial cells lining the bladder suggests that changes in endosomal trafficking and fusion are also part of the inflammatory response. To test directly for substance P mediation of changes in endosomal fusion, we reconstituted fusion of transitional cell endosomes in vitro using both cuvette-based and flow cytometry energy transfer assays. Bladders were loaded with fluorescent dyes by a hypotonic withdrawal protocol before endosomal isolation by gradient centrifugation. Endosomal fusion assayed by energy transfer during in vitro reconstitution was both cytosol and ATP dependent. Fusion was confirmed by the increase in vesicle size on electron micrographs of fused endosomal preparations compared with controls. In inflamed bladders, dye uptake was inhibited 20% and endosomal fusion was inhibited 50%. These changes are partly mediated by the neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor (NK1R), as 4 mg/kg of CP-96,345, a highly selective NK1 antagonist, increased fusion in inflamed bladders but had no effect on control bladders. The receptor-mediated nature of this effect was demonstrated by the expression of substance P receptor mRNA in rat bladder lumen scrapings and by the detection of the NK1R message in guinea pig subapical endosomes by Western blot analysis. The NK1Rs were significantly upregulated following induction of an inflammatory response in the bladder. These results demonstrate that 1) in ovalbumin-induced inflammation in the guinea pig bladder, in vitro fusion of apical endosomes is inhibited, showing endocytotic processes are altered in inflammation; 2) pretreatment in vivo with an NK1R antagonist blocks this inhibition of in vitro fusion

  1. Urodynamic characteristics might be variable in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients with different non-bladder co-morbid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ming Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients, especially females, are more likely to have non-bladder co-morbidities, especially tension/migraine headache and localized myofascial pain. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis Patients with co-morbid irritable bowel syndrome are younger and more likely to have abnormal urodynamic findings.

  2. Detection of bladder cancer using proteomic profiling of urine sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Majewski

    Full Text Available We used protein expression profiles to develop a classification rule for the detection and prognostic assessment of bladder cancer in voided urine samples. Using the Ciphergen PBS II ProteinChip Reader, we analyzed the protein profiles of 18 pairs of samples of bladder tumor and adjacent urothelium tissue, a training set of 85 voided urine samples (32 controls and 53 bladder cancer, and a blinded testing set of 68 voided urine samples (33 controls and 35 bladder cancer. Using t-tests, we identified 473 peaks showing significant differential expression across different categories of paired bladder tumor and adjacent urothelial samples compared to normal urothelium. Then the intensities of those 473 peaks were examined in a training set of voided urine samples. Using this approach, we identified 41 protein peaks that were differentially expressed in both sets of samples. The expression pattern of the 41 protein peaks was used to classify the voided urine samples as malignant or benign. This approach yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 59% and 90%, respectively, on the training set and 80% and 100%, respectively, on the testing set. The proteomic classification rule performed with similar accuracy in low- and high-grade bladder carcinomas. In addition, we used hierarchical clustering with all 473 protein peaks on 65 benign voided urine samples, 88 samples from patients with clinically evident bladder cancer, and 127 samples from patients with a history of bladder cancer to classify the samples into Cluster A or B. The tumors in Cluster B were characterized by clinically aggressive behavior with significantly shorter metastasis-free and disease-specific survival.

  3. Exercise Decreases and Smoking Increases Bladder Cancer Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Michael A; White, Martha; Natarajan, Loki; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate modifiable lifestyle factors of smoking, exercise, and obesity with bladder cancer mortality. We used mortality-linked data from the National Health Information Survey from 1998 through 2006. The primary outcome was bladder cancer-specific mortality. The primary exposures were self-reported smoking status (never- vs. former vs. current smoker), self-reported exercise (dichotomized as "did no exercise" vs. "light, moderate, or vigorous exercise in ≥ 10-minute bouts"), and body mass index. We utilized multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models, with delayed entry to account for age at survey interview. Complete data were available on 222,163 participants, of whom 96,715 (44%) were men and 146,014 (66%) were non-Hispanic whites, and among whom we identified 83 bladder cancer-specific deaths. In multivariate analyses, individuals who reported any exercise were 47% less likely (adjusted hazard ratio [HR adj ], 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.96; P = .038) to die of bladder cancer than "no exercise". Compared with never-smokers, current (HR adj , 4.24; 95% CI, 1.89-9.65; P = .001) and former (HR adj , 2.95; 95% CI, 1.50-5.79; P = .002) smokers were 4 and 3 times more likely, respectively, to die of bladder cancer. There were no significant associations of body mass index with bladder cancer mortality. Exercise decreases and current smoking increases the risk of bladder cancer-specific mortality. These data suggest that exercise and smoking cessation interventions may reduce bladder cancer death. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Perineal hernia with bladder retroflexion in a female cocker spaniel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niles, J.D.; Williams, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Perineal herniation in the bitch is rare and its complication by bladder retroflexion in the bitch has not been previously reported in the literature. This case report describes a multigravid, five-year-old female cocker spaniel with bilateral perineal hernias, complicated by marked rectal sacculation and ventral bladder retroflexion. The case was managed initially by cystopexy and colopexy, followed seven days later by bilateral perineal herniorrhaphy. There was no recurrence of the problem by 12 months postsurgery

  5. Bladder cancer mortality after spinal cord injury over 4 decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Laura S; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Lloyd, L Keith

    2015-06-01

    We estimate bladder cancer mortality in people with spinal cord injury compared to the general population. Data and statistics were retrieved from the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center and the National Center for Health Statistics. The mortality experience of the 45,486 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury treated at a Spinal Cord Injury Model System or Shriners Hospital was compared to the general population using a standardized mortality ratio. The standardized mortality ratio data were further stratified by age, gender, race, time since injury and injury severity. Our study included 566,532 person-years of followup between 1960 and 2009, identified 10,575 deaths and categorized 99 deaths from bladder cancer. The expected number of deaths from bladder cancer would have been 14.8 if patients with spinal cord injury had the same bladder cancer mortality as the general population. Thus, the standardized mortality ratio is 6.7 (95% CI 5.4-8.1). Increased mortality risk from bladder cancer was observed for various ages, races and genders, as well as for those injured for 10 or more years and with motor complete injuries. Bladder cancer mortality was not significantly increased for ventilator users, those with motor incomplete injuries or those injured less than 10 years. Individuals with a spinal cord injury can potentially live healthier and longer by reducing the incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. Study findings highlight the need to identify at risk groups and contributing factors for bladder cancer death, leading to the development of prevention, screening and management strategies. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple urinary bladder masses from metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Choo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma that manifested with multiple exophytic intravesical masses, mimicking a multifocal primary bladder tumor. Biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis confirmed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated palliatively with external beam radiotherapy to prevent possible symptoms from local tumor progression. This case illustrates that when a patient with known prostate cancer presents with multifocal bladder tumors, the possibility of metastatic prostate cancer should be considered.

  7. Natural biology and management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Tyson, Mark D; Clark, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... helped triage patients but improved tools, including biomarkers, are still needed. Enhanced endoscopy with photodynamic imaging, narrow band imaging, optical coherence tomography and confocal laser endomicroscopy show promise for diagnosis, risk stratification and disease monitoring. Attempts at better...

  8. Outpatient diagnostic of bladder tumours in flexible cystoscopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Gregers G; Mogensen, Karin; Toft, Birgitte Grønkær

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) in flexible cystoscopes and the diagnostic quality of biopsies for diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the outpatients department (OPD).......The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) in flexible cystoscopes and the diagnostic quality of biopsies for diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the outpatients department (OPD)....

  9. An Unusual Case Of Urinary Bladder Arteriovenous Malformation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gnanappiragasam, D

    2016-07-01

    A 45-year-old male presented with haematuria and urinary frequency. Computed Tomography (CT) urogram revealed gross thickening of the left bladder wall. Histology showed large vessels cuffed by eosinophonilic material suggestive of urinary bladder arteriovenous malformation (AVM). No further intervention was carried out as symptoms resolve after the resection. Follow up rigid cystoscopy and CT at 3 months showed resolution of all visible pathology and no evidence of recurrence.

  10. Urinary Tract Infection in Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Yu.B. Bielan; T.A. Morozova

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Among all the diseases of the urinary system, microbial-inflammatory lesions dominate, their prevalence is 29 per 1,000 of child population. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction leads to the chronicity and recurrence of urinary tract infections. Objective. To study the etiologic spectrum in children with urinary tract infection associated with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study involved 434 children aged 4 to 15 years, who were hospitalized and out-patien...

  11. The bladder pain/interstitial cystitis symptom score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humphrey, Louise; Arbuckle, Rob; Moldwin, Rob

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to develop a self-report measure that reliably identifies moderate to severe bladder pain syndrome (BPS) patients for inclusion into clinical trials to assess the efficacy of new BPS treatments.......There is a need to develop a self-report measure that reliably identifies moderate to severe bladder pain syndrome (BPS) patients for inclusion into clinical trials to assess the efficacy of new BPS treatments....

  12. The Rare Togetherness of Bladder Leiomyoma and Neurofibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Yucel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (Von Recklinghausen disease is a common, autosomal dominant hereditary disorder characterized by involvement of multiple tissues derived from the neural crest. Urinary system involvement in neurofibromatosis is a rare condition. Leiomyoma of the bladder is a rare benign mesenchymal tumor. In this case, our experience and approach regarding the bladder leiomyoma development in a patient diagnosed with neurofibromatosis are presented and the literature data has been reviewed.

  13. Impact of Overactive Bladder Syndrome on Female Sexual Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Toksöz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of female sexual dysfunction includes psychological, physiological and iatrogenic causes. Physiological and iatrogenic causes are abdominal surgery, menopause, smoking, spinal cord injuries and some antipsychotic, antihypertensive, and antidepressant drugs. When assessing sexual function, sexual function questionnaires, such as the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Sexual Function Questionnaire are used. The prevalence of female sexual dysfunction is 43% and it has been reported to increase depending on menopause and age. Estrogen, estrogen + testosterone and tibolone, PDE5, apomorphine, bupropion and flibanserin are used in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction. Overactive bladder is a disease affecting the quality of life and is characterized by urgency, frequency, nocturia and urge incontinence with especially filling phase of the bladder resulting from loss of detrusor muscle inhibition. The prevalence of overactive bladder in women in the United States has been reported to be 16.9%. Lower urinary tract symptoms and overactive bladder syndrome are not known how to cause female sexual dysfunction. Menopause and partner status were the most important predictors for female sexual dysfunction. It has been reported that overactive bladder syndrome and urinary incontinence provide prediction of development of female sexual dysfunction. Shame, fear of incontinence, and urinary incontinence as well as urge sensation during sexual intercourse in individuals with overactive bladder syndrome have been reported to be the main factors causing female sexual dysfunction. Pathophysiological relationship between the two disorders has not been elucidated and further clinical and experimental studies are needed in this regard.

  14. Neuromodulation attenuates bladder hyperactivity in a rat cystitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Nickles, Angela; Nelson, Dwight E

    2013-12-06

    We investigated the regulation of urinary bladder function by electrical stimulation of the L6 spinal nerve (SN) using cystometry in normal rats and in rats with cystitis induced by intravesical infusion of dilute acetic acid. In anesthetized rats, a cannula was placed into the bladder dome for saline/acetic acid infusion and intravesical pressure monitoring. Threshold pressure (TP), basal pressure (BP) and inter-contraction interval (ICI) were measured from the bladder pressure recording and void volume (VV) was measured by weighing the voided fluid. Comparison of cystometrograms obtained with infusion of saline or acetic acid showed that acetic acid decreases TP, ICI and VV. These excitatory effects, characteristic of acetic acid induced bladder hyperactivity, were significantly reversed by bilateral SN stimulation (P Hz and at motor threshold (0.19 ± 0.01 milliamps) increased ICI (265%) and VV (217%). In rats perfused with acetic acid, the corresponding increases produced by SN stimulation were 350% for ICI and 383% for VV. The percentage increases in the acetic acid-treated group were not significantly higher than those in saline-treated group. Using continuous flow cystyometry, we find that SN stimulation can produce effects on micturition consistent with its effects on isovolumetric model, and consistent with the therapeutic effect observed with InterStim® therapy in overactive bladder patients. Although the effect of SN stimulation was slightly greater in bladder irritated over normal rats, the difference was not statistically significant.

  15. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chiu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A, derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC. However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC.

  16. Four cases of spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Toshiyasu; Miwa, Sotaro; Takashima, Hiroshi; Takemae, Katsuro

    2002-01-01

    Between November 1997 and March 2001, 4 female patients from 44 to 65 years of age with a spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder were analyzed. They complained of abdominal pain and had undergone an intra-pelvic gynecological operation (3 for uterine cancer, 1 for an ovarian cyst) several years before. The three with uterine cancer had also received radiation therapy. For their present condition, spontaneous urinary bladder rupture, their treatment was indwelling a urethral catheter. Two of them have had no recurrence of urinary bladder rupture after one month since having the urethral catheter indwelt. One, however, had to have the catheter re-indwelt due to unsuccessful suturing of the urinary bladder wall. The fourth patient had bilateral nephrostomy tubes due to severe radiation cystitis. Thus, one can infer that intra-pelvic gynecological operations and radiation therapy are major factors causing spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. While indwelling a urethral catheter may be effective for some patients with a spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder, it may be very difficult to treat more complicated cases. (author)

  17. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Bin; Tai, Huai-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Birder, Lori A

    2016-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC.

  18. Preclinical dosimetry of magnetic fluid hyperthermia for bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea; Etienne, Wiguins; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-02-01

    Background Despite positive efficacy, thermotherapy is not widely used in clinical oncology. Difficulties associated with field penetration and controlling power deposition patterns in heterogeneous tissue have limited its use for heating deep in the body. Heat generation using iron-oxide super-paramagnetic nanoparticles excited with magnetic fields has been demonstrated to overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this preclinical study is to investigate the feasibility of treating bladder cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Methods The bladders of 25 female rats were injected with 0.4 ml of Actium Biosystems magnetite-based nanoparticles (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) via catheters inserted in the urethra. To assess the distribution of nanoparticles in the rat after injection we used the 7 T small animal MRI system (Bruker ClinScan, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany). Heat treatments were performed with a small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) with a goal of raising bladder temperature to 42°C in 1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that a MFH system provides well-localized heating of rat bladder with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues.

  19. Multiple imaging procedures including MRI for the bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikata, Noriharu; Suzuki, Makoto; Takeuchi, Takumi; Kunisawa, Yositaka; Fukutani, Keiko; Kawabe, Kazuki

    1986-01-01

    Endoscopic photography, double contrast cystography, transurethral echography, X-ray CT scan, and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) were utilized for the staging diagnosis of the four patients with carcinoma of the bladder. In the first case, a 70-year-old man, since all of the five imaging procedures suggested a superficial and pedunculated tumor, his bladder cancer was considered T1. The classification of stage T3 carcinoma was made for the second 86-year-old male. Because all of his imaging examinations showed a tumor infiltrating deep muscle and penetrating the bladder wall. The third case was a 36-year-old male. His clinical stage was diagnosed as T2 or T3a by cystophotography, double contrast cystogram, ultrasonography, and X-ray CT scan. However, MRI showed only thickened bladder wall and the infiltrating tumor could not be distinguished from the hypertrophic wall. The last patient, a 85-year-old female, had a smaller Ta cancer. Her double contrast cystography revealed the small tumor at the lateral bladder wall. But, the tumor could not be detected by transaxial, sagittal and coronal scans. Multiple imaging procedures combining MRI and staging diagnosis of the bladder carcinoma were discussed. (author)

  20. [A Case of Primary Schwannoma of the Urinary Bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Waku, Natsui; Kawai, Koji; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kimura, Tomokazu; Ishitsuka, Ryutaro; Kojima, Takahiro; Suetomi, Takahiro; Joraku, Akira; Miyazaki, Jun; Sakashita, Mai; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented with a bladder tumor. She was asymptomatic, and the tumor was incidentally detected with radiological imaging performed during treatment of cervical cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed a solitary submucosal tumor located in the anterior wall of the urinary bladder, with homogeneous contrast enhancement. Cystoscopy showed a submucosal tumor covered by normal mucosa. A paraganglioma was considered in the differential diagnosis, but symptoms suggesting hypercatecholaminemia were not apparent. Moreover, she did not have a family history or symptoms associated with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1). She underwent partial cystectomy with a preliminary diagnosis of submucosal bladder tumor. Histopathological diagnosis confirmed a schwannoma arising from the bladder wall. She was followed up without intravesical recurrence or metastases for 6 months. In the literature, only 12 cases of bladder schwannoma have been reported. There was no reported family history or symptoms associated with NF-1 in any of the cases. Although the number of cases is limited, literature review showed a favorable prognosis for bladder schwannoma with local tumor resection in patients without NF-1.

  1. Surgical outcome of carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sun, Zhao-Li; Montgomey, Robert A; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma, which comprises less than one percent of all gall bladder neoplasms, is characterized by the presence of variable proportions of carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements. Recently, several reports have described patients suffering from carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder. However, there are no large studies regarding the clinicopathologic features, therapeutic management, and surgical outcome of this disease because the number of patients who undergo resection of gall bladder carcinosarcoma at a single institution is limited. A Medline search was performed using the keywords ‘gall bladder’ and ‘carcinosarcoma’. Additional articles were obtained from references within the papers identified by the Medline search. Optimal adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy protocols for carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder have not been established. Curative surgical resection offers the only chance for long-term survival from this disease. The outcome of 36 patients who underwent surgical resection for carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder was poor; the 3-year overall survival rate was only 31.0% and the median survival time was 7.0 mo. Since the postoperative prognosis of carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder is worse than that of adenocarcinoma, new adjuvant chemotherapies and/or radiation techniques are essential for improvement of surgical outcome. PMID:19842216

  2. Tumor motion and deformation during external radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, Heidi T.; Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.; Duppen, Joop C.; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: First, to quantify bladder-tumor motion in 3 dimensions during a 4-week to 5-week course of external radiotherapy. Second, to relate the motion to the tumor location on the bladder wall. Third, to extensively evaluate gross tumor volume (GTV) shape and volume changes during the course of the treatment. Methods and Materials: Multiple repeat computed tomography (CT) images were obtained for 21 bladder cancer patients. These scans were matched to the rigid bony anatomy. For each patient, the main direction and magnitude of the tumor movement was determined by use of principle-component analysis. To study GTV shape changes, all GTVs were registered to the GTV in the planning CT scan, and the residual shape errors were determined by measurement of edge variations perpendicular to the median surface. Results: Gross tumor volume translations were largest in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior direction (SD, 0.1 to ∼0.9 cm). The translations were strongly correlated with the tumor location on the bladder wall. The average value of the local standard deviations of the GTV shape ranged from 0.1 to approximately 0.35 cm. Conclusions: Despite large differences in bladder filling, variations in GTV shape were small compared with variations in GTV position. Geometric uncertainties in the GTV position depended strongly on the tumor location on the bladder wall

  3. [Multicenter case-control study of the relationship between smoking and bladder cancer in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qi-Shan; He, Hui-Chan; Cai, Chao; Chen, Jia-Hong; Han, Zhao-Dong; Qin, Guo-Qiang; Liang, Yu-Xiang; Zhong, Wei-de

    2011-09-13

    To explore the relationship between smoking and bladder cancer in China. A multicenter case-control study was conducted from September 2005 to June 2008. A total of 432 bladder cancer patients, matched with 392 control cases, received a questionnaire including the type of exposure (active vs. passive smoking), the age of beginning and/or quitting smoking, smoking amount and time and depth of smoke inhalation. Both active smoking and passive smoking increased the incidence of bladder cancer (P Smoke amount and time were significantly correlated with bladder cancer risk (P smoking did not affect the bladder cancer risk (P > 0.05). Inhaling smoke into mouth or throat was also a risk factor for bladder cancer (P smoking and bladder cancer. Active and passive smoking, smoke amount and time, and the depth of smoke inhalation are risk factors for bladder cancer. The best way of preventing bladder cancer is never smoking.

  4. High resolution photoacoustic imaging of microvasculature in normal and cancerous bladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhixing; Roberts, William; Carson, Paul L.; Liu, Xiaojun; Tao, Chao; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    We explored the potential of an emerging laser-based technology, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), for bladder cancer diagnosis through high resolution imaging of microvasculature in the interior bladder tissues. Images of ex vivo canine bladders demonstrated the excellent ability of PAI to map three-dimensional microvasculature in optically scattering bladder tissues. By comparing the results from human bladder specimens affected by cancer to those from the normal control, the feasibility of PAI in differentiating malignant from benign bladder tissues was explored. The reported distinctive morphometric characteristics of tumor microvasculature can be seen in the images from cancer samples, suggesting that PAI may allow in vivo assessment of neoangiogenesis that is closely associated with bladder cancer generation and progression. By presenting subsurface morphological and physiological information in bladder tissues, PAI, when performed in a similar way to that in conventional endoscopy, provides an opportunity for improved diagnosis, staging and treatment guidance of bladder cancer.

  5. Development and validation of the Chinese Overactive Bladder Symptom Score for assessing overactive bladder syndrome in a RESORT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Jung Hung

    2013-05-01

    Conclusion: The Chinese OABSS has been developed and validated as a reliable instrument for assessing OAB symptoms. OABSS can be an alternative to, but not a replacement for, a 3-day bladder diary for assessing patients.

  6. [Neurology and the bladder: how to assess and manage neurogenic bladder dysfunction. With particular references to neural control of micturition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyusaki, Yohei; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Bladder dysfunctions are one of the most common features seen in the failure of the autonomic nervous system. Among those, overactive bladder (urinary urgency and frequency) worsens quality of life of the patients, and a large amount of post-voiding residual urine or urinary retention causes urinary tract infection, kidney dysfunction, and may bring renal failure. In the present paper we discussed neural control of micturition and how to assess it. Also, we proposed appropriate management of bladder dysfunction in elderly white matter lesions (a common cause of OAB) and diabetic neuropathy (a usual pathology underlying urinary retention). For OAB, anti-cholinergics are the mainstay, whereas for the pathological post-voiding residual urine or urinary retention, alpha-blockers, cholinergic agents and clean, intermittent self-catheterization are the choice. Treatment of bladder dysfunctions is the important target for maximizing patients' quality of life.

  7. Novel multisensor probe for monitoring bladder temperature during locoregional chemohyperthermia for nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: technical feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordeiro, Ernesto R.; Geijsen, Debby E.; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Schooneveldt, Gerben; Sijbrands, Jan; Hulshof, Maarten C.; de la Rosette, Jean; de Reijke, Theo M.; Crezee, Hans

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of locoregional hyperthermia combined with intravesical instillation of mitomycin C to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is currently investigated in clinical trials. Clinically effective locoregional

  8. Histological aspects of the bladder in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to study pathological data from bladders of systemic lupus erythematosus patients, correlate them to clinical events and the use of therapeutic drugs, and compare them to bladder histopathological findings in individuals not affected by systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods: thirty-nine out or inpatients of the Department of Rheumatology at Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus were clinically and cystoscopically evaluated. Bladder biopsy was also performed. As a normal parameter, bladders taken from 20 corpses collected at the Death Verification Department  of São Paulo city, without autolysis or evidence of urinary tract or autoimmune disease were also histologically studied. This group was considered as a Control Group. A correlation among clinical, cystoscopic and histopathological data was carried out. Rresults: the patients’ mean age was 29 years (range 13-62. Thirty-six were females and three were males. Twenty-five patients were asymptomatic during the study period. In the Control Group the age range was 20-65 years. Nineteen were females (95% and one was male (5%. Cystoscopic examination of the group with systemic lupus erythematosus showed interstitial pattern in 16 cases (41.0% and normal in 15 (38.5%. The bladder was normal in four patients (10.3%. Chronic unspecific cystitis was observed in 18 (46.2% patients. In the remaining, several alterations were found, including bladder vasculitis in seven patients (17.9%. The mean number of mast cells in the bladder area was 2.223/mm2. In the Control Group, unspecific cystitis was found in three cases (15.0%. No other abnormalities were found. The mean number of mast cells in this group was 0.777/mm2 (±2.7. Chronic unspecific cystitis, bladder vasculitis and the mean number of mast cells were compared with each other and no statistical differences were found (p > 0.05. There were

  9. Stimulation of the pelvic nerve increases bladder capacity in the prostaglandin E2rat model of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdale, Christopher L; Hokanson, James A; Sridhar, Arun; Grill, Warren M

    2017-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is a highly prevalent condition that may lead to medical complications and decreased quality of life. Emerging therapies focusing on selective electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves associated with lower urinary tract function may provide improved efficacy and reduced side effects compared with sacral neuromodulation for the treatment of OAB symptoms. Prior studies investigating the effects of pelvic nerve (PelN) stimulation on lower urinary tract function were focused on promoting bladder contractions, and it is unclear whether selective stimulation of the PelN would be beneficial for the treatment of OAB. Therefore our motivation was to test the hypothesis that PelN stimulation would increase bladder capacity in the prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) rat model of OAB. Cystometry experiments were conducted in 17 urethane-anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of intravesical PGE 2 vs. vehicle and PelN stimulation after intravesical PGE 2 on cystometric parameters were quantified. Intravesical infusion of PGE 2 resulted in decreased bladder capacity and increased voiding efficiency without a change in bladder contraction area under the curve, maximum contraction pressure, or contraction duration. Bladder capacity was also significantly decreased compared with vehicle (1% ethanol in saline) confirming that the change in bladder capacity was mediated by PGE 2 PelN stimulation reversed the PGE 2 -induced change in bladder capacity and increased the external urethral sphincter electromyogram activity at a specific stimulation condition (amplitude of 1.0 times threshold at 10 Hz). These results confirm that the urodynamic changes reported in conscious rats are also observed under urethane anesthesia and that PelN stimulation is a novel and promising approach for the treatment of the symptoms of OAB. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Outcome of urinary bladder recurrence after partial cystectomy for en bloc urinary bladder adherent colorectal cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao Lun; Tsai, Kai Lung; Lin, Shung Eing; Chiang, Po Hui

    2013-05-01

    Around 10 % of colorectal cancers are locally advanced at diagnosis. There are higher incidences for sigmoid and rectal cancer adhered to urinary bladder (UB) rather than other segments of colon cancer. Surgeons often performed partial cystectomy as possible for preservation of patient's life quality. This study investigates prognostic factors in patients who underwent bladder preservation en bloc resection for UB adherent colorectal cancer. From 2000 to 2011, 123 patients with clinically UB involvement colorectal cancer underwent primary colorectal cancer with urinary bladder resection. Seventeen patients were excluded because of the concurrent distant metastasis at diagnosis and another 22 patients were excluded because of total cystectomy with uretero-ileal urinary diversion. Finally, 84 patients with clinical stage IIIC (T4bN0M0, according to AJCC 7th edition) that underwent en bloc colorectal cancer resection with partial cystectomy were enrolled into this study for further analysis. Preoperative colovesical fistula and positive CT result were significantly more in the urinary bladder invasion group (p = 0.043 and 0.010, respectively). Pathological UB invasion is an independent predictor of intravesical recurrence (p = 0.04; HR, 10.71; 95 % CI = 1.12∼102.94) and distant metastasis (p = 0.016; HR, 4.85; 95 % CI = 1.34 ∼ 17.53) in multivariate analysis. For bladder preservation en bloc resection of urinary bladder adherent colorectal cancer, the pathological urinary bladder invasion is significantly associated with more urinary bladder recurrence and distant metastasis. This result helps surgeons make decisions at surgical planning and establish follow-up protocol.

  11. Bladder preservation by concurrent chemoradiation for muscle-invasive bladder cancer: Applicability in low-income countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khader, J.; Salem, A.; Farah, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for patients with muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer; however, is associated with major treatment - related morbidity. Furthermore, a significant proportion of patients are deemed unsuitable for surgery due to inoperability, advanced age, and/or comorbid conditions. As such, several groups have explored effectiveness of less radical therapeutic strategies that aim at bladder preservation. Nonetheless, there is scarcity of reports assessing the applicability of urinary bladder-sparing outside developed countries. Aim: Determine the achievable outcomes for patients with muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer treated via bladder-sparing techniques in a low income country. Materials and methods: Fourteen consecutive patients with a diagnosis of muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer (clinical stage; T2-3N0M0) were treated via a bladder-sparing approach at King Hussein Cancer Center (Amman, Jordan) between 2005 and 2009. Records were electronically retrieved and retrospectively analyzed and included 11 males and 3 females from 41 to 74 years of age (median age, 61). Initial therapy consisted of trans-urethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by induction chemotherapy then irradiation (4500 cGy) with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. Urological evaluation directed additional therapy in a proportion of patients with irradiation (up to 6400 cGy) in patients who achieved CR. Results: Eleven patients were evaluable for pathological response at time of re-staging; of whom 8 (73%) achieved CR and 3 (27%) achieved partial response (PR). In all but one patient; combined-modality treatment was well tolerated. After a median follow-up of 18.5 months (range, 3 - 48 months); 5 of 8 (62.5%) patients with CR were alive. (authors)

  12. Understanding the gender disparity in bladder cancer risk: The impact of sex hormones and liver on bladder susceptibility to carcinogens

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuesheng

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that bladder cancer (BC) incidence is approximately 4-fold higher in men than in women in the US, and a similar disparity also exists in other countries. The reason for this phenomenon is not known, which impedes progress in BC prevention. However, BC incidence is also significantly higher in male animals than in their female counterparts after treatment with aromatic amines, which are principal human bladder carcinogens. These animal studies and related studies in the ...

  13. Should simultaneous ureteral reimplantation be performed during sigmoid bladder augmentation to reduce vesicoureteral reflux in neurogenic bladder cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Yong; Wu, Zhi-jin; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Chao-hua; Zhang, Xiao-dong

    2015-05-01

    To assess the necessity of performing simultaneous collateral reimplantation during sigmoid bladder augmentation (SBA) to reduce vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in low-compliance neuropathic bladder with associated VUR. We retrospectively identified 31 patients who underwent SBA alone or with simultaneous ureteral reimplantation at our hospital. The video urodynamics data, VUR status, renal function, and clinical symptoms were studied during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 57 months (range 12-117). All patients displayed significantly increased safe cystometric capacity (P bladder compliance (P bladder volumes due to augmentation. The patients' improving renal function benefited most from the enlarged bladder and partly from increased antireflux resistance of vesico-ureter anastomosis. Twelve (38.7%) had recurrent febrile urinary tract infection after SBA, and one (3.2%) suffered from vesico-ureter anastomosis contracture after ureteral reimplantation. A preoperative intravesical VUR pressure of 20 cmH2O is not an effective cutoff point for whether ureteral reimplantation should be simultaneously performed during SBA. Augmentation appears to be more important than reimplantation for protecting kidney from damage due to febrile urinary tract infection after SBA. Simultaneous reimplantation may be not necessary during SBA in neurogenic bladder.

  14. Long-term survival of bladder preservation therapy with radiation and chemotherapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Sumio; Takase, Kazunori; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Masuda, Mitsunobu; Yao, Masahiro; Hosaka, Masahiko

    1998-01-01

    The prognoses and prognostic factors of the 54 patients with locally invasive bladder cancer who underwent bladder preservation therapy at Yokohama City University Hospital between 1977 and 1995 were analyzed statistically. The therapeutic modalities of bladder preservation were mainly radiation or chemotherapy. The prognosis for the patients who underwent bladder preservation therapy was worse than that for the patients who underwent total cystectomy. The prognostic factors of these patients were size and grade of tumor, presence of hydronephrosis and performance status (PS) of the patients by univariate analysis. Tumor grade was the most predictable prognostic factor using multivariate analysis. Only 17 patients survived more than 5 years after treatment; 78% of the survivors had good PS (0 or 1). Five of them died of cancer and two patients were alive with cancer. All of them had G3 tumors. These results suggest that patients with locally invasive G2 tumor could be candiates for bladder preservation therapy and patients who underwent bladder preservation therapy should be evaluated at 10 years post-therapy. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the NMP22 BladderChek test for detecting bladder cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijie; Que, Hongliang; Suo, Chuanjian; Han, Zhijian; Tao, Jun; Huang, Zhengkai; Ju, Xiaobin; Tan, Ruoyun; Gu, Min

    2017-11-21

    We examined the usefulness of the nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22) BladderChek test for detecting bladder cancer. A literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. The diagnostic accuracy of the NMP22 BladderChek test was evaluated via pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under curve (AUC). Inter-study heterogeneity was explored using meta-regression and subgroup analyses. We included 23 studies in the systematic review and 19 in the quantitative meta-analysis. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 56% (52-59%) and 88% (87-89%), respectively; pooled PLR and NLR were 4.36 (3.02-6.29) and 0.51 (0.40-0.66), respectively; DOR was 9.29 (5.55-15.55) with an AUC of 0.8295. The mean sensitivity for Ta, T1, ≥ T2, Tis, G1, G2, and G3 disease was 13.68%, 29.49%, 74.03%, 34.62%, 44.16%, 56.25%, and 67.34%, respectively. The NMP22 BladderChek test shows good discrimination ability for detecting bladder cancer and a high-specificity algorithm that can be used for early detection to rule out patients with higher bladder cancer risk. It also has better potential for screening higher-grade and higher-stage tumors, and better diagnostic performance in Asians.

  16. Understanding the gender disparity in bladder cancer risk: the impact of sex hormones and liver on bladder susceptibility to carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuesheng

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that bladder cancer (BC) incidence is approximately four-fold higher in men than in women in the United States, and a similar disparity also exists in other countries. The reason for this phenomenon is not known, which impedes progress in BC prevention. However, BC incidence is also significantly higher in male animals than in their female counterparts after treatment with aromatic amines, which are principal human bladder carcinogens. These animal studies and related studies in the context of available human data provide significant insight into what may drive the excessive BC risk in men, which is the focus of this article. The carcinogenicity and biotransformation of bladder carcinogens as well as the impact of sex hormones on these processes are discussed, highlighting the novel concept that the gender disparity in BC risk may result primarily from the interplay of androgen, estrogen, and liver, with the liver functioning via its metabolic enzymes as the main decider of bladder exposure to carcinogens in the urine and the male and female hormones exerting opposing effects on carcinogenesis in the bladder and likely also on liver enzymes handling bladder carcinogens. The findings may facilitate further investigation into the mechanism of gender disparity in BC risk and may also have important implications for BC prevention.

  17. Urothelial Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder in Young Adults — Clinical Experience at Taipei Veterans General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ching Wen

    2005-06-01

    Conclusion: Urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder in young adults is usually associated with low grade and low stage. Invasive bladder cancer had no worse a survival rate than superficial bladder cancer.

  18. Comparison of ultrasound and computed tomography in staging of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Bunzo

    1982-01-01

    Preoperative staging of bladder cancer is very important for decision of treating methods and prognostication. The present author used ultrasound via the abdominal wall in the diagnosis of 83 patients with bladder cancer. I estimated the extent of bladder tumor infiltration by ultrasound via the abdominal wall according to Shiraishi's criteria. Ultrasound scans, pelvic angiograms and CT scans were reviewed to determine their accuracy in staging of bladder tumors. Ultrasound scans were excellent in staging of non-infiltrated bladder tumors, while pelvic angiograms and CT scans were excellent in staging of infiltrated bladder tumors. (author)

  19. [Bladder dysfunction and surgery in the small pelvis. Therapeutic possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberger, B

    2003-12-01

    The more extensive a surgical procedure in a small pelvis, the higher the risk for the lower urinary tract with its nerve supply and nerve plexus. This concerns mainly the sympathetic chains, the parasympathetic structures and, rarely, the visceral supply of the pelvic floor. Direct trauma to the bladder and its vascular supply as well as indirect injury by displacement of the bladder need to be seriously considered. Problems with micturition and impaired storage capacity of the bladder are the result. Complete urodynamic examination and follow-up can help in differentiating between temporary and persisting disturbances and in taking therapeutical decisions. The most evident postoperative complication is disturbed micturition, managed initially by suprapubic urinary diversion, followed as soon as possible by intermittent self-catheterisation. This is the only way to avoid overstretching of the bladder, recurring urinary tract infection and damage to the upper urinary tract. Restoration of spontaneous micturition can be supported by drug treatment with parasympatholytics and/or alpha-blockers if the measured bladder pressure and residual urine are within tolerable limits. For electrostimulation of micturition, intravesical therapy, although timeconsuming, is best suited because it can easily be done on an outpatient basis. More promising seems bilateral sacral neuromodulation, which, however, is a rather complicated and expensive procedure. Surgical procedures to reduce the voiding resistance of the bladder involve the risk of postoperative incontinence because the sphincter function in those patients is often disturbed too. Persisting problems with bladder storage capacity as a result of tumor surgery in the small pelvis are frequently secondary to retention of urine (overflow incontinence). In these cases, regular evacuation of the bladder by intermittent self-catheterisation can lead to social acceptance. Reduced bladder compliance and lowering of the urethral

  20. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saban, Marcia R; Wu, Xue-Ru; Saban, Ricardo; Towner, Rheal; Smith, Nataliya; Abbott, Andrew; Neeman, Michal; Davis, Carole A; Simpson, Cindy; Maier, Julie; Mémet, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatics form a second circulatory system that drains the extracellular fluid and proteins from the tumor microenvironment, and provides an exclusive environment in which immune cells interact and respond to foreign antigen. Both cancer and inflammation are known to induce lymphangiogenesis. However, little is known about bladder lymphatic vessels and their involvement in cancer formation and progression. A double transgenic mouse model was generated by crossing a bladder cancer-induced transgenic, in which SV40 large T antigen was under the control of uroplakin II promoter, with another transgenic mouse harboring a lacZ reporter gene under the control of an NF-κB-responsive promoter (κB-lacZ) exhibiting constitutive activity of β-galactosidase in lymphatic endothelial cells. In this new mouse model (SV40-lacZ), we examined the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and function (LVF) during bladder cancer progression. LVD was performed in bladder whole mounts and cross-sections by fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC) using LYVE-1 antibody. LVF was assessed by real-time in vivo imaging techniques using a contrast agent (biotin-BSA-Gd-DTPA-Cy5.5; Gd-Cy5.5) suitable for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, IHC of Cy5.5 was used for time-course analysis of co-localization of Gd-Cy5.5 with LYVE-1-positive lymphatics and CD31-positive blood vessels. SV40-lacZ mice develop bladder cancer and permitted visualization of lymphatics. A significant increase in LVD was found concomitantly with bladder cancer progression. Double labeling of the bladder cross-sections with LYVE-1 and Ki-67 antibodies indicated cancer-induced lymphangiogenesis. MRI detected mouse bladder cancer, as early as 4 months, and permitted to follow tumor sizes during cancer progression. Using Gd-Cy5.5 as a contrast agent for MRI-guided lymphangiography, we determined a possible reduction of lymphatic flow within the tumoral area. In addition, NIRF

  1. Are we accurately predicting bladder capacity in infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel F.G.; Lavallée, Luke T.; Dubois, Claude; Leonard, Michael; Guerra, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Estimating bladder capacity is an important component in the evaluation of many urological disorders. For estimates to be of clinical value, precise reference ranges are needed. While accepted reference ranges have been established in adults and older children, none have been validated in infants. We endeavour to determine the normal bladder capacity of children less than 1 year of age. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of children aged 0 to 12 months with cutaneous stigmata of spinal dysraphism who were referred to the urology clinic to rule out tethered cord between October 2004 and July 2011. Patients with normal urologic assessment, who did not have surgery during the time they were followed, were included in the study cohort. Urodynamic studies were performed using the Laborie Medical Technologies UDS-600. Bladder filling occurred via a catheter at a rate of 10% of the expected total bladder capacity/minute. Bladder capacity was defined as the volume of filling when the child voided around the catheter. We collected data, including age at urodynamics, bladder capacity, detrusor pressure at capacity, bladder compliance and length of follow-up. Result: In total, 46% (84/183) of patients had a normal urologic assessment and met the inclusion criteria. The median age was 9.0 months (interquartile range [IQR] 6.8–11.0). The average bladder capacity was 48.9 mL (standard deviation [SD] 32.8) and the mean detrusor pressure at capacity was 8.5 cmH2O (SD 10.0). Mean compliance was 14.1 mL/cmH2O (SD 13.6). The average length of follow-up was 40.7 months (SD 26.2) and during this interval no patients were found to have urologic or neurologic abnormalities and none underwent tethered cord release. Conclusion: Bladder capacity in infants with a median age of 9.0 months was found to be 48.9 mL. This is less than half of the volume predicted by a commonly employed formula. A novel method of estimating bladder capacity in infants is required

  2. Solifenacin in overactive bladder syndrome: pharmacoeconomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iannazzo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The overactive bladder (OAB syndrome can be treated with behavioural, surgical and/or pharmaceutical interventions, mainly represented by antimuscarinic drugs. Solifenacin is a new antimuscarinic with selectivity for the bladder and it demonstrated good effectiveness, safety and tolerability. Scope of the present study is to investigate the pharmacoeconomic performance of the treatment with solifenacin, when compared to tolterodine and placebo, in Italian patients with OAB. The economic evaluation is performed with a simulation model, based on a Markov chain. The time horizon of the simulation is 52 weeks, with a 1-week cycle. The model simulates the outcomes and costs of the treatment with solifenacin (5 mg/die, tolterodine ER (4 mg/die and no treatment in a cohort representative of the Italian population with OAB (estimated in about 1,400 thousands patients. The cost analysis is conducted mainly in the perspective of the patient, since drugs for the treatment of OAB are currently not included in the Italian reimbursement list. The results show that both treatments produce significative improvements in symptoms and quality of life, with an increase in costs of about 540-640 Euro/year with solifenacin and of 680-780 Euro/year with tolterodine. In the cost-utility analysis, solifenacin dominates tolterodine since it results more effective and less costly, and its cost cost-utility ratio with respect to no treatment is in the range 7,600-18,600 Euro/QALY. In the subgroup of patients incontinent at baseline and who best respond to the therapy (responders, the increase in costs with solifenacin results of about 100-400 Euro/year and the cost-utility ratio is 600-4,200 Euro/QALY. A supplementary scenario has been elaborated to explore the consequences of a hypothetical reimbursement decision by the Italian NHS. In this scenario, the NHS cost perspective is considered and the antimuscarinic drugs are assumed to be reimbursed at a half of the current

  3. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinski, Ronald W.; Siegel, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB) that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or without

  4. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W Glinski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS, have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or

  5. Bladder wall biomechanics: A comprehensive study on fresh porcine urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sami Jokandan, Maryam; Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Edinger, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    on viscoelastic properties of fresh porcine urinary BW. Three testing modes including Uniaxial tensile, Ball-burst (BB) and Dynamic Mechanical Analyses (DMA) were applied in parallel. Uniaxial tests were applied to study how different circumferential and longitudinal cut-outs of lateral region of BW behave under......, the anisotropic behavior of bladder was evident at strain loads higher than 200%. According to DMA, storage modulus was found to be consistently higher than loss modulus in both directions, revealing the elasticity of the BW. The stress-strain curves of both uniaxial and BB tests showed similar trends. However...

  6. Should the bladder be full or empty during gynecologic brachytherapy applications? A bladder dose volume histogram analysis and implications for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Lewandowski, Loretta A.; Higgins, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic radiation cystitis is an uncommon but debilitating late complication of definitive external beam (EB) and brachytherapy (BT) for cervix cancer. During BT an indwelling catheter is usually placed in the bladder, collapsing it closer to the BT sources. We have devised a method to deliver BT with a full bladder. The difference in bladder dose in the full and empty state were analyzed during definitive EBT and BT for cervix cancer. Methods: The technique of Lyman and Wolbarst (1) were used to evaluate the bladder complication probability for a representative cervix cancer patient undergoing EBT and BT. DVHs were generated from CT scans obtained with a full and empty bladder. Three possible dose prescriptions were analyzed. Results: The DVH for the full and empty situations are shown. With the bladder full, the volume of bladder predicted to receive ≥ 80 Gy was approximately 10% for all dose schemes evaluated, whereas with the bladder empty, up to 50% of the bladder volume received ≥ 80 Gy. Conclusions: A distended bladder improves the DVH. A technique for performing full bladder LDR brachytherapy will be discussed

  7. The role of oxidative stress in bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sawicka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The review of the knowledge concerning the impact of oxidative and nitrosative stress on signaling pathways and transcription factors involved in the formation of bladder cancer was prepared. In the industrialized countries, bladder cancer is the fourth most frequently occurring malignant tumors. Recent studies indicate the involvement of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the formation and development of this disease. Red-ox disorders are characteristic for both, the initiation and progression of bladder cancer. There are observed changes in the activity of transcription factors, such as nuclear factor NF-kB; transcription factors: AP-1, Nrf2 and STAT3 and hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1α. In addition, studies indicate a role for oxidative stress in the regulation of MAPK cascade and its involvement in carcinogenesis consisting bladder. Examples of kinases belonging to the MAPK family are ERK kinases, which expression is proportional to the severity and malignant of bladder cancer. Nitric oxide also plays an important role in tumor biology. Overproduction of NO can both inhibit and promote tumor growth, depending on its concentration, duration of action and tumor microenvironment. Numerous studies show that the bladder cancer is characterized by an intensified production of NO. Reactive forms of nitrogen, similar to oxygen free radicals, could cause oxidative and nitrosative damage to DNA and have capacity to post-translational modification of proteins. In contrast to the ROS, which overproduction result from exposure to carcinogenic xenobiotic, nitrogen oxide in high level is produced during inflammation. Sustained iNOS activity therefore plays an important role in carcinogenesis associated with the inflammatory response, characteristic also for bladder cancer.

  8. Effect of diabetes on the ion pumps of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Seham

    2013-01-01

    To establish whether the activities of Na+/K+-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and Ca2+-ATPases ion pumps in bladder smooth muscle are altered as a consequence of diabetes and, if so, how this might contribute to bladder cystopathy. Urinary bladder dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with diabetes. Pressure generation requires calcium and cytosolic ATP. Activities of these pumps are responsible for calcium homeostasis. Rat urinary detrusor muscle strips were suspended in organ baths containing Krebs solution for isometric tension recording. Tissue responses to the Na+/K+-ATPase pump inhibitor, ouabain, the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, vanadate, and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), were examined from normal and streptozocin-induced diabetic rats for 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Ouabain, vanadate, and CPA caused concentration-dependent contractions of bladder strips from diabetic and normal rats. The degree of contraction of diabetic bladder muscle was lower than that of controls. This reduction was a function of duration of diabetes. For ouabain, the reduction peaked at 2 weeks, with partial restoration to normal after diabetes induction. For vanadate and CPA, the reduction increased with the duration of diabetes. The ion pumps are important modulators of bladder smooth muscle tone, and in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, the activity of these pumps is impaired. Although this is only a single model of diabetes, these findings suggest that a defect in these pumps may be an important component of the development of diabetic bladder cystopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Outlines on nanotechnologies applied to bladder tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, C

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering technologies are more and more expanding as consequence of recent developments in the field of biomaterial science and nanotechnology research. An important issue in designing scaffold materials is that of recreating the ECM (extra-cellular matrix) functional features - particularly ECM-derived complex molecule signalling - to mimic its capability of directing cell-growth and neotissue morphogenesis. In this way the nanotechnology may offer intriguing chances, biomaterial nanoscale-based scaffold geometry behaving as nanomechanotransducer complex interacting with different cell nanosize proteins, especially with those of cell surface mechanoreceptors. To fabricate 3D-scaffold complex architectures, endowed with controlled geometry and functional properties, bottom-up approaches, based on molecular self-assembling of small building polymer units, are used, sometimes functionalizing them by incorporation of bioactive peptide sequences such as RDG (arginine - glycine - aspartic acid, a cell-integrin binding domain of fibronectin), whereas the top-down approaches are useful to fabricate micro/nanoscale structures, such as a microvasculature within an existing complex bioarchitecture. Synthetic polymer-based nanofibers, produced by electrospinning process, may be used to create fibrous scaffolds that can facilitate, given their nanostructured geometry and surface roughness, cell adhesion and growth. Also bladder tissue engineering may benefit by nanotechnology advances to achieve a better reliability of the bladder engineered tissue. Particularly, bladder smooth muscle cell adhesion to nanostructured polymeric surfaces is significantly enhanced in comparison with that to conventional biomaterials. Moreover nanostructured surfaces of bladder engineered tissue show a decreased calcium stone production. In a bladder tumor animal model, the dispersion of carbon nanofibers in a polymeric scaffold-based tissue engineered replacement neobladder, appears to

  10. Mortality after bladder augmentation in children with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Konrad M; Misseri, Rosalia; Whittam, Benjamin; Adams, Cyrus M; Kirkegaard, Jordan; King, Shelly; Kaefer, Martin; Rink, Richard C; Cain, Mark P

    2015-02-01

    Renal failure has been a leading cause of death for children with spina bifida. Although improvements in management have increased survival, current data on mortality are sparse. Bladder augmentation, a modern intervention to preserve renal function, carries risks of morbidity and mortality. We determined long-term mortality and causes of death in patients with spina bifida treated with bladder augmentation. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with spina bifida who underwent bladder augmentation between 1979 and 2013. Those born before 1972 or older than 21 years at augmentation were excluded. Demographic and surgical data were collected. Outcomes were obtained from medical records, death records and the Social Security Death Index. Fisher exact and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and Kaplan-Meier plots were used for analysis. Of 888 patients in our bladder reconstruction database 369 with spina bifida met inclusion criteria. Median followup was 10.8 years. A total of 28 deaths (7.6%) occurred. The leading causes of mortality were nonurological infections (ventriculoperitoneal shunt related, decubitus ulcer fasciitis, etc) and pulmonary disease. Two patients (0.5%) died of renal failure. No patient died of malignancy or bladder perforation. Patients with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt had a higher mortality rate than those without a shunt (8.9% vs 1.5%, p = 0.04). Previously reported mortality rates of 50% to 60% in patients with spina bifida do not appear to apply in children who have undergone bladder augmentation. On long-term followup leading causes of death in patients with spina bifida after bladder augmentation were nonurological infections rather than complications associated with augmentation or renal failure. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Are mast cells still good biomarkers for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Marianne; Regauer, Sigrid; Welter, JoEllen; Eberhard, Jakob; Viereck, Volker

    2015-06-01

    ESSIC identifies mast cell infiltrates of detrusor muscle as a diagnostic criterion for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. However, an increased mast cell count is also characteristic of overactive bladder syndrome. The lack of uniformity in mast cell detection methods hampers data comparison. Using state-of-the-art techniques we investigated whether mast cells differ among bladder conditions. We analyzed bladder biopsies from 56 patients, including 31 with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with (12) or without (19) Hunner lesions, 13 with overactive bladder syndrome and 12 without bladder symptoms to determine the quantity, location, distribution and activation of mast cells using immunohistochemistry with anti-mast cell tryptase. Patients were allocated to study groups by key bladder symptoms commonly used to define conditions (pain and major urgency). Subepithelial mast cell localization (p interstitial cystitis with Hunner lesions. The optimal cutoff of 32 detrusor mast cells per mm(2) achieved only 68% accuracy with 38% positive predictive value. No difference was observed between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis without Hunner lesions and overactive bladder syndrome. Patient groups differed in lymphocyte infiltration (p = 0.001), nodular lymphocyte aggregates (p interstitial cystitis with Hunner lesions. Detrusor mastocytosis had poor predictive value for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Mast cell assessment did not distinguish bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis without Hunner lesions from overactive bladder syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Benzidine dyes and risk of bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, M; Yoshida, O

    1989-12-01

    Until the early 1970's there was little concern about dyes which contain benzidine as an integral part of their chemical structure. Furthermore, use of the finished dyes was not considered dangerous. To ascertain whether azo dyes are associated with risk of development of bladder tumors in workers who handpaint Yuzen-type silk kimonos in Kyoto, we investigated the disintegration of dyes to benzidine. In these studies, we found that in rats and mice benzidine-based dyes are metabolized to benzidine and that the azo linkage of benzidine dyes is reduced by Escherichia coli and soil bacteria. These experimental findings were reported previously. In this report, we outline an approach to these studies. Many of the dyes used to color paper, textiles, lipstick, bait used by fishermen, as well as hair dyes, and dyes used in research, for pharmaceutical products, and by defence personnel for the detection of liquid chemical warfare agents, have been shown to be potentially mutagenic or carcinogenic. We review the literature on these dyes.

  13. Epidemiology of underactive bladder: Common but underresearched

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Dong Yu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Detrusor underactivity (DU or underactive bladder is a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, but it is still poorly understood and underresearched. Although there has been a proposed definition by International Continence Society in 2002, no widely accepted diagnostic criteria have been established for this entity in clinical practice. Therefore, it has been rare to identify community-based researches on the epidemiology of DU until now. Only certain studies have reported the prevalence of DU in community-dwelling cohorts with significant LUTS using arbitrary urodynamic criteria for DU and these investigations have indicated that DU accounts for 25%–48% and 12%–24% of elderly men and women, respectively. However, these prevalence data based on the urodynamic definition apparently are limited in their extrapolation to the general population. Despite the clinical ambiguity of DU, its clinical effects on quality of life are quite significant, especially in the elderly population. An overall and proper comprehension of epidemiologic studies of DU may be crucial for better insight into DU, relevant decision making, and a more reasonable allocation of health resources. Therefore, researchers should find clues to the solution for the clinical diagnosis of this specific condition of LUTS from contemporary epidemiologic studies and try to develop a possible definition of ‘clinical’ DU from further studies.

  14. Inter-fraction bladder filling variations and time trends for cervical cancer patients assessed with a portable 3-dimensional ultrasound bladder scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Rozilawati; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Quint, Sandra; Mens, Jan Willem; Pree, Ilse de; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: For cervical cancer patients, bladder filling variations may result in inadequate EBRT target coverage, unless large safety margins are used. For a group of patients who received full bladder instructions, inter-fraction variations and time trends in bladder volume were quantified, and a 3D ultrasound (US) scanner was tested for on-line bladder volume measurements. Methods and materials: For 24 patients, the bladder volume was measured with US at the time of the planning CT scan, and twice weekly during the course of RT. Comparisons of US with planning CT were used to assess the bladder scanner accuracy. Patients were treated in prone on a belly board, EPID images were acquired to correlate set-up errors with bladder filling variations. Results: Measured US and CT bladder volumes were strongly correlated (R = 0.97, slope 1.1 ± 0.1). The population mean bladder volume at planning of 378 ± 209 ml (1 SD) reduced to 109 ± 88 ml (1 SD) in week 6, a reduction by 71% (average reduction 46 ml/week), revealing a large inter-fraction time trend. Intra-patient variation in bladder volume during RT was 168 ml (1 SD) (range 70-266 ml). Rotation around the LR axis was significantly correlated with bladder volume changes. Conclusions: Despite a full bladder instruction, bladder volumes reduced dramatically during treatment, implying large time trends in target position of these patients. The portable US scanner provides a quick and reliable measurement of the bladder volume, which might assist future online treatment adaptation

  15. Toll-like receptor 7 is overexpressed in the bladder of Hunner-type interstitial cystitis, and its activation in the mouse bladder can induce cystitis and bladder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Koji; Aizawa, Naoki; Akiyama, Yoshiyuki; Kamei, Jun; Masumori, Naoya; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Homma, Yukio; Igawa, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is associated with the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome, well-known diseases accompanying interstitial cystitis (IC). We studied TLR7 expression in the bladder of patients with Hunner-type IC (HIC) and its functional roles in bladder inflammation and nociception using mice. Bladder biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with HIC. Specimens from the noncancerous portion of the bladder of patients with bladder cancer served as controls. The specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction of TLR7. Loxoribine (LX), a TLR7 agonist, was instilled in the bladder of C57BL/6N female mice, and TLR7-mRNA expression and histological changes of the bladder, bladder pain-like licking behavior, voiding behavior, cystometry, and bladder afferent nerve activities were investigated. The effects of hydroxychloroquine, a TLR7 antagonist, on the LX-induced changes on cystometry and voiding behavior were studied. The number of TLR7 immuno-reactive cells and the mRNA expression of TLR7 were significantly increased in HIC specimens. Intravesical instillation of LX induced edema, congestion, inflammation, and significantly increased TLR7-mRNA expression in the mouse bladder. Loxoribine-instillation also significantly increased licking behavior, voiding frequency, and afferent nerve activities associated with decreased single-voided volume and intercontraction interval of micturitions. Hydroxychloroquine reversed the LX-induced cystometric and voiding behavioral changes. Toll-like receptor 7 was up-regulated in the bladder mucosa of patients with HIC, and activation of TLR7 in the mouse bladder induced cystitis with sensory hyperactivity of the bladder. Blocking the TLR7 pathway may be an innovative treatment target of HIC.

  16. 'Omics' Approaches to Understanding Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome/Bladder Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sungyong; Yang, Wei; Anger, Jennifer T.; Freeman, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts in the generation of large genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and other types of 'omics' data sets have provided an unprecedentedly detailed view of certain diseases, however to date most of this literature has been focused on malignancy and other lethal pathological conditions. Very little intensive work on global profiles has been performed to understand the molecular mechanism of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome/bladder pain syndrome (IC/PBS/BPS), a chronic lower urinary tract disorder characterized by pelvic pain, urinary urgency and frequency, which can lead to long lasting adverse effects on quality of life. A lack of understanding of molecular mechanism has been a challenge and dilemma for diagnosis and treatment, and has also led to a delay in basic and translational research focused on biomarker and drug discovery, clinical therapy, and preventive strategies against IC/PBS/BPS. This review describes the current state of 'omics' studies and available data sets relevant to IC/PBS/BPS, and presents opportunities for new research directed at understanding the pathogenesis of this complex condition. PMID:23346481

  17. Economic Burden of Bladder Cancer Across the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Jose; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Sullivan, Richard; Witjes, J Alfred

    2016-03-01

    More than 120,000 people are diagnosed annually with bladder cancer in the 28 countries of the European Union (EU). With >40,000 people dying of it each year, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer. However, to date, no systematic cost-of-illness study has assessed the economic impact of bladder cancer in the EU. To estimate the annual economic costs of bladder cancer in the EU for 2012. Country-specific cancer cost data were estimated using aggregate data on morbidity, mortality, and health care resource use, obtained from numerous international and national sources. Health care costs were estimated from expenditures on primary, outpatient, emergency, and inpatient care, as well as medications. Costs of unpaid care and lost earnings due to morbidity and early death were estimated. Bladder cancer cost the EU €4.9 billion in 2012, with health care accounting for €2.9 billion (59%) and representing 5% of total health care cancer costs. Bladder cancer accounted for 3% of all cancer costs in the EU (€143 billion) in 2012 and represented an annual health care cost of €57 per 10 EU citizens, with costs varying >10 times between the country with the lowest cost, Bulgaria (€8 for every 10 citizens), and highest cost, Luxembourg (€93). Productivity losses and informal care represented 23% and 18% of bladder cancer costs, respectively. The quality and availability of comparable cancer-related data across the EU need further improvement. Our results add to essential public health and policy intelligence for delivering affordable bladder cancer care systems and prioritising the allocation of public research funds. We looked at the economic costs of bladder cancer across the European Union (EU). We found bladder cancer to cost €4.9 billion in 2012, with health care accounting for €2.9 billion. Our study provides data that can be used to inform affordable cancer care in the EU. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  18. Bladder cancer, a review of the environmental risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letašiová Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological studies and reviews have been performed to identify the causes of bladder cancer. The aim of this review is to investigate the links between various environmental risk factors and cancer of the bladder. Methods A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Scholar Google and Russian Google databases to identify reviews and epidemiological studies on bladder cancer risk factors associated with the environment published between 1998 and 2010. Only literature discussing human studies was considered. Results Smoking, mainly cigarette smoking, is a well known risk factor for various diseases, including bladder cancer. Another factor strongly associated with bladder cancer is exposure to arsenic in drinking water at concentrations higher than 300 µg/l. The most notable risk factor for development of bladder cancer is occupational exposure to aromatic amines (2-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl and benzidine and 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline, which can be found in the products of the chemical, dye and rubber industries as well as in hair dyes, paints, fungicides, cigarette smoke, plastics, metals and motor vehicle exhaust. There are also data suggesting an effect from of other types of smoking besides cigarettes (cigar, pipe, Egyptian waterpipe, smokeless tobacco and environmental tobacco smoking, and other sources of arsenic exposure such as air, food, occupational hazards, and tobacco. Other studies show that hairdressers and barbers with occupational exposure to hair dyes experience enhanced risk of bladder cancer. For example, a study related to personal use of hair dyes demonstrates an elevated bladder cancer risk for people who used permanent hair dyes at least once a month, for one year or longer. Conclusion Smoking, in particular from cigarettes, exposure to arsenic in drinking water, and occupational exposure to aromatic amines and 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline

  19. The translation and validation of Chinese overactive bladder symptom score for assessing overactive bladder syndrome and response to solifenacin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung; Hung, Man-Jung; Yen, Ta-Wei; Chuang, Yao-Chi; Meng, En; Huang, Shih-Tsung; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-08-01

    Overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) was developed by a Japanese urologist and is widely used in Asian countries. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a Chinese OABSS for assessing overactive bladder (OAB) and treatment outcome after solifenacin. The Chinese OABSS was developed by linguistic validation of the original version. Its reliability and validity, and correlations with a three-day bladder diary were tested. Patients answered the Chinese OABSS at enrollment and repeated the questionnaire after a non-treatment period of 2 weeks, and at 4 and 12 weeks after solifenacin (5mg/day). Patients also completed a three-day bladder diary and forms including patient perception of bladder condition, International Prostatic Symptom Score and quality of life index at each study visit (for a total of four visits). An analysis was conducted to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Chinese OABSS and the correlations with a three-day bladder diary and a patient perception of bladder condition, respectively. A total of 60 patients with OAB, including 31 OAB wet and 29 OAB dry, were enrolled. The test-retest reliability of Chinese OABSS was moderate to good with weighted kappa coefficients of 0.515-0.721 for each symptom score and 0.610 for total symptom score. Forty-eight (80%) patients completed the responsiveness study and were followed-up at all time points. Patients' OAB symptoms improved significantly from baseline to 3 months after solifenacin treatment. The changes in OABSS decreased gradually with time within the three months of solifenacin treatment. The Chinese OABSS has been validated as a reliable instrument for assessing OAB. Solifenacin 5mg once daily improved urgency and other symptoms of OAB including frequency, urge incontinence, OABSS and International Prostatic Symptom Score. The adverse effects were acceptable and became less significant with time in the three months of treatment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. A study of image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer based on lipiodol injection in the bladder wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soendergaard, Jimmi; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Elstroem, Ulrik Vindelev; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten; Oerding Olsen, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. We have tested a procedure of focal injection of the contrast medium Lipiodol as a fiducial marker for image-guided boost of the tumor in bladder cancer radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we have evaluated the feasibility and the safety of the method as well as the inter- and intra-fraction shift of the bladder tumor. Materials and methods. Five patients with muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer were included in the study. Lipiodol was injected during flexible cystoscopy into the submucosa of the bladder wall at the periphery of the tumor or the post resection tumor-bed. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired daily throughout the course of RT. Results. Lipiodol demarcation of the bladder tumor was feasible and safe with only a minimum of side effects related to the procedure. The Lipiodol spots were visible on CT and CBCT scans for the duration of the RT course. More than half of all the treatment fractions required a geometric shift of 5 mm or more to match on the Lipiodol spots. The mean intra-fraction shift (3D) of the tumor was 3 mm, largest in the anterior-posterior and cranial-caudal directions. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that Lipiodol can be injected into the bladder mucosa and subsequently visualized on CT and CBCT as a fiducial marker. The relatively large inter-fraction shifts in the positions of Lipiodol spots compared to the intra-fraction movement indicates that image-guided RT based on radio-opaque markers is important for RT of the bladder cancer tumor.

  1. Concepts in causality: chemically induced human urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower, G.M. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A significant portion of the incidence of human urinary bladder cancer can be attributed to occupational and cultural (tobacco smoking) situations associated with exposures to various arylamines, many of which represent established human carcinogens. A brief historical overview of research in bladder cancer causality indicates that the identification of causal agents and causal mechanism has been approached and rests upon information gathered at the organismal (geographical/historical), cellular, and molecular levels of biologic organization. This viewpoint speaks of a natural evolution within the biomedical sciences; a natural evolution from descriptive approaches to mechanistic approaches; and a natural evolution from more or less independent discipline-oriented approaches to hierarchically organized multidisciplinary approaches. Available information relevant to bladder cancer causality can be readily integrated into general conceptual frameworks to yield a hierarchial view of the natural history of urinary bladder cancer, a view consistent with contemporary natural systems and information theory and perhaps relevant also to other chemically induced epithelial cancers. Such frameworks are useful in appreciating the spatial and temporal boundaries and interrelationships in causality and the conceptual interrelationships within the biomedical sciences. Recent approaches in molecular epidemiology and the assessment of relative individual susceptibility to bladder cancer indicate that such frameworks are useful in forming hypotheses

  2. Treatment of overactive bladder syndrome with urethral calibration in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao H; Sato, Renee L; Matsuura, Grace Hk; Wei, David C; Chen, John J

    2013-10-01

    Our objective was to determine whether urethral calibration with Walther's urethral sounds may be an effective treatment for overactive bladder syndrome. The diagnosis of overactive bladder syndrome is a clinical one based on the presence of urgency, with or without urge incontinence, and is usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia in the absence of obvious pathologic or metabolic disease. These symptoms exert a profound effect on the quality of life. Pharmacologic treatment is generally used to relieve symptoms, however anticholinergic medications may be associated with several undesirable side effects. There are case reports of symptom relief following a relatively quick and simple office procedure known as urethral dilation. It is hypothesized that this may be an effective treatment for the symptoms of overactive bladder. Women with clinical symptoms of overactive bladder were evaluated. Eighty-eight women were randomized to either urethral calibration (Treatment), or placebo (Control) treatment. Women's clinical outcomes at two and eight weeks were assessed and compared between the two treatment arms. Eight weeks after treatment, 31.1% (n=14) of women who underwent urethral calibration were responsive to the treatment versus 9.3% (n=4) of the Control group. Also, 51.1% (n=23) of women within the Treatment group showed at least a partial response versus 20.9% (n=9) of the Control group. Our conclusion is that Urethral calibration significantly improves the symptoms of overactive bladder when compared to placebo and may be an effective alternative treatment method.

  3. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years. PMID:27176184

  4. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Truzzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years.

  5. Transition to adulthood with a bladder augmentation: histopathologic concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Mammadov

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aim: To investigate the histopathologic changes in native bladder and gastrointestinal segment, the relation between histopathologic changes, type of operation and the period passed over operation in patients with bladder augmentation. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. Histopathologic evaluation of the cystoscopic mucosal biopsies from native bladder and enteric augment was performed in all patients. Results: Active or chronic non-specific inflammation of various degrees was found in all specimens except two. Metaplastic changes were detected in 3 patients. Two patients had squamous metaplasia (one focal, one extensive and one patient had intestinal metaplasia. All metaplastic changes were found in native bladder specimens. The type of augmentation in patients with metaplastic changes were ileocystoplasty and sigmoidocystoplasty. No signs of malignancy were detected in any patient. Conclusion: The complexity of the disorders requiring bladder augmentation does not let the surgeons to draw a clear line between different groups of complications including malignancy formation. However, due to challenging course of the augmentation procedure itself, surgeons should be well aware of the possibility of malignancy development.

  6. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlBazzaz Pishtewan H

    2009-01-01

    The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations. (author)

  7. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bazzaz Pishtewan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations.

  8. Developing a functional urinary bladder: a neuronal context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet R Keast

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of organs occurs in parallel with the formation of their nerve supply. The innervation of pelvic organs (lower urinary tract, hindgut, and sexual organs is complex and we know remarkably little about the mechanisms that form these neural pathways. The goal of this short review is to use the urinary bladder as an example to stimulate interest in this question. The bladder requires a healthy mature nervous system to store urine and release it at behaviourally appropriate times. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the construction of these neural circuits is not only relevant to defining the basis of developmental problems but may also suggest strategies to restore connectivity and function following injury or disease in adults. The bladder nerve supply comprises multiple classes of sensory, and parasympathetic or sympathetic autonomic effector (motor neurons. First, we define the developmental endpoint by describing this circuitry in adult rodents. Next we discuss the innervation of the developing bladder, identifying challenges posed by this area of research. Last we provide examples of genetically modified mice with bladder dysfunction and suggest potential neural contributors to this state.

  9. The Mystery of the Interstitial Cells in the Urinary Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sang Don; Lee, Haeyeong; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2018-01-06

    Intrinsic mechanisms to restrain smooth muscle excitability are present in the bladder, and premature contractions during filling indicate a pathological phenotype. Some investigators have proposed that c-Kit + interstitial cells (ICs) are pacemakers and intermediaries in efferent and afferent neural activity, but recent findings suggest these cells have been misidentified and their functions have been misinterpreted. Cells reported to be c-Kit + cells colabel with vimentin antibodies, but vimentin is not a specific marker for c-Kit + cells. A recent report shows that c-Kit + cells in several species coexpress mast cell tryptase, suggesting that they are likely to be mast cells. In fact, most bladder ICs labeled with vimentin antibodies coexpress platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Rather than an excitatory phenotype, PDGFRα + cells convey inhibitory regulation in the detrusor, and inhibitory mechanisms are activated by purines and stretch. PDGFRα + cells restrain premature development of contractions during bladder filling, and overactive behavior develops when the inhibitory pathways in these cells are blocked. PDGFRα + cells are also a prominent cell type in the submucosa and lamina propria, but little is known about their function in these locations. Effective pharmacological manipulation of bladder ICs depends on proper identification and further study of the pathways in these cells that affect bladder functions.

  10. Investigation into neurogenic bladder in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes de Araújo, Liubiana; Ferraz de Arruda Musegante, André; de Oliveira Damasceno, Edjane; Barroso, Ubirajara; Badaro, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    During the follow-up of children who had been diagnosed with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), it was noted that some were experiencing dysfunctional voiding. Further investigation into these cases led to a diagnosis of neurogenic bladder. Few studies have investigated the relationship between AMC and neurogenic bladder, this being the first to describe the clinical characteristics of neurogenic bladder among these patients. A series of 26 cases were obtained from the electronic medical records of patients with AMC who were admitted to Hospital Sarah in Salvador between 1994 and 2007. The patients had all been diagnosed with neurogenic bladder through clinical symptoms, lower urinary tract exams, and urodynamic findings. There was urinary incontinence in 21 patients (81%), and 50% had a history of urinary tract infections. Renal function was altered in 4 patients (15%) and normal in 22 (85%). In the urodynamic study, 14 patients (64%) had detrusor overactivity and 6 (27%) had underactivity. Patients with AMC may show changes in the urinary tract, including neurogenic bladder. It is mandatory to study these symptomatic children with urinary disorders. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Bladder pain syndrome--an urological-gynecological problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabkowski, Tomasz; Bortnowski, Leszek; Zieliński, Henryk

    2011-03-01

    Bladder Pain Syndrome remains a great challenge for urologists, both in diagnostics and treatment. Etiopathogenesis of the disease is unknown. It is reported that the reason for Bladder Pain Syndrome is the urothelium dysfunction resulting in the destruction of the protective glycosaminoglycan layer/barrier protecting the urothelium from bacteria adhesion and penetration of toxic substances/by bacteria. It is considered to be a syndrome of dysuria and diuresis. Urine analysis usually is normal. It is diagnosed after exclusion of other causes leading to painful symptoms. It is estimated that 90% of the cases of the disease concern women. Treatment with glycocorticosteroids, antihistaminic drugs and antiallergic drugs was not successful. The attempts to find the right method of treatment led to the introduction of hyaluronic acid, which alleviated Bladder Pain Syndrome and its symptoms. Hyaluronic acid reacting with glycosaminoglycans on the bladder decreases penetrability of irritant substances. The patients were treated with 4-8 weekly instillations--40 mg of hyaluronic acid in 50 ml NaCl solution for 1-2 months. After the last instillation, therapy is repeated for the next 6-8 months with one instillation monthly. This method is for patients a chance for getting rid of painful symptoms from the bladder

  12. Adaptive radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten; Lebesque, Joos; Lotz, Heidi; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Moonen, Luc; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) in combination with a partial bladder irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with solitary T1-T4 N0M0 bladder cancer were treated to the bladder tumor + 2 cm margin planning target volume (PTV CONV ). During the first treatment week, five daily computed tomography (CT) scans were made immediately before or after treatment. In the second week, a volume was constructed encompassing the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) on the planning scan and the five CT scans (GTV ART ). The GTV ART was expanded with a 1 cm margin for the construction of a PTV ART . Starting in the third week, patients were treated to PTV ART . Repeat CT scans were used to evaluate treatment accuracy. Results: On 5 of 91 repeat CT scans (5%), the GTV was not adequately covered by the PTV ART . On treatment planning, there was only one scan in which the GTV was not adequately covered by the 95% isodose. On average, the treatment volumes were reduced by 40% when comparing PTV ART with PTV CONV (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The adaptive strategy for bladder cancer is an effective way to deal with treatment errors caused by variations in bladder tumor position and leads to a substantial reduction in treatment volumes

  13. Impaired swim bladder inflation in early-life stage fathead ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated whether inhibition of deiodinase, the enzyme which converts thyroxine (T4) to the more biologically-active form, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), would impact inflation of the posterior and/or anterior chamber of the swim bladder, processes previously demonstrated to be thyroid-hormone regulated. Two experiments were conducted using a model deiodinase inhibitor, iopanoic acid (IOP). In the first study, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) embryos were exposed to 0.6, 1.9, or 6.0 mg IOP/L or control water in a flow-through system until reaching 6 days post-fertilization (dpf) at which time posterior swim bladder inflation was assessed. To examine effects on anterior swim bladder inflation, a second study was conducted with 6 dpf larvae exposed to the same IOP concentrations until reaching 21 dpf. Fish from both studies were sampled for T4/T3 measurements, gene transcription analyses, and thyroid histopathology. In the embryo study, incidence and length of inflated posterior swim bladders were significantly reduced in the 6.0 mg/L treatment at 6 dpf. Incidence of inflation and length of anterior swim bladder in larval fish were significantly reduced in all IOP treatments at 14 dpf, but inflation recovered by 18 dpf. Throughout the larval study, whole body T4 concentrations were significantly increased and T3 concentrations were significantly decreased in all IOP treatments. Consistent with hypothesized compensatory responses, sig

  14. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offiah, I; McMahon, S B; O'Reilly, B A

    2013-08-01

    The bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is a spectrum of urological symptoms characterised by bladder pain with typical cystoscopic features. Diagnosis and management of this syndrome may be difficult. There is no evidence-based management approach for the diagnosis or treatment of BPS. The objective of this study was to critically review and summarise the evidence relating to the diagnosis and treatment of the bladder pain syndrome. A review of published data on the diagnosis and treatment of the BPS was performed. Our search was limited to English-language articles, on the "diagnosis", and "management" or "treatment" of "interstitial cystitis" and the "bladder pain syndrome" in "humans." Frequency, urgency and pain on bladder filling are the most common symptoms of BPS. All urodynamic volumes are reduced in patients with BPS. Associated conditions include psychological distress, depression, history of sexual assault, irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia. Cystoscopy remains the test for definitive diagnosis, with visualisation of haemorrhage on cystoreduction. A multidisciplinary treatment approach is essential in the management of this condition. Orally administered amitriptyline is an efficacious medical treatment for BPS. Intravesical hyaluronic acid and local anaesthetic, with/without hydrodistension are among new treatment strategies. Sacral or pudendal neuromodulation is effective, minimally invasive and safe. Surgery is reserved for refractory cases. There remains a paucity of evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of BPS. We encountered significant heterogeneity in the assessment of symptoms, duration of treatment and follow up of patients in our literature review.

  15. An orthotopic bladder tumor model and the evaluation of intravesical saRNA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moo Rim; Yang, Glen; Charisse, Klaus; Epstein-Barash, Hila; Manoharan, Muthiah; Li, Long-Cheng

    2012-07-28

    We present a novel method for treating bladder cancer with intravesically delivered small activating RNA (saRNA) in an orthotopic xenograft mouse bladder tumor model. The mouse model is established by urethral catheterization under inhaled general anesthetic. Chemical burn is then introduced to the bladder mucosa using intravesical silver nitrate solution to disrupt the bladder glycosaminoglycan layer and allows cells to attach. Following several washes with sterile water, human bladder cancer KU-7-luc2-GFP cells are instilled through the catheter into the bladder to dwell for 2 hours. Subsequent growth of bladder tumors is confirmed and monitored by in vivo bladder ultrasound and bioluminescent imaging. The tumors are then treated intravesically with saRNA formulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). Tumor growth is monitored with ultrasound and bioluminescence. All steps of this procedure are demonstrated in the accompanying video.

  16. Results of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens De Lichtenberg, Mette; Miskowiak, J; Rolff, H

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer.......To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer....

  17. Endoscopic lysis of bladder scar associated with Hunner's lesions: A new technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Bahlani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Patients with IC/BPS may be severely debilitated by a clinically significant decrease in their bladder capacity, especially in the face of HL. The use of the holmium laser to incise regions of scar and bladder wall tethering may produce a clinically significant and durable increase in bladder capacity. The use of this technique as a means of treating bladder scarring poses an excellent adjunct to existing treatment strategies.

  18. ISOLATED REDUCED NOCTURNAL BLADDER RESERVOIR FUNCTION - A NEW TYPE OF NOCTURNAL ENURESIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Britt; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Rittig, Søren

    PURPOSE Bladder reservoir function in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) is assessed by maximal voided volumes (MVV) registered on frequency-volume charts during daytime. Although a degree of association is evident, MVV does not necessarily reflect the nocturnal bladder...... below their MVV and MVVAge, the latter could be viewed as isolated reduced nocturnal bladder reservoir function. This indicates bladder reservoir function abnormalities during sleep that is not assessed by day recordings. Physicians treating children with MNE should consider anticholinergic...

  19. Review: Application of Nanoparticles in Urothelial Cancer of the Urinary Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chieh-Hsiao; Chan, Tzu-Min; Wu, Yi-Jhen; Chen, Jia-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common malignancy of the urinary tract, which generally develops in the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder. The specific course of treatment depends on the stage of bladder cancer; however, therapeutic strategies typically involve intravesical drug delivery to reduce toxicity and increase therapeutic effects. Recently, metallic, polymeric, lipid, and protein nanoparticles have been introduced to aid in the treatment of bladder cancer. Nanoparticles are also commonly ...

  20. Single Large Bladder Stone in a Young Male Adult with Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Halalsheh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bladder stones are caused when minerals are built up in the bladder, especially if the bladder is incompletely emptied. These stones will pass while they are small. Otherwise, they get stuck to the bladder wall or ureter. If this happens, they gradually gather more mineral crystals, becoming larger over time. Primary hyperparathyroidism is usually caused by a tumor within the parathyroid gland, and elevated calcium levels can cause digestive symptoms, psychiatric abnormalities, bone disease and multiple kidney stones.