WorldWideScience

Sample records for bladder volume variation

  1. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    : The correlation between the relative bladder volume (RBV, defined as repeat scan volume/planning scan volume) and the margins required to account for internal motion was first studied using a series of 20 bladder cancer patients with weekly repeat CT scanning during treatment. Both conformal RT (CRT) and IGRT......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS...... these patients were given fluid intake restrictions on alternating weeks during treatment. RESULTS: IGRT gave the strongest correlation between the RBV and margin size (R(2)=0.75; p10mm were required in only 1% of the situations when the RBV1, whereas isotropic margins >10...

  2. Cone Beam CT Imaging Analysis of Interfractional Variations in Bladder Volume and Position During Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Rathee, Satyapal; Ghosh, Sunita; Ko, Lawrence; Murray, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm). The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (± standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm 3 (SD, 29.71 cm 3 ). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm 3 (SD, 21.64 cm 3 ). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm 3 (SD, 36.51 cm 3 ). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm 3 (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm 3 (SD, 3.97 cm 3 ). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.

  3. Evaluating Variations of Bladder Volume Using an Ultrasound Scanner in Rectal Cancer Patients during Chemoradiation: Is Protocol-Based Full Bladder Maintenance Using a Bladder Scanner Useful to Maintain the Bladder Volume?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong In Yoon

    Full Text Available The maintenance of full bladder is important to reduce radiation-induced toxicities and maintain the therapeutic consistency in locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of protocol-based full bladder maintenance by assessing bladder volume variation using an ultrasound bladder scanner to maintain bladder volume.From March 2011 to May 2011, twenty consecutive rectal cancer patients receiving external beam RT participated in this prospective study. Protocol-based full bladder maintenance consisted of education, training and continuous biofeedback by measuring bladder volume. Bladder volume was measured by bladder scan immediately before simulation CT scan and before each treatment three times weekly during the RT period. The relative bladder volume change was calculated. Intra-patient bladder volume variations were quantified using interquartile range (IQR of relative bladder volume change in each patient. We compared intra-patient bladder volume variations obtained (n=20 with data from our previous study patients (n=20 performing self-controlled maintenance without protocol.Bladder volumes measured by bladder scan highly correlated with those on simulation CT scan (R=0.87, p<0.001. Patients from this study showed lower median IQR of relative bladder volume change compared to patients of self-controlled maintenance from our previous study, although it was not statistically significant (median 32.56% vs. 42.19%, p=0.058. Upon logistic regression, the IQR of relative bladder volume change was significantly related to protocol-based maintenance [relative risk 1.045, 95% confidence intervals (CI 1.004-1.087, p=0.033]. Protocol-based maintenance included significantly more patients with an IQR of relative bladder volume change less than 37% than self-controlled maintenance (p=0.025.Our findings show that bladder volume could be maintained more consistently during

  4. Bladder volume variations of cervical cancer patient in radiation therapy using ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The bladder volume change was measured using ultrasonography for helping decrease the side effects and other organ variations in the location of radiation therapy for cervical cancer patients. An experiment was performed targeting patients who were treated with radiation therapy at PNUH within the period from September to December 2015. To maintain the bladder volume, each patient was instructed to drink 500 cc water before and after CT simulation, 60 minutes before the dry run. Also, the bladder volume was measured in each patient CT scan, and a 3D conformal therapy plan was designed. The bladder volumes measured before and after the CT simulation, dry run, and radiation treatment planning were compared and analyzed. The average volume and average error of the bladder that were obtained from the measurement based on the CT scan images had the lowest standard deviation in the CT simulation. This means that the values that were obtained before and after the CT simulation were statistically relevant and correlative. Moreover, the bladder volume measured via ultrasonography was larger size, the average volume in the CT scan. But the values that were obtained Dry run and after the CT simulation were not statistically relevant. Drinking a certain amount of water helps a patient maintain his/her bladder volume for a dry run. Even then, it is difficult to maintain the bladder volume for the dry run. Also, whether or not the patients followed the directions for the dry run correctly is important.

  5. Bladder filling variations during concurrent chemotherapy and pelvic radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients: early experience of bladder volume assessment using ultrasound scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jee Suk; Yoon, Hong In; Cha, Hye Jung; Chang, Yoon Sun; Cho, Yeo Na; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub

    2013-01-01

    To describe the early experience of analyzing variations and time trends in bladder volume of the rectal cancer patients who received bladder ultrasound scan. We identified 20 consecutive rectal cancer patients who received whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) and bladder ultrasound scan between February and April 2012. Before simulation and during the entire course of treatment, patients were scanned with portable automated ultrasonic bladder scanner, 5 times consecutively, and the median value was reported. Then a radiation oncologist contoured the bladder inner wall shown on simulation computed tomography (CT) and calculated its volume. Before simulation, the median bladder volume measured using simulation CT and bladder ultrasound scan was 427 mL (range, 74 to 1,172 mL) and 417 mL (range, 147 to 1,245 mL), respectively. There was strong linear correlation (R = 0.93, p < 0.001) between the two results. During the course of treatment, there were wide variations in the bladder volume and every time, measurements were below the baseline with statistical significance (12/16). At 6 weeks after RT, the median volume was reduced by 59.3% to 175 mL. Compared to the baseline, bladder volume was reduced by 38% or 161 mL on average every week for 6 weeks. To our knowledge, this study is the first to prove that there are bladder volume variations and a reduction in bladder volume in rectal cancer patients. Moreover, our results will serve as the basis for implementation of bladder training to patients receiving RT with full bladder.

  6. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sithamparam, S; Ahmad, R; Sabarudin, A; Othman, Z; Ismail, M

    2017-01-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients. (paper)

  7. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  8. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Marcel R; van Lin, Emile N J Th; van der Vight, Lisette P; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Visser, Andries G

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 SD = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  9. Occupational variation in incidence of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; MacLeod, Jill; Demers, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare occupational variation of the risk of bladder cancer in the Nordic countries and Canada. Methods: In the Nordic Occupational Cancer study (NOCCA), 73 653 bladder cancer cases were observed during follow-up of 141.6 million person......: Elevated risks of bladder cancer were observed among hairdressers, printers, sales workers, plumbers, painters, miners and laundry workers. Teachers and agricultural workers had reduced risk of bladder cancer in both cohorts. Chimney-sweeps, tobacco workers and waiters had about 1.5-fold risk in the Nordic...... countries; no risk estimates for these categories were given from the CanCHEC cohort. Conclusion: We observed different occupational patterns in risk of bladder cancer in Nordic countries and Canada. The only occupation with similarly increased risk was observed among sales workers. Differences in smoking...

  10. Pad-weighing test performed with standardized bladder volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lose, G; Rosenkilde, P; Gammelgaard, J

    1988-01-01

    The result of the one-hour pad-weighing test proposed by the International Continence Society has been demonstrated to depend on the urine load during the test. To increase reproducibility of the pad-weighing test by minimizing the influence of variation in urine load the test was done...... with a standardized bladder volume (50% of the cystometric bladder capacity). Twenty-five female patients with stress or mixed incontinence underwent two separate tests. Test-retest results were highly correlated (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001). Nonetheless, analysis of test-retest differences revealed a variation up...... to +/- 24 g between two tests. It is concluded that this setup (i.e., standardized bladder volume) of the one-hour pad-weighing test allows for a more reliable assessment of urinary incontinence for quantitative purposes....

  11. Inter-fraction bladder filling variations and time trends for cervical cancer patients assessed with a portable 3-dimensional ultrasound bladder scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Rozilawati; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Quint, Sandra; Mens, Jan Willem; Pree, Ilse de; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: For cervical cancer patients, bladder filling variations may result in inadequate EBRT target coverage, unless large safety margins are used. For a group of patients who received full bladder instructions, inter-fraction variations and time trends in bladder volume were quantified, and a 3D ultrasound (US) scanner was tested for on-line bladder volume measurements. Methods and materials: For 24 patients, the bladder volume was measured with US at the time of the planning CT scan, and twice weekly during the course of RT. Comparisons of US with planning CT were used to assess the bladder scanner accuracy. Patients were treated in prone on a belly board, EPID images were acquired to correlate set-up errors with bladder filling variations. Results: Measured US and CT bladder volumes were strongly correlated (R = 0.97, slope 1.1 ± 0.1). The population mean bladder volume at planning of 378 ± 209 ml (1 SD) reduced to 109 ± 88 ml (1 SD) in week 6, a reduction by 71% (average reduction 46 ml/week), revealing a large inter-fraction time trend. Intra-patient variation in bladder volume during RT was 168 ml (1 SD) (range 70-266 ml). Rotation around the LR axis was significantly correlated with bladder volume changes. Conclusions: Despite a full bladder instruction, bladder volumes reduced dramatically during treatment, implying large time trends in target position of these patients. The portable US scanner provides a quick and reliable measurement of the bladder volume, which might assist future online treatment adaptation

  12. Bladder wall dose from administered radiopharmaceuticals: the effects of variations in urine flow rate, voiding interval and initial bladder content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.; Veall, N.; Wootton, R.

    1982-01-01

    Equations are given for calculating the dose to the surface of the bladder wall for any values of the parameters, urine flow-rate, bladder voiding period and initial content, for any administered radiopharmaceutical with known biokinetics. The necessary relationships which describe the variation in dose to the bladder wall per unit of cumulated activity in contents with increasing volume of contents are given for 31 radionuclides. Two commonly used renal radiopharmaceuticals, 131 I Hippuran and 99 Tcsup(m) DTPA, are used to illustrate the effects of the above three physiological variables on the dose to the bladder wall and it may be concluded that, for radiopharmaceuticals which are rapidly transferred to the bladder, substantial dose reduction can be achieved by optimising these parameters. Thus, where possible, the patient should be well hydrated, the radiopharmaceutical should be administered when the bladder is partly filled and the voiding period should be about 1.5 h. (author)

  13. Dose Distribution in Bladder and Surrounding Normal Tissues in Relation to Bladder Volume in Conformal Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, Wojciech; Wesolowska, Iwona; Urbanczyk, Hubert; Hawrylewicz, Leszek; Schwierczok, Barbara; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate bladder movements and changes in dose distribution in the bladder and surrounding tissues associated with changes in bladder filling and to estimate the internal treatment margins. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with bladder cancer underwent planning computed tomography scans with 80- and 150-mL bladder volumes. The bladder displacements associated with the change in volume were measured. Each patient had treatment plans constructed for a 'partially empty' (80 mL) and a 'partially full' (150 mL) bladder. An additional plan was constructed for tumor irradiation alone. A subsequent 9 patients underwent sequential weekly computed tomography scanning during radiotherapy to verify the bladder movements and estimate the internal margins. Results: Bladder movements were mainly observed cranially, and the estimated internal margins were nonuniform and largest (>2 cm) anteriorly and cranially. The dose distribution in the bladder worsened if the bladder increased in volume: 70% of patients (11 of 16) would have had bladder underdosed to 70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 23%, 20%, and 15% for the rectum and 162, 144, 123 cm 3 for the intestines, respectively) than with a 'partially full' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 28%, 24%, and 18% for the rectum and 180, 158, 136 cm 3 for the intestines, respectively). The change in bladder filling during RT was significant for the dose distribution in the intestines. Tumor irradiation alone was significantly better than whole bladder irradiation in terms of organ sparing. Conclusion: The displacements of the bladder due to volume changes were mainly related to the upper wall. The internal margins should be nonuniform, with the largest margins cranially and anteriorly. The changes in bladder filling during RT could influence the dose distribution in the bladder and intestines. The dose distribution in the rectum and bowel was slightly better with

  14. Vaginal Motion and Bladder and Rectal Volumes During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Hysterectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingran, Anuja, E-mail: ajhingra@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. Results: The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Conclusion: Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation.

  15. A randomized trial comparing bladder volume consistency during fractionated prostate radiation therapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, L.

    2014-01-10

    Organ motion is a contributory factor to the variation in location of the prostate and organs at risk during a course of fractionated prostate radiation therapy (RT). A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed with the primary endpoint to provide evidence-based bladder-filling instructions to achieve a consistent bladder volume (BV) and thus reduce the bladder-related organ motion. The secondary endpoints were to assess the incidence of acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients and patients’ satisfaction with the bladder-filling instructions.

  16. Expression profiles of variation integration genes in bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J M; Wang, Y Q; Gao, Z L; Wu, J T; Shi, B K; Yu, C C

    2014-04-30

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide and its incidence continues to increase. There are approximately 261,000 cases of bladder cancer resulting in 115,000 deaths annually. This study aimed to integrate bladder cancer genome copy number variation information and bladder cancer gene transcription level expression data to construct a causal-target module network of the range of bladder cancer-related genomes. Here, we explored the control mechanism underlying bladder cancer phenotype expression regulation by the major bladder cancer genes. We selected 22 modules as the initial module network to expand the search to screen more networks. After bootstrapping 100 times, we obtained 16 key regulators. These 16 key candidate regulatory genes were further expanded to identify the expression changes of 11,676 genes in 275 modules, which may all have the same regulation. In conclusion, a series of modules associated with the terms 'cancer' or 'bladder' were considered to constitute a potential network.

  17. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Ann M.; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology

  18. Associations between volume changes and spatial dose metrics for the urinary bladder during local versus pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Moiseenko, Vitali; Hopper, Austin; Pettersson, Niclas Johan; Thor, Maria; Knopp, Rick; Deasy, Joseph O; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Einck, John

    2017-06-01

    Inter-fractional variation in urinary bladder volumes during the course of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer causes deviations between planned and delivered doses. This study compared planned versus daily cone-beam CT (CBCT)-based spatial bladder dose distributions, for prostate cancer patients receiving local prostate treatment (local treatment) versus prostate including pelvic lymph node irradiation (pelvic treatment). Twenty-seven patients (N = 15 local treatment; N = 12 pelvic treatment) were treated using daily image-guided RT (1.8 Gy@43-45 fx), adhering to a full bladder/empty rectum protocol. For each patient, 9-10 CBCTs were registered to the planning CT, using the clinically applied translations. The urinary bladder was manually segmented on each CBCT, 3 mm inner shells were generated, and semi and quadrant sectors were created using axial/coronal cuts. Planned and delivered DVH metrics were compared across patients and between the two groups of treatment (t-test, p bladder volume variations and the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the bladder and its sectors were evaluated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r s ). Bladder volumes varied considerably during RT (coefficient of variation: 16-58%). The population-averaged planned and delivered DVH metrics were not significantly different at any dose level. Larger treatment bladder volumes resulted in increased absolute volume of the posterior/inferior bladder sector receiving intermediate-high doses, in both groups. The superior bladder sector received less dose with larger bladder volumes for local treatments (r s  ± SD: -0.47 ± 0.32), but larger doses for pelvic treatments (r s  ± SD: 0.74 ± 0.24). Substantial bladder volume changes during the treatment course occurred even though patients were treated under a full bladder/daily image-guided protocol. Larger bladder volumes resulted in less bladder wall spared at the posterior-inferior sector, regardless the

  19. Defining bowel dose volume constraints for bladder radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, F; Waters, R; Gulliford, S; Hall, E; James, N; Huddart, R A

    2015-01-01

    Increases to radiotherapy dose are constrained by normal tissue effects. The relationship between bowel dose volume data and late bowel toxicity in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with radical radiotherapy was assessed. The bowel was contoured retrospectively on radiotherapy plans of 47 patients recruited to the BC2001 trial (CRUK/01/004). The relationship between bowel volume at various dose levels and prospectively collected late bowel toxicity was explored. Fifteen per cent and 6% of patients experienced grade 1 and grade 2 or more late bowel toxicity, respectively. The mean bowel volume was significantly less at doses ≥50 Gy in those treated with reduced high dose volume radiotherapy compared with standard radiotherapy. The probability of late bowel toxicity increased as bowel volume increased (P ≤ 0.05 for dose levels 30-50 Gy). No grade 2 or more late bowel toxicity was observed in patients with bowel volumes under the thresholds given in the model that predict for 25% probability of late bowel toxicity. There is a dose volume effect for late bowel toxicity in radical bladder radiotherapy. We have modelled the probability of late bowel toxicity from absolute bowel volumes to guide clinicians in assessing radical bladder radiotherapy plans. Thresholds predicting for a 25% probability of late bowel toxicity are proposed as dose volume constraints. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Intravesical TRPV4 blockade reduces repeated variate stress-induced bladder dysfunction by increasing bladder capacity and decreasing voiding frequency in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with functional lower urinary tract disorders including interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) and overactive bladder (OAB) often report symptom (e.g., urinary frequency) worsening due to stress. One member of the transient receptor potential ion channel vanilloid family, TRPV4, has recently been implicated in urinary bladder dysfunction disorders including OAB and IC/BPS. These studies address the role of TRPV4 in stress-induced bladder dysfunction using an animal model of stress in male rats. To induce stress, rats were exposed to 7 days of repeated variate stress (RVS). Quantitative PCR data demonstrated significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in TRPV4 transcript levels in urothelium but not detrusor smooth muscle. Western blot analyses of split urinary bladders (i.e., urothelium and detrusor) showed significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in TRPV4 protein expression levels in urothelial tissues but not detrusor smooth muscle. We previously showed that RVS produces bladder dysfunction characterized by decreased bladder capacity and increased voiding frequency. The functional role of TRPV4 in RVS-induced bladder dysfunction was evaluated using continuous, open outlet intravesical infusion of saline in conjunction with administration of a TRPV4 agonist, GSK1016790A (3 μM), a TRPV4 antagonist, HC067047 (1 μM), or vehicle (0.1% DMSO in saline) in control and RVS-treated rats. Bladder capacity, void volume, and intercontraction interval significantly decreased following intravesical instillation of GSK1016790A in control rats and significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased following administration of HC067047 in RVS-treated rats. These results demonstrate increased TRPV4 expression in the urothelium following RVS and that TRPV4 blockade ameliorates RVS-induced bladder dysfunction consistent with the role of TRPV4 as a promising target for bladder function disorders. PMID:24965792

  1. Noninvasive Evaluation of Bladder Wall Mechanical Properties as a Function of Filling Volume: Potential Application in Bladder Compliance Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Nenadic

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method to monitor bladder wall mechanical properties as a function of filling volume, with the potential application to bladder compliance assessment. The proposed ultrasound bladder vibrometry (UBV method uses ultrasound to excite and track Lamb waves on the bladder wall from which its mechanical properties are derived by fitting measurements to an analytical model. Of particular interest is the shear modulus of bladder wall at different volumes, which we hypothesize, is similar to measuring the compliance characteristics of the bladder.Three experimental models were used: 1 an ex vivo porcine model where normal and aberrant (stiffened by formalin bladders underwent evaluation by UBV; 2 an in vivo study to evaluate the performance of UBV on patients with clinically documented compliant and noncompliant bladders undergoing UDS; and 3 a noninvasive UBV protocol to assess bladder compliance using oral hydration and fractionated voiding on three healthy volunteers.The ex vivo studies showed a high correlation between the UBV parameters and direct pressure measurement (R2 = 0.84-0.99. A similar correlation was observed for 2 patients with compliant and noncompliant bladders (R2 = 0.89-0.99 undergoing UDS detrusor pressure-volume measurements. The results of UBV on healthy volunteers, performed without catheterization, were comparable to a compliant bladder patient.The utility of UBV as a method to monitor changes in bladder wall mechanical properties is validated by the high correlation with pressure measurements in ex vivo and in vivo patient studies. High correlation UBV and UDS in vivo studies demonstrated the potential of UBV as a bladder compliance assessment tool. Results of studies on healthy volunteers with normal bladders demonstrated that UBV could be performed noninvasively. Further studies on a larger cohort are needed to fully validate the use of UBV as a clinical tool for bladder compliance assessment.

  2. Real-time bladder volume monitoring by the application of a new implantable bladder volume sensor for a small animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sup Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although real-time monitoring of bladder volume together with intravesical pressure can provide more information for understanding the functional changes of the urinary bladder, it still entails difficulties in the accurate prediction of real-time bladder volume in urodynamic studies with small animal models. We studied a new implantable bladder volume monitoring device with eight rats. During cystometry, microelectrodes prepared by the microelectromechanical systems process were placed symmetrically on both lateral walls of the bladder, and the expanded bladder volume was calculated. Immunohistological study was done after 1 week and after 4 weeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of the microelectrode. From the point that infused saline volume into the bladder was higher than 0.6 mL, estimated bladder volume was statistically correlated with the volume of saline injected (p<0.01. Additionally, the microelectromechanical system microelectrodes used in this study showed reliable biocompatibility. Therefore, the device can be used to evaluate changes in bladder volume in studies with small animals, and it may help to provide more information about functional changes in the bladder in laboratory studies. Furthermore, owing to its biocompatibility, the device could be chronically implanted in conscious ambulating animals, thus allowing a novel longitudinal study to be performed for a specific purpose.

  3. Implantable bladder volume sensor based on resistor ladder network composed of conductive hydrogel composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi Kyung Kim; Hyojung Kim; Jung, Yeon Su; Adem, Kenana M A; Bawazir, Sarah S; Stefanini, Cesare; Lee, Hyunjoo J

    2017-07-01

    An accurate bladder volume monitoring system is a critical component in diagnosis and treatment of urological disorders. Here, we report an implantable bladder volume sensor with a multi-level resistor ladder which estimates the bladder volume through discrete resistance values. Discretization allows the sensor output to be resilient to the long-term drift, hysteresis, and degradation of the sensor materials. Our sensor is composed of biocompatible polypyrrole/agarose hydrogel composite. Because Young's modulus of this composite is comparable to that of the bladder wall, the effect of mechanical loading of the sensor on the bladder movement is minimized which allows more accurate volume monitoring. We also demonstrate the patterning and molding capability of this material by fabrication various structures. Lastly, we successfully demonstrate the functionality of the multi-level resistor ladder sensor as a bladder volume sensor by attaching the sensor on the pig's bladder and observing the impedance change of the sensor.

  4. Variations in the spatial distribution of gall bladder cancer: a call for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The incidence of gall bladder cancers in this part of the world is high and the spatial variation in occurrence of gall bladder cancers can be identified by using geographical information system. Materials and Methods: Data set containing the address information of gall bladder cancer patients from the District of ...

  5. A cadaveric study involving variations in external morphology of gall bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjankar Vaibhav Prakash, Panshewdikar Pradnyesh N, Joshi DS, Anjankar Ashish Prakash

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Variations in the pattern of the extra hepatic biliary tract are usual and are commonly encountered during some radiological investigations or in operation theaters. Such Variations of the morphology of Gall bladder have been well documented in the literature for many years but a detail morphological study of variations of the gall bladder and its incidence is very rare. In this era of quick results, increasing use of diagnostic and interventional procedures makes it important to study variations of gall bladder morphology. Most of the interventional procedures in this modern era are done laparoscopically and there is tremendous increase in the number of laparoscopic cholecystectomies. So, sound knowledge of possible variations in morphology of gall bladder is important. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken on 90 cadaveric liver and gall bladder specimens in terms of length, maximum transverse diameter, shape, external variations of gall bladder, Interior and length of gall bladder below the inferior border of the liver. Results: GB had length ranging between 7 and 10 cm, transverse diameter between 2 and 5 cm. The commonest shape observed in this study was pear shaped in 82.22% of cases. The length of gall bladder below the inferior border of liver varied between 0.4 and 2.5 cm. Conclusion: The growing importance of such variations, lie not only from the point of biliary disease but also with respect to the various invasive techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of gall bladder and extrahepatic bile duct disease.

  6. Repeated variate stress in male rats induces increased voiding frequency, somatic sensitivity, and urinary bladder nerve growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Liana; Malley, Susan; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2013-07-15

    Stress exacerbates symptoms of functional lower urinary tract disorders including interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) and overactive bladder (OAB) in humans, but mechanisms contributing to symptom worsening are unknown. These studies address stress-induced changes in the structure and function of the micturition reflex using an animal model of stress in male rats. Rats were exposed to 7 days of repeated variate stress (RVS). Target organ (urinary bladder, thymus, adrenal gland) tissues were collected and weighed following RVS. Evans blue (EB) concentration and histamine, myeloperoxidase (MPO), nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), and CXCL12 protein content (ELISA) were measured in the urinary bladder, and somatic sensitivity of the hindpaw and pelvic regions was determined following RVS. Bladder function was evaluated using continuous, open outlet intravesical infusion of saline in conscious rats. Increases in body weight gain were significantly (P ≤ 0.01) attenuated by day 5 of RVS, and adrenal weight was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased. Histamine, MPO, NGF, and CXCL12 protein expression was significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased in the urinary bladder after RVS. Somatic sensitivity of the hindpaw and pelvic regions was significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased at all monofilament forces tested (0.1-4 g) after RVS. Intercontraction interval, infused volume, and void volume were significantly (P ≤ 0.01) decreased after RVS. These studies demonstrate increased voiding frequency, histamine, MPO, NGF, and CXCL12 bladder content and somatic sensitivity after RVS suggesting an inflammatory component to stress-induced changes in bladder function and somatic sensitivity.

  7. Comparison of doses according to change of bladder volume in treatment of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    In the case of radiation therapy for prostate cancer, a balloon infused with a certain amount of air through the anus is used to reduce rectal dose. Because of the reason, radiation therapy for prostate cancer has acquired CBCT for daily image induction. In order to maintain the anatomical structure most similar to the first CT taken before treatment, it is pretreated, but it can not be said to be perfectly consistent. In two actual treatment regimens, the volume of the bladder was measured as 45.82 cc and 63.43 cc, and the equivalent diameter was 4.4 cm and 4.9 cm. As a result of this study, the mean volume of the bladder was estimated to be 56.2 cc, 105.6 cc by 20 CBCT. The mean dose of CBCT was 1.74% and the mean Bladder mean dose was 96.67%. In case B, PTV mean dose was 4.31%, Bladder mean Dose was estimated to be 97.35%. The changes in the volume of the bladder resulted in changes in the dose of PTV and bladder. The correlation coefficient of bladder dose according to the change of bladder volume showed linearity of mean dose R2= -0.94. The correlation coefficient of the PTV dose according to the volume change of the bladder showed linearity of mean dose R2= 0.04. It was found that the dose change of PTV was larger than that of bladder according to the change of bladder volume.

  8. Should the bladder be full or empty during gynecologic brachytherapy applications? A bladder dose volume histogram analysis and implications for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Lewandowski, Loretta A.; Higgins, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic radiation cystitis is an uncommon but debilitating late complication of definitive external beam (EB) and brachytherapy (BT) for cervix cancer. During BT an indwelling catheter is usually placed in the bladder, collapsing it closer to the BT sources. We have devised a method to deliver BT with a full bladder. The difference in bladder dose in the full and empty state were analyzed during definitive EBT and BT for cervix cancer. Methods: The technique of Lyman and Wolbarst (1) were used to evaluate the bladder complication probability for a representative cervix cancer patient undergoing EBT and BT. DVHs were generated from CT scans obtained with a full and empty bladder. Three possible dose prescriptions were analyzed. Results: The DVH for the full and empty situations are shown. With the bladder full, the volume of bladder predicted to receive ≥ 80 Gy was approximately 10% for all dose schemes evaluated, whereas with the bladder empty, up to 50% of the bladder volume received ≥ 80 Gy. Conclusions: A distended bladder improves the DVH. A technique for performing full bladder LDR brachytherapy will be discussed

  9. An improved distance-to-dose correlation for predicting bladder and rectum dose-volumes in knowledge-based VMAT planning for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Phillip D. H.; Carver, Robert L.; Fontenot, Jonas D.

    2018-01-01

    The overlap volume histogram (OVH) is an anatomical metric commonly used to quantify the geometric relationship between an organ at risk (OAR) and target volume when predicting expected dose-volumes in knowledge-based planning (KBP). This work investigated the influence of additional variables contributing to variations in the assumed linear DVH-OVH correlation for the bladder and rectum in VMAT plans of prostate patients, with the goal of increasing prediction accuracy and achievability of knowledge-based planning methods. VMAT plans were retrospectively generated for 124 prostate patients using multi-criteria optimization. DVHs quantified patient dosimetric data while OVHs quantified patient anatomical information. The DVH-OVH correlations were calculated for fractional bladder and rectum volumes of 30, 50, 65, and 80%. Correlations between potential influencing factors and dose were quantified using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (R). Factors analyzed included the derivative of the OVH, prescribed dose, PTV volume, bladder volume, rectum volume, and in-field OAR volume. Out of the selected factors, only the in-field bladder volume (mean R  =  0.86) showed a strong correlation with bladder doses. Similarly, only the in-field rectal volume (mean R  =  0.76) showed a strong correlation with rectal doses. Therefore, an OVH formalism accounting for in-field OAR volumes was developed to determine the extent to which it improved the DVH-OVH correlation. Including the in-field factor improved the DVH-OVH correlation, with the mean R values over the fractional volumes studied improving from  -0.79 to  -0.85 and  -0.82 to  -0.86 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. A re-planning study was performed on 31 randomly selected database patients to verify the increased accuracy of KBP dose predictions by accounting for bladder and rectum volume within treatment fields. The in-field OVH led to significantly more precise

  10. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of a coating material for an implantable bladder volume sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Kim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As the applications for implantable medical devices have increased, the need for biocompatible packaging materials has become important. Recently, we reported an implantable sensor for real-time monitoring of the changes in bladder volume, which necessitated finding a safe coating material for use in bladder tissue. At present, materials like polyethylene glycol (PEG, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and parylene-C are used in biomedical devices or as coating materials, owing to their excellent safety in various medical fields. However, few studies have assessed their safety in bladder tissue, therefore, we evaluated the biocompatibility of PEG, PDMS and parylene-C in the bladder. All three materials turned out to be safe in in vitro tests of live/dead staining and cell viability. In vivo tests with hematoxylin and eosin and immunofluorescence staining with MAC387 showed no persistent inflammation. Therefore, we consider that the three materials are biocompatible in bladder tissue. Despite this safety, however, PEG has biodegradable characteristics and thus is not suitable for use as packaging. We suggest that PDMS and parylene-C can be used as safe coating materials for the implantable bladder volume sensor reported previously.

  11. Interobserver variation in rectal and bladder doses in orthogonal film-based treatment planning of cancer of the uterine cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghukumar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal film-based treatment planning is the most commonly adopted standard practice of treatment planning for cancer of the uterine cervix using high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR. This study aims at examining the variation in rectal and bladder doses when the same set of orthogonal films was given to different observers. Five physicists were given 35 pairs of orthogonal films obtained from patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy. They were given the same instructions and asked to plan the case assuming the tumor was centrally placed, using the treatment-planning system, PLATO BPS V13.2. A statistically significant difference was observed in the average rectal (F = 3.407, P = 0.01 and bladder (F = 3.284, P = 0.013 doses and the volumes enclosed by the 100% isodose curve ( P < 0.01 obtained by each observer. These variations may be attributed to the differences in the reconstruction of applicators, the selection of source positions in ovoids and the intrauterine (IU tube, and the differences in the selection of points especially for the rectum, from lateral radiographs. These variations in planning seen within a department can be avoided if a particular source pattern is followed in the intrauterine tube, unless a specific situation demands a change. Variations in the selection of rectal points can be ruled out if the posterior vaginal surface is clearly seen.

  12. Variation in bowel and bladder continence across US spina bifida programs: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Kurt A; Castillo, Heidi; Castillo, Jonathan; Liu, Tiebin; Schechter, Michael; Wiener, John S; Thibadeau, Judy; Ward, Elisabeth; Brei, Timothy

    2017-12-11

    Continence is low in individuals with spina bifida, but published prevalence varies markedly across studies. The objective of this study was to examine bladder and bowel continence among patients served by multidisciplinary clinics participating in the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry and to examine whether variation in prevalence exists across clinics. Data were obtained from patients 5 years and older from March 2009 to December 2012. Data were gathered at clinic visits using standardized definitions. Data from 3252 individuals were included. Only 40.8% of participants were continent of urine; 43% were continent of stool. Bladder and bowel continence differed by spina bifida type, with those with myelomeningocele having significantly lower reported prevalence of continence than those with other forms of spina bifida. Bladder and bowel continence varied across registry sites. Adjustment based on demographic and condition-specific variables did not make substantive differences in prevalence observed. Less than half of spina bifida patients served in multidisciplinary clinics report bladder or bowel continence. Variability in prevalence was observed across clinics. Further research is needed to examine if clinic-specific variables (e.g., types of providers, types of interventions used) account for the observed variation.

  13. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, M.R.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Vight, L.P. van der; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Visser, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was

  14. Robust bladder image registration by redefining data-term in total variational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sharib; Daul, Christian; Galbrun, Ernest; Amouroux, Marine; Guillemin, François; Blondel, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Cystoscopy is the standard procedure for clinical diagnosis of bladder cancer diagnosis. Bladder carcinoma in situ are often multifocal and spread over large areas. In vivo, localization and follow-up of these tumors and their nearby sites is necessary. But, due to the small field of view (FOV) of the cystoscopic video images, urologists cannot easily interpret the scene. Bladder mosaicing using image registration facilitates this interpretation through the visualization of entire lesions with respect to anatomical landmarks. The reference white light (WL) modality is affected by a strong variability in terms of texture, illumination conditions and motion blur. Moreover, in the complementary fluorescence light (FL) modality, the texture is visually different from that of the WL. Existing algorithms were developed for a particular modality and scene conditions. This paper proposes a more general on fly image registration approach for dealing with these variability issues in cystoscopy. To do so, we present a novel, robust and accurate image registration scheme by redefining the data-term of the classical total variational (TV) approach. Quantitative results on realistic bladder phantom images are used for verifying accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. This method is also qualitatively assessed with patient data mosaicing for both WL and FL modalities.

  15. 640-slice DVCT multi-dimensionally and dynamically presents changes in bladder volume and urine flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yunshan; Fang, Kewei; Mao, Chongwen; Xiang, Shutian; Wang, Jin; Li, Yingwen

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the application of 640-slice dynamic volume computed tomography (DVCT) to excretory cystography and urethrography. A total of 70 healthy subjects were included in the study. Excretory cystography and urethrography using 640-slice DVCT was conducted to continuously record the motions of the bladder and the proximal female and male urethra. The patients' voiding process was divided into early, early to middle, middle, middle to late, and late voiding phases. The subjects were analyzed using DVCT and conventional CT. The cross-sectional areas of various sections of the male and female urethra were evaluated, and the average urine flow rate was calculated. The 640-slice DVCT technique was used to dynamically observe the urine flow rate and changes in bladder volume at all voiding phases. The urine volume detected by 640-slice DVCT exhibited no significant difference compared with the actual volume, and no significant difference compared with that determined using conventional CT. Furthermore, no significant difference in the volume of the bladder at each phase of the voiding process was detected between 640-slice DVCT and conventional CT. The results indicate that 640-slice DVCT can accurately evaluate the status of the male posterior urethra and female urethra. In conclusion, 640-slice DVCT is able to multi-dimensionally and dynamically present changes in bladder volume and urine flow rate, and could obtain similar results to conventional CT in detecting urine volume, as well as the status of the male posterior urethra and female urethra. PMID:29467853

  16. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder with Cone Beam CT Scan: Use of Individualized Internal Target Volumes for a Single Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Saini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While planning radiation therapy (RT for a carcinoma of the urinary bladder (CaUB, the intra-fractional variation of the urinary bladder (UB volume due to filling-up needs to be accounted for. This internal target volume (ITV is obtained by adding internal margins (IM to the contoured bladder. This study was planned to propose a method of acquiring individualized ITVs for each patient and to verify their reproducibility. Methods: One patient with CaUB underwent simulation with the proposed ‘bladder protocol’. After immobilization, a planning CT scan on empty bladder was done. He was then given 300 ml of water to drink and the time (T was noted. Planning CT scans were performed after 20 min (T+20, 30 min (T+30 and 40 min (T+40. The CT scan at T+20 was co-registered with the T+30 and T+40 scans. The bladder volumes at 20, 30 and 40 min were then contoured as CTV20, CTV30 and CTV40 to obtain an individualized ITV for our patient. For daily treatment, he was instructed to drink water as above, and the time was noted; treatment was started after 20 min. Daily pre- and post-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT scans were done. The bladder visualized on the pre-treatment CBCT scan was compared with CTV20 and on the post-treatment CBCT scan with CTV30. Results: In total, there were 65 CBCT scans (36 pre- and 29 post-treatment. Individualized ITVs were found to be reproducible in 93.85% of all instances and fell outside in 4 instances. Conclusions: The proposed bladder protocol can yield a reproducible estimation of the ITV during treatment; this can obviate the need for taking standard IMs.

  17. Variation of clinical target volume definition in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Sweet, John W.; Hauck, Walter W.; Hudes, Richard S.; Lee, Tony; Dicker, Adam P.; Waterman, Frank M.; Anne, Pramila R.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Galvin, James M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) planning relies on the interpretation of computed tomography (CT) axial images for defining the clinical target volume (CTV). This study investigates the variation among multiple observers to define the CTV used in 3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seven observers independently delineated the CTVs (prostate ± seminal vesicles [SV]) from the CT simulation data of 10 prostate cancer patients undergoing 3D-CRT. Six patients underwent CT simulation without the use of contrast material and serve as a control group. The other 4 had urethral and bladder opacification with contrast medium. To determine interobserver variation, we evaluated the derived volume, the maximum dimensions, and the isocenter for each examination of CTV. We assessed the reliability in the CTVs among the observers by correlating the variation for each class of measurements. This was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), with 1.00 defining absolute correlation. Results: For the prostate volumes, the ICC was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.96). This changed to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.75-0.99) with the use of contrast material. Similarly, the maximal prostatic dimensions were reliable and improved. There was poor agreement in defining the SV. For this structure, the ICC never exceeded 0.28. The reliability of the isocenter was excellent, with the ICC exceeding 0.83 and 0.90 for the prostate ± SV, respectively. Conclusions: In 3D-CRT for prostate cancer, there was excellent agreement among multiple observers to define the prostate target volume but poor agreement to define the SV. The use of urethral and bladder contrast improved the reliability of localizing the prostate. For all CTVs, the isocenter was very reliable and should be used to compare the variation in 3D dosimetry among multiple observers

  18. Comparison between prostate volume and intravesical prostatic protrusion in detecting bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, A K M S; Alam, A K M K; Habib, A K M K; Rashid, M M; Rahman, H; Islam, A K M A; Jahan, M U

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the correlation of intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP) and prostate volume (PV) with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). This study was conducted in the department of urology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh, between July 2009 to September 2010. Fifty benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients were included in the study. Their evaluation consisted of history along with International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), digital rectal examination (DRE), transabdominal ultrasonography to measure prostate volume, intravesical prostatic protrusion & post voidal residual (PVR) urine and pressure-flow studies to detect bladder outflow obstruction (BOO). Statistical analysis included Unpaired 't' test, Chi-square test and Spearman's Rank correlation test. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the correlation of PV and IPP with BOO. Mean prostate volume was significantly larger in bladder outlet obstructed patients (PProstate volume & intravesical prostatic protrusion measured through transabdominal ultrasonography are noninvasive and accessible method that significantly correlates with bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and the correlation of IPP is much more stronger than that of prostate volume.

  19. Variations in the Spatial Distribution of Gall Bladder Cancer: A Call ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    which is second to the highest (Chile) in the world and AAR of carcinoma gall bladder is 7.4/100,000 male population, the AAR of carcinoma gall bladder in males is highest in the country.[1,2] Nandakumar et al. had identified this part of the country as a geographically high risk area for carcinoma of the gall bladder.

  20. Genetic variation in DROSHA 3'UTR regulated by hsa-miR-27b is associated with bladder cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yuan

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: miRNAs can regulate the biological processes, including differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. DICER and DROSHA are two members of RNase III family, playing pivotal roles in the pathway of miRNAs biogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that genetic variations of the DICER and DROSHA genes were associated with the bladder cancer risk. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We performed a case-control study of 685 bladder cancer cases and 730 controls to investigate the association between the seven functional SNPs of DICER and DROSHA genes and bladder cancer risk. We then evaluated the functionality of the important SNPs. RESULTS: We found that rs10719T>C polymorphism located in 3' untranslated region (UTR of DROSHA gene was associated with the increased risk of bladder cancer. Stratified analysis suggested that rs10719TC/CC genotype can increase risk of bladder cancer among male patients (Adjusted OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.05-1.70, P = 0.018, and ever smokers (1.56, 1.14-2.14, 0.006, compared with TT genotype. Furthermore, DROSHA rs10719T>C polymorphism was predicted to regulate the binding activity of hsa-miR-27a/b. Luciferase reported gene assay confirmed that rs10719 T to G substitution disrupted the binding site for hsa-miR-27b, resulting the increased levels of DROSHA protein. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these findings suggested that DROSHA rs10719T>C polymorphism may be associated with bladder cancer risk in a Chinese population, and hsa-miR-27b can influence the expression of DROSHA protein by binding with 3'UTR.

  1. Urethral Pressure Variation: A neglected contributing factor in patients with overactive bladder syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Kirschner-Hermanns; Ralf, Anding; Nariman, Gadzhiev; Ing, Goping; Adele, Campbell; Nadine, Huppertz

    2017-01-01

    To study urethral pressure variations during the whole filling phase among different groups of patients. We investigated 79 consecutive patients from January 2011 to June 2012. All patients were recruited within our routine practice in our continence clinic and were evaluated with urodynamic exam according to the standards of the International Continence Society (ICS) with an additional continuous measurement of the urethral pressure profile (cUPP) that was done in a supine position. Patients with genital prolapse >grade I, as well as patients with impaired cognitive function or neurogenic disorders were excluded. Bacteriuria at the time of investigation was excluded by urine analysis. Urethral pressure changes higher than 15cmH2O were considered as 'urethral instability'. From 79 investigated patients, 29 were clinically diagnosed with OAB syndrome, 19 with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and 31 with mixed (OAB and SUI) incontinence. The prevalence of 'urethral instability' as defined in this study was 54.4% (43/79). The mean Δp in patients with OAB (36.5cmH2O) was significantly higher (poveractive bladder syndrome, especially concomitant with detrusor activity can raise a fair question and direct further diagnostic as well as treatment efforts. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  2. Bladder volume at onset of vesicoureteral reflux is an independent risk factor for breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Siobhan E; Arlen, Angela M; Storm, Douglas W; Kieran, Kathleen; Cooper, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Improved identification of children with vesicoureteral reflux at risk for recurrent febrile urinary tract infection may impact management decisions. We hypothesized that reflux occurring earlier during bladder filling increases the duration of exposure of the kidneys to bacteria, and, therefore, increases the risk of pyelonephritis. Children with vesicoureteral reflux and detailed voiding cystourethrogram data were identified. Bladder volume at onset of reflux was normalized for age. Demographics, reflux grade, laterality, presence/absence of bladder-bowel dysfunction and breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections were assessed. Median followup was 24 months (IQR 12 to 52). A total of 208 girls and 47 boys were analyzed with a mean ± SD age at diagnosis of 3.1 ± 2.6 years. On univariate analysis history of febrile urinary tract infection (HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.33-2.85, p = 0.01), dilating vesicoureteral reflux (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.05-2.42, p = 0.03) and bladder-bowel dysfunction (HR 1.66, 95% CI 0.99-2.75, p = 0.05) were associated with an increased risk of breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection. Median bladder volume at onset of reflux in children with breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection was significantly less (33.1%) than in those without infection (49.5%, p = 0.003). Reflux onset at 35% predicted bladder capacity or less was associated with a significantly increased risk of breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection on multivariate analysis (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.05-2.38, p = 0.03). Children with early filling vesicoureteral reflux are at increased risk for breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection independent of reflux grade. Bladder volume at onset of reflux should be recorded during cystograms since it provides additional prognostic information about the risk of pyelonephritis and resolution, and may assist with counseling and clinical decision making. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  3. Urethral pressure variation: a neglected contributing factor in patients with overactive bladder syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Kirschner-Hermanns

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To study urethral pressure variations during the whole filling phase among different groups of patients. Material and Methods We investigated 79 consecutive patients from January 2011 to June 2012. All patients were recruited within our routine practice in our continence clinic and were evaluated with urodynamic exam according to the standards of the International Continence Society (ICS with an additional continuous measurement of the urethral pressure profile (cUPP that was done in a supine position. Patients with genital prolapse >grade I, as well as patients with impaired cognitive function or neurogenic disorders were excluded. Bacteriuria at the time of investigation was excluded by urine analysis. Urethral pressure changes higher than 15cmH2O were considered as ‘urethral instability’. Results From 79 investigated patients, 29 were clinically diagnosed with OAB syndrome, 19 with stress urinary incontinence (SUI and 31 with mixed (OAB and SUI incontinence. The prevalence of ‘urethral instability’ as defined in this study was 54.4% (43/79. The mean Δp in patients with OAB (36.5cmH2O was significantly higher (p<0.05 than in groups with pure stress (14.9cmH2O and mixed urinary incontinence (19.3cmH2O. Conclusions Etiology of ‘urethral instability’ is unknown, but high prevalence among patients with overactive bladder syndrome, especially concomitant with detrusor activity can raise a fair question and direct further diagnostic as well as treatment efforts.

  4. Correlation between cystometric volumes, ATP release, and pH in women with overactive bladder versus controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Mansfield, Kylie J; Allen, Wendy; Millard, Richard J; Burcher, Elizabeth; Moore, Kate H

    2013-09-01

    In the bladder, ATP is an important signaling molecule, which is released by bladder stretch and acid. We hypothesized that ATP might play a unique role in patients with OAB, characterized by low bladder volumes at first desire to void (FDV) and maximal cystometric capacity (MCC) and symptoms of frequency/urgency [mild bladder pain syndrome (BPS)]. Our aim was to investigate the correlation between ATP release and urodynamic parameters, as well as urine pH, in OAB patients. Routine cystometry was performed in a consecutive series of 249 women. The voided urodynamic fluid (VUF) was stored at -20°C and ATP measured using bioluminescence. Catheter urine was collected for pH measurement. Correlations between two factors were tested by linear regression analysis. Subjects with urinary tract infection, voiding dysfunction, and detrusor overactivity (DO) were excluded. For OAB patients (n = 25), there was an inverse correlation between ATP concentration in VUF and FDV (r(2)  = 0.25; P = 0.01) but not MCC. This was not seen in controls (n = 69). In OAB, but not controls, there was a significant reverse correlation (r(2)  = 0.16; P = 0.047) between ATP in VUF and urine pH. Urine pH was not significantly correlated with MCC in either group. In OAB patients, ATP is an important factor for initial perception of need to urinate (as indicated by FDV). This is similar to our previous findings in patients with DO, suggesting that ATP may mediate initial afferent sensation in patients with bladder dysfunctions characterized by urgency. ATP release was also strongly affected by urine pH, in patients with OAB (at FDV). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Genetic variation in the prostate stem cell antigen gene PSCA confers susceptibility to urinary bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, X.; Ye, Y.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Sulem, P.; Rafnar, T.; Matullo, G.; Seminara, D.; Yoshida, T.; Saeki, N.; Andrew, A.S.; Dinney, C.P.; Czerniak, B.; Zhang, Z.F.; Kiltie, A.E.; Bishop, D.T.; Vineis, P.; Porru, S.; Buntinx, F.; Kellen, E.; Zeegers, M.P.; Kumar, R.; Rudnai, P.; Gurzau, E; Koppova, K.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Sanchez, M.; Saez, B.; Lindblom, A.; Verdier, P. de; Steineck, G.; Mills, G.B.; Schned, A.; Guarrera, S.; Polidoro, S.; Chang, S.C.; Lin, J.; Chang, D.W.; Hale, K.S.; Majewski, T.; Grossman, H.B.; Thorlacius, S.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Aben, K.K.H.; Witjes, J.A.; Stefansson, K.; Amos, C.I.; Karagas, M.R.; Gu, J.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study on 969 bladder cancer cases and 957 controls from Texas. For fast-track validation, we evaluated 60 SNPs in three additional US populations and validated the top SNP in nine European populations. A missense variant (rs2294008) in the PSCA gene showed

  6. Volume variation of Gruneisen parameters of fcc transition metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ultrasonic measurements and melting of solids (Mulargia and Boschi 1978 .... Several studies in the past based on model pseudo- potential suggest ... Volume variation of fcc transition metals. 65. The present value for Cu is in good agreement with the experimental values. Also, the presently obtained value agrees well with ...

  7. Patient preferences for clean intermittent catheterisation and transurethral indwelling catheterisation for treatment of abnormal post-void residual bladder volume after vaginal prolapse surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakvoort, R. A.; Nieuwkerk, P. T.; Burger, M. P.; Emanuel, M. H.; Roovers, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    To determine patient preferences for clean intermittent catheterisation (CIC) relative to transurethral indwelling catheterisation (TIC) as the treatment of abnormal post-void residual bladder volume (PVR) following vaginal prolapse surgery. Scenario-based preference assessment during face-to-face

  8. Tumor motion and deformation during external radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, Heidi T.; Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.; Duppen, Joop C.; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: First, to quantify bladder-tumor motion in 3 dimensions during a 4-week to 5-week course of external radiotherapy. Second, to relate the motion to the tumor location on the bladder wall. Third, to extensively evaluate gross tumor volume (GTV) shape and volume changes during the course of the treatment. Methods and Materials: Multiple repeat computed tomography (CT) images were obtained for 21 bladder cancer patients. These scans were matched to the rigid bony anatomy. For each patient, the main direction and magnitude of the tumor movement was determined by use of principle-component analysis. To study GTV shape changes, all GTVs were registered to the GTV in the planning CT scan, and the residual shape errors were determined by measurement of edge variations perpendicular to the median surface. Results: Gross tumor volume translations were largest in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior direction (SD, 0.1 to ∼0.9 cm). The translations were strongly correlated with the tumor location on the bladder wall. The average value of the local standard deviations of the GTV shape ranged from 0.1 to approximately 0.35 cm. Conclusions: Despite large differences in bladder filling, variations in GTV shape were small compared with variations in GTV position. Geometric uncertainties in the GTV position depended strongly on the tumor location on the bladder wall

  9. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-21

    CBCT sampled on the segmentation contour candidate. The cost function measured the goodness of fit of the segmentation on the validation image and was minimized using a simplex optimizer. For each validation CBCT image, the segmentations were done five times using a different reference CBCT. The one with the lowest cost function was selected as the final bladder segmentation. Volume- and distance-based metrics and the accuracy of plan selection were evaluated to quantify the performance. Two to four PCA modes were needed to represent the bladder shape variation with less than 0.1 cm average residual error for the training data of each patient. The automatically segmented bladders had a 78.5% mean conformity index with the manual delineations. The mean SD of the local residual error over all patients was 0.24 cm. The agreement of plan selection between automatic and manual bladder segmentations was 77.5%. PCA is an efficient method to describe patient-specific bladder deformation. The statistical-shape-based segmentation approach is robust to handle the relatively poor CBCT image quality and allows for fast and reliable automatic segmentation of the bladder on CBCT for selecting the appropriate plan from a library of plans.

  10. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xiangfei; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan; Van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja

    2012-01-01

    CBCT sampled on the segmentation contour candidate. The cost function measured the goodness of fit of the segmentation on the validation image and was minimized using a simplex optimizer. For each validation CBCT image, the segmentations were done five times using a different reference CBCT. The one with the lowest cost function was selected as the final bladder segmentation. Volume- and distance-based metrics and the accuracy of plan selection were evaluated to quantify the performance. Two to four PCA modes were needed to represent the bladder shape variation with less than 0.1 cm average residual error for the training data of each patient. The automatically segmented bladders had a 78.5% mean conformity index with the manual delineations. The mean SD of the local residual error over all patients was 0.24 cm. The agreement of plan selection between automatic and manual bladder segmentations was 77.5%. PCA is an efficient method to describe patient-specific bladder deformation. The statistical-shape-based segmentation approach is robust to handle the relatively poor CBCT image quality and allows for fast and reliable automatic segmentation of the bladder on CBCT for selecting the appropriate plan from a library of plans. (paper)

  11. When treating prostate cancer with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy the impact of bladder filling status on the volume and integral dose distribution of the target and critical organs should be kept in mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Li Yexiong; Guang Ying

    2007-01-01

    Objective: In prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), we tried to prospectively assess the impact of the filling status of bladder on the volume and the integral dose distribution to the target and surrounding critical organs. Methods: Ten patients with stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer were studied. All patients received 3DCRT to the prostate and inferior seminal vesicle. One hour before CT simulation, the bladder was first voided, and then 400 ml of oral contrast solution was given at every half hour before the CT scan. Urethral catheterization was used for voiding or distending the bladder. When distending the bladder, 250-300 ml of contrast was injected into the bladder with the patient fixed at the supine position. Two sets of transverse images were taken for the whole pelvis in empty and full bladder. After the target and critical organs (bladder, rectum, pelvic small bowel, and femoral heads) were contoured, a treatment plan of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy was made using the CMS Focus-Xio treatment planning system. The volume and mean doses of CTV, PTV, rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and small bowel with the bladder empty and full were evaluated. The percentage of volume which received 50 Gy in the rectum and bladder, 30 Gy in the femoral heads, and the maximal dose to the pelvic small bowel were also assessed . The variability of volume and dose distribution in these targets or organs was compared between the empty and full bladder status. Results: Comparing to the bladder empty status, full bladder led to a mean increase of 499% in the bladder volume, (67±9) ml and (336±48) ml (P=0.000), respectively. No volume change was found in the CTV, PTV, rectum, femoral heads and pel- vic small bowel(P=0.153,0.501,0.929,0.771,0.081). The mean dose to the bladder in full status was only 35% of that in empty status, (1501±201 ) cGy and (4267±216) cGy(P =0.000), respectively. The mean dose to the pelvic small

  12. Running interval training and estimated plasma-volume variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abderrahman, Abderraouf; Prioux, Jacques; Chamari, Karim; Ben Ounis, Omar; Tabka, Zouhair; Zouhal, Hassane

    2013-07-01

    The effect of endurance interval training (IT) on hematocrit (Ht), hemoglobin (Hb), and estimated plasma- volume variation (PVV) in response to maximal exercise was studied in 15 male subjects (21.1 ± 1.1 y; control group n = 6, and training group, n = 9). The training group participated in interval training 3 times a week for 7 wk. A maximal graded test (GXT) was performed to determine maximal aerobic power (MAP) and maximal aerobic speed (MAS) both before and after the training program. To determine Ht, Hb concentration, and lactate concentrations, blood was collected at rest, at the end of GXT, and after 10 and 30 min of recovery. MAP and MAS increased significantly (P training only in training group. Hematocrit determined at rest was significantly lower in the training group than in the control group after the training period (P training group (P training between PVV deter- mined at the end of the maximal test and MAS (r = .60, P training group. In conclusion, 7 wk of IT led to a significant increase in plasma volume that possibly contributed to the observed increase of aerobic fitness (MAP and MAS).

  13. Bladder Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  14. Neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your bladder at all Have signs of a bladder infection (fever, burning when you urinate, frequent urination) Urinate small amounts, frequently Alternative Names Neurogenic detrusor overactivity; NDO; Neurogenic bladder sphincter dysfunction; NBSD ...

  15. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  16. The Antimuscarinic Agent Tolterodine Regulates Bladder Extracellular Matrix in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Xin Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Antimuscarinic agents can delay the progression of bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. To date, the relationship between muscarinic receptor activity and the bladder extracellular matrix (ECM remains unclear. Thus, an animal model of partial BOO (PBOO in female rats was established to explore the variation in bladder wall ECM proteins under PBOO conditions with antimuscarinic agent administration. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham, PBOO, and PBOO plus tolterodine. Picrosirius red staining was used to examine the smooth muscle and collagen content of bladder samples. Gene microarray and RT-PCR were performed to survey the expression of ECM proteins, receptors, and metabolism regulators in the rat bladder. Positive results were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Picrosirius red staining showed that smooth muscle volume significantly increased in the PBOO and PBOO plus tolterodine groups (p < 0.05, while collagen significantly increased in the PBOO group (p < 0.05 but not in the PBOO plus tolterodine group. Gene microarray and RT-PCR revealed that none of the collagen subtypes exhibited significant changes after PBOO establishment and tolterodine administration. However, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs increased significantly in the PBOO plus tolterodine group (p < 0.05. Additionally, PBOO inhibited the expression of non-collagen ECM proteins in the rat bladder wall, while tolterodine induced the expression of non-collagen ECM proteins and ECM receptors. Conclusions: Tolterodine decreased the volume of collagen in PBOO rat bladder wall, possibly via MMPs, and regulated the expression of ECM proteins and receptors.

  17. Bladder Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  18. Adaptive radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten; Lebesque, Joos; Lotz, Heidi; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Moonen, Luc; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) in combination with a partial bladder irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with solitary T1-T4 N0M0 bladder cancer were treated to the bladder tumor + 2 cm margin planning target volume (PTV CONV ). During the first treatment week, five daily computed tomography (CT) scans were made immediately before or after treatment. In the second week, a volume was constructed encompassing the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) on the planning scan and the five CT scans (GTV ART ). The GTV ART was expanded with a 1 cm margin for the construction of a PTV ART . Starting in the third week, patients were treated to PTV ART . Repeat CT scans were used to evaluate treatment accuracy. Results: On 5 of 91 repeat CT scans (5%), the GTV was not adequately covered by the PTV ART . On treatment planning, there was only one scan in which the GTV was not adequately covered by the 95% isodose. On average, the treatment volumes were reduced by 40% when comparing PTV ART with PTV CONV (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The adaptive strategy for bladder cancer is an effective way to deal with treatment errors caused by variations in bladder tumor position and leads to a substantial reduction in treatment volumes

  19. External Validation and Optimization of International Consensus Clinical Target Volumes for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Abhinav V. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christodouleas, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wu, Tianming [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Smith, Norman D.; Steinberg, Gary D. [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: International consensus (IC) clinical target volumes (CTVs) have been proposed to standardize radiation field design in the treatment of patients at high risk of locoregional failure (LRF) after radical cystectomy. The purpose of this study was to externally validate the IC CTVs in a cohort of postsurgical patients followed up for LRF and identify revisions that might improve the IC CTVs' performance. Methods and Materials: Among 334 patients with pT3 to pT4 bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy, LRF developed in 58 (17%), of whom 52 had computed tomography scans available for review. Images with LRF were exported into a treatment planning system, and IC CTVs were contoured and evaluated for adequacy of coverage of each LRF with respect to both the patient and each of 6 pelvic subsites: common iliac (CI) region, obturator region (OR), external and internal iliac region, presacral region, cystectomy bed, or other pelvic site. Revisions to the IC contours were proposed based on the findings. Results: Of the 52 patients with documented LRF, 13 (25%) had LRFs that were outside of the IC CTV involving 17 pelvic subsites: 5 near the CI CTV, 5 near the OR CTV, 1 near the external and internal iliac region, and 6 near the cystectomy bed. The 5 CI failures were located superior to the CTV, and the 5 OR failures were located medial to the CTV. Increasing the superior boundary of the CI to a vessel-based definition of the aortic bifurcation, as well as increasing the medial extension of the OR by an additional 9 mm, decreased the number of patients with LRF outside of the IC CTV to 7 (13%). Conclusions: Modified IC CTVs inclusive of a slight adjustment superiorly for the CI region and medially for the OR may reduce the risk of pelvic failure in patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy.

  20. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is

  1. Urodynamic Features and Significant Predictors of Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Patients With Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Small Prostate Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minyong; Kim, Myong; Choo, Min Soo; Paick, Jae-Seung; Oh, Seung-June

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the clinical and urodynamic features of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) according to their prostate size. We analyzed 2039 LUTS/BPH patients who underwent urodynamic study between October 2004 and August 2013. We divided the patients into three groups according to their prostate size: small (≤30 mL), moderately enlarged (31-80 mL), and large prostate (≥81 mL) groups. We compared the groups regarding age, International Prostatic Symptom Score, maximal flow rate (Qmax), postvoided residual (PVR), serum prostate-specific antigen, prostate volume measured by ultrasonography, and urodynamic findings. Patients with a small prostate had better urodynamic outcomes than those with larger prostates in overall population. Although the total prostate volume significantly correlated with the bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) index (r  =  0.51), BOO patients with a small prostate had similar Qmax, higher PVR, and lower voiding efficiency, compared to those with larger prostates. Moreover, urodynamic parameters indicating bladder abnormalities, including low compliance and involuntary detrusor contraction positivity, were similar among the groups in BOO patients. A higher proportion of detrusor underactivity was also observed in the small prostate group in BOO patients. Finally, when adjusting for potential confounding variables, we identified serum prostate-specific antigen levels (odds ratio, 1.34) and Qmax (odds ratio, 0.77) as significant predictors for BOO in LUTS/BPH patients with a small prostate. BOO patients with a small prostate showed higher PVR and poor voiding efficiency, as well as similar urodynamic bladder abnormalities, compared to those with moderately enlarged and large prostates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of dose volume histogram parameters to estimate late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, L.J.; Brink, M. van den; Bruce, A.; Gras, L.; Velde, A. te; Lebesque, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to examine the effect of using different morbidity scoring systems on the results of these analyses. Materials and Methods: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications was scored based on questionnaires and classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. Moreover, patients were classified as being a rectal bleeder or no rectal bleeder and a distinction was made between non-severe and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 22 months. It was investigated whether the relative and absolute rectal wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels (≥ 60 Gy, ≥ 65 Gy, ≥ 70 Gy and ≥ 75 Gy) were correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI complications. First, the analysis was performed using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cut-off levels. Twenty cut-off levels were tested on their ability to discriminate between high and low risk for developing GI complications (Fig.). The relationship between bladder wall volumes irradiated to various dose levels and observed actuarial GU complications was investigated using the absolute bladder wall volumes, measured as a continuous variable. For both GI and GU complications, the role of the prescribed radiation dose and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: None of the DVH parameters of the rectal wall was significantly correlated with the actuarial incidences of

  3. A variational method for multiphase volume-preserving interface motions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švadlenka, Karel; Ginder, E.; Omata, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 257, Feb (2014), s. 157-179 ISSN 0377-0427 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : mean curvature flow * volume preservation * multiphase Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.266, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377042713004391

  4. International Prostatic Symptom Score-voiding/storage subscore ratio in association with total prostatic volume and maximum flow rate is diagnostic of bladder outlet-related lower urinary tract dysfunction in men with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hong Jiang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive values of the total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS-T and voiding to storage subscore ratio (IPSS-V/S in association with total prostate volume (TPV and maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax in the diagnosis of bladder outlet-related lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. METHODS: A total of 298 men with LUTS were enrolled. Video-urodynamic studies were used to determine the causes of LUTS. Differences in IPSS-T, IPSS-V/S ratio, TPV and Qmax between patients with bladder outlet-related LUTD and bladder-related LUTD were analyzed. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV for bladder outlet-related LUTD were calculated using these parameters. RESULTS: Of the 298 men, bladder outlet-related LUTD was diagnosed in 167 (56%. We found that IPSS-V/S ratio was significantly higher among those patients with bladder outlet-related LUTD than patients with bladder-related LUTD (2.28±2.25 vs. 0.90±0.88, p1 or >2 was factored into the equation instead of IPSS-T, PPV were 91.4% and 97.3%, respectively, and NPV were 54.8% and 49.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Combination of IPSS-T with TPV and Qmax increases the PPV of bladder outlet-related LUTD. Furthermore, including IPSS-V/S>1 or >2 into the equation results in a higher PPV than IPSS-T. IPSS-V/S>1 is a stronger predictor of bladder outlet-related LUTD than IPSS-T.

  5. Estimation of the incidence of late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Brink, Mandy van den; Bruce, Allison M.; Shouman, Tarek; Gras, Luuk; Velde, Annet te; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (>6 months) GI and GU complications was classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. In addition, GI complications were divided in nonsevere and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments or blood transfusions) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 24 months. We investigated whether rectal and bladder wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels, correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI and GU complications, using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH, the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cutoff levels. The impact of the total radiation dose, and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: The actuarial incidence at 2 years for GI complications ≥Grade II was 14% (RTOG/EORTC) or 20% (SOMA/LENT); for GU complications ≥Grade III 8% (RTOG/EORTC) or 21% (SOMA/LENT). Neither for GI complications ≥Grade II (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), nor for GU complications ≥Grade III (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), was a significant correlation found between any of the DVH parameters and the actuarial incidence of complications. For severe rectal bleeding (actuarial incidence at 2 years 3%), four consecutive volume cutoff levels were found, which significantly discriminated between high and low risk. A trend was observed that a total radiation dose ≥ 74 Gy (or a maximum radiation dose in the rectal wall >75 Gy) resulted in a higher incidence of severe rectal bleeding (p

  6. Can a central blood volume deficit be detected by systolic pressure variation during spontaneous breathing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael; Hayes, Chris; Steen Rasmussen, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether during spontaneous breathing arterial pressure variations (APV) can detect a volume deficit is not established. We hypothesized that amplification of intra-thoracic pressure oscillations by breathing through resistors would enhance APV to allow identification of a reduced...... resistors. A brachial arterial catheter was used to measure blood pressure and thus systolic pressure variation (SPV), pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation . Pulse contour analysis determined stroke volume (SV) and CO and we evaluated whether APV could detect a 10 % decrease in CO. RESULTS...... (from 21 (±15)% to 30 (±13)%). Yet during head-up tilt, a SPV ≥ 37 % predicted a decrease in CO ≥ 10 % with a sensitivity and specificity of 78 % and 100 %, respectively. CONCLUSION: In spontaneously breathing healthy volunteers combined inspiratory and expiratory resistors enhance SPV during head...

  7. Bladder dose accumulation based on a biomechanical deformable image registration algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E S; Muren, L P; Sørensen, T S

    2012-01-01

    Variations in bladder position, shape and volume cause uncertainties in the doses delivered to this organ during a course of radiotherapy for pelvic tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of dose accumulation based on repeat imaging and deformable image registration (DIR...... in individual patients between the doses from the initial treatment plan and the accumulated bladder doses. Hence, the use of repeat imaging has a potential for improved accuracy in treatment dose reporting....

  8. Neurogenic Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Dorsher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented.

  9. Predictor model for seasonal variations in skid resistance, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, J. J.; Saito, K.; Blackburn, R.

    1984-04-01

    Two models, utilizing data collected in 1979 and 1980, were developed to predict variations in skid resistance due to rainfall conditions, temperature effects, and time of the year. A generalized predictor model was developed from purely statistical considerations and a mechanistic model was developed from hypothesized mechanisms. This model may be utilized to estimate the skid resistance at any time in the season from a measurement made during the same season, or to adjust skid-resistance measurement made at any time during the season to the end-of-season level. The mechanistic model requires, in addition to the above inputs, two pavement properties describing the polishing characteristics of the aggregate and an estimate of the percent normalized gradient of the skid resistance. The application of these models is summarized.

  10. Stroke volume variation compared with pulse pressure variation and cardiac index changes for prediction of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Aly Soliman

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Baseline stroke volume variation ⩾8.15% predicted fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with acute circulatory failure. The study also confirmed the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness.

  11. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume in the prognostic evaluation of primary flat carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Jacobsen, F

    1991-01-01

    bladder biopsies from 22 patients with primary flat carcinoma in situ (Bergkvist grades III-IV). On average, nuclear vv was 77 microns 3 in nine biopsies with morphologically normal urothelium, 292 microns 3 in 56 isolated primary lesions and 266 microns 3 in lesions of luminal urothelium in 13 biopsies...... carcinoma in situ (nuclear vv = 261 microns 3), the survival was the same in patients with nuclear vv above and below the cut-off point (2P = 0.16). However, the survival curves showed a tendency to differ in the first 2-8 years of observation. Stereological estimates of nuclear vv provide objective...

  12. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bladder cancer care at Mayo Clinic Symptoms Bladder cancer signs and symptoms may include: Blood in urine (hematuria) Painful urination Pelvic pain If you have hematuria, your urine may appear bright red or cola colored. Sometimes, urine may not look any different, ...

  13. Moderate intensity supine exercise causes decreased cardiac volumes and increased outer volume variations: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Jablonowski, Robert; Arvidsson, Per M; Carlsson, Marcus; Saltin, Bengt; Arheden, Håkan

    2013-10-24

    The effects on left and right ventricular (LV, RV) volumes during physical exercise remains controversial. Furthermore, no previous study has investigated the effects of exercise on longitudinal contribution to stroke volume (SV) and the outer volume variation of the heart. The aim of this study was to determine if LV, RV and total heart volumes (THV) as well as cardiac pumping mechanisms change during physical exercise compared to rest using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). 26 healthy volunteers (6 women) underwent CMR at rest and exercise. Exercise was performed using a custom built ergometer for one-legged exercise in the supine position during breath hold imaging. Cardiac volumes and atrio-ventricular plane displacement were determined. Heart rate (HR) was obtained from ECG. HR increased during exercise from 60±2 to 94±2 bpm, (pexercise although not statistically significant (p=0.18). Longitudinal contribution to RVSV decreased during exercise by -6±15% (pexercise by -4±1%, (pexercise from 5.9±0.5% to 9.7±0.6% (pexercise. THV becomes significantly smaller due to decreases in RVEDV whilst LVEDV remains unchanged. THVV and consequently radial pumping increases during exercise which may improve diastolic suction during the rapid filling phase.

  14. Post-traumatic stress and age variation in amygdala volumes among youth exposed to trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Carl F; Klabunde, Megan; Russell, Justin D; Reiss, Allan L; Carrión, Victor G

    2015-12-01

    Theoretically, normal developmental variation in amygdala volumes may be altered under conditions of severe stress. The purpose of this article was to examine whether posttraumatic stress moderates the association between age and amygdala volumes in youth exposed to traumatic events who are experiencing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Volumetric imaging was conducted on two groups of youth aged 9-17 years: 28 with exposure to trauma and PTSD symptoms (boys = 15, girls = 13) and 26 matched (age, IQ) comparison youth (Controls; boys = 12, girls = 14). There was a significant group by age interaction in predicting right amygdala volumes. A positive association between age and right amygdala volumes was observed, but only in PTSD youth. These associations with age remained when controlling for IQ, total brain volumes and sex. Moreover, older youth with PTSD symptoms had relatively larger right amygdala volumes than controls. Findings provide evidence that severe stress may influence age-related variation in amygdala volumes. Results further highlight the importance of utilizing age as an interactive variable in pediatric neuroimaging research, in so far as age may act as an important moderator of group differences. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  16. Menstrual variation of breast volume and T2 relaxation times in cyclical mastalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Zainab; Brooks, Jonathan; Percy, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Hormonal activity causes breast volume to change during the menstrual cycle. One possible cause of this volume change is thought to be due to water retention or oedema within the tissues. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the variation in breast volume and 1 H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) to measure T 2 relaxation times which are known to increase with increasing tissue water content. We hypothesised that an increase in breast volume will elevate T 2 relaxation due to the presence of an increased water content within the breast. T 2 Relaxation time and volume were studied in fifteen control subjects and in a cohort of eight patients with cyclical mastalgia in order to determine whether changes in breast volume and T 2 relaxation times differed in controls and patients during menses, ovulation and premenses. Method: Breast volume was determined by the Cavalieri method in combination with point counting techniques on MR images and T 2 relaxation times of the water and fat in a voxel of breast tissue were obtained using 1 H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). Results: Statistical analysis (ANOVA) demonstrated highly significant differences in breast volume between the three stages of the cycle (p 2 of fat or water did not depend on stage of cycle. T-tests demonstrated no significant differences in T 2 of water or fat between patient and control groups. The average T 2 relaxation time of water was lowest in the patient and control groups during ovulation and highest in the patient group during premenses. Conclusion: We have performed the first combined volumetric and spectroscopic study of women with cyclical mastalgia and demonstrated that the global changes in volumes and T 2 were not significantly different from normal menstrual variations

  17. Intrafraction Bladder Motion in Radiation Therapy Estimated From Pretreatment and Posttreatment Volumetric Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Bressel, Mathias; Gill, Suki; Kron, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of image guidance protocols using soft tissue anatomy identification before treatment can reduce interfractional variation. This makes intrafraction clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) changes more important, including those resulting from intrafraction bladder filling and motion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the required intrafraction margins for soft tissue image guidance from pretreatment and posttreatment volumetric imaging. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-T4) underwent an adaptive radiation therapy protocol using daily pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with weekly posttreatment CBCT. A total of 235 pairs of pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT images were retrospectively contoured by a single radiation oncologist (CBCT-CTV). The maximum bladder displacement was measured according to the patient's bony pelvis movement during treatment, intrafraction bladder filling, and bladder centroid motion. Results: The mean time between pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT was 13 minutes, 52 seconds (range, 7 min 52 sec to 30 min 56 sec). Taking into account patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling, the required margins to cover intrafraction changes from pretreatment to posttreatment in the superior, inferior, right, left, anterior, and posterior were 1.25 cm (range, 1.19-1.50 cm), 0.67 cm (range, 0.58-1.12 cm), 0.74 cm (range, 0.59-0.94 cm), 0.73 cm (range, 0.51-1.00 cm), 1.20 cm (range, 0.85-1.32 cm), and 0.86 cm (range, 0.73-0.99), respectively. Small bladders on pretreatment imaging had relatively the largest increase in pretreatment to posttreatment volume. Conclusion: Intrafraction motion of the bladder based on pretreatment and posttreatment bladder imaging can be significant particularly in the anterior and superior directions. Patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling all contribute to changes between

  18. Intrafraction Bladder Motion in Radiation Therapy Estimated From Pretreatment and Posttreatment Volumetric Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroudi, Farshad, E-mail: farshad.foroudi@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gill, Suki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The use of image guidance protocols using soft tissue anatomy identification before treatment can reduce interfractional variation. This makes intrafraction clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) changes more important, including those resulting from intrafraction bladder filling and motion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the required intrafraction margins for soft tissue image guidance from pretreatment and posttreatment volumetric imaging. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-T4) underwent an adaptive radiation therapy protocol using daily pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with weekly posttreatment CBCT. A total of 235 pairs of pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT images were retrospectively contoured by a single radiation oncologist (CBCT-CTV). The maximum bladder displacement was measured according to the patient's bony pelvis movement during treatment, intrafraction bladder filling, and bladder centroid motion. Results: The mean time between pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT was 13 minutes, 52 seconds (range, 7 min 52 sec to 30 min 56 sec). Taking into account patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling, the required margins to cover intrafraction changes from pretreatment to posttreatment in the superior, inferior, right, left, anterior, and posterior were 1.25 cm (range, 1.19-1.50 cm), 0.67 cm (range, 0.58-1.12 cm), 0.74 cm (range, 0.59-0.94 cm), 0.73 cm (range, 0.51-1.00 cm), 1.20 cm (range, 0.85-1.32 cm), and 0.86 cm (range, 0.73-0.99), respectively. Small bladders on pretreatment imaging had relatively the largest increase in pretreatment to posttreatment volume. Conclusion: Intrafraction motion of the bladder based on pretreatment and posttreatment bladder imaging can be significant particularly in the anterior and superior directions. Patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling all contribute to changes between

  19. Volume and hormonal effects for acute side effects of rectum and bladder during conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Slot, Annerie; Tabak, Hans; Koper, Peter C.M.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric variables predictive of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity and to determine whether hormonal therapy (HT) is independently associated with acute GI and GU toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This analysis was performed on 336 patients participating in a multicenter (four hospitals) randomized trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy. The clinical target volume consisted of the prostate with or without the seminal vesicles, depending on the risk of seminal vesicle involvement. The margin from the clinical target volume to the planning target volume was 1 cm. For these patients, the treatment plan for a total dose of 68 Gy was used, because nearly all toxicity appeared before the onset of the 10-Gy boost. Acute toxicity ( 3 months before RT). Results: Acute GI toxicity Grade 2 or worse was seen in 46% of the patients. Patients with long-term neoadjuvant HT experienced less Grade 2 or worse toxicity (27%) compared with those receiving short-term neoadjuvant HT (50%) and no HT (50%). The volumes of the prostate and seminal vesicles were significantly smaller in both groups receiving neoadjuvant HT compared with those receiving no HT. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, including the two statistically significant clinical variables neoadjuvant HT and hospital, a volume effect was found for the relative, as well as absolute, rectal wall volumes exposed to intermediate and high doses. Of all the length parameters, the relative rectal length irradiated to doses of ≥5 Gy and ≥30 Gy and absolute lengths receiving ≥5-15 and 30 Gy were significant. Acute GU toxicity Grade 2 or worse was reported in 56% of cases. For patients with pretreatment GU symptoms, the rate was 93%. The use of short-term and long-term neoadjuvant HT resulted in more GU toxicity (73% and 71%) compared with no HT (50%). In multivariate analysis, containing the variables

  20. Menstrual variation of breast volume and T{sub 2} relaxation times in cyclical mastalgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zainab [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom); Magnetic Resonance and Image Analysis Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: zay@liverpool.ac.uk; Brooks, Jonathan [Magnetic Resonance and Image Analysis Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom); Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Percy, Dave [Centre for Operational Research and Applied Statistics, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    Purpose: Hormonal activity causes breast volume to change during the menstrual cycle. One possible cause of this volume change is thought to be due to water retention or oedema within the tissues. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the variation in breast volume and {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) to measure T{sub 2} relaxation times which are known to increase with increasing tissue water content. We hypothesised that an increase in breast volume will elevate T{sub 2} relaxation due to the presence of an increased water content within the breast. T{sub 2} Relaxation time and volume were studied in fifteen control subjects and in a cohort of eight patients with cyclical mastalgia in order to determine whether changes in breast volume and T{sub 2} relaxation times differed in controls and patients during menses, ovulation and premenses. Method: Breast volume was determined by the Cavalieri method in combination with point counting techniques on MR images and T{sub 2} relaxation times of the water and fat in a voxel of breast tissue were obtained using {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). Results: Statistical analysis (ANOVA) demonstrated highly significant differences in breast volume between the three stages of the cycle (p < 0.0005) with breast volume being greatest premenstrually. Patients did not exhibit an increase in volume premenstrually, significantly above controls. T{sub 2} of fat or water did not depend on stage of cycle. T-tests demonstrated no significant differences in T{sub 2} of water or fat between patient and control groups. The average T{sub 2} relaxation time of water was lowest in the patient and control groups during ovulation and highest in the patient group during premenses. Conclusion: We have performed the first combined volumetric and spectroscopic study of women with cyclical mastalgia and demonstrated that the global changes in volumes and T{sub 2} were not significantly different from normal

  1. Segmentation of inner and outer bladder wall using deep-learning convolutional neural network in CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Marshall; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Cha, Kenny; Chan, Heang-Ping; Samala, Ravi; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.

    2017-03-01

    We are developing a computerized system for detection of bladder cancer in CT urography. In this study, we used a deep-learning convolutional neural network (DL-CNN) to segment the bladder wall. This task is challenging due to differences in the wall between the contrast and non-contrast-filled regions, significant variations in appearance, size, and shape of the bladder among cases, overlap of the prostate with the bladder wall, and the wall being extremely thin compared to the overall size of the bladder. We trained a DL-CNN to estimate the likelihood that a given pixel would be inside the wall of the bladder using neighborhood information. A segmented bladder wall was then obtained using level sets with this likelihood map as a term in the level set energy formulation to obtain contours of the inner and outer bladder walls. The accuracy of the segmentation was evaluated by comparing the segmented wall outlines to hand outlines for a set of 79 training cases and 15 test cases using the average volume intersection % as the metric. For the training set, the inner wall achieved an average volume intersection of 90.0+/-8.7% and the outer wall achieved 93.7+/-3.9%. For the test set, the inner wall achieved an average volume intersection of 87.6+/-7.6% and the outer wall achieved 87.2+/-9.3%. The results show that the DL-CNN with level sets was effective in segmenting the inner and outer bladder walls.

  2. Simple DVH parameter addition as compared to deformable registration for bladder dose accumulation in cervix cancer brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Else Stougård; Noe, Karsten Østergaaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Variations in organ position, shape, and volume cause uncertainties in dose assessment for brachytherapy (BT) in cervix cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate uncertainties associated with bladder dose accumulation based on DVH parameter addition (previously...

  3. Low variation and high reproducibility in plaque volume with intravascular ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per; Pedersen, Knud Erik

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has several advantages compared to angiography when evaluating coronary atherosclerosis in the vessel wall. METHODS: The accuracy, reproducibility, and short-time spontaneous variation in volume of vessel, plaque and lumen were studied by electrocardiog......BACKGROUND: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has several advantages compared to angiography when evaluating coronary atherosclerosis in the vessel wall. METHODS: The accuracy, reproducibility, and short-time spontaneous variation in volume of vessel, plaque and lumen were studied...... by electrocardiographic-gated three-dimensional (3D) IVUS in 20 male patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD). RESULTS: The study lesions were angiographically insignificant, with a length of the analysed segment on 11.4+/-5.9 mm. At baseline the mean minimal lumen diameter was 2.41+/-0.59 mm, minimal lumen area 4......=0.804; pIVUS is a highly reproducible method when applied on coronary artery...

  4. Whole bladder photodynamic therapy: critical review of present-day technology and rationale for development of intravesical laser catheter and monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseyo, U O; Lundahl, S L; Merrill, D C

    1990-11-01

    Present-day whole bladder photodynamic therapy (WBPDT) is cumbersome and time consuming because cystoscopic and ultrasonic manipulations are necessary to position the light emitter within the bladder. More important, WBPDT is inherently unsafe and often ineffective since neither uniform photoirradiation nor accurate light dosimetry can be achieved with the techniques employed to photoirradiate the bladder wall. The intravesical laser catheter (IVLC) eliminates the need for cystoscopy and ultrasonography because passage of the treatment fiber into the catheter's central lumen automatically positions its light-diffusing tip within the center of the bladder. Use of the IVLC delivery system also assures accurate photoirradiation of the bladder wall since inflation of the catheter's balloon transforms the asymmetric bladder into a sphere of known diameter. The light sensor incorporated in the balloon wall provides a method to monitor light fluence and measure total light dose. When provided the parameters of bladder volume, laser energy output, and desired light dose, the computerized control system calculates treatment time and automatically adjusts the period of photoirradiation to compensate for variations in laser light production, energy losses during transmission, and for variations in light intensity resulting from the integrating sphere effect of the bladder wall. This delivery system also increases the safety of WBPDT since the monitor automatically discontinues treatment if any unsafe situation, with respect to light fluence, develops during photoirradiation.

  5. Adaptive radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten; Lebesque, Joos; Lotz, Heidi; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Moonen, Luc; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) in combination with a partial bladder irradiation. Twenty-one patients with solitary T1-T4 N0M0 bladder cancer were treated to the bladder tumor + 2 cm margin planning target volume (PTV(CONV)). During the first treatment week, five daily

  6. Adaptive-Predictive Organ Localization Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Improved Accuracy in External Beam Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Methods and Materials: Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30 minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's 'library,' and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. Results: A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Conclusions: Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens.

  7. [Bladder lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, C; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A; Diao, B; Diallo, A B; Gueye, S M; Ba, M; Diagne, B A

    2001-01-01

    to study the particularities of the bladder lithiasis in our countries. This was a retrospective study of 94 cases (62 men and 32 women) of bladder lithiasis over a period of 13 years. The lithogenic factors; clinic, paraclinic and therapeutic aspects have been studied. Morphoconstitutional analysis has been carded out in collaboration with Cristal Laboratory (St Cloud hospital center in France). mean age was 24.2+/-20.7 years old. The principals mains of consultation were: dysuria (n =36), mictionnal pain (n = 28), hematuria (n = 15). Facilitating factors have been found in 27% of cases. In 10 cases, there was an association bladdder lithiasis and bladdder-vaginal fistula. Radiologic test was dominated by intraveinous urographic (53.19 of cases). The metabolic test showed hypercalcemia and cristalluria in 2 cases. In 7,45 % of cases, we have founding a renal failure. An urinary tract infection have been noticed in 42 % of cases. Open surgery has been the main treatement (96 %) associating in 15 % of cases the treatement of an uropathy. In one case the bladder lithiasis weighed 1120 g. The morphologic and spectrophotometric analysis of the lithiasis have been achieved in 13 % of cases showing the predominance of struvite. the bladder lithiasis is still common in our countries; it could be good for us to access endoorporeals and extracorporeals therapeutic equipements in orderto reduce the indications of open surgery.

  8. A review of plan library approaches in adaptive radiotherapy of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Shane D; Leech, Michelle M

    2018-05-01

    Large variations in the shape and size of the bladder volume are commonly observed in bladder cancer radiotherapy (RT). The clinical target volume (CTV) is therefore frequently inadequately treated and large isotropic margins are inappropriate in terms of dose to organs at risk (OAR); thereby making adaptive radiotherapy (ART) attractive for this tumour site. There are various methods of ART delivery, however, for bladder cancer, plan libraries are frequently used. A review of published studies on plan libraries for bladder cancer using four databases (Pubmed, Science Direct, Embase and Cochrane Library) was conducted. The endpoints selected were accuracy and feasibility of initiation of a plan library strategy into a RT department. Twenty-four articles were included in this review. The majority of studies reported improvement in accuracy with 10 studies showing an improvement in planning target volume (PTV) and CTV coverage with plan libraries, some by up to 24%. Seventeen studies showed a dose reduction to OARs, particularly the small bowel V45Gy, V40Gy, V30Gy and V10Gy, and the rectal V30Gy. However, the occurrence of no suitable plan was reported in six studies, with three studies showing no significant difference between adaptive and non-adaptive strategies in terms of target coverage. In addition, inter-observer variability in plan selection appears to remain problematic. The additional resources, education and technology required for the initiation of plan library selection for bladder cancer may hinder its routine clinical implementation, with eight studies illustrating increased treatment time required. While there is a growing body of evidence in support of plan libraries for bladder RT, many studies differed in their delivery approach. The advent of the clinical use of the MRI-linear accelerator will provide RT departments with the opportunity to consider daily online adaption for bladder cancer as an alternate to plan library approaches.

  9. Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoyama, Kuniko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Chiharu; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Osamu; Sugiyama, Megumi; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina

    2011-03-01

    Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation is not well known. Hence, we systematically investigated the frequency of reduced or increased bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. We analyzed 911 patients who were referred from within our hospital. Data registries included a diagnosis, a lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire, a urodynamic study, and neurological examinations. Reduced bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation >300 ml. Increased bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation sensation (33.3-43.8% in diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Myelopathies are the second most common cause (17.4-25.0% in multiple sclerosis, etc.). Less common is brain diseases (9.6% in multiple system atrophy, etc.). In contrast, myelopathies are the most common cause of increased bladder sensation without DO (25.0-40.0% in spinal forms of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, etc.). Neuropathies are the second most common (17.3-22.2% in post-pelvic organ surgery, diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Less common is brain/mental diseases (20.0% in psychogenic bladder dysfunction, 8.1% in Parkinson's disease, etc.). The present study revealed that neuropathies are the most common cause of reduced bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. Increased bladder sensation without DO occurs mainly in peripheral and central sensory pathway lesions, as well as in basal ganglia lesions and psychogenic bladder dysfunction. Reduced and increased bladder sensation should be a major treatment target for maximizing patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Genomic regulation of natural variation in cortical and noncortical brain volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laughlin Rick E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relative growth of the neocortex parallels the emergence of complex cognitive functions across species. To determine the regions of the mammalian genome responsible for natural variations in cortical volume, we conducted a complex trait analysis using 34 strains of recombinant inbred (Rl strains of mice (BXD, as well as their two parental strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. We measured both neocortical volume and total brain volume in 155 coronally sectioned mouse brains that were Nissl stained and embedded in celloidin. After correction for shrinkage, the measured cortical and noncortical brain volumes were entered into a multiple regression analysis, which removed the effects of body size and age from the measurements. Marker regression and interval mapping were computed using WebQTL. Results An ANOVA revealed that more than half of the variance of these regressed phenotypes is genetically determined. We then identified the regions of the genome regulating this heritability. We located genomic regions in which a linkage disequilibrium was present using WebQTL as both a mapping engine and genomic database. For neocortex, we found a genome-wide significant quantitative trait locus (QTL on chromosome 11 (marker D11Mit19, as well as a suggestive QTL on chromosome 16 (marker D16Mit100. In contrast, for noncortex the effect of chromosome 11 was markedly reduced, and a significant QTL appeared on chromosome 19 (D19Mit22. Conclusion This classic pattern of double dissociation argues strongly for different genetic factors regulating relative cortical size, as opposed to brain volume more generally. It is likely, however, that the effects of proximal chromosome 11 extend beyond the neocortex strictly defined. An analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in these regions indicated that ciliary neurotrophic factor (Cntf is quite possibly the gene underlying the noncortical QTL. Evidence for a candidate gene modulating neocortical

  11. Target volume and position variations during intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan W

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wenyong Tan,* Yanping Li,* Guang Han, Jiaozhen Xu, Xiaohong Wang, Ying Li, Desheng HuDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: Considerable anatomical changes occur during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. This study aimed to quantify volumetric and positional variations of the target volume during IMRT.Materials and methods: Twenty patients with locally advanced NPC who received concurrent (13 patients or sequential (seven patients chemoradiotherapy were prospectively recruited and underwent planning computed tomography (CT and six repeat CTs (every five fractions. Each repeat CT was rigidly registered to the planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV and elective clinical target volume (CTV were manually delineated on each axial CT image. CTVs of the primary tumor and lymph nodes were expanded with 5 mm margins to corresponding GTVs, with necessary modifications. Volume loss, system and random errors, and the mean and three-dimensional vector displacements were calculated and compared statistically.Results: Volumes of the primary tumor and small (>1 cm, ≤3 cm and large (>3 cm positive neck lymph nodes decreased at a rate of 2.6%, 3.7%, and 3.9% per treatment day, respectively. CTVs of the primary tumor, lymph nodes, and elective region decreased 1.5%, 2.3%, and 0.3% per treatment day, respectively. Average displacements of the GTVs and CTVs were <1.3 mm in all directions. GTVs and CTVs of the large and small lymph nodes shifted medially by 0.8–1.3 and 0.6–1.2 mm, respectively, on average. Average three-dimensional displacements of the GTVs and CTVs were 3.4–4.3 mm and 2.5–3.7 mm, respectively. Volume loss and displacements in most directions were significantly larger in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy than in those receiving sequential therapy. Volume loss and displacements of the

  12. Pulse pressure variation as a guide for volume expansion in dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Denise T; Ida, Keila K; Gimenes, André M; Mantovani, Matheus M; Castro, Jacqueline R; Patrício, Geni C F; Ambrósio, Aline M; Otsuki, Denise A

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether pulse pressure variation (PPV) can predict fluid responsiveness in healthy dogs during clinical surgery. Prospective clinical study. Thirty-three isoflurane-anesthetized dogs with arterial hypotension during orthopedic surgery. Fluid challenge with lactated Ringer's solution (15 mL kg -1 in 15 minutes) was administered in mechanically ventilated dogs (tidal volume 10 mL kg -1 ) with hypotension [mean arterial pressure (MAP) dogs, resulting in a decrease in PPV (p dogs. The increase in CO was correlated with the decrease in PPV (r = -0.65; p dogs, PPV predicted fluid responsiveness to volume expansion, and MAP and CVP did not show such applicability. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of Bladder Motion for Clinical Radiotherapy Practice Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBain, Catherine A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Buckley, David L.; Sykes, Jonathan S.; Green, Melanie M.; Cowan, Richard A.; Hutchinson, Charles E.; Moore, Christopher J.; Price, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. Methods and Materials: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. Results: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. Conclusions: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.

  14. Temporal variations of serial correlations of trading volume in the US stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ramírez, José; Rodríguez, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    Serial correlations in the trading volume of the US stock market are investigated in this paper. The use of the detrended fluctuation analysis implemented within a rolling window indicated that, for the period 1929-2011, the strength of correlations exhibits important temporal variations with a trend shift by the 1990s, and 4-year and 21-year cycles. These empirical findings are compared to those obtained for mature international stock markets (FTSE-100 and Nikkei) and discussed in terms of potential economic and financial implications.

  15. Determination of protein and solvent volumes in protein crystals from contrast variation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, J

    1996-01-01

    By varying the relative values of protein and solvent scattering densities in a crystal, it is possible to obtain information on the shape and dimensions of protein molecular envelopes. Neutron diffraction methods are ideally suited to these contrast variation experiments because H/D exchange leads to large differential changes in the protein and solvent scattering densities and is structurally non-perturbing. Low resolution structure factors have been measured from cubic insulin crystals with differing H/D contents. Structure factors calculated from a simple binary density model, in which uniform scattering densities represent the protein and solvent volumes in the crystals, were compared with these data. The contrast variation differences in the sets of measured structure factors were found to be accurately fitted by this simple model. Trial applications to two problems in crystal structure determination illustrate how this fact may be exploited. (i) A translation function that employs contrast variation data gave a sharp minimum within 1-9A of the correctly positioned insulin molecule and is relatively insensitive to errors in the atomic model. (ii) An ab initio phasing method for the contrast variation data, based on analyzing histograms of the density distributions in trial maps, was found to recover the correct molecular envelope.

  16. Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bladder Control Problems in Women (Urinary Incontinence) Kegel Exercises Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) What ... a vaginal pessary, or surgery. Pelvic floor, or Kegel, exercises involve strengthening pelvic floor muscles. Strong pelvic ...

  17. Target volume delineation in external beam partial breast irradiation: less inter-observer variation with preoperative- compared to postoperative delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leij, F. van der; Elkhuizen, P.H.M.; Janssen, T.M.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Sangen, M. van der; Scholten, A.N.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, C. van; Boersma, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of adequate target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) could be overcome with preoperative irradiation, due to less inter-observer variation. We compared the target volume delineation for external beam PBI on preoperative versus postoperative CT scans of

  18. Assessment of the accuracy of ABC/2 variations in traumatic epidural hematoma volume estimation: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pengfei; Yan, Ling; Hu, Tingting; Zhang, Zhen; Feng, Jun; Zhao, Hongyang

    2016-01-01

    Background. The traumatic epidural hematoma (tEDH) volume is often used to assist in tEDH treatment planning and outcome prediction. ABC/2 is a well-accepted volume estimation method that can be used for tEDH volume estimation. Previous studies have proposed different variations of ABC/2; however, it is unclear which variation will provide a higher accuracy. Given the promising clinical contribution of accurate tEDH volume estimations, we sought to assess the accuracy of several ABC/2 variations in tEDH volume estimation. Methods. The study group comprised 53 patients with tEDH who had undergone non-contrast head computed tomography scans. For each patient, the tEDH volume was automatically estimated by eight ABC/2 variations (four traditional and four newly derived) with an in-house program, and results were compared to those from manual planimetry. Linear regression, the closest value, percentage deviation, and Bland-Altman plot were adopted to comprehensively assess accuracy. Results. Among all ABC/2 variations assessed, the traditional variations y = 0.5 × A 1 B 1 C 1 (or A 2 B 2 C 1) and the newly derived variations y = 0.65 × A 1 B 1 C 1 (or A 2 B 2 C 1) achieved higher accuracy than the other variations. No significant differences were observed between the estimated volume values generated by these variations and those of planimetry (p > 0.05). Comparatively, the former performed better than the latter in general, with smaller mean percentage deviations (7.28 ± 5.90% and 6.42 ± 5.74% versus 19.12 ± 6.33% and 21.28 ± 6.80%, respectively) and more values closest to planimetry (18/53 and 18/53 versus 2/53 and 0/53, respectively). Besides, deviations of most cases in the former fell within the range of 20% (90.57% and 96.23, respectively). Discussion. In the current study, we adopted an automatic approach to assess the accuracy of several ABC/2 variations for tEDH volume estimation. Our initial results showed that the variations y = 0.5 × A 1 B 1 C 1 (or

  19. Assessment of the accuracy of ABC/2 variations in traumatic epidural hematoma volume estimation: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Yan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The traumatic epidural hematoma (tEDH volume is often used to assist in tEDH treatment planning and outcome prediction. ABC/2 is a well-accepted volume estimation method that can be used for tEDH volume estimation. Previous studies have proposed different variations of ABC/2; however, it is unclear which variation will provide a higher accuracy. Given the promising clinical contribution of accurate tEDH volume estimations, we sought to assess the accuracy of several ABC/2 variations in tEDH volume estimation. Methods. The study group comprised 53 patients with tEDH who had undergone non-contrast head computed tomography scans. For each patient, the tEDH volume was automatically estimated by eight ABC/2 variations (four traditional and four newly derived with an in-house program, and results were compared to those from manual planimetry. Linear regression, the closest value, percentage deviation, and Bland-Altman plot were adopted to comprehensively assess accuracy. Results. Among all ABC/2 variations assessed, the traditional variations y = 0.5 × A1B1C1 (or A2B2C1 and the newly derived variations y = 0.65 × A1B1C1 (or A2B2C1 achieved higher accuracy than the other variations. No significant differences were observed between the estimated volume values generated by these variations and those of planimetry (p > 0.05. Comparatively, the former performed better than the latter in general, with smaller mean percentage deviations (7.28 ± 5.90% and 6.42 ± 5.74% versus 19.12 ± 6.33% and 21.28 ± 6.80%, respectively and more values closest to planimetry (18/53 and 18/53 versus 2/53 and 0/53, respectively. Besides, deviations of most cases in the former fell within the range of 20% (90.57% and 96.23, respectively. Discussion. In the current study, we adopted an automatic approach to assess the accuracy of several ABC/2 variations for tEDH volume estimation. Our initial results showed that the variations y = 0.5 × A1B1C1 (or A2B2C1

  20. Analysis of molecular intra-patient variation and delineation of a prognostic 12-gene signature in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; technology transfer from microarrays to PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Reinert, Thomas; Novoradovsky, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple clinical risk factors and genetic profiles have been demonstrated to predict progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however, no easily clinical applicable gene signature has been developed to predict disease progression independent of disease stage and grade. Meth...

  1. Variations in Brain Volume and Growth in Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaika, Paul K; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Mauras, Nelly; Buckingham, Bruce; White, Neil H; Tsalikian, Eva; Hershey, Tamara; Cato, Allison; Aye, Tandy; Fox, Larry; Wilson, Darrell M; Tansey, Michael J; Tamborlane, William; Peng, Daniel; Raman, Mira; Marzelli, Matthew; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-02-01

    Early-onset type 1 diabetes may affect the developing brain during a critical window of rapid brain maturation. Structural MRI was performed on 141 children with diabetes (4-10 years of age at study entry) and 69 age-matched control subjects at two time points spaced 18 months apart. For the children with diabetes, the mean (±SD) HbA1c level was 7.9 ± 0.9% (63 ± 9.8 mmol/mol) at both time points. Relative to control subjects, children with diabetes had significantly less growth of cortical gray matter volume and cortical surface area and significantly less growth of white matter volume throughout the cortex and cerebellum. For the population with diabetes, the change in the blood glucose level at the time of scan across longitudinal time points was negatively correlated with the change in gray and white matter volumes, suggesting that fluctuating glucose levels in children with diabetes may be associated with corresponding fluctuations in brain volume. In addition, measures of hyperglycemia and glycemic variation were significantly negatively correlated with the development of surface curvature. These results demonstrate that early-onset type 1 diabetes has widespread effects on the growth of gray and white matter in children whose blood glucose levels are well within the current treatment guidelines for the management of diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  2. Dosimetric impact of the variation of the prostate volume and shape between pretreatment planning and treatment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Aubin, Sylviane; Taschereau, Richard; Pouliot, Jean; Vigneault, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric impact on a pretreatment planning of prostatic volume and shape variations occurring between the moment of the volume study (preplanning) and just before a transperineal permanent seed implant procedure. Such variations could be an obvious source of misplacement of the seeds relative to the prostate gland and organs at risk. Other sources of dosimetric uncertainties, such as misplacement due to the procedure itself or edema, are eliminated by looking at these variations before the implant procedure. Methods and Materials: For 35 clinical cases, prostate contours were taken at preplanning time as well as in the operating room (OR) minutes before the procedure. Comparison of shape and volume between the two sets was made. The impact on V100 was evaluated by placing the seeds in their planned positions in the new volume (clinical situation) and also by performing a new plan with the second set of contours to simulate an intraoperative approach. Results: The volume taken in the OR remained unchanged compared to the pretreatment planning volume in only 37% of the cases. While on average the dose coverage loss from pretreatment planning due to a combination of variations of volume and shape was small at 5.7%, a V100 degradation of up to 20.9% was observed in extreme cases. Even in cases in which no changes in volume were observed, changes in shape occurred and strongly affected implant dosimetry. Conclusions: Variations of volume and shape between pretreatment planning and the implant procedure can have a strong impact on the dosimetry if the planning and the implant procedure are not performed on the same day. This is an argument in favor of performing implant dosimetry in the OR

  3. A bladder diverticulum model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Süleyman; Kuzdan, Özgür; Özaydın, Seyithan; Başdaş, Cemile Beşik; Özaydın, İpek; Erdoğan, Cankat; Sander, Serdar

    2016-10-01

    Shuttling of some of the bladder volume into the bladder diverticulum (BD) can cause urinary retention, lower urinary tract dysfunction, infection, and stone formation. This experimental study is the first to create a rabbit BD to study micturition physiology (urodynamics and pathology) that mimics clinical findings. The study included 16 New Zealand adult male rabbits in the BD group and 16 sham-operated controls. BD creation consisted of a lower midline laparotomy and bladder entry via the spacing between the detrusor muscle fibers and the mucosa, posterolaterally from the bladder wall. The detrusor was excised to provide a mucosal prolapsus, creating a narrow BD neck (Figure). The sham group underwent bladder exposure with a midline incision. All rabbits underwent urodynamic study preoperatively and postoperatively, consisting of postmicturition residue (PMR), maximum bladder capacity (MBC), voiding detrusor pressure (VPdet), filling detrusor pressure (FPdet), compliance, and urine flow (Qflow). The animals were then sacrificed and their bladders assessed for pathology and stone formation. Preoperative MBC, Pdet, and Qmax were within reference ranges. No animals had PMR or urinary tract infections (UTIs). The BD group showed urodynamic and pathologic bladder changes, including decreased (28%) cystometric bladder capacity and compliance (Sham: 26.8 ± 0.4; BD: 4.46 ± 1.08, p = 0.0001) and increased post-void residual PMR (8.3 ± 2.4 mL). Pathology revealed increased bladder detrusor thickness correlated with urodynamic findings of increased filling detrusor pressures (Sham: 1.58 ± 0.2; BD: 4.89 ± 0.93, p = 0.0001). Urodynamics revealed intermittent BD bladder contraction during the filling phases. Eight BD group rabbits had UTIs; five had stone formation (4-9 mm). In the literature, it has not been determined whether lower urinary tract disorders (LUTD) could cause diverticula, or if a congenital diverticula could be reason for LUTD. Anatomical

  4. The paediatric neuropathic bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A neurogenic bladder can be defined as a dysfunctinal urinary bladder caused by disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves involved in the control of micturition (urination). In pathophysiological terms, a neurogenic bladder is caused by a spinal reflex arc that occurs when the bladder becomes autonomous.

  5. Effects of urinary bladder distention on location of the urinary bladder and urethra of healthy dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, G.R.; Osborne, C.A.; Jessen, C.R.; Feeney, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Evaluation of the anatomic location of the distended and empty urinary bladders and urethras of healthy adult male and female dogs and cats by retrograde urethrocystography revealed substantial variations. In 15 dogs in lateral recumbency with empty bladder lumens, the caudal portion of the urinary bladder was within the pelvic canal in 5 of 7 male and 5 of 8 female dogs. In female dogs examined in ventrodorsal recumbency, only 4 of 8 had the empty urinary bladders in part within the pelvic canal. After luminal distention, 3 of 7 male and 3 of 8 female dogs, while in lateral recumbency, had the urinary bladders in part intrapelvically. However, when female dogs were placed in ventrodorsal recumbency, only 1 of 7 urinary bladders was in part within the pelvis. The urinary bladders of 14 cats were consistently within the abdominal cavity, irrespective of whether the bladder lumen was distended or empty. Urethral flexures occurred in dogs with intrapelvic bladders that were distended or empty. Urethral flexures were not found in cats. The urethras of dogs and cats in lateral recumbency were generally closer to the floor of the pelvis after urinary bladder distention than when the bladder was empty. The urethra of the dogs and cats in ventrodorsal recumbency was to the left or right of or on the midsagittal plane, whether the urinary bladder was empty or distended. A greater degree of lateral displacement was encountered in ventrodorsal recumbency after urinary bladder distention

  6. Variation of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume after Moderate Endurance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lippi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although physical exercise strongly influences several laboratory parameters, data about the hematological changes after medium distance running are scarce. We studied 31 middle-trained athletes (mean training regimen 217±32 min/week who performed a 21.1 km, half-marathon run. Blood samples were collected before the run, at the end, and 3 and 20 hours thereafter. The complete blood count was performed on Advia 2120 and included red blood cell (RBC, reticulocyte, and platelet counts; hemoglobin; mean corpuscular volume (MCV; mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH; reticulocyte haemoglobin content (Ret CHR; RBC distribution width (RDW, mean platelet volume (MPV. No significant variations were observed for MCH and Ret CHR. The RBC, reticulocyte, and hemoglobin values modestly decreased after the run. The MCV significantly increased at the end of running but returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. The RDW constantly increased, reaching a peak 20 hours after the run. The platelet count and MPV both increased after the run and returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. These results may have implications for definition of reference ranges and antidoping testing, and may also contribute to explaining the relationship between endurance exercise and mortality, since previous studies reported that RDW and MPV may be significantly associated with cardiovascular disease.

  7. Quantification of dose uncertainties for the bladder in prostate cancer radiotherapy based on dominant eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Richard; Acosta, Oscar; Lafond, Caroline; Espinosa, Jairo; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    In radiotherapy for prostate cancer the dose at the treatment planning for the bladder may be a bad surrogate of the actual delivered dose as the bladder presents the largest inter-fraction shape variations during treatment. This paper presents PCA models as a virtual tool to estimate dosimetric uncertainties for the bladder produced by motion and deformation between fractions. Our goal is to propose a methodology to determine the minimum number of modes required to quantify dose uncertainties of the bladder for motion/deformation models based on PCA. We trained individual PCA models using the bladder contours available from three patients with a planning computed tomography (CT) and on-treatment cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Based on the above models and via deformable image registration (DIR), we estimated two accumulated doses: firstly, an accumulated dose obtained by integrating the planning dose over the Gaussian probability distribution of the PCA model; and secondly, an accumulated dose obtained by simulating treatment courses via a Monte Carlo approach. We also computed a reference accumulated dose for each patient using his available images via DIR. Finally, we compared the planning dose with the three accumulated doses, and we calculated local dose variability and dose-volume histogram uncertainties.

  8. ISOLATED REDUCED NOCTURNAL BLADDER RESERVOIR FUNCTION - A NEW TYPE OF NOCTURNAL ENURESIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Britt; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Rittig, Søren

    PURPOSE Bladder reservoir function in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) is assessed by maximal voided volumes (MVV) registered on frequency-volume charts during daytime. Although a degree of association is evident, MVV does not necessarily reflect the nocturnal bladder...... below their MVV and MVVAge, the latter could be viewed as isolated reduced nocturnal bladder reservoir function. This indicates bladder reservoir function abnormalities during sleep that is not assessed by day recordings. Physicians treating children with MNE should consider anticholinergic...

  9. Characterisation of the contractile dynamics of the resting ex vivo urinary bladder of the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentle, Roger G; Reynolds, Gordon W; Janssen, Patrick W M; Hulls, Corrin M; King, Quinten M; Chambers, John Paul

    2015-12-01

    To characterise the area and movements of ongoing spontaneous localised contractions in the resting porcine urinary bladder and relate these to ambient intravesical pressure (Pves ), to further our understanding of their genesis and role in accommodating incoming urine. We used image analysis to quantify the areas and movements of discrete propagating patches of contraction (PPCs) on the anterior, anterolateral and posterior surfaces of the urinary bladders of six pigs maintained ex vivo with small incremental increases in volume. We then correlated the magnitude of Pves and cyclic changes in Pves with parameters derived from spatiotemporal maps. Contractile movements in the resting bladder consisted only of PPCs that covered around a fifth of the surface of the bladder, commenced at various sites, and were of ≈6 s in duration. They propagated at around 6 mm/s, mainly across the anterior and lateral surface of the bladder by various, sometimes circular, routes in a quasi-stable rhythm, and did not traverse the trigone. The frequencies of these rhythms were low (3.15 cycles/min) and broadly similar to those of cyclic changes in Pves (3.55 cycles/min). Each PPC was associated with a region of stretching (positive strain rate) and these events occurred in a background of more constant strain. The amplitudes of cycles in Pves and the areas undergoing PPCs increased after a sudden increase in Pves but the frequency of cycles of Pves and of origin of PPCs did not change. Peaks in Pves cycles occurred when PPCs were traversing the upper half of the bladder, which was more compliant. The velocity of propagation of PPCs was similar to that of transverse propagation of action potentials in bladder myocytes and significantly greater than that reported in interstitial cells. The size of PPCs, their frequency and their rate of propagation were not affected by intra-arterial dosage with tetrodotoxin or lidocaine. The origin and duration of PPCs influence both Pves and cyclic

  10. Bladder sensation measures and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, David E; Neil, Nancy J; Govier, Fred E; Kobashi, Kathleen C

    2009-09-01

    We performed a prospective multicomponent study to determine whether subjective and objective bladder sensation instruments may provide data on sensory dysfunction in patients with overactive bladder. We evaluated 70 prospectively enrolled patients with urodynamics and questionnaires on validated urgency (Urgency Perception Score), general overactive bladder (Urogenital Distress Inventory) and quality of life (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire). We first sought a correlation between sensory specific (Urgency Perception Score) and quality of life questionnaire scores. We then assessed a correlation between sensory questionnaire scores and urodynamic variables, exploring the hypothesis that certain urodynamic parameters may be bladder sensation measures. We evaluated 2 urodynamic derivatives (first sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity) to increase sensory finding discrimination. We noted a moderate correlation between the Urgency Perception Score (0.56) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (0.74) vs the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (each p Perception Score and bladder capacity (-0.25, p sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity statistically significantly correlated with the Urgency Perception Score despite the lesser or absent correlation associated with the individual components of these derivatives. Bladder sensation questionnaires may be valuable to identify patients with sensory dysfunction and provide additional data not obtained in generalized symptom questionnaires. Urodynamic variables correlated with bladder sensation questionnaire scores and may be an objective method to assess sensory dysfunction.

  11. Stroke volume variation does not predict fluid responsiveness in patients with septic shock on pressure support ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Faber, T

    2006-01-01

    Stroke volume variation (SVV)--as measured by the pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) system--predicts the cardiac output response to a fluid challenge in patients on controlled ventilation. Whether this applies to patients on pressure support ventilation is unknown....

  12. Variation in Results of Volume Measurements of Stumps of Lower-Limb Amputees : A Comparison of 4 Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer-Wilzing, Vera G.; Bolt, Arjen; Geertzen, Jan H.; Emmelot, Cornelis H.; Baars, Erwin C.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    de Boer-Wilzing VG, Bolt A, Geertzen JH, Emmelot CH, Baars EC, Dijkstra PU. Variation in results of volume measurements of stumps of lower-limb amputees: a comparison of 4 methods. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2011;92:941-6. Objective: To analyze the reliability of 4 methods (water immersion,

  13. Evaluation of stroke volume variation obtained by arterial pulse contour analysis to predict fluid responsiveness intraoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, D; Kabon, B; Marschalek, C; Chiari, A; Pestel, G; Kaider, A; Fleischmann, E; Hetz, H

    2009-09-01

    Fluid management guided by oesophageal Doppler monitor has been reported to improve perioperative outcome. Stroke volume variation (SVV) is considered a reliable clinical predictor of fluid responsiveness. Consequently, the aim of the present trial was to evaluate the accuracy of SVV determined by arterial pulse contour (APCO) analysis, using the FloTrac/Vigileo system, to predict fluid responsiveness as measured by the oesophageal Doppler. Patients undergoing major abdominal surgery received intraoperative fluid management guided by oesophageal Doppler monitoring. Fluid boluses of 250 ml each were administered in case of a decrease in corrected flow time (FTc) to 10%. The ability of SVV to predict fluid responsiveness was assessed by calculation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Twenty patients received 67 fluid boluses. Fifty-two of the 67 fluid boluses administered resulted in fluid responsiveness. SVV achieved an area under the ROC curve of 0.512 [confidence interval (CI) 0.32-0.70]. A cut-off point for fluid responsiveness was found for SVV > or =8.5% (sensitivity: 77%; specificity: 43%; positive predictive value: 84%; and negative predictive value: 33%). This prospective, interventional observer-blinded study demonstrates that SVV obtained by APCO, using the FloTrac/Vigileo system, is not a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness in the setting of major abdominal surgery.

  14. Relationship between Stroke Volume Variation and Blood Transfusion during Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Yoo, Hwanhee; Lee, Sukyung; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative blood transfusion increases the risk for perioperative mortality and morbidity in liver transplant recipients. A high stroke volume variation (SVV) method has been proposed to reduce blood loss during living donor hepatectomy. Herein, we investigated whether maintaining high SVV could reduce the need for blood transfusion and also evaluated the effect of the high SVV method on postoperative outcomes in liver transplant recipients. We retrospectively analyzed 332 patients who underwent liver transplantation, divided into control (maintaining blood transfusion requirement and hemodynamic parameters, including SVV, as well as postoperative outcomes, such as incidences of acute kidney injury, durations of postoperative intensive care unit and hospital stay, and rates of 1-year mortality. Mean SVV values were 7.0% ± 1.3% in the control group (n = 288) and 11.2% ± 1.8% in the high SVV group (n = 44). The median numbers of transfused packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasmas in the high SVV group were significantly lower than those in control group (0 vs. 2 units, P = 0.003; and 0 vs. 3 units, P = 0.033, respectively). No significant between-group differences were observed for postoperative outcomes. Maintaining high SVV can reduce the blood transfusion requirement during liver transplantation without worsening postoperative outcomes. These findings provide insights into improving perioperative management in liver transplant recipients.

  15. Comparison of CLASS and ITK-SNAP in segmentation of urinary bladder in CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    We are developing a computerized method for bladder segmentation in CT urography (CTU) for computeraided diagnosis of bladder cancer. We have developed a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) consisting of four stages: preprocessing and initial segmentation, 3D and 2D level set segmentation, and post-processing. In case the bladder contains regions filled with intravenous (IV) contrast and without contrast, CLASS segments the noncontrast (NC) region and the contrast (C) filled region separately and conjoins the contours. In this study, we compared the performance of CLASS to ITK-SNAP 2.4, which is a publicly available software application for segmentation of structures in 3D medical images. ITK-SNAP performs segmentation by using the edge-based level set on preprocessed images. The level set were initialized by manually placing a sphere at the boundary between the C and NC parts of the bladders with C and NC regions, and in the middle of the bladders that had only C or NC region. Level set parameters and the number of iterations were chosen after experimentation with bladder cases. Segmentation performances were compared using 30 randomly selected bladders. 3D hand-segmented contours were obtained as reference standard, and computerized segmentation accuracy was evaluated in terms of the average volume intersection %, average % volume error, average absolute % volume error, average minimum distance, and average Jaccard index. For CLASS, the values for these performance metrics were 79.0±8.2%, 16.1±16.3%, 19.9±11.1%, 3.5±1.3 mm, 75.7±8.4%, respectively. For ITK-SNAP, the corresponding values were 78.8±8.2%, 8.3±33.1%, 24.2±23.7%, 5.2±2.6 mm, 71.0±15.4%, respectively. CLASS on average performed better and exhibited less variations than ITK-SNAP for bladder segmentation.

  16. SU-E-J-83: CBCT Based Rectum and Bladder Dose Tracking in the Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z; Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to monitor the volume changes of bladder and rectum and evaluate the dosimetric changes of bladder and rectum using daily cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy. Methods: The data of this study were obtained from 12 patients, totally 222 CBCTs. All the volume of the bladder and the rectum on the CBCT were normalized to the bladder and the rectum on their own original CT to monitory the volume changes. To evaluate dose delivered to the OARs, volumes that receive 70Gy (V70Gy), 60Gy, 50Gy, 40Gy and 30Gy are calculated for the bladder and the rectum, V20Gy and V10Gy for rectum additionally. And the deviation of the mean dose to the bladder and the rectum are also chosen as the evaluation parameter. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify the mean dose change of the volume change using SPSS 19. Results: The results show that the variances of the normalize volume of the bladder and the rectum are 0.15–0.58 and 0.13–0.50. The variances of V70Gy, V60Gy, V50Gy, V40Gy and V30Gy of bladder are bigger than rectum for 11 patients. The linear regression analysis indicated a negative correlation between the volume and the mean dose of the bladder (p < 0.05). A 10% increase in bladder volume will cause 5.1% (±4.3%) reduction in mean dose. Conclusion: The bladder volume change is more significant than that for rectum for the prostate cancer patient. The volume changes of rectum are not significant except air gap in the rectum. Bladder volume varies will cause significant dose change. The bladder volume monitoring before fractional treatment delivery would be crucial for accuracy dose delivery.

  17. Bladder outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002238.htm Bladder outlet obstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base ...

  18. Portable bladder ultrasound: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound. TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Data from the National Population Health Survey indicate prevalence rates of urinary incontinence are 2.5% in women and 1.4 % in men in the general population. Prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women than men and prevalence increases with age. Identified risk factors for urinary incontinence include female gender, increasing age, urinary tract infections (UTI), poor mobility, dementia, smoking, obesity, consuming alcohol and caffeine beverages, physical activity, pregnancy, childbirth, forceps and vacuum-assisted births, episiotomy, abdominal resection for colorectal cancer, and hormone replacement therapy. For the purposes of this review, incontinence populations will be stratified into the following; the elderly, urology patients, postoperative patients, rehabilitation settings, and neurogenic bladder populations. Urinary incontinence is defined as any involuntary leakage of urine. Incontinence can be classified into diagnostic clinical types that are useful in planning evaluation and treatment. The major types of incontinence are stress (physical exertion), urge (overactive bladder), mixed (combined urge and stress urinary incontinence), reflex (neurological impairment of the central nervous system), overflow (leakage due to full bladder), continuous (urinary tract abnormalities), congenital incontinence, and transient incontinence (temporary incontinence). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, which is the amount of urine in the bladder immediately after urination, represents an important component in continence assessment and bladder management to provide quantitative feedback to the patient and continence care team regarding the effectiveness of the voiding technique. Although there is no standardized definition of normal PVR urine volume, measurements greater than 100 mL to 150 mL are considered an indication for urinary

  19. Prostate cancer treated with image-guided helical TomoTherapy {sup registered} and image-guided LINAC-IMRT. Correlation between high-dose bladder volume, margin reduction, and genitourinary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdz, Sonia; Wendt, Thomas G. [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jena (Germany); Schwedas, Michael; Salz, Henning [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Section of Medical Physics, Jena (Germany); Foller, Susan [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Urology, Jena (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    We compared different image-guidance (IG) strategies for prostate cancer with high-precision IG intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using TomoTherapy {sup registered} (Accuray Inc., Madison, WI, USA) and linear accelerator (LINAC)-IMRT and their impact on planning target volume (PTV) margin reduction. Follow-up data showed reduced bladder toxicity in TomoTherapy patients compared to LINAC-IMRT. The purpose of this study was to quantify whether the treatment delivery technique and decreased margins affect reductions in bladder toxicity. Setup corrections from 30 patients treated with helical TomoTherapy and 30 treated with a LINAC were analyzed. These data were used to simulate three IG protocols based on setup error correction and a limited number of imaging sessions. For all patients, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was documented and correlated with the treatment delivery technique. For fiducial marker (FM)-based RT, a margin reduction of up to 3.1, 3.0, and 4.8 mm in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions, respectively, could be achieved with calculation of a setup correction from the first three fractions and IG every second day. Although the bladder volume was treated with mean doses of 35 Gy in the TomoTherapy group vs. 22 Gy in the LINAC group, we observed less GU toxicity after TomoTherapy. Intraprostate FMs allow for small safety margins, help decrease imaging frequency after setup correction, and minimize the dose to bladder and rectum, resulting in lower GU toxicity. In addition, IMRT delivered with TomoTherapy helps to avoid hotspots in the bladder neck, a critical anatomic structure associated with post-RT urinary toxicity. (orig.) [German] Wir haben im Rahmen der Prostatakarzinombehandlung verschiedene bildgefuehrte (IG) Strategien der hochpraezisen intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) unter Einsatz der Tomotherapie (TomoTherapy {sup registered}, Accuray Inc., Madison

  20. A correlation study on position and volume variation of primary lung cancer during respiration by four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingjie; Li Jianbin; Tian Shiyu; Li Fengxiang; Fan Tingyong; Shao Qian; Xu Min; Lu Jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of position movement of primary tumor with interested organs and skin markers, and to investigate the correlation of volume variation of primary tumors and lungs during different respiration phases for patients with lung cancer at free breath condition scanned by four-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation. Methods: 16 patients with lung cancer were scanned at free breath condition by simulation 4DCT which connected to a respiration-monitoring system. A coordinate system was created based on image of T 5 phase,gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures of 10 phases were contoured. The three dimensional position variation of them were measured and their correlation were analyzed, and the same for the volume variation of GTV and lungs of 10 respiratory phases. Results: Movement range of lung cancer in different lobe differed extinct: 0.8 - 5.0 mm in upper lobe, 5.7 -5.9 mm in middle lobe and 10.2 - 13.7 mm in lower lobe, respectively. Movement range of lung cancer in three dimensional direction was different: z-axis 4.3 mm ± 4.3 mm > y-axis 2.2 mm ± 1.0 mm > x-axis 1.7 mm ± 1.5 mm (χ 2 =16.22, P =0.000), respectively. There was no statistical significant correlation for movement vector of GTV and interested structures (r =-0.50 - -0.01, P =0.058 - -0.961), nor for volume variation of tumor and lung (r =0.23, P =0.520). Conclusions: Based on 4DCT, statistically significant differences of GTV centroid movement are observed at different pulmonary lobes and in three dimensional directions. So individual 4DCT measurement is necessary for definition of internal target volume margin for lung cancer. (authors)

  1. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). Participants The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Findings to date Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. Future plans The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding

  2. Giant bladder diverticulum : A rare cause of bladder outlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant bladder diverticula are rare causes of bladder outlet obstruction in children and have rarely been reported. In this paper, we present three children with giant bladder diverticula who presented with bladder outlet obstruction within a year. Micturating cystourethrogram is important for investigating bladder outlet ...

  3. Patterns of trematode infection in gall bladder from cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of gall-bladder of slaughtered cattle was carried out to determine variation pattern of trematode infection. A total of 1,240 gall-bladders of cattle were examined for trematode eggs and adult worms between August 2008 and March 2009. Fifty questionnaires were randomly administered to cattle handlers to ...

  4. Daily variations in delivered doses in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Langen, Katja M.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Jeswani, Sam; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Haimerl, Jason; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the variations in delivered doses to the prostate, rectum, and bladder during a full course of image-guided external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to 78 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 39 fractions. Daily target localization was performed using intraprostatic fiducials and daily megavoltage pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans, resulting in a total of 390 CT scans. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on each CT by a single physician. Daily dosimetric analysis was performed with dose recalculation. The study endpoints were D95 (dose to 95% of the prostate), rV2 (absolute rectal volume receiving 2 Gy), and bV2 (absolute bladder volume receiving 2 Gy). Results: For the entire cohort, the average D95 (±SD) was 2.02 ± 0.04 Gy (range, 1.79-2.20 Gy). The average rV2 (±SD) was 7.0 ± 8.1 cc (range, 0.1-67.3 cc). The average bV2 (±SD) was 8.7 ± 6.8 cc (range, 0.3-36.8 cc). Unlike doses for the prostate, there was significant daily variation in rectal and bladder doses, mostly because of variations in volume and shape of these organs. Conclusion: Large variations in delivered doses to the rectum and bladder can be documented with daily megavoltage CT scans. Image guidance for the targeting of the prostate, even with intraprostatic fiducials, does not take into account the variation in actual rectal and bladder doses. The clinical impact of techniques that take into account such dosimetric parameters in daily patient set-ups should be investigated

  5. Particle size distribution function of photoelectric counter and closed volume aureole photometer (seasonal variations and inter-annual differences)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkin, Vas. V.; Polkin, Vik. V.; Panchenko, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    The results of atmospheric aerosol monitoring are discussed. We compare data of particle size distribution function, which are obtained by photoelectric counter, with inversion of data closed volume aureole photometer, that's allow us to measure the aureole scattering phase function in the range of angles 1.2-20 degrees at a wavelength of 650 nm. Seasonal variations and inter-annual differences collected from 2010 to 2015 years are analyzed and evaluated.

  6. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  7. A general methodology for three-dimensional analysis of variation in target volume delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remeijer, P.; Rasch, C.; Lebesque, J. V.; van Herk, M.

    1999-01-01

    A generic method for three-dimensional (3-D) evaluation of target volume delineation in multiple imaging modalities is presented. The evaluation includes geometrical and statistical methods to estimate observer differences and variability in defining the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) in relation to the

  8. Variations in cereal volume affect the amount selected and eaten for breakfast

    OpenAIRE

    Rolls, Barbara J.; Meengs, Jennifer S.; Roe, Liane S.

    2014-01-01

    Food volume could influence both the portions that people take and the amount that they eat, but these effects have had little investigation. The influence of food volume was tested by systematically reducing the flake size of a breakfast cereal so that the cereal was more compact and the same weight filled a smaller volume. In a crossover design, 41 adults ate cereal for breakfast once a week for four weeks during 2011-2012. The cereal was either standard wheat flakes or th...

  9. Credentialing of radiotherapy centres for a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, Tomas; Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Daily variations in bladder filling make conformal treatment of bladder cancer challenging. On-line adaptive radiotherapy with a choice of plans has been demonstrated to reduce small bowel irradiation in single institution trials. In order to support a multicentre feasibility clinical trial on adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01) a credentialing programme was developed for centres wishing to participate. Methods: The credentialing programme entails three components: a facility questionnaire; a planning exercise which tests the ability of centres to create three adaptive plans based on a planning and five cone beam CTs; and a site visit during which image quality, imaging dose and image guidance procedures are assessed. Image quality and decision making were tested using customised inserts for a Perspex phantom (Modus QUASAR) that mimic different bladder sizes. Dose was assessed in the same phantom using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Results: All 12 centres participating in the full credentialing programme were able to generate appropriate target volumes in the planning exercise and identify the correct target volume and position the bladder phantom in the phantom within 3 mm accuracy. None of the imaging doses exceeded the limit of 5 cGy with a CT on rails system having the lowest overall dose. Conclusion: A phantom mimicking the decision making process for adaptive radiotherapy was found to be well suited during site visits for credentialing of centres participating in a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer. Combined with a planning exercise the site visit allowed testing the ability of centres to create adaptive treatment plans and make appropriate decisions based on the volumetric images acquired at treatment.

  10. Exstrophy of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollohan, J

    1999-03-01

    Exstrophy of the bladder is a rare congenital defect that occurs when the abdominal wall and underlying structures, including the ventral wall of the bladder, fail to fuse in utero. As a result, the lower urinary tract is exposed, and the everted bladder appears through the abdominal opening. Various surgical interventions have been employed with variable success in the hope of achieving complete dryness, full control over delivery of urine, freedom from catheters and external appliances, and a protected upper urinary tract. The most popular surgical approach is the primary bladder closure with secondary bladder neck reconstruction. Comprehensive nursing, medical, and surgical care are necessary to preserve renal and sexual function. The many complex problems experienced by these infants and their families call for a multidisciplinary approach. This article reviews occurrence, clinical presentation, and management of exstrophy of the bladder.

  11. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has ex...... can be challenging, and misdiagnosis as a psychological problem, overactive bladder, or chronic urinary infection has plagued patients with the problem....

  12. Variations in cereal volume affect the amount selected and eaten for breakfast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Barbara J; Meengs, Jennifer S; Roe, Liane S

    2014-09-01

    Food volume could influence both the portions that people take and the amount that they eat, but these effects have had little investigation. The influence of food volume was tested by systematically reducing the flake size of a breakfast cereal so that the cereal was more compact and the same weight filled a smaller volume. In a crossover design, 41 adults ate cereal for breakfast once a week for 4 weeks during 2011 and 2012. The cereal was either standard wheat flakes or the same cereal crushed to reduce the volume to 80%, 60%, or 40% of the standard. A constant weight of cereal was provided in an opaque container and participants poured the amount they wanted into a bowl, added fat-free milk and noncalorie sweetener as desired, and consumed as much as they wanted. Results from a mixed linear model showed that as flake size was reduced, subjects poured a smaller volume of cereal, but still took a greater amount by weight and energy content (both P values breakfast energy intake increased from a mean±standard error of the mean of 286±18 kcal to 358±19 kcal, an increase of a mean±standard error of the mean 34%±7% (Pportion served, which in turn affects energy intake. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SU-F-J-05: The Effect of Air Pockets in the Urinary Bladder During Bladder Hyperthermia Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schooneveldt, G.; Kok, H.P.; Bakker, A.; Geijsen, E.D.; Reijke, T.M. de; Crezee, J. [Academisch Medisch Centrum / Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperthermia combined with Mitomycin C is used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), using a phased array system of microwave antennas for bladder heating. Often some air is present in the bladder, which effectively blocks the microwave radiation, potentially preventing proper treatment of that part of the bladder. Air can be a relevant fraction of the bladder content and large air pockets are expected to have a noticeable influence on achieved temperatures. Methods: We analysed 14 NMIBC patients treated at our institute with our AMC-4 hyperthermia device with four 70MHz antennas around the pelvis. A CT scan was made after treatment and a physician delineated the bladder on the CT scan. On the same scan, the amount of air present in the bladder was delineated. Using our in-house developed hyperthermia treatment planning system, we simulated the treatment using the clinically applied device settings. We did this once with the air pocket delineated on the CT scan, and once with the same volume filled with bladder tissue. Results: The patients had on average 4.2ml (range 0.8–10.1ml) air in the bladder. The bladder volume was delineated by the physician, that is including air pocket and bladder wall, was on average 253ml (range 93–452ml). The average volume in which changes exceeded 0.25°C was 22ml (range 0–108 ml), with the bladder being up to 2°C cooler when an air pocket was present. Except for extreme cases, there was no evident relation between the quantity of air and the difference in temperature. Conclusion: The effect of an air pocket in the bladder during bladder hyperthermia treatment varies strongly between patients. Generally, this leads to lower temperatures in the bladder, potentially affecting treatment quality, and suggesting that care need be taken to minimise the size of air pockets during hyperthermia treatments. The KWF Dutch Cancer Society financially supported this work, grant UVA 2012-5539.

  14. Genes encoding heterotrimeric G-proteins are associated with gray matter volume variations in the medial frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarría-Siles, Iván; Rijpkema, Mark; Lips, Esther; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Verhage, Matthijs; Franke, Barbara; Fernández, Guillén; Posthuma, Danielle

    2013-05-01

    G-protein-coupled signal transduction mediates most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters; this signaling system transduces a large variety of extracellular stimuli into neurons and is the most widely used mechanism for cell communication at the synaptic level. The heterotrimeric G-proteins have been well established as key regulators of neuronal growth, differentiation, and function. More recently, the heterotrimeric G-protein genes group was associated with general cognitive ability. Although heterotrimeric G-proteins are linked to both cognitive ability and neuron signaling, it is unknown whether heterotrimeric G-proteins are also important for brain structure. We tested for association between local cerebral gray matter volume and the heterotrimeric G-protein genes group in 294 subjects; a replication analysis was performed in an independent sample of 238 subjects. Voxel-based morphometry revealed a strong replicated association between 2 genes encoding heterotrimeric G-proteins with specific local increase in medial frontal cortex volume, an area known to be involved in cognitive control and negative affect. This finding suggests that heterotrimeric G-proteins might modulate medial frontal cortex gray matter volume. The differences in gray matter volume due to variations in genes encoding G-proteins may be explained by the role of G-proteins in prenatal and postnatal neocortex development.

  15. Variations in gastric compliance induced by acute blood volume changes in anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça J.R.V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of acute volume imbalances on gastric volume (GV was studied in anesthetized rats (250-300 g. After cervical and femoral vessel cannulation, a balloon catheter was positioned in the proximal stomach. The opposite end of the catheter was connected to a barostat with an electronic sensor coupled to a plethysmometer. A standard ionic solution was used to fill the balloon (about 3.0 ml and the communicating vessel system, and to raise the reservoir liquid level 4 cm above the animals' xiphoid appendix. Due to constant barostat pressure, GV values were considered to represent the gastric compliance index. All animals were monitored for 90 min. After a basal interval, they were randomly assigned to normovolemic, hypervolemic, hypovolemic or restored protocols. Data were compared by ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's test. Mean arterial pressure (MAP, central venous pressure (CVP and GV values did not change in normovolemic animals (N = 5. Hypervolemic animals (N = 12 were transfused at 0.5 ml/min with a suspension of red blood cells in Ringer-lactate solution with albumin (12.5 ml/kg, which reduced GV values by 11.3% (P0.05. MAP and CVP values increased (P<0.05 after hypervolemia but decreased (P<0.05 with hypovolemia. In conclusion, blood volume level modulates gastric compliance, turning the stomach into an adjustable reservoir, which could be part of the homeostatic process to balance blood volume.

  16. Variation in Nectar Volume and Sugar Concentration of Allium ursinum L. ssp. ucrainicum in Three Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Farkas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Floral nectar volume and concentration of ramson (Allium ursinum L. ssp. ucrainicum were investigated in three different habitats, including two types of sessile oak-hornbeam association on brown forest soil with clay illuviation and a silver lime-flowering ash rock forest association on rendzina. Daily nectar production ranged from 0.1 to 3.8 μL per flower with sugar concentrations of 25 to 50%. Mean nectar volumes and concentrations showed significant differences between freely exposed flowers and covered flowers, which had been isolated from flower visitors 24 h prior to nectar studies. Both the amount and quality of nectar were affected by microclimatic conditions and soil properties and varied between populations at different habitats. In the silver lime-flowering ash rock-forest association mean nectar volumes and concentrations were lower than in a typical sessile oak-hornbeam association on three occasions, the difference being significant in two cases. During full bloom, the date of sampling did not have a profound effect on either nectar volume or concentration.

  17. Bladder necrosis: 'A man without a bladder'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosschieter, Judith; Oudshoorn, Frederik H K; Meuleman, Eric J H; Nieuwenhuijzen, Jakko A

    2018-02-17

    Since the use of antibiotics, bladder necrosis has become a rare condition. We report a case of bladder necrosis in a 90-year-old man following urinary retention. After insertion of a transurethral catheter (TUC), 2 L of urine was evacuated. In the following days, the TUC became intermittently blocked. Adequate bladder drainage could not be obtained despite intensive rinsing and placement of a suprapubic catheter. On surgical exploration necrosis of almost the entire bladder wall, except for the trigone, was encountered. Surgical debridement of the non-viable bladder wall without opening the abdominal cavity was conducted, and a TUC was placed in the Retzius cavity to ensure evacuation of urine. Since the patient was haemodynamically unstable, construction of a urinary diversion was waived and urinary drainage of the Retzius cavity by the TUC was accepted, resulting in adequate urinary drainage without compromising renal function. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...

  19. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If You Have Questions Print en español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that ... Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) Urinary ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  20. Long neglected neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnani, Pooja; Gupta, Ruchi; Kedia, Nikhil; Pattewar, Sainath; Bahadur, Madan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI) post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  1. Long neglected neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Pooja Binnani; Ruchi Gupta; Nikhil Kedia; Sainath Pattewar; Madan Mohan Bahadur

    2011-01-01

    Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI) post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  2. Developments in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, L.; Niijima, T.; Prout, G.; Schroder, F.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Guidelines for Radiation Therapy in Clinical Research on Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma in Situ; Policy on Monitoring and Reporting Results; Standardization of Protocol Formnd The Role of Cytology in the Diagnosis, Detection and Follow-up of Bladder Cancer

  3. A study on variation types in celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery using 3D volume rendering of MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Keun; Jang, Seong Joo [Dept. of Radiological physics Graduate School of Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Young Ill [Dept. of Radiological Technology of Kwangyang Health College, Kwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation which based on Celiac axis and SMA using by CT volume rendering images. 613 patients underwent abdominal CTA, there were 552 patients (99.05%, TypeⅠ, Ⅱ ) with normal anatomical form and 61 (9.95%, Type Ⅲ-Ⅻ) with variation. TypeⅠ was 339(55.31%), Type Ⅱ was 213 (34.74%), Type Ⅲ was 18 (2.93%), Type Ⅳ was 12 patients (1.95%), Type Ⅴ was 11 patient (1.79%), Type Ⅵ was 9 patients (1.46%), Type Ⅶ was 6 patients (0.97%), Type Ⅷ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅸ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅹ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅺ was 1 patient (0.16%), and Type Ⅻ was 1 patient (0.16%) into totally new types of variation. In conclusion, we could found 9 new types of variation by classifying based on celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. These results were considered to be an important opportunity for a new vessel map.

  4. FURTHER STUDIES ON THE VARIATION OF SPRAY DEPOSITS IN VINEYARDS WITH AIRFLOW RATE AND VOLUME RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Cerruto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The present research, continuing that reported in [2], deals with the spray application subject, so to investigate as volume rate and airflow rate, forward speed being equal, affect the foliar deposition in an espalier vineyard. Experimental trials were carried out by means of an air assisted towed sprayer, equipped with “Albuz ATR” nozzles. To take into account the influence of the development of the trees, the field trials were replicated in two phenological stages with an interval of about one month: “Inflorescences fully developed” (stage 1 and “Beginning of berry touch” (stage 2. A full factorial experiment was carried out for each growth stage, with two airflow rates (3.9 and 7.5 m3/s, three volume rates (103, 216, and 276 L/ha in the first growth stage and 154, 330 and 432 L/ha in the second growth stage, and four replicates, arranged according to a randomised complete block design. Working pressure (1.2 MPa and forward speed (1.4 m/s were kept unchanged for all the trials. The foliar deposition was measured by means of a spectrophotometric technique. The leaves were sampled on two depth layers and two or three heights, according to the trees’ development. The results showed that volume rate did not significantly influence the mean foliar deposition in both the two growth stages, while the highest deposits were obtained with the lowest airflow rate. The airflow rate × volume rate interaction, though not statistically significant, showed that low volume rates together with high airflow rates, result in a noticeable reduction in foliar deposition (29% with respect the grand mean, due to an increase of the spry drift, especially at the first growth stage, when the foliar development is little. These second tests, unlike those described in [2], did not show any positive influence of the airflow rate on the foliar deposition in the inner part of the canopy, so further investigations could be necessary to better understand the

  5. Variations on calculating left-ventricular volume with the radionuclide count-based method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koral, K.F.; Rabinovitch, M.A.; Kalff, V.

    1985-01-01

    Various methods for the calculation of left-ventricular volume by the count-based method utilizing red-blood-cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc and a parallel-hole collimator are evaluated. Attenuation correction, linked to an additional left posterior oblique view, is utilized for all 26 patients. The authors examine (1) two methods of calculating depth, (2) the use of a pair of attenuation coefficients, (3) the optimization of attenuation coefficients, and (4) the employment of an automated program for expansion of the region of interest. The standard error of the estimate (SEE) from the correlation of the radionuclide volumes with the contrast-angiography volumes, and the root-mean-square difference between the two volume sets at the minimum SEE are computed. It is found that optimizing a single linear attenuation coefficient assumed for attenuation correction best reduces the value of the SEE. The average of the optimum value from the end-diastolic data and that from the end-systolic data is 0.11 cm-1. This value agrees with the mean minus one standard deviation value determined independently from computed tomography scans (0.13-0.02 cm-1). It is also found that expansion of the region of interest beyond the second-derivative edge with an automated program, in order to correctly include more counts, does not lower the SEE as hoped. This result is in contrast to the results of others with different data and a manual method. Possible causes for the difference are given

  6. The concept of peripheral modulation of bladder sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Jane E; Gillespie, James I

    2013-01-01

    It is recognized that, as the bladder fills, there is a corresponding increase in sensation. This awareness of the volume in the bladder is then used in a complex decision making process to determine if there is a need to void. It is also part of everyday experience that, when the bladder is full and sensations strong, these sensations can be suppressed and the desire to void postponed. The obvious explanation for such altered perceptions is that they occur centrally. However, this may not be the only mechanism. There are data to suggest that descending neural influences and local factors might regulate the sensitivity of the systems within the bladder wall generating afferent activity. Specifically, evidence is accumulating to suggest that the motor-sensory system within the bladder wall is influenced in this way. The motor-sensory system, first described over 100 years ago, appears to be a key component in the afferent outflow, the afferent "noise," generated within the bladder wall. However, the presence and possible importance of this complex system in the generation of bladder sensation has been overlooked in recent years. As the bladder fills the motor activity increases, driven by cholinergic inputs and modulated, possibly, by sympathetic inputs. In this way information on bladder volume can be transmitted to the CNS. It can be argued that the ability to alter the sensitivity of the mechanisms generating the motor component of this motor-sensory system represents a possible indirect way to influence afferent activity and so the perception of bladder volume centrally. Furthermore, it is emerging that the apparent modulation of sensation by drugs to alleviate the symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB), the anti-cholinergics and the new generation of drugs the β 3 sympathomimetics, may be the result of their ability to modulate the motor component of the motor sensory system. The possibility of controlling sensation, physiologically and pharmacologically, by

  7. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Yongkan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wontaek, E-mail: rokwt@hanmail.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam [Department of Urology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC{sub R}), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10{sup 8} colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC{sub R}, defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC{sub R} values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC{sub R} (P<.001). However, the radiation therapy fraction number did not significantly influence the PVC{sub R}. Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC{sub R}, which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

  8. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-07-01

    intestine and rectum) doses. Using previously published clinical data as input to normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, the application of PWBs was found to permit radiation dose escalation of 2-6 Gy in up to 60% of the patients without increasing the overall NTCP above the risk resulting from the standard treatment. This analysis also revealed the uncertainty in the present NTCP models, an issue we addressed in a separate study. This study illustrated both the uncertainty in currently available small intestine and rectum radiation tolerance data as well as the differences between the probit and relative seriality models. Consequently, the results of the prospective studies on the late effects after pelvic irradiation that are underway both in our clinic and elsewhere are highly needed. Finally, as an important prerequisite for prescribing escalated radiation doses is to determine adequate target volume margins, we quantified the internal organ motion and patient set-up variation in bladder irradiation by weekly repeat CT scans and electronic portal images. New treatment margin proposals were derived, and were used to update the margins we use in bladder irradiation. We also generated rectum and intestine motion data that in the future can be applied to supplement the static treatment planning scan used in DVH/NTCP analysis to predict the risks for experiencing late effects. Currently, a clinical trial of radiation dose escalation in bladder irradiation using the PWB principle is underway. (Author)

  9. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-01-01

    intestine and rectum) doses. Using previously published clinical data as input to normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, the application of PWBs was found to permit radiation dose escalation of 2-6 Gy in up to 60% of the patients without increasing the overall NTCP above the risk resulting from the standard treatment. This analysis also revealed the uncertainty in the present NTCP models, an issue we addressed in a separate study. This study illustrated both the uncertainty in currently available small intestine and rectum radiation tolerance data as well as the differences between the probit and relative seriality models. Consequently, the results of the prospective studies on the late effects after pelvic irradiation that are underway both in our clinic and elsewhere are highly needed. Finally, as an important prerequisite for prescribing escalated radiation doses is to determine adequate target volume margins, we quantified the internal organ motion and patient set-up variation in bladder irradiation by weekly repeat CT scans and electronic portal images. New treatment margin proposals were derived, and were used to update the margins we use in bladder irradiation. We also generated rectum and intestine motion data that in the future can be applied to supplement the static treatment planning scan used in DVH/NTCP analysis to predict the risks for experiencing late effects. Currently, a clinical trial of radiation dose escalation in bladder irradiation using the PWB principle is underway. (Author)

  10. Fesoterodine for the Treatment of Nocturnal Urgency in Patients with Overactive Bladder Syndrome: An Analysis of Responders and Nonresponders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusid, Johnathan A; Weiss, Jeffrey P; Carlsson, Martin O; Mangan, Erin K

    2017-11-01

    A recent study demonstrated improvement in nocturnal urgency in patients with overactive bladder when treated with fesoterodine. In the current study we aimed to determine which bladder diary parameters predict the response to fesoterodine in these patients. Patients with nocturnal urgency completed a 2-week, single-blind placebo run-in followed by 1:1 double-blind randomization to 12 weeks of fesoterodine or placebo. We analyzed bladder diary parameter changes from baseline to week 12, including the actual number of night voids (total number of nocturia episodes), maximum voided volume, nocturnal bladder capacity, Nocturnal Bladder Capacity Index (NBCi) (actual number of night voids - nocturnal urine volume/maximum voided volume - 1), nocturnal urine volume, the nocturia index (nocturnal urine volume/maximum voided volume) and the nocturnal polyuria index (nocturnal urine volume/24-hour volume). Additionally, we analyzed OAB-q (Overactive Bladder Questionnaire) changes. There was a linear relationship between the likelihood of being a responder for NBCi and the nocturia index. Responders had a significant decrease in nocturnal urine volume relative to baseline (-181.7 ml, p overactive bladder syndrome and low nocturnal bladder capacity with a mismatch between nocturnal urine production and bladder capacity may benefit from fesoterodine. Symptom improvement appears to be mediated by increases in typical rather than maximum nocturnal voided volumes. Symptom improvement was associated with improved quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Compositional Variation of Microindentation Induced Densified and Plastic Deformation Volumes in Simple Silicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian; Matsuoka, Jun; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    the corners of a Vickers pyramid indent.) These two properties are commercially important as they correlate with e.g. resistance to surface damage and the ultimate strength of glass, yet little is known of their variation with glass composition. In the present work, we determine the densified and plastically...... cracking, this finding is an important guide for discovering new highly crack resistant silicate glasses....

  12. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    Stem cells;. Bladder tissue engineering;. Decellularization;. Bladder acellular matrix. Abstract. A wide range of injuries could affect the bladder and lead to eventual loss ... Tissue engineering relies upon three essential pillars; the scaffold, the cells seeded on scaffolds and lastly ..... Clinical trials in bladder tissue engineering.

  13. Neurophysiological modeling of bladder afferent activity in the rat overactive bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Mahipal; van Asselt, Els; van Mastrigt, Ron; Clavica, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome-based urinary dysfunction characterized by "urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia". Earlier we developed a mathematical model of bladder nerve activity during voiding in anesthetized rats and found that the nerve activity in the relaxation phase of voiding contractions was all afferent. In the present study, we applied this mathematical model to an acetic acid (AA) rat model of bladder overactivity to study the sensitivity of afferent fibers in intact nerves to bladder pressure and volume changes. The afferent activity in the filling phase and the slope, i.e., the sensitivity of the afferent fibers to pressure changes in the post-void relaxation phase, were found to be significantly higher in AA than in saline measurements, while the offset (nerve activity at pressure ~0) and maximum pressure were comparable. We have thus shown, for the first time, that the sensitivity of afferent fibers in the OAB can be studied without cutting nerves or preparation of single fibers. We conclude that bladder overactivity induced by AA in rats is neurogenic in origin and is caused by increased sensitivity of afferent sensors in the bladder wall.

  14. THE EFFECT OF VOLUME VARIATION OF SILVER NANOPARTICLE SOLUTION TOWARDS THE POROSITY AND COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF MORTAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.S.B. Dwandaru

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As the world is growing rapidly, people need better building materials such as mortar. The aim of this research is to determine the effect of adding silver nanoparticle solution towards the porosity and compressive strength of mortar. This research was started by making silver nanoparticle solution from nitrate silver (AgNO3. The solution is then characterized using Uv-Vis spectrophotometer. 5 mM silver nanoparticle is added in the process of mortar production with volume variation of the silver nanoparticle solution. The porosity, compressive strength, and the content of mortar were determined by digital scale, universal testing machine, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. For silver nanoparticle solution volumes of (in mL 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 the porosity obtained are (in % 20.38, 19.48, 19.42, 18.9, 17.8, and 17.5, respectively. The best increase in compressive strength is obtained for (in MPa 29,068, 29,308, and 31,385, with nanoparticle solution volumes of (in mL 5, 10, and 15   Keywords: mortar, silver nanoparticle, compressive strength

  15. Predictor model for seasonal variations in skid resistance. Volume 2: Comprehensive report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, J. J.; Saito, K.; Blackburn, R.

    1984-04-01

    Two models, utilizing data collected in 1979 and 1980, were developed to predict variations in skid resistance due to rainfall conditions, temperature effects, and time of the year. A generalized predictor model was developed from purely statistical considerations and a mechanistic model was developed from hypothesized mechanisms. This model may be utilized to estimate the skid resistance at any time in the season from a measurement made during the same season, or to adjust skid-resistance measurement made at any time during the season to the end-of-season level.

  16. Paraganglioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder are tumors of chromaffin tissue originating from the sympathetic innervations of the urinary bladder wall and are extremely rare. Being functional, in most of the cases they are recognized by their characteristic presentation of hypertensive crisis and postmicturition syncope. A silent presentation of a bladder paraganglioma is very unusual but quite dangerous as they are easily misdiagnosed and adequate peri-operative attention is not provided. Here, we are presenting one such silent paraganglioma in adult women who presented with only a single episode of hematuria and severe hypertensive crisis occur during its trans-urethral resection.

  17. "Focused introspection" during naturally increased diuresis: description and repeatability of a method to study bladder sensation non-invasively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wachter, Stefan G G; Heeringa, Rhea; Van Koeveringe, Gommert A; Winkens, Bjorn; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip E V; Gillespie, James I

    2014-06-01

    To present and describe a non-invasive method to study the origin and development of bladder filling sensation and to evaluate the repeatability of the method. Eighteen volunteers participated in the study and were given a water loading protocol consisting of 1,000 ml water intake 1 hr before the session and 200 ml every 10 min during the session. Protocol 1: To evaluate diuresis rate, seven participants were asked to void every 15 min and the voided volume was measured. Protocol 2: Eleven volunteers graded bladder sensation on regular time points, on an empty graph with time on the X-axis and intensity of sensation on the Y-axis. The protocol ended at absolute need to void (maximal intensity) and voided volumes were measured. This protocol was conducted three times with a 10 days interval. Protocol 1: The diuresis rate was not different during the sessions and showed no variation over the studied time period (P = 0.2). Protocol 2: For an individual, the diuresis rate was not different between the sessions. The curves in all patients showed a continuously increasing bladder intensity. In seven participants the curve was convex, in the other four, the curve was sigmoidal. For each individual the pattern was constant during the three sessions. A strict water loading protocol induces a constant diuresis. This allows individuals to draw an introspection bladder sensation curve with a specific shape, which can be used as a method to study the development of bladder sensation non-invasively. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bladder Diseases - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Bladder Diseases: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Enfermedades de la vejiga: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National ...

  19. Isolated Inguinal Bladder Hernia

    OpenAIRE

    BAYSAL, Tamer; SOYLU, Ahmet; ERDOĞAN, Özgül

    2010-01-01

    Isolated urinary bladder herniation into the inguinal canal is rare. It is often diagnosed intraoperatively during surgery or is identified after intraoperative injury. Early diagnosis with radiologic imaging is important to avoid complications during repair surgery. Computed tomography seems the best imaging choice to outline the details of herniation. We report an incidentally discovered case of inguinal bladder herniation with intravenous pyelography and computed tomography findings. ...

  20. Long neglected neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Binnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  1. Engineering functional bladder tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Maya; Madduri, Srinivas; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Milleret, Vinzent; Hall, Heike; Atala, Anthony; Eberli, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    End stage bladder disease can seriously affect patient quality of life and often requires surgical reconstruction with bowel tissue, which is associated with numerous complications. Bioengineering of functional bladder tissue using tissue-engineering techniques could provide new functional tissues for reconstruction. In this review, we discuss the current state of this field and address different approaches to enable physiologic voiding in engineered bladder tissues in the near future. In a collaborative effort, we gathered researchers from four institutions to discuss the current state of functional bladder engineering. A MEDLINE® and PubMed® search was conducted for articles related to tissue engineering of the bladder, with special focus on the cells and biomaterials employed as well as the microenvironment, vascularisation and innervation strategies used. Over the last decade, advances in tissue engineering technology have laid the groundwork for the development of a biological substitute for bladder tissue that can support storage of urine and restore physiologic voiding. Although many researchers have been able to demonstrate the formation of engineered tissue with a structure similar to that of native bladder tissue, restoration of physiologic voiding using these constructs has never been demonstrated. The main issues hindering the development of larger contractile tissues that allow physiologic voiding include the development of correct muscle alignment, proper innervation and vascularization. Tissue engineering of a construct that will support the contractile properties that allow physiologic voiding is a complex process. The combination of smart scaffolds with controlled topography, the ability to deliver multiple trophic factors and an optimal cell source will allow for the engineering of functional bladder tissues in the near future. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Understanding the Warm Water Volume Precursor of ENSO Events and its Interdecadal Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neske, S.; McGregor, S.

    2018-02-01

    A wind forced ocean model is used to decompose the equatorial Pacific warm water volume (WWV) between 1980 and 2016 into two components: the (i) adjusted wind response, which is found by letting the model evolve unforced for three months, and (ii) instantaneous wind response, which are the instantaneous WWV changes due to Ekman transports. Our results suggest that roughly half of WWV variability is only as predictable as the winds that drive the instantaneous change. Separate examinations of pre-2000 and post-2000 periods reveal (i) nearly equal importance of instantaneous and adjusted responses for the pre-2000 period and (ii) dominance of the instantaneous response during the post-2000 period, which is most apparent during the recharged phase. This increasing instantaneous contribution prominence explains the post-2000 reduction in WWV/El Niño-Southern Oscillation sea surface temperature lead times (from six to nine months pre-2000 down to three months post-2000) and is consistent with the reduction in post-2000 El Niño-Southern Oscillation prediction skill.

  3. Bladder cancer and schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer was believed, for several decades, to be a completely unique entity of disease, different from urothelial cancer. This was probably due to its distinct clinico pathologic and demographic features that varied from those of urothelial entity. The carcinogenesis is an extremely complex process resulting from the accumulation of many genetic and epigenetic changes leading to alterations in the cell proliferation regulation process. In bladder cancer, many of these carcinogenic cascades were not fully documented or somewhat conflicting. In spite of the efforts performed, much is still needed to explore the presence or absence of the carcinogenic difference with a different etiology. The control of schistosomiasis in certain countries and the subsequent decrease in the intensity of infestation showed changing of features approaching that of urothelial tumors. However the schistosoma-associated bladder cancer presented in more advanced stages than schistosoma-non associated urothelial cancer. More recently, data are gathered that, upon applying the same treatment protocol and management care, stage by stage comparison of the treatment end-results were found to be similar in bladder cancer patients with a different etiology. All treatment options; including radical cystectomy with or without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy or tri modality bladder preserving treatment seem to lead to similar end-results regardless of etiologic factor(s) implicated in bladder cancer development.

  4. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-09-27

    To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding author. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  5. Quantification of Prostate and Seminal Vesicle Interfraction Variation During IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, Steven J.; Dong Lei; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, Rex; Choi, Seungtaek; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Tucker, Susan L.; Wang He; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction variability in prostate and seminal vesicle (SV) positions during a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using an integrated computed tomography (CT)-linear accelerator system and to assess the impact of rectal and bladder volume changes. Methods and Materials: We studied 15 patients who had undergone IMRT for prostate carcinoma. Patients had one pretreatment planning CT scan followed by three in-room CT scans per week using a CT-on-rails system. The prostate, bladder, rectum, and pelvic bony anatomy were contoured in 369 CT scans. Using the planning CT scan as a reference, the volumetric and positional changes were analyzed in the subsequent CT scans. Results: For all 15 patients, the mean systematic internal prostate and SV variation was 0.1 ± 4.1 mm and 1.2 ± 7.3 mm in the anteroposterior axis, -0.5 ± 2.9 mm and -0.7 ± 4.5 mm in the superoinferior axis, and 0.2 ± 0.9 mm and -0.9 ± 1.9 mm in the lateral axis, respectively. The mean magnitude of the three-dimensional displacement vector was 4.6 ± 3.5 mm for the prostate and 7.6 ± 4.7 mm for the SVs. The rectal and bladder volume changes during treatment correlated with the anterior and superior displacement of the prostate and SVs. Conclusion: The dominant prostate and SV variations occurred in the anteroposterior and superoinferior directions. The systematic prostate and SV variation between the treatment planning CT and daily therapy as a result of the rectal and bladder volume changes emphasizes the need for daily directed target localization and/or immobilization techniques

  6. Characterization of a Murine Model of Bioequivalent Bladder Wound Healing and Repair Following Subtotal Cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarifpour, Mona; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Kelkar, Sneha S; Mohs, Aaron; Mendelsohn, Cathy; Schneider, Kerry; Marini, Frank; Christ, George J

    2017-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated restoration of a bioequivalent bladder within 8 weeks of removing the majority of the bladder (subtotal cystectomy or STC) in rats. The goal of the present study was to extend our investigations of bladder repair to the murine model, to harness the power of mouse genetics to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed robust bladder regrowth. Female C57 black mice underwent STC, and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-STC, bladder repair and function were assessed via cystometry, ex vivo pharmacologic organ bath studies, and T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Histology was also performed to measure bladder wall thickness. We observed a time-dependent increase in bladder capacity (BC) following STC, such that 8 and 12 weeks post-STC, BC and micturition volumes were indistinguishable from those of age-matched non-STC controls and significantly higher than observed at 4 weeks. MRI studies confirmed that bladder volume was indistinguishable within 3 months (11 weeks) post-STC. Additionally, bladders emptied completely at all time points studied (i.e., no increases in residual volume), consistent with functional bladder repair. At 8 and 12 weeks post-STC, there were no significant differences in bladder wall thickness or in the different components (urothelium, lamina propria, or smooth muscle layers) of the bladder wall compared with age-matched control animals. The maximal contractile response to pharmacological activation and electrical field stimulation increased over time in isolated tissue strips from repaired bladders but remained lower at all time points compared with controls. We have established and validated a murine model for the study of de novo organ repair that will allow for further mechanistic studies of this phenomenon after, for example, genetic manipulation.

  7. Spontaneous Bladder Perforation in an Infant Neurogenic Bladder: Laparoscopic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cabezalí Barbancho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bladder perforation is an uncommon event in childhood. It is usually associated with bladder augmentation. We are presenting a case of bladder rupture in an infant with neurogenic bladder without prior bladder surgery. Three days after lipomyelomeningocele excision the patient showed signs and symptoms of acute abdomen. The ultrasound exploration revealed significant amount of intraperitoneal free fluid and therefore a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A posterior bladder rupture was diagnosed and repaired laparoscopically. Currently, being 3 years old, she keeps successfully dry with clean intermittent catheterization. Neurogenic bladder voiding function can change at any time of its evolution and lead to complications. Early diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture is of paramount importance, so it is essential to think about it in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen.

  8. Bladder activation: afferent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2002-05-01

    The major function of the lower urinary tract is to store and periodically evacuate urine from the bladder. This requires coordination of the smooth muscles of the bladder and urethra, and of the striated muscles of the outflow region and pelvic floor by a complex neural control system. Lumbosacral afferent fibers (pelvic afferents), but also afferents in the hypogastric and pudendal nerves, are of major importance for the regulation of the mechanisms for continence and micturition. In the bladder, afferent nerves have been identified suburothelially as well as in the detrusor muscle. Suburothelially, they form a plexus that lies immediately beneath the epithelial lining. This plexus is particularly dense in the bladder neck and the trigone. The most important afferents for the micturition process are myelinated Adelta-fibers and unmyelinated C-fibers. Immunocytochemical and tracing studies have revealed that numerous peptides, including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, enkephalins, and cholecystokinin are localized either alone, or in combination, in afferent pathways of the bladder and urethra. The receptors on these nerves include: vanilloid receptors, purinoceptors, tachykinin, and prostanoid receptors. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been found to mediate excitation of small-diameter sensory neurons via P2X3 receptors, and it has been proposed that in the bladder, distention causes release of ATP from the urothelium. ATP, in turn, can activate P2X3 receptors on suburothelial afferent nerve terminals to evoke a neural discharge. However, it is most likely that a cascade of inhibitory and stimulatory transmitters/mediators, as well as ATP, are involved in the transduction mechanisms underlying the activation of afferent fibers during bladder filling.

  9. Intra-fractional bladder motion and margins in adaptive radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Caroline; Vestergaard, Anne; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    and to estimate population-based and patient-specific intra-fractional margins, also relevant for a future re-optimisation strategy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients treated in a clinical phase II ART trial of daily plan selection for bladder cancer were included. In the library plans, 5 mm isotropic margins......BACKGROUND: The bladder is a tumour site well suited for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional changes, but it also displays considerable intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to assess target coverage with a clinically applied method for plan selection ART...... were added to account for intra-fractional changes. Pre-treatment and weekly repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series were acquired in which a full three-dimensional (3D) volume was scanned every second min for 10 min (a total of 366 scans in 61 series). Initially, the bladder clinical target...

  10. A Primer for the Primary Care Physician: Management of Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, Margaret E; Barker, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome affects millions of women in the U.S. and is defined by urinary urgency, urinary frequency, and small volume voids, with or without nocturia and incontinence. Overactive bladder is a diagnosis of exclusion, and several therapies exist for the management of this condition. This article outlines a systematic approach that the primary care physician can take when treating a patient with overactive bladder. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  11. Toll-like receptor 7 is overexpressed in the bladder of Hunner-type interstitial cystitis, and its activation in the mouse bladder can induce cystitis and bladder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Koji; Aizawa, Naoki; Akiyama, Yoshiyuki; Kamei, Jun; Masumori, Naoya; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Homma, Yukio; Igawa, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is associated with the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome, well-known diseases accompanying interstitial cystitis (IC). We studied TLR7 expression in the bladder of patients with Hunner-type IC (HIC) and its functional roles in bladder inflammation and nociception using mice. Bladder biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with HIC. Specimens from the noncancerous portion of the bladder of patients with bladder cancer served as controls. The specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction of TLR7. Loxoribine (LX), a TLR7 agonist, was instilled in the bladder of C57BL/6N female mice, and TLR7-mRNA expression and histological changes of the bladder, bladder pain-like licking behavior, voiding behavior, cystometry, and bladder afferent nerve activities were investigated. The effects of hydroxychloroquine, a TLR7 antagonist, on the LX-induced changes on cystometry and voiding behavior were studied. The number of TLR7 immuno-reactive cells and the mRNA expression of TLR7 were significantly increased in HIC specimens. Intravesical instillation of LX induced edema, congestion, inflammation, and significantly increased TLR7-mRNA expression in the mouse bladder. Loxoribine-instillation also significantly increased licking behavior, voiding frequency, and afferent nerve activities associated with decreased single-voided volume and intercontraction interval of micturitions. Hydroxychloroquine reversed the LX-induced cystometric and voiding behavioral changes. Toll-like receptor 7 was up-regulated in the bladder mucosa of patients with HIC, and activation of TLR7 in the mouse bladder induced cystitis with sensory hyperactivity of the bladder. Blocking the TLR7 pathway may be an innovative treatment target of HIC.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Malignant tumor of urinary bladder Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Bladder Cancer General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  13. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Avelumab Bavencio (Avelumab) Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Durvalumab ...

  14. Impact of a Common Genetic Variation Associated With Putamen Volume on Neural Mechanisms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Jia, Tianye; Macare, Christine; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia J; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Paus, Tomáš; Poustka, Luise; Smolka, Michael N; Walter, Henrik; Whelan, Robert; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivières, Sylvane

    2017-05-01

    In a recent genomewide association study of subcortical brain volumes, a common genetic variation at rs945270 was identified as having the strongest effect on putamen volume, a brain measurement linked to familial risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To determine whether rs945270 might be a genetic determinant of ADHD, its effects on ADHD-related symptoms and neural mechanisms of ADHD, such as response inhibition and reward sensitivity, were explored. A large population sample of 1,834 14-year-old adolescents was used to test the effects of rs945270 on ADHD symptoms assessed through the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and region-of-interest analyses of putamen activation by functional magnetic resonance imaging using the stop signal and monetary incentive delay tasks, assessing response inhibition and reward sensitivity, respectively. There was a significant link between rs945270 and ADHD symptom scores, with the C allele associated with lower symptom scores, most notably hyperactivity. In addition, there were sex-specific effects of this variant on the brain. In boys, the C allele was associated with lower putamen activity during successful response inhibition, a brain response that was not associated with ADHD symptoms. In girls, putamen activation during reward anticipation increased with the number of C alleles, most significantly in the right putamen. Remarkably, right putamen activation during reward anticipation tended to negatively correlate with ADHD symptoms. These results indicate that rs945270 might contribute to the genetic risk of ADHD partly through its effects on hyperactivity and reward processing in girls. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface area and the seabed area, volume, depth, slope, and topographic variation for the world's seas, oceans, and countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Mark John; Cheung, Alan; De Hauwere, Nathalie

    2010-12-01

    Depth and topography directly and indirectly influence most ocean environmental conditions, including light penetration and photosynthesis, sedimentation, current movements and stratification, and thus temperature and oxygen gradients. These parameters are thus likely to influence species distribution patterns and productivity in the oceans. They may be considered the foundation for any standardized classification of ocean ecosystems and important correlates of metrics of biodiversity (e.g., species richness and composition, fisheries). While statistics on ocean depth and topography are often quoted, how they were derived is rarely cited, and unless calculated using the same spatial resolution the resulting statistics will not be strictly comparable. We provide such statistics using the best available resolution (1-min) global bathymetry, and open source digital maps of the world's seas and oceans and countries' Exclusive Economic Zones, using a standardized methodology. We created a terrain map and calculated sea surface and seabed area, volume, and mean, standard deviation, maximum, and minimum, of both depth and slope. All the source data and our database are freely available online. We found that although the ocean is flat, and up to 71% of the area has a ocean volume exceeds 1.3 billion km(3) (or 1.3 sextillion liters), and sea surface and seabed areas over 354 million km(2). We propose the coefficient of variation of slope as an index of topographic heterogeneity. Future studies may improve on this database, for example by using a more detailed bathymetry, and in situ measured data. The database could be used to classify ocean features, such as abyssal plains, ridges, and slopes, and thus provide the basis for a standards based classification of ocean topography.

  16. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: A 'Big Brother' evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Duppen, Joop C.; Fitton, Isabelle; Deurloo, Kirsten E.I.; Zijp, Lambert; Uitterhoeve, Apollonia L.J.; Rodrigus, Patrick T.R.; Kramer, Gijsbert W.P.; Bussink, Johan; Jaeger, Katrien De; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen R.N.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. Patients and methods: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) including positive lymph nodes of 22 lung cancer patients (stages I-IIIB) on CT only. All radiation oncologist-computer interactions were recorded with a tool called 'Big Brother'. For each radiation oncologist and patient the following issues were analyzed: delineation time, number of delineated points and corrections, zoom levels, level and window (L/W) settings, CT slice changes, use of side windows (coronal and sagittal) and software button use. Results: The mean delineation time per GTV was 16 min (SD 10 min). The mean delineation time for lymph node positive patients was on average 3 min larger (P=0.02) than for lymph node negative patients. Many corrections (55%) were due to L/W change (e.g. delineating in mediastinum L/W and then correcting in lung L/W). For the lymph node region, a relatively large number of corrections was found (3.7 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that it was difficult to delineate lymph nodes. For the tumor-atelectasis region, a relative small number of corrections was found (1.0 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that including or excluding atelectasis into the GTV was a clinical decision. Inappropriate use of L/W settings was frequently found (e.g. 46% of all delineated points in the tumor-lung region were delineated in mediastinum L/W settings). Despite a large observer variation in cranial and caudal direction of 0.72 cm (1 SD), the coronal and sagittal side windows were not used in 45 and 60% of the cases, respectively. For the more difficult cases, observer variation was smaller when the coronal and sagittal side windows were used. Conclusions: With the 'Big Brother' tool a method was developed to trace the delineation process. The differences between

  17. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  18. The artificial bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgrandchamps, F; Griffith, D P

    1999-04-01

    An artificial bladder should provide adequate urine storage, allow volitional complete evacuation of urine and preserve renal function. Moreover, its structure has to be biocompatible, resistant to urinary encrustation and tolerant to bacterial infection. Various solutions have been proposed over the years to achieve these multiple requirements. However, most of these solutions and their corresponding prototypes did not advance beyond the stage of a preliminary report of experimental data. This review will bring out the 'proof of principal' in alloplastic prosthetic bladder, including type of alloplast and design concept and the recent development in tissue engineering approaches.

  19. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...... experienced the symptoms for at least 6 weeks in the absence of any confusable diseases that may give rise to the symptoms. Symptoms compatible with the diagnosis are now thought to affect up to 3% of the female population in the United States with a 5:1 female-to-male preponderance. Diagnosis and treatment...

  20. Segmental irradiation of the bladder with neodymium YAG laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPhee, M.S.; Mador, D.R.; Tulip, J.; Ritchie, B.; Moore, R.; Lakey, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Neodymium YAG laser energy source can be readily adapted for cystoscopic use by some simple modifications of existing urologic equipment. Both the fiberoptic resectoscope and a deflecting cystourethroscope have been adapted for this purpose. Fixation of the fiber tip 1 cm. from the target and use of a divergent beam of 36 degrees allows the delivery of standardized dosage to a relatively large bladder tissue volume. Animal experiments involving 35 mongrel dogs established that repetitive overlapping doses of 200 joules ech can successfully treat a large area of bladder resulting in a full thickness bladder wall injury. This technique has been used in 4 high risk patients with infiltrating bladder cancer without adverse sequelae. The ability to reliably produce a full thickness lesion may give this modality a therapeutic advantage over conventional cautery techniques especially for the treatment of residual infiltrative carcinoma

  1. The NLRP3 Inflammasome Mediates Inflammation Produced by Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Francis M; Hill, Hayden M; Wood, Case M; Edmondson, Andrew T; Dumas, Aliya; Foo, Wen-Chi; Oelsen, James M; Rac, Goran; Purves, J Todd

    2016-05-01

    While bladder outlet obstruction is well established to elicit an inflammatory reaction in the bladder that leads to overactive bladder and fibrosis, little is known about the mechanism by which this is initiated. NLRs (NOD-like receptors) and the structures that they form (inflammasomes) have been identified as sensors of cellular damage, including pressure induced damage, and triggers of inflammation. Recently we identified these structures in the urothelium. In this study we assessed the role of the NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3) inflammasome in bladder dysfunction resulting from bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder outlet obstruction was created in female rats by inserting a 1 mm outer diameter transurethral catheter, tying a silk ligature around the urethra and removing the catheter. Untreated and sham operated rats served as controls. Rats with bladder outlet obstruction were given vehicle (10% ethanol) or 10 mg/kg glyburide (a NLRP3 inhibitor) orally daily for 12 days. Inflammasome activity, bladder hypertrophy, inflammation and bladder function (urodynamics) were assessed. Bladder outlet obstruction increased urothelial inflammasome activity, bladder hypertrophy and inflammation, and decreased voided volume. Glyburide blocked inflammasome activation, reduced hypertrophy and prevented inflammation. The decrease in voided volume was also attenuated by glyburide mechanistically as an increase in detrusor contraction duration and voiding period. Results suggest the importance of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the induction of inflammation and bladder dysfunction secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Arresting these processes with NLRP3 inhibitors may prove useful to treat the symptoms that they produce. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer using deformable image registration of empty and full bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Caine, H.; Hunt, P.

    2015-01-01

    A common objective of various adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies for bladder cancer is to reduce irradiation of normal tissue, thereby reduce the risk of radiation induced toxicity, and maintain or improve the target coverage. Bladder radiotherapy, typically involves generous margins (up to 20...... bladder cancer patients and a total of 100 fractions. It was found that the smaller a-PTV, a-PTV4 and a-PTV3, were appropriate in 87% of the fractions, while a-PTV2 and a-PTV1 were required in 12% of the fractions respectively. The use of the a-PTVs reduced the PTV volume by 32% (28-36%) as compared...... to conv-PTV. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study indicate that the use of a-PTVs could result in substantial decrease in the course averaged planning target volume. This reduction in the PTV is likely to decrease the radiation related toxicity and benefit bladder cancer patients. Currently...

  3. Generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam CT using a patient-specific bladder shape model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoot, A. J. A. J. van de; Schooneveldt, G.; Wognum, S.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Bel, A.; Hoogeman, M. S.; Chai, X.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop and validate a generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), independent of gender and treatment position (prone or supine), using only pretreatment imaging data. Methods: Data of 20 patients, treated for tumors in the pelvic region with the entire bladder visible on CT and CBCT, were divided into four equally sized groups based on gender and treatment position. The full and empty bladder contour, that can be acquired with pretreatment CT imaging, were used to generate a patient-specific bladder shape model. This model was used to guide the segmentation process on CBCT. To obtain the bladder segmentation, the reference bladder contour was deformed iteratively by maximizing the cross-correlation between directional grey value gradients over the reference and CBCT bladder edge. To overcome incorrect segmentations caused by CBCT image artifacts, automatic adaptations were implemented. Moreover, locally incorrect segmentations could be adapted manually. After each adapted segmentation, the bladder shape model was expanded and new shape patterns were calculated for following segmentations. All available CBCTs were used to validate the segmentation algorithm. The bladder segmentations were validated by comparison with the manual delineations and the segmentation performance was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), surface distance error (SDE) and SD of contour-to-contour distances. Also, bladder volumes obtained by manual delineations and segmentations were compared using a Bland-Altman error analysis. Results: The mean DSC, mean SDE, and mean SD of contour-to-contour distances between segmentations and manual delineations were 0.87, 0.27 cm and 0.22 cm (female, prone), 0.85, 0.28 cm and 0.22 cm (female, supine), 0.89, 0.21 cm and 0.17 cm (male, supine) and 0.88, 0.23 cm and 0.17 cm (male, prone), respectively. Manual local adaptations improved the segmentation

  4. Generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam CT using a patient-specific bladder shape model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoot, A. J. A. J. van de, E-mail: a.j.schootvande@amc.uva.nl; Schooneveldt, G.; Wognum, S.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Chai, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Palo Alto, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop and validate a generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), independent of gender and treatment position (prone or supine), using only pretreatment imaging data. Methods: Data of 20 patients, treated for tumors in the pelvic region with the entire bladder visible on CT and CBCT, were divided into four equally sized groups based on gender and treatment position. The full and empty bladder contour, that can be acquired with pretreatment CT imaging, were used to generate a patient-specific bladder shape model. This model was used to guide the segmentation process on CBCT. To obtain the bladder segmentation, the reference bladder contour was deformed iteratively by maximizing the cross-correlation between directional grey value gradients over the reference and CBCT bladder edge. To overcome incorrect segmentations caused by CBCT image artifacts, automatic adaptations were implemented. Moreover, locally incorrect segmentations could be adapted manually. After each adapted segmentation, the bladder shape model was expanded and new shape patterns were calculated for following segmentations. All available CBCTs were used to validate the segmentation algorithm. The bladder segmentations were validated by comparison with the manual delineations and the segmentation performance was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), surface distance error (SDE) and SD of contour-to-contour distances. Also, bladder volumes obtained by manual delineations and segmentations were compared using a Bland-Altman error analysis. Results: The mean DSC, mean SDE, and mean SD of contour-to-contour distances between segmentations and manual delineations were 0.87, 0.27 cm and 0.22 cm (female, prone), 0.85, 0.28 cm and 0.22 cm (female, supine), 0.89, 0.21 cm and 0.17 cm (male, supine) and 0.88, 0.23 cm and 0.17 cm (male, prone), respectively. Manual local adaptations improved the segmentation

  5. Stepwise cystometry : a new method to investigate properties of the urinary bladder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L.R.A. Coolsaet (Bo)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe urinary bladder has a twofold function : 1. to store urine and 2. to expel it if necessary under complete voluntary control. The bladder can store various volumes of urine at a low and approximately constant intravesical pressure until capacity is reached. In the literature, this

  6. Duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with PKU microwave driven Cs-free volume H- sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, A. L.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, J. F.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Microwave driven cesium-free volume H- sources, that have the ability to deliver tens of mA H- at 35 keV both in CW and 10% duty factor (100 Hz/1 ms), were developed at Peking University (PKU) [S. X. Peng et al., in Proceeding of IPAC 2015, WEPWA027, Richmond, Virginia, USA, 3-8 May 2015]. Recently, special efforts were paid on the investigation of duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with them. Most of the experiments were carried out with a pulsed length (τ) of 1 ms and different intervals of 99 ms, 49 ms, 39 ms, 29 ms, 19 ms, 9 ms, 4 ms, 2 ms, 1 ms, 0.5 ms, and 0 ms, respectively. Other experiments were focused on CW operation and fixed duty factor of 1%. Experimental results prove that PKU H- sources can deliver tens of mA H- at duty factor from 1% to 100%. The RF power efficiency increases steadily with the increasing of duty factor from 1% to CW at a fixed pulsed length. Under a given duty factor and pulsed length, RF power efficiency keeps constant and the H- current increases with RF power linearly. Details will be presented in the paper.

  7. Duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with PKU microwave driven Cs-free volume H⁻ sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S X; Zhang, T; Ren, H T; Zhang, A L; Xu, Y; Zhang, J F; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Microwave driven cesium-free volume H(-) sources, that have the ability to deliver tens of mA H(-) at 35 keV both in CW and 10% duty factor (100 Hz/1 ms), were developed at Peking University (PKU) [S. X. Peng et al., in Proceeding of IPAC 2015, WEPWA027, Richmond, Virginia, USA, 3-8 May 2015]. Recently, special efforts were paid on the investigation of duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with them. Most of the experiments were carried out with a pulsed length (τ) of 1 ms and different intervals of 99 ms, 49 ms, 39 ms, 29 ms, 19 ms, 9 ms, 4 ms, 2 ms, 1 ms, 0.5 ms, and 0 ms, respectively. Other experiments were focused on CW operation and fixed duty factor of 1%. Experimental results prove that PKU H(-) sources can deliver tens of mA H(-) at duty factor from 1% to 100%. The RF power efficiency increases steadily with the increasing of duty factor from 1% to CW at a fixed pulsed length. Under a given duty factor and pulsed length, RF power efficiency keeps constant and the H(-) current increases with RF power linearly. Details will be presented in the paper.

  8. Urothelial Tight Junction Barrier Dysfunction Sensitizes Bladder Afferents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rued, Anna C.; Taiclet, Stefanie N.; Birder, Lori A.; Kullmann, F. Aura

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a chronic voiding disorder that presents with pain in the urinary bladder and surrounding pelvic region. A growing body of evidence suggests that an increase in the permeability of the urothelium, the epithelial barrier that lines the interior of the bladder, contributes to the symptoms of IC/BPS. To examine the consequence of increased urothelial permeability on pelvic pain and afferent excitability, we overexpressed in the urothelium claudin 2 (Cldn2), a tight junction (TJ)-associated protein whose message is significantly upregulated in biopsies of IC/BPS patients. Consistent with the presence of bladder-derived pain, rats overexpressing Cldn2 showed hypersensitivity to von Frey filaments applied to the pelvic region. Overexpression of Cldn2 increased the expression of c-Fos and promoted the activation of ERK1/2 in spinal cord segments receiving bladder input, which we conceive is the result of noxious stimulation of afferent pathways. To determine whether the mechanical allodynia observed in rats with reduced urothelial barrier function results from altered afferent activity, we examined the firing of acutely isolated bladder sensory neurons. In patch-clamp recordings, about 30% of the bladder sensory neurons from rats transduced with Cldn2, but not controls transduced with GFP, displayed spontaneous activity. Furthermore, bladder sensory neurons with tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) action potentials from rats transduced with Cldn2 showed hyperexcitability in response to suprathreshold electrical stimulation. These findings suggest that as a result of a leaky urothelium, the diffusion of urinary solutes through the urothelial barrier sensitizes bladders afferents, promoting voiding at low filling volumes and pain. PMID:28560313

  9. Copy number variation in glutathione-S-transferase T1 and M1 predicts incidence and 5-year survival from prostate and bladder cancer, and incidence of corpus uteri cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, M S; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Bojesen, S E

    2011-01-01

    were, respectively, 1.5 (0.7-3.2) and 2.0 (0.9-4.3) for GSTM1*1/0 and GSTM1*0/0 versus GSTM1*1/1. The HR for death after bladder cancer diagnosis was 1.9 (1.0-3.7) for GSTM1*0/0 versus GSTM1*1/0. In conclusion, exact CNV in GSTT1 and GSTM1 predict incidence and 5-year survival from prostate and bladder...... and for death after prostate cancer diagnosis were, respectively, 1.2 (0.8-1.8) and 1.2 (0.6-2.1) for GSTT1*1/0, and 1.8 (1.1-3.0) and 2.2 (1.1-4.4) for GSTT1*0/0 versus GSTT1*1/1. In women, the cumulative incidence of corpus uteri cancer increased with decreasing GSTT1 copy numbers (trend=0.04). The HRs...... for corpus uteri cancer were, respectively, 1.8 (1.0-3.2) and 2.2 (1.0-4.6) for GSTT1*1/0 and GSTT1*0/0 versus GSTT1*1/1. Finally, the cumulative incidence of bladder cancer increased, and the cumulative 5-year survival decreased, with decreasing GSTM1 copy numbers (P=0.03-0.05). The HRs for bladder cancer...

  10. SU-F-T-397: Evaluating the Impact of Bladder Filling Status for the Organs at Risk Dose Distribution in Cervical Cancer Patients with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, JY [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Hong, DL [The First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of bladder filling status of the organs at risk (OARs) on dose distribution during intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer patients. Methods: Twelve cervical cancer patients treated with IMRT were selected for this study. The prescription dose was 45Gy/25 fractions with the 6 MV photon beam. All patients performed two CT scans, one with an empty bladder, the other one with bladder filled. For the registration of two CT scans, the fusion was automatically carried out upon the bony anatomy. The OARs (bladder, rectum, pelvic bone and small intestine) were delineated to planning CT to evaluate the dose distributions. These dose distributions were compared between empty bladder and bladder filling. Results: The bladder volume with empty bladder and bladder filling was 403.2±124.13cc and 101.4±87.5cc, respectively. There were no statistical differences between empty bladder and bladder filling in the mean value of pelvic bone V10Gy, V20Gy, V40Gy; rectum V40Gy and V45Gy. The bladder V40Gy and V45Gy were lower in the bladder filling group than in the empty bladder group (63.7%±5.8% vs 87.5%±7.8%, 45.1%±9.5% vs 62.4%±11.8%, respectively). The V45Gy for small intestine in the bladder filling group was significantly less than the empty bladder group (146.7cc±95.3cc vs 245.7cc±101.8cc). Conclusion: Our study finds that the bladder filling status did not have a significant impact on dose distribution in the rectum and pelvic bone. However, the changes of bladder filling have a large impact on bladder and small intestine doses. A full bladder is strongly recommended during treatment for cervical cancer patients.

  11. SU-F-T-397: Evaluating the Impact of Bladder Filling Status for the Organs at Risk Dose Distribution in Cervical Cancer Patients with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, JY; Hong, DL

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of bladder filling status of the organs at risk (OARs) on dose distribution during intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer patients. Methods: Twelve cervical cancer patients treated with IMRT were selected for this study. The prescription dose was 45Gy/25 fractions with the 6 MV photon beam. All patients performed two CT scans, one with an empty bladder, the other one with bladder filled. For the registration of two CT scans, the fusion was automatically carried out upon the bony anatomy. The OARs (bladder, rectum, pelvic bone and small intestine) were delineated to planning CT to evaluate the dose distributions. These dose distributions were compared between empty bladder and bladder filling. Results: The bladder volume with empty bladder and bladder filling was 403.2±124.13cc and 101.4±87.5cc, respectively. There were no statistical differences between empty bladder and bladder filling in the mean value of pelvic bone V10Gy, V20Gy, V40Gy; rectum V40Gy and V45Gy. The bladder V40Gy and V45Gy were lower in the bladder filling group than in the empty bladder group (63.7%±5.8% vs 87.5%±7.8%, 45.1%±9.5% vs 62.4%±11.8%, respectively). The V45Gy for small intestine in the bladder filling group was significantly less than the empty bladder group (146.7cc±95.3cc vs 245.7cc±101.8cc). Conclusion: Our study finds that the bladder filling status did not have a significant impact on dose distribution in the rectum and pelvic bone. However, the changes of bladder filling have a large impact on bladder and small intestine doses. A full bladder is strongly recommended during treatment for cervical cancer patients.

  12. Voiding diary might serve as a useful tool to understand differences between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Han; Oh, Shin Ah; Oh, Seung-June

    2014-02-01

    To identify the voiding characteristics of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and overactive bladder. Between September 2005 and June 2010, 3-day voiding diaries of 49 consecutive bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients and 301 overactive bladder patients were prospectively collected at an outpatient clinic and retrospectively analyzed. The characteristics of the two groups were not significantly different. However, all voiding variables including volume and frequency were significantly different except for the total voided volume: patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis showed significantly higher voiding frequencies, smaller maximal and mean voided volume, and more constant and narrower ranges of voided volume compared with overactive bladder patients (P interstitial cystitis were shorter and more consistent during the day and night (P interstitial cystitis and overactive bladder patients differ significantly according to 3-day voiding diary records. These findings provide additional information regarding the differences between these two diseases in the outpatient clinical setting. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Change of Ultrasound Estimated Bladder Weight and Bladder Wall Thickness After Treatment of Bladder Outlet Obstruction With Dutasteride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Na; Lee, Young-Suk; Han, Deok Hyun; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the change of bladder wall hypertrophy to relieve bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) by treatment with 5α-reductase inhibitor. Men who have BOO confirmed by urodynamic study (BOO index ≥40) were treated with dutasteride 0.5 mg once a day for 6 months. We measured ultrasound estimated bladder weight (UEBW), UEBW divided by body surface area (UEBW/BSA), and bladder wall thickness (BWT) before and after treatment. Changes in LUTS parameters were assessed by using the International Prostate Symptom Score, uroflowmetry, residual urine volume, prostate volume, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and LUTS outcome scores (LOS). Correlation between the change of LUTS parameters and UEBW, UEBW/BSA, and BWT were evaluated. We assessed the changes of bladder wall hypertrophy according to the results of benefit, satisfaction, and willingness to continue (BSW) questionnaire. Thirty patients completed the 6-month study. The mean UEBW was 47.10 ± 7.79 g before and 50.07 ± 5.39 g after dutasteride treatment (P = 0.259). The mean UEBW/BSA was 26.47 ± 4.30 g/m 2 before and 28.2 ± 3.53 g/m 2 after treatment (P = 0.253), and there was no definite change in mean BWT after treatment (P = 0.301). Most LUTS parameters including LOS significantly improved. Increased BOO index value was related to decreased BWT (ρ = 0.361, P = 0.049). There was no definite change in mean UEBW, UEBW/BSA, and BWT according to the results of the BSW questionnaire. There was no change in UEBW, UEBW/BSA and BWT despite improving most clinical parameters suggesting BOO. The changes of bladder wall hypertrophy parameters still have limitations to directly reflect the relief of BOO. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Chronic kidney disease in neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bong Mo; Oh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Moon Hee; Choi, Hye Min

    2018-03-01

    It was believed that neurogenic bladder (NB) might be a risk factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, data are limited regarding the real incidence or risk of CKD in NB. In addition, serum creatinine (sCr), a classical marker of renal function, is not reliable in NB patients because they present muscle wasting due to disuse or denervation. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of CKD in NB patients using serum Cystatin-C. Secondly, we aimed to identify the risk factors for CKD development in NB. This was a cross-sectional study in a public hospital, a specialized center for patients who were victims of industrial accidents. Serum Cystatin-C was checked at the regular laboratory test in the structured NB programme of the hospital, and 313 patients were included in the study. The overall prevalence of CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria were significantly associated with CKD in the multivariable analysis. Chronic kidney disease prevalence was more than three times higher in NB patients than in the general population despite recent progress in the medical care of NB. Co-morbid diabetes, small bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria seem to be the risk factors for CKD development in NB. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  15. Leiomyoma of Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of leiomyoma of urinary bladder, a rare benign tumor, is presented. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with long duration history of dysuria. Intravenous urography (IVU, ultrasound (US, computed tomography (CT and biopsy diagnosed this case accurately. The clinical presentation, imaging findings and management of this benign tumor are discussed.

  16. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Tomaszewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, 3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and 3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future.

  17. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  18. SU-E-T-287: Dose Verification On the Variation of Target Volume and Organ at Risk in Preradiation Chemotherapy IMRT for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X; Kong, L; Wang, J; Hu, W; Chen, Z [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the target volume and organ at risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with preradiation chemotherapy based on CT scanned during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and recalculate the dose distribution. Methods: Seven patients with NPC and preradiation chemotherapy, treated with IMRT (35 to 37 fractions) were reviewed. Repeat CT scanning was required to all of the patients during the radiotherapy, and the number of repeat CTs varies from 2 to 6. The plan CT and repeat CT were generated by different CT scanner. To ensure crespectively on the same IMPT plan. The real dose distribution was calculated by deformable registration and weighted method in Raystation (v 4.5.1). The fraction of each dose is based on radiotherapy record. The volumetric and dose differences among these images were calculated for nascIpharyngeal tumor and retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes (GTV-NX), neck lymph nodes(GTV-ND), and parotid glands. Results: The volume variation in GTV-NX from CT1 to CT2 was 1.15±3.79%, and in GTV-LN −0.23±4.93%. The volume variation in left parotid from CT1 to CT2 was −6.79±11.91%, and in right parotid −3.92±8.80%. In patient 2, the left parotid volume were decreased remarkably, as a Result, the V30 and V40 of it were increased as well. Conclusion: The target volume of patients with NPC varied lightly during IMRT. It shows that preradiation chemotherapy can control the target volume variation and perform a good dose repeatability. Also, the decreasing volume of parotid in some patient might increase the dose of it, which might course potential complications.

  19. Bladder function in 17β-estradiol-induced nonbacterial prostatitis model in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Seiji; Kawai, Yuko; Oka, Michiko; Oyama, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Kazumi; Wada, Naoki; Hori, Jun-ichi; Tamaki, Gaku; Kita, Masafumi; Iwata, Tatsuya; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2013-06-01

    To investigate bladder function in a model of nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP) induced in castrated rats by 17β-estradiol injection. Ten-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups, sham and NBP (both N = 8). NBP was induced by castration followed by daily subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol for 30 days. On the 31st day after surgery, we investigated (1) voiding behavior, (2) bladder blood flow (BBF), (3) prostate and bladder weight, and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and CXCL1) levels and (4) bladder contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS), carbachol and KCl. (1) Voiding behavior (average micturition volume, total urine volume and number of micturitions) and (2) BBF were not significantly different between the sham and NBP groups. (3) NBP led to a significant decrease in prostatic weight and increase in proinflammatory cytokine levels in the prostate, but NBP did not cause a significant change in bladder weight or proinflammatory cytokine levels in the bladder. (4) Bladder contractile forces in response to EFS, carbachol and KCl were not significantly affected by NBP. In this rat model, NBP did not cause a significant change in the level of proinflammatory cytokines in the bladder and affect bladder function.

  20. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: a 'Big Brother' evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, R.J.; Duppen, J.C.; Fitton, I.; Deurloo, K.E.; Zijp, L.; Uitterhoeve, A.L.; Rodrigus, P.T.; Kramer, G.W.P.M.; Bussink, J.; Jaeger, K. de; Belderbos, J.S.; Hart, A.A.M.; Nowak, P.J.; Herk, M. van; Rasch, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume

  1. Urodynamic characteristics might be variable in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients with different non-bladder co-morbid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Ming; Fan, Yu-Hua; Lin, Alex T L

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the impact of non-bladder co-morbid conditions on the urodynamic characteristics of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis completed the screening questionnaires for chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, temporo-mandibular disorders, multiple chemical sensitivities, tension/migraine headache, and localized myofascial pain disorder. They underwent either conventional pressure-flow urodynamic studies or video-urodynamic studies. Urodynamic variables were compared between patients with and those without co-morbid conditions. Of 111 patients (16 males and 95 females) with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, 87 (78.4%) had at least one co-morbid condition (62% males vs 82% females, p = 0.005). Those with concomitant irritable bowel syndrome were younger and had urodynamic characteristics of smaller catheter-free voided volume, lower catheter-free average flow rate, smaller bladder volume on the first desire to void, and more prevalent dysfunctional voiding than those without irritable bowel syndrome. Patients with concomitant localized myofascial pain disorder also had larger bladder volume at the first desire to void and lower pressure at maximum flow than those without co-morbid myofascial pain disorder. There were no significant differences in urodynamic parameters between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients with and those without other co-morbidities. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients, especially females, are more likely to have non-bladder co-morbidities, especially tension/migraine headache and localized myofascial pain. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis Patients with co-morbid irritable bowel syndrome are younger and more likely to have abnormal urodynamic findings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  2. Carcinoma Gall Bladder: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Y

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma gall bladder is a very aggressive disease with poor outcomes. Despite achievements in the field of advanced imaging techniques, there is a very high mortality rate of the disease Cancer is the second most common disease in India responsible for maximum mortality with about 0.3 million deaths per year. The magnitude of cancer problem in the Indian Sub-continent (sheer numbers is increasing due to poor to moderate living standards and inadequate medical facilities. Women are more commonly affected than men. The peak incidence occurs in people in their 60s, but the disease age range is from 29 to 90 years of age and there is great geographic and ethnic variation. Carcinoma gall bladder, a disease of old age, is now found in the younger age group and presents with greater ferocity.

  3. Neuromodulation attenuates bladder hyperactivity in a rat cystitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Nickles, Angela; Nelson, Dwight E

    2013-12-06

    We investigated the regulation of urinary bladder function by electrical stimulation of the L6 spinal nerve (SN) using cystometry in normal rats and in rats with cystitis induced by intravesical infusion of dilute acetic acid. In anesthetized rats, a cannula was placed into the bladder dome for saline/acetic acid infusion and intravesical pressure monitoring. Threshold pressure (TP), basal pressure (BP) and inter-contraction interval (ICI) were measured from the bladder pressure recording and void volume (VV) was measured by weighing the voided fluid. Comparison of cystometrograms obtained with infusion of saline or acetic acid showed that acetic acid decreases TP, ICI and VV. These excitatory effects, characteristic of acetic acid induced bladder hyperactivity, were significantly reversed by bilateral SN stimulation (P Hz and at motor threshold (0.19 ± 0.01 milliamps) increased ICI (265%) and VV (217%). In rats perfused with acetic acid, the corresponding increases produced by SN stimulation were 350% for ICI and 383% for VV. The percentage increases in the acetic acid-treated group were not significantly higher than those in saline-treated group. Using continuous flow cystyometry, we find that SN stimulation can produce effects on micturition consistent with its effects on isovolumetric model, and consistent with the therapeutic effect observed with InterStim® therapy in overactive bladder patients. Although the effect of SN stimulation was slightly greater in bladder irritated over normal rats, the difference was not statistically significant.

  4. Presumptive migrating gall bladder mucocoele in two dogs with gall bladder rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, R K; Thornton, L; Lim, C K; Murakami, M; Nakamura, Y; Gal, A

    2017-12-13

    A 10-year-old neutered female soft-coated wheaten terrier and a 10-year-old, entire female Pomeranian were presented for vomiting and anorexia. Using ultrasound, an oval structure with a stellate, kiwifruit-like appearance typical of a gall bladder mucocoele was observed in the caudal abdomen of the soft-coated wheaten terrier and adjacent to the liver in the Pomeranian. There was also a moderate volume of abdominal effusion in both dogs. Cytology of the peritoneal fluid indicated a sterile exudative process but varied between the two dogs, with an absence of bile pigment in the soft-coated wheaten terrier and marked bile peritonitis in the Pomeranian. An entire free-floating ectopic mucocoele was confirmed via exploratory laparotomy with concomitant gall bladder rupture and common bile duct obstruction. Both dogs recovered completely after surgery. This is the first report of cases of gall bladder rupture with entire free-floating gall bladder mucocoeles in dogs. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  6. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  7. Pathophysiology of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banakhar, Mai A; Al-Shaiji, Tariq F; Hassouna, Magdy M

    2012-08-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common disorder that negatively affects the quality of life of our patients and carries a large socioeconomic burden. According to the International Continence Society, it is characterized as urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually, with frequency and nocturia in the absence of causative infection. The pathophysiology of this disease entity varies between neurogenic, myogenic, or idiopathic factors. This paper provides a review of the contemporary theories behind the pathophysiology of OAB.

  8. Should simultaneous ureteral reimplantation be performed during sigmoid bladder augmentation to reduce vesicoureteral reflux in neurogenic bladder cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Yong; Wu, Zhi-jin; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Chao-hua; Zhang, Xiao-dong

    2015-05-01

    To assess the necessity of performing simultaneous collateral reimplantation during sigmoid bladder augmentation (SBA) to reduce vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in low-compliance neuropathic bladder with associated VUR. We retrospectively identified 31 patients who underwent SBA alone or with simultaneous ureteral reimplantation at our hospital. The video urodynamics data, VUR status, renal function, and clinical symptoms were studied during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 57 months (range 12-117). All patients displayed significantly increased safe cystometric capacity (P bladder compliance (P bladder volumes due to augmentation. The patients' improving renal function benefited most from the enlarged bladder and partly from increased antireflux resistance of vesico-ureter anastomosis. Twelve (38.7%) had recurrent febrile urinary tract infection after SBA, and one (3.2%) suffered from vesico-ureter anastomosis contracture after ureteral reimplantation. A preoperative intravesical VUR pressure of 20 cmH2O is not an effective cutoff point for whether ureteral reimplantation should be simultaneously performed during SBA. Augmentation appears to be more important than reimplantation for protecting kidney from damage due to febrile urinary tract infection after SBA. Simultaneous reimplantation may be not necessary during SBA in neurogenic bladder.

  9. Superficial Bladder Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Schenkman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer treatment remains a challenge despite significant improvements in preventing disease progression and improving survival. Intravesical therapy has been used in the management of superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder (i.e. Ta, T1, and carcinoma in situ with specific objectives which include treating existing or residual tumor, preventing recurrence of tumor, preventing disease progression, and prolonging survival. The initial clinical stage and grade remain the main determinant factors in survival regardless of the treatment. Prostatic urethral mucosal involvement with bladder cancer can be effectively treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG intravesical immunotherapy. Intravesical chemotherapy reduces short-term tumor recurrence by about 20%, and long-term recurrence by about 7%, but has not reduced progression or mortality. Presently, BCG immunotherapy remains the most effective treatment and prophylaxis for TCC (Ta, T1, CIS and reduces tumor recurrence, disease progression, and mortality. Interferons, Keyhole-limpet hemocyanin (KLH, bropirimine and Photofrin-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT are under investigation in the management of TCC and early results are encouraging. This review highlights and summarizes the recent advances in therapy for superficial TCC.

  10. Clinical implications of underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Jin Ko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB is a common urologic condition but a complex disease that causes troublesome lower urinary tract symptoms. Currently, management of UAB remains unsatisfactory. Also, many urological diseases can be combined with UAB. In these combined cases, the treatment results may be affected by UAB component. This review focuses on the clinical implications of UAB in patients with common urologic conditions, including bladder outlet obstruction, overactive bladder syndrome and stress urinary incontinence.

  11. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    R F Sholan; G Sh Garaev; G M Nasrullaeva

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 0...

  12. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  13. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  14. Permeability and ultrastructure of human bladder epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, J; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Nielsen, S L

    1983-01-01

    Leakage of tight junctions as observed with electron microscopy and demonstration of solute transport across bladder epithelium was investigated in 13 patients with different bladder diseases: urinary retention and infection, bladder tumours and interstitial cystitis. The latter group showed cons...

  15. Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Causes in Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder outlet obstruction: Causes in men? My doctor says I might have bladder outlet obstruction. What does that mean? Answers from Erik P. Castle, M.D. Bladder outlet obstruction in men is a blockage that slows ...

  16. Analysis of parotid gland and target volume variations during the head neck cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Jingwei; Fu Weihua; Xu Guozhen; Gao Li; Yan Di; Wu Qiuwen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and parotid gland volume dur- ing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods: Five patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma were treated by IMRT. Cone beam CT was done every week during the whole course of radiotherapy. All images were fused with cone beam CT pictures and the initial CT pictures. The contouring was on normal parotid gland and gas cavity in each slide of cone beam CT. The changes of parotid gland and gas volume in GTV were calculated. Results: The parotid gland volume decreased, and gas volume in the GTV increased throughout the course of IMRT. At the end of radiotherapy, the parotid gland volume decreased to 90.1%- 52.3% compared with the volume before IMRT, gas cavity volume increased and took up to 3.7%-16.8% of GTV at the beginning of radiotherapy. Conclusion: Normal parotid gland volume and GTV is changed during IMRT in head and neck cancer. Cone beam CT can be used to find these changes which are helpful in carrying out the second IMRT plan. (authors)

  17. Prevalence of postoperative bladder distension and urinary retention detected by ultrasound measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamonerie, L; Marret, E; Deleuze, A; Lembert, N; Dupont, M; Bonnet, F

    2004-04-01

    Postoperative bladder distension and urinary retention are commonly underestimated. Ultrasound enables accurate measurement of bladder volume and thus makes it possible to determine the prevalence of postoperative bladder distension. Using ultrasound, we measured the volume of the bladder contents at the time of discharge from the recovery room in 177 adult patients who had undergone thoracic, vascular, abdominal, orthopaedic or ENT surgery. Forty-four per cent of the patients had a bladder volume >500 ml and 54% of the 44%, who had no symptoms of bladder distension, were unable to void spontaneously within 30 min. The risk factors for urinary retention were age >60 yr (odds ratio (OR) 2.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-4.38), spinal anaesthesia (OR 3.97, 95% CI 1.32-11.89) and duration of surgery >120 min (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.39-6.61). Before discharge from the recovery room it seems worthwhile to systematically check the bladder volume with a portable ultrasound device in patients with risk factors.

  18. Are we accurately predicting bladder capacity in infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel F.G.; Lavallée, Luke T.; Dubois, Claude; Leonard, Michael; Guerra, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Estimating bladder capacity is an important component in the evaluation of many urological disorders. For estimates to be of clinical value, precise reference ranges are needed. While accepted reference ranges have been established in adults and older children, none have been validated in infants. We endeavour to determine the normal bladder capacity of children less than 1 year of age. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of children aged 0 to 12 months with cutaneous stigmata of spinal dysraphism who were referred to the urology clinic to rule out tethered cord between October 2004 and July 2011. Patients with normal urologic assessment, who did not have surgery during the time they were followed, were included in the study cohort. Urodynamic studies were performed using the Laborie Medical Technologies UDS-600. Bladder filling occurred via a catheter at a rate of 10% of the expected total bladder capacity/minute. Bladder capacity was defined as the volume of filling when the child voided around the catheter. We collected data, including age at urodynamics, bladder capacity, detrusor pressure at capacity, bladder compliance and length of follow-up. Result: In total, 46% (84/183) of patients had a normal urologic assessment and met the inclusion criteria. The median age was 9.0 months (interquartile range [IQR] 6.8–11.0). The average bladder capacity was 48.9 mL (standard deviation [SD] 32.8) and the mean detrusor pressure at capacity was 8.5 cmH2O (SD 10.0). Mean compliance was 14.1 mL/cmH2O (SD 13.6). The average length of follow-up was 40.7 months (SD 26.2) and during this interval no patients were found to have urologic or neurologic abnormalities and none underwent tethered cord release. Conclusion: Bladder capacity in infants with a median age of 9.0 months was found to be 48.9 mL. This is less than half of the volume predicted by a commonly employed formula. A novel method of estimating bladder capacity in infants is required

  19. Preventive Effect of Hydrogen Water on the Development of Detrusor Overactivity in a Rat Model of Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Nozomu; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Nomiya, Masanori; Aikawa, Ken; Kimura, Junko

    2016-03-01

    Bladder ischemia and oxidative stress contribute to the pathogenesis of bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction. H2 reportedly acts as an effective antioxidant. We investigated whether oral ingestion of H2 water would have a beneficial effect on bladder function in a rat model of bladder outlet obstruction. H2 water was made by dissolving H2 gas in ordinary drinking water using a hydrogen water producing apparatus. The bladder outlet obstruction model was surgically induced in male rats. Rats with obstruction were fed H2 water or ordinary drinking water. On week 4 postoperatively cystometry was performed. Oxidative stress markers and the bladder nerve growth factor level were determined. Bladder tissues were processed for pharmacological studies and histological analysis. The micturition interval and micturition volume significantly decreased in obstructed rats given ordinary drinking water. These decreases were significantly suppressed by oral ingestion of H2 water. Increased post-void residual volume in obstructed rats was significantly reduced by H2 water. Obstruction led to a significant increase in bladder weight, oxidative stress markers and nerve growth factor. H2 water significantly suppressed these increases without affecting bladder weight. There was no significant difference in histological findings between rats with bladder obstruction given H2 water and ordinary drinking water. Decreased responses of detrusor muscle strips from obstructed bladders to KCl, carbachol and electrical field stimulation were reversed by H2 water ingestion. Results suggest that H2 water could ameliorate bladder dysfunction secondary to bladder outlet obstruction by attenuating oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. OVERACTIVE BLADDER SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Vishnevskiy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder is a specific syndrome characterized by bladder dysfunction that is clinically manifested by imperative urination (pollakiuria, urgency, urgent incontinence and nocturia. This state is very widely spread among children: every fifth child aged 4 to 7 shows typical bladder dysfunction. Quite often if urinary distresses are not studied well enough such children are falsely diagnosed with monosymptom enuresis, which, according to our information, actually happens in only 3,9% of cases. When examining children with urinary disorders it is reasonable to be geared to the protocol of European urologist association. According to this protocol, treatment should be started with antimuscarinimedications. The only antimuscarinic medication for treating children with hyperactive bladder that is legal in Russia is oxybutinin (Driptane, that is presently considered to be the «golden standard» of pharmaceutical treatment of overactive bladder for patients of any age. This statement is based on the modern idea of overactive bladder pathogenesis, that presupposes detrusorhypersensibility to acetylcholine. However, in some cases it might be reasonable to use some other medications, physiotherapy, sometimes as part of complex therapy. If individual dosage is observed, which will enable preventing or significantly lowering possible side effects, oxybutinin will be still considered «the golden standard» for treating overactive bladder for years to come in cases when detrusor hypersensibility to acetylcholine is the key component of bladder dysfunction pathogenesis.Key words: overactive bladder, oxybutinin, urination disorder, children.

  1. Image-Based 3D Treatment Planning for Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy: Dosimetric Effects of Bladder Filling on Organs at Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Jennifer; Shen Sui; De Los Santos, Jennifer F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States); Kim, Robert Y., E-mail: rkim@uabmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of bladder filling on organs at risk (OARs) using three-dimensional image-based treatment planning for vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent postoperative high-dose rate vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. For three-dimensional planning, patients were simulated by computed tomography with an indwelling catheter in place (empty bladder) and with 180 mL of sterile water instilled into the bladder (full bladder). The bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and small bowel (OARs) were contoured, and a prescription dose was generated for 10 to 35 Gy in 2 to 5 fractions at the surface or at 5 mm depth. For each OAR, the volume dose was defined by use of two different criteria: the minimum dose value in a 2.0-cc volume receiving the highest dose (D{sub 2cc}) and the dose received by 50% of the OAR volume (D{sub 50%}). International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) bladder and rectum point doses were calculated for comparison. The cylinder-to-bowel distance was measured using the shortest distance from the cylinder apex to the contoured sigmoid or small bowel. Statistical analyses were performed with paired t tests. Results: Mean bladder and rectum D{sub 2cc} values were lower than their respective ICRU doses. However, differences between D{sub 2cc} and ICRU doses were small. Empty vs. full bladder did not significantly affect the mean cylinder-to-bowel distance (0.72 vs. 0.92 cm, p = 0.08). In contrast, bladder distention had appreciable effects on bladder and small bowel volume dosimetry. With a full bladder, the mean small bowel D{sub 2cc} significantly decreased from 677 to 408 cGy (p = 0.004); the mean bladder D{sub 2cc} did not increase significantly (1,179 cGy vs. 1,246 cGy, p = 0.11). Bladder distention decreased the mean D{sub 50%} for both the bladder (441 vs. 279 cGy, p = 0.001) and the small bowel (168 vs. 132 cGy, p = 0.001). Rectum

  2. Variations in CT determination of target volume with active breath co-ordinate in radiotherapy for post-operative gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gui-Chao; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Xue-Jun; Yu, Xiao-Li; Hu, Wei-Gang; Wang, Jia-Zhou; Li, Qi-Wen; Liang, Li-Ping; Shen, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate interobserver and inter-CT variations in using the active breath co-ordinate technique in the determination of clinical tumour volume (CTV) and normal organs in post-operative gastric cancer radiotherapy. Ten gastric cancer patients were enrolled in our study, and four radiation oncologists independently determined the CTVs and organs at risk based on the CT simulation data. To determine interobserver and inter-CT variation, we evaluated the maximum dimensions, derived volume and distance between the centres of mass (CMs) of the CTVs. We assessed the reliability in CTV determination among the observers by conformity index (CI). The average volumes ± standard deviation (cm(3)) of the CTV, liver, left kidney and right kidney were 674 ± 138 (range, 332-969), 1000 ± 138 (range, 714-1320), 149 ± 13 (range, 104-183) and 141 ± 21 (range, 110-186) cm(3), respectively. The average inter-CT distances between the CMs of the CTV, liver, left kidney and right kidney were 0.40, 0.56, 0.65 and 0.6 cm, respectively; the interobserver values were 0.98, 0.53, 0.16 and 0.15 cm, respectively. In the volume size of CTV for post-operative gastric cancer, there were significant variations among multiple observers, whereas there was no variation between different CTs. The slices in which variations more likely occur were the slices of the lower verge of the hilum of the spleen and porta hepatis, then the paraoesophageal lymph nodes region and abdominal aorta, and the inferior vena cava, and the variation in the craniocaudal orientation from the interobserver was more predominant than that from inter-CT. First, this is the first study to evaluate the interobserver and inter-CT variations in the determination of the CTV and normal organs in gastric cancer with the use of the active breath co-ordinate technique. Second, we analysed the region where variations most likely occur. Third, we investigated the influence of interobserver variation on

  3. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Orange, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.

  4. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments

  5. [Hospital variation in anastomotic leakage after rectal cancer surgery in the Spanish Association of Surgeons project: The contribution of hospital volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Héctor; Biondo, Sebastiano; Codina, Antonio; Ciga, Miguel Á; Enríquez-Navascués, José; Espín, Eloy; García-Granero, Eduardo; Roig, José Vicente

    2016-04-01

    This multicentre observational study aimed to determine the anastomotic leak rate in the hospitals included in the Rectal Cancer Project of the Spanish Society of Surgeons and examine whether hospital volume may contribute to any variation between hospitals. Hospital variation was quantified using a multilevel approach on prospective data derived from the multicentre database of all adenocarcinomas of the rectum operated by an anterior resection at 84 surgical departments from 2006 to 2013. The following variables were included in the analysis; demographics, American Society of Anaesthesiologists classification, use of defunctioning stoma, tumour location and stage, administration of neoadjuvant treatment, and annual volume of elective surgical procedures. A total of 7231 consecutive patients were included. The rate of anastomotic leak was 10.0%. Stratified by annual surgical volume hospitals varied from 9.9 to 11.3%. In multilevel regression analysis, the risk of anastomotic leak increased in male patients, in patients with tumours located below 12 cm from the anal verge, and advanced tumour stages. However, a defunctioning stoma seemed to prevent this complication. Hospital surgical volume was not associated with anastomotic leak (OR: 0.852, [0.487-1.518]; P=.577). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant variation in anastomotic leak between all departments (MOR: 1.475; [1.321-1.681]; P<0.001). Anastomotic leak varies significantly among hospitals included in the project and this difference cannot be attributed to the annual surgical volume. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall for different radiopharmaceuticals using dynamic S-values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, M.; Minarik, D.; Mattsson, S.; Leide-Svegborn; Johansson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim and background: the urinary bladder wall is a radiosensitive organ that can receive a high absorbed dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Current dynamic models estimate the photon and electron absorbed dose at the inner surface of the bladder wall. The aim of this work has been to create a more realistic estimation of the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall from different radiopharmaceuticals. This calculation also uses dynamic specific absorption fractions (SAF) that changes with bladder volume and are gender specific. Materials and Methods: the volume of the urinary bladder content was calculated using a spherical approximation with a urinary inflow of 1.0 ml/min and 0.5 ml/min during day and night time, respectively. The activity in the bladder content was described using a bi-exponential extraction from the body. The absorbed dose to the bladder wall was estimated using linear interpolation of SAF values from different bladder volumes, ranging from 10 ml to 800 ml. Administration of the activity was assumed to start at 09:00 with an initial voiding after 40 minutes and a voiding interval of 3.5 hours during the day. A six hour night gap, starting at midnight, with a voiding right before and after the night period, was used. Calculations were made, with the same assumptions, for an earlier dynamic bladder model and with a static SAF value from the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms for a bladder containing 200 ml. Values for the absorbed dose per unit administered activity for 19 commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were calculated, e.g. 18 F-FDG, 99m Tc-pertechnetate, 99m Tc-MAG3 and 123 I-NaI. Results and conclusion: the results of the estimates of the absorbed doses to the inner bladder wall were a factor of ten higher than the estimates mean absorbed doses. The mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were slightly higher for females than males, due to a smaller female

  7. [Irradiation of hepatocellular carcinoma: impact of breathing on motions and variations of volume of the tumor, liver and upper abdominal organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubas, A; Mornex, F; Merle, P; d'Hombres, A; Lorchel, F; Chapet, O

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the amplitude of motion and the variations of volume of the tumor, the liver and upper abdominal organs induced by breathing during the irradiation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two scanners were performed in inhale and in exhale not forced in 20 patients with a HCC. The liver (left/right lobes), the tumor, the duodenum, the two kidneys and the pancreas were delineated on each acquisition. The superposition of the two spirals made it possible to measure the displacements and variations of volume of these structures in the craniocaudal (CC), lateral (Lat), and anteroposterior (AP) directions. The mean displacement of the tumour in CC, Lat and AP was of 19.7+/-8.3 mm, 4.5+/-2.3 mm, and 8.9+/-6.5 mm. The greatest amplitude of movement was obtained in CC for the right and left hepatic lobes (19+/-6.5 mm, 10+/-5.6 mm), the duodenum(12.6+/-6.4 mm), the kidneys right and left (15.5+/-6.1 mm, 16.2+/-10 mm) and the pancreas (13.2+/-6 mm). No significant variation of volume was observed for these organs. The movements of the tumour, the liver and the abdominal organs, induced by breathing are significant. The respiratory gating appears essential in particular with the development of new techniques of irradiation such as the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT).

  8. The study of dose variation and change of heart volume using 4D-CT in left breast radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seon Mi; Cheon, Geum Seong; Heo, Gyeong Hun; Shin, Sung Pil; Kim, Kwang Seok; Kim, Chang Uk; Kim, Hoi Nam

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the results of changed heart volume and heart dose in the left breast cancer patients while considering the movements of respiration. During the months of March and May in 2012, we designated the 10 patients who had tangential irradiation with left breast cancer in the department of radiation Oncology. With acquired images of free breathing pattern through 3D and 4D CT, we had planed enough treatment filed for covered up the whole left breast. It compares the results of the exposed dose and the volume of heart by DVH (Dose Volume histogram). Although total dose was 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/28 fraction), reirradiated 9 Gy (1.8 Gy/5 Fraction) with PTV (Planning Target Volume) if necessary. It compares the results of heart volume and heart dose with the free breathing in 3D CT and 4D CT. It represents the maximum difference volume of heart is 40.5%. In addition, it indicated the difference volume of maximum and minimum, average are 8.8% and 27.9%, 37.4% in total absorbed dose of heart. In case of tangential irradiation (opposite beam) in left breast cancer patients, it is necessary to consider the changed heart volume by the respiration of patient and the heartbeat of patient

  9. Study of dosimetric variation due to interfraction organ movement in High Dose Rate Interstital (MUPIT) brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Thanigaimalai; Sukumar, Prabakar; Krishnappan, Chokkalingam; Boopathy, Raghavendiran

    2010-01-01

    Ten patients with cancer of uterine cervix who underwent interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT templates were CT scanned (CT1) using which bladder, rectum and CTV were delineated. The treatment plan PCT1 was generated and optimized geometrically on the volume. CT scan (CT2) was repeated before the second fraction of the treatment CTV and critical organs were delineated. The plan (PCT2) was created by reproducing the Plan PCT1 in the CT2 images and compared with PCT1. Bladder, Rectum and CTV percentage volume variation ranges from +28.6% to -34.3%, 38.4% to -14.9% and 8.5% to -15.2% respectively. Maximum dose variation in bladder was +17.1%, in rectum was up to +410% and in CTV was -13.0%. The dose to these structures varies independently with no strong correlation with the volume variation. Hence it is suggested that repeat CT and re-planning is mandatory before second fraction execution.

  10. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Susan K.; Birder, Lori A.; Chai, Toby C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology. PMID:24900993

  11. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Keay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC, feline interstitial cystitis (FIC, and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB. These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology.

  12. Normal bladder wall thickness measurement in healthy Iranian children, a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Atoosa; Kazemian, Afarin; Toghiani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Normal bladder function is necessary for micturition. Many causes such as urinary tract infection, bladder outlet obstruction, and neuropathic bladder can influence bladder wall thickness (BWT). This study was designed to determine normal BWT in Iranian children. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study done in Isfahan in 2012 comprising 82 children aged 2-14 years without any urinary complaint. We measured thickness of posterior and lateral walls of the bladder in all children. Mean bladder wall thickness (MBWT) and mean bladder volume (BV) were also calculated. Results: In this study, we included 82 children (40 boys and 42 girls). Patients’ mean age was 6.43 ± 2.89 years, mean weight was 21.32 ± 8.40 kg, mean height was 111.57 ± 20.51 cm, and mean Body Mass Index was 17.12 ± 4.93. Mean lateral bladder wall thickness (LBWT) was 1.75 ± 0.32 mm and mean posterior bladder wall thickness (PBWT) was 1.59 ± 0.34 mm. Mean BV was 111.65 ± 72.11 ml and MBWT was 1.67 ± 0.28 mm. BVW all Index (BVWI) was 1249.05 ± 701.67. Conclusions: LBWT was1.75 ± 0.32 mm and PBWT was 1.59 ± 0.34 mm. PMID:25250302

  13. Normal bladder wall thickness measurement in healthy Iranian children, a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Adibi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Normal bladder function is necessary for micturition. Many causes such as urinary tract infection, bladder outlet obstruction, and neuropathic bladder can influence bladder wall thickness (BWT.This study was designed to determine normal BWT in Iranian children. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study done in Isfahan in 2012 comprising 82 children aged 2-14 years without any urinary complaint. We measured thickness of posterior and lateral walls of the bladder in all children. Mean bladder wall thickness (MBWT and mean bladder volume (BV were also calculated. Results: In this study, we included 82 children (40 boys and 42 girls. Patients′ mean age was 6.43 ± 2.89 years, mean weight was 21.32 ± 8.40 kg, mean height was 111.57 ± 20.51 cm, and mean Body Mass Index was 17.12 ± 4.93. Mean lateral bladder wall thickness (LBWT was 1.75 ± 0.32 mm and mean posterior bladder wall thickness (PBWT was 1.59 ± 0.34 mm. Mean BV was 111.65 ± 72.11 ml and MBWT was 1.67 ± 0.28 mm. BVW all Index (BVWI was 1249.05 ± 701.67. Conclusions: LBWT was1.75 ± 0.32 mm and PBWT was 1.59 ± 0.34 mm.

  14. Evaluation of delivered dose for a clinical daily adaptive plan selection strategy for bladder cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J; Visser, Jorrit; de Jong, Rianne; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Bel, Arjan

    2015-07-01

    To account for variable bladder size during bladder cancer radiotherapy, a daily plan selection strategy was implemented. The aim of this study was to calculate the actually delivered dose using an adaptive strategy, compared to a non-adaptive approach. Ten patients were treated to the bladder and lymph nodes with an adaptive full bladder strategy. Interpolated delineations of bladder and tumor on a full and empty bladder CT scan resulted in five PTVs for which VMAT plans were created. Daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scans were used for plan selection. Bowel, rectum and target volumes were delineated on these CBCTs, and delivered dose for these was calculated using both the adaptive plan, and a non-adaptive plan. Target coverage for lymph nodes improved using an adaptive strategy. The full bladder strategy spared the healthy part of the bladder from a high dose. Average bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy significantly reduced with 60 and 69ml, respectively (pstrategy yielded similar bladder coverage and improved coverage for lymph nodes, with a significant reduction in bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy only, while other sparing was limited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Virtual 3D bladder reconstruction for augmented medical records from white light cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Angst, Roland; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate that necessitates lifelong surveillance to detect mucosal lesions. Examination with white light cystoscopy (WLC), the standard of care, is inherently subjective and data storage limited to clinical notes, diagrams, and still images. A visual history of the bladder wall can enhance clinical and surgical management. To address this clinical need, we developed a tool to transform in vivo WLC videos into virtual 3-dimensional (3D) bladder models using advanced computer vision techniques. WLC videos from rigid cystoscopies (1280 x 720 pixels) were recorded at 30 Hz followed by immediate camera calibration to control for image distortions. Video data were fed into an automated structure-from-motion algorithm that generated a 3D point cloud followed by a 3D mesh to approximate the bladder surface. The highest quality cystoscopic images were projected onto the approximated bladder surface to generate a virtual 3D bladder reconstruction. In intraoperative WLC videos from 36 patients undergoing transurethral resection of suspected bladder tumors, optimal reconstruction was achieved from frames depicting well-focused vasculature, when the bladder was maintained at constant volume with minimal debris, and when regions of the bladder wall were imaged multiple times. A significant innovation of this work is the ability to perform the reconstruction using video from a clinical procedure collected with standard equipment, thereby facilitating rapid clinical translation, application to other forms of endoscopy and new opportunities for longitudinal studies of cancer recurrence.

  16. Functional and biochemical characteristics of urinary bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To re-examine the function of the urinary bladder in vivo as well as to determine the functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan-induced diabetes rats. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were injected with alloxan and the animals showing blood glucose levels >300mg/dL together with age-paired untreated animals were kept for 11 months. Body weight, bladder weight, blood glucose, and urinary volume over a period of 24 hours were determined in both groups of animals. A voiding cystometry in conscious control and diabetic rats was performed to determine maximal micturition pressure, micturition contraction interval and duration as well as voided and post-voiding residual volume. In addition, concentration-response curves for bethanechol in isolated bladder strips, as well as [3H]-N methyl-scopolamine binding site characteristics in bladder homogenates were determined. Results Mean bladder weight was 162.5±21.2mg versus 290±37.9mg in control and treated animals, respectively (pmuscarinic receptors were also not statistically different. Conclusion Bladder function in vivo is altered in chronic alloxan-induced diabetes rats without changes in functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors. PMID:26466064

  17. Detection of Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients with Bladder Cancer using Maximum Standardised Uptake Value and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Results from a High-volume Centre Including Long-term Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Stefan; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Ipsen, Pia; Høyer, Søren; Bell, Cathrine; Bjerggaard Jensen, Jørgen

    2017-06-23

    Preoperative staging with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT) is used for the evaluation of metastatic disease in patients with invasive bladder cancer. The use of quantification with maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of regional lymph nodes (LNs) has been suggested to increase the diagnostic ability for detection of malignancy. Assessment of the utility and clinical relevance of SUVmax in 18 F-FDG PET in detecting regional nodal metastases in patients considered for radical cystectomy. From 2011 to 2014, we identified a total of 119 patients with urothelial carcinoma who underwent radical cystectomy with extended LN dissection; additionally, 12 patients were identified by preoperative biopsy. All patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT before treatment recommendation. Pathological findings were compared with preoperative PET/CT staging and analysed in a regional- or patient-based model according to SUVmax values. In total, 2291 LNs were identified in 131 patients; locoregional involvement of 85 LNs were confirmed in 34 patients. SUVmax >2 analysis: sensitivity±95% confidence interval of 79.4% (62.1-91.3) and specificity 66.5% (55.7-75.3). SUVmax >4 based analysis: sensitivity was 61.8% (43.6-77.8) and specificity was 84.5% (75.8-91.1). Two years of follow-up implied that higher SUVmax is correlated with higher recurrence risk, independent of conventional pathological findings. 18 F-FDG PET/CT using SUVmax of LNs is a useful tool for preoperative evaluation of pelvic LN metastases from invasive bladder cancer and contributes to the selection of patients for personalized treatment. In this report, we establish that it is possible to identify disease from bladder cancer in the lymphatic tissue surrounding the bladder using a scan analysis. This assists in the selection of treatment for patients with bladder cancer and may spare patients from unnecessary procedures. Copyright © 2017

  18. Bladder cancer: Analysis of the 2004 WHO classification in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Bladder cancer (BCA) is aworldwide disease and shows a wide range of geographical variation. The aim of this study is to analyze the prevalence of schistosomal and non-schistosomal associated BCA as well as compare our findings with the 2004 WHO consensus classification of urothelial neoplasms and ...

  19. Goal-directed fluid optimization based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopy lobectomy operations: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This pilot study was designed to utilize stroke volume variation and cardiac index to ensure fluid optimization during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomies. METHODS: Eighty patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomy were randomized into either a goal-directed therapy group or a control group. In the goal-directed therapy group, the stroke volume variation was controlled at 10%±1%, and the cardiac index was controlled at a minimum of 2.5 L.min-1.m-2. In the control group, the MAP was maintained at between 65 mm Hg and 90 mm Hg, heart rate was maintained at between 60 BPM and 100 BPM, and urinary output was greater than 0.5 mL/kg-1/h-1. The hemodynamic variables, arterial blood gas analyses, total administered fluid volume and side effects were recorded. RESULTS: The PaO2/FiO2-ratio before the end of one-lung ventilation in the goal-directed therapy group was significantly higher than that of the control group, but there were no differences between the goal-directed therapy group and the control group for the PaO2/FiO2-ratio or other arterial blood gas analysis indices prior to anesthesia. The extubation time was significantly earlier in the goal-directed therapy group, but there was no difference in the length of hospital stay. Patients in the control group had greater urine volumes, and they were given greater colloid and overall fluid volumes. Nausea and vomiting were significantly reduced in the goal-directed therapy group. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrated that an optimization protocol, based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index obtained with a FloTrac/Vigileo device, increased the PaO2/FiO2-ratio and reduced the overall fluid volume, intubation time and postoperative complications (nausea and vomiting in thoracic surgery patients requiring one-lung ventilation.

  20. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Brendan R. [St George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Martin A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Bockenhauer, Detlef [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  1. Molecular Diagnosis in Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Zuiverloon (Tahlita)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEpidemiologyBladder cancer (BC) is the most prevalent type of urothelial cancer and is associated with thehighest costs of all cancer types due to intensive patient surveillance. Because bladder tumorsfrequently recur, patients need to be monitored extensively [1-4]. Incidence increases

  2. Vulvar Metastasis from Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is a very rare entity; few cases are reported in the English literature. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological characteristics, evolution, and treatment of a patient with vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder followed by a brief review of the reported cases in the literature.

  3. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Brendan R.; Weber, Martin A.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran

    2011-01-01

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  4. Extravascular Lung Water Does Not Increase in Hypovolemic Patients after a Fluid-Loading Protocol Guided by the Stroke Volume Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ferrando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Circulatory failure secondary to hypovolemia is a common situation in critical care patients. Volume replacement is the first option for the treatment of hypovolemia. A possible complication of volume loading is pulmonary edema, quantified at the bedside by the measurement of extravascular lung water index (ELWI. ELWI predicts progression to acute lung injury (ALI in patients with risk factors for developing it. The aim of this study was to assess whether fluid loading guided by the stroke volume variation (SVV, in patients presumed to be hypovolemic, increased ELWI or not. Methods. Prospective study of 17 consecutive postoperative, fully mechanically ventilated patients diagnosed with circulatory failure secondary to presumed hypovolemia were included. Cardiac index (CI, ELWI, SVV, and global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI were determined using the transpulmonary thermodilution technique during the first 12 hours after fluid loading. Volume replacement was done with a strict hemodynamic protocol. Results. Fluid loading produced a significant increase in CI and a decrease in SVV. ELWI did not increase. No correlation was found between the amount of fluids administered and the change in ELWI. Conclusion. Fluid loading guided by SVV in hypovolemic and fully mechanically ventilated patients in sinus rhythm does not increase ELWI.

  5. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuge O

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Oliver Fuge,1 Nikhil Vasdev,1 Paula Allchorne,2 James SA Green2 1Department of Urology, Lister Hospital, Stevenage, UK; 2Department of Urology, Bartshealth NHS Trust, Whipps Cross Rd, London, UK Abstract: It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest

  6. Basic bladder neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, J Quentin

    2010-11-01

    Maintenance of normal lower urinary tract function is a complex process that requires coordination between the central nervous system and the autonomic and somatic components of the peripheral nervous system. This article provides an overview of the basic principles that are recognized to regulate normal urine storage and micturition, including bladder biomechanics, relevant neuroanatomy, neural control of lower urinary tract function, and the pharmacologic processes that translate the neural signals into functional results. Finally, the emerging role of the urothelium as a sensory structure is discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  8. Increased bladder wall thickness is associated with severe symptoms and reduced bladder capacity in patients with bladder pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Wu

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: There are obvious differences in bladder CT scans of patients with symptoms of bladder pain due to different etiology. Increased BWT was associated with increased pain scores and decreased bladder capacity in patients with KC and IC. BWT on a CT scan might be considered a marker for the severity of bladder inflammation.

  9. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saban, Marcia R; Wu, Xue-Ru; Saban, Ricardo; Towner, Rheal; Smith, Nataliya; Abbott, Andrew; Neeman, Michal; Davis, Carole A; Simpson, Cindy; Maier, Julie; Mémet, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    studies of Gd-Cy5.5 confirmed its temporal distribution between CD31-positive blood vessels and LYVE-1 positive lymphatic vessels. SV40-lacZ mice permit the visualization of lymphatics during bladder cancer progression. Gd-Cy5.5, as a double contrast agent for NIRF and MRI, permits to quantify delivery, transport rates, and volumes of macromolecular fluid flow through the interstitial-lymphatic continuum. Our results open the path for the study of lymphatic activity in vivo and in real time, and support the role of lymphangiogenesis during bladder cancer progression

  10. Bladder stones after bladder augmentation are not what they seem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Konrad M; Misseri, Rosalia; Whittam, Benjamin; Lingeman, James E; Amstutz, Sable; Ring, Joshua D; Kaefer, Martin; Rink, Richard C; Cain, Mark P

    2016-04-01

    Bladder and renal calculi after bladder augmentation are thought to be primarily infectious, yet few studies have reported stone composition. The primary aim was to assess bladder stone composition after augmentation, and renal stone composition in those with subsequent nephrolithiasis. The exploratory secondary aim was to screen for possible risk factors for developing infectious stones. Patients treated for bladder stones after bladder augmentation at the present institution between 1981 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected on demographics, surgeries and stone composition. Patients without stone analysis were excluded. Stones containing struvite, carbonate apatite or ammonium acid ureate were classified as infectious. The following variables were analyzed for a possible association with infectious bladder stone composition: gender, history of cloacal exstrophy, ambulatory status, nephrolithiasis, recurrent urea-splitting urinary tract infections, first vs recurrent stones, timing of presentation with a calculus, history of bladder neck procedures, catheterizable channel and vesicoureteral reflux. Fisher's exact test was used for analysis. Of the 107 patients with bladder stones after bladder augmentation, 85 met inclusion criteria. Median age at augmentation was 8.0 years (follow-up 10.8 years). Forty-four patients (51.8%) recurred (14 multiple recurrences, 143 bladder stones). Renal calculi developed in 19 (22.4%) patients with a bladder stone, and 10 (52.6%) recurred (30 renal stones). Overall, 30.8% of bladder stones were non-infectious (Table). Among patients recurring after an infectious bladder stone, 30.4% recurred with a non-infectious one. Among patients recurring after a non-infectious stone, 84.6% recurred with a non-infectious one (P = 0.005). Compared with bladder stones, renal stones were more likely to be non-infectious (60.0%, P = 0.003). Of patients with recurrent renal calculi after an infectious stone, 40.0% recurred with

  11. Retro-nasal aroma release is correlated with variations in the in-mouth air cavity volume after empty deglutition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mishellany-Dutour

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that interindividual differences in motor activities during chewing and/or swallowing were determining factors for the transfer of volatile aroma from the in-mouth air cavity (IMAC toward the olfactory mucosa. In our first experiment, we looked for changes in IMAC volume after saliva deglutition in 12 healthy subjects. The mean IMAC volume was measured after empty deglutition using an acoustic pharyngometer device. Based on the time course of the IMAC volume after swallowing, we discerned two groups of subjects. The first group displayed a small, constant IMAC volume (2.26 mL ±0.62 that corresponded to a high tongue position. The second group displayed a progressive increase in IMAC (from 6.82 mL ±2.37 to 22.82 mL ±3.04 that corresponded to a progressive lowering of the tongue to its resting position. In our second experiment, we investigated the relationship between IMAC volume changes after deglutition and the level of aroma release at the nostril. For this purpose, the release of menthone was measured at the nostril level in 25 subjects who consumed similar amounts of a mint tablet. The subjects were separated into two groups corresponding to two levels of menthone release: high (H and low (L. The mean volume of IMAC was measured during and after empty deglutition. Group H displayed a small, constant amplitude of IMAC volume change after deglutition, while Group L displayed a progressive increase in IMAC. It is likely that Group H continuously released the aroma through the veloglossal isthmus as the mint was consumed, while Group L trapped the aroma in the oral cavity and then released it into the nasal cavity upon swallowing. These results show that the in vivo aroma release profile in humans depends closely on the different motor patterns at work during empty deglutition.

  12. Effect of Naftopidil on Bladder Microcirculation in a Rat Model of Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majima, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Takai, Shun; Matsukawa, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Masaki; Gotoh, Momokazu

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of naftopidil on bladder capillary blood flow using bladder outlet obstruction model rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control group, bladder-outlet-obstruction group, and bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group. Bladder-outlet-obstruction surgery was performed in the bladder-outlet-obstruction and bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil groups. The control group received sham-operation. The bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group were treated with naftopidil (30 mg/kg) for 14 days after bladder-outlet-obstruction operation, while the control and bladder-outlet-obstruction groups were treated with vehicle. Continuous cystometry was performed 14 days after the surgery. Bladder blood flow was measured after 14 days using a pencil lens charge-coupled device microscopy system. The bladder was then harvested for histology and measuring 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine tissue level by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In cystometry, the bladder-outlet-obstruction rats showed bladder overactivity, while naftopidil treatment improved the cystometric pattern. The blood flow through the submucosal capillaries of the bladder base in the bladder-outlet-obstruction group was lesser than that in the control, whereas the bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group showed significantly greater blood flow than the bladder-outlet-obstruction group. The bladder tissue in the bladder-outlet-obstruction group showed a tendency to contain more hypertrophic detrusor muscle and inflammatory cells compared to those in the control group, while naftopidil treatment suppressed these histological changes. The 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels in the bladder tissue significantly differed among the three groups (the bladder-outlet-obstruction group > the bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group > the control group). Naftopidil improved bladder overactivity as well as the impaired bladder

  13. Electrical stimulation of dog pudendal nerve regulates the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-he Ju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pudendal nerve plays an important role in urine storage and voiding. Our hypothesis is that a neuroprosthetic device placed in the pudendal nerve trunk can modulate bladder function after suprasacral spinal cord injury. We had confirmed the inhibitory pudendal-to-bladder reflex by stimulating either the branch or the trunk of the pudendal nerve. This study explored the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex in beagle dogs, with intact or injured spinal cord, by electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk. The optimal stimulation frequency was approximately 15-25 Hz. This excitatory effect was dependent to some extent on the bladder volume. We conclude that stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk is a promising method to modulate bladder function.

  14. Does this man with lower urinary tract symptoms have bladder outlet obstruction?: The Rational Clinical Examination: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Karen A; Dahm, Philipp; Wong, Camilla L

    2014-08-06

    Early, accurate diagnosis of bladder outlet obstruction in men with lower urinary tract symptoms may reduce the need for invasive testing (ie, catheter placement, urodynamics), and prompt early treatment to provide symptomatic relief and avoid complications. To systematically review the evidence on (1) the diagnostic accuracy of office-based tests for bladder outlet obstruction in men with lower urinary tract symptoms; and (2) the accuracy of the bladder scan as a measure of urine volume because management decisions rely on measuring postvoid bladder residual volumes. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1950-March 2014), along with reference lists from retrieved articles were searched to identify studies of diagnostic test accuracy among males with lower urinary tract symptoms due to bladder outlet obstruction. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library (1950-March 2014) were searched to identify studies of urine volumes measured with a bladder scanner vs those measured with bladder catheterization. Prospective studies were selected if they compared 1 or more office-based, noninvasive diagnostic test with the reference test or were invasive urodynamic studies, and if urine volumes were measured with a bladder scanner and bladder catheterization. For the bladder outlet obstruction objective, 8628 unique citations were identified. Ten studies (1262 patients among 9 unique cohorts) met inclusion criteria. For the bladder scan objective, 2254 unique citations were identified. Twenty studies (n = 1397 patients) met inclusion criteria. The first main outcome and measure was the diagnostic accuracy of individual symptoms and questionnaires compared with the reference standard (urodynamic studies) for the diagnosis of bladder outlet obstruction in males with lower urinary tract symptoms. The second was the correlation between urine volumes measured with a bladder scanner and those measured with bladder catheterization. Among

  15. Giant bladder diverticulum in a boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Ozcakir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the bladder diverticula in children are seen commonly which is association with infravesical obstruction or neurogenic bladder function, the case of giant congenital bladder diverticula are rare. In this paper, an 11 years old boy with giant bladder diverticula presenting urinary infections is evaluated in terms of diagnosis and management by current literature.

  16. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offiah, I; McMahon, S B; O'Reilly, B A

    2013-08-01

    The bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is a spectrum of urological symptoms characterised by bladder pain with typical cystoscopic features. Diagnosis and management of this syndrome may be difficult. There is no evidence-based management approach for the diagnosis or treatment of BPS. The objective of this study was to critically review and summarise the evidence relating to the diagnosis and treatment of the bladder pain syndrome. A review of published data on the diagnosis and treatment of the BPS was performed. Our search was limited to English-language articles, on the "diagnosis", and "management" or "treatment" of "interstitial cystitis" and the "bladder pain syndrome" in "humans." Frequency, urgency and pain on bladder filling are the most common symptoms of BPS. All urodynamic volumes are reduced in patients with BPS. Associated conditions include psychological distress, depression, history of sexual assault, irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia. Cystoscopy remains the test for definitive diagnosis, with visualisation of haemorrhage on cystoreduction. A multidisciplinary treatment approach is essential in the management of this condition. Orally administered amitriptyline is an efficacious medical treatment for BPS. Intravesical hyaluronic acid and local anaesthetic, with/without hydrodistension are among new treatment strategies. Sacral or pudendal neuromodulation is effective, minimally invasive and safe. Surgery is reserved for refractory cases. There remains a paucity of evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of BPS. We encountered significant heterogeneity in the assessment of symptoms, duration of treatment and follow up of patients in our literature review.

  17. Substantial interobserver variation of thyroid volume and function by visual evaluation of thyroid (99m)Tc scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    (99m)Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy is much used in the evaluation of patients with nodular goitre. We investigated the ability of experienced observers to estimate the thyroid 24-h (131)I uptake (RAIU) and the thyroid volume by visual evaluation of the scintigram.......(99m)Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy is much used in the evaluation of patients with nodular goitre. We investigated the ability of experienced observers to estimate the thyroid 24-h (131)I uptake (RAIU) and the thyroid volume by visual evaluation of the scintigram....

  18. Urethral morphology and bladder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausegger, K A; Fotter, R; Sorantin, E; Schmidt, P

    1991-01-01

    In order to calculate the relationship between Spinning top urethra (STU) and bladder instability 160 voiding cystourethrogramms (VCU), performed in 102 girls, have been analysed retrospectively. 28 girls had STU, 16 of those had bladder instability as well (57%). We could not find the highly positive correlation between unstable bladder and STU as reported by other authors, although there was a statistically positive correlation between STU and bladder instability. However the confidence interval was very broad (38%-75%). We conclude that bladder instability may contribute to STU but cannot render the etiological explanation for all cases. STU seems to be a polyetiological sign. In our opinion only the combination of STU and bladder instability has a diagnostic impact, since several therapeutical concepts are available in cases of bladder instability. The finding of STU in the VCU should alert the examiner's attention to functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. If no instability can be found, STU should be considered to be a normal variant.

  19. Urethral morphology and bladder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Fotter, R.; Sorantin, E. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Radiologische Klinik); Schmidt, P. (Rehabilitationszentrum, Schallerbach (Austria))

    1991-05-01

    In order to calculate the relationship between Spinning top urethra (STU) and bladder instability 160 voiding cystourethrogramms (VCU), performed in 102 girls, have been analysed retrospectively. 28 girls had STU, 16 of those had bladder instability as well (57%). We could not find the highly positive correlation between unstable bladder and STU as reported by other authors, although there was a statistically positive correlation between STU and bladder instability. However the confidence interval was very broad (38%-75%). We conclude that bladder instability may contribute to STU but cannot render the etiological explanation for all cases. STU seems to be a polyetiological sign. In our opinion only the combination of STU and bladder instability has a diagnostic impact, since several therapeutical concepts are available in cases of bladder instability. The finding of STU in the VCU should alert the examiner's attention to functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. If no instability can be found, STU should be considered to be a normal variant. (orig.).

  20. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  1. Real-time bladder lesion registration and navigation: a phantom study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Agenant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in men, with a recurrence rate of 33-64%. Tumor documentation during cystoscopy of the bladder is suboptimal and might play a role in these high recurrence rates. OBJECTIVE: In this project, a bladder registration and navigation system was developed to improve bladder tumor documentation and consequently increase reproducibility of the cystoscopy. MATERIALS/METHODS: The bladder registration and navigation system consists of a stereo-tracker that tracks the location of a newly developed target, which is attached to the endoscope during cystoscopy. With this information the urology registration and navigation software is able to register the 3D position of a lesion of interest. Simultaneously, the endoscopic image is captured in order to combine it with this 3D position. To enable navigation, navigational cues are displayed on the monitor, which subsequently direct the cystoscopist to the previously registered lesion. To test the system, a rigid and a flexible bladder phantom was developed. The system's robustness was tested by measuring the accuracy of registering and navigating the lesions. Different calibration procedures were compared. It was also tested whether system accuracy is limited by using a previously saved calibration, to avoid surgical delay due to calibration. Urological application was tested by comparing a rotational camera (fixed to the rotating endoscope to a non-rotational camera (dangling by gravity used in standard urologic practice. Finally, the influence of volume differences on registering and navigating was tested. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: The bladder registration and navigation system has an acceptable accuracy for bladder lesion registration and navigation. Limitations for patient determinants included changes in bladder volume and bladder deformation. In vivo studies are required to measure the effect of these limitations and functionality in urological

  2. Factors of tidal volume variation during augmented spontaneous ventilation in patients on extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal. A multivariate analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bein, T.; Müller, T.; Graf, B. M.; Philipp, A.; Zeman, F.; Schultz, M. J.; Slutsky, A. S.; Weber-Carstens, S.

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2-R) allows lung protective ventilation using lower tidal volumes (VT) in patients with acute respiratory failure. The dynamics of spontaneous ventilation under ECCO2-R has not been described previously. This retrospective multivariable analysis examines VT

  3. Bladder Diverticulitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Silberman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  4. Variations in Rectal Volumes and Dosimetry Values Including NTCP due to Interfractional Variability When Administering 2D-Based IG-IMRT for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hanada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimated variations in rectal volumes and dosimetry values including NTCP with interfractional motion during prostate IG-IMRT. Rectal volumes, DVH parameters, and NTCPs of 20 patients were analyzed. For this patient population, the median (range volume on the initial plan for the rectum was 45.6 cc (31.3–82.0, showing on-treatment spread around the initial prediction based on the initial plan. DVH parameters of on-treatment CBCT analyses showed systematic regularity shift from the prediction based on the initial plan. Using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, NTCPs of predicted late rectal bleeding toxicity of rectal grade ≥ 2 (RTOG and the QUANTEC update rectal toxicity for the prediction based on the initial plan were 0.09% (0.02–0.24 and 0.02% (0.00–0.07, respectively, with NTCPs from on-treatment CBCT analyses being 0.35% (0.01–6.16 and 0.12% (0.00–4.11, respectively. Using the relative seriality model, for grade ≥ 2 bleeding rectal toxicity, NTCP of the prediction based on the initial plan was 0.64% (0.15–1.22 versus 1.48% (0.18–7.66 for on-treatment CBCT analysis. Interfraction variations in rectal volumes occur in all patients due to physiological changes. Thus, rectal assessment during 2D-based IG-IMRT using NTCP models has the potential to provide useful and practical dosimetric verification.

  5. Bladder Capacity is a Biomarker for a Bladder Centric versus Systemic Manifestation in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen J; Zambon, João; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Langefeld, Carl D; Matthews, Catherine A; Badlani, Gopal; Bowman, Heather; Evans, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome presents a significant clinical challenge due to symptom heterogeneity and the myriad associated comorbid medical conditions. We recently reported that diminished bladder capacity may represent a specific interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome subphenotype. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between anesthetic bladder capacity, and urological and nonurological clinical findings in a cohort of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had undergone therapeutic urinary bladder hydrodistention. This is a retrospective chart review of prospectively collected data on women diagnosed with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome between 2011 and 2015 who underwent bladder hydrodistention. Assessments in each patient included a detailed history and physical examination, ICPI (Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index), ICSI (Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index) and PUF (Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency Patient Symptom Scale). Bladder capacity was determined during bladder hydrodistention with the patient under general anesthesia. Mean age was 45.8 years and mean bladder capacity was 857 ml in the 110 enrolled patients. We found a significant inverse correlation between bladder capacity and scores on 3 gold standard interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome metrics, including ICPI (p = 0.0014), ICSI (p = 0.0022) and PUF (p = 0.0009) as well as urination frequency (p = 0.0025). Women with higher bladder capacity were significantly more likely to report depression (p = 0.0059) and irritable bowel syndrome (p = 0.022). Low bladder capacity while under anesthesia was significantly associated with high symptom scores on 3 validated interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome questionnaires as well as with urinary frequency. However, it was not associated with depression or other common systemic pain problems. These results suggest that low bladder capacity is a marker for a bladder

  6. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  7. Bladder dysfunction in Wolfram syndrome is highly prevalent and progresses to megacystis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wragg, Ruth; Dias, Renuka P; Barrett, Timothy; McCarthy, Liam

    2018-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare genetic defect in WFS1 or WSF2(CISD2). It includes diabetes mellitus and insipidis, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, but not bladder dysfunction. However, this has appeared a common finding in our national referral clinic, and we sought to quantify this problem. Data were collected from a multidisciplinary team managing all Wolfram patients in the UK. The following was analyzed: age, date of non-invasive urodynamics (NIU), symptoms, bladder capacity, voided volume, post-void residual and uroflow pattern. Bladder capacity was given as percentage predicted bladder capacity (PBC). Bladders were divided into normal, overactive (OAB), and underactive (UAB). Symptoms, bladder behavior, and genotyping were correlated. Data were expressed as median (interquartile range). Forty patients with Wolfram syndrome were identified, and 38 underwent NIU. This showed normal bladder function (n=4), OAB (n=9), UAB (n=25). Symptoms were present in only 11 children. The different patterns of bladder behavior (OAB vs. normal vs. UAB) were significantly associated with different %PBC (36 (29-59)% vs. 105 (93-233)% vs. 100 (77.5-337)%; pWolfram syndrome (~90%), but most children cope (symptoms ~30%). With time there is a significant progression to megacystis, which may represent an underlying neuropathic myogenic failure and is likely to require intervention in the future. Level II (National cohort study of prognosis). Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Invasive bladder cancer: Our experience with bladder sparing approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervek, Jozica; Cufer, Tanja; Zakotnik, Branko; Kragelj, Borut; Borstnar, Simona; Matos, Tadeja; Zumer-Pregelj, Mirjana

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is a disease associated with several unresolved therapeutic questions. Radical cystectomy still represents the most frequent treatment approach. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of bladder-sparing treatment by transurethral resection (TUR) and sequential chemoradiotherapy in patients with biopsy-proven invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: After maximal TUR, 105 patients were treated with two to four cycles of methotrexate, cisplatinum, and vinblastine polychemotherapy. In complete responders, the treatment was continued by radiotherapy (50 Gy to the bladder and 40 Gy to the regional lymph nodes), whereas in nonresponders, cystectomy was performed when feasible. Results: Complete response after TUR and chemotherapy was achieved in 52% of patients. After a median follow-up of 42 months, 52 of 75 patients (69%) selected for bladder preservation were without evidence of disease in the bladder. Freedom from local failure in complete responders to chemotherapy was 80% [95% confidence interval (CI), 69-91%) at 4 years. The actuarial survival of the entire group was 58% (95% CI, 47-69%), whereas the survival rate with the bladder intact was 45% (95% CI, 34-56%) at 4 years. Survival was significantly better in patients who responded to chemotherapy (79%) than in nonresponders (35%, p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in survival between nonresponders who underwent cystectomy and nonresponders who completed treatment with radiotherapy (approximately 30% at 3 years). Conclusion: The present study confirms that MIBC is a heterogeneous disease, and that in more than half of patients who are affected, a bladder-sparing approach is safe. Our study has also demonstrated that in nonresponders, radical cystectomy as the treatment of choice is questionable

  9. Does the hearing sensitivity in thorny catfishes depend on swim bladder morphology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Zebedin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thorny catfishes exhibit large variations in swim bladder morphology. These organs are of different sizes, forms and may have simple or branched diverticula. The swim bladder plays an important role in otophysans because it enhances their hearing sensitivity by transmitting sound pressure fluctuations via ossicles to the inner ear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate if a form-function relationship exists, the swim bladder morphology and hearing ability were analyzed in six species. The morphology was quantified by measuring the length, width and height and calculating a standardized swim bladder length (sSBL, which was then used to calculate the relative swim bladder length (rSBL. Hearing was measured using the auditory evoked potential (AEP recording technique. Two species had simple apple-shaped and four species heart-shaped (cordiform bladders. One of the latter species had short unbranched diverticula on the terminal margin, two had a secondary bladder and two had many long, branched diverticula. The rSBL differed significantly between most of the species. All species were able to detect frequencies between 70 Hz and 6 kHz, with lowest thresholds found between 0.5 and 1 kHz (60 dB re 1 µPa. Hearing curves were U-shaped except in Hemidoras morrisi in which it was ramp-like. Mean hearing thresholds of species possessing smaller rSBLs were slightly lower (maximum 8.5 dB than those of species having larger rSBLs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The current findings reveal a relationship between swim bladder form and its function among thorny catfishes. Relatively smaller swim bladders resulted in relatively better hearing. This is in contrast to a prior inter-familial study on catfishes in which species with large unpaired bladders possessed higher sensitivity at higher frequencies than species having tiny paired and encapsulated bladders.

  10. M-CHOLINOLYTICS IN RHEABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH VOIDING DISFUNCTION AND URNARY BLADDER HYPERACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Kazanskaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Voiding dysfunction is a common problem in pediatrics. Hyperactive urinary bladder is the most frequent cause of voiding dysfunction. Macholinolytic drugs are the first choice treatment for urinary bladder hyperactivity. The «urination pathology» center has investigated the efficacy of an macholinolytic, oxybutynin. The study included 25 children (aged 6–14 with different causes of voiding dysfunction and bladder hyperactivity. Oxybutynin was administered with a dosage of 5 mg twice a day, the follow up period was 8 weeks. The control evaluation of urodynamics (voiding rhythm, uroflowmetry, residual urine volume was performed at 4–8 weeks. Symptoms of bladder hyperactivity have been eliminated in 50% of patients, the bladder capacity has increased in 70% of cases, the frequency of night and day incontinence has diminished. The report demonstrates that oxybutynin has been most effective in patients with urinary bladder volume between 80 and 100 ml. the side effects, as dryness of mucous membranes and voiding difficulties, have been rarely observed. These side effects could be avoided by individual dose titration.Key words: voiding dysfunction, urinary bladder hyperactivity, oxybutynin, children.

  11. Dienogest. A possible conservative approach in bladder endometriosis. Results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, Stefano; Nappi, Luigi; Pontis, Alessandro; Sedda, Federica; Luisi, Stefano; Mais, Valerio; Melis, Gian Benedetto

    2015-05-01

    Deep endometriosis involvement of the bladder is uncommon but it is symptomatic in most of the cases. Although laparoscopic excision is very effective, some patients with no pregnancy desire require a medical approach. We performed a pilot study on the effect of a new progestin dienogest on bladder endometriosis. Six patients were treated for 12 months with dienogest 2 mg/daily. Pain, urinary symptoms, quality of life, nodule volume and side effects were recorded. During treatment, symptoms improved very quickly and the nodules exhibit a remarkable reduction in size. Dienogest may be an alternative approach to bladder endometriosis.

  12. Development and evaluation of a training program for therapeutic radiographers as a basis for online adaptive radiation therapy for bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Wong, Jacky; Kron, Tomas; Roxby, Paul; Haworth, Annette; Bailey, Alistair; Rolfo, Aldo; Paneghel, Andrea; Styles, Colin; Laferlita, Marcus; Tai, Keen Hun; Williams, Scott; Duchesne, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Online adaptive radiotherapy requires a new level of soft tissue anatomy recognition and decision making by therapeutic radiographers at the linear accelerator. We have developed a therapeutic radiographer training workshop encompassing soft tissue matching for an online adaptive protocol for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Our aim is to present the training program, and its evaluation which compares pre and post training staff soft tissue matching and bladder contouring using Cone Beam Computer Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Prior to commencement of an online adaptive bladder protocol, a staff training program for 33 therapeutic radiographers, with a separate ethics approved evaluation component was developed. A multidisciplinary training program over two days was carried out with a total of 11 h of training, covering imaging technology, pelvic anatomy and protocol specific decision making in both practical and theoretical sessions. The evaluation included both pre training and post training testing of staff. Results: Pre training and post training, the standard deviations in the contoured bladder between participants in left-right direction were 0.64 vs 0.59 cm, superior-inferior 0.89 vs 0.77 cm and anterior-posterior direction was 0.88 vs 0.52 cm respectively. Similarly the standard deviation in the volume contoured decreased from 40.7 cc pre training to 24.5 cc post training. Time taken in contouring was reduced by the training program (19.8 vs 17.2 min) as was the discrepancy in choice of adaptive radiotherapy plans. The greatest reduction in variations in contouring was seen in staff whose pre training had the largest deviations from the reference radiation oncologist contours. Conclusion: A formalized staff training program is feasible, well received by staff and reduces variation in organ matching and contouring. The improvement was particularly noticed in staff who pre training had larger deviations from the reference standard.

  13. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vesicoureteral Reflux The Urinary Tract & How It Works Interstitial Cystitis (Painful Bladder Syndrome) View or Print All Sections Definition & Facts Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, or long-lasting, condition ...

  14. Inhibition of HIF Reduces Bladder Hypertrophy and Improves Bladder Function in Murine Model of Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Nao; Malykhina, Anna P; Wilcox, Duncan T

    2016-04-01

    Posterior urethral valves are the most common cause of partial bladder outlet obstruction in the pediatric population. However, to our knowledge the etiology and the detailed mechanisms underlying pathological changes in the bladder following partial bladder outlet obstruction remain to be elucidated. Recent findings suggest that hypoxia and associated up-regulation of HIFs (hypoxia-inducible factors) have a key role in partial bladder outlet obstruction induced pathology in the bladder. We examined the effects of pharmacological inhibition of HIF pathways by 17-DMAG (17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) in pathophysiological phenotypes after partial bladder outlet obstruction. Partial bladder outlet obstruction was surgically created in male C57BL/6J mice. The animals received oral administration of 17-DMAG or vehicle daily starting from the initiation of obstruction up to 5 days. Sham operated mice served as controls. Bladders were harvested from each group 2, 4 and 7 days postoperatively, and analyzed for histological and biochemical changes. Bladder function was assessed by in vitro muscle contractility recordings. Partial bladder outlet obstruction caused a significant increase in the bladder mass accompanying enhanced collagen deposition in the bladder wall while 17-DMAG treatment suppressed those increases. Treatment with 17-DMAG attenuated the degree of up-regulation of HIFs and their target genes involving the development of tissue fibrosis in obstructed bladders. Treatment with 17-DMAG improved the decreased responses of obstructed bladder strips to electrical field stimulation and KCl. In vivo 17-DMAG treatment decreased partial bladder outlet obstruction induced pathophysiological changes in the bladder. HIF pathway inhibition has a potential clinical implication for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat bladder pathology associated with partial bladder outlet obstruction. Copyright © 2016 American Urological

  15. Intraspinal schwannoma and neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K S; Ho, C S; Tai, P A; Kung, W M

    2018-04-01

    Most lumbar intradural schwannomas present initially as radiculopathies with sensory disturbances. However, neurogenic bladder dysfunction may be one of the earliest manifestations and can cause long-term disability. We present the case of a patient with a L3-4 schwannoma (newly diagnosed owing to recurrent urinary retention and urinary tract infection) who finally underwent surgical resection. Improvement of bladder sensation was documented by urodynamic study and the patient was subsequently weaned off her Foley catheter with satisfactory outcome.

  16. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  17. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  18. Economic impacts from energy efficiency programs - Variations in multiplier effects by program type and region. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, John; Skumatz, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Research indicates that the value of omitted program effects - specifically non-energy benefits (NEBs) - represent a significant share of overall program impacts. One of the largest components of societal benefits is the direct and indirect economic and job creation effects stimulated by the investment in conservation on behalf of the program. The literature has indicated that the valuations assigned to this category of these categories can be large, but much of the literature overstates the impact of economic NEBs. We conducted extensive research to develop reliable and defensible estimates of these benefits categories. This study used input-output analysis to update the economic multipliers for NEBs in several ways. Net: Developed 'net' estimates of the multipliers (rather than 'gross' factors)Variations by Region: Estimated multipliers for multiple states and for the entire US; Variations by Program Type: Developed estimates based on different types or categories of programs (e.g weatherization vs. new construction vs. appliance programs, etc.), Variations in Baseline Assumptions: Different assumptions about where the expenditures are transferred 'from' for the net analysis (e.g. from 'generation', from a mixed market basket, etc.); and Variations over Time: Used data from multiple time periods to examine changes in the size of multipliers over time. We examined the results by state, by program type, and over time and found dramatic differences in the economic impacts by program type and territory under consideration. The results provide estimates of the economic impacts derived from the program; however, for communities or utilities with economic development goals, the results can be used to help select between program alternatives. The results are new, and the revised figures have been used to compute more reliable and tailored estimates of economic non-energy benefits that can be applied in regulatory tests

  19. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R F Sholan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 000 women are diagnosed with interstitial cystitis. Diagnosis of the disease is difficult and is substantially based on clinical symptoms. Pelvic pain, urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia are the basic complaints in this pathology. The diagnosis requires exclusion of diseases with similar manifestations. So interstitial cystitis is frequently misdiagnosed as urinary tract infection, overactive bladder, urethral obstruction or diverticulosis, chronic prostatitis, bladder cancer, vulvodynia, endometriosis, and chronic pelvic pain. Etiopathogenesis of the disease is uncertain, which makes etiologic treatment impossible. Currently scientific discussions on the causes of disease continue as well as different treatment regimens are offered, but are often ineffective, palliative and temporary. The treatment for intersticial cystitis should focus on restoring normal bladder function, prevention of relapse of symptoms and improvement of patients’ quality of life. The literature review presents current view on the terminology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  20. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Sillén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB and the dysfunctional voiding (DV, have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome, most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB, with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed.

  1. Effect of allelic variations at the Glu-D1, Glu-A3, Glu-B3 and Pinb-D1 loci on flour characteristics and bread loaf volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubled haploid wheat lines developed from a cross between Keumkang, a hard white winter wheat, and Olgeuru, soft red winter wheat were used to determine the effects of allelic variation in Glu-D1, Glu-A3, Glu-B3 and Pinb-D1 loci on physiochemical properties of flour and bread loaf volume. Variation...

  2. Mitomycin C Intravesical Chemotherapy in Conjunction With Synergo® Radiofrequency-Induced Hyperthermia for Treatment of Carcinoma in Situ Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Unresponsive to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, With or Without Papillary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-20

    Bladder Cancer; Bladder Neoplasm; Bladder Tumors; Cancer of Bladder; Cancer of the Bladder; Malignant Tumor of Urinary Bladder; Neoplasms, Bladder; Urinary Bladder Cancer; Carcinoma in Situ of Bladder; Papillary Carcinoma of Bladder (Diagnosis); BCG-Unresponsive Bladder Cancer

  3. Impact of electromechanical parameter variations in treatment volume doses and adjacent structures; Impacto da variacao dos parametros eletro-mecanicos nas doses do volume de tratamento e nas estruturas adjacentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, M.E.; Campos, A.M. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Qualidade em Radioterapia]. E-mails: memorais@yahoo.com.br; amcampos@inca.gov.br; Goncalves, J. F. [Instituto de Oncologia e Radioterapia GV, Governador Valadares, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: joelfgoncalves@yahoo.com.br; Ferreira, M.L. [Centro Radioterapico Gavea, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: mluciaf@yahoo.com

    2003-07-01

    ICRU Report 62 recommends that radiotherapy treatment dose should be prescribed in such a way that the dose to the target volume varies no more than 10%. In order to keep this goal, a very important role is played by the quality assurance (QA) of the treatment unit associated to the high level work of the personnel involved in planning and patient treatment. This paper shows the influence of the main electrical and mechanical linear accelerator parameters: field size, source-skin distance, gantry angle and light x radiation field coincidence in tumor volume and adjacent organ doses. We simulated a cubic tumor and a cubic adjacent critical organ in a cubic phantom and used a 3D Prowess system for planning. The treatment has been simulated for a 6 MV linear accelerator. We simulated two treatment planning: one using all the parameters inside their tolerance limits and another doubling these limits. The final results have show that, if the irradiation machine operates out of the tolerance limits, the dose variation in the planning target volume (PTV) can goes till {+-} 5,8% and in the critical adjacent organ till {+-} 7,7%. Therefore we concluded that, according to the complexity of the treatment, it can be necessary to reduce the tolerance levels advised by the IAEA/TECDOC - 1151. (author)

  4. A study on the variation of maxillary sinus volume and projection angle in children for CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Youn Sang; Dong, Kyung Rae; Choi, Seong Kwan; Kim, Mi Hyun [Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Myung Jin [Dept. of Radiation Science and Technology, Graduate School of Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Hwa Yeon [Dept. of Radiology, Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The Water's view is that you can examine and diagnose disease of the maxillary sinus and implemented a simple and economical because a lot of tests. Because changes in the size of the maxillary sinus and skull growth in volume, depending on the disease that occurs in children often differ from the baseline angle of the water's view that it is easy to observe. Through Computed tomography (CT) and volumetric analysis and Orbitmeatal line (OML) and Image plate (IP) is the angle and evaluate the appropriate Water's view angle in children.

  5. A molecular dynamics study of ambient and high pressure phases of silica: structure and enthalpy variation with molar volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappa, Chitra; Sringeri, S Bhuvaneshwari; Subramanian, Yashonath; Gopalakrishnan, J

    2014-06-28

    Extensive molecular dynamics studies of 13 different silica polymorphs are reported in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble with the Parrinello-Rahman variable shape simulation cell. The van Beest-Kramer-van Santen (BKS) potential is shown to predict lattice parameters for most phases within 2%-3% accuracy, as well as the relative stabilities of different polymorphs in agreement with experiment. Enthalpies of high-density polymorphs - CaCl2-type, α-PbO2-type, and pyrite-type - for which no experimental data are available as yet, are predicted here. Further, the calculated enthalpies exhibit two distinct regimes as a function of molar volume-for low and medium-density polymorphs, it is almost independent of volume, while for high-pressure phases a steep dependence is seen. A detailed analysis indicates that the increased short-range contributions to enthalpy in the high-density phases arise not only from an increased coordination number of silicon but also shorter Si-O bond lengths. Our results indicate that amorphous phases of silica exhibit better optimization of short-range interactions than crystalline phases at the same density while the magnitude of Coulombic contributions is lower in the amorphous phase.

  6. Patient resources available to bladder cancer patients: a pilot study of healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheryl T; Mei, Minghua; Ashley, Jan; Breslow, Gene; O'Donnell, Michael; Gilbert, Scott; Lemmy, Simon; Saxton, Claire; Sagalowsky, Arthur; Sansgiry, Shubhada; Latini, David M

    2012-01-01

    To survey thought leaders attending an annual bladder cancer conference about resources available to survivors at, primarily, large academic centers treating a high volume of patients. Bladder cancer is a disease with high treatment burden. Support groups and survivorship programs are effective at managing physical and psychosocial impairments experienced by patients. The Institute of Medicine recommends increased resources for cancer survivorship, but no description of current resources exists for bladder cancer patients. Preceding the 4th annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank meeting in August 2009, we carried out an Internet-based survey of registrants that queried respondents about institutional resources and support systems devoted to bladder cancer survivors. Data were collected using SurveyMonkey.com, and descriptive statistics were computed. A total of 43 eligible respondents included urologists (77%), medical oncologists (16%), and other physicians or health professionals (7%). Physician respondents represented 22 academic centers and 2 private groups. Although 63% of respondent institutions had a National Cancer Institute designation, only 33% had an active bladder cancer support group. Survivorship clinics were available in 29% of institutions, and peer support networks, community resources for education, and patient navigation were available in 58%, 13%, and 25% of respondent institutions, respectively. Resources for bladder cancer survivors vary widely and are lacking at several academic centers with high-volume bladder cancer populations. Bladder cancer providers are often unaware of available institutional resources for patients. Urologists need to advocate for additional survivor resources and partner with other disciplines to provide appropriate care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Relevance of the volume-axis intercept, V0, compared with the slope of end-systolic pressure-volume relationship in response to large variations in inotropy and afterload in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaudszun, Grégoire; Morel, Denis R

    2011-11-01

    The end-systolic pressure-volume relationship (ESPVR) is proposed and used as a reliable index of left ventricular (LV) contractility despite the fact that its afterload independence has been challenged. Furthermore, the physiological relevance of its volume-axis intercept, V(0), remains unclear. Systemic haemodynamics and pressure-volume loops obtained by inferior vena cava occlusion were recorded in 21 rats anaesthetized by isoflurane inhalation and instrumented with a conductance pressure-volume catheter in response to incremental I.V. doses of adrenaline, dobutamine, phenylephrine, metoprolol, papaverine and isoflurane inhalation. In conditions with large variations (± 100%) of both inotropy and afterload, infusion of negative inotropic drugs was associated with a dose-dependent rightward shift of ESPVR accompanied by a decrease in its slope (end-systolic elastance, E(es)), whereas positive inotropic agents produced an isolated decrease in V(0). With the predominant vasoactive drugs, there was a dose-dependent change in E(es) without major horizontal shifts, demonstrating that this slope mainly represents LV afterload rather than inotropy. When contractility was altered, V(0) was negatively correlated to the preload-adjusted contractility index, PAdP/dt(max), demonstrating that a reduced V(0) provides a good reflection of increased LV contractility. From these results, we computed a logarithmically adjusted E(es)/V(0) ratio, which resulted in reasonably strong concordance with PAdP/dt(max), including all the investigated drugs and dosages [n = 288; bias, 0.8 ± 16.2% (SD)]. Concordance with E(es) (bias, 7.2 ± 58.7%) or V(0) (bias, -0.6 ± 33.4%), used alone or with other commonly used contractility indices, was far less significant. In contrast to E(es), V(0) provides a relatively good LV contractility index because it is much less sensitive to afterload.

  8. Continuous Flushing of the Bladder in Rodents Reduces Artifacts and Improves Quantification in Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Deleye

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the partial volume effect (PVE of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG tracer accumulation in the bladder on the positron emission tomographic (PET image quantification in mice and rats suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. To improve the accuracy, we implemented continuous bladder flushing procedures. Female mice and rats were scanned using microPET/computed tomography (CT at baseline and after induction of acute colitis by injecting 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS intrarectally. During the scans, the bladder was continuously flushed in one group, whereas in the other group, no bladder flushing was performed. As a means of in vivo and ex vivo validation of the inflammation, animals also underwent colonoscopy and were sacrificed for gamma counting (subpopulation and to score the colonic damage both micro- and macroscopically as well as biochemically. At baseline, the microPET signal in the colon of both mice and rats was significantly higher in the nonflushed group compared to the flushed group, caused by the PVE of tracer activity in the bladder. Hence, the colonoscopy and postmortem analyses showed no significant differences at baseline between the flushed and nonflushed animals. TNBS induced significant colonic inflammation, as revealed by colonoscopic and postmortem scores, which was not detected by microPET in the mice without bladder flushing, again because of spillover of bladder activity in the colonic area. MicroPET in bladder-flushed animals did reveal a significant increase in 18F-FDG uptake. Correlations between microPET and colonoscopy, macroscopy, microscopy, and myeloperoxidase yielded higher Spearman rho values in mice with continuously flushed bladders during imaging. Comparable, although somewhat less pronounced, results were shown in the rat. Continuous bladder flushing reduced image artifacts and is mandatory for accurate image quantification in the pelvic region for both mice

  9. Bladder preservation using chemoradiation therapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toyofumi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Sato, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Ken-Ichiro; Itatani, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the long-term results and molecular markers of outcome with selective organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer using chemoradiation therapy. We examined locally invasive bladder cancer in 32 patients (30 men, 2 women; mean age at treatment 68.1 years) who underwent bladder-sparing protocols in the Department of Urology at Sumitomo Hospital between 2000 and 2005. The clinical stage was T2, T3, and T4 in 13, 16, and 3 patients, respectively. Our protocol includes aggressive transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) and 46 Gy radiotherapy (2 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the pelvis with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy (20 mg/body/day, 5 days/week, the first and fourth week, intravenously). The initial evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), urine cytology, and cystoscopy with a biopsy. During follow-up, if the patients developed superficial recurrence, they was treated with TURBT and intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), while patients with invasive recurrence were advised to undergo a salvage cystectomy. We examined the association between the expression of the Bcl-2 family in pretreatment TUR specimens and patient outcome. The mean follow-up was 54.6 months. The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that bladder preservation was achieved in 27 patients (84.4%). The actuarial local control rate with an intact bladder was 56.3% (18 patients) at 3 years. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 90.6, 84.0, and 66.9%, respectively. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 75.0, 67.2, and 33.3% in T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Bcl-x positivity was significantly associated with a poor cancer-specific survival rate (log-rank test, p=0.038). Chemoradiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer can achieve survival rates similar to those in patients treated with radical cystectomy, with successful bladder preservation. Our results suggest that the expression of Bcl-x is a

  10. Videourodynamic characteristics of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome-The role of bladder outlet dysfunction in the pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuh-Chen; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2018-03-05

    To investigate the characteristics of videourodynamic study (VUDS) in females with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) focusing on the etiologies of bladder outlet dysfunction (BOD) and their associations with clinical and urodynamic parameters. IC/BPS females with complete data on symptom assessment, VUDS, the potassium sensitivity test, and cystoscopic hydrodistention were reviewed retrospectively. Diagnoses of bladder dysfunction (hypersensitive bladder, HSB) and BOD including dysfunctional voiding (DV), poor relaxation of the external urethral sphincter (PRES), and bladder neck dysfunction (BND) were made by VUDS. The clinical and urodynamic parameters between patients with normal and abnormal VUDS diagnoses were analyzed. A total of 348 IC/BPS female patients (mean age 48.8 ± 13.5) were enrolled. HSB was found in 307 (88.2%) patients and BOD in 209 (60.1%). The causes of BOD included DV in 40 (11.5%), PRES in 168 (48.3%), and BND in 1 (0.3%). Patients with DV and BND had higher, and those with PRES had lower detrusor pressures at maximum flow rate (Q max ) than those with normal tracings. For all BOD patients, univariate logistic regression revealed a significant positive correlation of disease duration and negative correlations of urodynamic volume parameters with BOD in IC/BPS patients. Multivariate logistic regression found a cut-off value of Q max  ≦ 11 mL/s predicted BOD in IC/BPS with a receiver operating characteristic area of 0.81 (sensitivity = 82.0%, specificity = 68.5%). HSB and BOD are common findings on VUDS in IC/BPS females. BOD is associated with duration and hypersensitive bladder. A Q max  ≦ 11 mL/s predicts BOD in IC/BPS. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  12. Seasonal and spatial distribution of Bacterioplankton in a fluvial-lagunar system of a tropical region: density, biomass, cellular volume and morphologic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnólia Fernandes Florêncio de Araújo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The temporal and spatial fluctuations of Bacterioplankton in a fluvial-lagunar system of a tropical region (Pitimbu River and Jiqui Lake, RN were studied during the dry and the rainy periods. The bacterial abundance varied from 2.67 to 5.1 Cells10(7mL-1 and did not show a typical temporal variation, presenting only small oscillations between the rainy and the dry periods. The bacterial biomass varied from 123 µgC L-1 to 269 µgC L-1 in the sampling sites and the average cellular volume varied from 0.12 to 0.54µm³, showing a predominance of the rods. The temperature showed a positive correlation with the cellular volume of the rods (R=0.55; p=0.02 and vibrio (R=0.53; p=0.03. Significant spatial differences of biomass (Mann Whitney: p=0.01 and cellular volume of the morphotypes (Mann Whitney: p=0.003 were found between the sampling sites. The strong positive correlations of the water temperature and oxygen with bacterioplankton showed a probable high bacterial activity in this system.A variação temporal e espacial do bacterioplâncton em um sistema fluvial-lagunar de região tropical foi estudada em períodos seco e chuvoso. As médias da abundância bacteriana variaram de 2,67 a 5,1 x 10(7 e não exibiram uma variação temporal marcante, tendo apresentado apenas pequenas oscilações entre os períodos chuvoso e seco. A biomassa bacteriana variou de 123 µg C L-1 a 269 µg C L-1 entre os locais de coleta e o volume celular médio de 0,12µm³ a 0,54µm³, ocorrendo predominância de bacilos. A temperatura mostrou correlação positiva com o volume celular de bacilos (R=0,55; p=0,02 e de vibriões (R=0,53; p=0,03. Foram encontradas diferenças espaciais significativas de biomassa (Mann Whitney: p=0,01 e volume celular dos morfotipos (Mann Whitney: p= 0,003, entre os locais de coleta. As fortes correlações positivas da temperatura da água e do oxigênio, com o bacterioplâncton, são sugestivas de uma provavelmente elevada atividade

  13. Timing of blood transfusion and not ABO blood type is associated with survival in patients treated with radical cystectomy for nonmetastatic bladder cancer: Results from a single high-volume institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschini, Marco; Bianchi, Marco; Rossi, Martina Sofia; Dell׳Oglio, Paolo; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Fossati, Nicola; Mattei, Agostino; Damiano, Rocco; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Salonia, Andrea; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto; Colombo, Renzo; Gallina, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Perioperative transfusions have been recently associated to poor outcomes as an indirect consequence of immune-hematological changes related to transfusion itself and blood type. We tested the role of blood transfusion on cancer-specific mortality (CSM) and overall mortality (OM), considering the effect of ABO system, Rh factor, and timing of transfusions. The study focused on 728 patients with bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy at a single tertiary care referral center between January 1995 and August 2013 with complete ABO blood type information. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess the effect of transfusions, stratified according to ABO type and Rh factor, on CSM and OM. The same endpoints were tested in Cox regression models, after adjusting for all available confounders. A total of 341 (46.8%), 277 (38.0%), 83 (11.4%), and 27 (3.7%) patients had blood type O, A, B and AB, respectively. Overall, 630 (86.5%) and 98 (13.5%) patients were Rh-and Rh+, respectively. At a median follow-up time of 65 months, 225 (30.9%) and 282 (38.7%) patients recorded CSM and OM, respectively. At univariable analyses, ABO blood type and Rh status were not associated to either CSM or OM (all P>0.2). Similar results were observed when ABO blood type and Rh factor were tested in multivariable models (all P>0.3). Conversely, Charlson score, preoperative hemoglobin, number of nodes removed, pathological T stage, and number of positive nodes were associated to both CSM and OM (all Pblood units in the postoperative period (P>0.05) was associated with an increase of CSM and OM. Although ABO type or Rh factor or both were associated with several adverse outcomes in many cancers, we were not able to confirm this association in bladder cancer. Based on our results, the effect of transfusion on survival is independent by ABO type but is associated to the timing of blood supply administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudino, Mário Angelo; Leiria, Luiz Osório Silveira; da Silva, Fábio Henrique; Alexandre, Eduardo Costa; Renno, Andre; Mónica, Fabiola Zakia; de Nucci, Gilberto; Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto; Antunes, Edson; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Franco-Penteado, Carla Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS). Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g). Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM), relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM) and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM), KCl (1 mM-300mM), CaCl2 (1μM-100mM), α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz) were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM) was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder. SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo), compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron) and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol) agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration. Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections

  15. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Angelo Claudino

    Full Text Available Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD, include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking.Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS.Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g. Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM, relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM, KCl (1 mM-300mM, CaCl2 (1μM-100mM, α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder.SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo, compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration.Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections

  16. Medical management of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvpreet S Ubee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB, as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat.

  17. Bladder hernia: Multidetector computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Gadodia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of bladder in inguinal hernia is rare, with most cases diagnosed intraoperatively. Preoperative diagnosis is even rarer. We report a case of bladder as content of inguinal hernia diagnosed using multidetector computed tomography.

  18. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  19. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Mahantshetty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods : This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1, after 50 ml (series 2, and 100 ml (series 3 bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results : The mean (± SD bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25 cc, 116.2 (± 28 cc, and 172.9 (± 29 cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm 3 ,1 cm 3 , 2 cm 3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm 3 , 1 cm 3 , and 2 cm 3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1 compared to full bladder (series 3 (p = 0.03 was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions : Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume

  20. [Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Tovar, Anel Rogelio; Pineda-Rodríguez, Marco Elí; Puente-Gallegos, Francisco Edgardo; Zavala-Pompa, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an infrequent lesion. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who arrived at the emergency room with a history of 24-h gross hematuria. Imaging studies show a urinary bladder tumor with a 218 cc volume that during a 20-day period increased to 426 cc. Histopathological images with hematoxylin-eosin show an infiltrating solid mass with uneven borders. It is composed of neoplastic cells with evident nuclei predominance and scant cytoplasm (small cells). Chromogranin immunohistochemical staining shows a diffusely positive cytoplasmic granular pattern on neoplastic cells. High molecular weight cytokeratin staining shows a negative pattern on neoplastic cells along with a positive pattern on reporsurrounding normal urothelium. Tumoral mass is positive for synaptophysin and CD-56 and negative for CK-7 and CK-20. Patient therapy was based on radiation plus chemotherapy. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder represents 0.35-0.70% of urinary bladder tumors. Histological and immunohistochemical identification are key elements in the diagnosis. Treatment approach is based on cisplatin-based chemotherapy plus radical cystectomy, except when metastatic disease is present.

  1. Factors of tidal volume variation during augmented spontaneous ventilation in patients on extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal. A multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bein, T; Müller, T; Graf, B M; Philipp, A; Zeman, F; Schultz, M J; Slutsky, A S; Weber-Carstens, S

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2-R) allows lung protective ventilation using lower tidal volumes (VT) in patients with acute respiratory failure. The dynamics of spontaneous ventilation under ECCO2-R has not been described previously. This retrospective multivariable analysis examines VT patterns and investigates the factors that influence VT, in particular sweep gas flow and blood flow through the artificial membrane. We assessed VT, respiratory rate (RR), minute ventilation (MV), and levels of pressure support (0-24 cm H2O), sweep gas flow (0-14 L/min) and blood flow through the membrane (0.8-1.8 L/min) in 40 patients from the moment they were allowed to breathe spontaneously. Modest hypercapnia was accepted. Patients tolerated moderate hypercapnia well. In a generalized linear model the increase in sweep gas flow (P<0.001), a low PaCO2 (P=0.029), and an increased breathing frequency (P<0.001) were associated with lower VT. Neither blood flow through the membrane (P=0.351) nor the level of pressure support (P=0.595) influenced VT size. Higher sweep gas flow is associated with low VT in patients on extracorporeal lung assist and augmented spontaneous ventilation. Such a technique can be used for prolonged lung protective ventilation even in the patient's recovery period.

  2. Lipase inhibition by orlistat: effects on gall-bladder kinetics and cholecystokinin release in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathus-Vliegen, E M H; Van Ierland-Van Leeuwen, M L; Terpstra, A

    2004-03-01

    Obese subjects are at risk of developing gallstones as a result of the obese state and during weight reduction. To study whether orlistat, by lipase inhibition, impairs gall-bladder emptying, thus further predisposing weight-losing obese subjects to gallstone formation. Patients entering a randomized clinical trial of 1 month of diet, followed by treatment with placebo, 3 x 60 mg orlistat or 3 x 120 mg orlistat, underwent gall-bladder emptying studies measured by ultrasound. Meal-induced cholecystokinin release and gall-bladder emptying were investigated at the start, at randomization and after 1 and 12 months. One month of dieting did not change gall-bladder emptying and cholecystokinin release. After 1 month, placebo treatment resulted in a decreased fasting volume of 11%, compared with increases of 26% and 47% with 60 and 120 mg orlistat, respectively. Gall-bladder emptying increased by 9% with placebo and decreased by 15% and 53% with 60 and 120 mg orlistat, respectively. Fasting cholecystokinin values and cholecystokinin release decreased significantly in the orlistat group. After 1 year, a persistent but attenuated effect of orlistat on gall-bladder emptying and cholecystokinin release remained. Three of 40 patients developed gallstones, two on placebo with major weight loss and one on 60 mg orlistat. One month of lipase inhibition by orlistat significantly impaired gall-bladder motility, which persisted to some extent after 1 year. Obese subjects with diabetes or hyperlipidaemia, who are more at risk of gallstones, should be followed carefully.

  3. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplas...

  4. Pathophysiology of the underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Aizawa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB, which has been described as a symptom complex suggestive of detrusor underactivity, is usually characterized by prolonged urination time with or without a sensation of incomplete bladder emptying, usually with hesitancy, reduced sensation on filling, and slow stream often with storage symptoms. Several causes such as aging, bladder outlet obstruction, diabetes mellitus, neurologic disorders, and nervous injury to the spinal cord, cauda equine, and peripheral pelvic nerve have been assumed to be responsible for the development of UAB. Several contributing factors have been suggested in the pathophysiology of UAB, including myogenic failure, efferent and/or afferent dysfunctions, and central nervous system dysfunction. In this review article, we have described relationships between individual contributing factors and the pathophysiology of UAB based on previous reports. However, many pathophysiological uncertainties still remain, which require more investigations using appropriate animal models.

  5. Trigonalgia: An overlooked cause of bladder pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Aminu

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... has shown a mean prevalence of 61% due to bladder pain syndrome excluding pregnancy and cancer [2]. E-mail address: sani aminu@hotmail.com. Peer review under responsibility of Pan African Urological Surgeons'. Association. Bladder pain denotes painful experience arising from the bladder.

  6. Tumour cell expansion in bladder epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.J. Rebel (Annemarie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBladder cancer is common in western society. The major problem of patients with superficial bladder cancer is the high recurrence rate and multifocality of these tumours. In 70 % of the patients superficial bladder cancer recurs after local resection of the tumour within 15 years. The

  7. Swim bladder function and buoyancy control in pink snapper (Pagrus auratus) and mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John; Hughes, Julian M

    2014-04-01

    Physoclist fish are able to regulate their buoyancy by secreting gas into their hydrostatic organ, the swim bladder, as they descend through the water column and by resorbing gas from their swim bladder as they ascend. Physoclists are restricted in their vertical movements due to increases in swim bladder gas volume that occur as a result of a reduction in hydrostatic pressure, causing fish to become positively buoyant and risking swim bladder rupture. Buoyancy control, rates of swim bladder gas exchange and restrictions to vertical movements are little understood in marine teleosts. We used custom-built hyperbaric chambers and laboratory experiments to examine these aspects of physiology for two important fishing target species in southern Australia, pink snapper (Pagrus auratus) and mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus). The swim bladders of pink snapper and mulloway averaged 4.2 and 4.9 % of their total body volumes, respectively. The density of pink snapper was not significantly different to the density of seawater (1.026 g/ml), whereas mulloway were significantly denser than seawater. Pink snapper secreted gas into their swim bladders at a rate of 0.027 ± 0.005 ml/kg/min (mean ± SE), almost 4 times faster than mulloway (0.007 ± 0.001 ml/kg/min). Rates of swim bladder gas resorption were 11 and 6 times faster than the rates of gas secretion for pink snapper and mulloway, respectively. Pink snapper resorbed swim bladder gas at a rate of 0.309 ± 0.069 ml/kg/min, 7 times faster than mulloway (0.044 ± 0.009 ml/kg/min). Rates of gas exchange were not affected by water pressure or water temperature over the ranges examined in either species. Pink snapper were able to acclimate to changes in hydrostatic pressure reasonably quickly when compared to other marine teleosts, taking approximately 27 h to refill their swim bladders from empty. Mulloway were able to acclimate at a much slower rate, taking approximately 99 h to refill their swim bladders. We estimated that the

  8. Bioremediation of Spent Bleaching Earth (SBE Wastes using Lipolitic Bacteria (Bacillus cereus with Variation of Inoculum Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lusia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Spent bleaching earth (SBE is a solid waste was generated from the CPO refining step into cooking oil.  SBE that was discharged directly into the environment has the potential to pollute the environment, because in the SBE waste contained oil and acid residues, which are easily to be oxidized and flammable.  Therefore, SBE must be processed first before being discharged into the environment.  One way to manage SBE is by bioremediation.  Bioremediation is a method on cleaning the environment from contaminants by using  biological agents, such as bacteria, fungi etc.  The bacterial isolates used in this study were Bacillus cereus.  This study aims to obtain the best inoculum and to know the ability of Bacillus cereus bacteria in degrading the oil content in SBE waste. This study used Completely Randomized Design with the volume of Bacillus cereus bacteria inoculum as a treatment, consisting of 6 treatment levels of 0 mL kg-1, 25 mL kg-1, 50 mL kg-1, 75 mL kg-1, 100 mL kg-1, 125 mL kg-1.  Each treatment level was repeated 3 times, so taht 18 experimental units were obtained.  Observation was done once a week, in a month.  Parameters observed were bacterial population, percentage of oil degradation, and oil content degradation.  The best treatment result for the bacterial population was obtained at the treatment of 100 mL kg-1, at week 4 which was 7,4 x 108 cfu g-1, and for the oil degradation was obtained at 50 mL kg-1 on the treatment at week 4 as big as 90,43%.

  9. Occupation and Risk of Bladder Cancer in Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of bladder cancer incidence according to occupational categories in the Nordic countries. METHODS: The study cohort comprised 15 million individuals older than 30 years who participated in one or more population censuses in 1960......% CI 1.33 to 1.53), hairdressers (1.28; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.40), seamen (1.22; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.30), printers (1.21; 95% CI 1.14 to 1.30), and plumbers (1.20; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.30). A significantly decreased risk of bladder cancer was observed among gardeners (0.78, 0.75 to 0.80), forestry workers (0.......74; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.78), and farmers (0.70; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: The SIR of bladder cancer was overall similar across the Nordic countries. The study suggests that occupation is evidently associated with bladder cancer risk....

  10. Mechanoreceptor afferent activity compared with receptor field dimensions and pressure changes in feline urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, J W; Armour, J A

    1992-11-01

    The relationship between vesical mechanoreceptor field dimensions and afferent nerve activity recorded in pelvic plexus nerve filaments was examined in chloralose-anesthetized cats. Orthogonal receptor field dimensions were monitored with piezoelectric ultrasonic crystals. Reflexly generated bladder contractile activity made measurements difficult, therefore data were collected from cats subjected to actual sacral rhizotomy. Afferent activity was episodic and was initiated at different pressure and receptor field dimension thresholds. Maximum afferent activity did not correlate with maximum volume or pressure. Furthermore, activity was not linearly related to intravesical pressure, receptor field dimensions, or calculated wall tension. Pressure-length hysteresis of the receptor fields occurred. The responses of identified afferent units and their associated receptor field dimensions to brief contractions elicited by the ganglion stimulant 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (2.5-20 micrograms i.a.), studied under constant volume or constant pressure conditions, are compatible with bladder mechanoreceptors behaving as tension receptors. Because activity generated by bladder mechanoreceptors did not correlate in a simple fashion with intravesical pressure or receptor field dimensions, it is concluded that such receptors are influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the bladder wall. Furthermore, as a result of the heterogeneity of the bladder wall, receptor field tension appears to offer a more precise relationship with the activity of bladder wall mechanoreceptors than does intravesical pressure.

  11. The use of ultrasound-estimated bladder weight in diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction and detrusor overactivity in men with lower urinary tract symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Housami

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Measurement of bladder weight using ultrasound estimates of bladder wall thickness and bladder volume is an emerging clinical measurement technique that may have a role in the diagnosis of lower urinary tract dysfunction. We have reviewed available literature on this technique to assess current clinical status. Methods: A systematic literature search was carried out within PubMed and MedLine to identify relevant publications. These were then screened for relevance. Preliminary results from our clinical experiments using the technique are also included. Results: We identified 17 published papers concerning the technique which covered clinical studies relating ultrasound-estimated bladder wall thickness to urodynamic diagnosis in men, women, and children together with change in response to treatment of bladder outlet obstruction. The original manual technique has been challenged by a commercially available automated technique. Conclusion: Ultrasound-estimated bladder weight is a promising non-invasive technique for the categorization of storage and voiding disorders in both men and women. Further studies are needed to validate the technique and assess accuracy of diagnosis.

  12. Bladder Dysfunction and Urinary Incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    F. faizi

    2009-01-01

      "nIn the name of God. Dear colleagues, ladies and gentlemen, it is a great honor to be here. Bladder dysfunction is serious enough to seek serious help. If you may know I am working in a private clinic which it is impossible to follow the patients so this lecture is based on unusual and rare cases who came to me. Bladder dysfunction (BD) is common among 30% of young and old people who are suffering from it, however it is more common in old ages. According to a research, women ...

  13. Segmentation of urinary bladder in CT urography (CTU) using CLASS with enhanced contour conjoint procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    We are developing a computerized method for bladder segmentation in CT urography (CTU) for computeraided diagnosis of bladder cancer. A challenge for computerized bladder segmentation in CTU is that the bladder often contains regions filled with intravenous (IV) contrast and without contrast. Previously, we proposed a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) consisting of four stages: preprocessing and initial segmentation, 3D and 2D level set segmentation, and post-processing. In case the bladder is partially filled with contrast, CLASS segments the non-contrast (NC) region and the contrast (C) filled region separately and conjoins the contours with a Contour Conjoint Procedure (CCP). The CCP is not trivial. Inaccuracies in the NC and C contours may cause CCP to exclude portions of the bladder. To alleviate this problem, we implemented model-guided refinement to propagate the C contour if the level set propagation in the region stops prematurely due to substantial non-uniformity of the contrast. An enhanced CCP with regularized energies further propagates the conjoint contours to the correct bladder boundary. Segmentation performance was evaluated using 70 cases. For all cases, 3D hand segmented contours were obtained as reference standard, and computerized segmentation accuracy was evaluated in terms of average volume intersection %, average % volume error, and average minimum distance. With enhanced CCP, those values were 84.4±10.6%, 8.3±16.1%, 3.4±1.8 mm, respectively. With CLASS, those values were 74.6±13.1%, 19.6±18.6%, 4.4±2.2 mm, respectively. The enhanced CCP improved bladder segmentation significantly (p<0.001) for all three performance measures.

  14. Automatic staging of bladder cancer on CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, Sankeerth S.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Cha, Kenny H.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon; Alva, Ajjai; Paramagul, Chintana; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Correct staging of bladder cancer is crucial for the decision of neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment and minimizing the risk of under- or over-treatment. Subjectivity and variability of clinicians in utilizing available diagnostic information may lead to inaccuracy in staging bladder cancer. An objective decision support system that merges the information in a predictive model based on statistical outcomes of previous cases and machine learning may assist clinicians in making more accurate and consistent staging assessments. In this study, we developed a preliminary method to stage bladder cancer. With IRB approval, 42 bladder cancer cases with CTU scans were collected from patient files. The cases were classified into two classes based on pathological stage T2, which is the decision threshold for neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (i.e. for stage >=T2) clinically. There were 21 cancers below stage T2 and 21 cancers at stage T2 or above. All 42 lesions were automatically segmented using our auto-initialized cascaded level sets (AI-CALS) method. Morphological features were extracted, which were selected and merged by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. A leave-one-case-out resampling scheme was used to train and test the classifier using the 42 lesions. The classification accuracy was quantified using the area under the ROC curve (Az). The average training Az was 0.97 and the test Az was 0.85. The classifier consistently selected the lesion volume, a gray level feature and a contrast feature. This predictive model shows promise for assisting in assessing the bladder cancer stage.

  15. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  16. Leiomyoma of the bladder and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabbaj, N.; Dafiri, R.; Imani, F.; Benslimane, L.; Benchekroun, A.

    1998-01-01

    Unlike epithelial tumors, connective tissue tumors are uncommon, representing only 3 % of all bladder tumors. Leiomyoma of the bladder is the most frequent non-epithelial benign tumor of the bladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MIR) is highly useful for diagnostic purposes and to determine the degree of extension. Only few reports of sonographic findings have been reported for leiomyoma of the bladder. The tumor usually develops within the bladder. Extra-vesicular formations have also been reported as well as a few intramural localizations. The characteristic feature is the absence of mucosal involvement. We analyzed the MRI findings in a case of leiomyoma of the bladder with intra and extra-vesicular development inflammatory reaction of the bladder wall and uterine adherences in a woman with a past history of chronic cystitis. The role of diagnostic MRI is discussed. (author)

  17. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  18. Bladder-type hydropneumatic accumulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anigas, F.

    1985-01-01

    Hydropneumatic pressure accumulators allow liquids to be stored under pressure, their operating principle being based on the inherent compressibility of elements in a liquid and gaseous state. A wide range of fluids can be covered by means of the appropriate choice of the material for the body and bladder. Their main applications are: energy accumulation, safety reserve, suspension. (author)

  19. Bladder carcinoma. Apport MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.; Spittler, G.; Jacqmin, D.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the second most commun cause of urogenital tumor. It is suspected by abdominal ultrasound and prouved by cystoscopy with biopsy. At present, MR Imaging is the most accurate diagnostic modality for loco-regional staging. Urography is still useful to appreciate urinary tract [fr

  20. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    promote angiogenesis and neurogenesis of the regenerated organs. The choice of the scaffold and the type of cells is a crucial and fundamental step in regenerative medicine. In this review article, we demonstrated these three crucial factors of bladder tissue engineering, with the pros and cons of each scaffold type and.

  1. Variational Monte Carlo Technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 8. Variational Monte Carlo Technique: Ground State Energies of Quantum Mechanical Systems. Sukanta Deb. General Article Volume 19 Issue 8 August 2014 pp 713-739 ...

  2. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W; Garland, Marc V

    2013-12-28

    The partial molar volumes, V(i), of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. V(i) is determined with the direct method, while the composition of V(i) is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated V(i) deviate only 3.4 cm(3) mol(-1) (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental V(i) variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of V(i) variations. In all solutions, larger V(i) are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus V(i). Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the V(i) trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute movement. This wake behind

  3. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W.; Garland, Marc V.

    2013-12-01

    The partial molar volumes, bar V_i, of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. bar V_i is determined with the direct method, while the composition of bar V_i is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated bar V_i deviate only 3.4 cm3 mol-1 (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental bar V_i variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of bar V_i variations. In all solutions, larger bar V_i are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus bar V_i. Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the bar V_i trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute

  4. Enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection in the spinal cord-injured host with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Zarine R; Ross, Sherry S; Dolber, Paul C; Wiener, John S; Tang, Yuping; Seed, Patrick C

    2013-08-01

    Neurogenic bladder predisposes to recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) and renal failure, and susceptibility is commonly ascribed to urinary stasis from elevated residual urine volumes. Escherichia coli UTI was modeled in the spinal cord-injured (SCI) rat with the hypothesis that SCI animals would require fewer bacteria to establish infection, have an exaggerated inflammatory response, and have delayed clearance of infection compared to normal-voiding controls. T10 SCI rats and controls had median infectious doses (ID50) of 10(2) and 10(5) CFU, respectively. Mean residual volumes in the SCI animals did not correlate with susceptibility to initiation of UTI or outcome. In the acute infection, control and SCI rats developed acute cystitis and pyelitis without acute differences in histopathological scores of inflammation. However, in vivo imaging of infected animals revealed persistently higher levels of bacteria in the SCI urine and bladders than were seen for controls over 2 weeks. Likewise, at 2 weeks, acute and chronic inflammatory infiltrates persisted in the bladders and kidneys of SCI rats, whereas inflammation largely resolved within the controls. Together these data demonstrate that SCI rats exhibit delayed clearance of infection and exaggerated inflammatory responses in bladders and kidneys; however, the severity of residual volumes does not predict increased susceptibility to UTI. These studies suggest that host-dependent mechanisms that are discrete from alterations in bladder physiology influence UTI susceptibility with the SCI-neurogenic bladder. This model will allow elucidation of SCI-neurogenic bladder-mediated changes in host response that yield UTI susceptibility and may lead to new preventative and therapeutic options.

  5. Modeling correlation indices between bladder and Foley′s catheter balloon dose with CT-based planning using limited CT slices in intracavitary brachytherapy for carcinoma of cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oinam Arun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To derive and validate an index to correlate the bladder dose with the catheter balloon dose using limited computed tomography (CT slices. Materials and Methods: Applicator geometry reconstructed from orthogonal radiographs were back-projected on CT images of the same patients for anatomy-based dosimetric evaluation. The correlation indices derived using power function of the catheter balloon dose and the bladder volume dose were validated in 31 patients with cervical cancer. Results: There was significant correlation between International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU-38 balloon reference dose (Dr and the dose received by 25% bladder volume (D 25 (P < 0.0001. Significant correlation was also found between the reference dose of mid-balloon point (D rm and the dose to D 25 (P < 0.0001. Average percentage difference [100 x (observed index - expected index / expected index] of observed value of I′ 25 (index for the dose to D25 bladder with respect to mid-balloon reference point from that of expected value was 0.52%, when the index was modeled with reference dose alone. Similarly the average percentage difference for I′10cc (index for the dose to 10 cc volume of bladder with respect to mid balloon point was 0.84%. When this index was modeled with absolute bladder volume and reference dose, standard deviation of the percentage difference between observed and expected index for D rm reduced by approximately 2% when compared to D r . Conclusion: For clinical applications, correlation index modeled with reference dose and volume predicts dose to absolute volume of bladder. Correlation index modeled with reference dose gives a good estimate of dose to relative bladder volume. From our study, we found D rm to be a better indicator of bladder dose than D r .

  6. TGF-β/MAPK signaling mediates the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on urinary control and interstitial cystitis after urinary bladder transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ya; Song, Ya-Jun; Song, Bo; Huang, Chi-Bing; Ling, Qing; Yu, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the role of the transforming growth factor-β/mitogen activated protein kinase (TGF-β/MAPK) signaling pathway in the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on urinary control and interstitial cystitis in a rat model of urinary bladder transplantation. A urinary bladder transplantation model was established using Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were assigned to normal (blank control), negative control (phosphate-buffered saline injection), BMSCs (BMSC injection), sp600125 (MAPK inhibitor injection), or protamine sulfate (protamine sulfate injection) groups. Immunohistochemistry, urodynamic testing, hematoxylin-eosin staining, Western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and MTT assay were used to assess BMSC growth, the kinetics of bladder urinary excretion, pathological changes in bladder tissue, bladder tissue ultrastructure, the expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins, levels of inflammatory cytokines, and the effects of antiproliferative factor on cell proliferation. Compared with normal, negative control, BMSCs, and sp600125 groups, rats in the PS group exhibited decreased discharge volume, maximal micturition volume, contraction interval, and bladder capacity but increased residual urine volume, bladder pressure, bladder peak pressure, expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins, levels of inflammatory cytokines, and growth inhibition rate. Levels of inflammatory cytokines and the growth inhibition rate were positively correlated with the expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins. Our findings demonstrate that the TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway mediates the beneficial effects of BMSCs on urinary control and interstitial cystitis.

  7. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia) is found to be a preneoplastic lesion of the rat urinary bladder. Therefore, the promoting and inhibitory effects of various chemicals in two-stage urinary bladder carcinogenesis were judged by measuring PN hyperplasia in rats. Dose-dependent and organ-specific effects of the urinary bladder promoter, saccharin, in the induction of PN hyperplasia were shown in rats after initiation by BBN. The promoting effect of saccharin was seen more clearly in the urinary bladder of rats after potent initiation. A strain difference in susceptibility of the urinary bladder to the promoter was also shown. These results suggest that the above various factors may also have modifying activities on urinary bladder carcinogenesis in man. PMID:6832095

  8. Management of vesicoureteral reflux in neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Q. Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is a significant risk factor for pyelonephritis and renal scarring. VUR can occur through a defective ureterovesical junction (UVJ or an overwhelmed normal UVJ mechanism such as in bladder dysfunction of congenital, acquired, or behavioral etiology. There are numerous causes for the development of a neurogenic bladder from spinal dysraphisms to spinal cord trauma and even centrally based abnormalities in children with apparently normal motor function (inappropriately termed nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder. The foundation of managing reflux in these neurogenic bladders is to maintain low bladder pressures which will commonly mean that compliance will be normal as well. There have been several publications that have shown that if bladder pressures are lowered simply with clean intermittent catheterization and medications that the reflux can resolve spontaneously. Alternatively, the patients that are in need of bladder augmentation can have spontaneous resolution of their reflux with the resulting increase in capacity. Surgical intervention is called for when bladder capacity is adequate and the reflux persists or if it is part of a larger operation to increase capacity and to manage outlet resistance. In some instances, reimplantation is necessary because the ureters interfere with the bladder neck procedure. Aside from open and robotic surgical intervention the use of endoscopic injectable agents is beginning to become more popular especially when combined with intravesical botulinum toxin A injections. Great strides are being made in the management of patients with neurogenic bladders and we are seeing more choices for the urologist to be able to manage these patients.

  9. Exogenous glycosaminoglycans coat damaged bladder surfaces in experimentally damaged mouse bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstital cystitis is often treated with exogenous glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, chondroitin sulphate (Uracyst, hyaluronate (Cystistat or the semi-synthetic pentosan polysulphate (Elmiron. The mechanism of action is presumed to be due to a coating of the bladder surface to replace the normally present chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate lost as a result of the disease. This study used fluorescent labelled chondroitin sulphate to track the distribution of glycosaminoglycans administered intravesically to mouse bladder that had been damaged on the surface. Methods The surfaces of mouse bladders were damaged by 3 mechanisms – trypsin, 10 mM HCl, and protamine sulphate. Texas Red-labeled chondroitin sulphate was instilled into the bladders of animals with damaged bladders and controls instilled only with saline. Bladders were harvested, frozen, and sectioned for examination by fluorescence. Results The normal mouse bladder bound a very thin layer of the labelled chondroitin sulphate on the luminal surface. Trypsin- and HCl-damaged bladders bound the labelled chondroitin sulphate extensively on the surface with little penetration into the bladder muscle. Protamine produced less overt damage, and much less labelling was seen, presumably due to loss of the label as it complexed with the protamine intercalated into the bladder surface. Conclusion Glycosaminoglycan administered intravesically does bind to damaged bladder. Given that the changes seen following bladder damage resemble those seen naturally in interstitial cystitis, the mechanisms proposed for the action of these agents is consistent with a coating of damaged bladder.

  10. Pitfalls and Limitations of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Urinary Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ching Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adequately selecting a therapeutic approach for bladder cancer depends on accurate grading and staging. Substantial inaccuracy of clinical staging with bimanual examination, cystoscopy, and transurethral resection of bladder tumor has facilitated the increasing utility of magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate bladder cancer. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI is a noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging technique. The high tissue contrast between cancers and surrounding tissues on DWI is derived from the difference of water molecules motion. DWI is potentially a useful tool for the detection, characterization, and staging of bladder cancers; it can also monitor posttreatment response and provide information on predicting tumor biophysical behaviors. Despite advancements in DWI techniques and the use of quantitative analysis to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient values, there are some inherent limitations in DWI interpretation related to relatively poor spatial resolution, lack of cancer specificity, and lack of standardized image acquisition protocols and data analysis procedures that restrict the application of DWI and reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient values. In addition, inadequate bladder distension, artifacts, thinness of bladder wall, cancerous mimickers of normal bladder wall and benign lesions, and variations in the manifestation of bladder cancer may interfere with diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Recognition of these pitfalls and limitations can minimize their impact on image interpretation, and carefully applying the analyzed results and combining with pathologic grading and staging to clinical practice can contribute to the selection of an adequate treatment method to improve patient care.

  11. Pitfalls and Limitations of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Urinary Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2015-01-01

    Adequately selecting a therapeutic approach for bladder cancer depends on accurate grading and staging. Substantial inaccuracy of clinical staging with bimanual examination, cystoscopy, and transurethral resection of bladder tumor has facilitated the increasing utility of magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate bladder cancer. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging technique. The high tissue contrast between cancers and surrounding tissues on DWI is derived from the difference of water molecules motion. DWI is potentially a useful tool for the detection, characterization, and staging of bladder cancers; it can also monitor posttreatment response and provide information on predicting tumor biophysical behaviors. Despite advancements in DWI techniques and the use of quantitative analysis to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient values, there are some inherent limitations in DWI interpretation related to relatively poor spatial resolution, lack of cancer specificity, and lack of standardized image acquisition protocols and data analysis procedures that restrict the application of DWI and reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient values. In addition, inadequate bladder distension, artifacts, thinness of bladder wall, cancerous mimickers of normal bladder wall and benign lesions, and variations in the manifestation of bladder cancer may interfere with diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Recognition of these pitfalls and limitations can minimize their impact on image interpretation, and carefully applying the analyzed results and combining with pathologic grading and staging to clinical practice can contribute to the selection of an adequate treatment method to improve patient care. PMID:26055180

  12. Multielectrode array recordings of bladder and perineal primary afferent activity from the sacral dorsal root ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Tim M.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Weber, Douglas J.

    2011-10-01

    The development of bladder and bowel neuroprostheses may benefit from the use of sensory feedback. We evaluated the use of high-density penetrating microelectrode arrays in sacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for recording bladder and perineal afferent activity. Arrays were inserted in S1 and S2 DRG in three anesthetized cats. Neural signals were recorded while the bladder volume was modulated and mechanical stimuli were applied to the perineal region. In two experiments, 48 units were observed that tracked bladder pressure with their firing rates (79% from S2). At least 50 additional units in each of the three experiments (274 total; 60% from S2) had a significant change in their firing rates during one or more perineal stimulation trials. This study shows the feasibility of obtaining bladder-state information and other feedback signals from the pelvic region with a sacral DRG electrode interface located in a single level. This natural source of feedback would be valuable for providing closed-loop control of bladder or other pelvic neuroprostheses.

  13. Duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with PKU microwave driven Cs-free volume H{sup −} sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Zhang, T.; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, J. F.; Guo, Z. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, A. L. [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, J. E. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Microwave driven cesium-free volume H{sup −} sources, that have the ability to deliver tens of mA H{sup −} at 35 keV both in CW and 10% duty factor (100 Hz/1 ms), were developed at Peking University (PKU) [S. X. Peng et al., in Proceeding of IPAC 2015, WEPWA027, Richmond, Virginia, USA, 3–8 May 2015]. Recently, special efforts were paid on the investigation of duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with them. Most of the experiments were carried out with a pulsed length (τ) of 1 ms and different intervals of 99 ms, 49 ms, 39 ms, 29 ms, 19 ms, 9 ms, 4 ms, 2 ms, 1 ms, 0.5 ms, and 0 ms, respectively. Other experiments were focused on CW operation and fixed duty factor of 1%. Experimental results prove that PKU H{sup −} sources can deliver tens of mA H{sup −} at duty factor from 1% to 100%. The RF power efficiency increases steadily with the increasing of duty factor from 1% to CW at a fixed pulsed length. Under a given duty factor and pulsed length, RF power efficiency keeps constant and the H{sup −} current increases with RF power linearly. Details will be presented in the paper.

  14. Variations in urban traffic volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Tom; Weijermars, Wendy; van Berkum, Eric C.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades passenger transport has grown rapidly resulting in a multitude of problems including severe traffic congestion and pollution. It is expected that passenger transport will continue to grow rapidly in the future, which will worsen the situation even further. The traditional

  15. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  16. Bladder injuries frequently missed in polytrauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanweer Karim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tanweer Karim, Margaret Topno, Vinod Sharma, Raymond Picardo, Ankur HastirSurgery, MGM Medical College, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, IndiaAbstract: Bladder injuries are very common in patients who have had road traffic accidents. The method of diagnosis and management of such injuries is well established and accepted. However, trauma to the bladder can be associated with other life-threatening injuries which are frequently missed, and often diagnosed during laparotomy for other reasons. The aim of this study was to diagnose bladder injury in polytrauma patients as early as possible, taking into consideration the fact that these patients are hemodynamically unstable and require rapid evaluation and management. In order to achieve our objective, we used bedside sonography with retrograde instillation of normal saline to diagnose bladder injury in addition to use of the conventional retrograde cystogram.Keywords: bladder injury, bladder rupture, retrograde cystogram

  17. UTIs in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Mona S; Mure, Amanda; Gomez, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) remain one of the most prevalent and frustrating morbidities for neurogenic bladder patients, and death attributed to urosepsis in the spinal cord injury (SCI) patient is higher when compared to the general population. Risk factors include urinary stasis, high bladder pressures, bladder stones, and catheter use. While classic symptoms of UTI include dysuria, increased frequency and urgency, neurogenic bladder patients present differently with increased spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary incontinence, and vague pains. Multiple modalities have been assessed for prevention including catheter type, oral supplements, bladder irrigation, detrusor injections and prophylactic antimicrobials. Of these, bladder inoculation with E. coli HU2117, irrigation with iAluRil(®), detrusor injections, and weekly prophylaxis with alternating antibiotics appear to have a positive reduction in UTI but require further study. Ultimately, treatment for symptomatic UTI should account for the varied flora and possible antibiotic resistances including relying on urine cultures to guide antibiotic therapy.

  18. SOX4 expression in bladder carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Mads; Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Wiuf, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    The human transcription factor SOX4 was 5-fold up-regulated in bladder tumors compared with normal tissue based on whole-genome expression profiling of 166 clinical bladder tumor samples and 27 normal urothelium samples. Using a SOX4-specific antibody, we found that the cancer cells expressed...... in the clinical bladder material and a small subset of the genes showed a high correlation to SOX4 expression. The present data suggest a role of SOX4 in the bladder cancer disease....... the SOX4 protein and, thus, did an evaluation of SOX4 protein expression in 2,360 bladder tumors using a tissue microarray with clinical annotation. We found a correlation (P bladder cell line HU609, SOX4...

  19. Scrotal Herniation of Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hamidi Madani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inguinal bladder hernia is a rare clinical condition, with 1–3% of all inguinal hernias involving the bladder. Any portion of the bladder may herniate, from a small portion or a diverticulum to most of the bladder. We present a 55-year-old male with an intermittent right scrotal mass of 6 months’ duration. The mass lesion protruded through the right inguinal canal before voiding and reduced after that. Scrotal sonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion in the scrotum that stretched cranially to the intra-abdominal portion of the bladder. Excretory urography showed a duplicated system in the left kidney and deviation of the left orifice to the right side of the trigon. Finally, cystography illustrated herniation of the bladder to the right scrotum. Surgical repair of the hernia was done with mesh. Follow-up cystography one month postoperatively revealed no herniation.

  20. Sunitinib malate provides activity against murine bladder tumor growth and invasion in a preclinical orthotopic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eddie Shu-yin; Patel, Amit R; Hansel, Donna E; Larchian, William A; Heston, Warren D

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of sunitinib on localized bladder cancer in a mouse orthotopic bladder tumor model. We used an established orthotopic mouse bladder cancer model in syngeneic C3H/He mice. Treatment doses of 40 mg/kg of sunitinib or placebo sterile saline were administrated daily by oral gavage. Tumor volume, intratumoral perfusion, and in vivo vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression were measured using a targeted contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound imaging system. The findings were correlated with the total bladder weight, tumor stage, and survival. The effects of sunitinib malate on angiogenesis and cellular proliferation were measured by immunostaining of CD31 and Ki-67. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was seen after sunitinib treatment compared with the control. The incidence of extravesical extension of the bladder tumor and hydroureter in the sunitinib-treated group (30% and 20%, respectively) was lower than the incidence in the control group (66.7% and 55.6%, respectively). Sunitinib therapy prolonged the survival in mice, with statistical significance (log-rank test, P = .03). On targeted contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound imaging, in vivo vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression was reduced in the sunitinib group and correlated with a decrease in microvessel density. The results of our study have demonstrated the antitumor effects of sunitinib in the mouse localized bladder cancer model. Sunitinib inhibited the growth of bladder tumors and prolonged survival. Given that almost 30% of cases in our treatment arm developed extravesical disease, sunitinib might be suited as a part of a multimodal treatment regimen for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of intravesical recurrence after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, Mizuki; Miyanaga, Naoto; Hinotsu, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The subjects were 77 patients with T2-3N0M0 bladder cancer whose bladder was preserved by intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation. The patterns of the first recurrences were retrospectively analyzed. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, 17 patients (22.1%) experienced intravesical recurrence without metastasis, 14 (82.4%) of which were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence and 3 (17.6%) of which were muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrences. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at the same site as the initial tumor site in all three cases, whereas non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at different sites in 64% of the patients in that group. The peak hazard of the non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence was observed at around a year after treatment. Recurrent non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer was of a significantly lower histological grade with lower Ki-67-labeling indices than the initial muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Twelve (85.7%) of 14 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence achieved disease-free status. The multivariate analysis revealed that multiplicity, grade and tumor size were significantly correlated with the recurrence (P=0.0001, 0.0442 and 0.0412, respectively). Most of the recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The recurrence pattern and characteristics of the tumors did not differ from those of primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk factors would be candidates for prophylactic intravesical therapy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence. (author)

  2. Epitheloid hemangioendothelioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitheloid hemangioendothelioma is an uncommon vascular neoplasm and has an unpredictable clinical behavior. It is characterized by round or spindle-shaped endothelial cells with cytoplasmic vacuolation. Most often, epitheloid hemangioendothelioma arise from the soft tissues of the upper and lower extremities and it has borderline malignant potential. We describe the first reported case of epitheloid hemangioendothelioma in the urinary bladder, which was treated by transurethral resection. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry.

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of bladder cancer tissues using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Muslet, Nafie A.; Ali, Essam E.

    2012-03-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in Africa. It takes several days to reach a diagnosis using histological examinations of specimens obtained by endoscope, which increases the medical expense. Recently, spectroscopic analysis of bladder cancer tissues has received considerable attention as a diagnosis technique due to its sensitivity to biochemical variations in the samples. This study investigated the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to analyze a number of bladder cancer tissues. Twenty-two samples were collected from 11 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer from different hospitals without any pretreatment. From each patient two samples were collected, one normal and another cancerous. FTIR spectrometer was used to differentiate between normal and cancerous bladder tissues via changes in spectra of these samples. The investigations detected obvious changes in the bands of proteins (1650, 1550 cm-1), lipids (2925, 2850 cm-1), and nucleic acid (1080, 1236 cm-1). The results show that FTIR spectroscopy is promising as a rapid, accurate, nondestructive, and easy to use alternative method for identification and diagnosis of bladder cancer tissues.

  4. Dog Ear-Like Bladder Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Cuce

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The hernia content involving a bladder segment occurs in 1-4 % of cases of the inguinal hernias. Inguinoscrotal bladder hernias are usually found incidentally on radiological examinations or at the time of herniorrhaphy. We present an adult case that has a left inguinal bladder hernia detected and evaluated by sonography, intravenous pyelography (IVP, and computerized tomography (CT. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(3.000: 187-189

  5. Bladder Management in Children: Intermittent Catheterization Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Suzanne Marie; Korcal, Layna; Thomas, Ginger

    2018-03-01

    Clean intermittent catheterization (IC) of the bladder is one example of advanced medical care required by students with special health care needs. The success of a child's intermittent catheterization program in a community setting such as a school is dependent on an educated team. This article discusses indications and problems that arise with IC bladder management in the pediatric population. The article also provides information about current best practice for IC management to assist school nurses in the optimization of bladder health.

  6. Occupational exposure to solvents and bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between exposure to selected solvents and the risk of bladder cancer. This study is based on the Nordic Occupational Cancer (NOCCA) database and comprises 113,343 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed in Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden...... of occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, aromatic hydrocarbon solvents, benzene and toluene and the risk of bladder cancer....

  7. Fesoterodine: a novel muscarinic receptor antagonist for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fesoterodine is a newly approved drug for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to review the preclinical and clinical data on fesoterodine. METHODS: The study involved a search of the Medline database and the proceedings volumes of urological

  8. Application of the Mitrofanoff principle in children with severe impairment of bladder function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heij, H. A.; Ekkelkamp, S.; Moorman-Voestermans, C. G.; Vos, A.

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of children with severe impairment of bladder function requires a large-volume, low-pressure reservoir combined with a continent, easily catheterizable valve. The Mitrofanoff principle (MP) appears to meet these requirements. Between 1986 and 1993, the MP was applied in 15 children (4

  9. A comparison of morbidity following conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Jimmi; Holmberg, Mats; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Agerbæk, Mads; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Høyer, Morten

    2014-10-01

    In radiotherapy (RT) of urinary bladder cancer, the use of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) opens for sparing of considerable intestinal volumes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the acute and late toxicities following either conformal RT (CRT) or IMRT for bladder cancer, and to correlate the toxicities to dose-volume parameters. The study included 116 consecutively treated patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who received either CRT (n = 66) or IMRT (n = 50) during 2007-2010. Acute side effects were retrospectively collected whereas late effects were assessed by a cross-sectional evaluation by telephone interview of 44 recurrence-free patients. Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) version 3.0. Acute diarrhoea grade ≥ 2 was more frequent in patients treated by CRT (56%) compared to IMRT (30%) (p = 0.008). Logistic regression analysis showed a correlation between acute diarrhoea and bowel cavity dose-volume parameters in the 10-50 Gy range. Severe late toxicity (grade ≥ 3) was recorded in 10% of the total cohort, with no statistical difference between the IMRT and CRT groups. Patients treated with IMRT for bladder cancer had significantly less acute diarrhoea compared to those treated with CRT, but there was no significant difference in late morbidity between the groups. The risk of acute diarrhoea was related to the volume of bowel irradiated.

  10. Bladder wash cytology, quantitative cytology, and the qualitative BTA test in patients with superficial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, H. G.; van Balken, M. R.; Schamhart, D. H.; Peelen, P.; de Reijke, T.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.; Witjes, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Two new methods for the detection of transitional tumor cells in bladder wash (karyometry: QUANTICYT) and voided urine material (BARD BTA test) were compared with bladder wash cytology for the prediction of histology and tumor recurrence. Bladder wash material and voided urine were sampled from 138

  11. Bladder Control Problems and Bedwetting in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Clinical Trials Hematuria: Blood in the Urine Interstitial Cystitis (Painful Bladder Syndrome) Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Kidney Infection Definition & ...

  12. Microvascular Injury in Ketamine-Induced Bladder Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Lin

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of ketamine-induced cystitis (KC remains unclear. In this study, bladder microvascular injury was investigated as a possible contributing mechanism. A total of 36 KC patients with exposure to ketamine for more than 6 months, and 9 control subjects, were prospectively recruited. All participants completed questionnaires, including the O'Leary-Sant interstitial cystitis symptom index (ICSI and the interstitial cystitis problem index (ICPI. All KC patients received a urodynamic study and radiological exams. Bladder tissues were obtained from cystoscopic biopsies in the control group and after hydrodistention in the KC group. Double-immunofluorescence staining of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NMDAR1 and the endothelial marker, cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31, was performed to reveal the existence of NMDAR1 on the endothelium. Electron microscopy (EM was applied to assess the microvascular change in the urinary bladder and to measure the thickening of the basement membrane (BM. A proximity ligation assay (PLA was used to quantify the co-localization of the endothelial CD31 receptor and the mesenchymal marker [fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP-1]. The Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. The mean ICSI [14.38 (± 4.16] and ICPI [12.67 (± 3.54] scores of the KC group were significantly higher than those (0 and 0, respectively of the control group (both p < 0.001. The KC patients had decreasing cystometric bladder capacity (CBC with a mean volume of 65.38 (± 48.67 mL. NMDAR1 was expressed on endothelial cells in both groups under immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, KC patients had significant BM duplication of microvessels in the mucosa of the urinary bladder under EM. The co-expression of the endothelial marker CD31 and mesenchymal marker FSP1 was significantly stained and calculated under PLA. In conclusion, microvascular injury and mesenchymal phenotypic

  13. Childhood bladder stones-an endemic disease of developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, B.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder calculi are one of the commonest health problems in young children especially in rural and underprivileged areas. Methods: All children of bladder stones operated at District Headquarter Hospital Mithi from July 2009 to June 2012 were included in this cross-sectional study. Data was collected regarding age, sex, address (rural or urban), body weight, duration of breast feeding, weaning, detailed dietary history regarding milk type, volume, amount of water intake, recurrent diarrhoea, urinary tract infection (UTI), family history, and socioeconomic history. Urine analysis, complete blood count (CBC), renal function, ultra sound abdomen, X-ray kidney, ureter, and bladder (KUB) was done in all patients. All patients had cystolithotomy and were followed up till complete recovery. Results: A total of 113 children (97 males and 16 females) operated at District Headquarter Hospital Mithi Tharparker were included in study. All patients belonged to local desert areas of Tharparker. Age ranged from 18 months to 14 year (mean age 8.6 year). Most frequent symptom was difficulty in micturition in 76 (67.25%) patients, urinary retention in 18 (15.9%) and stone with pyuria and fever in 12 (10.6%) patients. Recurrent episodes of diarrhoea (more than 3 episodes per year) in 73(65%) patients, recurrent UTI in 51 (45.6%), family history of stone disease in 6 (5%) and associated rectal prolapse in 3(2.6%) patients. On x-ray KUB 111 (98%) patients had single stone in bladder, 2 (2%) had multiple stones and an associated renal and ureteric stone in 5 (4.5%). Mild anaemia (Hb 7-10 gm%) was seen in 35 (39.55%) patients, moderate anaemia (Hb 5-7 gm %) was seen in 21(24%) and severe anaemia (Hb less than 5 gm%) was seen in 14 (16%) patients. All patients had open cystolithotomy for removal of stones under general anaesthesia. Conclusion: Bladder stones are public health problem. Majority of affected patients were less than 5 years old. Low protein diet, dehydration, use of goat milk

  14. Comparative analysis of the effects of belly board and bladder distension in postoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Kim, D.Y.; Cho, K.H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effect of reducing the irradiated small-bowel volume with the use of belly board, bladder distension or both methods combined, in patients with rectal cancer undergoing postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. Patients and methods: This study enrolled 20 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who were scheduled to receive postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. All patients underwent four sets of CT scans under four different methods as follows: group I: empty bladder without the use of a belly board; group II: empty bladder with the use of a belly board; group III: bladder distension without the use of a belly board; group IV: bladder distension with the use of a belly board. The conventional three-field treatment plan was made using a three-dimensional treatment planning system. The irradiated small-bowel volume was calculated at 10% intervals from 10% to 100% of the prescribed dose. Results: The volume of the irradiated small bowel decreased in the order of group I, group II, group III, and group IV at all dose levels (p 3 (33.9±12.9%) in group II, 76.6±30.5 cm 3 (55.1±17.8%) in group III, and 98.5±36.7 cm 3 (70.7±14.5%) in group IV. Conclusion: Bladder distension was a more effective method than the belly board for reducing the irradiated small-bowel volume in postoperative pelvic radiotherapy of rectal cancer patients. The combination of the belly board and bladder distension showed an additive effect and was the most effective method for reducing the irradiated small-bowel volume. (orig.)

  15. Enhanced angiogenesis and relaxation of bladder as early response to bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun; Doo, Seung Whan; An, Jin; Kim, Seung U

    2013-01-01

    To provide insights into the pathogenesis of bladder insult secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Six-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 80) were divided into eight groups, 10 rats each, according to the duration of bladder outlet obstruction, including 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h and 1 week. Cystometric parameters were evaluated at 72 h and 1 week after bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder tissues were harvested and Masson's trichrome staining was carried out. Each slide was inspected microscopically and the mean percent collagen area was examined. Changes of collagen deposition and pathological expression of several factors including hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1 and nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid of bladders were evaluated. A significant time-dependent increase in the bladder weight after 6 h and the percent of collagen area after 24 h of bladder outlet obstruction were found. Increase in hypoxia inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β1, inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression, time-dependent increase in vascular endothelial growth factor, neuronal nitric oxide synthase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression after 6 h of bladder outlet obstruction was found. The intercontraction interval decreased significantly after 72 h of bladder outlet obstruction. Cellular remodeling in the bladder secondary to bladder outlet obstruction starts in the early hours and it includes enhanced angiogenesis and bladder relaxation. Early relief from bladder outlet obstruction is helpful to preserve bladder structure and function. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Do Foley catheters adequately drain the bladder? Evidence from CT imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avulova, Svetlana; Li, Valery J.; Khusid, Johnathan A. [Department of Urology, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Choi, Woo S. [Radiology, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Weiss, Jeffrey P., E-mail: johnathan.khusid@downstate.edu [Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Introduction: The Foley catheter has been widely assumed to be an effective means of draining the bladder. However, recent studies have brought into question its efficacy. The objective of our study is to further assess the adequacy of Foley catheter for complete drainage of the bladder. Materials and Methods: Consecutive catheterized patients were identified from a retrospective review of contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced computed tomographic (CT) abdomen and pelvis studies completed from 7/1/2011-6/30/2012. Residual urine volume (RUV) was measured using 5mm axial CT sections as follows: The length (L) and width (W) of the bladder in the section with the greatest cross sectional area was combined with bladder height (H) as determined by multiplanar reformatted images in order to calculate RUV by applying the formula for the volume (V) of a sphere in a cube:V=(π/6)⁎L⁎W⁎H). Results: RUVs of 167 (mean age 67) consecutively catheterized men (n=72) and women (n=95) identified by CT abdomen and pelvis studies were calculated. The mean RUV was 13.2 mL (range: 0.0 mL-859.1 mL, standard deviation: 75.9 mL, margin of error at 95% confidence:11.6 mL). Four (2.4%) catheterized patients had RUVs of >50 mL, two of whom had an improperly placed catheter tip noted on their CT-reports. Conclusions: Previous studies have shown that up to 43% of catheterized patients had a RUV greater than 50 mL, suggesting inadequacy of bladder drainage via the Foley catheter. Our study indicated that the vast majority of patients with Foley catheters (97.6%), had adequately drained bladders with volumes of <50 mL. (author)

  17. Statistical analysis of the inter-individual variations of the bone shape, volume fraction and fabric and their correlations in the proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Elham; Chandran, Vimal; Reyes, Mauricio; Zysset, Philippe; Büchler, Philippe

    2017-10-01

    Including structural information of trabecular bone improves the prediction of bone strength and fracture risk. However, this information is available in clinical CT scans, only for peripheral bones. We hypothesized that a correlation exists between the shape of the bone, its volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric, which could be characterized using statistical modeling. High-resolution peripheral computed tomography (HR-pQCT) images of 73 proximal femurs were used to build a combined statistical model of shape, BV/TV and fabric. The model was based on correspondence established by image registration and by morphing of a finite element mesh describing the spatial distribution of the bone properties. Results showed no correlation between the distribution of bone shape, BV/TV and fabric. Only the first mode of variation associated with density and orientation showed a strong relationship (R 2 >0.8). In addition, the model showed that the anisotropic information of the proximal femur does not vary significantly in a population of healthy, osteoporotic and osteopenic samples. In our dataset, the average anisotropy of the population was able to provide a close approximation of the patient-specific anisotropy. These results were confirmed by homogenized finite element (hFE) analyses, which showed that the biomechanical behavior of the proximal femur was not significantly different when the average anisotropic information of the population was used instead of patient-specific fabric extracted from HR-pQCT. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that the fabric information of the proximal femur follows a similar structure in an elderly population of healthy, osteopenic and osteoporotic proximal femurs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Grey matter volume and resting-state functional connectivity of the motor cortex-cerebellum network reflect the individual variation in masticatory performance in the healthy elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Shu eLin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have consistently identified brain activation in the motor area and the cerebellum during chewing. In this study, we further investigated the structural and functional brain signature associated with masticatory performance, which is a widely used index for evaluating overall masticatory function in the elderly. Twenty-five healthy elderly participants underwent oral examinations, masticatory performance tests, and behavioral assessments, including the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument and the short-form Geriatric Depression Scale. Masticatory performance was assessed with the validated colorimetric method, using color-changeable chewing gum. T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and resting-state function MRI were performed. We analyzed alterations in grey matter volume (GMV using voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC between brain regions using the seed-based method. The structural and functional MRI analyses revealed the following findings: (1 the GMV change in the premotor cortex was positively correlated with masticatory performance. (2 The rsFC between the cerebellum and the premotor cortex was positively correlated with masticatory performance. (3 The GMV changes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, as well as the rsFC between the cerebellum and the DLPFC, was positively correlated with masticatory performance. The findings showed that in the premotor cortex, a reduction of GMV and rsFC would reflect declined masticatory performance. The positive correlation between DLPFC connectivity and masticatory performance implies that masticatory ability is associated with cognitive function in the elderly. Our findings highlighted the role of the central nervous system in masticatory performance and increased our understanding of the structural and functional brain signature underlying individual variations in masticatory performance in the elderly.

  19. Neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention associated with MDMA abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, John R; Barrueto, Fermin

    2008-06-01

    The use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, known as "ecstasy"), a synthetic amphetamine and "club drug," has been associated with acute, transient urinary retention. We report a case of neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention associated with MDMA abuse. A 21-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED) because he had abdominal pain and difficulty urinating. He had experienced difficulty in initiating urination over the past 1.5 months, with periods of 24 to 36 hours between voids and large volumes of urine. The patient had a chronic pattern of MDMA use, taking 4 tablets/day for 3 months. Two weeks before coming to the ED, he had been admitted to an inpatient drug rehabilitation center. During the time since that admission, the patient had visited EDs repeatedly for insertion and removal of Foley catheters to relieve the urinary retention until he could be admitted to a urologic service. Cystometrogram was abnormal, finding no sensation of bladder fullness after instillation of 350 mL of saline and inability to generate a voluntary voiding pressure. Cystoscopy revealed no outlet obstruction. The findings were consistent with neurogenic bladder. The patient was given prescriptions for bethanecol and phenazopyridine, and told to continue a 10-day course of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim for urinary tract infection. He was discharged with a Foley catheter in place. Symptoms of urinary retention persisted at 1-year follow-up, despite self-catheterization and complete cessation of MDMA use. Chronic MDMA use may lead to neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention.

  20. CNV analysis in 169 patients with bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowtzow, C. von; Hofmann, A.; Zhang, R.; Marsch, F.; Ebert, A.K.; Rosch, W.; Stein, R.; Boemers, T.M.; Hirsch, K.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Brusco, A.; Migone, N.; Grazia, M. Di; Moebus, S.; Nothen, M.M.; Reutter, H.; Ludwig, M.; Draaken, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) represents the severe end of the congenital uro-rectal malformation spectrum. Initial studies have implicated rare copy number variations (CNVs), including recurrent duplications of chromosomal region 22q11.21, in BEEC etiology. METHODS: To

  1. Giant bladder lithiasis: case report and bibliographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Vilar, Daniel; Beltran Persiva, José; Pérez Mestre, Mateo; Povo Martin, Iván José; Miralles Aguado, Jaume; Garau Perelló, Carmen; De Francia, Jose Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Urinary lithiasis is a very frequent urological disease but bladder lithiasis is very uncommon.Patients usually refer voiding symptoms and hematuria. The diagnosis is made after imaging tests. We report a clinical case describing a giant bladder stone and perform a bibliographic review. A 43 year old man with the diagnosis of giant bladder stone (more than 10 cm diameter). We searched Medline using the terms: giant bladder stone, giant bladder lithiasis, bladder lithiasis, giant bladder lithiasis. We made the diagnosis of giant bladder stone after a simple kidney, ureter and bladder (KUB) X Ray. The treatment for this patient was a cystolithotomy. We found more than 230 reports at Medline and chose the most referred ones and the last 10 years reports. Giant bladder lithiasis is a very rare pathology. The gold standard for diagnosis is cystoscopy but sometimes with a KUB Xray or an ultrasound is enough. Because of its size, cistolitotomy is the correct treatment for giant bladder stone.

  2. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.E. Mensah

    ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication: Bladder can be augmented with dorsal urethral mucosa. J.E. Mensaha,∗. , K.N. Ampadua, M.Y. Kyeia, B. Edusieb.

  3. Suprapubic prostatectomy with and without continuous bladder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... without continuous bladder irrigation is simple to perform, safe and easy to learn. This procedure permits patient ambulation as soon as spinal anesthesia wears out, reducing the risk of the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis. With the radical removal of bladder infusion solutions and reduced need for nursing attention ...

  4. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Agrawal, Sachin; Bläckberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has evolved from the first reports on bladder endoscopy and transurethral resection to the introduction of adjuvant intravesical treatment. However, disease recurrence and progression remain an ongoing risk, placing a heavy burden on he...

  5. Bladder diverticulitis on PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Wosnitzer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Diverticula are commonly seen in hollow viscous organs. One common complication of diverticula is infection, known as diverticulitis. Although diverticulitis has been extensively described with respect to the colon, not many cases describe diverticulitis of the urinary bladder. We report a case of diverticulitis of the bladder to emphasize the imaging findings on PET/CT and to discuss management and possible complications.

  6. Bladder pressure sensors in an animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koldewijn, E. L.; van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Schaafsma, E.; Wijkstra, H.; Debruyne, F. M.; Brindley, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    Urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia might be inhibited on demand if changes in bladder pressure could be detected by sensors and transferred into pudendal nerve electrostimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate how the bladder wall reacts on different sensor implants.

  7. NEOADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY FOR BLADDER CARCINOMA IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate the impact of preoperative accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of bladder carcinoma in Egyptian patients. Patients and Methods Between December 1996 and February 2000, 104 Egyptian patients with pathologically proven infiltrative bladder carcinoma were enrolled in ...

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma in bladder extrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral-Ribeiro, J; Silva, C; Sousa, L; Pérez García, D; Ribeiro dos Santos, A

    2005-01-01

    Bladder extrophy is a rare congenital malformation that nowadays is surgically corrected in neonatal period. We present a case report of a 71-year-old male with a verrucous squamous cell carcinoma arising in a classical uncorrected form of bladder extrophy.

  9. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  10. Bladder dysfunction in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Kristian; Nielsen, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often have lower urinary tract symptoms. Seventy-four percent of patients with early-to-moderate disease report more than one bladder disturbance symptom. Severe bladder symptoms are reported in 27-39% of PD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  11. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  12. Treatment of urethral obstruction secondary to caudal bladder displacement, trigonal invagination, and urethral kinking in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakubo, Kayo; Palm, Carrie A; Korner, Amber L; Culp, William T N

    2017-10-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 15-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog was evaluated for a 7-week history of stranguria, pollakiuria, and intermittent urethral obstruction. CLINICAL FINDINGS On initial evaluation, the patient had persistent stranguria with lack of urine production; after multiple unsuccessful attempts to urinate, a large volume of urine was produced. Prior to voiding the large volume, the urinary bladder was not palpable during examination. Abdominal ultrasonography confirmed caudal displacement of the urinary bladder, and the urethra and trigone could not be located ultrasonographically. Positive-contrast cystourethrography and CT confirmed caudal displacement of the urinary bladder and also revealed trigonal invagination and urethral kinking; dysuria was attributed to these findings. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Surgical repositioning of the lower urinary tract was performed. The urinary bladder was moved cranially and was fixed in place along the left lateral aspect of the body wall by cystopexy. After surgery, positive-contrast cystourethrography revealed a more cranial positioning of the urinary bladder and straightening of the urethra with no urethral kinking or trigonal invagination. Immediately after surgery, stranguria had resolved and the patient was able to void normally. Two years after surgery, the dog was reported to be urinating normally. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Surgical correction of caudal urinary bladder displacement with cystopexy led to resolution of trigonal invagination, urethral kinking, and urethral obstruction in the dog of the present report. Trigonal invagination and urethral kinking, although uncommon findings, should be considered as possible causes of dysuria in dogs.

  13. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, M.L.; Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S.; Ahmad, R.; Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To design and evaluate individualized nonadaptive and online-adaptive strategies based on a pretreatment established motion model for the highly deformable target volume in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 14 patients, nine to ten variable bladder filling computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired at pretreatment and after 40 Gy. Individualized model-based internal target volumes (mbITVs) accounting for the cervix and uterus motion due to bladder volume changes were generated by using a motion-model constructed from two pretreatment CT scans (full and empty bladder). Two individualized strategies were designed: a nonadaptive strategy, using an mbITV accounting for the full-range of bladder volume changes throughout the treatment; and an online-adaptive strategy, using mbITVs of bladder volume subranges to construct a library of plans. The latter adapts the treatment online by selecting the plan-of-the-day from the library based on the measured bladder volume. The individualized strategies were evaluated by the seven to eight CT scans not used for mbITVs construction, and compared with a population-based approach. Geometric uniform margins around planning cervix–uterus and mbITVs were determined to ensure adequate coverage. For each strategy, the percentage of the cervix–uterus, bladder, and rectum volumes inside the planning target volume (PTV), and the clinical target volume (CTV)-to-PTV volume (volume difference between PTV and CTV) were calculated. Results: The margin for the population-based approach was 38 mm and for the individualized strategies was 7 to 10 mm. Compared with the population-based approach, the individualized nonadaptive strategy decreased the CTV-to-PTV volume by 48% ± 6% and the percentage of bladder and rectum inside the PTV by 5% to 45% and 26% to 74% (p < 0.001), respectively. Replacing the individualized nonadaptive strategy by an online-adaptive, two-plan library further decreased the percentage of

  14. Overactive bladder syndrome - management and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Janine; McLeod, Nicholas; Thani-Gasalam, Ruban; Rashid, Prem

    2012-11-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is a symptom-based clinical diagnosis. It is characterised by urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia, with or without urge urinary incontinence. These symptoms can often be managed in the primary care setting. This article provides a review on overactive bladder syndrome and provides advice on management for the general practitioner. Overactive bladder syndrome can have a significant effect on quality of life, and affects 12-17% of the population. Prevalence increases with age. The management of overactive bladder syndrome involves exclusion of underlying pathology. First line treatment includes lifestyle interventions, pelvic floor exercises, bladder training and antimuscarinic agents. Failure of conservative management necessitates urology referral. Second line therapies are more invasive, and include botulinum toxin, neuromodulation or surgical interventions such as augmentation cystoplasty or urinary diversion.

  15. [Etiology and pathogenesis of overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bschleipfer, T; Wagenlehner, F; Weidner, W

    2011-04-01

    The symptom complex"overactive bladder" (OAB) affects more than 10% of adult individuals. The etiopathology is complex and multifactorial. Foremost, urinary tract infection, bladder cancer, foreign bodies, and history of radiation or intravesical instillation of chemotherapeutics must be excluded. In many cases, OAB is caused by neurogenic disorders that activate involuntary detrusor contractions (detrusor overactivity, DO). Also, non-neurogenic disorders such as bladder outlet obstruction or dysfunctions of the female pelvic floor/slack ligaments that affect the urothelium, suburothelium, detrusor and bladder afferents are substantially involved in the pathogenesis of OAB. Until now, circulatory disorders have not been adequately taken into consideration but seem to be another etiological factor that causes OAB. Henceforth, molecular changes of bladder afferents and circulatory disorders in patients suffering from OAB have to be investigated in more detail.

  16. Contouring and Constraining Bowel on a Full-Bladder Computed Tomography Scan May Not Reflect Treatment Bowel Position and Dose Certainty in Gynecologic External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra, E-mail: ryaparpa@montefiore.org; Mehta, Keyur J.; Bernstein, Michael B.; Kabarriti, Rafi; Hong, Linda X.; Garg, Madhur K.; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a gynecologic cancer setting, changes in bowel position, dose-volume parameters, and biological indices that arise between full-bladder (FB) and empty-bladder (EB) treatment situations; and to evaluate, using cone beam computed tomography (CT), the validity of FB treatment presumption. Methods and Materials: Seventeen gynecologic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed. Empty-bladder and FB CTs were obtained. Full-bladder CTs were used for planning and dose optimization. Patients were given FB instructions for treatment. For the study purpose, bowel was contoured on the EB CTs for all patients. Bowel position and volume changes between FB and EB states were determined. Full-bladder plans were applied on EB CTs for determining bowel dose-volume changes in EB state. Biological indices (generalized equivalent uniform dose and normal tissue complication probability) were calculated and compared between FB and EB. Weekly cone beam CT data were available in 6 patients to assess bladder volume at treatment. Results: Average (±SD) planned bladder volume was 299.7 ± 68.5 cm{sup 3}. Median bowel shift in the craniocaudal direction between FB and EB was 12.5 mm (range, 3-30 mm), and corresponding increase in exposed bowel volume was 151.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 74.3-251.4 cm{sup 3}). Absolute bowel volumes receiving 45 Gy were higher for EB compared with FB (mean 328.0 ± 174.8 vs 176.0 ± 87.5 cm{sup 3}; P=.0038). Bowel normal tissue complication probability increased 1.5× to 23.5× when FB planned treatments were applied in the EB state. For the study, the mean percentage value of relative bladder volume at treatment was 32%. Conclusions: Full-bladder planning does not necessarily translate into FB treatments, with a patient tendency toward EB. Given the uncertainty in daily control over bladder volume for treatment, we strongly recommend a “planning-at-risk volume bowel” (PRV{sub B}owel) concept to account for bowel motion

  17. Testosterone Modifies Alterations to Detrusor Muscle after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Juvenile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Flum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to posterior urethral valves (PUV arise in boys during adolescence. The reasons for this have previously been attributed to increased urine output as boys experience increased growth. Additionally, there are few choices for clinicians to effectively treat these complications. We formed the new hypothesis that increased androgen levels at this time of childhood development could play a role at the cellular level in obstructed bladders. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of testosterone on bladder detrusor muscle following injury from partial bladder outlet obstruction (PO in mice. A PO model was surgically created in juvenile male mice. A group of mice were castrated by bilateral orchiectomy at time of obstruction (CPO. Testosterone cypionate was administered to a group of castrated, obstructed mice (CPOT. Bladder function was assessed by voiding stain on paper (VSOP. Bladders were analyzed at 7 and 28 days by weight and histology. Detrusor collagen to smooth muscle ratio (Col/SM was calculated using Masson’s trichrome stain. All obstructed groups had lower max voided volumes (MVV than sham mice at 1 day. Hormonally intact mice (PO continued to have lower MVV at 7 and 28 days while CPO mice improved to sham levels at both time points. In accordance, PO mice had higher bladder-to-body weight ratios than CPO and sham mice demonstrating greater bladder hypertrophy. Histologically, Col/SM was lower in sham and CPO mice. When testosterone was restored in CPOT mice, MVV remained low at 7 and 28 days compared to CPO and bladder-to-body weight ratios were also greater than CPO. Histologic changes were also seen in CPOT mice with higher Col/SM than sham and CPO mice. In conclusion, our findings support a role for testosterone in the fibrotic changes that occur after obstruction in male mice. This suggests that while other changes may occur in adolescent boys that cause complication in boys

  18. Development and application of the condom catheter method for non-invasive measurement of bladder pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R van Mastrigt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A non-invasive method to measure the bladder pressure in males using a condom catheter has been developed. The measurement technique, its validation and limitations, a diagnostic nomogram to non-invasively diagnose bladder outlet obstruction (BOO, and results of large-scale application are discussed. Methods: Modified incontinence condoms are attached to the penis. During voiding the flow of urine is mechanically interrupted. The subsequent maximum pressure in the condom reflects the isovolumetric bladder pressure. The method was validated in a group of 46 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms who were simultaneously studied invasively and non-invasively. Subsequently it was applied in a non-invasive epidemiological study in 1020 healthy males. Results: The reproducibility of the measured isovolumetric bladder pressure is comparable to that of conventional pressure-flow parameters. The measured pressure can be used to diagnose bladder outlet obstruction with a diagnostic accuracy (Area Under receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.98, which compares most favorably with the area under the curve of 0.79 of Q max in the same population. During condom catheter measurements, both the involuntary interruption of voiding and the forced diuresis increase post-void residual volume. This increase does not affect the accuracy of the pressure measurements. Conclusions: We conclude that in males bladder pressure can successfully be measured non-invasively using the condom catheter method. By combining the measured volumetric bladder pressure with a separately measured free flow rate, BOO can non-invasively and accurately be diagnosed.

  19. Correlation of bladder base elevation with pelvic floor hypertonicity in women with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Fei-Chi; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether the bladder base elevation as revealed by cystogram under fluoroscopy is associated with pelvic floor hypertonicity or bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in women. Sixty-two women who were referred to our videourodynamic laboratory for assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were included in this retrospective analysis. Thirty-one of these women with bladder base elevation-revealed by cystogram under fluoroscopy during videourodynamic study-served as the experimental group, and another group of 31 women without bladder base elevation served as control. None of the patients had neuropathy, previous pelvic surgery or chronic urinary retention. The clinical symptoms, urodynamic diagnosis, and parameters were compared between the two groups. The mean voiding pressure (Pdet.Qmax) and postvoid residual (PVR) were significantly greater, and maximum flow rate (Qmax) and voided volume were significantly lower in the bladder base elevation group. When a Pdet.Qmax of >or=35 cmH2O combined with a Qmax of elevation group had BOO than controls (51.6% vs. 9.7%, P=0.0003). Pelvic floor muscle electromyogram (EMG) was dyscoordinated during the voiding phase in 18 (58.1%) and 9 (29%) of the patients with and without bladder base elevation, respectively (P=0.0212). Women with LUTS and bladder base elevation revealed in the filling phase of videourodynamic study had significantly higher voiding pressure and incidence of dyscoordinated pelvic floor EMG activities during voiding, suggesting a higher incidence of BOO and pelvic floor hypertonicity. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The molecular basis of urgency: regional difference of vanilloid receptor expression in the human urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Mansfield, Kylie J; Kristiana, Ika; Vaux, Kenneth J; Millard, Richard J; Burcher, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Treatments targeting vanilloid receptor TRPV1 are effective in some bladder disorders. Our aim was to determine the expression profiles of TRPV1 in regions of human bladder and test the hypothesis that there would be an upregulation of TRPV1 in mucosa of patients with bladder hypersensitivity but not idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO). Women with sensory urgency (SU), interstitial cystitis (IC), and IDO were investigated by videourodynamics and cystoscopy. Control biopsies were used for comparison. Biopsies were dissected into mucosa and muscle, and evaluated for TRPV1 mRNA expression using quantitative competitive RT-PCR (QC-RT-PCR). TRPV1 mRNA from SU trigonal mucosa was significantly higher than control trigonal mucosa or SU bladder body mucosa. In contrast, in IDO patients, there was no difference between trigonal mucosa and body mucosa. In IC biopsies, RNA quality was substandard and unable to be used for analysis. The most striking finding was that TRPV1 mRNA expressed in SU trigonal mucosa was significantly inversely correlated with the bladder volume at first sensation of filling during cystometry. No such relationship was seen for IDO trigonal mucosa. No difference was seen in bladder body mucosa from any disease groups compared with age-matched control. The symptoms of SU were associated with the increased expression of TRPV1 mRNA in the trigonal mucosa. No upregulation or regional differences of TRPV1 mRNA were seen in IDO patients. TRPV1 may play a role in SU and premature first bladder sensation on filling.

  1. Near infrared imaging to identify sentinel lymph nodes in invasive urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Deborah W.; Adams, Larry G.; Niles, Jacqueline D.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Ramos-Vara, Jose; Bonney, Patty L.; deGortari, Amalia E.; Frangioni, John V.

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 12,000 people are diagnosed with invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (InvTCC) each year in the United States. Surgical removal of the bladder (cystectomy) and regional lymph node dissection are considered frontline therapy. Cystectomy causes extensive acute morbidity, and 50% of patients with InvTCC have occult metastases at the time of diagnosis. Better staging procedures for InvTCC are greatly needed. This study was performed to evaluate an intra-operative near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) system (Frangioni laboratory) for identifying sentinel lymph nodes draining InvTCC. NIRF imaging was used to map lymph node drainage from specific quadrants of the urinary bladder in normal dogs and pigs, and to map lymph node drainage from naturally-occurring InvTCC in pet dogs where the disease closely mimics the human condition. Briefly, during surgery NIR fluorophores (human serum albumen-fluorophore complex, or quantum dots) were injected directly into the bladder wall, and fluorescence observed in lymphatics and regional nodes. Conditions studied to optimize the procedure including: type of fluorophore, depth of injection, volume of fluorophore injected, and degree of bladder distention at the time of injection. Optimal imaging occurred with very superficial injection of the fluorophore in the serosal surface of the moderately distended bladder. Considerable variability was noted from dog to dog in the pattern of lymph node drainage. NIR fluorescence was noted in lymph nodes with metastases in dogs with InvTCC. In conclusion, intra-operative NIRF imaging is a promising approach to improve sentinel lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer.

  2. Behavior of Lipiodol Markers During Image Guided Radiotherapy of Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xiangfei; Herk, Marcel van; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Remeijer, Peter; Bex, Axel; Betgen, Anja; De Reijke, Theo M.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Pos, Floris J.; Bel, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the stability of a novel type of markers used in partial bladder tumor irradiation and tumor deformation as indicated by the markers. Materials and Methods: In 15 patients with solitary bladder cancer, lipiodol was injected in the bladder wall during flexible cystoscopy to identify the tumor. A planning CT scan was made, followed by daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans during treatment. To study the accuracy of using these markers for image guidance, uncertainties U1 and U2 were calculated, which were defined as the difference between submask registration (covering single marker) and the average of all submask registrations and the difference between the submask registration and the general mask registration (including all markers), respectively. Finally, to study tumor deformation, the relative movement of each marker pair was correlated with the relative bladder volume (RBV). Results: The analyzed patients had 2.3 marker injections on average. The lipiodol spot size was 0.72 ± 1.1 cm 3 . The intensity of spots in both CT and CBCT was significantly higher than the surrounding bladder tissue. The uncertainties U1 and U2 were comparable, and the uncertainties in left-right direction (0.14-0.19 cm) were smaller than those in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior directions (0.19-0.32 cm). The relative marker movement of within-zone marker pairs was much smaller (and has less dependence on the RBV) than across-zones marker pairs. Conclusions: Lipiodol markers are a feasible method to track bladder tumor by using online CBCT. Tumor deformation is observed, especially for tumors that cross the defined bladder zones.

  3. Non-bladder conditions in female Taiwanese patients with interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu-Hua; Lin, Alex T L; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2014-08-01

    To detect non-bladder conditions in patients with interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome. A total of 122 female interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome patients and a control group of 122 age-matched female patients with stress urinary incontinence completed screening questionnaires for irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, multiple chemical sensitivities, tension and migraine headache, localized myofascial pain disorder, and fibromyalgia. Interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome patients also completed questionnaires on interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome symptom severity, including the O'Leary-Sant symptom index, and the visual analog scale for pain and urgency. Interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome patients were more likely to meet diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome than controls (37.5% vs 11.5%), and tension/migraine headache (38.7% vs 15.7%; all P interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome symptoms as measured by the visual analog scale of pain (P = 0.008) and O'Leary-Sant bother index (P = 0.035). Interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome patients are more likely to have multiple non-bladder conditions. These conditions correlate with the severity of interstitial cystitis/hypersensitive bladder syndrome symptoms. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi Jeanet; Nørgaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results......-intended radiation therapy. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: One-year mortality was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15-21). One-year cancer-specific mortality was 25% (95% CI: 22-27%). One-year mortality after cystectomy was 14% (95% CI: 10-18). Ninety-day mortality after cystectomy was 3% (95% CI: 1-5) in 2013. One......-year mortality following curative-intended radiation therapy was 32% (95% CI: 24-39) and 1-year cancer-specific mortality was 23% (95% CI: 16-31) in 2013. CONCLUSION: This preliminary DaBlaCa-data report showed that the treatment of MIBC in Denmark overall meet high international academic standards. The database...

  5. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18(q21: 21. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment.

  6. Adverse Events of Intravesical OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection between Patients with Overactive Bladder and Interstitial Cystitis--Different Mechanisms of Action of Botox on Bladder Dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuh-Chen; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-03-16

    Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injections have been proposed to treat both overactive bladder (OAB) and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) in patients with refractory conditions. We compared adverse events (AEs) after BoNT-A treatment between IC/BPS and OAB in women. IC/BPS patients who failed conventional treatments were enrolled to receive suburothelial injections of BoNT-A (100 U) followed by hydrodistention. Age matched OAB female patients refractory to antimuscarinic agents underwent BoNT-A (100 U) injections. The bladder capacity, maximum flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual (PVR), and voiding efficiency (VE) at baseline, 3 and 6 months, and the post-treatment AEs were analyzed between groups. Finally, 89 IC/BPS and 72 OAB women were included. In the OAB group, the bladder capacity and PVR increased, and VE decreased significantly at three and six months after BoNT-A treatment. In the IC/BPS group, the Qmax increased significantly at six months. There were significant differences in changes of capacity, Qmax, PVR and VE between the two groups. Moreover, OAB patients suffered more frequently from events of hematuria, UTI, and large PVR (>200 mL), but less frequently from events of straining to void. In conclusion, OAB women had higher PVR volume and lower VE than those in IC/BPS after BoNT-A injections. These results imply that the bladder contractility of OAB patients are more susceptible to BoNT-A, which might reflect the different mechanisms of action of Botox on bladder dysfunction. Further investigations to confirm this hypothesis are warranted.

  7. Adverse Events of Intravesical Onabotulinum Toxin A Injection between Patients with Overactive Bladder and Interstitial Cystitis—Different Mechanisms of Action of Botox on Bladder Dysfunction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Chen Kuo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A injections have been proposed to treat both overactive bladder (OAB and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS in patients with refractory conditions. We compared adverse events (AEs after BoNT-A treatment between IC/BPS and OAB in women. IC/BPS patients who failed conventional treatments were enrolled to receive suburothelial injections of BoNT-A (100 U followed by hydrodistention. Age matched OAB female patients refractory to antimuscarinic agents underwent BoNT-A (100 U injections. The bladder capacity, maximum flow rate (Qmax, post-void residual (PVR, and voiding efficiency (VE at baseline, 3 and 6 months, and the post-treatment AEs were analyzed between groups. Finally, 89 IC/BPS and 72 OAB women were included. In the OAB group, the bladder capacity and PVR increased, and VE decreased significantly at three and six months after BoNT-A treatment. In the IC/BPS group, the Qmax increased significantly at six months. There were significant differences in changes of capacity, Qmax, PVR and VE between the two groups. Moreover, OAB patients suffered more frequently from events of hematuria, UTI, and large PVR (>200 mL, but less frequently from events of straining to void. In conclusion, OAB women had higher PVR volume and lower VE than those in IC/BPS after BoNT-A injections. These results imply that the bladder contractility of OAB patients are more susceptible to BoNT-A, which might reflect the different mechanisms of action of Botox on bladder dysfunction. Further investigations to confirm this hypothesis are warranted.

  8. Adverse Events of Intravesical OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection between Patients with Overactive Bladder and Interstitial Cystitis—Different Mechanisms of Action of Botox on Bladder Dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuh-Chen; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injections have been proposed to treat both overactive bladder (OAB) and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) in patients with refractory conditions. We compared adverse events (AEs) after BoNT-A treatment between IC/BPS and OAB in women. IC/BPS patients who failed conventional treatments were enrolled to receive suburothelial injections of BoNT-A (100 U) followed by hydrodistention. Age matched OAB female patients refractory to antimuscarinic agents underwent BoNT-A (100 U) injections. The bladder capacity, maximum flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual (PVR), and voiding efficiency (VE) at baseline, 3 and 6 months, and the post-treatment AEs were analyzed between groups. Finally, 89 IC/BPS and 72 OAB women were included. In the OAB group, the bladder capacity and PVR increased, and VE decreased significantly at three and six months after BoNT-A treatment. In the IC/BPS group, the Qmax increased significantly at six months. There were significant differences in changes of capacity, Qmax, PVR and VE between the two groups. Moreover, OAB patients suffered more frequently from events of hematuria, UTI, and large PVR (>200 mL), but less frequently from events of straining to void. In conclusion, OAB women had higher PVR volume and lower VE than those in IC/BPS after BoNT-A injections. These results imply that the bladder contractility of OAB patients are more susceptible to BoNT-A, which might reflect the different mechanisms of action of Botox on bladder dysfunction. Further investigations to confirm this hypothesis are warranted. PMID:26999201

  9. Down-regulation of LncRNA TUG1 enhances radiosensitivity in bladder cancer via suppressing HMGB1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huijuan; Hu, Xigang; Zhang, Hongzhi; Li, Wenbo

    2017-04-04

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to regulate the sensitivity of different cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy. Aberrant expression of lncRNA Taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) has been found to be involved in the development of bladder cancer, however, its function and underlying mechanism in the radioresistance of bladder cancer remains unclear. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was conducted to measure the expression of TUG1 and HMGB1 mRNA in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. HMGB1 protein levels were tested by western blot assays. Different doses of X-ray were used for radiation treatment of bladder cancer cells. Colony survival and cell viability were detected by clonogenic assay and CCK-8 Kit, respectively. Cell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. A xenograft mouse model was constructed to observe the effect of TUG1 on tumor growth in vivo. The levels of TUG1 and HMGB1 were remarkably increased in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. Radiation treatment markedly elevated the expression of TUG1 and HMGB1. TUG1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis and decreased colony survival in SW780 and BIU87 cells under radiation. Moreover, TUG1 depletion suppressed the HMGB1 mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, overexpression of HMGB1 reversed TUG1 knockdown-induced effect in bladder cancer cells. Radiation treatment dramatically reduced the tumor volume and weight in xenograft model, and this effect was more obvious when combined with TUG1 silencing. LncRNA TUG1 knockdown enhances radiosensitivity of bladder cancer by suppressing HMGB1 expression. TUG1 acts as a potential regulator of radioresistance of bladder cancer, and it may represent a promising therapeutic target for bladder cancer patients.

  10. Complex bladder-exstrophy-epispadias management: Causes of failure of initial bladder closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouame Dibi Bertin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of the initial closure of the complex bladder-exstrophy remains a challenge in pediatric surgery. This study describes a personal experience of the causes of failure of the initial closure and operative morbidity during the surgical treatment of bladder-exstrophy complex. From April 2000 to March 2014, four patients aged 16 days to 7 years and 5 months underwent complex exstrophy-epispadias repair with pelvic osteotomies. There were three males and one female. Three of them had posterior pelvic osteotomy, one had anterior innominate osteotomy. Bladder Closure: Bladder closure was performed in three layers. Our first patient had initial bladder closure with polyglactin 4/0 (Vicryl ® 4/0, concerning the last three patients, initial bladder closure was performed with polydioxanone 4/0 (PDS ® 4/0. The bladder was repaired leaving the urethral stent and ureteral stents for full urinary drainage for three patients. In one case, only urethral stent was left, ureteral drainage was not possible, because stents sizes were more important than the ureteral diameter. Out of a total of four patients, initial bladder closure was completely achieved for three patients. At the immediate postoperative follow-up, two patients presented a complete disunion of the abdominal wall and bladder despite an appropriate postoperative care. The absorbable braided silk (polyglactin used for the bladder closure was considered as the main factor in the failure of the bladder closure. The second cause of failure of the initial bladder closure was the incomplete urine drainage, ureteral catheterisation was not possible because the catheters sizes were too large compared with the diameters of the ureters. The failure of the initial bladder-exstrophy closure may be reduced by a closure with an absorbable monofilament silk and efficient urine drainage via ureteral catheterisation.

  11. Complex bladder-exstrophy-epispadias management: causes of failure of initial bladder closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Kouame Dibi; Serge, Kouame Yapo Guy; Moufidath, Sounkere; Maxime, Koffi; Hervé, Odehouri Koudou Thierry; Baptiste, Yaokreh Jean; Samba, Tembely; Gaudens, Dieth Atafi; Ossenou, Ouattara; Ruffin, Dick

    2014-01-01

    The success of the initial closure of the complex bladder-exstrophy remains a challenge in pediatric surgery. This study describes a personal experience of the causes of failure of the initial closure and operative morbidity during the surgical treatment of bladder-exstrophy complex. From April 2000 to March 2014, four patients aged 16 days to 7 years and 5 months underwent complex exstrophy-epispadias repair with pelvic osteotomies. There were three males and one female. Three of them had posterior pelvic osteotomy, one had anterior innominate osteotomy. Bladder Closure: Bladder closure was performed in three layers. Our first patient had initial bladder closure with polyglactin 4/0 (Vicryl ® 4/0), concerning the last three patients, initial bladder closure was performed with polydioxanone 4/0 (PDS ® 4/0). The bladder was repaired leaving the urethral stent and ureteral stents for full urinary drainage for three patients. In one case, only urethral stent was left, ureteral drainage was not possible, because stents sizes were more important than the ureteral diameter. Out of a total of four patients, initial bladder closure was completely achieved for three patients. At the immediate postoperative follow-up, two patients presented a complete disunion of the abdominal wall and bladder despite an appropriate postoperative care. The absorbable braided silk (polyglactin) used for the bladder closure was considered as the main factor in the failure of the bladder closure. The second cause of failure of the initial bladder closure was the incomplete urine drainage, ureteral catheterisation was not possible because the catheters sizes were too large compared with the diameters of the ureters. The failure of the initial bladder-exstrophy closure may be reduced by a closure with an absorbable monofilament silk and efficient urine drainage via ureteral catheterisation.

  12. Sensory Hyperinnervation Distinguishes Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis from Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regauer, Sigrid; Gamper, Marianne; Fehr, Mathias K; Viereck, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Pain is the key symptom that distinguishes bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis from overactive bladder syndrome but overlap occurs. To find a discriminating marker for these bladder diseases we examined sensory hyperinnervation and neurotrophin receptor expression in bladder biopsies as well as nerve growth factor levels in urine. Bladder biopsies from patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, including 12 with and 19 without Hunner lesions, 13 with overactive bladder syndrome and 12 healthy controls, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry with antibodies to the nerve cell marker PGP9.5 (neuron-specific protein gene product 9.5), p75 NTR (p75 neurotrophin receptor), the B-lymphocyte marker CD20 and mast cell tryptase. Urinary nerve growth factor was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Subepithelial sensory hyperinnervation on PGP9.5 staining had 97% sensitivity and 76% specificity, increased lymphocytic infiltration had 90% sensitivity and 80% specificity, and urothelial defects had 97% sensitivity and 76% specificity to distinguish bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with and without Hunner lesions from overactive bladder syndrome and healthy controls. Increased sensory innervation was associated with submucosal mast cell localization. Staining of p75 NTR in basal urothelial cells was indicative of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Urinary nerve growth factor levels were below the detection level and did not differentiate bladder diseases from healthy controls. Sensory hyperinnervation and basal urothelial p75 NTR staining together with assessment of inflammatory lymphocytes and urothelial integrity allow for the differentiation of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and overactive bladder syndrome even in the absence of Hunner lesions. Furthermore, these histopathological criteria enable the identification of early disease stages or oligosymptomatic/asymptomatic cases and may permit timely treatment

  13. Normal tissue sparing in a phase II trial on daily adaptive plan selection in radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Muren, Ludvig P; Lindberg, Henriette; Jakobsen, Kirsten L; Petersen, Jørgen B B; Elstrøm, Ulrik V; Agerbæk, Mads; Høyer, Morten

    2014-08-01

    Background: Patients with urinary bladder cancer often display large changes in the shape and size of their bladder target during a course of radiotherapy (RT), making adaptive RT (ART) appealing for this tumour site. We are conducting a clinical phase II trial of daily plan selection-based ART for bladder cancer and here report dose-volume data from the first 20 patients treated in the trial. All patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the bladder; in 13 of the patients the pelvic lymph nodes were simultaneously treated to 48 Gy. Daily patient set-up was by use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The first 5 fractions were delivered with large, population-based (non-adaptive) margins. The bladder contours from the CBCTs acquired in the first 4 fractions were used to create a patient-specific library of three plans, corresponding to a small, medium and large size bladder. From fraction 6, daily online plan selection was performed, where the smallest plan covering the bladder was selected prior to each treatment delivery. A total of 600 treatment fractions in the 20 patients were evaluated. Small, medium and large size plans were used almost equally often, with an average of 10, 9 and 11 fractions, respectively. The median volume ratio of the course-averaged PTV (PTV-ART) relative to the non-adaptive PTV was 0.70 (range: 0.46-0.89). A linear regression analysis showed a 183 cm(3) (CI 143-223 cm(3)) reduction in PTV-ART compared to the non-adaptive PTV (R(2) = 0.94). Daily adaptive plan selection in RT of bladder cancer results in a considerable normal tissue sparing, of a magnitude that we expect will translate into a clinically significant reduction of the treatment-related morbidity.

  14. Overactive Bladder Syndrome and the Potential Role of Prostaglandins and Phosphodiesterases: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama'i, Mohammad Sajjad; Van Koeveringe, Gommert A.; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a general introduction is given, presenting the overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) and its impact on the quality of life and economical burden in patients affected. Moreover, the anatomy, physiology and histology of the lower urinary tract are discussed, followed by a brief overview on the possible role of prostaglandin (PG) and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) in the urinary bladder. The current literature on the role and distribution of PGE2 and its receptors in the urinary bladder is discussed. In both animal models and in human studies, high levels of signaling molecules such as PG and cGMP have been implicated, in decreased functional bladder capacity and micturition volume, as well as in increased voiding contraction amplitude. As a consequence, inhibition of prostanoid production, the use of prostanoid receptor antagonists, or PDE inhibitors might be a rational way to treat patients with detrusor overactivity. Similarly, prostanoid receptor agonists, or agents that stimulate their production, might have a function in treating bladder underactivity. PMID:24350100

  15. Urethral orifice hyaluronic acid injections: a novel animal model of bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongquan; Xiong, Zhiyong; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Zhansong; Lu, Gensheng

    2015-02-21

    We produced a novel model of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) by periurethral injection of hyaluronic acid and compared the cystometric features, postoperative complications, and histopathological changes of that model with that of traditional open surgery. Forty female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Fifteen rats were subcutaneously injected with 0.2 ml hyaluronic acid at 5, 7, and 12 o'clock around the urethral orifice. Another fifteen rats underwent traditional open partial proximal urethral obstruction surgery, and 10 normal rats used as controls. After 4 weeks, filling cystometry, postoperative complications, and histopathological features were evaluated in each group. Three rats were also observed for 12 weeks after hyaluronic acid injection to evaluate the long-term effect. Hyaluronic acid periurethral injection caused increased maximum cystometric capacity, maximum bladder pressure, micturition interval, and post-void residual urine volume compared with control (p injection group had significantly shorter operative time, less incidence of incision infection and bladder stone formation compared with the surgery group (p injection and surgery bladders; these were not observed in the control group. Bladder weight and thickness of smooth muscle in the injection and surgery groups were significantly greater than those in the control group (p injection or control groups. Rats periurethrally injected hyaluronic acid were stable the compound was not fully absorbed in any rat after 12 weeks. Hyaluronic acid periurethral injection generates a simple, effective, and persistent animal model of BOO with lower complications, compared with traditional surgery.

  16. Effect of bladder wall thickness on miniature pneumatic artificial muscle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillsbury, Thomas E; Kothera, Curt S; Wereley, Norman M

    2015-09-28

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) are actuators known for their high power to weight ratio, natural compliance and light weight. Due to these advantages, PAMs have been used for orthotic devices and robotic limbs. Small scale PAMs have the same advantages, as well as requiring greatly reduced volumes with potential application to prostheses and small scale robotics. The bladder of a PAM affects common actuator performance metrics, specifically: blocked force, free contraction, hysteresis, and dead-band pressure. This paper investigates the effect that bladder thickness has on static actuation performance of small scale PAMs. Miniature PAMs were fabricated with a range of bladder thicknesses to quantify the change in common actuator performance metrics specifically: blocked force, free contraction, and dead-band pressure. These PAMs were then experimentally characterized in quasi-static conditions, where results showed that increasing bladder wall thickness decreases blocked force and free contraction, while dead-band pressure increases. A nonlinear model was then applied to determine the structure of the stress-strain relationship that enables accurate modeling and the minimum number of terms. Two nonlinear models are compared and the identified parameters are analyzed to study the effect of the bladder thickness on the model.

  17. Evaluation of autonomic nervous system function in children with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Aysegul Dogan; Gursoy, Azize Esra; Goknar, Nilufer; Uzuner, Selcuk; Ozkaya, Emin; Erenberk, Ufuk; Vehapoglu, Aysel; Dundaroz, Mehmet Rusen; Oktem, Faruk

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the autonomic nervous system activity in children with overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Included in the study were 40 children with overactive bladder and 28 healthy controls. Autonomic tests were performed on all participants, including heart rate interval variation (RRIV), heart rate response to valsalva maneuver, and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Mean valsalva rates in the overactive bladder and control groups were 1.53 ± 0.29 and 1.30 ± 0.18, respectively, a statistically significant difference (P  0.05). This study demonstrated a parasympathetic hyperactivity in children with OAB, results suggesting a dysfunction in their autonomic nervous systems. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:673-676, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Polyps in continent catheterizable bladder channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Travis W; Mitchell, Michael E; Balcom, Anthony H

    2013-02-01

    We describe our experience with polyps encountered in bladder continent catheterizable channels. An IRB-approved retrospective study was conducted on all patients at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin with continent catheterizable channels managed by a single physician over a 16-year time period. Fifty-five patients were identified with bladder channels. During a median follow-up of 7 years (range 3-16 years), 20% (11/55) of bladder channels developed polyps. The time to diagnosis of a polyp in bladder channels from initial surgery ranged from 3 months to 8 years (median of 29 months). Fifty-five percent (6/11) of patients who developed bladder polyps were symptomatic. All patients' symptoms resolved after treatment by endoscopic resection. Forty-five percent (5/11) of polyps recurred after resection. The time of recurrence ranged from 4 months to 7 years (median of 19 months). Polyps were universally benign inflammatory granulomatous tissue. This is the first series reporting the incidence of polyps in bladder catheterizable channels. Patients with continent catheterizable bladder channels can develop symptomatic polyps in their channels, of unknown long-term significance and risk. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. "Hair in the Bladder": An Unusual Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cindolo, Luca; Bada, Maida; Bellocci, Roberto; De Francesco, Piergustavo; Castellan, Pietro; Berardinelli, Francesco; Neri, Fabio; Schips, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare condition whereby a hairball is found in the human stomach or gastrointestinal tract, most frequently in young women, mainly in association with a psychiatric disorder. Trichobezoar cases have also been reported in the bladder and represent a rare complication of foreign bodies, called "hair nidus or hair ball," in patients with chronic catheter. Approximately 10% to 15% of patients on long-term urethral catheter or clean intermittent self-catheterization develop urinary tract stones. In a small minority of cases, bladder stones can develop around a foreign body that was introduced into the bladder. In the literature, there are few cases of foreign bladder bodies that formed stones over a hair nidus. Recognizing this condition can optimize the patient's quality of life. Herein, we present a case of a 71-year-old Caucasian male with a long-term catheter in hypocontractile urinary bladder secondary to injury of pelvic plexus after rectal surgery. He had a bladder stone caused by hair encrusted together. Hair is introduced into the bladder either by adherence to the catheter directly or by overlying the urethral meatus and being pushed internally. Regular hygiene and shaving of pubic area represent effective preventive measures to reduce this kind of complications in patients with chronic indwelling catheter or under a self-catheterization regimen.

  20. Thrombomodulin expression regulates tumorigenesis in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Te; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Lin, Paul- Yang; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potential tumor markers will help improve therapeutic planning and patient management. Thrombomodulin (TM) is a sensitive urothelial marker. TM was reported to be one of the endogenous anti-metastatic factors and has diagnostic and prognostic values for the progression of carcinoma. In the present study, we examine the role of TM in bladder cancer. We studied the role of TM in tumor behavior and related signaling pathways in vitro using the human bladder cancer cell lines HT1376, HT1197, J82 and T24, and in vivo using animal models. We also selected clinical specimens from 100 patients with bladder cancer for immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the predictive capacity of TM in tumor invasiveness. The data revealed that positive immunoreactivity for TM was inversely correlated with clinical stage and DNA methyltransferase 1 immunoreactivity. Decreased TM expression could predict the aggressive tumor growth and advanced clinical stage in bladder cancer. When TM was inhibited, tumor growth rate and invasion ability were augmented in vitro and in vivo. The underlying changes included increased cell proliferation, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB activation significantly increased TM expression and attenuated tumor aggressiveness in bladder cancer. TM plays an important role in bladder cancer tumor aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo and is a clinically significant predictor that may represent a suitable therapeutic target for bladder cancer

  1. Urinary bladder cancer: role of MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sadhna; Rajesh, Arumugam; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Gaitonde, Krishnanath; Lall, Chandana G; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Aeron, Gunjan; Bracken, Robert B; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2012-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variety of pathologic features, cytogenetic characteristics, and natural histories. It is the fourth most common cancer in males and the tenth most common cancer in females. Urinary bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate, necessitating long-term surveillance after initial therapy. Early detection is important, since up to 47% of bladder cancer-related deaths may have been avoided. Conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are only moderately accurate in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer, with cystoscopy and pathologic staging remaining the standards of reference. However, the role of newer MR imaging sequences (eg, diffusion-weighted imaging) in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer is still evolving. Substantial advances in MR imaging technology have made multiparametric MR imaging a feasible and reasonably accurate technique for the local staging of bladder cancer to optimize treatment. In addition, whole-body CT is the primary imaging technique for the detection of metastases in bladder cancer patients, especially those with disease that invades muscle. © RSNA, 2012.

  2. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.

  3. Morphologic change of rectosigmoid colon using belly board and distended bladder protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yeo Na; Chang, Jee Suk; Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Jae Hwan; Byun, Hwa Kyung; Kim, Na Lee; Park, Sang Joon; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    This study investigates morphologic change of the rectosigmoid colon using a belly board in prone position and distended bladder in patients with rectal cancer. We evaluate the possibility of excluding the proximal margin of anastomosis from the radiation field by straightening the rectosigmoid colon. Nineteen patients who received preoperative radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009 underwent simulation in a prone position (group A). These patients were compared to 19 patients treated using a belly board in prone position and a distended bladder protocol (group B). Rectosigmoid colon in the pelvic cavity was delineated on planning computed tomography (CT) images. A total dose of 45 Gy was planned for the whole pelvic field with superior margin of the sacral promontory. The volume and redundancy of rectosigmoid colon was assessed. Patients in group B had straighter rectosigmoid colons than those in group A (no redundancy; group A vs. group B, 10% vs. 42%; p = 0.03). The volume of rectosigmoid colon in the radiation field was significantly larger in group A (56.7 vs. 49.1 mL; p = 0.009). In dose volume histogram analysis, the mean irradiated volume was lower in patients in group B (V45 27.2 vs. 18.2 mL; p = 0.004). In Pearson correlation coefficient analysis, the in-field volume of rectosigmoid colon was significantly correlated with the bladder volume (R = 0.86, p = 0.003). Use of a belly board and distended bladder protocol could contribute to exclusion of the proximal margin of anastomosis from the radiation field.

  4. Unravelling detrusor underactivity: Development of a bladder outlet resistance-Bladder contractility nomogram for adult male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelke, Matthias; Rademakers, Kevin L J; van Koeveringe, Gommert A

    2016-11-01

    Voiding dysfunction in adult men may be caused by bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and/or detrusor underactivity (DU). Until now, it is only possible to classify BOO and DU by pressure-flow analysis. Low values of the maximum Watts factor (W max ) indicate DU but thresholds for the diagnosis have not been established. Purpose of this study was to construct a nomogram using bladder outlet resistance and detrusor contractility in order to classify BOO and DU simultaneously. Treatment naïve men aged ≥40 years with uncomplicated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were prospectively evaluated. Patients were assessed with IPSS, prostate volume, uroflowmetry, post-void residual, and pressure-flow measurement. The bladder outlet obstruction index (BOOI) was used to determine BOO-grade and W max to calculate detrusor contractility. Individual BOOI-W max values were plotted in a graph. Linear interpolation was applied to determine the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles. Retrospective analysis of 822 male patients with means of 64 years, IPSS 16, and prostate volume of 40 cc. Patient and clinical parameters of the <25th percentile groups were significantly different compared to the 25th-50th percentiles: age (66 vs. 63 years, P = 0.006), bladder capacity (503 vs. 442 ml, P = 0.009), post-void residual urine (167 vs. 116 ml, P = 0.001), and voiding efficiency (67% vs. 73%, P = 0.015). The nomogram quantifies the relationship between detrusor contractility and BOO in men with LUTS. A measurement value <25th percentile correlates with clinical indicators of DU and is proposed as a cut-off value for DU-diagnosis. Higher age, bladder capacity, and PVR as well as lower voiding efficiency indicate DU. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:980-986, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A voxel-based finite element model for the prediction of bladder deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xiangfei; Herk, Marcel van; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Bel, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A finite element (FE) bladder model was previously developed to predict bladder deformation caused by bladder filling change. However, two factors prevent a wide application of FE models: (1) the labor required to construct a FE model with high quality mesh and (2) long computation time needed to construct the FE model and solve the FE equations. In this work, we address these issues by constructing a low-resolution voxel-based FE bladder model directly from the binary segmentation images and compare the accuracy and computational efficiency of the voxel-based model used to simulate bladder deformation with those of a classical FE model with a tetrahedral mesh. Methods: For ten healthy volunteers, a series of MRI scans of the pelvic region was recorded at regular intervals of 10 min over 1 h. For this series of scans, the bladder volume gradually increased while rectal volume remained constant. All pelvic structures were defined from a reference image for each volunteer, including bladder wall, small bowel, prostate (male), uterus (female), rectum, pelvic bone, spine, and the rest of the body. Four separate FE models were constructed from these structures: one with a tetrahedral mesh (used in previous study), one with a uniform hexahedral mesh, one with a nonuniform hexahedral mesh, and one with a low-resolution nonuniform hexahedral mesh. Appropriate material properties were assigned to all structures and uniform pressure was applied to the inner bladder wall to simulate bladder deformation from urine inflow. Performance of the hexahedral meshes was evaluated against the performance of the standard tetrahedral mesh by comparing the accuracy of bladder shape prediction and computational efficiency. Results: FE model with a hexahedral mesh can be quickly and automatically constructed. No substantial differences were observed between the simulation results of the tetrahedral mesh and hexahedral meshes (<1% difference in mean dice similarity coefficient to

  6. Urinary bladder carcinoma with divergent differentiation featuring small cell carcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma, and liposarcomatous component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Mariko; Morikawa, Teppei; Nakagawa, Tohru; Miyakawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Daichi; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Both small cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder are highly aggressive tumors, and a concurrence of these tumors is extremely rare. We report a case of urinary bladder cancer with small cell carcinoma as a predominant component, accompanied by sarcomatoid carcinoma and conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC). Although the small cell carcinoma component had resolved on receiving chemoradiotherapy, rapid growth of the residual tumor led to a fatal outcome. A 47-year-old man presented with occasional bladder irritation and had a 2-year history of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a huge mass in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Microscopically, small cell carcinoma was detected as the major tumor component. Spindle-shaped sarcomatoid cells were also observed that were intermingled with small cell carcinoma and conventional UC. In addition, a sheet-like growth of the lipoblast-like neoplastic cells was observed focally. Initially, by providing chemoradiotherapy, we achieved a marked tumor regression; however, the tumor rapidly regrew after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, and the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Only conventional UC and sarcomatoid carcinoma were identified in the cystectomy specimen. The patient died of the disease 4 months after cystectomy. Urinary bladder cancer may include a combination of multiple aggressive histologies as in the present case. Because the variation in the tumor components may affect the efficacy of therapy, a correct diagnosis of every tumor component is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental electrical stimulation of the bladder using a new device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T; Christiansen, P; Nielsen, B

    1986-01-01

    Repeated bladder contractions were evoked during a six month period in three unanaesthetized female minipigs by using unipolar carbon fiber electrodes embedded in the bladder wall adjacent to the ureterovesical junction. In contrast to bipolar and direct bladder muscle stimulation unipolar...... electrodes at each ureterovesical junction evoked bladder pressure increase similar to those produced in previous investigations in dogs. Sacral nerve stimulation of S2 evoked bladder contraction at a minimal current. Microscopic examination revealed no cellular reactions to the carbon fibers...

  8. Bladder exstrophy: current management and postoperative imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, Ketsia [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Borer, Joseph [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Phelps, Andrew [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Pediatric Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chow, Jeanne S. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Bladder exstrophy is a rare malformation characterized by an infra-umbilical abdominal wall defect, incomplete closure of the bladder with mucosa continuous with the abdominal wall, epispadias, and alterations in the pelvic bones and muscles. It is part of the exstrophy-epispadias complex, with cloacal exstrophy on the severe and epispadias on the mild ends of the spectrum. Bladder exstrophy is the most common of these entities and is more common in boys. The goal of this paper is to describe common methods of repair and to provide an imaging review of the postoperative appearances. (orig.)

  9. Primary signet cell adenocarcinoma of bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Kinra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary signet cell cancer of the urinary bladder is a relatively rare entity. Since there is no mucinous epithelium in the bladder, It is proposed that the tumor arises from metaplastic urothelium. Two thirds of the tumours are mucin secreting, in most of which the site of the deposition is either extracellular or intracellular displacing the nucleus to a peripheral crescent, giving the cells a signet ring appearance. The tumours are most often infiltrative and diffusely involving the majority of the bladder akin to its name sake in stomach. It is essential to distinguish this carcinoma from gastrointestinal metastases as different therapeutic strategies are often necessary.

  10. Modelling Creep (Relaxation of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravkovic Nebojsa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We first present the results of an experiment in which the passive properties of the urinary bladder were investigated using strips of rabbit bladder. Under the assumption that the urinary bladder had orthopaedic characteristics, the strips were taken in the longitudinal and in the circumferential directions. The material was subjected to uniaxial tension, and stress-stretch curves were generated for various rates of deformation. We found that the rates did not have a significantly effect on the passive response of the material. Additionally, the stress-stretch dependence during relaxation of the material when exposed to isometric conditions was determined experimentally.

  11. Full-thickness endometriosis of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Jens Jørgen; Kristensen, Jens; Hartwell, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To draw attention to the rare condition of endometriosis in the bladder. This is correlated with symptoms not normally connected to endometriosis and therefore often remains underdiagnosed for years. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study in a university teaching hospital, one of two...... and March 2011. We included only patients with symptomatic full-thickness bladder detrusor endometriosis and mucosal involvement. All patients had had bladder symptoms for two to seven years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms after surgery and recurrence rate. RESULTS: The main preoperative symptom...

  12. [CYSTECTASY AND REHABILITATION TRAINING FOR TREATMENT OF NEUROGENIC BLADDER DYSFUNCTION WITH HYPERREFLEXIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luping; Fan, Yingzhong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Qian; Gou, Li

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of ileal mucosal seromuscular patch for bladder expansion combined with rehabilitation training for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD) with hyperreflexia. A retrospective study was performed on the clinical data of 61 patients with NBD and hyperreflexia who were treated and followed up between July 2008 and June 2013. There were 36 males and 25 females, aged 6-23 years (mean, 10 years). The reasons included meningomyelocele operation (43 patients),surgery for lipoma in lumbar vertebra (4 patients), operation of thoracolubar teratoma (2 patients), and lumbosacral spina B3ifida (12 patients). The results of urodynamics indicated that bladder volume decreased obviously and the residual urine increased. The voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) showed the vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), including 6 cases (10 sides) of grade V, 7 cases (12 sides) of grade IV, and 6 cases (8 sides) of grade III. The color doppler ultrosound showed mild hydronephrosis in 23 cases (41 sides), moderate hydronephrosis in 25 cases (42 sides), and severe hydronephrosis in 13 cases (22 sides). The blood biochemical examination suggested chronic renal failure (CRF) in 13 cases. The treatment included augmentation for bladder and rehabilitation training after operation. The operation time was (157+/- 26) minutes; the intraoperative blood loss was (43 +/- 15) mL, and no patient was given blood transfusion. The patients were followed up 1.5-6.0 years (mean, 4.5 years). Vesical fistula occurred in 4 cases, urinary infection in 5 cases, dysuresia in 2 cases, and cystolith in 1 case after operation. At 1 year after operation, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontience Short Form (IQ-F) score was significantly better than peoperative score (H=9.813, P=0.000). The aurdynmic data showed that the difference value between observed and theoretical bladder volumes, bladder compliance, residual urine volume, maximum flow rate, and

  13. Correlation of gene expression with bladder capacity in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc; Koslov, David S; Keys, Tristan; Evans, Robert J; Badlani, Gopal H; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Walker, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Interstitial cystitis and bladder pain syndrome are terms used to describe a heterogeneous chronic pelvic and bladder pain disorder. Despite its significant prevalence, our understanding of disease etiology is poor. We molecularly characterized interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and determined whether there are clinical factors that correlate with gene expression. Bladder biopsies from female subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and female controls without signs of the disease were collected and divided into those with normal and low anesthetized bladder capacity, respectively. Samples then underwent RNA extraction and microarray assay. Data generated by these assays were analyzed using Omics Explorer (Qlucore, Lund, Sweden), GeneSifter® Analysis Edition 4.0 and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis to determine similarity among samples within and between groups, and measure differentially expressed transcripts unique to each phenotype. A total of 16 subjects were included in study. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clear separation between gene expression in tissues from subjects with low compared to normal bladder capacity. Gene expression in tissue from patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had normal bladder capacity did not significantly differ from that in controls without interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Pairwise analysis revealed that pathways related to inflammatory and immune response were most involved. Microarray analysis provides insight into the potential pathological condition underlying interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. This pilot study shows that patients with this disorder who have low compared to normal bladder capacity have significantly different molecular characteristics, which may reflect a difference in disease pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc

  14. Researchers studying alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new phase I clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is evaluating the safety and tolerability, or the degree to which any side effects can be tolerated by patients, of a two-drug combination as a potential alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients. The trial targets patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) whose cancers have stopped responding to traditional therapies. Read more...

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of rectum and bladder using image-based CT planning and orthogonal radiographs with ICRU 38 recommendations in intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to compare CT-based dosimetry with International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU 38 bladder and rectum reference points in patients of carcinoma of uterine cervix treated with intracavitary brachytherapy (ICA. Twenty-two consecutive patients were evaluated. Orthogonal radiographs and CT images were acquired and transferred to PLATO planning system. Bladder and rectal reference points were identified according to ICRU 38 recommendations. Dosimetry was carried out based on Manchester system. Patient treatment was done using 192 Iridium high dose rate (HDR remote after-loading machine based on the conventional radiograph-based dosimetry. ICRU rectal and bladder point doses from the radiograph plans were compared with D 2 , dose received by 2 cm 3 of the organ receiving maximum dose from CT plan. V 2 , volume of organ receiving dose more than the ICRU reference point, was evaluated. The mean (±standard deviation volume of rectum and bladder was 60 (±28 cm 3 and 138 (±41 cm 3 respectively. The mean reference volume in radiograph and CT plan was 105 (±7 cm 3 and 107 (±7 cm 3 respectively. It was found that 6 (±4 cm3 of rectum and 16 (±10 cm 3 of bladder received dose more than the prescription dose. V2 of rectum and bladder was 7 (±1.7 cm 3 and 20.8 (±6 cm 3 respectively. Mean D 2 of rectum and bladder was found to be 1.11 (±0.2 and 1.56 (±0.6 times the mean ICRU reference points respectively. This dosimteric study suggests that comparison of orthogonal X-ray-based and CT-based HDR ICA planning is feasible. ICRU rectal point dose correlates well with maximum rectal dose, while ICRU bladder point underestimates the maximum bladder dose.

  16. Avaliação cronológica da variação no volume globular sanguíneo de bovinos leiteiros Cronological evaluation of variation in packed cell volume on dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmar Sachetin Marçal

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores avaliaram a variação no volume globular sangüíneo de 321 bovinos da raça Holandês preta e branca, sadios e criados em granjas leiteiras no Estado de São Paulo. Todos os animais trabalhados na presente pesquisa eram sadios, não reagentes ao vírus da Leucose Bovina, livres de hemoparasitas, brucelose e tuberculose. O volume globular sangüíneo foi efetuado através do método do hematócrito com tubos capilares. Os resultados mostram haver influência da idade sobre o volume globular sangüíneo, com valores médios encontrados de 30,12 ± 2,72%.The packet cell volume was evaluated by the authors in 321 healthy female Holstein cattle raised at Campinas dairy region. São Paulo State. All the animais used in this assay were healthy and free of Leucosis, Tuberculosis, Brucellosis and blood parasites. The packed cell volume has been studied by method of hematocrit with capilary tubos. The results showed an influence of age on packed cell volume with average reference values of 30.12 ± 2.72%.

  17. [A case of bladder hemangioma showing bladder tamponade during late pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, S; Okubo, K; Aoki, Y; Okada, T; Maeda, H; Arai, Y

    2000-07-01

    We report a case of bladder hemangioma manifesting bladder tamponade during pregnancy. A 25-year-old woman at 36 weeks of gestation was admitted with a two-week history of gross hematuria and clot retention. Blood hemoglobin concentration was 6.3 g/dl. After blood transfusion and Caesarian section, cystoscopy was performed. Bleeding was noticed from a strawberry-like tumor 5 mm in diameter near the right ureteral orifice, which was easily resected endoscopically. Histopathological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma of the urinary bladder. This is the first report of a case of bladder hemangioma during pregnancy.

  18. Urinary Cell-Free DNA Quantification as Non-Invasive Biomarker in Patients with Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisuda, Antonin; Pazourkova, Eva; Soukup, Viktor; Horinek, Ales; Hrbáček, Jan; Capoun, Otakar; Svobodova, Iveta; Pospisilova, Sarka; Korabecna, Marie; Mares, Jaroslav; Hanuš, Tomáš; Babjuk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of urinary cell-free DNA (ucfDNA) belongs to potential bladder cancer markers, but the reported results are inconsistent due to the use of various non-standardised methodologies. The aim of the study was to standardise the methodology for ucfDNA quantification as a potential non-invasive tumour biomarker. In total, 66 patients and 34 controls were enrolled into the study. Volumes of each urine portion (V) were recorded and ucfDNA concentrations (c) were measured using real-time PCR. Total amounts (TA) of ucfDNA were calculated and compared between patients and controls. Diagnostic accuracy of the TA of ucfDNA was determined. The calculation of TA of ucfDNA in the second urine portion was the most appropriate approach to ucfDNA quantification, as there was logarithmic dependence between the volume and the concentration of a urine portion (p = 0.0001). Using this methodology, we were able to discriminate between bladder cancer patients and subjects without bladder tumours (p = 0.0002) with area under the ROC curve of 0.725. Positive and negative predictive value of the test was 90 and 45%, respectively. Quantification of ucf DNA according to our modified method could provide a potential non-invasive biomarker for diagnosis of patients with bladder cancer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. THC/CBD oromucosal spray in patients with multiple sclerosis overactive bladder: a pilot prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, Giorgia Teresa; Aponte, R; Bruzzese, D; Guarcello, G; Manzo, V; Napolitano, M; Moreggia, O; Chiariello, F; Florio, C

    2018-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunctions (LUTDs) are commonly reported in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and are mainly related to neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB). The aim of this observational study was to assess the effect of a tetrahydrocannabinol-cannabidiol (THC/CBD) oromucosal spray on resistant OAB by means of clinical and instrumental tools. Twenty-one MS patients were screened, and 15 cases have been evaluated. They underwent a specific clinical assessment (overactive bladder symptom score, OABSS) and a urodynamic assessment evaluating the maximal cystometric capacity (CCmax), bladder compliance (Qmax), maximum detrusor pressure (Pdet max), detrusor pressure at the first desire (Pdet first), bladder volume at the first desire (BVFD), leakage volume (LV), and post-void residual volume (PVR), before and after 4 weeks of THC/CBD administration. A complete neurological evaluation, including the assessment of their spasticity using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and the spasticity 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS), was performed at the same times. Mobility was evaluated through the 25-ft walking-time test (T25-WT). The THC/CBD treatment successfully reduced the OAB symptoms (p = 0.001). Regarding the urodynamic findings after the end of treatment, PVR was significantly reduced (p = 0.016). Regarding the urodynamic findings after the end of treatment, PVR was significantly reduced (p = 0.016), while BVFD and CCmax were increased although the difference was not statistically significant. THC/CBD oromucosal spray has shown to be effective in improving overactive bladder symptoms in MS patients demonstrating a favorable impact on detrusor overactivity.

  20. Diurnal and seasonal variations of NO, NO2 and PM2.5 mass as a function of traffic volumes alongside an urban arterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Christine M.; Koonce, Peter; George, Linda A.

    2015-12-01

    Urban arterial corridors are landscapes that give rise to short and long-term exposures to transportation-related pollution. With high traffic volumes and a wide mix of road users, urban arterial environments are important targets for improved exposure assessment to traffic-related pollution. A common method to estimate exposure is to use traffic volumes as a proxy. The study presented here analyzes a unique yearlong dataset of simultaneous roadside air quality and traffic observations for a U.S. arterial to assess the reliability of using traffic volumes as a proxy for traffic-related exposure. Results show how the relationships of traffic volumes with NO and NO2 vary not only by time of day and season but also by time aggregation. At short-term aggregations (15 min) nitrogen oxides were found to have a significant linear relationship with traffic volumes during morning hours for all seasons although variability was still high (r2 = 0.1-0.45 NO, r2 = 0.14-0.27 NO2), and little to no relationship during evening periods (r2 road users, these results show when traffic volumes alone can be a reliable proxy for exposure and when this approach is not warranted.

  1. Differences in Urodynamic Parameters Between Women With Interstitial Cystitis and/or Bladder Pain Syndrome and Severe Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ji Sung; Kang, Sung Gu; Park, Jae Young; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kang, Seok Ho; Park, Hong Seok; Moon, Du Geon; Cheon, Jun; Lee, Jeong Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Oh, Mi Mi

    2016-08-01

    To identify differences in urodynamic parameters between female outpatients with interstitial cystitis (IC) and/or bladder pain syndrome (BPS) and severe overactive bladder (OAB). This cross-sectional study included 24 and 28 consecutive IC/BPS and severe OAB female patients, respectively. IC/BPS was defined based on the American Urological Association guideline, and severe OAB was defined based on baseline symptoms recorded in a voiding diary. Before treatment, symptom assessment using questionnaires and a 3-day voiding diary, as well as laboratory tests, were performed at the initial visit. The patients' baseline characteristics and urodynamic parameters were compared between the IC/BPS and severe OAB groups. The IC/BPS group showed fewer episodes of urge incontinence and shorter duration of symptoms than the severe OAB group (P = .019, P = .017, respectively). Volumes at first sense, normal desire, strong desire, and maximal capacity during filling cystometry (MBC) were significantly higher in the severe OAB group than in the IC/BPS group (P <.001, P <.001, P = .006, P <.001, respectively). The IC/BPS and severe OAB groups showed significant differences in urodynamic parameters in terms of MBC and the volume discrepancy between MBC and maximal voided volume (P <.001, both). The receiver operating characteristic curve also showed an area under the curve of 0.760 and 0.783 for MBC and volume discrepancy, respectively (both P <.001). Data from our study suggest that combined with other clinical findings, urodynamic studies could provide useful information to differentiate between a diagnosis of IC/BPS or severe OAB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of major geometric variations between intracavitary applications on pear-shaped isodose dimension in cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, R. Y.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: The basic principal of intracavitary brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix is based on specific loading rules to achieve a pear-shaped isodose distribution centered around the cervix. Recently, ICRU Report 38 recommends a dose reference volume for reporting. Our previous studies have confirmed that there is considerable variations of geometry between applications. This study is to evaluate the effect of major geometric variations on pear-shaped isodose dimension in manual afterloading low-dose-rate system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred orthogonal films of 50 patients with cancer of the cervix (2 applications/patient) were reviewed for comparative measurements of geometric variations between applications. Major geometric variations were found for 13 patients in lengths of tandem, 7 patients in colpostats separation and 16 patients in vaginal packing. The direct measurement of these geometric variations were compared with the three-dimensional measurement of the pear-shaped isodose enclosed by the point A between the two applications. RESULTS: The geometric variations in the width of colpostats separation and length of tandem were directly related to the width and height of the pear-shaped isodose dimension. The geometric relationship between the colpostats and distal tandem had an important effect on the thickness of the pear-shape. In optimization of poor geometry for rectum or bladder wall, high dose volume centered around the cervix is reduced without changing the overall pear-shaped volume due to changing configuration of the pear-shaped isodose. In our selected patients with two applications, variations in vaginal packing had no direct effect on the width and thickness of the pear-shape due to other variables. CONCLUSION: Major geometric variations between applications greatly affect the dimension of the pear-shaped isodose distribution. Optimization of poor geometry is quite limited without compromising the high-dose volume centered around the

  3. Clinical Outcomes With Dose-Escalated Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, Vedang; Masodkar, Renuka; Kalyani, Nikhil; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Bakshi, Ganesh; Prakash, Gagan; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar; Ghonge, Sujata; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility, clinical outcomes, and toxicity in patients with bladder cancer treated with adaptive, image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder preservation as a part of trimodality treatment. The role of dose escalation was also studied. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with localized bladder cancer were enrolled in a prospective study. They underwent maximal safe resection of bladder tumor and concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with large tumors were offered induction chemotherapy. Radiation therapy planning was done using either 3 (n=34) or 6 (n=10) concentrically grown planning target volumes (PTV). Patients received 64 Gy in 32 fractions to the whole bladder and 55 Gy to the pelvic nodes and, if appropriate, a simultaneous integrated boost to the tumor bed to 68 Gy (equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions assuming α/β of 10 [EQD2] 10  = 68.7 Gy). Daily megavoltage (MV) imaging helped to choose the most appropriate PTV encompassing bladder for the particular day (using plan-of-the-day approach). Results: Most patients (88%) had T2 disease. Sixteen patients (36%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A majority of the patients (73%) received prophylactic nodal irradiation, whereas 55% of the patients received escalated dose to the tumor bed. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 3-year locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were 78%, 66%, and 67%, respectively. The bladder preservation rate was 83%. LRC (87% vs 68%, respectively, P=.748) and OS (74% vs 60%, respectively, P=.36) rates were better in patients receiving dose escalation. Instances of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was seen in 5 (11%) and 2 (4%) patients, respectively. There was no acute or late RTOG grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using plan-of-the-day approach for bladder preservation

  4. Clinical observation of radiation urinary bladder disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuke; Liu Libo; Zhang Haiying; Liang Shuo; Chen Dawei; Wu Zhenfeng; Dong Lihua; Lu Xuejun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Clinical characteristic, diagnosis and treatment of radiation urinary bladder disease induced by radiation therapy for cancers in the pelvis were inquired into for providing diagnostic basis. Methods: Statistical analysis for the clinical cases was carried out. Results: The incidence of radiation bladder diseases induced by radiation therapy of cervix cancer are about 0.8%-2.96%, with an average of 2.14%. Radiation bladder disease is divided into acute radiation cystitis, chronic radiation cystitis and radiation vesical fistula. Chronic radiation cystitis is seen most often in the clinic and its main clinical symptom is painless macroscopic hematuria, which is again subdivided into slight and severe degrees. Diagnosis should include history of exposure to radiation, which dose exceed the dose threshold, and typical clinical characteristics. Conclusion: The characteristics, types and diagnostic basis of radiation urinary bladder disease analyzed in this study can provide the reference for drawing up diagnostic standard

  5. Epidemiology of bladder cancer. A second look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynder, E.L.; Goldsmith, R.

    1977-09-01

    A case-control study among 574 male and 158 female bladder cancer patients and equal numbers of matched controls was conducted between 1969 and 1974 in 17 hospitals in six United States cities. We determined that cigarette smokers of both sexes were at higher relative risk than nonsmokers. Cigarette smoking was responsible for about one-half of male and one-third of female bladder cancer. There was an excess of bladder cancer patients with some previous occupational exposure, such as rubber, chemicals, and textiles. A weak association with coffee drinking, which appeared to be independent of smoking, was found for males. Users of artificial sweetners were not over-represented among the cases. The authors conclude that the epidemiologic pattern of bladder cancer cannot be fully accounted for by cigarette smoking and occupational exposure and suggest a series of metabolic studies to assess the role of additional factors, such as nutrition.

  6. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a disorder of the lower urinary tract created by damage to or diseases of the nervous system. Found in many patients with neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, and spina bifida among others, neurogenic bladder can lead to problematic symptoms and complications including urinary incontinence, frequency, and urgency, along with risk for infection and involvement of the upper urinary tract and kidney disease. The disorder can also create substantial embarrassment resulting in social isolation for affected patients. Healthcare utilization may be excessive in patients with neurogenic bladder, including office and emergency department visits and subsequent hospitalizations. Because of its significant effects on quality of life, it is important to reassess the epidemiology and physiology of neurogenic bladder, its diagnosis and assessment, and the impact of the symptoms and complications associated with it to better manage patients with this disorder and improve outcomes.

  7. Tetrachloroethylene exposure and bladder cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Straif, Kurt; Ruder, Avima

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified tetrachloroethylene, used in the production of chemicals and the primary solvent used in dry cleaning, as "probably carcinogenic to humans" based on limited evidence of an increased risk of bladder cancer in dry...... cleaners. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the epidemiological evidence for the association between tetrachloroethylene exposure and bladder cancer from published studies estimating occupational exposure to tetrachloroethylene or in workers in the dry-cleaning industry. METHODS: Random-effects meta-analyses were......-analysis demonstrates an increased risk of bladder cancer in dry cleaners, reported in both cohort and case-control studies, and some evidence for an exposure-response relationship. Although dry cleaners incur mixed exposures, tetrachloroethylene could be responsible for the excess risk of bladder cancer because...

  8. SMP Bladder Tooling for Manufacturing Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG's shape memory polymer (SMP) Bladder Tooling is a cutting-edge manufacturing technology that can meet the manufacturing needs of the Ares launch vehicles. This...

  9. Asymptomatic Bladder Metastasis from Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Cormio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Breast cancer is the most common nondermatologic cancer in women. Common metastatic sites include lymph nodes, lung, liver, and bone. Metastases to the bladder are extremely rare, with all reported cases presenting with urinary symptoms. Case Report. Herein, we report the first case of completely asymptomatic bladder metastasis from breast cancer, occasionally revealed, 98 months after the initial diagnosis of lobular breast carcinoma, by a follow-up computed tomography scanning showing thickening of left bladder wall and grade II left hydronephrosis. A positive staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Discussion. The reported case confirms that bladder metastases from breast cancer tend to occur late after the diagnosis of the primary tumor and, for the first time, points out they can be asymptomatic. Conclusion. Such data support the need for careful follow-up and early intervention whenever such clinical situation is suspected.

  10. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    OpenAIRE

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete...

  11. Integrated irradiation and cystectomy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Planned pre-operative irradiation and cystectomy for selected patients with bladder cancer was initiated approximately 20 years ago by a number of centres on the basis of the disappointing end results of treatment of bladder cancer by either irradiation or surgery and the empirical hope that the combination might lead to better results. This is a brief review of the logical basis for integrated treatment and of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) experience with such therapy. (author)

  12. The economics of bladder cancer: costs and considerations of caring for this disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatek, Robert S; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Holmäng, Sten; Lee, Richard; Kim, Simon P; Stenzl, Arnulf; Lotan, Yair

    2014-08-01

    Due to high recurrence rates, intensive surveillance strategies, and expensive treatment costs, the management of bladder cancer contributes significantly to medical costs. To provide a concise evaluation of contemporary cost-related challenges in the care of patients with bladder cancer. An emphasis is placed on the initial diagnosis of bladder cancer and therapy considerations for both non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and more advanced disease. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Medline (1966 to February 2011). Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms for search criteria included "bladder cancer, neoplasms" OR "carcinoma, transitional cell" AND all cost-related MeSH search terms. Studies evaluating the costs associated with of various diagnostic or treatment approaches were reviewed. Routine use of perioperative chemotherapy following complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor has been estimated to provide a cost savings. Routine office-based fulguration of small low-grade recurrences could decrease costs. Another potential important target for decreasing variation and cost lies in risk-modified surveillance strategies after initial bladder tumor removal to reduce the cost associated with frequent cystoscopic and radiographic procedures. Optimizing postoperative care after radical cystectomy has the potential to decrease length of stay and perioperative morbidity with substantial decreases in perioperative care expenses. The gemcitabine-cisplatin regimen has been estimated to result in a modest increase in cost effectiveness over methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin. Additional costs of therapies need to be balanced with effectiveness, and there are significant gaps in knowledge regarding optimal surveillance and treatment of both early and advanced bladder cancer. Regardless of disease severity, improvements in the efficiency of bladder cancer care to limit unnecessary interventions and optimize effective

  13. Prediction of chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer using k-means clustering of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huyen T.; Jia, Guang; Shah, Zarine K.; Pohar, Kamal; Mortazavi, Amir; Zynger, Debra L.; Wei, Lai; Yang, Xiangyu; Clark, Daniel; Knopp, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To apply k-means clustering of two pharmacokinetic parameters derived from 3T DCE-MRI to predict chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer at the mid-cycle time-point. Materials and Methods With the pre-determined number of 3 clusters, k-means clustering was performed on non-dimensionalized Amp and kep estimates of each bladder tumor. Three cluster volume fractions (VFs) were calculated for each tumor at baseline and mid-cycle. The changes of three cluster VFs from baseline to mid-cycle were correlated with the tumor’s chemotherapeutic response. Receiver-operating-characteristics curve analysis was used to evaluate the performance of each cluster VF change as a biomarker of chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer. Results k-means clustering partitioned each bladder tumor into cluster 1 (low kep and low Amp), cluster 2 (low kep and high Amp), cluster 3 (high kep and low Amp). The changes of all three cluster VFs were found to be associated with bladder tumor response to chemotherapy. The VF change of cluster 2 presented with the highest area-under-the-curve value (0.96) and the highest sensitivity/specificity/accuracy (96%/100%/97%) with a selected cutoff value. Conclusion k-means clustering of the two DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters can characterize the complex microcirculatory changes within a bladder tumor to enable early prediction of the tumor’s chemotherapeutic response. PMID:24943272

  14. Selective bladder preservation with curative intent for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. A contemporary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Fumitaka; Kihara, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    Radical cystectomy plus urinary diversion, the reference standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, associates with high complication rates and compromises quality of life as a result of long-term effects on urinary, gastrointestinal and sexual function, and changes in body image. As a society ages, the number of elderly patients unfit for radical cystectomy as a result of comorbidity will increase, and thus the demand for bladder-sparing approaches for muscle-invasive bladder cancer will also inevitably increase. Trimodality bladder-sparing approaches consisting of transurethral resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy (Σ55-65 Gy) yield overall survival rates comparable with those of radical cystectomy series (50-70% at 5 years), while preserving the native bladder in 40-60% of muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients, contributing to an improvement in quality of life for such patients. Limitations of the trimodality therapy include muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence in the preserved bladder, which most often arises in the original muscle-invasive bladder cancer site; potential lack of curative intervention for regional lymph nodes; and increased morbidity in the event of salvage radical cystectomy for remaining or recurrent disease as a result of high-dose pelvic irradiation. Consolidative partial cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by induction chemoradiotherapy at lower dose (exempli gratia (e.g.) 40 Gy) is a rational strategy for overcoming such limitations by strengthening locoregional control and reducing radiation dosage. Molecular profiling of the tumor and functional imaging might play important roles in optimal patient selection for bladder preservation. Refinement of radiation techniques, intensified concurrent or adjuvant chemotherapy, and novel sensitizers, including molecular targeting agent, are also expected to improve outcomes and consequently provide more muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients with favorable

  15. Neo bladder long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhr, I.; Mohamed, A. M.; Moustafa, A.; Al-Sherbiny, M.; Salama, M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the commonest forms of orthotopic bladder substitution for bladder cancer surivors, used in our institute, is the use of ileocecal segment. Sometimes, the need for Indiana pouch heterotropic continent diversion arises. Aim: To compare the long-term effect of orthotopic ileocecal bladder and heterotropic Indiana pouch following radical cystectomy in bladder cancer patients. Patients and methods: Between January 2008 and December 2011, 91 patients underwent radical cystectomy/anterior pelvic exentration and ortho topic ileocecal bladder reconstruction (61 patients) and Indiana pouch (30 patients), when orthotopic diversion could not be technically or oncologically feasible. Results: Convalescence was uneventful in most patients. All minor and major urinary leakage cases, in both diversions groups, where successfully conservatively treated. Only one patient in the ileocecal group with major urinary leak required re-exploration with successful revision of uretro-colonic anastomosis. Only one patient in the Indiana pouch group had accidentally discovered sub-centimetric stone, which was simply expelled. The overall survival proportion of ileocecal group was 100% compared to 80% in the Indiana pouch group (p < 0.001). The disease free survival proportion of ileocecal group was 90.8% compared to 80% in the Indiana pouch group (p = 0.076). Effective comparative daytime and nighttime urinary continence as well as renal function deterioration were not statistically significant between both reconstruction types. Conclusion: Both ileocecal bladder and Indiana pouch are safe procedures in regard to long-term effects over kidney function following radical cystectomy

  16. Bladder reconstruction--from cells to materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, J; Cross, W; Eardley, I; Thomas, D F M; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    2003-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the urinary bladder is performed on patients of all ages for a diverse range of conditions, including congenital abnormalities, bladder dysfunction, trauma and cancer. The most common material utilized to augment or replace the bladder during these procedures is a segment of the patient's own intestine. However, this procedure ('enterocytoplasty') is associated with significant clinical complications that arise due to the exposure of the epithelial lining of the intestine to urine. A number of alternative approaches are being actively developed to find a practical and functional substitute for native bladder tissue. These range from 'composite enterocystoplasty', where the de-epithelialized intestine wall is lined with bladder epithelial cells that have been propagated in vitro, to augmenting the urinary system with natural or synthetic biomaterials that may incorporate in vitro-propagated cells. However, if tissue-engineered products are to have therapeutic application in bladder reconstruction, a number of issues remain to be addressed; these issues are discussed briefly below.

  17. Validation of deformable image registration algorithms on CT images of ex vivo porcine bladders with fiducial markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wognum, S., E-mail: s.wognum@gmail.com; Heethuis, S. E.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosario, T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The spatial accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) is important in the implementation of image guided adaptive radiotherapy techniques for cancer in the pelvic region. Validation of algorithms is best performed on phantoms with fiducial markers undergoing controlled large deformations. Excised porcine bladders, exhibiting similar filling and voiding behavior as human bladders, provide such an environment. The aim of this study was to determine the spatial accuracy of different DIR algorithms on CT images ofex vivo porcine bladders with radiopaque fiducial markers applied to the outer surface, for a range of bladder volumes, using various accuracy metrics. Methods: Five excised porcine bladders with a grid of 30–40 radiopaque fiducial markers attached to the outer wall were suspended inside a water-filled phantom. The bladder was filled with a controlled amount of water with added contrast medium for a range of filling volumes (100–400 ml in steps of 50 ml) using a luer lock syringe, and CT scans were acquired at each filling volume. DIR was performed for each data set, with the 100 ml bladder as the reference image. Six intensity-based algorithms (optical flow or demons-based) implemented in theMATLAB platform DIRART, a b-spline algorithm implemented in the commercial software package VelocityAI, and a structure-based algorithm (Symmetric Thin Plate Spline Robust Point Matching) were validated, using adequate parameter settings according to values previously published. The resulting deformation vector field from each registration was applied to the contoured bladder structures and to the marker coordinates for spatial error calculation. The quality of the algorithms was assessed by comparing the different error metrics across the different algorithms, and by comparing the effect of deformation magnitude (bladder volume difference) per algorithm, using the Independent Samples Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The authors found good structure

  18. Validation of deformable image registration algorithms on CT images of ex vivo porcine bladders with fiducial markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wognum, S.; Heethuis, S. E.; Bel, A.; Rosario, T.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The spatial accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) is important in the implementation of image guided adaptive radiotherapy techniques for cancer in the pelvic region. Validation of algorithms is best performed on phantoms with fiducial markers undergoing controlled large deformations. Excised porcine bladders, exhibiting similar filling and voiding behavior as human bladders, provide such an environment. The aim of this study was to determine the spatial accuracy of different DIR algorithms on CT images ofex vivo porcine bladders with radiopaque fiducial markers applied to the outer surface, for a range of bladder volumes, using various accuracy metrics. Methods: Five excised porcine bladders with a grid of 30–40 radiopaque fiducial markers attached to the outer wall were suspended inside a water-filled phantom. The bladder was filled with a controlled amount of water with added contrast medium for a range of filling volumes (100–400 ml in steps of 50 ml) using a luer lock syringe, and CT scans were acquired at each filling volume. DIR was performed for each data set, with the 100 ml bladder as the reference image. Six intensity-based algorithms (optical flow or demons-based) implemented in theMATLAB platform DIRART, a b-spline algorithm implemented in the commercial software package VelocityAI, and a structure-based algorithm (Symmetric Thin Plate Spline Robust Point Matching) were validated, using adequate parameter settings according to values previously published. The resulting deformation vector field from each registration was applied to the contoured bladder structures and to the marker coordinates for spatial error calculation. The quality of the algorithms was assessed by comparing the different error metrics across the different algorithms, and by comparing the effect of deformation magnitude (bladder volume difference) per algorithm, using the Independent Samples Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The authors found good structure

  19. Stereological comparison of the effects of pentoxifylline, captopril, simvastatin, and tamoxifen on kidney and bladder structure after partial urethral obstruction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mehdi; Soltani, Mohammad-Reza; Jahanabadi, Zahra; Abdollahifar, Mohammad-Amin; Tanideh, Nader; Noorafshan, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Limited studies have shown antifibrotic effects of pentoxifylline, captopril, simvastatin, and tamoxifen. No comparisons are available of the effects of these drugs on prevention of renal and bladder changes in partial urethral obstruction (PUO). The rats were divided into six groups (n=7). The sham-operated rats (group I) only underwent laparotomy and did not receive any treatments. The PUO groups (group II-VI) received normal saline (PUO+NS), pentoxifylline (100 mg/kg/d; PUO+PEN), captopril (35 mg/kg/d; PUO+CAP), simvastatin (15 mg/kg/d; PUO+SIM), or tamoxifen (10 mg/kg/d; PUO+TAM) by gavage for 28 days. Then, the volume and/or length of the kidney components (tubules, vessels, and fibrous tissue) and the bladder components (epithelial and muscular layers, fibrous tissue, fibroblast and fibrocyte number) were quantitatively evaluated on the microscopic sections by use of stereological techniques. The volume of renal and bladder fibrosis was significantly ameliorated in the PUO+PEN group, followed by the PUO+CAP, PUO+SIM, and PUO+TAM groups. Also, the volume and length of the renal tubules and vessels and bladder layers were more significantly protected in the PUO+PEN group, followed by the PUO+CAP, PUO+SIM, and PUO+TAM groups. Treatment of PUO with PEN was more effective in the prevention of renal and bladder fibrosis and in the preservation of renal and bladder structures.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition of Bladder Epithelial Cells Using SILAC Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganglong Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT is an essential biological process involved in embryonic development, cancer progression, and metastatic diseases. EMT has often been used as a model for elucidating the mechanisms that underlie bladder cancer progression. However, no study to date has addressed the quantitative global variation of proteins in EMT using normal and non-malignant bladder cells. We treated normal bladder epithelial HCV29 cells and low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β to establish an EMT model, and studied non-treated and treated HCV29 and KK47 cells by the stable isotope labeling amino acids in cell culture (SILAC method. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography/LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among a total of 2994 unique identified and annotated proteins in HCV29 and KK47 cells undergoing EMT, 48 and 56 proteins, respectively, were significantly upregulated, and 106 and 24 proteins were significantly downregulated. Gene ontology (GO term analysis and pathways analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved mainly in enhancement of DNA maintenance and inhibition of cell-cell adhesion. Proteomes were compared for bladder cell EMT vs. bladder cancer cells, revealing 16 proteins that displayed similar changes in the two situations. Studies are in progress to further characterize these 16 proteins and their biological functions in EMT.

  1. Radiodiagnosis of anomalies, diseases and injuries of urinary bladder in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyul'ko, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of radiodiagnosis of such urinary bladder diseases as ureter and urinary bladder anomalies, congenital fistulae, urinary bladder calcicosis, calculuses, foreign bodies and injuries of urinary bladder tuberculosis and tumors neurogenic disorder of urination in children are considered

  2. Tolerance of the canine bladder to intraoperative radiation therapy: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Tochner, Z.; Mixon, A.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study of bladder tolerance to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was designed using a large animal model (adult American Foxhounds, weight 25-30 kg) to access acute and late radiation effects. Dogs were subjected to laparotomy where the bladder was mobilized and IORT was delivered using a 5 cm circular cone through a cystotomy incision with 12 MeV electrons. The bladder trigone including both ureteral orifices and the proximal urethra was irradiated in groups of 3 dogs with doses of 0, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 Gy. Dogs were followed clinically with repeat urinalysis, intravenous pyelogram (IVP), and cystometrogram at 1 month and then Q6 months for up to 4 years. One dog from each dose group was sacrificed electively at 1 and 2 years, whereas the other dog is being followed clinically for a minimum of 4 years. Complete autopsies were performed with particular attention to genitourinary and pelvic structures. No clinically detectable acute toxicity resulted from IORT to the bladder. Three of 15 IORT dogs (1 each at 25, 35, and 40 Gy) showed obstruction of a ureteral orifice with 2 dogs dying of renal failure secondary to bilateral hydronephrosis within 1-2 years of treatment. The remaining 12 IORT dogs and 3 control dogs have normal repeat IVP's and renal function with up to 4 years of follow-up. Serial cystometry demonstrates no major loss of bladder contractility or volume. At autopsy, histological changes of mucosal thinning and telangiectasia with submucosal fibrosis were confined to the IORT field and appeared dose-related. However, the bladder epithelium remained intact at all doses. The ureterovesical junction in animals receiving 20 Gy showed mild fibrosis of the lamina propria and moderate chronic inflammation. Above 20 Gy, these histological changes at the U-V junction were more pronounced with gross stenosis in 3 animals as predicted by the IVP

  3. Recurrent urinary tract infection and risk of bladder cancer in the Nijmegen bladder cancer study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, S.; Hanum, N.; Grotenhuis, A.J.; Castano-Vinyals, G.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Aben, K.K.H.; Mysorekar, I.U.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Controversy exists on whether urinary tract infection (UTI) is a risk factor for urinary bladder cancer (UBC). Here, the association is investigated using data from one of the largest bladder cancer case-control studies worldwide. METHODS: Information on (i) history and age at onset of

  4. Bladder biomechanics and the use of scaffolds for regenerative medicine in the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Lemon, Greg; Hilborn, Jöns

    2018-01-01

    in vitro and in vivo, including in the treatment of clinical conditions. The biomechanical properties of the native bladder can be investigated using a range of mechanical tests for standardized assessments, as well as mathematical and computational bladder biomechanics. Despite a large body of research...

  5. Can we improve transurethral resection of the bladder tumour for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, Esmee Iml; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review The recurrence rate in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer is high, and the quality of transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) tumour influences recurrence risk. We review new methods that aim to improve the effectiveness of TURB, and highlight studies of the past

  6. Promising long-term outcome of bladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eva Lund; Hvistendahl, Gitte Møller; Rawashdeh, Yazan F H; Olsen, L Henning

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of bladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Data were compiled from the records of 25 children with a median age of 9.3 years (range 0.9 to 14.2) who underwent detrusor myotomy between 1992 and 2008. All patients were diagnosed with small bladder capacity, low compliance and high end filling pressures, and were unresponsive to clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergics. Median followup was 6.8 years (range 0.1 to 15.6). Median postoperative bladder capacity was unchanged or decreased to 95 ml (range 25 to 274) during the first 3 months compared to a median preoperative capacity of 103 ml (14 to 250). At 5 months postoperatively median bladder capacity increased significantly to 176 ml (range 70 to 420, pbladder compliance doubled after 1 year to 10 ml/cm H2O (range 1 to 31, pBladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction offers, after a transient decrease in bladder capacity, a long lasting increase in capacity and compliance, while the end filling pressure decreases. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Finite element based bladder modeling for image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Remeijer, Peter; Lotz, Heidi T.; Bel, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A biomechanical model was constructed to give insight into pelvic organ motion as a result of bladder filling changes. Methods: The authors used finite element (FE) modeling to simulate bladder wall deformation caused by urine inflow. For ten volunteers, a series of MRI scans of the pelvic

  8. The impact of rectal and bladder variability on target coverage during post-prostatectomy intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Linda J.; Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Accuracy when delivering post-prostatectomy intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is crucial. The aims of this study were to quantify prostate bed movement and determine what amount of bladder or rectum size variation creates the potential for geographic miss. Methods and materials: The Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images (n = 377) of forty patients who received post-prostatectomy IMRT with daily on-line alignment to bony anatomy were reviewed. Prostate bed movement was estimated using the location of surgical clips in the upper and lower sections of the PTV and correlated with rectal and bladder filling (defined as changes in the cross sectional diameter at defined levels). The number of potential geographic misses caused by bladder and rectum variation was calculated assuming a uniform CTV to PTV expansion of 1 cm except 0.5 cm posteriorly. Results: Variations in bladder filling of >2 cm larger, ±1 cm, or >2 cm smaller occurred in 3.4%, 56.2%, and 15.1% of images respectively with potential geographic misses in the upper prostate bed of 61.5%, 9.9% and 26.3% respectively. Variations in rectal filling in the upper prostate bed of >1.5 cm larger, 1.5 cm larger to 1 cm smaller, and >1 cm smaller occurred in 17.2%, 75.6%, and 7.2% of images respectively. These variations resulted in geographic misses in the upper prostate bed in 29.2%, 12.3%, and 63.0% of images respectively. Variations in bladder and rectal filling in the lower prostate bed region had minimal impact on geographic misses. Conclusions: Bladder and rectal size changes at treatment affect prostate bed coverage, especially in the upper aspect of the prostate bed. The greatest potential for geographic miss occurred when either the bladder increased in size or when the rectum became smaller. Ensuring a full bladder and empty rectum at simulation will minimise this risk. Our data also support anisotropic PTV margins with larger margins superiorly than inferiorly

  9. Expression of RFC/SLC19A1 is associated with tumor type in bladder cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa M Abdel-Haleem

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder cancer (UBC ranks ninth in worldwide cancer. In Egypt, the pattern of bladder cancer is unique in that both the transitional and squamous cell types prevail. Despite much research on the topic, it is still difficult to predict tumor progression, optimal therapy and clinical outcome. The reduced folate carrier (RFC/SLC19A1 is the major transport system for folates in mammalian cells and tissues. RFC is also the primary means of cellular uptake for antifolate cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, however, membrane transport of antifolates by RFC is considered as limiting to antitumor activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression level of RFC/SLC19A1 in urothelial and non-urothelial variants of bladder carcinomas. Quantification of RFC mRNA in the mucosa of 41 untreated bladder cancer patients was performed using RT-qPCR. RFC mRNA steady-state levels were ∼9-fold higher (N = 39; P<0.0001 in bladder tumor specimens relative to normal bladder mRNA. RFC upregulation was strongly correlated with tumor type (urothelial vs. non-urothelial; p<0.05 where median RFC mRNA expression was significantly (p<0.05 higher in the urothelial (∼14-fold compared to the non-urothelial (∼4-fold variant. This may account for the variation in response to antifolate-containing regimens used in the treatment of either type. RFC mRNA levels were not associated with tumor grade (I, II and III or stage (muscle-invasive vs. non-muscle invasive implying that RFC cannot be used for prognostic purposes in bladder carcinomas and its increased expression is an early event in human bladder tumors pathogenesis. Further, RFC can be considered as a potential marker for predicting response to antifolate chemotherapy in urothelial carcinomas.

  10. Work Capacity of the Bladder During Voiding: A Novel Method to Evaluate Bladder Contractile Function and Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work in voiding (WIV of the bladder may be used to evaluate bladder status throughout urination rather than at a single time point. Few studies, however, have assessed WIV owing to the complexity of its calculations. We have developed a method of calculating work capacity of the bladder while voiding and analyzed the associations of bladder work parameters with bladder contractile function and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 160 men and 23 women, aged >40 years and with a detrusor pressure at maximal flow rate (P det Q max of ≥40 cmH 2 O in men, who underwent urodynamic testing. The bladder power integration method was used to calculate WIV; WIV per second (WIV/t and WIV per liter of urine voided (WIV/v were also calculated. In men, the relationships between these work capacity parameters and P det Q max and Abrams-Griffiths (AG number were determined using linear-by-linear association tests, and relationships between work capacity parameters and BOO grade were investigated using Spearman′s association test. Results: The mean WIV was 1.15 ± 0.78 J and 1.30 ± 0.88 J, mean WIV/t was 22.95 ± 14.45 mW and 23.78 ± 17.02 mW, and mean WIV/v was 5.59 ± 2.32 J/L and 2.83 ± 1.87 J/L in men and women, respectively. In men, WIV/v showed significant positive associations with P det Q max (r = 0.845, P = 0.000, AG number (r = 0.814, P = 0.000, and Schafer class (r = 0.726, P = 0.000. Conversely, WIV and WIV/t showed no associations with P det Q max or AG number. In patients with BOO (Schafer class > II, WIV/v correlated positively with increasing BOO grade. Conclusions: WIV can be calculated from simple urodynamic parameters using the bladder power integration method. WIV/v may be a marker of BOO grade, and the bladder contractile function can be evaluated by WIV and WIV/t.

  11. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  12. Diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction can we do away with pressureflow studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Vinod Peedikayil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare pressure-flow study on one hand with BWT, prostate volume, urine flow rate PVR and IPSS index in the other arm for diagnosis of BOO. Materials and methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out in 48 men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. International prostate symptom score was completed by the patient who then underwent free urine flow study. Pressure-Flow study was performed as per recommendations of International continence Society. Abrams-Griffiths nomogram and number were used to diagnose BOO. Patients with diabetes, neurovesical dysfunction, acute urinary retention, prior pelvic surgery and known prostate cancer were excluded. Suprapubic ultrasonography was performed independently by a consultant radiologist, who was blinded to findings of Pressure-Flow study. Prevoid bladder volume, postvoid residue (PVR, prostate volume and bladder wall thickness (BWT were noted. Results: Based on objective evidence from Pressure-Flow study, 35 patients were obstructed, 13 were not. Multivariate analysis was performed using Backward Stepwise Logistic Regression Model. Bladder wall thickness, prostate volume and urine flow rate had statistically significant relationship with BOO. Their coefficients of correlation were +0.794, +0.084 and 0.393 respectively. Bladder outlet obstruction could be defined by using a mathematical formula as detailed in the text (Positive Predictive Value 96.97%. Post-void residue and IPSS index were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: In a select group of patients presenting with LUTS, it should be possible to diagnose BOO without the use of Pressure-Flow study.

  13. The link between vascular dysfunction, bladder ischemia, and aging bladder dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Boedtkjer, Donna B.; Forman, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The vascular supply to the human bladder is derived mainly from the superior and inferior vesical arteries, the latter being directly connected to the internal iliac artery. Aging is associated with an impairment of blood vessel function and changes may occur in the vasculature at the molecular, cellular and functional level. Pelvic arterial insufficiency may play an important role in the development of bladder dysfunctions such as detrusor overactivity (DO) and the overactive bladder syndrome. Chronic ischemia-related bladder dysfunction may progress to bladder underactivity and it would be desirable to treat not only lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) induced by chronic ischemia, but also the progression of the morphological bladder changes. Studies in experimental models in rabbits and rats have shown that pelvic arterial insufficiency may result in significant bladder ischemia with reduced bladder wall oxygen tension. In turn, this will lead to oxidative stress associated with upregulation of oxidative stress-sensitive genes, increased muscarinic receptor activity, ultrastructural damage, and neurodegeneration. The phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor tadalafil, the α1-adrenoceptor (AR) blocker silodosin, the β3-AR agonist mirabegron, and the free radical scavenger melatonin, exerted a protecting effect on urodynamic parameters, and on functional and morphological changes of the bladder demonstrable in vitro. Since the agents tested are used clinically for relieving LUTS, the results from the animal models seem to have translational value, and may be of relevance for designing clinical studies to demonstrate if the drugs may prevent progression of ischemia-related functional and morphological bladder changes. PMID:28042309

  14. A case-control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Chun; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2013-03-15

    Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. This case-control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening.

  15. Intraduodenal conjugated bile salts exert negative feedback control on gall bladder emptying in the fasting state without affecting cholecystokinin release or antroduodenal motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ooteghem, N A M; Moschetta, A; Rehfeld, J F; Samsom, M; van Erpecum, K J; van Berge-Henegouwen, G P

    2002-01-01

    Background: Intraduodenal bile salts exert negative feedback control on postprandial gall bladder emptying. Aims: We wished to examine whether a similar control mechanism occurs in the fasting state. Methods: Intraduodenal bile salt depletion was achieved by 12 g of cholestyramine. Thereafter, in study A (seven subjects), the effects on gall bladder volume (by ultrasound) and antroduodenal motility of intraduodenal infusions of taurocholate egg yolk-phosphatidylcholine micelles were assessed. In study B (nine subjects), the effects on gall bladder volume of infusing mixed micelles composed of taurocholate (100 mM) and low (26 mM) or high (68 mM) amounts of egg yolk-phosphatidylcholine, or low amounts of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine were determined. Results: Cholestyramine induced strong and prolonged gall bladder contraction without cholecystokinin release. In study A, micellar infusions increased gall bladder volume without affecting migrating motor complex cycle length. In study B, intraduodenal infusion induced strong increases in gall bladder volume in the case of taurocholate micelles containing low amounts of egg yolk-phosphatidylcholine, moderate increases in micelles containing low amounts of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine but no change in micelles containing high amounts of egg yolk-phosphatidylcholine, in all cases without altered plasma cholecystokinin levels. Phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was significantly higher after infusion of egg yolk-phosphatidylcholine compared with infusion of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine containing micelles. Intermixed micellar-vesicular bile salt concentrations (responsible for detergent effects) were higher in egg yolk-phosphatidylcholine than in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine containing model biles and if lyso-phosphatidylcholine was included. Conclusions: Intraduodenal bile salts exert negative feedback on fasting gall bladder volume. The modulating effects of various phospholipids may relate to their effects on

  16. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  17. Analysis of influence factors on the volume of pelvic bowel irradiated for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yuxiang; Cai Yong; Zhu Xianggao; Han Shukui; Xu Bo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate influence of prone/ supine position, gender, operation, bladder distension on bowel irradiated for patients with rectal cancer during pelvic radiotherapy. Methods: 36 patients with rectal cancer were investigated. Treatment plans were created with three dimensional treatment planning system. The dose and volume of bowel irradiated were analyzed according to dose-volume histograms (DVH) for every patient. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy. Results: The extent of bladder distension significantly influenced the mean doses and the V 45 high dose volumes of bowel irradiated. The treatment position and gender significantly influenced the V 15 low dose volume of bowel irradiated, the operation significantly influenced the mean doses of bowel. Either prone and supine position, or preoperative and postoperative, the doses of bowel irradiated for good bladder distension were lower and the volumes were smaller than that for bad bladder distension. The V 45 high dose volume of bowel irradiated for bad and good bladder distension at prone position were 15.3% and 7.4% (P=0.023), respectively, and at postoperative 14.1% and 7.2% (P=0.014), respectively. Conclusions: The doses and volumes of pelvic bowel irradiated were significantly influenced by the extent of bladder distension, and partly influenced by the prone/supine position, gender and operation. (authors)

  18. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  19. Evaluation of maximum voided volume in Korean children by use of a 48-h frequency volume chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kim, Kyung Do; Kim, Young Sig; Kim, Jun Mo; Moon, Du Geon; Park, Sungchan; Lee, Sang Don; Chung, Jae Min; Cho, Won Yeol

    2012-08-01

    Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort). Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The relationship between the maximum voided volume followed a linear curve. The formula presented, bladder capacity (mL) = 12 ×[age (years) + 11], is thought to be a reasonable one for Korean children. Korean children have a smaller bladder capacity than that reported in previous Western studies. • To develop practical guidelines for the prediction of normal bladder capacity in Korean children measured by a frequency volume chart (FVC), maximum voided volume (MVV) is an important factor in the diagnosis of children with abnormal voiding function. • In all, 298 children, aged 3-13 years, with no history of voiding disorders volunteered for the study. The MVV was determined in 219 subjects by use of a completely recorded FVC. • Linear regression analysis was used to define the exact relationship between age and bladder capacity. An approximate formula related age to bladder capacity as follows: bladder capacity (mL) = 12 ×[age (years) + 11]. • The relationship between the MVV measured by a FVC by age (3-13 years) of Korean children followed a linear curve. • When applied to normal voiding patterns, the formula presented appears to be a reasonable one for Korean children. © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  20. High precision bladder cancer irradiation by integrating a library planning procedure of 6 prospectively generated SIB IMRT plans with image guidance using lipiodol markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, Gert Johan; Toorn, Peter-Paul van der; Bal, Matthieu; Schuring, Danny; Weterings, Jan; Wildt, Michel de

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To increase local control and decrease side effects for urinary bladder cancer patients by integrating a library planning procedure with image guidance using lipiodol markers. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with T2-T4N0M0 grade 2–3 invasive bladder carcinoma were treated according to an online adaptive protocol. Initially, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was demarcated during cystoscopy by injecting several drops of lipiodol in the submucosa around the tumour. Subsequently two CT scans were acquired with a full bladder and a voided bladder. On both scans, the boost volume (GTV) and the low-risk bladder volume were delineated. Using an interpolation tool, six concomitant boost IMRT plans with increasing bladder volumes were generated. For each fraction the procedure at the treatment unit was as follows: Firstly, a ConeBeam-CT was acquired and based on the amount of bladder filling the best fitting bladder contours and corresponding GTV and IMRT plans were selected. Secondly, the lipiodol markers were registered using the corresponding GTV contours and it was verified that the corresponding 95%-isodose surface covered the entire bladder. Finally, an online setup correction was applied based on this registration and the corresponding treatment plan was irradiated. Results: The lipiodol markers were very useful in outlining the GTV at the planning CT and for daily setup correction. While the patients strived for a full bladder filling at time of the treatment, this was seldom accomplished. Due to our protocol an appropriate plan with adequate coverage of the PTV and without excessive dose to healthy tissue was delivered every day. The treatment was very well tolerated by all patients. At the end of the treatment no grade 3 urinary or gastro-intestinal toxicity was observed. After a median follow-up of 28 months two local relapses occurred. Conclusion: Using the library planning approach combined with online image guidance using lipiodol markers, we

  1. High precision bladder cancer irradiation by integrating a library planning procedure of 6 prospectively generated SIB IMRT plans with image guidance using lipiodol markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Gert Johan; van der Toorn, Peter-Paul; Bal, Matthieu; Schuring, Danny; Weterings, Jan; de Wildt, Michel

    2012-11-01

    To increase local control and decrease side effects for urinary bladder cancer patients by integrating a library planning procedure with image guidance using lipiodol markers. Twenty patients with T2-T4N0M0 grade 2-3 invasive bladder carcinoma were treated according to an online adaptive protocol. Initially, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was demarcated during cystoscopy by injecting several drops of lipiodol in the submucosa around the tumour. Subsequently two CT scans were acquired with a full bladder and a voided bladder. On both scans, the boost volume (GTV) and the low-risk bladder volume were delineated. Using an interpolation tool, six concomitant boost IMRT plans with increasing bladder volumes were generated. For each fraction the procedure at the treatment unit was as follows: Firstly, a ConeBeam-CT was acquired and based on the amount of bladder filling the best fitting bladder contours and corresponding GTV and IMRT plans were selected. Secondly, the lipiodol markers were registered using the corresponding GTV contours and it was verified that the corresponding 95%-isodose surface covered the entire bladder. Finally, an online setup correction was applied based on this registration and the corresponding treatment plan was irradiated. The lipiodol markers were very useful in outlining the GTV at the planning CT and for daily setup correction. While the patients strived for a full bladder filling at time of the treatment, this was seldom accomplished. Due to our protocol an appropriate plan with adequate coverage of the PTV and without excessive dose to healthy tissue was delivered every day. The treatment was very well tolerated by all patients. At the end of the treatment no grade 3 urinary or gastro-intestinal toxicity was observed. After a median follow-up of 28 months two local relapses occurred. Using the library planning approach combined with online image guidance using lipiodol markers, we were able to deliver a highly conformal dose distribution

  2. Glutathione S-transferases in kidney and urinary bladder tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Tatjana; Savic-Radojevic, Ana; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija; Matic, Marija; Mimic-Oka, Jasmina

    2009-05-01

    Exposure to potential carcinogens is an etiologic factor for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder. Cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a superfamily of enzymes that protect normal cells by catalyzing conjugation reactions of electrophilic compounds, including carcinogens, to glutathione. Some GST enzymes possess antioxidant activity against hydroperoxides. The most well characterized classes have been named alpha (GSTA), mu (GSTM), pi (GSTP) and theta (GSTT); each of these classes contains several different isoenzymes. Several types of allelic variation have been identified within classes, with GSTM1-null, GSTT1-null and GSTP1-Ile105/Ile105 conferring impaired catalytic activity. The effects of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphism on susceptibility to RCC depend on exposure to specific chemicals. Individuals with the GSTM1-null genotype carry a higher risk for TCC. The roles of GSTT1 polymorphism in TCC and GSTP1 polymorphisms in both cancers are still controversial. During kidney cancerization, expression of GSTA isoenzymes tends to decrease, which promotes the pro-oxidant environment necessary for RCC growth. In the malignant phenotype of TCC of the bladder, upregulation of various GST classes occurs. Upregulation of GSTT1 and GSTP1 might have important consequences for TCC growth by providing a reduced cellular environment and inhibition of apoptotic pathways.

  3. Automated mosaicing of feature-poor optical coherence tomography volumes with an integrated white light imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L; Angst, Roland; Ellerbee, Audrey K

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate the first automated, volumetric mosaicing algorithm for optical coherence tomography (OCT) that both accommodates 6-degree-of-freedom rigid transformations and implements a bundle adjustment step amenable to generating large fields of view with endoscopic and freehand imaging systems. Our mosaicing algorithm exploits the known, rigid connection between a combined white light and OCT imaging system to reduce the computational complexity of traditional volumetric mosaicing pipelines. Specifically, the search for 3-D point correspondences is replaced by two, 2-D processing steps: We first coregister a pair of white light images in 2-D and then generate a surface map based on the volumetric OCT data, which is used to convert 2-D image homographies into 3-D volumetric transformations. A significant benefit of our dual-modality approach is its tolerance for feature-poor datasets such as bladder tissue; in contrast, approaches to mosaic feature-rich volumes with significant variations in the local intensity gradient (e.g., retinal data containing prolific vasculature) are not suitable for such feature-poor datasets. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm using ex vivo bladder tissue and a custom tissue-mimicking phantom. The algorithm shows excellent performance over the range of volume-to-volume transformations expected during endoscopic examination and comparable accuracy with several orders of magnitude superior run times than an open-source gold-standard algorithm (N-SIFT). We anticipate the proposed algorithm can benefit bladder surveillance and surgical planning. Furthermore, its generality gives it broad applicability and potential to extend the use of OCT to clinical applications relevant to large organs typically imaged with freehand, forward-viewing endoscopes.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative histopathology in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. An international investigation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Sasaki, M; Fukuzawa, S

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histopathologic, prognosis-related grading of malignancy by means of morphologic examination in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder (TCC) may be subject to observer variation, resulting in a reduced level of reproducibility. This may confound comparisons of treatment r...

  5. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals - including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years.

  6. Overactive bladder [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Wallace

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder syndrome is highly prevalent, and increasingly so with aging. It is characterized by the presence of urinary urgency, and can be associated with incontinence, increased voiding frequency, and nocturia. Assessment needs to exclude serious medical disorders that might present with similar symptoms, and a bladder diary is an invaluable part of understanding the presentation. Initial management is conservative, comprising education, bladder training, and advice on