WorldWideScience

Sample records for bladder urothelial cells

  1. Experimental rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma models

    OpenAIRE

    Arentsen, Harm C.; Hendricksen, Kees; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Witjes, J Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a major public health problem. Currently available therapeutic options seem to be unable to prevent bladder cancer recurrence and progression. To enable preclinical testing of new intravesical therapeutic agents, a suitable bladder tumor model that resembles human disease is highly desirable. The aim of this topic paper was to discuss the problems associated with current in vivo animal bladder tumor models, focusing on the orthotopic syngeneic rat bladder tumor model. In the...

  2. Bladder cancer cell in co-culture induces human stem cell differentiation to urothelial cells through paracrine FGF10 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Seyung S.; Koh, Chester J.

    2013-01-01

    FGF10 is required for embryonic epidermal morphogenesis including brain development, lung morphogenesis, and initiation of limb bud formation. In this study, we investigated the role of FGF10 as a lead induction factor for stem cell differentiation toward urothelial cell. To this end, human multi-potent stem cell in vitro system was employed. Human amniotic fluid stem cells were co-cultured with immortalized bladder cancer lines to induce directed differentiation into urothelial cells. Urothe...

  3. Urothelial atypia and survival rate of 500 unselected patients with primary transitional-cell tumour of the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde Olsen, P; Wolf, H; Schroeder, T; Fischer, A; Højgaard, K

    1988-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 500 unselected patients with primary urinary bladder tumours the influence of urothelial atypia on the 5 years survival-rate was examined. All tumours were transitional-cell tumours categorized according to the T-classification. Mucosal biopsies from 7 pre-selected sites...... were taken at the initial cystoscopy in 391 patients (78%) to identify urothelial atypia. The over-all cumulative 5 years survival-rate was 48%. Submucosal and muscle invasion had major influence on survival, whereas tumour grade was less important. Patients with urothelial atypia fared significantly...

  4. Clear-cell variant urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Clear cell variants of transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) of the bladder are extremely rare tumors. Only 6 cases have been reported until now. We report of a 67 year old man who presented with fast growing tumor disease. While initial diagnosis showed localized bladder tumor, final histopathology revealed pT4, G3, L1 urothelial carcinoma with clear cell differentiation. No more than 14 weeks after initial diagnosis the patient died from multi-organ failure after unsuccessful salvage laparotom...

  5. Clear-cell variant urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Tezval

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell variants of transitional cell carcinomas (TCC of the bladder are extremely rare tumors. Only 6 cases have been reported until now. We report of a 67 year old man who presented with fast growing tumor disease. While initial diagnosis showed localized bladder tumor, final histopathology revealed pT4, G3, L1 urothelial carcinoma with clear cell differentiation. No more than 14 weeks after initial diagnosis the patient died from multi-organ failure after unsuccessful salvage laparotomy which showed massive tumor burden within the pelvis and peritoneal carcinosis. This case demonstrated an extremely fast tumor growth. Therefore, patients with clear cell urothelial carcinoma should be treated vigorously and without time delay. We present a case of clear cell variant of TCC which exhibited an extremely aggressive behavior. To our knowledge this is the fifth report of this rare disease.

  6. Characterization of HGF/Met Signaling in Cell Lines Derived From Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young H. [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Apolo, Andrea B. [Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Agarwal, Piyush K.; Bottaro, Donald P., E-mail: dbottaro@helix.nih.gov [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2014-11-25

    There is mounting evidence of oncogenic hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. The effects of three kinase inhibitors, cabozantinib, crizotinib and EMD1214063, on HGF-driven signaling and cell growth, invasion and tumorigenicity were analyzed in cultured UC cell lines. SW780 xenograft growth in SCID and human HGF knock-in SCID (hHGF/SCID) mice treated with cabozantinib or vehicle, as well as tumor levels of Met and pMet, were also determined. Met content was robust in most UC-derived cell lines. Basal pMet content and effector activation state in quiescent cells were low, but significantly enhanced by added HGF, as were cell invasion, proliferation and anchorage independent growth. These HGF-driven effects were reversed by Met inhibitor treatment. Tumor xenograft growth was significantly higher in hHGF/SCID mice vs. SCID mice and significantly inhibited by cabozantinib, as was tumor phospho-Met content. These studies indicate the prevalence and functionality of the HGF/Met signaling pathway in UC cells, suggest that paracrine HGF may contribute to UC tumor growth and progression, and that support further preclinical investigation of Met inhibitors for the treatment of UC is warranted.

  7. Lack of decorin expression by human bladder cancer cells offers new tools in the therapy of urothelial malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annele Sainio

    Full Text Available Decorin, a multifunctional small leucine-rich extracellular matrix proteoglycan, has been shown to possess potent antitumour activity. However, there is some uncertainty whether different cancer cells express decorin in addition to non-malignant stromal cells. In this study we clarified decorin expression by human bladder cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the effect of adenovirus-mediated decorin expression on human bladder cancer cells in vitro was examined. We first demonstrated using the publicly available GeneSapiens databank that decorin gene expression is present in both normal and malignant human bladder tissues. However, when we applied in situ hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled RNA probes for decorin on human bladder carcinoma tissue samples derived from a large radical cystectomy patient cohort (n = 199, we unambiguously demonstrated that invasive and non-invasive bladder carcinoma cells completely lack decorin mRNA. The cancer cells were also negative for decorin immunoreactivity. Instead, decorin expression was localized solely to original non-malignant stromal areas of bladder tissue. In accordance with the aforementioned results, human bladder cancer cells in vitro were also negative for decorin expression as shown by RT-qPCR analyses. The lack of decorin expression by bladder cancer cells was shown not to be due to the methylation of the proximal promoter region of the decorin gene. When bladder cancer cells were transfected with a decorin adenoviral vector, their proliferation was significantly decreased. In conclusion, we have shown that human bladder cancer cells are totally devoid of decorin expression. We have also shown that adenovirus-mediated decorin gene transduction of human bladder cancer cell lines markedly inhibits their proliferation. Thus, decorin gene delivery offers new potential therapeutic tools in urothelial malignancies.

  8. Diagnostic value of circulating tumor cell detection in bladder and urothelial cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic value and prognostic significance of circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection in patients with bladder cancer is controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to consolidate current evidence regarding the use of CTC detection assays to diagnose bladder and other urothelial cancers and the association of CTC positivity with advanced, remote disease. Studies that investigated the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with bladder cancer and/or urothelial cancer were identified and reviewed. Sensitivities, specificities, and positive (LR+) and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) of CTC detection in individual studies were calculated and meta-analyzed by random effects model. Overall odds ratio of CTC positivity in patients with advanced disease versus those with organ-confined cancer was also calculated. Overall sensitivity of CTC detection assays was 35.1% (95%CI, 32.4-38%); specificity, LR+, and LR- was 89.4% (95%CI, 87.2-91.3%), 3.77 (95%CI, 1.95-7.30) and 0.72 (95%CI, 0.64-0.81). CTC-positive patients were significantly more likely to have advanced (stage III-IV) disease compared with CTC-negative patients (OR, 5.05; 95%CI, 2.49-10.26). CTC evaluation can confirm tumor diagnosis and identify patients with advanced bladder cancer. However, due to the low overall sensitivity, CTC detection assays should not be used as initial screening tests

  9. Diagnostic value of circulating tumor cell detection in bladder and urothelial cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutsilieris Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnostic value and prognostic significance of circulating tumor cell (CTC detection in patients with bladder cancer is controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to consolidate current evidence regarding the use of CTC detection assays to diagnose bladder and other urothelial cancers and the association of CTC positivity with advanced, remote disease. Methods Studies that investigated the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with bladder cancer and/or urothelial cancer were identified and reviewed. Sensitivities, specificities, and positive (LR+ and negative likelihood ratios (LR- of CTC detection in individual studies were calculated and meta-analyzed by random effects model. Overall odds ratio of CTC positivity in patients with advanced disease versus those with organ-confined cancer was also calculated. Results Overall sensitivity of CTC detection assays was 35.1% (95%CI, 32.4-38%; specificity, LR+, and LR- was 89.4% (95%CI, 87.2-91.3%, 3.77 (95%CI, 1.95-7.30 and 0.72 (95%CI, 0.64-0.81. CTC-positive patients were significantly more likely to have advanced (stage III-IV disease compared with CTC-negative patients (OR, 5.05; 95%CI, 2.49-10.26. Conclusions CTC evaluation can confirm tumor diagnosis and identify patients with advanced bladder cancer. However, due to the low overall sensitivity, CTC detection assays should not be used as initial screening tests.

  10. Clear cell urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Knez, Virginia M; Barrow, Willis; Lucia, M. Scott; Wilson, Shandra; La Rosa, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The occurrence of clear cell tumors in the bladder is not uncommon. Clear cell dysplasia is well-described and characterized by focal replacement of transitional mucosa by cells with abundant clear cytoplasm, nuclear enlargement, and a granular chromatin pattern. Clear cells can also be seen in clear cell adenocarcinoma, which is rare, comprising 0.5% to 2.0% of the reported bladder carcinomas. Other clear cell tumors found in the bladder to be considered in the differential diag...

  11. Primary small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder with coexisting high-grade urothelial carcinoma: a case report and a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Khalbuss Walid; Bui Marilyn

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Primary neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urinary bladder are rare. Here, we report a case of an 82-year-old man who presented with hematuria and was found to have an ulcerated lesion in the bladder. A diagnosis of small neuroendocrine cell carcinoma with coexisting minor high-grade urothelial components was rendered. In this report, the clinical, cytological, histological, and immunohistochemical features of this case are described, and a review of the literature about this neoplasm ...

  12. Primary small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder with coexisting high-grade urothelial carcinoma: a case report and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalbuss Walid

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urinary bladder are rare. Here, we report a case of an 82-year-old man who presented with hematuria and was found to have an ulcerated lesion in the bladder. A diagnosis of small neuroendocrine cell carcinoma with coexisting minor high-grade urothelial components was rendered. In this report, the clinical, cytological, histological, and immunohistochemical features of this case are described, and a review of the literature about this neoplasm is presented. The differential diagnoses of small cell tumor in urinary bladder washing specimens are discussed.

  13. miR-145 induces caspase-dependent and -independent cell death in urothelial cancer cell lines with targeting of an expression signature present in Ta bladder tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Lamy, Philippe;

    2010-01-01

    Downregulation of miR-145 in a variety of cancers suggests a possible tumor suppressor function for this microRNA. Here, we show that miR-145 expression is reduced in bladder cancer and urothelial carcinoma in situ, compared with normal urothelium, using transcription profiling and in situ...... hybridization. Ectopic expression of miR-145 induced extensive apoptosis in urothelial carcinoma cell lines (T24 and SW780) as characterized by caspase activation, nuclear condensation and fragmentation, cellular shrinkage, and detachment. However, cell death also proceeded upon caspase inhibition by the...... pharmacological inhibitor zVAD-fmk and ectopic expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, indicating the activation of an alternative caspase-independent death pathway. Microarray analysis of transcript levels in T24 cells, before the onset of cell death, showed destabilization of mRNAs enriched for miR-145 7mer target...

  14. Urine and bladder washing cytology for detection of urothelial carcinoma: standard test with new possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light microscopic evaluation of cell morphology in preparations from urine or bladder washing containing exfoliated cells is a standard and primary method for the detection of bladder cancer and also malignancy from other parts of the urinary tract. The cytopathologic examination is a valuable method to detect an early recurrence of malignancy or new primary carcinoma during the follow-up of patients after the treatment of bladder cancer. Characteristic cellular and nuclear signs of malignancy indicate invasive or in situ urothelial carcinoma or high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma. However, low sensitivity of the method reflects the unreliable cytopathologic diagnosis of low-grade urothelial neoplasms as cellular and nuclear signs of malignancy in these neoplasms are poorly manifested. Many different markers were developed to improve the diagnosis of bladder carcinoma on urinary samples. UroVysion™ test is among the newest and most promising tests. By the method of in situ hybridization one can detect specific cytogenetic changes of urothelial carcinoma

  15. Histologic variants of urothelial bladder cancer and nonurothelial histology in bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chalasani, Venu; Chin, Joseph L.; Izawa, Jonathan I.

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer can be classified histologically as urothelial or non-urothelial. Urothelial cancer has a propensity for divergent differentiation, which has increasingly been recognized in recent years due to heightened awareness and improved immunohistochemistry techniques. Furthermore, the recent World Health Organization classification of urothelial cancers improved clarity on this issue, with its listing of 13 histologic variants of urothelial cancer. The divergent differentiation pattern...

  16. Renal Cell Carcinoma with Concurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of Urinary Bladder and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Danko; Tomasović-Lončarić, Čedna; Galešić-Ljubanović, Danica; Heinzl, Renata; Savić, Ivan; Marušić, Petar

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 71-year-old male with multiple primary malignancies involving kidney and urinary bladder, combined with synchronous lymphoma. The patient was admitted to the hospital because of painless gross hematuria. Examination revealed tumor of the right kidney and papillary tumor in the urinary bladder and enlarged lymph nodes along aorta and inferior vena cava. Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR), radical nephrectomy of the right kidney and retroperitoneal lymphadenect...

  17. Transcriptional Modulation of the ERK1/2 MAPK and NF-kB pathways in Human Urothelial cells after trivalent arsenical exposure: Implications for urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic exposure to drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with an increased risk ofurinary bladder (DB) cancers in humans. Rodent models administered particular arsenicals have indicated urothelial necrosis followed by regenerative proliferation i...

  18. Unusual presentation of cutaneous metastasis from bladder urothelial carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Pao Chang; I-Yen Lee; Hung-Jen Shih

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous metastases from urothelial carcinoma of the bladder are a rare disease.In previous reports,the most common metastatic cutaneous lesions were non-tender nodules on the abdominal skin.We report a patient with bladder urothelial carcinoma with cutaneous metastases initially presenting as right leg and suprapubic lymphedema.Bladder tumor was the incidental finding by magnetic resonance venography.Urothelial carcinoma (clinical stage Ⅳ) was diagnosed,and chemotherapy was performed.Extensive painful erythematous plaques with an erysipelas-like appearance located on the suprapubic area,chest and abdomen were noted,and cutaneous metastases were confirmed by histopathology.Subsequently,extensive scrotal and prepuce ulcerative changes developed.This paper reports a rare case of extensive cutaneous metastasis of bladder urothelial carcinoma who presented an interesting clinical course.

  19. Urothelial Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Dimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence supporting the idea that tumors, similar to normal adult tissues, arise from a specific stem-like cell population, the cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are considered as the real driving force behind tumor growth, the ability to metastasize, as well as resistance to conventional antitumor therapy. The concept that cancer growth recapitulates normal proliferative and/or regenerative processes, even though in very dysfunctional ways, has tremendous implications for cancer therapy. The rapid development of the CSC field, shoulder to shoulder with powerful genome-wide screening techniques, has provided cause for optimism for the development of more reliable therapies in the future. However, several important issues still lie ahead. Recent identification of a highly tumorigenic stem-like compartment and existence of urothelial differentiation programs in urothelial cell carcinomas (UCCs raised important questions about UCC initiation and development. This review examines the present knowledge on CSCs in UCCs regarding the similarities between CSCs and the adult urothelial stem cells, potential origin of urothelial CSCs, main regulatory pathways, surface markers expression, and the current state of CSC-targeting therapeutic strategies.

  20. Urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma with expression of KIT and PDGFRA and showing diverse differentiations into plasmacytoid, clear cell, acantholytic, nested, and spindle variants, and into adenocarcinoma, signet-ring cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and pleomorphic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Various tumors can arise in the urinary bladder (UB); most common is urothelial carcinoma (UC). UC of the UB have many variants. Other types of carcinomas such as adenocarcinoma (AC) and small cell carcinoma (SmCC) can occur in UB carcinomas. Expression of KIT and PDGFRA has not been reported. A 66-year-old man admitted to our hospital because of hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed papillary invasive tumor and a transurethral bladder tumorectomy (TUR-BT) was performed. The TUR-BT showed UC, AC, Sm...

  1. Pathogenic and Diagnostic Potential of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 Nuclear Proteins in Urothelial Cell Carcinoma of Human Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Santoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder is one of the most common malignancies of genitourinary tract. Patients with bladder cancer need a life-long surveillance, directly due to the relatively high recurrence rate of this tumor. The use of cystoscopy represents the gold standard for the followup of previously treated patients. Nevertheless, several factors, including cost and invasiveness, render cystoscopy not ideal for routine controls. Advances in the identification of specific alterations in the nuclear structure of bladder cancer cells have opened novel diagnostic landscapes. The members of nuclear matrix protein family BLCA-1 and BLCA-4, are currently under evaluation as bladder cancer urinary markers. They are involved in tumour cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In this paper, we illustrate the role of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 in bladder carcinogenesis and their potential exploitation as biomarkers in this cancer.

  2. Lack of Decorin Expression by Human Bladder Cancer Cells Offers New Tools in the Therapy of Urothelial Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Sainio, Annele; Nyman, Marie; Lund, Riikka; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Boström, Pia; Laato, Matti; Boström, Peter J.; Järveläinen, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Decorin, a multifunctional small leucine-rich extracellular matrix proteoglycan, has been shown to possess potent antitumour activity. However, there is some uncertainty whether different cancer cells express decorin in addition to non-malignant stromal cells. In this study we clarified decorin expression by human bladder cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the effect of adenovirus-mediated decorin expression on human bladder cancer cells in vitro was examined. We first demon...

  3. Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Prepuce and Glans Penis: Suspected Implantation of Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer via Urine

    OpenAIRE

    Makino, Tomoyuki; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Namiki, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cutaneous metastatic implantation of non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma via urine is a rare finding, and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here, we present a case of metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the prepuce and glans penis, which was suspected to be an implantation of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer via urine. The patient had pseudophimosis of the penis, and contact with urine containing urothelial carcinoma cells was considered to be the cause of th...

  4. Molecular Genetic Evidence for a Common Clonal Origin of Urinary Bladder Small Cell Carcinoma and Coexisting Urothelial Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Liang; Jones, Timothy D.; McCarthy, Ryan P.; Eble, John N.; Wang, Mingsheng; MacLennan, Gregory T.; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Yang, Ximing J; Koch, Michael O.; Zhang, Shaobo; Pan, Chong-xian; Baldridge, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    In most cases, small-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is admixed with other histological types of bladder carcinoma. To understand the pathogenetic relationship between the two tumor types, we analyzed histologically distinct tumor cell populations from the same patient for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and X chromosome inactivation (in female patients). We examined five polymorphic microsatellite markers located on chromosome 3p25-26 (D3S3050), chromosome 9p21 (IFNA and D9S171), chromoso...

  5. Inverse p16 and p63 expression in small cell carcinoma and high-grade urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Natalia; Cohen, Paul J; Pei Hui; Parkash, Vinita

    2010-04-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SmCC) of the urinary bladder is a rare, highly aggressive neoplasm. The diagnosis is usually made on morphologic grounds, with the help of immunohistochemistry to document neuroendocrine differentiation. However, neuroendocrine markers generally have low sensitivity, ranging between 30-70%. Recent studies have reported p16 over-expression in SmCC of the lung, suggesting that p16 immunohistochemistry may be useful in the diagnosis of bladder SmCC. This is the first study to analyze the usefulness of p16 in the distinction of small cell and high grade urothelial cell carcinoma (HG-UCC). Fourteen cases of SmCCs and sixteen cases of HG-UCC of the bladder were stained with p16, p63, cytokeratin 20 (CK20), cytokeratin 7 (CK7), chromogranin (Chr), synaptophysin (Syn), and CD56. P16 expression was significantly higher in SmCCs (92.8%) when compared to HG-UCCs (43.7%). P63 and CK20, on the other hand, were positive in the majority of HG-UCCs (81.3% and 50%, respectively), while only 14.3% of SmCCs showed focal immunoreactivity with CK20. The sensitivity of the traditional neuroendocrine markers was low, ranging between 28.6% (Chr) and 71.4% (CD56) in SmCCs. P16 positivity in the absence of p63 and CK20 is highly characteristic of SmCC, while p63 and CK20 positivity with or without p16 expression is typical of HG-UCC. PMID:20164052

  6. Productive infection of bovine papillomavirus type 2 in the urothelial cells of naturally occurring urinary bladder tumors in cattle and water buffaloes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Papillomaviruses (PVs are highly epitheliotropic as they usually establish productive infections within squamous epithelia of the skin, the anogenital tract and the oral cavity. In this study, early (E and late (L protein expression of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2 in the urothelium of the urinary bladder is described in cows and water buffaloes suffering from naturally occurring papillomavirus-associated urothelial bladder tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: E5 protein, the major oncoprotein of the BPV-2, was detected in all tumors. L1 DNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced and confirmed to be L1 DNA. The major capsid protein, L1, believed to be only expressed in productive papillomavirus infection was detected by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical investigations confirmed the presence of L1 protein both in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells of the neoplastic urothelium. Finally, the early protein E2, required for viral DNA replication and known to be a pivotal factor for both productive and persistent infection, was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemically. Electron microscopic investigations detected electron dense particles, the shape and size of which are consistent with submicroscopic features of viral particles, in nuclei of neoplastic urothelium. CONCLUSION: This study shows that both active and productive infections by BPV-2 in the urothelium of the bovine and bubaline urinary bladder can occur in vivo.

  7. Detection of Urothelial Bladder Cancer Cells in Voided Urine Can Be Improved by a Combination of Cytology and Standardized Microsatellite Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, P J; Fuchs, T.(Department of Physics, TU Dortmund University, 44221, Dortmund, Germany); Stoehr, R; Zimmermann, D.; S. Frigerio; Padberg, B; Steiner, I; Zwarthoff, E C; Burger, M.; Denzinger, S; Hofstaedter, F; Kristiansen, G; Hermanns, T.; Seifert, H H; Provenzano, M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate molecular and immunohistochemical markers to develop a molecular grading of urothelial bladder cancer and to test these markers in voided urine samples.Experimental Design: 255 consecutive biopsies from primary bladder cancer patients were evaluated on a tissue microarray. The clinical parameters gender, age, adjacent carcinoma in situ, and multifocality were collected. UroVysion fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was done. Expression of cytokeratin 20, MIB1, and T...

  8. Acrolein- and 4-Aminobiphenyl-DNA adducts in human bladder mucosa and tumor tissue and their mutagenicity in human urothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Weng, Mao-wen; Hu, Yu; Chen, Wei-Sheng; Chou, David; Yan LIU; Donin, Nicholas; Huang, William C; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Wang, Hailin; Beland, Frederick A.; Tang, Moon-shong

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoke (TS) is a major cause of human bladder cancer (BC). Two components in TS, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and acrolein, which also are environmental contaminants, can cause bladder tumor in rat models. Their role in TS related BC has not been forthcoming. To establish the relationship between acrolein and 4-ABP exposure and BC, we analyzed acrolein-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 4-ABP-DNA adducts in normal human urothelial mucosa (NHUM) and bladder tumor tissues (BTT), and measured their mutag...

  9. Roles of estrogen receptor α and β in modulating urothelial cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Jian; Wang, Zun-Yi; Jarrard, David F; Bjorling, Dale E.

    2008-01-01

    We reported previously that both subtypes of estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are expressed by human urothelial cells and mediate estrogen-induced cell proliferation in these cells. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which each ER subtype contributes to urothelial cell proliferation and their possible involvement in the regulation of the cell cycle. We compared the expression of ERα and ERβ mRNAs and protein quantitatively in primarily cultured human bladder urothelial cells...

  10. Expression and significance of androgen receptor coactivators in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Boorjian, Stephen A.; Heemers, Hannelore V.; Frank, Igor; Farmer, Sara A.; Schmidt, Lucy J.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2008-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is approximately three times more common in men than women. While the etiology for this gender difference in incidence remains unknown, a role for androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been suggested. The mechanisms by which AR activity is regulated in UC cells, however, are largely elusive. Here, we explore the significance of coregulators that are critical for the formation of a functional AR transcriptional complex, in UC cells. Using two AR-positive...

  11. Compensatory Paracrine Mechanisms That Define The Urothelial Response to Injury in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassuk, James; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Sweet, Robert; Han, Chang-Hee; Soygur, Tarkan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Plaire, J. Chadwick; Charleston, Jay S.; Charleston, Lynne B.; Bagai, Shelly; Cochrane, Kimberly; Rubio, Eric; Bassuk, James A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-06-21

    Diseases and conditions affecting the lower urinary tract are a leading cause of dysfunctional sexual health, incontinence, infection, and kidney failure. The growth, differentiation, and repair of the bladder's epithelial lining are regulated, in part, by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7 and -10 via a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the receptor for FGF-7 and -10 within the transitional epithelium (urothelium). The FGF-7 gene is located at the 15q15-q21.1 locus on chromosome 15 and four exons generate a 3.852-kb mRNA. Five duplicated FGF-7 gene sequences that localized to chromosome 9 were predicted not to generate functional protein products, thus validating the use of FGF-7-null mice as an experimental model. Recombinant FGF-7 and -10 induced proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice in vivo.To determine the extent that induction of urothelial cell proliferation during the bladder response to injury is dependent on FGF-7, an animal model of partial bladder outlet obstruction was developed. Unbiased stereology was used to measure the percentage of proliferating urothelial cells between obstructed groups of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice. The stereological analysis indicated that a statistical significant difference did not exist between the two groups, suggesting that FGF-7 is not essential for urothelial cell proliferation in response to partial outlet obstruction. In contrast, a significant increase in FGF-10 expression was observed in the obstructed FGF-7-null group, indicating that the compensatory pathway that functions in this model results in urothelial repair.

  12. Advanced small cell carcinoma of the bladder: clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes in 960 patients and comparison with urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geynisman, Daniel M; Handorf, Elizabeth; Wong, Yu-Ning; Doyle, Jamie; Plimack, Elizabeth R; Horwitz, Eric M; Canter, Daniel J; Uzzo, Robert G; Kutikov, Alexander; Smaldone, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes in advanced small cell bladder cancer (aSCBC) patients and compare to those with urothelial carcinoma (UC). Individuals in the National Cancer Data Base with a diagnosis of either nodal (TxN+M0) or distant metastatic (TxNxM1) disease were identified from 1998 to 2010. We assessed the relationships between stage, treatment modalities and survival in the aSCBC cohort and compared these to UC patients. In the 960 patient aSCBC cohort (62% M1), 50% received palliative therapy alone, 68% in M1 versus 21% in M0 groups (P carcinoma patients (n = 27,796, 45% M1) lived longer compared to aSCBC patients in the N+M0 group (17.3 months vs. 13.0 months, P = 0.0007). There were not clinically significant differences in OS between UC and aSCBC patients in the M1 group. Advanced SCBC is a rare disease with a poor survival and palliative therapy is common, especially in M1 patients. In comparison to UC, the outcomes for aSCBC patients are worse in those with lymph node only involvement but similar in those with distant disease. PMID:26679712

  13. Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Prepuce and Glans Penis: Suspected Implantation of Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer via Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Makino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastatic implantation of non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma via urine is a rare finding, and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here, we present a case of metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the prepuce and glans penis, which was suspected to be an implantation of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer via urine. The patient had pseudophimosis of the penis, and contact with urine containing urothelial carcinoma cells was considered to be the cause of the metastatic implantation.

  14. Screening for Bladder and Other Urothelial Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Using tobacco , especially smoking cigarettes. Having a family history of bladder cancer. Having certain changes in the genes . Being exposed to paints, dyes, metals or petroleum products in the workplace. Past treatment with radiation therapy to the pelvis or with certain anticancer drugs, ...

  15. Simultaneous Development of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Multifocal Urothelial Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Keng Chuang; Heng-Chang Chuang; Kwai-Fong Ng

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of multifocal urothelial carcinoma (UC) and ipsilateral renalcell carcinoma (RCC) is rare. We report a 67-year-old woman with multifocal, infiltratingurothelial carcinoma and unilateral renal cell carcinoma. She was referred to our departmentbecause of painless gross hematuria. Cystoscopy, computed tomography and retrogradepyelography studies revealed bladder, bilateral renal and ureter UC. She was treated withtransurethral resection of the bladder tumor followed by bi...

  16. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF UROTHELIAL BLADDER CANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Bevizova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant cancers of urinary bladder are the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract and the fourth most common malignancy in general, especially in men. The aim of this study was a retrospective analysis of selected markers (p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin of urinary bladder cancers from the Department of Urology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic between years 2007 and 2009. We analysed 244 patients (202 males, 42 females with diagnosed bladder cancer via cystoscopy and subsequent transurethral resection. Patients’ age varied from 36 to 98 years. Obtained samples were fixed by 10% buffered formalin for 24 to 48 h. Subsequently, they were dehydrated in ascending ethanol series and embedded in paraffin. The parafin sections of 5 µm were prepared by microtome and they were stained by haematoxylin and eosin. The antibodies against to p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin were used in immunohistochemical analysis. Statistical evaluation was performed via SPSS using non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test and p values<0.05 were considered statistically significant. No significant differences in the expression of selected markers were found between genders. Expression of p53 and Ki-67, in G1 and G2 of low grade tumours was lower in comparison to their expression in G3 tumors. Expression of E-cadherin was the opposite in this case. The expression of p53 and Ki-67 positively correlated with tumor’s depth of invasion, while the expression of E-cadherin significantly decreased. In case of T4 tumors, the expression of all markers exhibited consistently high values. When analysing tumor multiplicity, the expression of p53 and Ki-67 significantly decreased, while the expression of E-cadherin significantly increased. Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that the analysis of p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin expression is essential for diagnostics and prognostics of bladder cancer and should be routinely used in daily practise together with

  17. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. PMID:26908176

  18. New therapeutic targets in the management of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverrisson EF

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Einar F Sverrisson, Patrick N Espiritu, Philippe E SpiessDepartment of Genitourinary Oncology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, despite the myriad of treatment approaches and our progressively increasing knowledge into its disease processes, remains one of the most clinically challenging problems in modern urological clinical practice. New therapies target biomolecular pathways and cellular mediators responsible for regulating cell growth and metabolism, both of which are frequently overexpressed in malignant urothelial cells, with the intent of inducing cell death by limiting cellular metabolism and growth, creating an immune response, or selectively delivering or activating a cytotoxic agent. These new and novel therapies may offer a potential for reduced toxicity and an encouraging hope for better treatment outcomes, particularly for a disease often refractory or not amenable to the current therapeutic approaches.Keywords: targeted therapy, intravesical agents, systemic therapies

  19. Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 Infection and Microscopic Patterns of Urothelial Tumors of the Urinary Bladder in Water Buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Maiolino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic patterns of thirty-four urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of water buffaloes from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey are here described. All the animals grazed on lands rich in bracken fern. Histological diagnosis was assessed using morphological parameters recently suggested for the urinary bladder tumors of cattle. Papillary carcinoma was the most common neoplastic lesion (22/34 observed in this study, and low-grade carcinoma was more common (seventeen cases than high-grade carcinoma (five cases. Papilloma, papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP, and invasive carcinomas were less frequently seen. Carcinoma in situ (CIS was often detected associated with some papillary and invasive carcinomas. De novo (primary CIS was rare representing 3% of tumors of this series. A peculiar feature of the most urothelial tumors was the presence in the tumor stroma of immune cells anatomically organized in tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs. Bovine papillomavirus type-2 (PV-2 E5 oncoprotein was detected by molecular and immunohistochemistry procedures. Early protein, E2, and late protein, L1, were also detected by immunohistochemical studies. Morphological and molecular findings show that BPV-2 infection contributes to the development of urothelial bladder carcinogenesis also in water buffaloes.

  20. Urothelial Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Birder, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Beyond serving as a simple barrier, there is growing evidence that the urinary bladder urothelium exhibits specialized sensory properties and play a key role in the detection and transmission of both physiological and nociceptive stimuli. These urothelial cells exhibit the ability to sense changes in their extracellular environment including the ability to respond to chemical, mechanical and thermal stimuli that may communicate the state of the urothelial environment to the underlying nervous...

  1. Optimization of porcine urothelial cell cultures: Best practices, recommendations, and threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Czapiewska, Monika; Jundzill, Arkadiusz; Bodnar, Magdalena; Balcerczyk, Daria; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Nowacki, Maciej; Marszalek, Andrzej; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-07-01

    Many experimental approaches have been conducted in order to isolate urothelial cells from bladder tissue biopsies, but each method described has utilized different protocols and sources of bladder tissue. In this study, we compared the different methods of urothelial cell isolation available in literature together with standardized methods in order to obtain more unified results. Five methods for primary porcine urothelial culture establishment were compared: tissue explants and four enzymatic methods utilizing collagenase II, dispase II, combination of dispase II and trypsin, and trypsin alone. The average number of isolated cells, cell morphology, success of established culture, average number of cells from the first passage, expression of p63 and pancytokeratin and the characterization of urothelial cell growth, and aging were analyzed during the in vitro culture. The method utilizing dispase II was the most efficient and reproducible method for the isolation and culture of porcine urothelial cells when compared to the other tested methods. Urothelial cells obtained by this method grew considerably well and the cultures were established with high efficiency, which enabled us in obtaining a large quantity of cells with normal morphology. Contamination with fibroblasts in this method was the lowest. The utilization of a proper method for urothelial cell isolation is a critical step in the urinary tract regeneration when using tissue engineering techniques. In summary, this study demonstrated that by utilizing the described method with dispase II, a suitable number of cells was achieved, proving the method useful for tissue regeneration. PMID:27079486

  2. uPAR Expression Pattern in Patients with Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Line Hammer; Pappot, Helle; Iversen, Benedikte Richter;

    2015-01-01

    during cancer invasion and metastasis and is an established prognostic marker in various cancer diseases other than bladder cancer. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumour-tissue blocks from 186 patients treated with radical cystectomy were analysed. uPAR expression was scored as either negative or......The objective of the present study was to confirm the expression and localisation pattern of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) focusing on its possible clinical relevance in patients with urothelial neoplasia of the bladder. uPAR is a central molecule in tissue remodelling...... positive as well as by the actual score. Separate scores were obtained for cancer cells, macrophages and myofibroblasts at the invasive front and in tumour core. We were able to confirm, in an independent patient cohort, the tissue expression and localisation pattern of uPAR as investigated by...

  3. Loss of the urothelial differentiation marker FOXA1 is associated with high grade, late stage bladder cancer and increased tumor proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J DeGraff

    Full Text Available Approximately 50% of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC develop metastatic disease, which is almost invariably lethal. However, our understanding of pathways that drive aggressive behavior of MIBC is incomplete. Members of the FOXA subfamily of transcription factors are implicated in normal urogenital development and urologic malignancies. FOXA proteins are implicated in normal urothelial differentiation, but their role in bladder cancer is unknown. We examined FOXA expression in commonly used in vitro models of bladder cancer and in human bladder cancer specimens, and used a novel in vivo tissue recombination system to determine the functional significance of FOXA1 expression in bladder cancer. Logistic regression analysis showed decreased FOXA1 expression is associated with increasing tumor stage (p<0.001, and loss of FOXA1 is associated with high histologic grade (p<0.001. Also, we found that bladder urothelium that has undergone keratinizing squamous metaplasia, a precursor to the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC exhibited loss of FOXA1 expression. Furthermore, 81% of cases of SCC of the bladder were negative for FOXA1 staining compared to only 40% of urothelial cell carcinomas. In addition, we showed that a subpopulation of FOXA1 negative urothelial tumor cells are highly proliferative. Knockdown of FOXA1 in RT4 bladder cancer cells resulted in increased expression of UPK1B, UPK2, UPK3A, and UPK3B, decreased E-cadherin expression and significantly increased cell proliferation, while overexpression of FOXA1 in T24 cells increased E-cadherin expression and significantly decreased cell growth and invasion. In vivo recombination of bladder cancer cells engineered to exhibit reduced FOXA1 expression with embryonic rat bladder mesenchyme and subsequent renal capsule engraftment resulted in enhanced tumor proliferation. These findings provide the first evidence linking loss of FOXA1 expression with histological subtypes

  4. The Role of Structural Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brunner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM plays a key role in the modulation of cancer cell invasion. In urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UC the role of ECM proteins has been widely studied. The mechanisms, which are involved in the development of invasion, progression and generalization, are complex, depending on the interaction of ECM proteins with each other as well as with cancer cells. The following review will focus on the pathogenetic role and prognostic value of structural proteins, such as laminins, collagens, fi bronectin (FN, tenascin (Tn-C and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 in UC. In addition, the role of integrins mediating the interaction of ECM molecules and cancer cells will be addressed, since integrin-mediated FN, Tn-C and TSP1 interactions seem to play an important role during tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis.

  5. Clinicopathological spectrum of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder - a study of 541 cases at afip pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the clinicopathological spectrum of urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder. Study Design: Descriptive case series. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), from 1st January 2012 to 31st October 2013. Patients and methods: All cases of urothelial carcinoma were retrieved from AFIP tumour registry. Age, gender, histological type, grade and variant of tumour was noted. The data was analyzed by using computer software program SPSS version 19. Descriptive statistics and frequencies were calculated for age, gender, histological type, grade and variants. Results: A total of 541 cases of urothelial carcinoma were included in the study. The age at presentation ranged from 22 to 94 years with median age of 63.56 ± 12 years. A number (61%) of the cases were from 6th to 8th decade of life. The gender distribution showed 92.8% of patients (n=502) were males and 7.2 % (n=39) were females with male to female ratio of 12.9: 1. The most common histological type was papillary urothelial carcinoma; present in 493 cases (91.1%) followed by nonpapillary urothelial carcinoma; 48 cases (8.9%). Among papillary urothelial carcinomas, 302 cases (61.3%) were high grade and 191 cases (38.7%) were low grade. Among nonpapillary urothelial carcinomas, all were high grade and variant histology was observed in all cases. The variants included squamoid differentiation which was present in 27 cases (56.3%), nested variant in 8 cases (16.7%). The sarcomatoid, undifferentiated and clear cell variants in 3 cases (6.3%) each, micropapillary variant in 2 cases (4.2%), lymphoepithelial-like and plasmacytoid variant in 1 case (2.1%) each. Conclusion: Urothelial carcinoma is more common in males. Most of the tumours are papillary urothelial carcinomas. Most of them are high grade and pure urothelial carcinomas. A number of histologic variants are also recognized. Among them, squamoid differentiation is the most common variant histology. (author)

  6. Expression and Role of GPR87 in Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kakehi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The orphan GPR87 has recently been matched with its ligand LPA, which is a lipid mediator with multiple physiological functions, including cancer cell proliferation. This study aimed to clarify the role of GPR87 in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. GPR87 expression was assessed in seven human bladder cancer cell lines. A replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector expressing shRNA targeting GPR87 (Ad-shGPR87, was constructed. Gene silencing was carried out using Ad-shGPR87. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for transurethral resection of bladder tumor samples from 71 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. We observed GPR87 expression in five of the seven cell lines, and silencing GPR87 gene expression significantly reduced cell viability. GPR87 expression was positive in 38 (54% of 71 tumors. Ki-67 index was associated with positive GPR87 staining status (p < 0.0001. Patients with GPR87-positive tumors had shorter intravesical recurrence-free survival than those with GPR87-negative tumors (p = 0.010. Multivariate analysis revealed that GPR87 staining status was an independent prognostic parameter for intravesical recurrence (p = 0.041. Progression from non-muscle-invasive to muscle-invasive tumor was more frequently observed in patients with GPR87-positive tumors, although this trend did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.056. These results warrant further prospective studies to clarify the role of GPR87 expression in intravesical recurrence and progression in bladder cancer.

  7. Muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkowicz, S Bruce; van Poppel, Hendrik; Mickisch, Gerald; Pansadoro, Vito; Thüroff, Joachim; Soloway, Mark S; Chang, Sam; Benson, Mitchell; Fukui, Iwao

    2007-01-01

    Muscle-invasive urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma is a potentially lethal condition for which an attempt at curative surgery is required. Clinical staging does not allow for accurate determination of eventual pathologic status. Muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma is a highly progressive disease, and initiation of definitive therapy within 3 months of diagnosis is worthwhile. Age is not a contraindication for aggressive surgical care, and surgical candidates should be evaluated in the context of overall medical comorbidity. In those patients who undergo surgery, clinical pathways may streamline care. Radical cystectomy remains the "gold standard" of therapy, providing 5-year survival rates of 75% to 80% in patients with organ-confined disease, yet organ-sparing procedures demonstrate clinical effectiveness as well. Cystectomy should be undertaken with the intent of performing complete pelvic lymph node dissection and attaining surgically negative margins. In younger female patients, the preservation of reproductive organs may be achieved in many cases. Prostate- and seminal vesicle-preserving cystectomy has been performed, yet the long-term safety and efficacy of such a procedure remains to be determined. Laparoscopic and robotic cystectomy procedures continue to be explored by several investigators. The role of "radical transurethral resection" in muscle-invasive disease is limited to a small cohort of patients, and, when it is performed, cystectomy may be required to consolidate therapy. Postoperative follow-up after cystectomy should occur over short intervals during the first 2 years and can be extended, but not discontinued, beyond that time. Currently, no tumor markers have been prospectively validated to help guide clinical decision making, and prospective trials incorporating marker data should be encouraged. PMID:17280906

  8. Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Aldousari, Saad; Sircar, Kanishka; Kassouf, Wassim

    2009-01-01

    Plasmacytoid bladder cancer is a rare variant of transitional cell carcinoma. A 57-year-old man was referred to our institution for management of invasive transitional cell carcinoma diagnosed at a peripheral hospital. His complaints were of vague lower abdominal pain with associated urgency and frequency requiring oxybutynin. Metastatic workup was negative and was subsequently scheduled for a radical cystectomy. Routine colonoscopy 3 weeks prior to surgery was negative. Intraoperatively, he ...

  9. Value of positron emission tomography in diagnosing synchronous penile metastasis from urothelial bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rouanne, M.; Alhammadi, A.; Vilain, D.; Radulescu, C.; Lebret, T.

    2015-01-01

    Metastases to the penis are extremely rare events. Most frequently, penile metastases come from the urogenital system (bladder, prostate) or the rectum-sigmoid colon. Usually painful, penile lesions may be asymptomatic, making diagnosis more challenging. Hence, we report the adding value of 18F-fludeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in the detection of penile metastases originating from urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Arguably, penile metastases...

  10. Genetic instability persists in non-neoplastic urothelial cells from patients with a history of urothelial cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro Marcondes, João Paulo; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor; Gontijo, Alisson M; de Camargo, João Lauro Viana; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common genitourinary neoplasms in industrialized countries. Multifocality and high recurrence rates are prominent clinical features of this disease and contribute to its high morbidity. Therefore, more sensitive and less invasive techniques could help identify individuals with asymptomatic disease. In this context, we used the micronucleus assay to evaluate whether cytogenetic alterations could be used as biomarkers for monitoring patients with a history of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC). We determined the frequency of micronucleated urothelial cells (MNC) in exfoliated bladder cells from 105 patients with (n = 52) or without (n = 53) a history of UCC, all of whom tested negative for neoplasia by cytopathological and histopathological analyses. MNC frequencies were increased in patients with a history of UCC (non-smoker and smoker/ex-smoker patients vs non-smoker and smoker/ex-smoker controls; pMNC frequency compared to patients with non-recurrent neoplasia. However, logistic regression using smoking habits, age and gender as confounding factors did not confirm MNC frequency as a marker for UCC recurrence. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis (using a pan-centromeric probe) showed that micronuclei (MN) arose mainly from clastogenic events regardless of UCC and/or smoking histories. In conclusion, our results confirm previous indications that subjects with a history of UCC harbor genetically unstable cells in the bladder urothelium. Furthermore, these results support using the micronucleus assay as an important tool for monitoring patients with a history of UCC and tumor recurrence. PMID:24465937

  11. Molecular markers for urothelial bladder cancer prognosis: Toward implementation in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhijn, B.W. van; Catto, J.W.; Goebell, P.J.; Knuchel, R.; Shariat, S.F.; Poel, H.G. van der; Sanchez-Carbayo, M.; Thalmann, G.N.; Schmitz-Drager, B.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To summarize the current status of clinicopathological and molecular markers for the prediction of recurrence or progression or both in non-muscle-invasive and survival in muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer, to address the reproducibility of pathology and molecular markers, and to

  12. [A CASE OF UROTHELIAL CARCINOMA OF THE URINARY BLADDER WITH SQUAMOUS DIFFERENTIATION RESPONDING TO PACLITAXEL AND CARBOPLATIN NEOADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Eri; Nishino, Aki; Nagai, Yasuharu; Yasuda, Muneo; Tahara, Hideo; Kino, Shigeo; Kanno, Norihumi

    2015-07-01

    A 42-year-old man was referred to our hospital for macrohematuria. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed right hydronephrosis and a retroperitoneal mass, located next to right side of the bladder. Cystoscopy showed a protruded lesion covered with normal mucosa at the right lateral wall. The patient underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor and biopsies of the bladder wall. Histological examination showed squamous cell carcinoma. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy using paclitaxel and carboplatin (TC) was performed. A total cystectomy, right nephroureterectomy and construction of the ileal conduit were performed after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Histological examination showed urothelial carcinoma with squamous cell differentiation. Unexpectedly, a small amount of CIS was detected only in the vicinity of the TUR scar. The patient received 2 cycles of TC chemotherapy as adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, 11 months later, local recurrence and liver metastasis were detected. He died 17 months after the surgery. PMID:26419080

  13. Diagnosis and treatment in primary bladder small cell carcinoma: Literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Orcun Celik; Gokhan Ekin; Tumay Ipekci; Salih Budak; Yusuf Ozlem Ilbey

    2016-01-01

    Small cell bladder carcinoma is a rare and frequently fatal disease. It can be distinguished from classical urothelial carcinoma microscopically and immunohistochemically. Small cell bladder carcinoma has histologically similar properties with other small cell carcinomas in other organs. It has a worse prognosis when compared to urothelial bladder cancer. Multimodal treatments are recommended although there is no widely accepted consensus regarding to the treatment algorithm because of its ra...

  14. Urothelial neoplasm of the bladder in childhood and adolescence: a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haci Polat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: Bladder tumors are rare in children and adolescents. For this reason, the diagnosis is sometimes delayed in pediatric patients. We aimed to describe the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up methods of bladder urothelial neoplasms in children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We carried out a retrospective multicenter study involving patients who were treated between 2008 and 2014. Eleven patients aged younger than 18 years were enrolled in the study. In all the patients, a bladder tumor was diagnosed using ultrasonography and was treated through transurethral resection of the bladder (TURBT. Results: Nine of the 11 patients (82% were admitted with gross hematuria. The average delay in diagnosis was 3 months (range, 0–16 months until the ultrasonographic diagnosis was performed from the first episodes of macroscopic hematuria. A single exophytic tumor (1–4cm was present in each patient. The pathology of all patients was reported as superficial urothelial neoplasm: two with papilloma, one with papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP, four with low grade pTa, and four with low grade pT1. No recurrence was observed during regular cystoscopic and ultrasonographic follow-up. Conclusions: Regardless of the presence of hematuria, bladder tumors in children are usually not considered because urothelial carcinoma in this population is extremely rare, which causes a delay in diagnosis. Fortunately, the disease has a good prognosis and recurrences are infrequent. Cystoscopy may be unnecessary in the follow-up of children with bladder tumors. We believe that ultrasonography is sufficient in follow-up.

  15. Low grade urothelial carcinoma mimicking basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia in needle prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Arista-Nasr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The vast majority of urothelial carcinomas infiltrating the bladder are consistent with high-grade tumors that can be easily recognized as malignant in needle prostatic biopsies. In contrast, the histological changes of low-grade urothelial carcinomas in this kind of biopsy have not been studied. Materials and Methods We describe the clinicopathologic features of two patients with low-grade bladder carcinomas infiltrating the prostate. They reported dysuria and hematuria. Both had a slight elevation of the prostate specific antigen and induration of the prostatic lobes. Needle biopsies were performed. At endoscopy bladder tumors were found in both cases. Results Both biopsies showed nests of basophilic cells and cells with perinuclear clearing and slight atypia infiltrating acini and small prostatic ducts. The stroma exhibited extensive desmoplasia and chronic inflammation. The original diagnosis was basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia. The bladder tumors also showed low-grade urothelial carcinoma. In one case, the neoplasm infiltrated the lamina propria, and in another, the muscle layer. In both, a transurethral resection was performed for obstructive urinary symptoms. The neoplasms were positive for high molecular weight keratin (34BetaE12 and thrombomodulin. No metastases were found in either of the patients, and one of them has survived for five years. Conclusions The diagnosis of low-grade urothelial carcinoma in prostate needle biopsies is difficult and may simulate benign prostate lesions including basal cell hyperplasia and urothelial metaplasia. It is crucial to recognize low-grade urothelial carcinoma in needle biopsies because only an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can improve the prognosis for these patients.

  16. Transcriptional profiling of the bladder in urogenital schistosomiasis reveals pathways of inflammatory fibrosis and urothelial compromise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debalina Ray

    Full Text Available Urogenital schistosomiasis, chronic infection by Schistosoma haematobium, affects 112 million people worldwide. S. haematobium worm oviposition in the bladder wall leads to granulomatous inflammation, fibrosis, and egg expulsion into the urine. Despite the global impact of urogenital schistosomiasis, basic understanding of the associated pathologic mechanisms has been incomplete due to the lack of suitable animal models. We leveraged our recently developed mouse model of urogenital schistosomiasis to perform the first-ever profiling of the early molecular events that occur in the bladder in response to the introduction of S. haematobium eggs. Microarray analysis of bladders revealed rapid, differential transcription of large numbers of genes, peaking three weeks post-egg administration. Many differentially transcribed genes were related to the canonical Type 2 anti-schistosomal immune response, as reflected by the development of egg-based bladder granulomata. Numerous collagen and metalloproteinase genes were differentially transcribed over time, revealing complex remodeling and fibrosis of the bladder that was confirmed by Masson's Trichrome staining. Multiple genes implicated in carcinogenesis pathways, including vascular endothelial growth factor-, oncogene-, and mammary tumor-related genes, were differentially transcribed in egg-injected bladders. Surprisingly, junctional adhesion molecule, claudin and uroplakin genes, key components for maintaining the urothelial barrier, were globally suppressed after bladder exposure to eggs. This occurred in the setting of urothelial hyperplasia and egg shedding in urine. Thus, S. haematobium egg expulsion is associated with intricate modulation of the urothelial barrier on the cellular and molecular level. Taken together, our findings have important implications for understanding host-parasite interactions and carcinogenesis in urogenital schistosomiasis, and may provide clues for novel therapeutic

  17. Calpain3 is expressed in a proteolitically active form in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Calpain 3 (Capn3, also named p94, is a skeletal muscle tissue-specific protein known to be responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A. Recent experimental studies have hypothesized a pro-apoptotic role of Capn3 in some melanoma cell lines. So far the link between calpain3 and tumors comes from in vitro studies. The objective of this study was to describe Capn3 activation in naturally occurring urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder in cattle. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we describe, for the first time in veterinary and comparative oncology, the activation of Capn3 in twelve urothelial tumor cells of the urinary bladder of cattle. Capn3 protein was initially identified with nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS in a co-immunoprecipitation experiment on E2F3, known to be a transcription factor playing a crucial role in bladder carcinogenesis in humans. Capn3 expression was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Finally, the Ca(2+-dependent proteolytic activity of Capn3 was assayed following ion exchange chromatography. Morphologically, Capn3 expression was documented by immunohistochemical methods. In fact numerous tumor cells showed an intracytoplasmic immunoreactivity, which was more rarely evident also at nuclear level. In urothelial tumors, bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2 DNA was amplified by PCR and the expression of E5 protein, the major oncogenic protein of BVP-2, was detected by western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. E2F3 overexpression and pRb protein downregulation were shown by western blotting. CONCLUSION: The role of capn3 protein in urothelial cancer of the urinary bladder remains to be elucidated: further studies would be required to determine the precise function of this protease in tumor development and progression. However, we suggest that activated Capn3 may be involved in molecular

  18. Chromosomal imbalances in successive moments of human bladder urothelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento e Pontes, Merielen Garcia; da Silveira, Sara Martorelli; Trindade Filho, José Carlos de Souza;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To understand developmental characteristics of urinary bladder carcinomas (UBC) by evaluating genomic alterations and p53 protein expression in primary tumors, their recurrences, and in the morphologically normal urothelium of UBC patients. METHODS: Tumors and their respective recurren...

  19. Diagnosis and treatment in primary bladder small cell carcinoma: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orcun Celik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Small cell bladder carcinoma is a rare and frequently fatal disease. It can be distinguished from classical urothelial carcinoma microscopically and immunohistochemically. Small cell bladder carcinoma has histologically similar properties with other small cell carcinomas in other organs. It has a worse prognosis when compared to urothelial bladder cancer. Multimodal treatments are recommended although there is no widely accepted consensus regarding to the treatment algorithm because of its rarity. In this review, clinical properties and diagnosis of small cell bladder carcinoma, its histopathological and immunohistochemical properties and treatment modalities are examined.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment in primary bladder small cell carcinoma: Literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Orcun; Ekin, Gokhan; Ipekci, Tumay; Budak, Salih; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2016-03-01

    Small cell bladder carcinoma is a rare and frequently fatal disease. It can be distinguished from classical urothelial carcinoma microscopically and immunohistochemically. Small cell bladder carcinoma has histologically similar properties with other small cell carcinomas in other organs. It has a worse prognosis when compared to urothelial bladder cancer. Multimodal treatments are recommended although there is no widely accepted consensus regarding to the treatment algorithm because of its rarity. In this review, clinical properties and diagnosis of small cell bladder carcinoma, its histopathological and immunohistochemical properties and treatment modalities are examined. PMID:27072176

  1. Pure primary small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: A rare diagnostic entity

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Gon; Bipasa Majumdar; Ranjan Kumar Dey; Subrata Kumar Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm accounting for only 0.3-0.7% of all bladder tumors. Since the tumor is very rare, pathogenesis is uncertain. Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are mixed with classic urothelial carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the bladder in 68% cases, making pure primary small cell carcinoma even a rarer entity. The unknown etiology and natural history of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bla...

  2. ROS generation via NOX4 and its utility in the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kiyohide

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS production via NADPH oxidase (NOX contributes to various types of cancer progression. In the present research, we examined the pathobiological role of NADPH oxidase (NOX4-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in urothelial carcinoma (UC of the urinary bladder, and demonstrated the utility of ROS labeling in urine cytology. Methods NOX4 gene was silenced in vivo and in vitro by NOX4 siRNA transfection with or without atlocollagen. Cell cycle and measurement of ROS were analyzed by flowcytometry. Orthotopic implantation animal model was used in vivo experiment. NOX4 expression in urothelial carcinoma cells was observed by immunohistochemical analysis using surgical specimens of human bladder cancer. Urine cytology was performed after treatment with ROS detection reagents in addition to Papanicolaou staining. Results NOX4 was overexpressed in several UC cell lines and the NOX inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium reduced intracellular ROS and induced p16-dependent cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Moreover, silencing of NOX4 by siRNA significantly reduced cancer cell growth in vivo as assessed in an orthotopic mouse model. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated high expression of NOX4 in low grade/non-invasive and high grade/invasive UC including precancerous lesions such as dysplasia but not in normal urothelium. Then, we assessed the usefulness of cytological analysis of ROS producing cells in urine (ROS-C. Urine samples obtained from UC cases and normal controls were treated with fluorescent reagents labeling the hydrogen peroxide/superoxide anion and cytological atypia of ROS positive cells were analyzed. As a result, the sensitivity for detection of low grade, non-invasive UC was greatly increased (35% in conventional cytology (C-C vs. 75% in ROS-C, and the specificity was 95%. Through ROS-C, we observed robust improvement in the accuracy of follow-up urine cytology for cases with previously

  3. Phloroglucinols inhibit chemical mediators and xanthine oxidase, and protect cisplatin-induced cell death by reducing reactive oxygen species in normal human urothelial and bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai-Wei; Huang, A-Mei; Tu, Huang-Yao; Weng, Jing-Ru; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Wei, Bai-Luh; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Wang, Jih-Pyang; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2009-10-14

    Phloroglucinols, garcinielliptones HA-HE (1-5), and C (6) were studied in vitro for their inhibitory effects on chemical mediators released from mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Compound 6 revealed significant inhibitory effect on release of lysozyme from rat neutrophils stimulated with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)/cytochalasin B (CB). Compounds 3, 4, and 6 showed significant inhibitory effects on superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils stimulated with (fMLP)/(CB), while compounds 1 and 5 revealed inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) formation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Compounds 1 and 3-6 showed inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO) and could inhibit the DNA breakage caused by O2(-*). Treatment of NTUB1 with 2 to 60 microM compound 3 and 5 microM cisplatin and SV-HUC1 with 9 to 60 microM 3 and 5 microM cisplatin, respectively, resulted in an increase of viability of cells. These results indicated that compounds 1 and 3-6 showed anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities. Compound 3 mediates through the suppression of XO activity and reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and protection of subsequent cell death. PMID:19754119

  4. Cystitis: From Urothelial Cell Biology to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilho Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystitis is a urinary bladder disease with many causes and symptoms. The severity of cystitis ranges from mild lower abdominal discomfort to life-threatening haemorrhagic cystitis. The course of disease is often chronic or recurrent. Although cystitis represents huge economical and medical burden throughout the world and in many cases treatments are ineffective, the mechanisms of its origin and development as well as measures for effective treatment are still poorly understood. However, many studies have demonstrated that urothelial dysfunction plays a crucial role. In the present review we first discuss fundamental issues of urothelial cell biology, which is the core for comprehension of cystitis. Then we focus on many forms of cystitis, its current treatments, and advances in its research. Additionally we review haemorrhagic cystitis with one of the leading causative agents being chemotherapeutic drug cyclophosphamide and summarise its management strategies. At the end we describe an excellent and widely used animal model of cyclophosphamide induced cystitis, which gives researches the opportunity to get a better insight into the mechanisms involved and possibility to develop new therapy approaches.

  5. Bladder cancer will grow anywhere: report of a urothelial carcinoma drop metastasis to the vagina and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlman, Matthew A; Bevill, Mark D; Goodheart, Michael J; Brown, James A; O'Donnell, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Urothelial carcinoma is the 2nd most common cancer of the urinary tract and accounts for the majority of cases of bladder cancer. Metastases are not infrequently encountered, increasing with disease stage and are most commonly seen in the bones and lungs. Many other sites have been described including the omentum, liver, and ovaries. An extremely rare site of metastatic disease however is within the vagina. Here we present a case of a probable vaginal 'drop metastasis' from previously treated urothelial carcinoma in the ureter and bladder. PMID:27544563

  6. 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings of Metastasis to Spongy Body of Penis From Urothelial Carcinoma of Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Li; Fang, Na; Zeng, Lei; Wu, Zeng-Jie; Cui, Xin-Jian

    2016-05-01

    The spongy body of the penis metastasis from other primary sites is a rare clinical entity. It is frequently associated with widespread metastatic disease and poor prognosis clinically. We report a case of a 61-year-old man with a previous history of cystectomy due to infiltrating urothelial carcinoma of the bladder 12 months ago and presented with penile shaft swelling pain and hematuria for 3 months. The restaging F-FDG PET/CT scan demonstrated a hypermetabolic mass at his penile shaft. This lesion was confirmed on phallectomy to be infiltrating urothelial carcinoma metastasis from the known primary bladder tumor. PMID:26359570

  7. Expression of OCT4A: The First Step to the Next Stage of Urothelial Bladder Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Jóźwicki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor is a transcription factor responsible for maintaining the pluripotent properties of embryonic stem cells. In this paper, we present the results of studies to investigate the role of the OCT4 splicing variant in urothelial bladder cancer and the relationship between the OCT4 phenotype and the morphological parameters of tumor malignancy. Ninety patients who received a cystectomy for bladder cancer were enrolled. The expression of OCT4 protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The ratio of OCT4-positive cells was the lowest in pT1 (pathological assessment (p—tumor extent confined to mucosa (T1 tumors and the highest in pTis (non-papillary tumor extent confined to urothelium and pT2 (tumor extent including muscularis propria tumors. Information about the percentage of OCT4A-positive tumor cells could facilitate choosing the treatment mode in borderline pTis–pT1 (crossing the border of the basement membrane; the first stage of progression and pT1–pT2 (crossing the border of the muscularis propria; the second stage of progression cases: a higher percentage of OCT4A-positive cells should support more radical therapy. A significantly higher percentage of cases with moderate OCT4 intensity was found in metastasizing (the third stage of progression cases with >2 positive lymph nodes. The percentage of OCT4-positive cells was significantly higher for cancers with a high grade, higher non-classic differentiation number and greater aggressiveness of invasion. The differentiation, maturation and aggressiveness of tumor invasion appear to depend on the expression of the OCT4 phenotype in cancer cells, similar to the successive stages of malignancy progression in urothelial cancer.

  8. Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder Metastatic to Bone Marrow Presenting as Isolated Thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Chan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal system is a frequent site for metastases of urothelial carcinoma (UC of the bladder (22–37%. Of those cases involving bone, the marrow is infiltrated in 27% of patients. Imaging modalities, such as X-ray and CT, will detect gross skeletal lesions in the vast majority of these patients with bone marrow involvement, however, most patients with bone involvement are symptomatic at presentation. Additionally, there have been few reports in the literature of bone marrow metastases from UC presenting with isolated thrombocytopenia.

  9. Loss of GATA3 in bladder cancer promotes cell migration and invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yi; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Izumi, Koji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is known as a breast tumor suppressor as well as a urothelial marker, and its loss is often seen in high-grade invasive bladder cancer. Nonetheless, GATA3 functions in bladder cancer cells remain largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the effects of GATA3 silencing via RNA interference on cell migration, invasion, and proliferation of bladder cancer. GATA3 expression was downregulated in all four bladder cancer lines examined, compared with a non-neoplastic...

  10. Urothelial cells in smears from cervix uteri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Palaoro

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The umbrella cells may be mistaken for dysplastic cells originating in low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions lesions (LSILs due to their nuclear and cytoplasm sizes. Therefore, it is important to know the possibility of their appearance in the cervical smears, especially in post menopausal patients in order to avoid a false diagnosis of an intraepithelial lesion. It is unlikely that deeper cells of urothelium would be confused with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL cells. However, their presence might be a reason of mistake in the diagnosis. TCM is an under-recognized metaplastic phenomenon of the cervix and vagina, which is a mimicker of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The differential characteristic between umbrella cells, cells from TCM and the deeper urothelial cells, and LSIL and HSIL are detailed in the present paper.

  11. Hematuria in a 12-year-old child, a rare case of urothelial papilloma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Alexis Litchinko; Blaise Julien Meyrat; Antoine Nobile; Lara Raffoul; Gezim Dushi; Vanina Estremadoyro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 12-year-old boy with an isolated macroscopic hematuria. A urinary ultrasound revealed a bladder tumor next to the right ureteric orifice. A biopsy revealed a urothelial papilloma. He underwent a successful resection by cystostomy. This benign tumor is extremely rare in children and its management remains controversial.

  12. P53 Overexpression in Bladder Urothelial Neoplasms: New Aspect of World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the probable differences in P53 expression between papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP and varying grades of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder. Materials and Methods: Ten biopsy specimens of the patients with PUNLMP, 20 of the patients with papillary low-grade TCC, 20 of those with invasive high-grade TCC, and 10 of healthy individuals were stained for P53 protein by immunohitochemical methods. Histological grading was performed according to the World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology consensus classification of urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder. Results: Nuclear P53 protein in invasive high-grade TCC was slightly more frequent than that in noninvasive low-grade papillary TCC (P = .35. Ten percent of specimens with PUNLMP had nuclear P53 accumulation, while in low-grade and high-grade TCCs, 75% and 85% of the specimens were positive for P53 protein accumulation (P P53 was nil in all normal transitional epithelium specimens. Conclusion: Overexpression of P53 in papillary low-grade TCC and invasive high-grade TCC, while lacking of expression in PUNLMP indicates that mutations of P53

  13. Resolution of hypercalcemia of malignancy following radical cystectomy in a patient with paraneoplastic syndrome associated with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Harb-De La Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common finding associated with different types of cancers; however, its association with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is rare. We report a case of a 69-year-old male with nonmetastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder who developed hypercalcemia that failed to respond to medical management, but resolved completely after undergoing resection of the tumor through radical cystectomy.

  14. Pure primary small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: A rare diagnostic entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm accounting for only 0.3-0.7% of all bladder tumors. Since the tumor is very rare, pathogenesis is uncertain. Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are mixed with classic urothelial carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the bladder in 68% cases, making pure primary small cell carcinoma even a rarer entity. The unknown etiology and natural history of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder represent a challenge both to the pathologist and urologists for its diagnosis and treatment, respectively.

  15. Relevance of prostate cancer in patients with synchronous invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma: a monocentric retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Dell’Atti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We retrospectively reviewed data of patients with incidental prostate cancer (PCa who underwent radical cystoprostatectomy (RCP for invasive bladder cancer and we analyzed their features with regard to incidence, pathologic characteristics, clinical significance, and implications for management. Material and Methods: Clinical data and pathological features of 64 patients who underwent standard RCP for bladder cancer were included in this study. Besides the urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder, the location and tumor volume of the PCa, prostate apex involvement, Gleason score, pathological staging and surgical margins were evaluated. Clinically significant PCa was defined as a tumor with a Gleason 4 or 5 pattern, stage ≥ pT3, lymph node involvement, positive surgical margin or multifocality of three or more lesions. Postoperative follow-up was scheduled every 3 months in the first year, every 6 months in the second and third year, annually thereafter. Results: 11 out of 64 patients (17.2% who underwent RCP had incidentally diagnosed PCa. 3 cases (27.3% were diagnosed as significant PCa, while 8 cases (72.7% were clinically insignificant. The positive surgical margin of PCa was detected in 1 patient with significant disease. The prostate apex involvement was present in 1 patient of the significant PCa group. Median follow-up period was 47.8 ± 29.2 (range 4-79. During the follow-up, biochemical recurrence occurred in 1 patient (9%. Concernig the cancer specific survival there was no statistical significance (P = 0.326 between the clinically significant and clinical insignificant cancer group. Conclusions: In line with published studies, incidental PCa does not impact on the prognosis of bladder cancer of patients undergoing RCP.

  16. ROS generation via NOX4 and its utility in the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimoto Kiyohide; Anai Satoshi; Fujii Tomomi; Shimada Keiji; Konishi Noboru

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via NADPH oxidase (NOX) contributes to various types of cancer progression. In the present research, we examined the pathobiological role of NADPH oxidase (NOX)4-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the urinary bladder, and demonstrated the utility of ROS labeling in urine cytology. Methods NOX4 gene was silenced in vivo and in vitro by NOX4 siRNA transfection with or without atlocolla...

  17. Low grade urothelial carcinoma mimicking basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia in needle prostate biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Arista-Nasr, Julian; Martinez-Benitez, Braulio; Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Aguilar-Ayala, Elizmara; Aleman-Sanchez, Claudia Natalia; Ortiz-Bautista, Raul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The vast majority of urothelial carcinomas infiltrating the bladder are consistent with high-grade tumors that can be easily recognized as malignant in needle prostatic biopsies. In contrast, the histological changes of low-grade urothelial carcinomas in this kind of biopsy have not been studied. Materials and Methods We describe the clinicopathologic features of two patients with low-grade bladder carcinomas infiltrating the prostate. They reported dysuria and hematuria. Bot...

  18. High frequency of TERT promoter mutation in small cell carcinoma of bladder, but not in small cell carcinoma of other origins

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Xiaoyong; Zhuge, Jian; Bezerra, Stephania M.; Faraj, Sheila F.; Munari, Enrico; Fallon, John T.; Yang, Ximing J; Argani, Pedram; Netto, George J.; Zhong, Minghao

    2014-01-01

    TERT promoter mutations were recently discovered in melanoma by next generation sequencing. Subsequently, several malignancies including urothelial carcinoma were also found to be associated with the same TERT promoter mutations. Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the urinary bladder is a rare subtype with an aggressive clinical course. Despite the frequent occurrence of TERT promoter mutations in urothelial carcinoma, the incidence of the mutations in SCC of the urinary bladder is unknown. In add...

  19. Intravesical therapy for urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daher C. Chade

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB is a challenge for physicians and patients alike. This is largely due to the heterogeneous natural history of this disease, in which tumors range from indolent to rapidly progressive and eventually fatal. Moreover, the high rate of recurrence and progression cause significant morbidity, expense, and detriment to quality of life. The advent of effective and safe intravesical therapies has improved the management of non-muscle-invasive UCB. Nevertheless, despite over 30 years of research and clinical experience, the mechanism, risks, benefits, and optimal regimens and treatment algorithms remain unclear. Although immunotherapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG has been the mainstay of intravesical treatment and represents a significant advance in the interaction of immunology and oncology, its clinical effectiveness is accompanied by a wide range of adverse events. Here, we review the literature on intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy with the aim of evaluating the clinical utility of the different treatments and providing recommendations. Many studies over the years have compared efficacy and toxicities of different agents and regimens, and certain conclusions are now well supported by high-level evidence. Future perspectives and promising advances in drug development are discussed and areas of improvement are identified in order to promote better cancer control and decrease the rate and severity of side-effects.

  20. A Combined Clinicopathologic Analysis of 658 Urothelial Carcinoma Cases of Urinary Bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-zhi Zhang; Chao-fu Wang; Juan-juan Sun; Bao-hua Yu

    2012-01-01

    To study the clinicopathological features of patients with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder (UCB),and analyze the association of clinicopathological characteristics with tumor recurrence and progression.Methods Altogether 658 UCB cases in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center were collected from January 2006 to December 2010.The histopathologic materials and the clinical records were reviewed.Univariate and multivariate analyses were preformed to detect the association.Results The mean age of the patients was 61.97±12.97 years (range,20-90 years).Male to female ratio was about 5∶1.A total of 517 cases (78.6%) were superficial at the time of diagnosis (stage Ta/T1).The mean follow-up period was 22.36±24.92 months.Twenty-five patients lacking follow-up information were excluded in calculating recurrence and progression rates,the recurrence rate was about 37.0%(234/633),and progression rate about 6.2% (39/633).Three variables (grade,tumor growth pattern,and pathological stage) were found to be significant risk factors for tumor progression in univariate and multivariate analyses (P<0.05).Conclusions Most of the newly diagnosed UCB cases may be superficial diseases.Grade,tumor growth pattern,and pathological stage are associated with tumor progression of UCB.

  1. Immediate versus deferred chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (EORTC 30994): an intergroup, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sternberg, Cora N.; Skoneczna, Iwona; Kerst, J. Martijn; Albers, Peter; Fossa, Sophie D.; Agerbaek, Mads; Dumez, Herlinde; De Santis, Maria; Théodore, Christine; Leahy, Michael G.; Chester, John D; Verbaeys, Antony; Daugaard, Gedske; Wood, Lori; Witjes, J. Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Patients with muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder have poor survival after cystectomy. The EORTC 30994 trial aimed to compare immediate versus deferred cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

  2. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder diverticulum: A case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Xu Dong; Yan Xiao Ping; Wang Chen Liang; Li Zhi Jian; Zhang Ji Lin

    2013-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a mass with swiftly aggressive and metastatic, and with a poor prognosis. Due to its scarcity, no forward-looking researches assessing the most effective treatment have been issued in the medical literature. It can happen either in connection with urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma or in a pure form. Its treatment should include surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article...

  3. Chemotherapeutic potential of quercetin on human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oršolić, Nada; Karač, Ivo; Sirovina, Damir; Kukolj, Marina; Kunštić, Martina; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Štajcar, Damir

    2016-07-28

    In an effort to improve local bladder cancer control, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of quercetin on human bladder cancer T24 cells. The cytotoxic effect of quercetin against T24 cells was examined by MTT test, clonogenic assay as well as DNA damaging effect by comet assay. In addition, the cytotoxic effect of quercetin on the primary culture of papillary urothelial carcinoma (PUC), histopathological stage T1 of low- or high-grade tumours, was investigated. Our analysis demonstrated a high correlation between reduced number of colony and cell viability and an increase in DNA damage of T24 cells incubated with quercetin at doses of 1 and 50 µM during short term incubation (2 h). At all exposure times (24, 48 and 72 h), the efficacy of quercetin, administered at a 10× higher dose compared to T24 cells, was statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the primary culture of PUC. In conclusion, our study suggests that quercetin could inhibit cell proliferation and colony formation of human bladder cancer cells by inducing DNA damage and that quercetin may be an effective chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for papillary urothelial bladder cancer after transurethral resection. PMID:27149655

  4. Dose and temporal effects on gene expression profiles of urothelial cells from rats exposed to diuron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a substituted urea herbicide that at high dietary levels (2500 ppm) induces rat urinary bladder hyperplasia after 20 weeks of exposure and neoplasia after 2 years. The effects on the urothelium after short-term exposure have not been described. The present 7-day study evaluated the dose-dependency of urothelial alterations in the urinary bladder using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Male Wistar rats were fed 0, 125, 500, 2500 ppm diuron for 7 days. The urinary bladder and isolated urothelial cells of these animals were processed for microscopic examination and gene expression profiling, respectively. No significant treatment-related morphologic effects were observed. The number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the exposed groups increased with diuron levels. Diuron-altered genes involved in cell-to-cell interactions and tissue organization were identified in all treatment groups. After 7 days of diuron exposure, transcriptional responses were observed in the urothelium in the absence of clear morphologic changes. These morphological findings are different from those observed in a previous study in which 20 weeks of diuron exposure was associated with simple hyperplasia secondary to the persistent cytotoxicity and necrosis associated with continuous cellular regeneration. Comparison of the gene expression profiles of rats exposed to the 2500 ppm carcinogenic diuron dose for 7 days versus 20 weeks revealed few similarities between these two time points at the gene or pathway level. Taken together, these data provide insight into the dose- and temporal-dependent morphological and transcriptional changes associated with diuron exposure that may lead to the development of tumors in the rat urinary bladder

  5. ARID1A immunohistochemistry improves outcome prediction in invasive urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Sheila F; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Munari, Enrico; Ellis, Carla; Driscoll, Tina; Schoenberg, Mark P; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Shih, Ie-Ming; Netto, George J

    2014-11-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is tumor suppressor gene that interacts with BRG1 adenosine triphosphatase to form a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling protein complex. Inactivation of ARID1A has been described in several neoplasms, including epithelial ovarian and endometrial carcinomas, and has been correlated with prognosis. In the current study, ARID1A expression in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder and its association with clinicopathological parameters and outcome are addressed. Five tissue microarrays were constructed from 136 cystectomy specimens performed for UC at our institution. Nuclear ARID1A staining was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. An H-score was calculated as the sum of the products of intensity (0-3) multiplied by extent of expression (0%-100%). Average H-score per case was used for statistical analysis. ARID1A expression was categorized in low and high using Youden index to define the cut point. ARID1A expression significantly increased from normal to noninvasive UC to invasive UC. For both tumor progression and cancer death, Youden index yielded an H-score of 288 as the optimal cut point for ARID1A expression. Low ARID1A expression showed a tendency for lower risk of tumor progression and cancer mortality. Adding ARID1A expression to pathologic features offers a better model for predicting outcome than pathologic features alone. Low ARID1A expression was more frequently seen in earlier stage disease. There was a tendency for low ARID1A expression to predict better outcome. More importantly, the findings indicate that adding ARID1A expression to pathologic features increases the goodness of fit of the predictive model. PMID:25175170

  6. Exosomal protein interactors as emerging therapeutic targets in urothelial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Exosomes are rich sources of biological material (proteins and nucleic acids) secreted by both tumor and normal cells, and found in urine of urinary bladder cancer patients. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify interacting exosomal proteins in bladder cancer for future use in targeted therapy. Methods: The Exocarta database (www.exocarta.org) was mined for urinary bladder cancer specific exosomal proteins. The urinary bladder cancer specific exosomal proteins (n = 248) were analyzed to identify enriched pathways by Onto-tool Pathway Express (http://vortex.cs.wayne.edu/ ontoexpress). Results: Enriched pathways included cellular architecture, motility, cell to cell adhesion, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Proteins in the 9 top-ranked pathways included CTNNA1 (alpha-catenin), CTNNB1 (beta-catenin), VSAP, ITGA4, PAK1, DDR1, CDC42, RHOA, NRAS, RHO, PIK3AR1, MLC1, MMRN1, and CTTNBP2 and network analysis revealed 10 important hub proteins and identified inferred interactor NF2. Conclusions: The importance of identifying interactors is that that they can be used as targets for therapy, for example, using Bevacizumab (avastin - an angiogenesis inhibitor) against NF2 to inhibit protein-protein interactions will inhibit tumor growth and progression by hindering the exosome biogenesis

  7. Mechanical characterization of benign and malignant urothelial cells from voided urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei-Baghini, Ehsan; Zheng, Yi; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Geddie, William B.; Sun, Yu

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates whether mechanical differences exist between benign and malignant urothelial cells in voided urine. The Young's modulus of individual cells was measured using the micropipette aspiration technique. Malignant urothelial cells showed significantly lower Young's modulus values compared to benign urothelial cells. The results indicate that Young's modulus as a biomechanical marker could possibly provide additional information to conventional urinary cytology. We hope that these preliminary results could evoke attention to mechanical characterization of urine cells and spark interest in the development of biomechanical approaches to enhance non-invasive urothelial carcinoma detection.

  8. Correlation between Urothelial Differentiation and Sensory Proteins P2X3, P2X5, TRPV1, and TRPV4 in Normal Urothelium and Papillary Carcinoma of Human Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Sterle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminal differentiation of urothelium is a prerequisite for blood-urine barrier formation and enables normal sensory function of the urinary bladder. In this study, urothelial differentiation of normal human urothelium and of low and high grade papillary urothelial carcinomas was correlated with the expression and localization of purinergic receptors (P2X3, and P2X5 and transient receptor potential vanilloid channels (TRPV1, and TRPV4. Western blotting and immunofluorescence of uroplakins together with scanning electron microscopy of urothelial apical surface demonstrated terminal differentiation of normal urothelium, partial differentiation of low grade carcinoma, and poor differentiation of high grade carcinoma. P2X3 was expressed in normal urothelium as well as in low grade carcinoma and in both cases immunolabeling was stronger in the superficial cells. P2X3 expression decreased in high grade carcinoma. P2X5 expression was detected in normal urothelium and in high grade carcinoma, while in low grade carcinoma its expression was diminished. The expression of TRPV1 decreased in low grade and even more in high grade carcinoma when compared with normal urothelium, while TRPV4 expression was unchanged in all samples. Our results suggest that sensory proteins P2X3 and TRPV1 are in correlation with urothelial differentiation, while P2X5 and TRPV4 have unique expression patterns.

  9. Synchronous Contra Lateral Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC of the Kidney and Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razzaghi MR

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous upper urinary tract tumor and s uperficial bladder tumor are uncommon. This is a report of a 62- year- old man pr esented with episode of painless gross hematuria and flank pain. We worked him up and found a left renal mass and bladder lesion. He underwent nephrectomy and TUR-BT, and the pathology report of both showed a high grade urothelial tr ansitional cell carcinoma. The patient was followed by surveillance protocol for ureter stump. Our report included an uncommon case of high gr ade synchronous upper urinary tract and bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

  10. β-adrenergic receptor activation in immortalized human urothelial cells stimulates inflammatory responses by PKA-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter James E

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial cystitis (IC is a debilitating disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the urinary bladder, yet specific cellular mechanisms of inflammation in IC are largely unknown. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that β-adrenergic receptor (AR signaling is increased in the inflamed urothelium, however the precise effects of these urothelial cell signals have not been studied. In order to better elucidate the AR signaling mechanisms of inflammation associated with IC, we have examined the effects of β-AR stimulation in an immortalized human urothelial cell line (UROtsa. For these studies, UROtsa cells were treated with effective concentrations of the selective β-AR agonist isoproterenol, in the absence or presence of selective inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA. Cell lysates were analyzed by radioimmunoassay for generation of cAMP or by Western blotting for induction of protein products associated with inflammatory responses. Results Radioligand binding demonstrated the presence of β-ARs on human urothelial UROtsa cell membranes. Stimulating UROtsa cells with isoproterenol led to concentration-dependent increases of cAMP production that could be inhibited by pretreatment with a blocking concentration of the selective β-AR antagonist propranolol. In addition, isoproterenol activation of these same cells led to significant increases in the amount of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and the induced form of cyclooxygenase (COX-2 when compared to control. Moreover, preincubation of UROtsa cells with the selective PKA inhibitors H-89 or Rp-cAMPs did not diminish this isoproterenol mediated phosphorylation of ERK or production of iNOS and COX-2. Conclusion Functional β-ARs expressed on human urothelial UROtsa cell membranes increase the generation of cAMP and production of protein products associated with inflammation when activated by the selective

  11. Overactive and Underactive Bladder Dysfunction is Reflected by Alterations in Urothelial ATP and NO Release

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz, Alvaro; Smith, Christopher P.; Boone, Timothy B.; Somogyi, George T.

    2010-01-01

    ATP and NO are released from the urothelium in the bladder. Detrusor Overactivity (DO) following spinal cord injury results in higher ATP and lower NO release from the bladder urothelium. Our aim was to study the relationship between ATP and NO release in 1) early diabetic bladders, an overactive bladder model; and 2) in “diuretic” bladders, an underactive bladder model. To induce diabetes mellitus female rats received 65 mg/kg streptozocin (i.v.). To induce chronic diuresis rats were fed wit...

  12. Tailored Selection of First-Line Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Che; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Chiang, Po-Hui; Chen, Yen-Yang; Tang, Yeh; Su, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin plus cisplatin (MVAC) and gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) are both effective first-line chemotherapy. We explore the responsive variables of MVAC and GC for patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma of bladder (mUCB). Materials and Methods: Patients who were initially diagnosed to have mUCB and received MVAC or GC as metastatic first-line chemotherapy between 2000 and 2014 at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were reviewed. Totally, 130 patients were enrolled into our study. Univariable Cox proportional hazard models were constructed for OS. Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was also presented. Results: There were 50 patients (38%) in the MVAC group and 80 patients (62%) in the GC group. The median OS was insignificantly different between MVAC and GC groups, accounting for 17.0 and 14.4 months (P = 0.214), respectively. OS of MVAC group was significantly longer with regard to age ≦ 60 years (HR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.12-0.97, P = 0.036), pure urothelial carcinoma (HR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.34-0.90, P = 0.015), > 1 metastatic sites (HR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.08-0.44, P = 3(HR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.25-0.81, P = 0.006), while OS with GC group was significantly longer with regard to variant urothelial carcinoma (HR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.34-0.90, P = 0.015). Conclusions: Our study disclosed the predictive factors of different regimen for mUCB. These results have clinical implication for physicians who treat patients with mUCB. PMID:27390610

  13. Intraoperative frozen section evaluation of ureteral and urethral margins: studies of 203 consecutive radical cystoprostatectomy for men with bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haijun; Ro, Jae Y; Truong, Luan D; Ayala, Alberto G; Shen, Steven S

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative frozen section (FS) evaluation of ureteral and urethral margins is frequently requested during radical cystoprostatectomy in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, it is still controversial whether intraoperative FSs of ureteral and urethral margins are necessary in all patients with cystoprostatectomy or a risk-based assessment with limited to the high risk patients is the best approach. A total of 203 radical cystoprostatectomy specimens with FS evaluation on margin status from men treated for bladder urothelial carcinoma from 2003 to 2010 in our institution were reviewed. Clinicopathologic features studied include: patients' age, pathologic tumor stage, presence of carcinoma in- situ (CIS), and intraoperative FS diagnosis. All 203 patients had intraoperative FS evaluation of ureter, and of these, 37 patients had additional urethra FS evaluation. Of the 203 ureteral FS cases, 17 (8.4%) had positive margin for CIS (16 cases) or CIS with invasive urothelial carcinoma (1 case). All 17 patients with positive ureteral margin on FS had concomitant CIS in the bladder (15.5%; 17 of 110 patients). In contrast, none of the patients without concomitant CIS (n=93) had positive ureteral margins on FS. Among 37 patients who also had FS evaluation on urethral resection margin, 3 patients (8.1%) had positive margins for CIS and all three of them had concomitant CIS in the bladder. Positive ureteral/urethral margin was not associated with patients' age or tumor stage, but was significantly associated with the presence of CIS in the bladder (p<0.001). Our study demonstrates that presence of concomitant CIS in bladder cancer was often associated with positive ureteral or urethral margin for CIS or invasive carcinoma; therefore, intraoperative FS evaluation may be indicated to these patients with concomitant bladder CIS. In contrast, in patients with no associated concomitant CIS in the bladder, FS of ureteral/urethral margins may not be necessary unless

  14. Synchronous papillary urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder and adenocarcinoma of stomach in a middle-aged man: An extremely rare association with therapeutic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodul Mondal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous occurrence of urinary bladder carcinoma and gastric carcinoma is very rare. A middle-aged Asian man presented with complaints of hematuria which was diagnosed due to muscle invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder. Metastatic work-up revealed simultaneous presence of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. He was treated with TURBT for the bladder cancer and was planned for radical gastric resection followed by radiation to urinary bladder and stomach with concurrent chemotherapy. However, due to very advanced nature of the gastric tumor patient was treated only with palliative gastric resection followed by palliative radiation to both urinary bladder and stomach due to his poor performance status. Lack of published English literature and evidence related to such clinical entity made this an extremely rare clinical entity and treatment decision difficult.

  15. Uroplakins, specific membrane proteins of urothelial umbrella cells, as histological markers of metastatic transitional cell carcinomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Moll, R.; Wu, X. R.; Lin, J.H.; Sun, T. T.

    1995-01-01

    Uroplakins (UPs) Ia, Ib, II, and III, transmembrane proteins constituting the asymmetrical unit membrane of urothelial umbrella cells, are the first specific urothelial differentiation markers described. We investigated the presence and localization patterns of UPs in various human carcinomas by applying immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method), using rabbit antibodies against UPs II and III, to paraffin sections. Positive reactions for UP III (sometimes very focal) were...

  16. Recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder: A mixed nested variant case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    De Berardinis, Ettore; Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Antonini, Gabriele; Di Placido, Mariarosaria; Gentile, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Nested variant of urothelial cell carcinoma (NVUC) is a rare histological entity, with about 80 reported cases. It has a deceptively benign appearance with an aspect characterized by confluent small nest or urothelial’s cell tubules. This tumour often resembles inverted papilloma, von Brunn’s nests (VBNs), cystitis cystica, nephrogenic metaplasia and sometimes usual transitional cell cancer. It is very important to be able to distinguish between benign lesions and nested variant bladder cance...

  17. CD44 and MMP-2 expression in urothelial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülgün ERDOĞAN

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: CD44, one of the adhesion molecules, is thought to play an important role in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Matrix metalloproteinases are degradative enzymes that remodel extracellular components. In this study the relation of MMP-2 and CD44 expressions with the histologic classification and the pathologic stage of urothelial carcinoma was revealed using immunohistochemistry.Material and Methods: Thirty-nine patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder were studied. The histological classification was performed according to WHO criteria. Patients were grouped as infiltrating urothelial carcinoma, low grade non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma, and high grade non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma. The pathological staging was done according to the TNM classification. Immunohistochemical staining using CD44 and MMP-2 antibodies was performed on tissue blocks.Results: CD44 immunoreactivity was detected in 77% (30/39 of the tumours which was significantly higher in non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinomas, low grade non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinomas, high grade infiltrating urothelial carcinomas (p≥0.05. MMP-2 expression was observed in 69% (27 of 39 of the tumours. There were no significant differences in MMP-2 expression between various histologic subtypes and noninvasive and infiltrative tumours.Conclusion: In conclusion, higher expression of CD44 is inversely correlated with infiltrative potential of urothelial carcinoma. These results should be supported by further studies.

  18. Ketamine-Induced Apoptosis in Normal Human Urothelial Cells: A Direct, N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor-Independent Pathway Characterized by Mitochondrial Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Simon C; Shabir, Saqib; Georgopoulos, Nikolaos T; Southgate, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Recreational abuse of ketamine has been associated with the emergence of a new bladder pain syndrome, ketamine-induced cystitis, characterized by chronic inflammation and urothelial ulceration. We investigated the direct effects of ketamine on normal human urothelium maintained in organ culture or as finite cell lines in vitro. Exposure of urothelium to ketamine resulted in apoptosis, with cytochrome c release from mitochondria and significant subsequent caspase 9 and 3/7 activation. The anesthetic mode-of-action for ketamine is mediated primarily through N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonism; however, normal (nonimmortalized) human urothelial cells were unresponsive to NMDAR agonists or antagonists, and no expression of NMDAR transcript was detected. Exposure to noncytotoxic concentrations of ketamine (≤1 mmol/L) induced rapid release of ATP, which activated purinergic P2Y receptors and stimulated the inositol trisphosphate receptor to provoke transient release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum into the cytosol. Ketamine concentrations >1 mmol/L were cytotoxic and provoked a larger-amplitude increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration that was unresolved. The sustained elevation in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was associated with pathological mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP deficiency. Damage to the urinary barrier initiates bladder pain and, in ketamine-induced cystitis, loss of urothelium from large areas of the bladder wall is a reported feature. This study offers first evidence for a mechanism of direct toxicity of ketamine to urothelial cells by activating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:27001627

  19. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare; only several studies have been reported in the English literature. A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Bladder endoscopy revealed a large polypoid tumor at the bladder base. Transurethral bladder tumorectomy (TUR-BT) was performed. Many TUR-BT specimens were obtained. Histologically, the bladder tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positi...

  20. High prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in primary squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Morgan; Springer, Simeon; Nguyen, Doreen; Taheri, Diana; Guner, Gunes; Rodriguez, Maria Angelica Mendoza; Wang, Yuxuan; Kinde, Isaac; VandenBussche, Christopher J; Olson, Matthew T; Cunha, Isabela; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Ertoy, Dilek; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Kinzler, Kenneth; Vogelstein, Bert; Netto, George J; Papadopoulos, Nickolas

    2016-05-01

    TERT promoter mutations (TERT-mut) are detectable in the majority of urothelial carcinomas. The detection of TERT-mut in urine is under investigation as a potential urine-based molecular-screening assay for bladder cancer. A small but significant number of bladder carcinomas are pure squamous cell carcinoma. We sought to assess the incidence of TERT-mut in squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. A retrospective search of the institutional pathology archives yielded 15 cystectomy specimens performed for squamous cell carcinoma (2000-2014). Histologic slides were reviewed by a senior urologic pathologist to confirm the diagnosis and select a representative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue block for mutational analysis. All cases yielded adequate material for DNA analysis. Sequencing for TERT-mut was performed using previously described SafeSeq technique. We detected TERT-mut in 12/15 (80%) of bladder squamous cell carcinomas. TERT promoter mutations, commonly found in conventional urothelial carcinoma, are also highly prevalent in urinary bladder squamous cell carcinoma suggesting a common tumorigenesis and potential utility as a molecular urine-based-screening assay. PMID:26965579

  1. Gene profiling suggests a common evolution of bladder cancer subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Hansel, Donna E.; Zhang, ZhongFa; Petillo, David; Teh, Bin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Bladder cancer exists as several distinct subtypes, including urothelial carcinoma (UCa), squamous cell carcinoma (SCCa), adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma. These entities, despite showing distinct morphology and clinical behavior, arise from the urothelial lining and are often accompanied by similar precursor/in situ findings. The relationship between these subtypes has not been explored in detail. ...

  2. Impact of diabetes mellitus on bladder uroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Ruiz, Giovanni W; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A

    2013-01-15

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency, and incontinence. As DBD is commonly diagnosed late, it is important to understand the chronic impact of DM on bladder tissues. While changes in bladder smooth muscle and innervation have been reported in diabetic patients, the impact of DM on the specialized epithelial lining of the urinary bladder, the urothelium (UT), is largely unknown. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and electron microscopy were used to evaluate UT gene expression and cell morphology 3, 9, and 20 wk following streptozotocin (STZ) induction of DM in female Sprague-Dawley rats compared with age-matched control tissue. Desquamation of superficial (umbrella) cells was noted at 9 wk DM, indicating a possible breach in barrier function. One causative factor may be metabolic burden due to chronic hyperglycemia, suggested by upregulation of the polyol pathway and glucose transport genes in DM UT. While superficial UT repopulation occurred by 20 wk DM, the phenotype was different, with significant upregulation of receptors associated with UT mechanosensation (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1; TRPV1) and UT autocrine/paracrine signaling (acetylcholine receptors AChR-M2 and -M3, purinergic receptors P2X(2) and P2X(3)). Compromised barrier function and alterations in UT mechanosensitivity and cell signaling could contribute to bladder instability, hyperactivity, and altered bladder sensation by modulating activity of afferent nerve endings, which appose the urothelium. Our results show that DM impacts urothelial homeostasis and may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of DBD. PMID:23174855

  3. Impact of lymphovascular invasion on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nan Sha,* Linguo Xie,* Tao Chen,* Chen Xing, Xiaoteng Liu, Yu Zhang, Zhonghua Shen, Hao Xu, Zhouliang Wu, Hailong Hu, Changli Wu Department of Urology, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To evaluate the clinical significance of lymphovascular invasion (LVI on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection.Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 155 patients with newly diagnosed pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder who were treated with transurethral resection of bladder tumor at our institution from January 2006 to January 2010. The presence or absence of LVI was examined by pathologists. Chi-square test was performed to identify the correlations between LVI and other clinical and pathological features. Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate the recurrence-free survival (RFS and progression-free survival curves and difference was determined by the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive factors through a Cox proportional hazards analysis model.Results: LVI was detected in a total of 34 patients (21.9%. While LVI was associated with high-grade tumors (P<0.001 and intravesical therapy (P=0.009. Correlations with age (P=0.227, sex (P=0.376, tumor size (P=0.969, tumor multiplicity (P=0.196, carcinoma in situ (P=0.321, and smoking (P=0.438 were not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant tendency toward higher recurrence rate and shorter RFS time in LVI-positive patients. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in progression rate between the two groups. Moreover, multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that LVI, tumor size, and smoking were independent prognostic predictors of

  4. Prognostic Impact of Thrombospodin-2 (THBS2) Overexpression on Patients with Urothelial Carcinomas of Upper Urinary Tracts and Bladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I-Wei; Li, Chien-Feng; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; He, Hong-Lin; Liang, Per-In; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Li, Ching-Chia; Huang, Chun-Nung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is a type of tumor, especially of the urinary bladder, that affects people worldwide. Clarification of its detailed tumor biology and discovery of potential targets for developing treatment strategies are imperative because of frequent recurrences and poor prognosis of advanced UCs. By data mining a published dataset of UC of bladder (UCB) transcriptome (GSE31684) from Gene Expression Omnibus, National Center of Biotechnology Information (GEO, NCBI), we identified that THBS2 was the most significantly upregulated gene among those related to structural molecule activity (GO:0005198). Therefore, we evaluated the clinical significance and prognostic impact of thrombospondin-2 (THBS2) protein, A.K.A. TSP2, which encoded by THBS2 gene. Materials and Methods: THBS2 immunostaining was performed in 340 UCs of upper urinary tract (UC-UUTs) and 295 UCBs; subsequently, both groups were dichotomized into high- and low-expression subgroups. Moreover, statistical analyses were performed to correlate the association between THBS2 expression and clinicopathological parameters with two survival indexes: disease-specific survival (DSS) and metastasis-free survival (MeFS). Results: High THBS2 immunoexpression was significantly associated with advanced primary tumor status, nodal metastasis, and vascular invasion in both UC-UUT and UCB groups (all P ≤ .001). In addition, THBS2 overexpression was linked to adverse DSS and MeFS in univariate analyses and served as an independent prognosticator indicating poor outcomes in both groups in multivariate analyses. Conclusion: THBS2 may play a crucial role in UC progression and may be a novel prognostic marker. Additional investigations to elucidate the molecular pathway are necessary for developing potential THBS2-targeted therapies for UCs. PMID:27471570

  5. Urinary Bladder Cancer in Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Saleh Al-Samawi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of this study are to highlight the clinicopathological features of urinary bladder cancer in Yemen, and to describe the histological grading of urothelial neoplasms according to the World Health Organization and International Society of Urologic pathology (WHO/ISUP 1998 classification.Methods: This is a descriptive record-based study of 316 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed by two pathologists at the Department of pathology, Sana'a University from 1st January 2005 to 30th April 2009. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and categorized according to WHO/ISUP 1998 classification.Results: Out of 316 urinary bladder cancers, 248 (78% were urothelial neoplasms, 53 (17% were squamous cell carcinoma, 7 (2% were adenocarcinoma, and 3 (1% were rhabdomyosarcoma. The remaining cases were metastatic carcinomas (n=3, small cell carcinoma (n=1, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=1. The urothelial neoplasms observed were carcinoma in situ 4 (2%, papilloma 7 (3%, papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential 26 (11%, papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade 107 (43%, papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 18 (7%, and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 85 (34%, with 60 years mean age for males and 58 years for females; along with a male to female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was observed in the 61-70 years age group.Conclusion: This study documents a high frequency of urothelial neoplasms, mostly papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade with male preponderance and peak incidence in 6th decade of age.

  6. YAP activation protects urothelial cell carcinoma from treatment-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciamporcero, E; Shen, H; Ramakrishnan, S; Yu Ku, S; Chintala, S; Shen, L; Adelaiye, R; Miles, K M; Ullio, C; Pizzimenti, S; Daga, M; Azabdaftari, G; Attwood, K; Johnson, C; Zhang, J; Barrera, G; Pili, R

    2016-03-24

    Current standard of care for muscle-invasive urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is surgery along with perioperative platinum-based chemotherapy. UCC is sensitive to cisplatin-based regimens, but acquired resistance eventually occurs, and a subset of tumors is intrinsically resistant. Thus, there is an unmet need for new therapeutic approaches to target chemotherapy-resistant UCC. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator that has been associated with bladder cancer progression and cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. In contrast, YAP has been shown to induce DNA damage associated apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma. However, no data have been reported on the YAP role in UCC chemo-resistance. Thus, we have investigated the potential dichotomous role of YAP in UCC response to chemotherapy utilizing two patient-derived xenograft models recently established. Constitutive expression and activation of YAP inversely correlated with in vitro and in vivo cisplatin sensitivity. YAP overexpression protected while YAP knockdown sensitized UCC cells to chemotherapy and radiation effects via increased accumulation of DNA damage and apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacological YAP inhibition with verteporfin inhibited tumor cell proliferation and restored sensitivity to cisplatin. In addition, nuclear YAP expression was associated with poor outcome in UCC patients who received perioperative chemotherapy. In conclusion, these results suggest that YAP activation exerts a protective role and represents a pharmacological target to enhance the anti-tumor effects of DNA damaging modalities in the treatment of UCC. PMID:26119935

  7. The prognostic role of lymphovascular invasion in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Romain; Lucca, Ilaria; Rouprêt, Morgan; Briganti, Alberto; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2016-08-01

    Outcome prediction in patients with bladder cancer has improved through the development of nomograms and predictive models. However, integration of further characteristics such as lymphovascular invasion (LVI) might increase the accuracy and clinical utility of these instruments. Assessment and reporting of LVI in specimens from transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBT) or biopsy in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) or muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) might enable improved staging, prognostication and clinical decision-making. In NMIBC, presence of LVI in TURBT and biopsy samples seems to be associated with understaging and increased risks of disease recurrence and progression. In MIBC, presence of LVI is associated with features of aggressive disease and predicts recurrence and survival. Integration of LVI status into predictive models might aid clinical decision-making regarding intravesical instillation schedules and regimens, early radical cystectomy in patients with high-grade T1 disease and perioperative chemotherapy. However, LVI assessment is hampered by insufficient reproducibility and reliability, lack of routine evaluation and limited concordance between findings in TURBT and radical cystectomy specimens. Standardization of the pathological criteria defining LVI is warranted to improve its reporting in routine clinical practice and its utility as a care-changing prognostic marker. PMID:27431340

  8. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Çiçek, Tufan; Coşkunoğlu, Esra Zeynep; Duran, Berkan; Çiftci, Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder a...

  9. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Tufan Cicek; Esra Zeynep Coskunoglu; Berkan Duran; Egemen Ciftci

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder ...

  10. ERas protein is overexpressed and binds to the activated platelet-derived growth factor β receptor in bovine urothelial tumour cells associated with papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Valeria; Roperto, Franco; Esposito, Iolanda; Ceccarelli, Dora Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Leonardi, Leonardo; Capparelli, Rosanna; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Roperto, Sante

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic stem cell-expressed Ras (ERas) encodes a constitutively active form of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), which in turn phosphorylates and activates downstream targets such as Akt. The current study evaluated ERas regulation and expression in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumours in cattle grazing on lands rich in bracken fern. ERas was found upregulated and overexpressed by PCR, real time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, protein overexpression was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. ERas was found to interact physically and colocalise with the activated platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) by coimmunoprecipitation and laser scanning confocal investigations. Phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream effector both of ERas and PDGFβR, appeared to be increased in urothelial tumour cells. Altogether, these data indicate that ERas/PDGFβR complex could play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine papillomavirus-associated bladder neoplasia. PMID:27256024

  11. Primary uterine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the urinary bladder with urinary cytology mimicking carcinomas: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sumiyo Adachi; Kazuto Yamazaki; Shan-Guang Liang; Yasuo Ishida

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 69-year-old woman in whom diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) originated from the uterus and involved the urinary bladder. The cervical smears of the case mostly consisted of discohesive atypical round cells, which were highly suggestive of lymphoma; however, in voided urine smears, a majority of the cells formed large aggregates of degenerated cells, mimicking those of urothelial carcinoma (UC). The smears also represented some small loose clusters, in which tumo...

  12. FGFR3 expression in primary and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is frequently mutated or overexpressed in nonmuscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma (UC), the prevalence of FGFR3 protein expression and mutation remains unknown in muscle-invasive disease. FGFR3 protein and mRNA expression, mutational status, and copy number variation were retrospectively analyzed in 231 patients with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary UCs, 33 metastases, and 14 paired primary and metastatic tumors using the following methods: immunohistochemistry, NanoString nCounterTM, OncoMap or Affymetrix OncoScanTM array, and Gain and Loss of Analysis of DNA and Genomic Identification of Significant Targets in Cancer software. FGFR3 immunohistochemistry staining was present in 29% of primary UCs and 49% of metastases and did not impact overall survival (P = 0.89, primary tumors; P = 0.78, metastases). FGFR3 mutations were observed in 2% of primary tumors and 9% of metastases. Mutant tumors expressed higher levels of FGFR3 mRNA than wild-type tumors (P < 0.001). FGFR3 copy number gain and loss were rare events in primary and metastatic tumors (0.8% each; 3.0% and 12.3%, respectively). FGFR3 immunohistochemistry staining is present in one third of primary muscle-invasive UCs and half of metastases, while FGFR3 mutations and copy number changes are relatively uncommon

  13. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder diverticulum: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xu Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a mass with swiftly aggressive and metastatic, and with a poor prognosis. Due to its scarcity, no forward-looking researches assessing the most effective treatment have been issued in the medical literature. It can happen either in connection with urothelial (transitional cell carcinoma or in a pure form. Its treatment should include surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article,we report a case occurring in a mixed form in the urinary bladder diverticulum and we concisely review the published literature with respect to the clinical manifestation, pathology,differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.

  14. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Cicek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder arising in an unusual localization. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 604-608

  15. Commentary on "tissue-specific mutagenesis by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine as the basis for urothelial cell carcinogenesis." He Z, Kosinska W, Zhao ZL, Wu XR, Guttenplan JB, Department of Basic Science, New York University Dental College, NY, USA.: Mutat Res 2012;742(1-2):92-5 [Epub 2011 Dec 4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Douglas S

    2014-02-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the few cancers that have been linked to carcinogens in the environment and tobacco smoke. Of the carcinogens tested in mouse chemical carcinogenesis models, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is one that reproducibly causes high-grade, invasive cancers in the urinary bladder, but not in any other tissues. However, the basis for such a high-level tissue-specificity has not been explored. Using mutagenesis in lacI (Big Blue™) mice, we show here that BBN is a potent mutagen and it causes high-level of mutagenesis specifically in the epithelial cells (urothelial) of the urinary bladder. After a 2-6-week treatment of 0.05% BBN in the drinking water, mutagenesis in urothelial cells of male and female mice was about two orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous mutation background. In contrast, mutagenesis in smooth muscle cells of the urinary bladder was about five times lower than in urothelial tissue. No appreciable increase in mutagenesis was observed in kidney, ureter, liver or forestomach. In lacI (Big Blue™) rats, BBN mutagenesis was also elevated in urothelial cells, albeit not nearly as profoundly as in mice. This provides a potential explanation as to why rats are less prone than mice to the formation of aggressive form of bladder cancer induced by BBN. Our results suggest that the propensity to BBN-triggered mutagenesis of urothelial cells underlies its heightened susceptibility to this carcinogen and that mutagenesis induced by BBN represents a novel model for initiation of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24445298

  16. High frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 protein expression in human bladder cancer is associated with disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egr-1 (early growth response-1 transcription factor) has been proposed to be involved in invasion and metastasis processes of human bladder cancer, but Egr-1 protein expression levels in human bladder cancer have not been investigated. In the present study we investigated the expression levels of Egr-1 protein in early stages of human bladder cancer and correlated it to later progression. Expression of Egr-1 protein in human bladder cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry, on a tissue microarray constructed from tumors from 289 patients with non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer. The frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling correlated to bladder cancer stage, grade and to later progression to muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-4). Stage T1 tumors exhibited significantly higher frequencies of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling than Ta tumors (P = 0.001). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that a high frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling was significantly associated with a higher risk of progression to stage T2-4 (log-rank test, P = 0.035). Tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling were found to localize at the tumor front in some of the tumor biopsies. The results from this study support a potential involvement of Egr-1 in the progression from non-muscle invasive bladder cancers to muscle invasive bladder cancer

  17. 30. Knockdown of IGF-IR by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide auguments the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to MMC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    play key roles in autocrine mechanisms of bladder cancer cells remain to be definite and their physiological mechanism remain to be fully understood. More are still needed to know about the role of IGF1R signaling in bladder cancers. The following problems remain to be investigated in bladder cancer cells, about which the present studies are concerned: ①Is IGFs/IGF-IR signaling pathway involved in autocrine growth of human bladder cancer cells and how does bladder instillation drugs such as MMC affect the autocrine expression of bladder cancer cells? ②Can targeting against IGF1R gene can significantly enhance drug sensitivity of urinary bladder cancer cells to chemotherapy? ③What potential intracellular signaling mechanisms are involved in IGF1R blockage? ④May IGF1R self-stablized antisense ODN serves as a potential therapeutic approach to bladder cancer? To investigate whether IGF-1R was involved in drug resistance of bladder cancer cells. METHODS: RT-PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression of IGF-I, IGF-Ⅱ, and IGF-IR in T24 cells and normal urothelial cells. Flow cytometry and MTT tests were used to assess the effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) on drug sensitivities and apoptosis of T24 cells to mitomycin (MMC). Western blot was used to analyze the effect of ODN on expression of IGF-IR protein. RESULTS: mRNA of IGF-I, IGF-Ⅱ, and IGF-IR were strongly expressed in serum-free cultured T24 cell line, whereas normal urothelial cells did not express these factors/receptors or only in trace levels; knockdown of IGF1R by antisense ODN significantly inhibited the growth of bladder cancer cells and enhanced sensitivity and apoptosis of T24 cells to MMC. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that blockage of IGF-IR signaling might potentially contribute to the treatment of bladder cancer cells which are insensitive to chemotherapy.

  18. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Pant-Purohit, Mukta; López Beltrán, Antonio; Montironi, Rodolfo; MacLennan, Gregory T.; Cheng, Lian

    2010-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder(SCCUB) is a rare and aggressive cancer of the bladder.SCCUB is part of neuroendocrine family of tumors thataffect several organ systems including respiratory,gastrointestinal and male and female genitourinary tract.SCCUB affect males predominantly with common riskfactors include smoking, bladder calculi, bladdermanipulation, and chronic cystitis. Prognosis of SCCUBremains poor due to high metastatic potential and lack ofsymptoms in earlier stages of...

  19. miR-34a Inhibits Proliferation and Invasion of Bladder Cancer Cells by Targeting Orphan Nuclear Receptor HNF4G

    OpenAIRE

    Huaibin Sun; Jun Tian; Wanhua Xian; Tingting Xie; Xiangdong Yang

    2015-01-01

    miR-34a is a member of the miR-34 family and acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. This study explored the regulative role of miR-34a on an orphan nuclear receptor HNF4G, which has a well-confirmed role in bladder tumor growth and invasion. qRT-PCR analysis was applied to measure miR-34a expression in two tumorigenic bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and T24 and one normal human urothelial cell line SV-HUC-1. Luciferase assay was performed to verify the putative binding between miR-34a a...

  20. Detection of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid alterations in urine from urothelial cell carcinoma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dasgupta, S.; Shao, C.; Keane, T.E.; Duberow, D.P.; Mathies, R.A.; Fisher, P.B.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Sidransky, D.

    2012-01-01

    Our study aims at understanding the timing and nature of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) alterations in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) and their detection in urine sediments. The entire 16.5 kb mitochondrial genome was sequenced in matched normal lymphocytes, tumor and urine sediments f

  1. Absence of karyotype abnormalities in patients with familial urothelial cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, K.K.H.; Macville, M.V.E.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Witjes, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a previous pilot study, a constitutional balanced translocation t(5;20)(p15;q11) was identified in a family with urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC). The purpose of this study was to find (additional) constitutional chromosomal abnormalities in selected families to obtain an indication fo

  2. Ferritinophagy drives uropathogenic Escherichia coli persistence in bladder epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauckman, Kyle A; Mysorekar, Indira U

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling pathway, which in many cases, protects host cells from infections by degrading pathogens. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), persist within the urinary tract epithelium (urothelium) by forming reservoirs within autophagosomes. Iron is a critical nutrient for both host and pathogen, and regulation of iron availability is a key host defense against pathogens. Iron homeostasis depends on the shuttling of iron-bound ferritin to the lysosome for recycling, a process termed ferritinophagy (a form of selective autophagy). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that UPEC shuttles with ferritin-bound iron into the autophagosomal and lysosomal compartments within the urothelium. Iron overload in urothelial cells induces ferritinophagy in an NCOA4-dependent manner causing increased iron availability for UPEC, triggering bacterial overproliferation and host cell death. Addition of even moderate levels of iron is sufficient to increase and prolong bacterial burden. Furthermore, we show that lysosomal damage due to iron overload is the specific mechanism causing host cell death. Significantly, we demonstrate that host cell death and bacterial burden can be reversed by inhibition of autophagy or inhibition of iron-regulatory proteins, or chelation of iron. Together, our findings suggest that UPEC persist in host cells by taking advantage of ferritinophagy. Thus, modulation of iron levels in the bladder may provide a therapeutic avenue to controlling UPEC persistence, epithelial cell death, and recurrent UTIs. PMID:27002654

  3. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches to the treatment of urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthigi, Akhil; George, Arvin K; Brancato, Sam J; Agarwal, Piyush K

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy has long played a role in urothelial cancers with the use of bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) being a mainstay in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Novel therapeutic approaches have not significantly impacted mortality in this population and so a renaissance in immunotherapy has resulted. This includes recombinant BCG, oncolytic viruses, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Herein, we provide a review of the current state of the art and future therapies regarding immunotherapeutic strategies for urothelial carcinoma. PMID:27247630

  4. A Common MicroRNA Signature Consisting of miR-133a, miR-139-3p, and miR-142-3p Clusters Bladder Carcinoma in Situ with Normal Umbrella Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Angela Y.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Domingo-Domenech, Josep; Bonal, Dennis M.; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta; Silva, Jose M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs with critical roles in a large variety of biological processes such as development and tumorigenesis. miRNA expression profiling has been reported to be a powerful tool to classify tissue samples, including cancers, based on their developmental lineage. In this study, we have profiled the expression of miRNAs in bladder carcinoma in situ (CIS) and distinct cell compartments of the normal bladder, namely umbrella and basal-intermediate urothelial cells, as well ...

  5. Uropathogenic E. coli Promote a Paracellular Urothelial Barrier Defect Characterized by Altered Tight Junction Integrity, Epithelial Cell Sloughing and Cytokine Release

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, M W; Breitschwerdt, E B; Nordone, S.K.; Linder, K. E.; Gookin, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The urinary bladder is a common site of bacterial infection with a majority of cases attributed to uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Sequels of urinary tract infections (UTIs) include the loss of urothelial barrier function and subsequent clinical morbidity secondary to the permeation of urine potassium, urea and ammonia into the subepithelium. To date there has been limited research describing the mechanism by which this urothelial permeability defect develops. The present study models acute u...

  6. Clinical outcome of primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou CP

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Pang Hou,1,2 Yu-Hsiang Lin,1,2 Chien-Lun Chen,1,2 Phei-Lang Chang,1,2 Ke-Hung Tsui1,2 1Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linko, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare malignant disease. It accounts for less than 1% of all urinary bladder carcinomas. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical features, the treatment modalities, and the overall survival of these patients. We also compare the clinical outcomes between patients of bladder small cell carcinoma (SCC and bladder urothelial carcinoma (UC. Materials and methods: We reviewed the charts of patients with bladder tumors from January 1995 to December 2012 in the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. A total of 2421 malignant bladder tumor patients were reviewed and there were 18 patients who were diagnosed with primary bladder SCC. The patients' characteristics, including age, gender, smoking history, presented symptoms, tumor size, locations, clinical stages, treatment modalities, pathology appearance, recurrence conditions, and survival conditions were all recorded. We also compared the clinical outcomes and the overall survival rates between patients with bladder SCC and those with UC. Results: Bladder SCC accounted for about 0.74% of all bladder malignancies in our institution. The mean age at diagnosis was 70.67 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 2.6:1. Thirteen patients had a history of cigarette smoking. All patients presented with symptoms of gross hematuria, and three of them had bladder tamponade requiring blood clot evacuation by cystoscopy. Only one patient had T1 disease, ten patients had stage III disease, and seven patients had lymph node or distant metastasis (stage IV disease. The mean tumor size was 4.29 cm in diameter. For the majority (61.11% of patients, SCC coexisted with UC components. The average survival time

  7. [Solitary Bladder Metastasis of Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma: Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Satoshi; Suetomi, Takahiro; Kojou, Kousuke; Tanaka, Ken; Kurobe, Masahiro; Yoshino, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Kazumitu; Kimura, Tomokazu; Kandori, Shuya; Kawahara, Takashi; Kawai, Kouji; Miyazaki, Jun; Yano, Youko; Yamada, Kenji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Bladder metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is relatively rare, and only 43 cases have been reported in the Japanese literature. In most cases, the histology of the primary site was clear cell type. Here, we report a case of bladder metastasis of chromophobe RCC. A 74-year-old man presented with asymptomatic gross hematuria. He had a history of chromophobe RCC treated with radical nephrectomy 11 years previously. Since cystoscopy revealed a papillary pedunculated tumor, he underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TUR-Bt). The pathological diagnosis was chromophobe RCC because the histological findings were similar to those of nephrectomized specimens. Four years after TUR-Bt, the patient received bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy under the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ of urothelial cancer of the bladder but not chromophobe RCC. There was no recurrence of chromophobe RCC within 5 years follow-up after TUR-Bt. To the best of our knowledge, there has been only one other case report of bladder metastasis of chromophobe RCC in the Japanese literature. PMID:27018407

  8. [A CASE OF ADVANCED BLADDER NEUROENDOCRINE CARCINOMA (SMALL CELL CARCINOMA) SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVED BY LOW DOSE OF ORAL TEGAFUR-URACIL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomi, Hayahito; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Minami, Koichiro; Maenosono, Ryoichi; Matsunaga, Tomohisa; Yoshikawa, Yuki; Tsujino, Takuya; Hirano, Hajime; Inamoto, Teruo; Yamamoto, Ikuhisa; Tsuji, Motomu; Kiyama, Satoshi; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-10-01

    A 81-old-woman underwent a transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) at a nearby hospital in April 2011. The diagnosis was invasive urothelial carcinoma, G3 with a component of bladder small cell carcinoma, T1 or more. She was recommended to visit our hospital for combined modality therapy of bladder cancer, but she refused the treatment for over one year. In May 2012, she came to our hospital with the chief complaint of pain at urination. Cystoscopy revealed non-papillary sessile tumor in the top of the bladder, and CT scan demonstrated the presence of the right obturator lymph nodes swollen up to 1.2 cm in size. The second TURBT was performed and the diagnosis was bladder small cell carcinoma (pT3N2M0) according to urothelial cancer guidelines of the Japanese Urological Association (JUA). Because she strongly refused hospitalization anymore, we started daily oral intake of low dose Tegafur-Uracil (100 mg) for the treatment. After one month, the serum Neuron-Specific Enolase (NSE; tumor maker of small cell cancer) level was elevated to 27.6 ng/ml and the right obturator lymph node was enlarged up to 1.9 cm. Therefore, the Trgafur-Uracil dose was increased to 200 mg daily. After then, the serum NSE level was decreased to 15.5 ng/ml following reduction in size of the obturator lymph nodes with partial response in December 2013. After two years of follow-up period, her regular urine test showed normal findings, and no apparent recurrence was detected on urinary bladder with MRI and Cystoscopy. This is a case of advanced bladder small cell carcinoma significantly improved by oral administration of Tegafur-Uracil 200 mg/day for over 2 years. PMID:26717786

  9. Roles of ERβ and GPR30 in Proliferative Response of Human Bladder Cancer Cell to Estrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiren Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer belongs to one of the most common cancers and is a leading cause of deaths in our society. Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB is the main type of this cancer, and the estrogen receptors in UCB remain to be studied. Our experiment aimed to investigate the possible biological effect of 17β-estradiol on human bladder-derived T24 carcinoma cells and to indicate its related mechanisms. T24 cells were treated with various doses of 17β-estradiol, and cell proliferation was detected using MTT assays. 17β-estradiol promoted T24 cell proliferation independent of ERβ/GPR30-regulated EGFR-MAPK pathway, while it inhibited cell growth via GPR30. Furthermore, the expression levels of downstream genes (c-FOS, BCL-2, and CYCLIN D1 were increased by 17β-estradiol and this effect was independently associated with activity of the EGFR-MAPK pathway. The two estrogen receptors might be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  10. Cox-2 gene overexpression in ureteral stump urothelial carcinoma following nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Wei-Pin; Chien Tsu-Ming; Wang Yu-Shiuan; Chiu Siou-Jin; Lee Mei-Hui; Chang Wei-Chiao; Chou Yii-Her; Hou Ming-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction A primary ureteral stump tumor after a nephrectomy is rare; urothelial carcinoma of the ureteral stump after a nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma is even rarer. A thorough review of the literature indicated that only seven cases have previously been reported. In this study, we report the first Taiwanese case of urothelial carcinoma of the ureteral stump after a nephrectomy. It is also the first female case in the literature. The relationship between inflammatory genes,...

  11. Global gene expression changes in human urothelial cells exposed to low-level monomethylarsonous acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid in UROtsa was investigated. ► At 3 months of exposure substantial changes were observed in gene expression. ► Notable changes occurred in mitogenic signaling, stress, immune and inflammatory responses. ► Gene expression changes correlate with phenotypic changes from previous studies. -- Abstract: Bladder cancer has been associated with chronic arsenic exposure. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a metabolite of inorganic arsenic and has been shown to transform an immortalized urothelial cell line (UROtsa) at concentrations 20-fold less than arsenite. MMA(III) was used as a model arsenical to examine the mechanisms of arsenical-induced transformation of urothelium. A microarray analysis was performed to assess the transcriptional changes in UROtsa during the critical window of chronic 50 nM MMA(III) exposure that leads to transformation at 3 months of exposure. The analysis revealed only minor changes in gene expression at 1 and 2 months of exposure, contrasting with substantial changes observed at 3 months of exposure. The gene expression changes at 3 months were analyzed showing distinct alterations in biological processes and pathways such as a response to oxidative stress, enhanced cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, MAPK signaling, as well as inflammation. Twelve genes selected as markers of these particular biological processes were used to validate the microarray and these genes showed a time-dependent changes at 1 and 2 months of exposure, with the most substantial changes occurring at 3 months of exposure. These results indicate that there is a strong association between the acquired phenotypic changes that occur with chronic MMA(III) exposure and the observed gene expression patterns that are indicative of a malignant transformation. Although the substantial changes that occur at 3 months of exposure may be a consequence of transformation, there are common occurrences of altered

  12. Pannexin 1 channels play essential roles in urothelial mechanotransduction and intercellular signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Negoro

    Full Text Available Urothelial cells respond to bladder distension with ATP release, and ATP signaling within the bladder and from the bladder to the CNS is essential for proper bladder function. In other cell types, pannexin 1 (Panx1 channels provide a pathway for mechanically-induced ATP efflux and for ATP-induced ATP release through interaction with P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs. We report that Panx1 and P2X7R are functionally expressed in the bladder mucosa and in immortalized human urothelial cells (TRT-HU1, and participate in urothelial ATP release and signaling. ATP release from isolated rat bladders induced by distention was reduced by the Panx1 channel blocker mefloquine (MFQ and was blunted in mice lacking Panx1 or P2X7R expression. Hypoosmotic shock induced YoPro dye uptake was inhibited by MFQ and the P2X7R blocker A438079 in TRT-HU1 cells, and was also blunted in primary urothelial cells derived from mice lacking Panx1 or P2X7R expression. Rinsing-induced mechanical stimulation of TRT-HU1 cells triggered ATP release, which was reduced by MFQ and potentiated in low divalent cation solution (LDPBS, a condition known to enhance P2X7R activation. ATP signaling evaluated as intercellular Ca2+ wave radius was significantly larger in LDPBS, reduced by MFQ and by apyrase (ATP scavenger. These findings indicate that Panx1 participates in urothelial mechanotransduction and signaling by providing a direct pathway for mechanically-induced ATP release and by functionally interacting with P2X7Rs.

  13. Effects of increasing carbon nanofiber density in polyurethane composites for inhibiting bladder cancer cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Melissa; Chun, Young Wook; Im, Yeon Min; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is a versatile elastomer that is commonly used in biomedical applications. In turn, materials derived from nanotechnology, specifically carbon nanofibers (CNFs), have received increasing attention for their potential use in biomedical applications. Recent studies have shown that the dispersion of CNFs in PU significantly enhances composite nanoscale surface roughness, tensile properties, and thermal stability. Although there have been studies concerning normal primary cell functions on such nanocomposites, there have been few studies detailing cancer cell responses. Since many patients who require bladder transplants have suffered from bladder cancer, the ideal bladder prosthetic material should not only promote normal primary human urothelial cell (HUC) function, but also inhibit the return of bladder cancerous cell activity. This study examined the correlation between transitional (UMUC) and squamous (or SCaBER) urothelial carcinoma cells and HUC on PU:CNF nanocomposites of varying PU and CNF weight ratios (from pure PU to 4:1 [PU:CNF volume ratios], 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:4 composites to pure CNF). Composites were characterized for mechanical properties, wettability, surface roughness, and chemical composition by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and goniometry. The adhesion and proliferation of UMUC and SCaBER cancer cells were assessed by MTS assays. Cellular responses were further quantified by measuring the amounts of nuclear mitotic protein 22 (NMP-22), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Results demonstrated that both UMUC and SCaBER cell proliferation rates decreased over time on substrates with increased CNF in PU. In addition, with the exception of VEGF from UMUC (which was the same across all materials), composites containing the most CNF activated cancer cells (UMUC and SCaBER) the least, as shown by

  14. [Specific types of bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, S; Hartmann, A; Knüchel-Clarke, R; Gaisa, N T

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer shows rare variants and special subtypes with diverse prognostic importance and therefore may necessitate different therapeutic approaches. For pathologists it is important to histologically diagnose and specify such variants. Nested variants of urothelial carcinoma with inconspicuous, well-formed tumor cell nests present with an aggressive course. The plasmacytoid variant, which morphologically resembles plasma cells is associated with a shorter survival time and a high frequency of peritoneal metastasis. Micropapillary urothelial carcinoma with small papillary tumor cell islands within artificial tissue retraction spaces and frequent lymphovascular invasion also has a poor prognosis. Other important rare differential variants listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification are microcystic, lymphoepithelioma-like, sarcomatoid, giant cell and undifferentiated urothelial carcinomas. Additionally, there are three special types of bladder cancer: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the bladder. These tumors are characterized by pure squamous cell or glandular differentiation and are sometimes less responsive to adjuvant (chemo)therapy. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder mimics the neuroendocrine features of its pulmonary counterpart, shows an aggressive course but is sensitive to (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy. The morphology and histology of the most important variants and special types are discussed in this review. PMID:26782034

  15. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) over-production and autocrine cell activation are key factors in monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]-induced malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero-Lourdes, C., E-mail: cescuder@uaslp.mx [Centro de Investigación y Estudios de Posgrado (CIEP), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Wu, T.; Camarillo, J.M.; Gandolfi, A.J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona. Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The association between chronic human exposure to arsenicals and bladder cancer development is well recognized; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully determined. We propose that inflammatory responses can play a pathogenic role in arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis. In previous studies, it was demonstrated that chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsenous acid [MMA(III)] leads to malignant transformation of an immortalized model of urothelial cells (UROtsa), with only 3 mo of exposure necessary to trigger the transformation-related changes. In the three-month window of exposure, the cells over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8), consistent with the sustained activation of NFKβ and AP1/c-jun, ERK2, and STAT3. IL-8 was over-expressed within hours after exposure to MMA(III), and sustained over-expression was observed during chronic exposure. In this study, we profiled IL-8 expression in UROtsa cells exposed to 50 nM MMA(III) for 1 to 5 mo. IL-8 expression was increased mainly in cells after 3 mo MMA(III) exposure, and its production was also found increased in tumors derived from these cells after heterotransplantation in SCID mice. UROtsa cells do express both receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, suggesting that autocrine cell activation could be important in cell transformation. Supporting this observation and consistent with IL-8 over-expression, CXCR1 internalization was significantly increased after three months of exposure to MMA(III). The expression of MMP-9, cyclin D1, bcl-2, and VGEF was significantly increased in cells exposed to MMA(III) for 3 mo, but these mitogen-activated kinases were significantly decreased after IL-8 gene silencing, together with a decrease in cell proliferation rate and in anchorage-independent colony formation. These results suggest a relevant role of IL-8 in MMA(III)-induced UROtsa cell transformation. -- Highlights: ► IL-8 is over-expressed in human MMA(III)-exposed urothelial

  16. Xp11 Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma: Unusual Variant Masquerading as Upper Tract Urothelial Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Akhavein

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma (TRCC is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma characterized by chromosomal translocations involving the TFE3 gene located at the Xp11.2 locus. Initial cases were more common in children, but cases in older adults have begun to accrue and suggest a relatively more aggressive course. We report a case of Xp11 TRCC in a 63-year-old female patient with initial presentation mimicking upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma, with biopsy proving TRCC. She underwent a radical nephrectomy and paracaval lymph node dissection and is followed up with the intent to initiate vascular endothelial growth factor–targeted therapy in case of recurrence.

  17. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB) is an extremely rare tumor that exhibits aggressive behavior and accounts for approximately less than 1% of all primary bladder tumors. Small cell carcinoma generally occurs in the lung, accounting for 25% of all pulmonary malignancies. SCCUB exhibits a similar microscopic and immunohistochemical appearance to that of small cell carcinoma of the lung. There is no consensus about the standard therapy, owing to its rarity. Surgical resection seems to be the mainstay of treatment for patients with limited stage, together with neoadjuvant or adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Radiation therapy has same small effect for palliative purposes, as well as being an alternative to radical cystectomy. Patients with advanced stage, although given platinum-based chemotherapy, have a poor prognosis. We herein review epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, pathological features, and current management of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. (author)

  18. Pathologic Response Rates of Gemcitabine/Cisplatin versus Methotrexate/Vinblastine/Adriamycin/Cisplatin Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Muscle Invasive Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin C. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare pathologic outcomes after treatment with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC versus methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin, and cisplatin (MVAC in the neoadjuvant setting. Methods. Data was retrospectively collected on 178 patients with T2-T4 bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy between 2003 and 2011. Outcomes of interest included those with complete response (pT0 and any response (≤pT1. Odds ratios were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. Results. Compared to those who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, there were more patients with complete response (28% versus 9%, OR 3.11 (95% CI: 1.45–6.64, P=0.03 and any response (52% versus 25%, OR 3.23 (95% CI: 1.21–8.64, P=0.01. Seventy-two patients received GC (n=41 or MVAC (n=31. CR was achieved in 29% and 22% of GC and MVAC patients, respectively (multivariate OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.10–1.58. Any response (≤pT1 was achieved in 56% of GC and 45% of MVAC patients (multivariate OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.12–1.71. Conclusions. We observed similar pathologic response rates for GC and MVAC neoadjuvant chemotherapy in this cohort of patients with muscle invasive urothelial cancer (MIBC. Our findings support the use of GC as an alternative regimen in the neoadjuvant setting.

  19. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  20. Unusual manifestations of secondary urothelial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohui Lisa Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma regularly invades the bladder wall, adjacent prostate, seminal vesicles, ureters, vagina, rectum, retroperitoneum, and regional lymph nodes. In advanced stages, it may disseminate to the liver, lungs, and bone marrow. On rare occasions, unusual metastatic foci like skin have been reported. The incidence of urothelial carcinoma has increased with associated rise in variants of urothelial carcinoma and unusual metastatic foci. It is imperative that urologists and pathologists are aware of the unusual variants and unusual metastatic locations to expedite the diagnostic process. Hereby we report an unusual case of secondary involvement of spinal nerve by conventional urothelial carcinoma. Also a second case of rhabdoid variant of urothelial carcinoma showing synchronous involvement of bladder and subcutaneous tissue of upper extremity is presented.

  1. Loss of β1-integrin from urothelium results in overactive bladder and incontinence in mice: a mechanosensory rather than structural phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Kanasaki, Keizo; Yu, Weiqun; von Bodungen, Maximilian; Larigakis, John D.; Kanasaki, Megumi; Ayala de la Pena, Francisco; Kalluri, Raghu; Hill, Warren G.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder urothelium senses and communicates information about bladder fullness. However, the mechanoreceptors that respond to tissue stretch are poorly defined. Integrins are mechanotransducers in other tissues. Therefore, we eliminated β1-integrin selectively in urothelium of mice using Cre-LoxP targeted gene deletion. β1-Integrin localized to basal/intermediate urothelial cells by confocal microscopy. β1-Integrin conditional-knockout (β1-cKO) mice lacking urothelial β1-integrin exhibited dow...

  2. Orally administered nicotine induces urothelial hyperplasia in rats and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Rats and mice orally administered with nicotine tartrate for total of 4 weeks. • No treatment-related death or whole body toxicity observed in any of the groups. • Urothelium showed simple hyperplasia in treated rats and mice. • No significant change in BrdU labeling index or SEM classification of urothelium. - Abstract: Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for multiple human cancers including urinary bladder carcinoma. Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture containing chemicals that are known carcinogens in humans and/or animals. Aromatic amines a major class of DNA-reactive carcinogens in cigarette smoke, are not present at sufficiently high levels to fully explain the incidence of bladder cancer in cigarette smokers. Other agents in tobacco smoke could be excreted in urine and enhance the carcinogenic process by increasing urothelial cell proliferation. Nicotine is one such major component, as it has been shown to induce cell proliferation in multiple cell types in vitro. However, in vivo evidence specifically for the urothelium is lacking. We previously showed that cigarette smoke induces increased urothelial cell proliferation in mice. In the present study, urothelial proliferative and cytotoxic effects were examined after nicotine treatment in mice and rats. Nicotine hydrogen tartrate was administered in drinking water to rats (52 ppm nicotine) and mice (514 ppm nicotine) for 4 weeks and urothelial changes were evaluated. Histopathologically, 7/10 rats and 4/10 mice showed simple hyperplasia following nicotine treatment compared to none in the controls. Rats had an increased mean BrdU labeling index compared to controls, although it was not statistically significantly elevated in either species. Scanning electron microscopic visualization of the urothelium did not reveal significant cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that oral nicotine administration induced urothelial hyperplasia (increased cell proliferation), possibly due to a

  3. ERG–TMPRSS2 rearrangement is shared by concurrent prostatic adenocarcinoma and prostatic small cell carcinoma and absent in small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: evidence supporting monoclonal origin

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, Sean R; Zhang, Shaobo; Yao, Jorge L.; Huang, Jiaoti; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Shen, Steven; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; MacLennan, Gregory T.; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cheng, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is a heterogeneous disease with frequent multifocality and variability in morphology. Particularly, prostatic small cell carcinoma is a rare variant with aggressive behavior. Distinction between small cell carcinoma of the prostate and urinary bladder may be challenging, especially in small biopsy specimens without associated prostatic adenocarcinoma or urothelial carcinoma. Recently, gene fusions between ETS genes, particularly ETS-related gene (ERG), and transmembrane pr...

  4. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  5. Prima-1 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cell lines by activating p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila B. Piantino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bladder cancer represents 3% of all carcinomas in the Brazilian population and ranks second in incidence among urological tumors, after prostate cancer. The loss of p53 function is the main genetic alteration related to the development of high-grade muscle-invasive disease. Prima-1 is a small molecule that restores tumor suppressor function to mutant p53 and induces cancer cell death in various cancer types. Our aim was to investigate the ability of Prima-1 to induce apoptosis after DNA damage in bladder cancer cell lines. METHOD: The therapeutic effect of Prima-1 was studied in two bladder cancer cell lines: T24, which is characterized by a p53 mutation, and RT4, which is the wild-type for the p53 gene. Morphological features of apoptosis induced by p53, including mitochondrial membrane potential changes and the expression of thirteen genes involved in apoptosis, were assessed by microscopic observation and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. RESULTS: Prima-1 was able to reactivate p53 function in the T24 (p53 mt bladder cancer cell line and promote apoptosis via the induction of Bax and Puma expression, activation of the caspase cascade and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane in a BAK-independent manner. CONCLUSION: Prima-1 is able to restore the transcriptional activity of p53. Experimental studies in vivo may be conducted to test this molecule as a new therapeutic agent for urothelial carcinomas of the bladder, which characteristically harbor p53 mutations.

  6. Detection of bladder transitional cell carcinoma: urinary hTERT assay versus urine cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahyazadeh SR

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC of bladder is the second most common urogenital malignancy and because of its high rate of recurrence (two third of tumors recur vigilant surveillance is necessary. There have been a lot of efforts to find a proper biomarker for detecting urothelial cancers because available methods are expensive and invasive (like cystoscopy or have a low degree of sensitivity (like urine cytology. Urothelial malignancies, like other cancers tend to express a large amount of telomerase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible application of voided urine human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT mRNA assay in detecting low-grade bladder carcinoma in comparison with urine cytology. "nMethods: Voided urine samples were collected from 49 patients who were supposed to go under operation. Samples were examined by both Quantitative Real-time RT-PCR (for measuring hTERT mRNA level and cytology; the results were then compared to the final pathologic studies. "nResults: Regardless of clinical stage and or pathological grade of tumor, sensitivity of telomerase test and urine cytology was 74% and 16% respectively. There was a strong correlation between results of urine cytology and stage and/or grade of tumor; however, sensitivity of telomerase test was acceptable regardless of stage and or grade of tumor. There was a statistically significant difference between sensitivity of urine cytology and telomerase test (p<0.001. "nConclusion: Detection of hTERT-mRNA can potentially be used as a non-invasive method for diagnosis and follow up of bladder carcinoma instead of urine cytology.

  7. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy. PMID:26907529

  8. Association of FokI polymorphism of vitamin D receptor with urothelial bladder cancer in Tunisians: role of tobacco smoking and plasma vitamin D concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Fradj, Mohamed Kacem; Kallel, Amani; Gargouri, Mohamed Mourad; Chehida, Mohamed Ali Ben; Sallemi, Ahmed; Ouanes, Yassine; Rhouma, Sami Ben; Riadh, Jemaa; Feki, Moncef; Nouira, Yassine; Kaabachi, Naziha

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to test whether the VDR FokI polymorphism is associated with the risk of urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) in Tunisians. The study included 200 unrelated patients with UBC and 200 healthy controls. Genotyping of the VDR FokI polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP method. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were measured by immunoassay. Binary logistic regression model was applied to test how the association of VDR FokI polymorphism is independent of potential confounding factors. Genotype distribution (FF, 45 vs. 55 %; Ff, 52.1 vs. 47.9 %, and ff, 12 vs. 5.5 %, respectively) and allele frequencies (F, 66.5 vs. 74.8 % and f, 33.5 vs. 25.2 %, respectively) were significantly different between UBC patients and controls. The "ff" genotype [OR (95 % CI), 2.66 (1.24-5.73); p = 0.012] and "f" allele [1.49 (1.09-2.02); p = 0.010] were associated with increased risk of UBC. The association remained significant in multivariate analysis. Stratified analyses showed that VDR FokI polymorphism is only associated with UBC risk in ever-smokers, subjects exposed to chemical carcinogens and those with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D over 12 μg/L. The "f" allele of VDR FokI polymorphism is associated with a higher risk of UBC in Tunisians, especially in smokers as well as subjects with occupational exposition and subjects without vitamin D deficiency. These results should be replicated in other ethnic groups and the influence of other genetic factors and environments on this association should be investigated. PMID:26615419

  9. Loss of aquaporin 3 protein expression constitutes an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival: an immunohistochemical study on stage pT1 urothelial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of patients with stage pT1 urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) continues to be a challenge due to its unpredictable clinical course. Reliable molecular markers that help to determine appropriate individual treatment are still lacking. Loss of aquaporin (AQP) 3 protein expression has previously been shown in muscle-invasive UBC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of AQP3 protein expression with regard to the prognosis of stage pT1 UBC. AQP 3 protein expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in specimens of 87 stage T1 UBC patients, who were diagnosed by transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) and subsequent second resection at a high-volume urological centre between 2002 and 2009. Patients underwent adjuvant instillation therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Loss of AQP3 protein expression was defined as complete absence of the protein within the whole tumour. Expression status was correlated retrospectively with clinicopathological and follow-up data (median: 31 months). Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to assess the value of AQP3 tumour expression with regard to recurrence-free (RFS), progression-free (PFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). RFS, PFS and CSS were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Log rank test. 59% of patients were shown to exhibit AQP3-positive tumours, whereas 41% of tumours did not express the marker. Loss of AQP3 protein expression was associated with a statistically significantly worse PFS (20% vs. 72%, p=0.020). This finding was confirmed by multivariate Cox regression analysis (HR 7.58, CI 1.29 – 44.68; p=0.025). Loss of AQP3 protein expression in pT1 UBC appears to play a key role in disease progression and is associated with worse PFS. Considering its potential prognostic value, assessment of AQP3 protein expression could be used to help stratify the behavior of patients with pT1 UBC

  10. Analysis of the interaction of extracellular matrix and phenotype of bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extracellular matrix has a major effect upon the malignant properties of bladder cancer cells both in vitro in 3-dimensional culture and in vivo. Comparing gene expression of several bladder cancer cells lines grown under permissive and suppressive conditions in 3-dimensional growth on cancer-derived and normal-derived basement membrane gels respectively and on plastic in conventional tissue culture provides a model system for investigating the interaction of malignancy and extracellular matrix. Understanding how the extracellular matrix affects the phenotype of bladder cancer cells may provide important clues to identify new markers or targets for therapy. Five bladder cancer cell lines and one immortalized, but non-tumorigenic, urothelial line were grown on Matrigel, a cancer-derived ECM, on SISgel, a normal-derived ECM, and on plastic, where the only ECM is derived from the cells themselves. The transcriptomes were analyzed on an array of 1186 well-annotated cancer derived cDNAs containing most of the major pathways for malignancy. Hypervariable genes expressing more variability across cell lines than a set expressing technical variability were analyzed further. Expression values were clustered, and to identify genes most likely to represent biological factors, statistically over-represented ontologies and transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. Approximately 400 of the 1186 total genes were expressed 2 SD above background. Approximately 100 genes were hypervariable in cells grown on each ECM, but the pattern was different in each case. A core of 20 were identified as hypervariable under all 3 growth conditions, and 33 were hypervariable on both SISgel and Matrigel, but not on plastic. Clustering of the hypervariable genes showed very different patterns for the same 6 cell types on the different ECM. Even when loss of cell cycle regulation was identified, different genes were involved, depending on the ECM. Under the most permissive conditions

  11. Evaluation of viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells cultured onto xenogenic tissue-engineered extracellular matrices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells (HUCs) cultured on tissue-engineered extracellular matrix scaffolds and to assess the potential of extracellular matrixes to support the growth of HUCs in their expected in vivo urine environment.

  12. Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer:a primer on immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahir Maruf; Sam J. Brancato; Piyush K. Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has long been the gold standard treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Recently, there has been an emergence of novel immunotherapeutic agents, which have shown promise in the treatment of urothelial cell carcinoma. These agents aim to augment, modify, or enhance the immune response. Such strategies include recombinant BCG, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapy, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Here, we review the emerging immunotherapeutics in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

  13. Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: a primer on immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruf, Mahir; Brancato, Sam J.; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has long been the gold standard treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Recently, there has been an emergence of novel immunotherapeutic agents, which have shown promise in the treatment of urothelial cell carcinoma. These agents aim to augment, modify, or enhance the immune response. Such strategies include recombinant BCG, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapy, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Here, we review the emerging immunotherapeutics in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

  14. Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Duodenal Metastasis of Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H.F. Chan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute upper gastrointestinal (UGI bleeding is a common problem in our clinical practice and is often due to peptic ulcer diseases. Occasionally, malignancy may be implicated in these situations. Here we report a rare case of UGI bleeding secondary to metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder. A 62-year-old man with a history of stage IIIb TCC of the urinary bladder presented with hematemesis. Endoscopy showed a large tumor in the second stage of the duodenum that occupied 40% of the duodenal circumference, over 7 cm in length. Biopsies revealed a poorly differentiated malignant neoplasm consistent with metastasis from urothelial carcinoma that was identical to the previous surgical specimen of the urinary bladder. He was treated with supportive therapy and intravenous proton pump inhibitor and was discharged home 2 weeks later. Two weeks after discharge, the patient returned to the hospital with a painful swelling of the floor of his mouth. Biopsy again showed the same cancer type. He had unremitting bleeding from his mouth requiring multiple transfusions and a course of palliative radiation therapy. He progressively deteriorated in his cardiopulmonary and neurological functions and expired with cardiopulmonary arrest one month later.

  15. Perioperative search for circulating tumor cells in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Despite having an organ confined tumor stage at the time of radical cystectomy, a certain number of bladder cancer patients will develop local or distant metastases over time. Currently there are no reliable serum markers for monitoring and evaluating risk profiles of urothelial cancers. Several studies suggest that detection of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC may correlate with disease status and prognosis at baseline and early in the treatment of cancers. The presence of CTCs in whole blood before and during radical cystectomy could provide further information on disease status, and could be used as an indicator to determine the need for adjuvant or even perioperative chemotherapy. Methods From 03/2009 to 05/2009, five patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder participated in this study. All patients were admitted to the hospital for radical cystectomy (rCx. A standard or extended lymph node dissection was performed in all cases. Preoperative CT or MRI scans revealed no distant or local metastases. Median age was 66.8 years (55-81 yrs. After obtaining informed consent from each patient, approximately 30 mL of peripheral blood was taken immediately before rCx and again during surgical removal of the urinary bladder from the patients' body. As additional parameters, operation time (OR for surgical removal of the bladder and the amount of blood volume that was used for the detection of CTCs were recorded. Obtained blood samples were processed using the Cell-Search System (Veridex© within 48 hours of collection. CTCs were identified and quantitated using the Cell-Search System, followed by re-evaluation of the provided results by specially trained and experienced personal. (CS, SH Results CTCs were detected before and during surgical removal of the urinary bladder in one of five patients (20%. In the one patient positive for CTC, two CTCs were detected in the blood sample that was

  16. Enhanced Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in High Grade Human Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Kömhoff, Martin; Guan, Youfei; Shappell, Heidi W.; Davis, Linda; Jack, Greg; Shyr, Yu; Koch, Michael O.; Scott B. Shappell; D. Breyer, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    Studies in human and animal models have shown that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is up-regulated in several epithelial carcinomas including colon, breast, and lung. To elucidate the possible involvement of COX-2 in human bladder cancer we examined the expression of COX isoforms in benign tissue and in bladder carcinoma specimens. Paraffin embedded tissues from 75 patients with urothelial carcinomas were immunostained with specific antibodies raised against COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 expression was detec...

  17. IL22 regulates human urothelial cell sensory and innate functions through modulation of the acetylcholine response, immunoregulatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides: assessment of an in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phong T Le

    Full Text Available Human urinary disorders are generally studied in rodent models due to limitations of functional in vitro culture models of primary human urothelial cells (HUCs. Current HUC culture models are often derived from immortalized cancer cell lines, which likely have functional characteristics differ from healthy human urothelium. Here, we described a simple explant culture technique to generate HUCs and assessed their in vitro functions. Using transmission electron microscopy, we assessed morphology and heterogeneity of the generated HUCs and characterized their intercellular membrane structural proteins relative to ex vivo urothelium tissue. We demonstrated that our cultured HUCs are free of fibroblasts. They are also heterogeneous, containing cells characteristic of both immature basal cells and mature superficial urothelial cells. The cultured HUCs expressed muscarinic receptors (MR1 and MR2, carnitine acetyltransferase (CarAT, immunoregulatory cytokines IL7, IL15, and IL23, as well as the chemokine CCL20. HUCs also expressed epithelial cell-specific molecules essential for forming intercellular structures that maintain the functional capacity to form the physiological barrier of the human bladder urothelium. A subset of HUCs, identified by the high expression of CD44, expressed the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 along with its co-receptor CD14. We demonstrated that HUCs express, at the mRNA level, both forms of the IL22 receptor, the membrane-associated (IL22RA1 and the secreted soluble (IL22RA2 forms; in turn, IL22 inhibited expression of MR1 and induced expression of CarAT and two antimicrobial peptides (S100A9 and lipocalin-2. While the cellular sources of IL22 have yet to be identified, the HUC cytokine and chemokine profiles support the concept that IL22-producing cells are present in the human bladder mucosa tissue and that IL22 plays a regulatory role in HUC functions. Thus, the described explant technique is clearly capable of generating

  18. Loss of prostasin (PRSS8 in human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cell lines is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Karl X

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored epithelial extracellular membrane serine protease prostasin (PRSS8 is expressed abundantly in normal epithelia and essential for terminal epithelial differentiation, but down-regulated in human prostate, breast, and gastric cancers and invasive cancer cell lines. Prostasin is involved in the extracellular proteolytic modulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and is an invasion suppressor. The aim of this study was to evaluate prostasin expression states in the transitional cell carcinomas (TCC of the human bladder and in human TCC cell lines. Methods Normal human bladder tissues and TCC on a bladder cancer tissue microarray (TMA were evaluated for prostasin expression by means of immunohistochemistry. A panel of 16 urothelial and TCC cell lines were evaluated for prostasin and E-cadherin expression by western blot and quantitative PCR, and for prostasin gene promoter region CpG methylation by methylation-specific PCR (MSP. Results Prostasin is expressed in the normal human urothelium and in a normal human urothelial cell line, but is significantly down-regulated in high-grade TCC and lost in 9 (of 15 TCC cell lines. Loss of prostasin expression in the TCC cell lines correlated with loss of or reduced E-cadherin expression, loss of epithelial morphology, and promoter DNA hypermethylation. Prostasin expression could be reactivated by demethylation or inhibition of histone deacetylase. Re-expression of prostasin or a serine protease-inactive variant resulted in transcriptional up-regulation of E-cadherin. Conclusion Loss of prostasin expression in bladder transitional cell carcinomas is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and may have functional implications in tumor invasion and resistance to chemotherapy.

  19. Loss of prostasin (PRSS8) in human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cell lines is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored epithelial extracellular membrane serine protease prostasin (PRSS8) is expressed abundantly in normal epithelia and essential for terminal epithelial differentiation, but down-regulated in human prostate, breast, and gastric cancers and invasive cancer cell lines. Prostasin is involved in the extracellular proteolytic modulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and is an invasion suppressor. The aim of this study was to evaluate prostasin expression states in the transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) of the human bladder and in human TCC cell lines. Normal human bladder tissues and TCC on a bladder cancer tissue microarray (TMA) were evaluated for prostasin expression by means of immunohistochemistry. A panel of 16 urothelial and TCC cell lines were evaluated for prostasin and E-cadherin expression by western blot and quantitative PCR, and for prostasin gene promoter region CpG methylation by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Prostasin is expressed in the normal human urothelium and in a normal human urothelial cell line, but is significantly down-regulated in high-grade TCC and lost in 9 (of 15) TCC cell lines. Loss of prostasin expression in the TCC cell lines correlated with loss of or reduced E-cadherin expression, loss of epithelial morphology, and promoter DNA hypermethylation. Prostasin expression could be reactivated by demethylation or inhibition of histone deacetylase. Re-expression of prostasin or a serine protease-inactive variant resulted in transcriptional up-regulation of E-cadherin. Loss of prostasin expression in bladder transitional cell carcinomas is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and may have functional implications in tumor invasion and resistance to chemotherapy

  20. Further characterization of the muscle layers and lamina propria of the urinary bladder by systematic histologic mapping: implications for pathologic staging of invasive urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paner, Gladell P; Ro, Jae Y; Wojcik, Eva M; Venkataraman, Girish; Datta, Milton W; Amin, Mahul B

    2007-09-01

    bundles were noted in deep LP situated between the more typical slender MM layer and the MP. In conclusion, there are additional patterns of MM other than previously described. Awareness of the occasionally hyperplastic appearance of MM muscle is important to prevent overstaging of invasive urothelial carcinoma. In transurethral resection specimens, lack of orientation may preclude distinction of the hyperplastic MM from true MP in these rare situations. The number and orientation of muscle bundles, relationship to urothelium and vascular plexus, and comparison with more characteristic MP, if present, would be helpful; isolated bundles immediately adjacent to the urothelium with loose haphazard fiber orientation and irregular outlines favor MM over MP muscle. The hyperplastic MM mimicking MP may be more challenging; isolated muscle bundles immediately adjacent to the urothelium would favor hyperplastic pattern of MM over MP muscle. Topographical variations exist among the subsites, the more superficial location of the MP and the rarity of MM in the trigone, relative abundance of hyperplastic MM in dome, and presence of the more superficial ureteral MP at its insertion in the bladder complicate the traditional pT stage evaluation of invasion in these regions. The inconsistency of a distinct MM layer and variations in the LP vascular plexus indicate that substaging of pT1 would be problematic and thus provides further support to the World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology 1998 and World Health Organization 2004 recommendation against its implementation at the current time. PMID:17721199

  1. Androgen receptor expands the population of cancer stem cells in upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Huang, Chi-Ping; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Wen-Lin; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) affects the development and progression of upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma (UUTUC). However, the regulatory mechanism exerted by AR to affect UUTUC cells remains unclear. Here we investigated whether AR promotes UUTUC development and progression, possibly by expanding the population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are a particular population of cells within cancer cells responsible for tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. We compared UUTUC cells with or without the addition of AR on their CSC population with flow cytometry, colony formation and sphere formation assay to determine the effect of AR on CSC activity, and real-time PCR was used to detect the expression stemness genes and miRNAs. In vivo tumor formation was evaluated with the implantation of cancer cells in nude mice. We found that the addition of AR in UUTUC cells, significantly increased the population of CSC, clonogenicity, sphere formation and the expression of stemness genes (Oct4, Bmi1 and Nanog), altered CSC-related miRNA profile, as well as promoted epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). And AR inhibitor, enzalutamide was shown to suppress AR’s effect on tumorsphere formation. Furthermore, in an immune-deficient mouse model, the addition of AR in UUTUC cells also increased the tumor formation capacity. This study will help us better understand the extent to which AR contributes to UUTUC progression by expanding their CSC population and capacity. Our findings could explain high incidence of UUTUC observed in males. And targeting AR may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for genetically diversified urothelial carcinomas in precision medicine era.

  2. High expression of KPNA2 defines poor prognosis in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma treated with radical nephroureterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the expression of karyopherin alpha 2 (KPNA2) in upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) and to investigate whether the KPNA2 expression provides additional prognostic information following radical nephroureterectomy (RNU). A tissue microarray (TMA) containing samples from 176 patients with UTUC who underwent RNU at our institute was analyzed for KPNA2 expression using immunohistochemistry. KPNA2 expression in normal urothelial cell line and urothelial carcinoma cell lines was evaluated by western blot analysis. Using RNA interference in vitro, the effects of KPNA2 inhibition on cellular viability, migration and apoptosis were determined. KPNA2 expression was significantly upregulated in the UTUC samples compared with the adjacent normal urothelial tissues. High KPNA2 immunoreactivity was identified as a predictor of bladder recurrence (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.017, 95% CI 1.13-3.61, p = 0.018), poor disease-free survival (DFS, HR: 2.754, 95% CI 1.68-4.51, p = 0.001) and poor overall survival (OS, HR: 4.480, 95% CI 1.84-10.89, p = 0.001) for patients with UTUC after RNU. Furthermore, high KPNA2 immunoreactivity was independent of the conventional predictive factors in a multivariate analysis. Additional in vitro experiments revealed that KPNA2 expression was higher in urothelial carcinoma cell lines than in normal urothelial cell line. KPNA2 inhibition with a specific siRNA decreased cell viability and migration and increased apoptosis in urothelial carcinoma cell lines. KPNA2 is a novel independent prognostic marker for bladder recurrence, DFS and OS of UTUC patients who have undergone RNU. Moreover, these data suggest that KPNA2 may be a promising therapeutic target for UTUC

  3. Global gene expression changes in human urothelial cells exposed to low-level monomethylarsonous acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medeiros, M.; Zheng, X.; Novák, Petr; Wnek, S.M.; Chyan, V.; Escudero-Lourdes, C.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 291, 1-3 (2012), s. 102-112. ISSN 0300-483X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : HUMAN BLADDER CELLS * METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS * MALIGNANT-TRANSFORMATION0300 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.017, year: 2012

  4. A case report of a urothelial carcinoma arising in the renal pelvis with exuberant chondrosarcomatous element associated with adrenal metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor that has both malignant epithelial and mesenchymal components. We describe a sarcomatoid carcinoma arising in the left renal pelvis of a 49-year-old man. The dominant component of the tumor was chondrosarcomatous, but there were also focal carcinomatous areas. The carcinomatous tumor cells consisted of papillary urothelial carcinoma. Immunohistochemical assay showed that the sarcomatous tumor cells were positive for vimentin and S 100 and negative for cytokeratin. The papillary urothelial carcinoma was positive for cytokeratin and negative for vimentin. The patient underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after downsizing the tumor, radical nephrectomy was performed with excision of the cuff of bladder.

  5. Hydronephrotic urine in the obstructed kidney promotes urothelial carcinoma cell proliferation, migration, invasion through the activation of mTORC2-AKT and ERK signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hao Chang

    Full Text Available Obstructive nephropathy is the most common presentation of urothelial carcinoma. The role of the urine in the obstructed kidney namely "hydronephrotic urine" in urothelial carcinoma has not been extensively explored. This study aims to evaluate whether hydronephrotic urine in the obstructed kidney could promote urothelial carcinoma. The hydronephrotic urine was collected from the obstructed kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats induced by different periods of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO. By the inhibition of LY294002 and PD184352, we confirm that hydronephrotic urine promotes urothelial carcinoma cell (T24 and immortalized normal urothelial cells (E6 proliferation, migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner through the activation of the mTORC2-AKT and ERK signaling pathways. Hydronephrotic urine also increases the expression of cyclin-D2, cyclin-B and CDK2. It also decreases the expression of p27 and p21 in both urothelial carcinoma cells and normal urothelial cells. By the protein array study, we demonstrate that many growth factors which promote tumor cell survival and metastasis are over-expressed in a time-dependent manner in the hydronephrotic urine, including beta-FGF, IFN-γ, PDGF-BB, PIGF, TGF-β, VEGF-A, VEGF-D and EGF. These results suggest that hydronephrotic urine promotes normal and malignant urothelial cells proliferation, migration and invasion, through the activation of the mTORC2-AKT and ERK signaling pathways. Further investigation using live animal models of tumor growth may be needed to clarify aspects of these statements.

  6. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim;

    2007-01-01

    To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review the...... published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed, as...

  7. Skeletal muscle metastasis from transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: Clinicoradiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabi, G. E-mail: nabeegholam@hotmail.com; Gupta, N.P.; Gandhi, D

    2003-11-01

    AIM: To define the clinicoradiological characteristics of skeletal muscle metastasis from transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients with skeletal muscle metastasis was undertaken between January 1999 to December 2001. Patients suspected of having a metastasis on radiological examinations, and subsequently proven to have metastatic disease on histological examination were included in study. The clinical presentation and radiological features of five patients with skeletal muscle metastasis from bladder tumours were reviewed from hospital records. RESULTS: Twenty-four patients had skeletal muscle metastasis from various primaries. Of these five patients had previous or concurrent primary tumours in the bladder. Patients were aged between 27-70 years (mean 52 years), and all had persistent, localized pain with or without accompanying swelling. The muscles involved were psoas in three patients, adductor muscles of thigh in one and rectus abdominis in one. Four patients had radical cystectomy with urinary diversion (two ileal conduit and two orthotopic sigmoid neobladder). One patient presented with bladder tumour and concomitant muscular metastasis. All patients underwent helical computed tomography (CT) before confirmation of diagnosis by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) or biopsy. The typical appearance of low-density enhancing lesions on CT was mistaken for abscess in two patients and failure to respond to conservative treatment led to suspicion of metastasis. Diagnosis was proven histologically in all patients (FNA in three and biopsy in two). All patients had palliative chemotherapy (Mitomycin, Vincristine, Adriamycin and Cyclophosphamide). Two patients had local palliative 3500 rad radiotherapy for persistent pain. Mean survival was 8 months (range 6-12 months). CONCLUSION: Muscular metastasis from urothelial tumours typically presents with persistent localized pain with or without swelling. The

  8. Evaluation of time dependence and interindividual differences in benzo[a]pyrene-mediated CYP1A1 induction and genotoxicity in porcine urinary bladder cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plottner, Sabine; Borza, Alexandra; Wolf, Alexander; Bolt, Hermann M; Kuhlmann, Jurgen; Follmann, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to tobacco smoke is an established cause of cancer in humans and cigarette smoking is a risk factor for urinary bladder cancer development. Aromatic amines are believed responsible for the bladder-specific carcinogenic effect, but polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are also of potential relevance. Urothelial cells contain a number of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, which enable them to convert pro-carcinogens into reactive intermediates. In a preceding study, it was demonstrated using cultured porcine urinary bladder epithelial cells (PUBEC) that CYP1A1 mRNA is induced in a potent manner by treatment with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). In the present study, the time dependence of these effects was evaluated and whether PUBEC cultures derived from individual donors respond differently to BaP treatment was determined. CYP1A1 induction was analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and genotoxic effects were studied using the Comet assay. Incubation of PUBEC with BaP increased CYP1A1 expression and induction of DNA strand breaks in a time-dependent manner. Interindividual differences were found between PUBEC cultures derived from several donor animals with respect to the response to BaP, such that the extent of CYP1A1 induction and magnitude of DNA damage was interrelated. Hence, individual differences in metabolic capacities and responsiveness to xenobiotics of urothelial cells from individual donors may be factors in susceptibility to genotoxic effects induced by PAHs. PMID:18569604

  9. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules

  10. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hkitamu@sapmed.ac.jp; Tsukamoto, Taiji [Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South 1 West 16, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8543 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8{sup +} T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  11. The Salmochelin Siderophore Receptor IroN Contributes to Invasion of Urothelial Cells by Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli In Vitro▿

    OpenAIRE

    Feldmann, Friederike; Sorsa, Liisa Johanna; Hildinger, Kirsten; Schubert, Sören

    2007-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains possess several siderophore-dependent iron uptake systems. In this study we demonstrated that the salmochelin siderophore receptor IroN is involved in the invasion of urothelial cells by ExPEC in vitro. Thus, IroN may play a dual role in the establishment of urinary tract infections, displaying an iron uptake receptor as well as an internalization factor.

  12. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  13. The small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3) is a molecular target for Edelfosine to reduce the invasive potential of urothelial carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinestel, Konrad; Eder, Stefan; Ehinger, Konstantin; Schneider, Juliane; Genze, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Wardelmann, Eva; Schrader, Andres J; Steinestel, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is the survival-determining factor in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the urinary bladder. The small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3) enhances tumor cell invasion in breast cancer and malignant melanoma. Since Edelfosine, a glycerophospholipid with antitumoral properties, effectively inhibits SK3 channel activity, our goal was to evaluate SK3 as a potential molecular target to inhibit the gain of an invasive phenotype in UC. SK3 protein expression was analyzed in 208 tissue samples and UC cell lines. Effects of Edelfosine on SK3 expression and intracellular calcium levels as well as on cell morphology, cell survival and proliferation were assessed using immunoblotting, potentiometric fluorescence microscopy, and clonogenic/cell survival assay; furthermore, we analyzed the effect of Edelfosine and SK3 RNAi knockdown on tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. We found that SK3 is strongly expressed in muscle-invasive UC and in the RT112 cellular tumor model. Higher concentrations of Edelfosine have a strong antitumoral effect on UC cells, while 1 μM effectively inhibits migration/invasion of UC cells in vitro and in vivo comparable to the SK3 knockdown phenotype. Taken together, our results show strong expression of SK3 in muscle-invasive UC, consistent with the postulated role of the protein in tumor cell invasion. Edelfosine is able to effectively inhibit migration and invasion of UC cells in vitro and in vivo in an SK3-dependent way, pointing towards a possible role for Edelfosine as an antiinvasive drug to effectively inhibit UC cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26619845

  14. Detection of serum CYFRA21-1 in patients with urothelial bladder carci-noma%膀胱尿路上皮细胞癌患者血清 CYFRA21-1水平的测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔朝辉; 朱晓博; 范小玲

    2014-01-01

    目的:检测膀胱尿路上皮细胞癌患者血清中CYFRA21-1水平并探讨其临床意义。方法:采用电化学发光免疫分析技术检测57例膀胱尿路上皮细胞癌患者和52例泌尿系统良性疾病患者以及49例健康个体血清CY-FRA21-1水平。结果:膀胱尿路上皮细胞癌患者血清CYFRA21-1水平和阳性率均高于泌尿系统良性疾病患者与健康人群( F/χ2=28.949、15.221,P均<0.05)。膀胱尿路上皮细胞癌病理分级与血清CYFRA21-1水平及阳性率均无关(P均>0.05)。 T3及T3M+期肿瘤较Ta、T1、T2期肿瘤患者血清CYFRA21-1水平及阳性率均升高(F/χ2=2.096、34.232,P均<0.05);与初发肿瘤相比,复发膀胱尿路上皮细胞癌患者血清CYFRA21-1水平及阳性率均升高(t/χ2=3.968、9.541,P均<0.05)。结论:血清CYFRA21-1可以作为膀胱尿路上皮细胞癌的一个可靠的肿瘤标志物,特别是在监测膀胱尿路上皮癌转移或复发时更具优势。%Aim:To study value of serum CYFRA21-1 in urothelial bladder carcinoma and its clinical significance . Methods:Electrochemiluminescence method was used to detect serum CYFRA 21-1 level of 158 patients, including 57 ca-ses with urothelial bladder carcinoma (group 1), 52 cases with benign diseases of the urinary system (group 2), and 49 healthy individuals(group 3).Results: Compared with group 2 and group 3, serum CYFRA21-1 level and positive rate were significantly higher in group 1 (F/χ2 =28.949,15.221,P0.05).The CYFRA21-1 level and positive rate increased significantly in T 3 and T3M+stage compared to Ta, T1 and T2 stage(F/χ2 =2.096,34.232,P<0.05).Compared with primary tumor, serum CYFRA21-1 level and positive rate were significantly increased in recurrent urothelial bladder carcinoma ( t/χ2 =3.968, 9.541,P<0.05).Conclusion:Serum CYFRA21-1 seems to be a marker of urothelial bladder carcinoma .It is useful for monitoring this disease

  15. Transitional Cell Carcinoma within a Portion of Inguinally Herniated Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Uhlman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder herniation within the inguinal canal is a relatively uncommon finding. We report an even less-common occurrence of transitional cell carcinoma located within a portion of inguinally herniated bladder. Fewer than 20 reports exist in the literature describing this scenario.

  16. Substance P induces localization of MIF/α1-inhibitor-3 complexes to umbrella cells via paracellular transit through the urothelium in the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Pedro L

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is released into the intraluminal fluid during bladder inflammation in the rat complexed to α1-inhibitor-3 (A1-I3; a rodent proteinase inhibitor in the α-macroglobulin family. The location of A1-I3 in the bladder had not been investigated. Therefore, we examined the location of A1-I3 and MIF/A1-I3 complexes in the bladder and changes due to experimental inflammation. Methods Anesthetized male rats had bladders removed with no treatment (intact or were injected with Substance P (SP; s.c.; saline vehicle. After one hour intraluminal fluid was removed, bladder was excised and MIF and A1-I3 levels were determined using ELISA and/or western-blotting. MIF co-immunoprecipitation determined MIF/A1-I3 complexes in the bladder. Bladder sections were immunostained for A1-I3 and MIF/A1-I3. Results A1-I3 immunostaining was observed in interstitial spaces throughout the bladder (including submucosa but not urothelium in intact and saline-treated rats. RT-PCR showed that the bladder does not synthesize A1-I3, therefore, A1-I3 in the interstitial space of the bladder must be plasma derived. In SP-treated rats, A1-I3 in the bladder increased and A1-I3 was observed traversing through the urothelium. Umbrella cells that do not show MIF and/or A1-I3 immunostaining in intact or saline-treated rats, showed co-localization of MIF and A1-I3 after SP-treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that in the bladder MIF formed non-covalent interactions and also binds covalently to A1-I3 to form high molecular weight MIF/A1-I3 complexes (170, 130 and 75-kDa, respectively, verified by co-immunoprecipitation. SP-induced inflammation selectively reduced 170-kDa MIF/A1-I3 in the bladder while increasing 170 and 130-kDa MIF/A1-I3 in the intraluminal fluid. Conclusion A1-I3 and MIF/A1-I3 complexes are resident in bladder interstitium. During SP-induced inflammation, MIF/A1-I3 complexes are released from the bladder

  17. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Gall Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haid, Max; Gahju, Badri; Schulz, Craig; Sterner, David; Falconer, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the gall bladder (SCCGB) is a rare condition, with only 53 prior cases reported in the world literature when our case was first diagnosed. Our patient was found to have limited stage disease and was treated with sequential laparoscopic cholecystectomy, etoposide/carboplatin chemotherapy followed by consolidating loco-regional radiation therapy. She is alive and well without evidence of disease more than 132 months since diagnosis. We describe here our experience in the diagnosis, staging workup, treatment, and surveillance of a case of SCCGB and review the published literature. Treated aggressively with currently available methods, patients with limited stage SCCGB can have an excellent prognosis. The authors' intent is to provide a reasonable plan of treatment for other physicians facing such an unusual patient. PMID:27197345

  18. Inhibitory Role of the Small Leucine-Rich Proteoglycan Biglycan in Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Niedworok, Christian; Röck, Katharina; Kretschmer, Inga; Freudenberger, Till; Nagy, Nadine; Szarvas, Tibor; vom Dorp, Frank; Reis, Henning; Rübben, Herbert; Fischer, Jens W

    2013-01-01

    Background Urothelial bladder cancer is the ninth most common cancer. Despite surgical and chemotherapeutic treatment the prognosis is still poor once bladder cancer progresses to a muscle-invasive state. Discovery of new diagnostic markers and pathophysiologic effectors might help to contribute to novel diagnostic and therapeutic options. The extracellular matrix microenvironment shaped by the extracellular matrix critically affects tumor cell and stroma cell functions. Therefore, aim of the...

  19. Adult urinary bladder tumors with rabdomyosarcomatous differentiation: Clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Paul J; Bing Zhanyong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Adult rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in the urinary bladder is rare, and is the subject of case reports and small series. It consists of sheets of small round blue cells with high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, brisk mitosis and apoptosis. In this study, we reported one case of pure rhabdomyosarcoma and two cases of urothelial carcinomas with extensive rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. In addition, their immunohistochemical profile was compared to that of small cell carcinoma of the bladder....

  20. A rare case of pure small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita Singh; Divya Srivastava; Hemant Yadav; Rajeev Sen

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most common urologic malignancy. Up to 95% of the urinary bladder tumors are of epithelial origin, from which 90% are transitional neoplasms. However, small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is rare tumor accounting for

  1. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Igor Tsaur; Karen Nelson; Jesco Pfitzenmaier; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as...

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganglong Yang

    Full Text Available The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia, KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC, and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer.

  3. HERV-K and LINE-1 DNA methylation and reexpression in urothelial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WolfgangGoering

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in DNA methylation frequently accompany cancer development. One prominent change is an apparently genome-wide decrease in methylcytosine that is often ascribed to DNA hypomethylation at retroelements comprising nearly half the genome. DNA hypomethylation may allow reactivation of retroelements, enabling retrotransposition and causing gene expression disturbances favoring tumor development. However, neither the extent of hypomethylation nor of retroelement reactivation are precisely known. We therefore assessed DNA methylation and expression of three major classes of retroelements (LINE-1, HERV-K and AluY in human urinary bladder cancer tissues and cell lines by pyrosequencing and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, respectively. We found substantial global LINE-1 DNA hypomethylation in bladder cancer going along with a shift towards full-length LINE-1 expression. Thus, pronounced differences in LINE-1 expression were observed, which may be promoted, among others, by LINE-1 hypomethylation. Significant DNA hypomethylation was found at the HERV-K_22q11.23 proviral long terminal repeat (LTR in bladder cancer tissues but without reactivation of its expression. DNA methylation of HERVK17, essentially absent from normal urothelial cells, was elevated in cell lines from invasive bladder cancers. Accordingly, the faint expression of HERVK17 in normal urothelial cells disappeared in such cancer cell lines. Of 16 additional HERV-Ks, expression of 7 could be detected in the bladder, albeit generally at low levels. Unlike in prostate cancers, none of these showed significant expression changes in bladder cancer. In contrast, expression of the AluYb8 but not of the AluYa5 family was significantly increased in bladder cancer tissues. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a remarkable specificity of changes in expression and DNA methylation of retroelements in bladder cancer with a significantly different pattern from that

  4. Impacts of CA9 gene polymorphisms on urothelial cell carcinoma susceptibility and clinicopathologic characteristics in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Shiang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 is reportedly overexpressed in several types of carcinomas and is generally considered a marker of malignancy. The current study explored the effect of CA9 gene polymorphisms on the susceptibility of developing urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC and the clinicopathological status. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 442 participants, including 221 healthy people and 221 patients with UCC, were recruited for this study. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the CA9 gene were assessed by a real-time PCR with the TaqMan assay. After adjusting for other co-variants, the individuals carrying at least one A allele at CA9 rs1048638 had a 2.303-fold risk of developing UCC than did wild-type (CC carriers. Furthermore, UCC patients who carried at least one A allele at rs1048638 had a higher invasive stage risk (p< 0.05 than did patients carrying the wild-type allele. Moreover, among the UCC patients with smoker, people with at least one A allele of CA9 polymorphisms (rs1048638 had a 4.75-fold (95% CI = 1.204-18.746 increased risk of invasive cancer. CONCLUSION: The rs1048638 polymorphic genotypes of CA9 might contribute to the prediction of susceptibility to and pathological development of UCC. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with CA9 variants in carcinogenesis of UCC in Taiwan.

  5. Primary uterine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the urinary bladder with urinary cytology mimicking carcinomas: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiyo Adachi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a 69-year-old woman in whom diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL originated from the uterus and involved the urinary bladder. The cervical smears of the case mostly consisted of discohesive atypical round cells, which were highly suggestive of lymphoma; however, in voided urine smears, a majority of the cells formed large aggregates of degenerated cells, mimicking those of urothelial carcinoma (UC. The smears also represented some small loose clusters, in which tumor cells formed short chains with nuclear molding, mimicking those of small cell carcinoma. The cytodiagnosis got definitive when we identified the atypical cells that showed CD20+/CD3-/cytokeratin-/NSE- immunophenotype. These are of particular concern as they may have misleading similarities to other epithelial neoplasms when examining lymphoma involving the urinary bladder. Accordingly, this case highlights the importance of immunocytochemistry to rule out malignant lymphoma when encountering large and/or small loose clusters of atypical round cells on urinary cytology.

  6. Primary uterine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the urinary bladder with urinary cytology mimicking carcinomas: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Sumiyo; Yamazaki, Kazuto; Liang, Shan-Guang; Ishida, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 69-year-old woman in whom diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) originated from the uterus and involved the urinary bladder. The cervical smears of the case mostly consisted of discohesive atypical round cells, which were highly suggestive of lymphoma; however, in voided urine smears, a majority of the cells formed large aggregates of degenerated cells, mimicking those of urothelial carcinoma (UC). The smears also represented some small loose clusters, in which tumor cells formed short chains with nuclear molding, mimicking those of small cell carcinoma. The cytodiagnosis got definitive when we identified the atypical cells that showed CD20+/CD3-/cytokeratin-/NSE- immunophenotype. These are of particular concern as they may have misleading similarities to other epithelial neoplasms when examining lymphoma involving the urinary bladder. Accordingly, this case highlights the importance of immunocytochemistry to rule out malignant lymphoma when encountering large and/or small loose clusters of atypical round cells on urinary cytology. PMID:26729979

  7. Superficial Urothelial Cancer in the Prostatic Urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Kirkali

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is a multifocal disease of the urinary tract that can also involve the prostatic urethra (PU. The exact incidence of superficial involvement of the PU in patients with bladder TCC is not well known. Bladder TCC may involve the prostate in 12—40% of the patients and the degree of involvement can include urethral mucosa, ducts, acini, and stroma of the gland, which has been shown to affect the outcome. Risk factors for superficial urothelial cancer in the PU are high-grade, multifocal bladder TCC and presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS in the bladder. While visible tumors are easy to detect and resect, controversy still exists regarding the optimal technique to identify prostatic involvement by TCC. Prostatic urethral sampling by a transurethral resection biopsy or a cold-cup biopsy, particularly in the high-risk group of bladder cancer patients, has been recommended for detecting prostatic urethral involvement. Management of superficial prostatic involvement by TCC is also unclear. Currently, there is increasing recognition of the value of conservative treatment options with intravesical agents when there is superficial involvement of the PU. Particularly, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (BCG seems to be an effective treatment alternative in the management of superficial involvement of the PU by TCC. Close follow-up by cystoscopy and PU biopsy at 3-month intervals, particularly in intermediate and high-risk patients who respond to intravesical therapy and in whom cystectomy is appropriate, is recommended in order to detect persistent tumor, recurrences, or progression.

  8. Emerging Families of Ion Channels Involved in Urinary Bladder Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusaku Okada

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The expression of multiple ion channels and receptors is essential for nociceptors to detect noxious stimuli of a thermal, mechanical or chemical nature. The peripheral sensory transduction systems of the urinary bladder include sensory nerve endings, urothelial cells and others whose location is suitable for transducing mechanical and chemical stimuli. There is an increasing body of evidence implicating the Deg/ENaC and TRP channel families in the control of bladder afferent excitability under physiological and pathological conditions. Pharmacological interventions targeting these ion channels may provide a new strategy for the treatment of pathological bladder sensation and pain.

  9. Adult urinary bladder tumors with rabdomyosarcomatous differentiation: Clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Paul J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adult rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS in the urinary bladder is rare, and is the subject of case reports and small series. It consists of sheets of small round blue cells with high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, brisk mitosis and apoptosis. In this study, we reported one case of pure rhabdomyosarcoma and two cases of urothelial carcinomas with extensive rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. In addition, their immunohistochemical profile was compared to that of small cell carcinoma of the bladder. Our study showed that sufficient sampling was critical for the diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma with extensive rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. As adult RMS in the bladder and urothelial carcinoma with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation shared morphological features with small cell carcinoma of the bladder, appropriate immunohistochemical stains were necessary in the differential diagnosis. We showed both rhabdomyosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcomatous areas of the urothelial carcinoma were positive for myogenin, negative for cytokeratin and chromogranin stains. In contrast, small cell carcinoma was positive for cytokeratin, and 7 out of 9 cases were also positive for chromogranin. Both rhabdomyosarcoma and small cell carcinoma could be positive for synaptophysin, a potential pitfall to avoid. In addition, all of the tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation were negative for FKHR rearrangement.

  10. Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Urinary Bladder; Case Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşegül SARI; Ermete, Murat; Canan SADULLAHOĞLU; Bal, Kaan; Ahmet BOLÜKBAŞI

    2013-01-01

    Large cell neuroendocrine tumor of the urinary bladder is very rare. It is a type of neuroendocrine carcinoma that is morphologically different from small cell carcinoma.This manuscript describes a 67-year-old man who presented with hematuria. Ultrasonogrophic and computer tomography revealed a 5 cm mass in right posterolateral wall of the bladder that invaded perivesical tissue and he subsequently underwent transurethral resection. Microscopic examination showed a tumor with a sheet-like and...

  11. Unusual presentation of high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the Urinary bladder with small-cell and large-cell features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Fiorin de Vasconcellos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder comprehends small-cell and large-cell variants. It is a rare and aggressive neoplasm, mostly diagnosed in advanced stages. It is more frequently encountered among Caucasian men in the sixth decade of life. Urinary symptoms are the most common clinical presentation. Diagnosis is generally not troublesome once the lesions are easily detectable by imaging exams and cystoscopy. This neoplasia is associated with tobacco smoking, and is frequently associated with other carcinomatous components such as urothelial carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and sarcomatoid carcinoma. The authors report a case of an apparently healthy female patient who presented cervical lymph node enlargement not accompanied by systemic symptoms. The supraclavicular lymph node biopsy revealed metastatic small cell carcinoma. The computed tomography scan showed a bladder wall nodular thickening, enlarged lymph nodes along the iliac, periaortic, mediastinal, cervical and supraclavicular chains, as well as an insufflating lytic bone lesion in the right iliac wing. The positron emission tomography-fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-FDG added to these findings, the presence of a paraesophageal lymph node, lymphadenomegaly in the gluteal region and a vertebral lytic lesion in T10. Resected specimen of the bladder tumor revealed a high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma with small-cell and large-cell features.

  12. Polymorphisms in cell cycle regulatory genes, urinary arsenic profile and urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Polymorphisms in p53, p21 and CCND1 could regulate the progression of the cell cycle and might increase the susceptibility to inorganic arsenic-related cancer risk. The goal of our study was to evaluate the roles of cell cycle regulatory gene polymorphisms in the carcinogenesis of arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma (UC). Methods: A hospital-based case-controlled study was conducted to explore the relationships among the urinary arsenic profile, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, p53 codon 72, p21 codon 31 and CCND1 G870A polymorphisms and UC risk. The urinary arsenic profile was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). 8-OHdG levels were measured by high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Genotyping was conducted using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP). Results: Subjects carrying the p21 Arg/Arg genotype had an increased UC risk (age and gender adjusted OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.02-2.29). However, there was no association of p53 or CCND1 polymorphisms with UC risk. Significant effects were observed in terms of a combination of the three gene polymorphisms and a cumulative exposure of cigarette smoking, along with the urinary arsenic profile on the UC risk. The higher total arsenic concentration, monomethylarsonic acid percentage (MMA%) and lower dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%), possessed greater gene variant numbers, had a higher UC risk and revealed significant dose-response relationships. However, effects of urinary 8-OHdG levels combined with three gene polymorphisms did not seem to be important for UC risk. Conclusions: The results showed that the variant genotype of p21 might be a predictor of inorganic arsenic-related UC risk

  13. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. ► We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. ► We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2–T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  14. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nicolas, E-mail: simplissimus@gmx.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Goeke, Friederike, E-mail: Friederike.goeke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Splittstoesser, Vera, E-mail: Veri.sp@web.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Lankat-Buttgereit, Brigitte, E-mail: Lankatbu@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Internal Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); Mueller, Stefan C., E-mail: Stefan.mueller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Ellinger, Joerg, E-mail: Joerg.ellinger@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2-T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  15. In the absence of overt urothelial damage, chondroitinase ABC digestion of the GAG layer increases bladder permeability in ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Robert E; Van Gordon, Samuel; Tyler, Karl; Kropp, Bradley; Towner, Rheal; Lin, HsuehKung; Marentette, John O; McHowat, Jane; Mohammedi, Ehsan; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2016-05-01

    Loss of integrity of the protective impermeability barrier in the urothelium has been identified as significant in bladder dysfunction. In this study, we tested the theory that the luminal layer of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) serves as an important component of barrier function. The peptide polycation protamine sulfate (PS), 1 mg/ml, was instilled intravesically for 10 min into rat bladders. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), 63 IU/ml, was instilled into an additional six rats for 30 min to digest the GAG layer. Unmanipulated controls and sham-injected controls were also performed. After 24 h, the rats were euthanized, the bladders were removed, and permeability was assessed in the Ussing chamber and by diffusion of FITC-labeled dextran (4 kDa) to measure macromolecular permeability. The status of tight junctions was assessed by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. In control and sham treated rat bladders, the transepithelial electrical resistance were means of 2.5 ± 1.1 vs. 2.6 ± 1.1 vs 1.2 ± 0.5 and 1.01 ± 0.7 kΩ·cm(2) in the PS-treated and ChABC-treated rat bladders (P = 0.0016 and P = 0.0039, respectively). Similar differences were seen in dextran permeability. Histopathology showed a mild inflammation following PS treatment, but the ChABC-treated bladders were indistinguishable from controls. Tight junctions generally remained intact. ChABC digestion alone induced bladder permeability, confirming the importance of the GAG layer to bladder barrier function and supports that loss of the GAG layer seen in bladder biopsies of interstitial cystitis patients could be a significant factor producing symptoms for at least some interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome patients. PMID:26911855

  16. Enterovesical fistula caused by a bladder squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hsiang Ou Yang; Keng-Hao Liu; Tse-Ching Chen; Phei-Lang Chang; Ta-Sen Yeh

    2009-01-01

    Enterovesical fistulas are not uncommon in patients with inflammatory or malignant colonic disease, however,fistulas secondary to primary bladder carcinomas are extremely rare. We herein reported a patient presenting with intractable urinary tract infection due to enterovesical fistula formation caused by a squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. This patient underwent en bloc resection of the bladder dome and involved ileum, and recovered uneventfully without urinary complaint. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature.

  17. Association between selected dietary scores and the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Hodge, Allison M; Brinkman, Maree T; Bassett, Julie K; Shivappa, Nitin; Hebert, James R; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Milne, Roger L; Giles, Graham G

    2016-09-15

    Studies investigating the association of food and nutrient consumption with the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) have produced mixed results. We used three common dietary scores, the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS), the Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010 (AHEI-2010) and the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) to assess the evidence of an association between diet and the risk of UCC. Over a median follow-up time of 21.3 years, 379 incident UCC cases were diagnosed. Dietary scores were calculated using data from a 121-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. We used Cox models to compute hazard ratios (HR) for the association between dietary scores (per one standard deviation) and UCC risk. In order to reflect overall adherence to a healthy diet, a metascore was constructed by summing the quintiles of each of the three scores. None of the dietary scores was associated with the risk of UCC overall. A healthier diet was found to be inversely associated with the risk of invasive (MDS: HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.74-1.00, metascore: HR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71-0.98), but not superficial disease (heterogeneity between subtypes p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, respectively). Results were consistent but weaker for the DII and the AHEI-2010. We found some evidence of effect modification by smoking, in particular for the metascore (Current: HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.58-1.01, Former: HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.64-0.92, Never: HR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.81-1.26, p for heterogeneity = 0.05). A healthy diet may be protective against the risk of invasive, but not superficial, UCC. Promoting healthy dietary habits may help lower the risk of invasive UCC, especially for current and former smokers. PMID:27149545

  18. Differences in the epigenetic regulation of MT-3 gene expression between parental and Cd+2 or As+3 transformed human urothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajjimaporn Amornpan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that metallothionein 3 (MT-3 is not expressed in normal urothelium or in the UROtsa cell line, but is expressed in urothelial cancer and in tumors generated from the UROtsa cells that have been transformed by cadmium (Cd+2 or arsenite (As+3.The present study had two major goals. One, to determine if epigenetic modifications control urothelial MT-3 gene expression and if regulation is altered by malignant transformation by Cd+2 or As+3. Two, to determine if MT-3 expression might translate clinically as a biomarker for malignant urothelial cells released into the urine. Results The histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 induced MT-3 mRNA expression in both parental UROtsa cells and their transformed counterparts. The demethylating agent, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZC had no effect on MT-3 mRNA expression. ChIP analysis showed that metal-responsive transformation factor-1 (MTF-1 binding to metal response elements (MRE elements of the MT-3 promoter was restricted in parental UROtsa cells, but MTF-1 binding to the MREs was unrestricted in the transformed cell lines. Histone modifications at acetyl H4, trimethyl H3K4, trimethyl H3K27, and trimethyl H3K9 were compared between the parental and transformed cell lines in the presence and absence of MS-275. The pattern of histone modifications suggested that the MT-3 promoter in the Cd+2 and As+3 transformed cells has gained bivalent chromatin structure, having elements of being "transcriptionally repressed" and "transcription ready", when compared to parental cells. An analysis of MT-3 staining in urinary cytologies showed that a subset of both active and non-active patients with urothelial cancer shed positive cells in their urine, but that control patients only rarely shed MT-3 positive cells. Conclusion The MT-3 gene is silenced in non-transformed urothelial cells by a mechanism involving histone modification of the MT-3 promoter. In contrast, transformation of the

  19. Recurrent TERT promoter mutations in urothelial carcinoma and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtis, Boaz; Zhuge, Jian; Ojaimi, Caroline; Ye, Fei; Cai, Dongming; Zhang, David; Fallon, John T; Zhong, Minghao

    2016-04-01

    Increased telomerase activity is associated with almost all types of advanced human cancers with unknown molecular mechanism(s). Two recurrent point mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-the key subunit of telomerase-have recently been identified in melanoma as well as a small sample of bladder cancer cell lines. However, the incidence and clinical-pathological significance of these mutations in urothelial carcinoma have not been well established yet. We collected 86 specimens of urothelial carcinoma including upper and lower urinary tract: high grade and low grade, invasive and noninvasive, and primary and metastatic. We also included some matched benign urothelium and common benign bladder lesions: cystitis, nephrogenic adenoma, and inverted papilloma. In addition, we collected urine samples for urothelial carcinoma workup; blood samples from patients underwent cystectomy with extensive lymphovascular invasion. All specimens were subject to polymerase chain reaction amplification and bidirectional Sanger sequencing for the TERT promoter mutations: C228T and C250T. We found that 64 (74%) of 86 carcinoma samples harbored 1 of the 2 TERT promoter mutations (C228T, n = 54; C250T, n = 10); the incidences were roughly equal regardless of site of origin, histologic grade, and invasive status. All matched benign and benign lesion samples showed wild-type sequence. These TERT promoter mutations are the most common genetic alterations in urothelial carcinoma and are not associated with tumor locations, grade, or invasiveness. Importantly, the feasibility of detecting these mutations in urine samples may provide a novel method to detect urothelial carcinoma in urine. PMID:27040924

  20. Tissue uptake of docetaxel loaded hydrophobically derivatized hyperbranched polyglycerols and their effects on the morphology of the bladder urothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugabe, Clement; Raven, Peter A; Fazli, Ladan; Baker, Jennifer H E; Jackson, John K; Liggins, Richard T; So, Alan I; Gleave, Martin E; Minchinton, Andrew I; Brooks, Donald E; Burt, Helen M

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that docetaxel (DTX) loaded, amine terminated hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2)) nanoparticles significantly increased drug uptake in mouse bladder tissues and was the most effective formulation to significantly inhibit tumor growth in an orthotopic model of bladder cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles on bladder urothelial morphology and integrity, DTX uptake and permeability in bladder tissue and the extent of bladder urothelial recovery following exposure to, and then washout of, HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles. HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles significantly increased the uptake of DTX in both isolated pig bladder as well as in live mouse bladder tissues. Furthermore, HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles were demonstrated to increase the permeability of the urinary bladder wall by causing changes to the urothelial barrier function and morphology through opening of tight junctions and exfoliation of the superficial umbrella cells. These data suggest that exfoliation may be triggered by an apoptosis mechanism, which was followed by a rapid recovery of the urothelium within 24 h post-instillation of HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles. HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles cause significant but rapidly recoverable changes in the bladder urothelial morphology, which we believe may make them suitable for increasing drug permeability of bladder tissue and intravesical drug delivery. PMID:22014457

  1. The dual effects of polar methanolic extract of Hypericum perforatum L. in bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseyo, U. O.; Nseyo, O. U.; Shiverick, K. T.; Medrano, T.; Mejia, M.; Stavropoulos, N.; Tsimaris, I.; Skalkos, D.

    2007-02-01

    g/ml) + light at 630nm induced DNA fragmentation in a light dose-dependent manner; in contrast, PMF or light alone did not induce DNA fragmentation. In separate experiments, PMF alone treatment produced a dose-dependent DNA synthesis with a 90% inhibition at a concentration of 25μg/ml (IC90 = 25μg/ml). Expression of p53 and p27 cell cycle regulatory proteins was not altered by PMF alone, however, a dose-dependent increase in p21 expression was observed that correlates with PMF concentrations. Cyclin A and cyclin B protein levels showed a clear decrease inverse to the concentration of PMF. In the absence of light treatment, flow cytometry analysis showed that PMF alone results in G 0/G I cell cycle arrest, with a 2-fold increase in G 0/G I cells concomitant with 50% decrease in cells in both S and G II/M phases. However, flow cytometry on PMF alone-treated cells did not show sub G 0/G I peak, further evidence of the lack of apoptosis as a mechanism of effect of PMF in the dark. Conclusions: With respect to light treatment, apoptosis appears to play a vital role in PDT-induced cytotoxicity. The flow cytometry and DNA laddering results revealed that T24 cells demonstrated apoptotic responses in PMF-mediated PDT. Experiments conducted with PMF alone showed a dose-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis associated with G 0/G I cell cycle arrest and the extract is able to coordinate changes in key cell cycle regulatory proteins in human bladder cancer cells. Both experimental conditions suggest PMF as a potent and effect anti-proliferative agent in cancer chemoprevention and therapy of human urothelial carcinoma cells.

  2. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p < 0.05) increased expression of GRβ compared to UMUC-3, which also correlated with higher migration rates. Knockdown of GRβ in the T24 cells resulted in a decreased migration rate. Mutational analysis of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of human GRβ revealed that miR144 might positively regulate expression. Indeed, overexpression of miR144 increased GRβ by 3.8 fold. In addition, miR144 and GRβ were upregulated during migration. We used a peptide nucleic acid conjugated to a cell penetrating-peptide (Sweet-P) to block the binding site for miR144 in the 3'UTR of GRβ. Sweet-P effectively prevented miR144 actions and decreased GRβ expression, as well as the migration of the T24 human bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:27036026

  3. Intact urothelial barrier function in a mouse model of ketamine-induced voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajandram, Retnagowri; Ong, Teng Aik; Razack, Azad H A; MacIver, Bryce; Zeidel, Mark; Yu, Weiqun

    2016-05-01

    Ketamine is a popular choice for young drug abusers. Ketamine abuse causes lower urinary tract symptoms, with the underlying pathophysiology poorly understood. Disruption of urothelial barrier function has been hypothesized to be a major mechanism for ketamine cystitis, yet the direct evidence of impaired urothelial barrier function is still lacking. To address this question, 8-wk-old female C57BL/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with 30 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ketamine for 12 wk to induce ketamine cystitis. A spontaneous voiding spot assay showed that ketamine-treated mice had increased primary voiding spot numbers and smaller primary voiding spot sizes than control mice (P Ussing chamber system with isotopic urea and water. Mouse urothelial structure was also not altered, and intact umbrella cell structure was observed by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, immunostaining and confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of a well-defined distribution of zonula occuldens-1 in tight junctions and uroplakin in umbrella cells. In conclusion, these data indicate that ketamine injection induces voiding dysfunction in mice but does not necessarily disrupt mouse bladder barrier function. Disruption of urothelial barrier function may not be the major mechanism in ketamine cystitis. PMID:26911853

  4. The effect of short-chain fatty acids butyrate, propionate, and acetate on urothelial cell kinetics in vitro: potential therapy in augmentation cystoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, J P; Featherstone, J M; Solomon, L Z; Crook, T J; Cooper, A J; Malone, P S

    2005-07-01

    The intestinal element of enterocystoplasty is affected by chronic inflammatory changes, which lead to excess mucus production, urinary tract infections, and stone formation. There is also an increased risk of malignancy. These inflammatory changes may be due to diversion colitis, which affects colonic segments excluded from the faecal stream and likewise may respond to intraluminal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) therapy. The SCFAs have interesting antiproliferative, differentiating, and pro-apoptotic effects, which are protective against colorectal cancer and may influence the risk of malignancy in enterocystoplasty. Before intravesical therapy can be considered, the effect on normal urothelium must be investigated. Primary urothelial cells cultured from biopsy specimens and transformed urothelial (RT112 and MGH-U1) and intestinal cell lines (HT29 and CaCo-2) were incubated with SCFAs. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to measure the residual viable biomass to assess cell proliferation. Proliferation of primary and transformed urothelial cells in culture was inhibited by all SCFAs in a similar time- and dose-dependent manner. The concentration of SCFA required to inhibit growth of primary cells by 50% (IC50) was 20 mM of butyrate, 120 mM of propionate, and 240 mM of acetate after incubation for 1 h. After 72 h the IC50 was 2 mM of butyrate, 4 mM of propionate, and 20 mM of acetate. Transformed urothelial and colon cancer cell lines demonstrated similar growth inhibition. Butyrate was the most potent inhibitor of cell proliferation, followed by propionate and then acetate. Growth inhibition is not an immediate cytotoxic effect, and urothelial cells show a degree of adaptation to butyrate and growth recovery after incubation with butyrate. In conclusion, butyrate- and propionate-induced growth inhibition is potentially clinically significant and may have therapeutically beneficial implications in vivo. PMID:15864601

  5. Histopathological characterization of a syngeneic orthotopic murine bladder cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daher C. Chade

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We developed and characterized by histopathology and immunohistochemistry a syngeneic murine bladder tumor model derived from the MB49 tumor cell line. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bladder tumor implantation was achieved by intravesical instillation of 5 x 10(5 MB49 tumor cells in C57BL/6 mice. A chemical lesion of the bladder was performed in order to promote intravesical tumor implantation. The bladder wall lesion was accomplished by transurethral instillation of silver nitrate (AgNO3. After 15 days, the animals were sacrificed, examined macroscopically for intravesical tumor and bladder weight. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed using cytokeratin 7 (CK7, carcinoembrionic antigen (Dako-CEA, p53 and c-erbB2 oncoprotein (Her2/neu. RESULTS: Twenty-nine out of 30 animals (96.7% developed intravesical tumors in a 15-day period. Macroscopically, the mean bladder weight was 0.196g (0.069-0.538g, 10 to 15 times the normal bladder weight. The immunohistochemical analysis showed significant membrane expression of CEA and CK7: a similar finding for human urothelial cancer. We also characterized absence of expression of p53 and anti-Her2/neu in the murine model. CONCLUSIONS: High tumor take rates were achieved by using the chemical induction of the bladder tumor. Although electric cauterization is widely described in the literature for syngeneic orthotopic animal models, the technique described in this study represents an alternative for intravesical bladder tumor implantation. Moreover, the histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis of the murine bladder tumor model derived from the MB49 cell line showed a resemblance to human infiltrating urothelial carcinoma, allowing clinical inference from experimental immunotherapy testing.

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in bladder cancer is associated with chromatin modification and modifying protein expression: A proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingdi Quentin; Hao, Jian-Jiang; Zhang, Zheng; Hsu, Iawen; Liu, Yi; Tao, Zhen; Lewi, Keidren; Metwalli, Adam R; Agarwal, Piyush K

    2016-06-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project recently identified the importance of mutations in chromatin remodeling genes in human carcinomas. These findings imply that epigenetic modulators might have a therapeutic role in urothelial cancers. To exploit histone deacetylases (HDACs) as targets for cancer therapy, we investigated the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) romidepsin, trichostatin A, and vorinostat as potential chemotherapeutic agents for bladder cancer. We demonstrate that the three HDACIs suppressed cell growth and induced cell death in the bladder cancer cell line 5637. To identify potential mechanisms associated with the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of the HDACIs, we used quantitative proteomics to determine the proteins potentially involved in these processes. Our proteome studies identified a total of 6003 unique proteins. Of these, 2472 proteins were upregulated and 2049 proteins were downregulated in response to HDACI exposure compared to the untreated controls (P<0.05). Bioinformatic analysis further revealed that those differentially expressed proteins were involved in multiple biological functions and enzyme-regulated pathways, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, autophagy, free radical generation and DNA damage repair. HDACIs also altered the acetylation status of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as the levels of chromatin modification proteins, suggesting that HDACIs exert multiple cytotoxic actions in bladder cancer cells by inhibiting HDAC activity or altering the structure of chromatin. We conclude that HDACIs are effective in the inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis in the 5637 bladder cancer cells through multiple cell death-associated pathways. These observations support the notion that HDACIs provide new therapeutic options for bladder cancer treatment and thus warrant further preclinical exploration. PMID:27082124

  7. Pure Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma Originating from the Urinary Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takashi; Naiki, Taku; Kawai, Noriyasu; Iida, Keitaro; Etani, Toshiki; Ando, Ryosuke; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Sugiyama, Yosuke; Okada, Atsushi; Mizuno, Kentaro; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Yasui, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder (LELCB) is a rare variant of infiltrating urothelial carcinoma. We report a case of LELCB in a 43-year-old man. Ultrasonography and cystoscopy revealed two bladder tumors, one on the left side of the trigone and the other on the right side of the trigone. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumors was performed and pathological analysis revealed undifferentiated carcinoma. We therefore performed radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Immunohistochemically the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, but negative for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization as found for previous cases of LELCB. The final pathological diagnosis was a lymphoepithelioma-like variant of urothelial carcinoma with perivesical soft tissue invasion. For adjuvant systemic chemotherapy, three courses of cisplatin were administered. The patient subsequently became free of cancer 72 months postoperatively. Based on the literature, pure or predominant LELCB types show favorable prognoses due to their sensitivity to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. An analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of bladder tumors examined in our institution revealed that the ADC value measured for this LELCB was relatively low compared to conventional urothelial carcinomas. This suggests that measuring the ADC value of a lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma prior to operation may be helpful in predicting LELCB. PMID:27099604

  8. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of PIM Kinases as a Potential Treatment for Urothelial Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Foulks

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The proto-oncogene proviral integration site for moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM kinases (PIM-1, PIM-2, and PIM-3 are serine/threonine kinases that are involved in a number of signaling pathways important to cancer cells. PIM kinases act in downstream effector functions as inhibitors of apoptosis and as positive regulators of G1-S phase progression through the cell cycle. PIM kinases are upregulated in multiple cancer indications, including lymphoma, leukemia, multiple myeloma, and prostate, gastric, and head and neck cancers. Overexpression of one or more PIM family members in patient tumors frequently correlates with poor prognosis. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate PIM expression in low- and high-grade urothelial carcinoma and to assess the role PIM function in disease progression and their potential to serve as molecular targets for therapy. One hundred thirty-seven cases of urothelial carcinoma were included in this study of surgical biopsy and resection specimens. High levels of expression of all three PIM family members were observed in both noninvasive and invasive urothelial carcinomas. The second-generation PIM inhibitor, TP-3654, displays submicromolar activity in pharmacodynamic biomarker modulation, cell proliferation studies, and colony formation assays using the UM-UC-3 bladder cancer cell line. TP-3654 displays favorable human ether-à-go-go-related gene and cytochrome P450 inhibition profiles compared with the first-generation PIM inhibitor, SGI-1776, and exhibits oral bioavailability. In vivo xenograft studies using a bladder cancer cell line show that PIM kinase inhibition can reduce tumor growth, suggesting that PIM kinase inhibitors may be active in human urothelial carcinomas.

  9. Stromal mesenchyme cell genes of the human prostate and bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Laura E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal mesenchyme cells play an important role in epithelial differentiation and likely in cancer as well. Induction of epithelial differentiation is organ-specific, and the genes responsible could be identified through a comparative genomic analysis of the stromal cells from two different organs. These genes might be aberrantly expressed in cancer since cancer could be viewed as due to a defect in stromal signaling. We propose to identify the prostate stromal genes by analysis of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells, and to examine their expression in prostate cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to cluster designation (CD cell surface antigens was first used to characterize the stromas of the prostate and bladder. Stromal cells were prepared from either prostate or bladder tissue for cell culture. RNA was isolated from the cultured cells and analyzed by DNA microarrays. Expression of candidate genes in normal prostate and prostate cancer was examined by RT-PCR. Results The bladder stroma was phenotypically different from that of the prostate. Most notable was the presence of a layer of CD13+ cells adjacent to the urothelium. This structural feature was also seen in the mouse bladder. The prostate stroma was uniformly CD13-. A number of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells were identified. One prostate gene, proenkephalin (PENK, was of interest because it encodes a hormone. Secreted proteins such as hormones and bioactive peptides are known to mediate cell-cell signaling. Prostate stromal expression of PENK was verified by an antibody raised against a PENK peptide, by RT-PCR analysis of laser-capture microdissected stromal cells, and by database analysis. Gene expression analysis showed that PENK expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Conclusion Our findings show that the histologically similar stromas of the prostate and

  10. Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group: 2011 consensus guidelines for curative radiotherapy for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curative radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, is recognized as a standard treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. It is commonly used for two distinct groups of patients: either for those medically unfit for surgery, or as part of a 'bladder preserving' management plan incorporating the possibility of salvage cystectomy. However, in both situations, the approach to radiotherapy varies widely around the world. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group recognised a need to develop consistent, evidence-based guidelines for patient selection and radiotherapy technique in the delivery of curative radiotherapy. Following a workshop convened in May 2009, a working party collated opinions and conducted a wide literature appraisal linking each recommendation with the best available evidence. This process was subject to ongoing re-presentation to the Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group members prior to final endorsement. These Guidelines include patient selection, radiation target delineation, dose and fractionation schedules, normal tissue constraints and investigational techniques. Particular emphasis is given to the rationale for the target volumes described. These Guidelines provide a consensus-based framework for the delivery of curative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Widespread input from radiation oncologists treating bladder cancer ensures that these techniques are feasible in practice. We recommend these Guidelines be adopted widely in order to encourage a uniformly high standard of radiotherapy in this setting, and to allow for better comparison of outcomes.

  11. Redirecting neutrophils against bladder cancer cells by BCG and Smac mimetic combination

    OpenAIRE

    Jinesh G, Goodwin; Kamat, Ashish M

    2012-01-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy results in neutrophil recruitment and subsequent secretion of cytokines to eliminate non-muscle invasive bladder cancer cells. However, bladder cancer cells often resist BCG immunotherapy. Thus, understanding the mechanism of action of BCG, and designing appropriate combination therapies might help to overcome BCG resistance and redirect neutrophils against bladder cancer cells.

  12. Role of KIT-Positive Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Urinary Bladder and Possible Therapeutic Target for Overactive Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Shoichi Sasaki; Makoto Imura; Yasuhiro Shibata; Yoshiyuki Kojima; Yasue Kubota; Kenjiro Kohri

    2011-01-01

    In the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) act as pacemaker cells to generate slow wave activity. Interstitial cells that resemble ICCs in the gastrointestinal tract have been identified by their morphological characteristics in the bladder. KIT is used as an identification marker of ICCs. ICCs in the bladder may be involved in signal transmission between smooth muscle bundles, from efferent nerves to smooth muscles, and from the urothelium to afferent nerves. Recent re...

  13. Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Urinary Bladder; Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül SARI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large cell neuroendocrine tumor of the urinary bladder is very rare. It is a type of neuroendocrine carcinoma that is morphologically different from small cell carcinoma.This manuscript describes a 67-year-old man who presented with hematuria. Ultrasonogrophic and computer tomography revealed a 5 cm mass in right posterolateral wall of the bladder that invaded perivesical tissue and he subsequently underwent transurethral resection. Microscopic examination showed a tumor with a sheet-like and trabecular growth pattern comprising necrotic areas which infiltrated the muscularis propria. Tumoral cells had coarse chromatin, prominent nucleoli, moderate amount of cytoplasm and immunohistochemically stained strongly positive with synaptophysin, chromogranin and CD56.There are only few case reports of large cell neuroendocrine tumor of the urinary bladder so the biological behavior and the treatment protocol of these tumors are still obscure. Appropriate management protocols and prognostic estimation could be achived by the increased number of cases being reported. Therefore in a case of a poorly differentiated tumor in bladder, although rare, it is important to consider large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma in differential diagnosis.

  14. OPIUM USE IN TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF THE URINARY BLADDER

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nourbakhsh; M. G. Mohseni Z. N. Hatmi

    2006-01-01

    Opium use is one of the most common forms of substance abuse in Iran and there are some evidence indicating it is a risk factor of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder. The majority of opium users are also cigarette smokers, so consideration of the high prevalence of smoking which is the most important risk factor of TCC of the urinary bladder among opium users is essential to assess the role of opium use as a possible risk factor of TCC. This study was done to evaluate th...

  15. Immunohistochemical positive stained p53 protein in bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halimi Monireh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular genetics and immunopathologic analysis of bladder cancer have shown some abnormalities in a number of genes and proteins that have been implicated in the development and progression of such tumors, mainly in the p53 pathway. Aims: To investigate the rate of positively stained p53 protein in patients with urothelial papillary carcinoma of the bladder (UCB by immunohistochemistry and its relationship with tumor grade, gender and age of the patients. Settings and Design: During the present cross-sectional study, 100 paraffin-embedded specimens of UCB, which were provided from biopsies of the bladder by transurethral access, were immunohistochemically stained and studied for p53 protein from May 2006 to May 2007 in our referral center pathology laboratory. Materials and Methods: First, 4 µm slices of paraffin sections were provided and then stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase method. The rate of positively stained p53 protein (defined as positive nuclear staining in over 10% of the cells was assessed. This rate was also estimated and compared between grades, genders and age-related groups (< 70 years, ≥70 years. Statistical Analysis: The χ2 , Fisher′s exact test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for comparing. Results: The overall rate of positively stained specimens was 11% for nuclear p53 protein. This rate was significantly higher in females (10/29 vs. 1/71; P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR]: 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.43-306.08, patients with 70 or older than 70 years (8/42 vs. 3/58; P = 0.04; OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 1.07-17.39 and in high-grade tumors (10/58 vs. 1/42; P = 0.02; OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.01-0.95. Conclusions: The rate of positively stained p53 protein for UCB was lower in our population. This rate was also higher in females, patients with 70 or older than 70 years and high grade of UCB.

  16. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder with intravesical cervical invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchalik, Daniel; Krishnan, Jayashree; Verghese, Mohan; Venkatesan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a complicated urological and gynecological history with uterine didelphys with bilaterally inserting intravesical cervical oses presented with cyclical haematuria. Work up revealed a mass in the ectopic cervical os and adjacent bladder wall. Subsequent resection confirmed a clear cell adenocarcinoma of urological origin with invasion into neighbouring os. PMID:26109625

  17. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma in Urinary Bladder: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Çamtosun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of bladder, which does not have a common and accepted treatment protocol, is a rare and highly aggressive tumor. It is mostly pulmonary originated; however, it can rarely be seen in extrapulmonary sites. We presented an interesting and uncommon case, in which the transitional cell tumor was found in the transurethral resection specimen, but the small cell carcinoma was detected in the final radical cystectomy material.

  18. A rare bladder cancer - small cell carcinoma: review and update

    OpenAIRE

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) is rare, highly aggressive and diagnosed mainly at advanced stages. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy. The origin of the disease is unknown; however the multipotent stem cell theory applies best to this case. Histology and immunohistochemistry shows a tumour which is indistinguishable from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Coexistence of SCCB with other types of carcinoma is common. The staging system used is the TNM-staging o...

  19. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma in Urinary Bladder: A Rare Case

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Çamtosun; Huseyin Çelik; Ramazan Altıntaş; Nusret Akpolat

    2015-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of bladder, which does not have a common and accepted treatment protocol, is a rare and highly aggressive tumor. It is mostly pulmonary originated; however, it can rarely be seen in extrapulmonary sites. We presented an interesting and uncommon case, in which the transitional cell tumor was found in the transurethral resection specimen, but the small cell carcinoma was detected in the final radical cystectomy material.

  20. Inhalation of tobacco smoke induces increased proliferation of urinary bladder epithelium and endothelium in female C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigarette smoking is the major environmental risk factor for bladder cancer in humans. Aromatic amines, potent DNA-reactive bladder carcinogens present in cigarette smoke, contribute significantly. However, increased cell proliferation, caused by direct mitogenesis or in response to cytotoxicity, may also play a role since urothelial hyperplasia has been observed in human cigarette smokers. We examined the urothelial effects of cigarette smoke (whole body inhalation exposure (Teague) system) in female C57BL/6 mice at various times in two studies, including reversibility evaluations. In both studies, no urothelial hyperplasia was observed by light microscopy in any group. However, in study 1, the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) of the urothelium was significantly increased in the smoke exposed group compared to controls through 3 months, but was not present at 6, 9 or 12 months even with continued exposures. In the groups that discontinued smoke exposure, it returned to the same levels as controls or lower. In study 2, the bromodeoxyuridine LI was similar to controls on day 1 but significantly increased at 5 days in the smoke exposed group. In the group that discontinued smoke exposure for 2 days, the LI was increased compared to controls but not significantly. Superficial urothelial cell cytotoxicity and necrosis were detectable by scanning electron microscopy at 5 days. Changes in LI of submucosal endothelial cells generally followed those of the urothelium and effects were reversible upon cessation of exposure. The increased urothelial proliferation appeared to be due to superficial cell cytotoxicity with consequent regeneration

  1. FGFR3b Extracellular Loop Mutation Lacks Tumorigenicity In Vivo but Collaborates with p53/pRB Deficiency to Induce High-grade Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haiping; He, Feng; Mendelsohn, Cathy L; Tang, Moon-Shong; Huang, Chuanshu; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) occur in up to 80% of low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (LGP-UCB) suggesting that these mutations are tumor drivers, although direct experimental evidence is lacking. Here we show that forced expression of FGFR3b-S249C, the most prevalent FGFR3 mutation in human LGP-UCB, in cultured urothelial cells resulted in slightly reduced surface translocation than wild-type FGFR3b, but nearly twice as much proliferation. When we expressed a mouse equivalent of this mutant (FGFR3b-S243C) in urothelia of adult transgenic mice in a tissue-specific and inducible manner, we observed significant activation of AKT and MAPK pathways. This was, however, not accompanied by urothelial proliferation or tumorigenesis over 12 months, due to compensatory tumor barriers in p16-pRB and p19-p53-p21 axes. Indeed, expressing FGFR3b-S249C in cultured human urothelial cells expressing SV40T, which functionally inactivates pRB/p53, markedly accelerated proliferation and cell-cycle progression. Furthermore, expressing FGFR3b-S243C in transgenic mouse urothelium expressing SV40T converted carcinoma-in-situ to high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma. Together, our study provides new experimental evidence indicating that the FGFR3 mutations have very limited urothelial tumorigenicity and that these mutations must collaborate with other genetic events to drive urothelial tumorigenesis. PMID:27157475

  2. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Angelo Claudino

    Full Text Available Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD, include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking.Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS.Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g. Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM, relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM, KCl (1 mM-300mM, CaCl2 (1μM-100mM, α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder.SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo, compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration.Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections

  3. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder: CT and MR Imaging Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong Chul; Kim, Kie Hwan; Jung, Seungeun

    2003-01-01

    Objective Primary small cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare aggressive malignancy of the urinary bladder, with identical histopathology to that of the lung. The treatment and prognosis of bladder SCC are somewhat different from those of more frequent transitional cell carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT and MR imaging findings of bladder SCC. Materials and Methods Six adult patients (five males and one female) with pathologically proven SCC of the urinary bladder who had und...

  4. Surgical Treatment of Adrenal Gland Metastasis Originating from Small Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Minekatsu Taga; Hideaki Ito; Naoya Kusukawa; Yoshiji Miwa; Hironobu Akino; Yoshiaki Imamura; Osamu Yokoyama

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of a solitary adrenal metastasis from small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder that was successfully treated with surgical resection. A 71-year-old man was suffering from bladder tamponade for hematuria. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a bladder tumor at the left wall. The patients underwent radical cystectomy. Histopathological results were obtained in small cell carcinoma of the bladder with muscle invasion. Thus, he received two courses of adjuvant etoposide and ...

  5. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) of the urinary bladder: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Colarossi Cristina; Pino Piero; Giuffrida Dario; Aiello Eleonora; Costanzo Rosario; Martinetti Daniela; Memeo Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare entity, accounting less then 1% of urinary bladder malignancies. The vast majority of the neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder is represented by small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma while just few cases of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) have been reported. In this cases report we describe a rare case of primary bladder LCNEC. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://...

  6. Luminal DMSO: Effects on Detrusor and Urothelial/Lamina Propria Function

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Katrina J.; Russ Chess-Williams; Catherine McDermott

    2014-01-01

    DMSO is used as a treatment for interstitial cystitis and this study examined the effects of luminal DMSO treatment on bladder function and histology. Porcine bladder was incubated without (controls) or with DMSO (50%) applied to the luminal surface and the release of ATP, acetylcholine, and LDH assessed during incubation and in tissues strips after DMSO incubation. Luminally applied DMSO caused ATP, Ach, and LDH release from the urothelial surface during treatment, with loss of urothelial la...

  7. Tissue-engineered conduit using bladder acellular matrix and bladder epithelial cells for urinary diversion in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Wen-biao; SONG Chao; LI Yong-wei; YANG Si-xing; MENG Lin-chao; LI Xin-hui

    2013-01-01

    Background For muscle invasive bladder cancer,radical cystectomy is the most effective treatment now and urinary diversion is often necessary.The use of intestinal tissue for urinary diversion is frequently associated with complications.In this study,we aimed to make a tissue-engineered conduit (TEC) using bladder epithelial cells and bladder acellular matrix (BAM) for urinary diversion in rabbits.Methods Bladder epithelial cells of rabbit were cultivated and expanded in vitro,then seeded on BAM,and cultured for 7 days.Then cell-seeded graft was used to make TEC.In the experimental group,most of bladder of the rabbit was removed while bladder trigone was retained.The proximal end of TEC was anastomosed with bladder trigone and the distal end was anastomosed with the abdominal stoma.In the control group,TEC was made using unseeded BAM.Haematoxylin and eosin staining was conducted,respectively,at 1,2,4,and 8 weeks postoperatively.Immunohistochemistry was performed 8 weeks postoperatively.Intravenous urography,retrograde pyelography,and cystoscopy of TEC were made at 12 weeks postoperatively.Results All animals were alive in the experimental group.Haematoxylin and eosin staining showed epithelial coverage in TEC.Immunohistochemistry showed anti-cytokeratin AE1/AE3 antibody and anti-ZO1 antibody positive,confirming there were mature and functional epithelial cells on the lumen of TEC.Retrograde pyelography and intravenous urography showed that TEC developed well and that there was no obstruction.In the control group,four rabbits were dead within 2 weeks and scar formation,atresia,and severe hydronephrosis were found.Conclusions We successfully made TEC using BAM and bladder epithelial cells for urinary diversion in rabbits.The lumen of this new TEC covered mature epithelial cells and could prevent urinary extravasation.

  8. Stem cell applications for pathologies of the urinary bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    New stem cell based therapies are undergoing intenseresearch and are widely investigated in clinical fieldsincluding the urinary system. The urinary bladderperforms critical complex functions that rely on its highlycoordinated anatomical composition and multiplex ofregulatory mechanisms. Bladder pathologies resulting insevere dysfunction are common clinical encounter andoften cause significant impairment of patient's quality oflife. Current surgical and medical interventions to correcturinary dysfunction or to replace an absent or defectivebladder are sub-optimal and are associated with notablecomplications. As a result, stem cell based therapiesfor the urinary bladder are hoped to offer new venuesthat could make up for limitations of existing therapies.In this article, we review research efforts that describethe use of different types of stem cells in bladderreconstruction, urinary incontinence and retentiondisorders. In particular, stress urinary incontinence hasbeen a popular target for stem cell based therapiesin reported clinical trials. Furthermore, we discuss therelevance of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to thedevelopment of bladder cancer. A key subject thatshould not be overlooked is the safety and quality ofstem cell based therapies introduced to human subjectseither in a research or a clinical context.

  9. Cigarette side-stream smoke lung and bladder carcinogenesis: inducing mutagenic acrolein-DNA adducts, inhibiting DNA repair and enhancing anchorage-independent-growth cell transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Weng, Mao-wen; Chin, Chiu; Huang, William; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Rom, William N; Chen, Lung-Chi; Tang, Moon-shong

    2015-10-20

    Second-hand smoke (SHS) is associated with 20-30% of cigarette-smoke related diseases, including cancer. Majority of SHS (>80%) originates from side-stream smoke (SSS). Compared to mainstream smoke, SSS contains more tumorigenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and acrolein (Acr). We assessed SSS-induced benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)- and cyclic propano-deoxyguanosine (PdG) adducts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung, heart, liver, and bladder-mucosa from mice exposed to SSS for 16 weeks. In SSS exposed mice, Acr-dG adducts were the major type of PdG adducts formed in BAL (p < 0.001), lung (p < 0.05), and bladder mucosa (p < 0.001), with no significant accumulation of Acr-dG adducts in heart or liver. SSS exposure did not enhance BPDE-DNA adduct formation in any of these tissues. SSS exposure reduced nucleotide excision repair (p < 0.01) and base excision repair (p < 0.001) in lung tissue. The levels of DNA repair proteins, XPC and hOGG1, in lung tissues of exposed mice were significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) lower than the levels in lung tissues of control mice. We found that Acr can transform human bronchial epithelial and urothelial cells in vitro. We propose that induction of mutagenic Acr-DNA adducts, inhibition of DNA repair, and induction of cell transformation are three mechanisms by which SHS induces lung and bladder cancers. PMID:26431382

  10. Polyomavirus large T antigen is prevalent in urothelial carcinoma post-kidney transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ling; Salama, Mohamed E; Lanciault, Christian; Matsumura, Linh; Troxell, Megan L

    2016-02-01

    Viral pathogens have been associated with both infectious disease and neoplasia in transplant recipients. Polyomavirus is emerging as a potential causative agent for genitourinary tract cancer in post-kidney transplant patients. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a proven role in squamous cancers, but has not been studied in genitourinary malignancies in transplantation. Of 2345 kidney transplants performed at our center over the past 20 years, we identified 16 patients with 20 genitourinary cancers (0.7%), including 13 bladder/ureter carcinomas, 5 renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), and 2 prostate carcinomas. We performed immunohistochemical staining for polyomavirus large T antigen and p16, followed by in situ hybridization for HPV in p16+ cases. Four cases of high-grade invasive urothelial bladder carcinomas were positive for large T. Large T+ urothelial carcinomas developed at least 8 years posttransplant in young men, 3 with history of BK polyoma viremia, 2 of whom had native kidney failure due to reflux/obstruction. In situ hybridization for high-risk HPV was negative in all tested cases. Overall, 3 patients died of carcinoma. All 5 RCCs were negative for both large T and p16; 2 prostate cancers were p16 negative and p16+/HPV negative, respectively. Thus, our study shows a relatively high prevalence of large T antigen in urothelial carcinoma in kidney transplant patients (31%), but not in RCC. Although sample size is small, young patients with obstructive disease may be at particular risk for developing large T-positive urothelial carcinoma. Overall, our data further support the necessities of long-term cancer surveillance for renal transplant patients. PMID:26615524

  11. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  12. Ketamine-induced ulcerative cystitis and bladder apoptosis involve oxidative stress mediated by mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Keh-Min; Chuang, Shu-Mien; Long, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Yi-Lun; Wang, Chao-Chuan; Lu, Mei-Chin; Lin, Rong-Jyh; Lu, Jian-He; Jang, Mei-Yu; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Ho, Wan-Ting; Juan, Yung-Shun

    2015-08-15

    Ketamine abusers develop severe lower urinary tract symptoms. The major aims of the present study were to elucidate ketamine-induced ulcerative cystitis and bladder apoptosis in association with oxidative stress mediated by mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into three different groups, which received normal saline or ketamine for a period of 14 or 28 days, respectively. Double-labeled immunofluorescence experiments were performed to investigate tight junction proteins for urothelial barrier functions. A TUNEL assay was performed to evaluate the distribution of apoptotic cells. Western blot analysis was carried out to examine the expressions of urothelial tight junction proteins, ER stress markers, and apoptosis-associated proteins. Antioxidant enzymes, including SOD and catalase, were investigated by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence experiments. Ketamine-treated rats were found to display bladder hyperactivity. This bladder dysfunction was accompanied by disruptions of epithelial cadherin- and tight junction-associated proteins as well as increases in the expressions of apoptosis-associated proteins, which displayed features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals and ER stress markers. Meanwhile, expressions of mitochondria respiratory subunit enzymes were significantly increased in ketamine-treated bladders. Conversely, mRNA expressions of the antioxidant enzymes Mn-SOD (SOD2), Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1), and catalase were decreased after 28 days of ketamine treatment. These results demonstrate that ketamine enhanced the generation of oxidative stress mediated by mitochondria- and ER-dependent pathways and consequently contributed to bladder apoptosis and urothelial lining defects. Such oxidative stress-enhanced bladder cell apoptosis and urothelial barrier defects are potential factors that may play a crucial role in bladder overactivity and ulceration. PMID:26109091

  13. Expression of metastasis-associated protein 1 and Ezrin in bladder urothelial carcinoma%转移相关蛋白1和埃兹蛋白在膀胱尿路上皮癌中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘兆君; 黄伟佳; 瞿虎; 邹自灏; 高兴成

    2010-01-01

    Objective To detect the expression of metastasis- associated protein 1 (MTA- 1) and Ezrin in bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC) and normal bladder mucosa, and to investigate their correlation with clinical pathology and prognosis. Methods The expression of MTA- 1 and Ezrin proteins was detected in 65 specimens of surgically resected BUC tissue and 30 of normal bladder mucosa with immunohistochemistry. The correlation of MTA- 1 and Ezrin expressions in BUC with clinicopathological parameters, the correlation between MTA-1 and Ezrin protein expressions and their effects on prognosis were also analyzed. Results In 65 specimens of BUC tissue, the positive rates of MTA- 1 and Ezrin expression were 72.3% (n=47) and 89.2% (n=58) , respectively, in contrast to 0% for both MTA- 1 and Ezrin expressions in 30 specimens of normal bladder mucosa, which reached the level of statistical difference (all P<0.01). The expression of MTA- 1 in BUC tissue was closely related to the clinical stages, tumor pathological grading, metastasis and recurrence (all P<0.01 ) , while the expression of Ezrin was closely related to the clinical stages, metastasis and recurrence (all P<0.01 ), and the expression of MTA-1 was positively correlated with Ezrin expression (r=0.742, P<0.01 ). The disease free survival (DFS) in patients with combined expression was significantly lower than that in those with negative expression of MTA- 1 and Ezrin (P<0.01). Conclusion The high expression of MTA-1 and Ezrin is related to the occurrence,progression, as well as invasion and metastasis of BUC.%目的 检测转移相关蛋白1(MTA-1)、埃兹蛋白(Ezrin)在膀胱尿路上皮癌(BUC)组织及正常膀胱黏膜组织中的表达,探讨两者与患者临床病理及预后之间的关系.方法 采用免疫组化法检测65例手术切除的BUC组织和30例正常膀胱黏膜组织中MTA-1和Ezrin蛋白表达,分析MTA-1和Ezrin在BUC中的表达与患者临床病理参数的关系,分析MTA-1和Ezrin

  14. Arsenicals produce stable progressive changes in DNA methylation patterns that are linked to malignant transformation of immortalized urothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrant DNA methylation participates in carcinogenesis and is a molecular hallmark of a tumor cell. Tumor cells generally exhibit a redistribution of DNA methylation resulting in global hypomethylation with regional hypermethylation; however, the speed in which these changes emerge has not been fully elucidated and may depend on the temporal location of the cell in the path from normal, finite lifespan to malignant transformation. We used a model of arsenical-induced malignant transformation of immortalized human urothelial cells and DNA methylation microarrays to examine the extent and temporal nature of changes in DNA methylation that occur during the transition from immortal to malignantly transformed. Our data presented herein suggest that during arsenical-induced malignant transformation, aberrant DNA methylation occurs non-randomly, progresses gradually at hundreds of gene promoters, and alters expression of the associated gene, and these changes are coincident with the acquisition of malignant properties, such as anchorage independent growth and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. The DNA methylation changes appear stable, since malignantly transformed cells removed from the transforming arsenical exhibited no reversion in DNA methylation levels, associated gene expression, or malignant phenotype. These data suggest that arsenicals act as epimutagens and directly link their ability to induce malignant transformation to their actions on the epigenome.

  15. Glycan-mediated uptake in urothelial primary cells: Perspectives for improved intravesical drug delivery in urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichl, Clara Maria; Feilhauer, Sophie; Schwaigerlehner, Rose-Marie; Gabor, Franz; Wirth, Michael; Neutsch, Lukas

    2015-11-30

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections. Despite a wide range of therapeutic options, treatment success is compromised by multiresistance and the efficient mechanism of tissue colonization of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). In advanced drug delivery systems, a similar, glycan-mediated targeting mechanism may be realized by conjugating the drug to a plant lectin. This may lead to the drug being more efficiently accumulated at the desired site of action, the bacterial reservoirs. In this study, we aimed at elucidating the potential of this biorecognitive approach. Glycan-triggered interaction cascades and uptake processes of several plant lectins with distinct carbohydrate specificities were characterized using single cells and monolayer culture. Due to pronounced cytoadhesive and cytoinvasive properties, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) emerged as a promising targeter in porcine urothelial primary cells. The lectin-cell interaction proved highly stabile in artificial urine, simulating the conditions in actual application. Colocalisation studies with internalized WGA and lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) revealed that intracellular accumulation sites were largely identical for GlcNAc- and Mannose-specific lectins. This indicates that WGA-mediated delivery may indeed constitute a potent tool to reach bacteria taken up via a FimH-triggered invasion process. Existing pitfalls in intravesical treatment schedules may soon be overcome. PMID:26383837

  16. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 enhances NF-kappaB activation in Escherichia coli-stimulated urinary bladder cells through TLR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial cells of the urinary tract recognize pathogenic bacteria through pattern recognition receptors on their surface, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs, and mount an immune response through the activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. Some uropathogenic bacteria can subvert these cellular responses, creating problems with how the host eliminates pathogens. Lactobacillus is a genus of lactic acid bacteria that are part of the microbiota and consist of many probiotic strains, some specifically for urogenital infections. Immunomodulation has emerged as an important mode of action of probiotic and commensal lactobacilli and given the importance of epithelial cells, we evaluated the effect of the urogenital probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 on epithelial immune activation. Results Immune activation through the NF-kappaB pathway was initiated by stimulation of T24 urothelial cells with heat-killed Escherichia coli and this was further potentiated when cells were co-cultured with live L. rhamnosus GR-1. Heat-killed lactobacilli were poor activators of NF-kappaB. Concomitant stimulation of bladder cells with E. coli and L. rhamnosus GR-1 increased the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF, whereas IL-6 and CXCL8 levels were reduced. Another probiotic, L. rhamnosus GG, was also able to potentiate NF-kappaB in these cells although at a significantly reduced level compared to the GR-1 strain. The transcript numbers and protein levels of the lipopolysaccharide receptor TLR4 were significantly increased after co-stimulation with E. coli and lactobacilli compared to controls. Furthermore, inhibition of TLR4 activation by polymixin B completely blocked the lactobacilli potentiation of NF-kappaB. Conclusions The immunological outcome of E. coli challenge of bladder cells was influenced by probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1, by enhancing the activation of NF-kappaB and TNF release. Thus the urogenital probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1

  17. Recurrence patterns of bladder transitional cell carcinoma after radical cystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bohyun; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Mi-hyun; Cho, Kyung-Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Univ. of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); E-mail: choihj@amc.seoul.kr

    2012-10-15

    Background Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is widely accepted as an effective imaging modality in monitoring for bladder cancer recurrence after radical cystectomy. Elucidating the pattern of bladder cancer recurrence on CT can increase the diagnostic accuracy. Purpose To evaluate the recurrence patterns of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and the factors associated with cancer recurrence. Material and Methods One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients (mean age, 66.55 years; range, 32-86 years) who underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced CT and radical cystectomy were included in this study. The presence, site, and time of tumor recurrence were recorded retrospectively by two radiologists in a consensus fashion. The association of tumor recurrence and tumor factors (T stage, lymph node metastasis, nuclear grade, and tumor diameter) were also evaluated using multiple logistic regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier statistics. Results Tumor recurrence occurred in 60 patients (40.3%) with a mean time of 14 months (range, 1-64 months). The sites of recurrence included the operation site (n = 20), lymph node (n = 20), bone (n = 11), liver (n = 6), lung (n = 5), upper urinary tract (n = 4), colon (n = 3), adrenal gland (n = 2), peritoneum (n = 1), abdominal wall (n = 1), psoas muscle (n = 1), and penile skin (n = 1). Tumor recurrence was found to be associated with advanced T stage (P = 0.002) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Conclusion Transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder recur more frequently at the operation site and lymph node, and T-stage and lymph node metastasis are closely associated with tumor recurrence.

  18. Recurrence patterns of bladder transitional cell carcinoma after radical cystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is widely accepted as an effective imaging modality in monitoring for bladder cancer recurrence after radical cystectomy. Elucidating the pattern of bladder cancer recurrence on CT can increase the diagnostic accuracy. Purpose To evaluate the recurrence patterns of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and the factors associated with cancer recurrence. Material and Methods One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients (mean age, 66.55 years; range, 32-86 years) who underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced CT and radical cystectomy were included in this study. The presence, site, and time of tumor recurrence were recorded retrospectively by two radiologists in a consensus fashion. The association of tumor recurrence and tumor factors (T stage, lymph node metastasis, nuclear grade, and tumor diameter) were also evaluated using multiple logistic regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier statistics. Results Tumor recurrence occurred in 60 patients (40.3%) with a mean time of 14 months (range, 1-64 months). The sites of recurrence included the operation site (n = 20), lymph node (n = 20), bone (n = 11), liver (n = 6), lung (n = 5), upper urinary tract (n = 4), colon (n = 3), adrenal gland (n = 2), peritoneum (n = 1), abdominal wall (n = 1), psoas muscle (n = 1), and penile skin (n = 1). Tumor recurrence was found to be associated with advanced T stage (P = 0.002) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Conclusion Transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder recur more frequently at the operation site and lymph node, and T-stage and lymph node metastasis are closely associated with tumor recurrence

  19. Characterization of Uptake and Internalization of Exosomes by Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A. Franzen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder tumors represent a special therapeutic challenge as they have a high recurrence rate requiring repeated interventions and may progress to invasive or metastatic disease. Exosomes carry proteins implicated in bladder cancer progression and have been implicated in bladder cancer cell survival. Here, we characterized exosome uptake and internalization by human bladder cancer cells using Amnis ImageStreamX, an image cytometer. Exosomes were isolated by ultracentrifugation from bladder cancer culture conditioned supernatant, labeled with PKH-26, and analyzed on the ImageStreamX with an internal standard added to determine concentration. Exosomes were cocultured with bladder cancer cells and analyzed for internalization. Using the IDEAS software, we determined exosome uptake based on the number of PKH-26+ spots and overall PKH-26 fluorescence intensity. Using unlabeled beads of a known concentration and size, we were able to determine concentrations of exosomes isolated from bladder cancer cells. We measured exosome uptake by recipient bladder cancer cells, and we demonstrated that uptake is dose and time dependent. Finally, we found that uptake is active and specific, which can be partially blocked by heparin treatment. The characterization of cellular uptake and internalization by bladder cancer cells may shed light on the role of exosomes on bladder cancer recurrence and progression.

  20. Small cell cancer of the bladder: The Leon-Berard cancer centre experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ismaili, Nabil; Elkarak, Fadi; Heudel, Pierre Etienne; Flechon, Aude; Droz, Jean Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Background: Small cell bladder carcinoma is an uncommon tumor. In this retrospective study we report our experience dealing with this disease at the Leon-Berard Cancer Centre. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed various characteristics of small cell bladder carcinoma: patient demographics, histological diagnosis, disease stage, treatment effects and outcome, in 14 non-metastatic small cell bladder carcinoma patients treated at our institution between 1995 and 2006. Results: The...

  1. Sequential gemcitabine and tamoxifen treatment enhances apoptosis and blocks transformation in bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    TAKEUCHI, HISASHI; MMEJE, CHINEDU O.; Goodwin G. Jinesh; TAOKA, RIKIYA; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common malignancy for which regional or metastatic disease is identified at diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether tamoxifen (Tam), an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, can sensitize bladder cancer cell lines to gemcitabine (Gem) chemotherapy. ERα and ERβ protein levels were determined in each cell line using western blot analysis. The TCC-Sup, 5637, and RT4 bladder cancer cells were exposed to various concentrations and regimens of Tam or Gem alone or ...

  2. Surgical management of bladder transitional cell carcinoma in a vesicular diverticulum: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of a bladder diverticum along with a literature review. A 55-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria. A histological diagnosis of TCC within a bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopical examination. Initially transurethral resection of bladder tumour with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy followed. As a result of recurrence and in view of bladder-sparing therapy, a distal partial cystectomy was performed. This report demonstrates that conservative bladder-sparing treatment can be achieved and subsequently followed by vigilant cystoscopy.

  3. Surgical management of bladder transitional cell carcinoma in a vesicular diverticulum: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of a bladder diverticum along with a literature review. A 55-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria. A histological diagnosis of TCC within a bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopical examination. Initially transurethral resection of bladder tumour with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy followed. As a result of recurrence and in view of bladder-sparing therapy, a distal partial cystectomy was performed. This report demonstrates that conservative bladder-sparing treatment can be achieved and subsequently followed by vigilant cystoscopy.

  4. OPIUM USE IN TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF THE URINARY BLADDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nourbakhsh

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Opium use is one of the most common forms of substance abuse in Iran and there are some evidence indicating it is a risk factor of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder. The majority of opium users are also cigarette smokers, so consideration of the high prevalence of smoking which is the most important risk factor of TCC of the urinary bladder among opium users is essential to assess the role of opium use as a possible risk factor of TCC. This study was done to evaluate the role of opium as a risk factor of TCC. A case-control study was performed on 255 individuals diagnosed with TCC of the urinary bladder by pathologic light microscopic examination of the tumor biopsies. Control population was chosen from individuals who had no history or presenting signs or symptoms of urinary problems. Case and control groups were matched by sex and age and also by cigarette smoking habits. Forty-one (18.1% of the cases and 12 (5% of controls were recognized to be opium users. Mantel-Haenszel analysis showed an odds ratio of 3.88, with 95% confidence interval of 1.99-7.57 and P value of < 0.001. Results indicate that opium use is a risk factor for TCC. The majority of opium users are also cigarette smokers, which is another important risk factor for TCC. Routine urine cytology and early evaluation in the patients presenting with any of the symptoms of urinary bladder malignancy by means of cystoscopy and urine cytology are highly recommended.

  5. Factors related to recurrence of bladder transitional cell carcinoma after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate factors related to the recurrence of TCC (transitional cell carcinoma) in the urinary bladder after transurethal resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT). We retrospectively reviewed 54 patients in whom TCC (transitional cell carcinoma) after TUR-BT had been confirmed. Recurrence was evaluated by US, CT, cystoscopy and urine smear during the follow-up period of 6 months. The multiplicity, shape, size, and calcification of TCC, as revealed by radiologic studies, were evaluated retrospectively before TUR-BT. After TUR-BT, the histologic grade and pathologic stage of TCC were evaluated. Radiologically, multiple and/or sessile type TCC had a higher recurrence rate than the single and/or pedunculated type. Pathologically, when the grade and stage of bladder tumor were higher, recurrent rates were higher. (author). 17 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  6. A rare bladder cancer - small cell carcinoma: review and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB is rare, highly aggressive and diagnosed mainly at advanced stages. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy. The origin of the disease is unknown; however the multipotent stem cell theory applies best to this case. Histology and immunohistochemistry shows a tumour which is indistinguishable from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. Coexistence of SCCB with other types of carcinoma is common. The staging system used is the TNM-staging of bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The treatment is extrapolated from that of SCLC. However, many patients with SCCB undergo radical resection which is rarely performed in SCLC. Patients with surgically resectable disease ( or = cT4bN+M+ should be managed with palliative chemotherapy based on neuroendocrine type regimens comprising a platinum drug (cisplatin in fit patients. The prognosis of the disease is poor mainly in the case of pure small cell carcinoma. Other research programs are needed to improve the outcome of SCCB.

  7. Bladder Cancer Stem-Like Cells: Their Origin and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohishi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BC, the most common cancer arising from the human urinary tract, consists of two major clinicopathological phenotypes: muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC and non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. MIBC frequently metastasizes and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. A certain proportion of patients with metastatic BC can achieve a remission with systemic chemotherapy; however, the disease relapses in most cases. Evidence suggests that MIBC comprises a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs, which may be resistant to these treatments and may be able to form new tumors in the bladder or other organs. Therefore, the unambiguous identification of bladder CSCs and the development of targeted therapies are urgently needed. Nevertheless, it remains unclear where bladder CSCs originate and how they are generated. We review recent studies on bladder CSCs, specifically focusing on their proposed origin and the possible therapeutic options based on the CSC theory.

  8. Multidisciplinary Approach in the Treatment of Patients with Small Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, L. Traldi; Ribeiro, J.; Curigliano, G; Fumagalli, L.; Locatelli, M.; Campello Carvalheira, J. Barreto; Quintela, A.; Bertelli, S.; O. De Cobelli

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB) is considered to be a tumor with a neuroendocrine phenotype characterised by aggressive behaviour and poor prognosis. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder comprises 0,35 to 1% of all bladder cancers and is frequently observed in combination with other histological subtypes of carcinoma. Clinical presentation is characterized by advanced stage at diagnosis and rapidly progressive disease. In daily clinical practice ...

  9. Effect of sirolimus on urinary bladder cancer T24 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Paula A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirolimus is recently reported to have antitumour effects on a large variety of cancers. The present study was performed to investigate sirolimus's ability to inhibit growth in T24 bladder cancer cells. Methods T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of sirolimus. MTT assay was used to evaluate the proliferation inhibitory effect on T24 cell line. The viability of T24 cell line was determined by Trypan blue exclusion analysis. Results Sirolimus inhibits the growth of bladder carcinoma cells and decreases their viability. Significant correlations were found between cell proliferation and sirolimus concentration (r = 0.830; p Conclusion Sirolimus has an anti-proliferation effect on the T24 bladder carcinoma cell line. The information from our results is useful for a better understanding sirolimus's anti-proliferative activity in the T24 bladder cancer cell line.

  10. Concurrent Testicular and Bladder Cancer in a 57-year-old Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Esther; Stein, Daniel M; Shi, Dongping; Miocinovic, Ranko

    2015-09-01

    We present a rare finding of concurrent right testis non-seminomatous mixed germ cell tumor and muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder in a 57-year-old homeless man. The socioeconomic factors and the disease presentation caused a treatment dilemma in terms of the appropriate type of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The patient ultimately underwent upfront surgery with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and radical cystoprostatectomy followed by adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:26793541

  11. Concurrent Testicular and Bladder Cancer in a 57-year-old Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare finding of concurrent right testis non-seminomatous mixed germ cell tumor and muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder in a 57-year-old homeless man. The socioeconomic factors and the disease presentation caused a treatment dilemma in terms of the appropriate type of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The patient ultimately underwent upfront surgery with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and radical cystoprostatectomy followed by adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  12. The granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine against metastatic bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-tong Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The MB49 bladder cancer cell vaccine was effective against bladder cancer in the mice model in previous studies. However, part of the tumors regrew as the vaccine could not eliminate the cancer stem cells (CSCs. MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs were isolated by a combination of the limited dilution method and the serum free culture medium method. MCSCs possessed higher expression of CD133, CD44, OCT4, NANOG, and ABCG2, the ability of differentiation, higher proliferative abilities, lower susceptibility to chemotherapy, greater migration in vitro, and stronger tumorigenic abilities in vivo. Then streptavidin–mouse granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor (SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine was prepared. SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine extended the survival of the mice and inhibited the growth of tumor in protective, therapeutic, memorial and specific immune response experiments. The level of immunoglobulin G and the ratio of dendritic cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were highest in the experimental group when compared to those in other four control groups, as well as for the cytotoxicity assay. We demonstrated that SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine induces an antitumor immune response to metastatic bladder cancer.

  13. Telomerase Activity, Cytokeratin 20 and Cytokeratin 19 in Urine Cells of Bladder Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of the Study: This work aims to search for markers suitable for the screening of bladder cancer, which should be specific, sensitive, reproducible, non-invasive and at acceptable cost. Patients and Methods: The study included 50 patients diagnosed as bladder cancer (35 TCC, 15 SCC) of different stages and grades, 30 patients with various urothelial diseases, besides 20 apparently healthy subjects of matched age and sex to the malignant group. A random midstream urine sample was collected in a sterile container for the determination of telomerase by RT-PCR, keratin 19 by ELSA CYFRA 21-1 IRMA kit, keratin 20 by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining, and urine cytology. Results: For all parameters (telomerase, K19, K20 and cytology) the malignant group was significantly different from both the benign and the control groups. None of the four studied parameters was correlated to the stage of the disease, and when it comes to grade, only KI9 showed a significant positive correlation with grade both in TCC and SCe. When ROC curves for all parameters were compared, K 19 had the largest area under the curve, and then comes K20 . o Conclusion: K 19 may be used as a biological marker for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. K 19 could not be used for differential diagnosis of different types of bladder cancer, meanwhile it could be a marker for differentiation that decreases in less differentiated tumors. As a tumor marker, K20 reflects inability to differentiate tumor type or grade in TCC, while in SCC of the bladder it is correlated with the grade. As a method, RT-PCR is superior to immunostaining for the detection of bladder cancer, meanwhile K20 immunohistochemistry ([HC) results were much better than urine cytology as a bladder cancer screening test. haematuria and inflammation reduced the specificity of telomerase assay, which reduced its validity as a tumor marker of bladder cancer. K 19 and K20 are the best candidates as screening tests for the diagnosis of bladder

  14. Construction and evaluation of urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To design and construct a urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes and to compare the viability and proliferative activity of cell-seeded extracellular matrix scaffolds cultured in the bioreactor with conventional static growth conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A urinary bladder bioreactor was designed and constructed to replicate physiologic bladder dynamics. The bioreactor mimicked the filling pressures of the human bladder by way of a cyclical low-delivery pressure regulator. In addition, cell growth was evaluated by culturing human urothelial cells (UCs) on porcine extracellular matrix scaffolds in the bioreactor and in static growth conditions for 5 consecutive days. The attachment, viability, and proliferative potential were assessed and compared with quantitative viability indicators and by fluorescent markers for intracellular esterase activity and plasma membrane integrity. Scaffold integrity was characterized with scanning electron microscopy and 4\\

  15. Inhibitory role of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan in bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Niedworok

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urothelial bladder cancer is the ninth most common cancer. Despite surgical and chemotherapeutic treatment the prognosis is still poor once bladder cancer progresses to a muscle-invasive state. Discovery of new diagnostic markers and pathophysiologic effectors might help to contribute to novel diagnostic and therapeutic options. The extracellular matrix microenvironment shaped by the extracellular matrix critically affects tumor cell and stroma cell functions. Therefore, aim of the present study was to assess the possible implication of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan in progression of human urothelial bladder cancer. METHODS AND RESULTS: For this purpose tumor biopsies of 76 bladder cancer patients with different tumor stages (pTa, pT1-T4 were investigated with respect to biglycan expression and correlated with a long-term (10 years clinical follow-up. Interestingly, higher biglycan mRNA expression was associated with higher tumor stages and muscle invasiveness. In vitro knock-down of endogenous biglycan in human urothelial carcinoma cells (J82 cells increased proliferation, whereas addition of recombinant biglycan and overexpression of biglycan inhibited tumor cell proliferation. In line with this growth-inhibitory effect of biglycan, transplantation of J82 cells after knock-down of biglycan resulted in significantly increased growth of subcutaneous xenograft tumors in nude mice in vivo. Furthermore, treatment with two anti-proliferative, multi-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors-sunitinib and sorafenib-strongly upregulated biglycan expression. Collectively, the experimental data suggest that high biglycan expression is associated with reduced tumor cell proliferation. In accordance, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed higher 10-year survival in patients with high biglycan mRNA expression in tumor biopsies. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the present data suggest that biglycan is an endogenous inhibitor of bladder cancer cell

  16. Short-term resveratrol exposure causes in vitro and in vivo growth inhibition and apoptosis of bladder cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo-Li Wu

    Full Text Available Conventional adjuvant chemotherapies for bladder transitional cell carcinomas (TCCs may cause strong systemic toxicity and local irritation. Non-toxic resveratrol inhibits TCC cell growth but its feasibility in clinical management of TCCs remains obscure. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and anti-TCC efficacy of resveratrol, using the experimental models closer to the clinical treatment condition. Human TCC EJ cells were exposed to 100 µM, 150 µM and 200 µM resveratrol respectively for 1 hour and 2 hours to mimic intravesical drug instillation and the cell responses were analyzed by multiple experimental approaches. An orthotopic TCC nude mouse model was established by injecting EJ cells into the sub-urothelial layer and used for short-term intravesical resveratrol instillation. The safety of resveratrol instillation was evaluated and compared with that of MCC. The results revealed that 2 h 150 µM or 200 µM resveratrol treatment leaded to remarkable S phase arrest and apoptosis at 72 h time-point, accompanied with attenuated phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and transcription of STAT3, down-regulation of STAT3 downstream genes (survivin, cyclinD1, c-Myc and VEGF and nuclear translocations of Sirt1 and p53. The importance of STAT3 signaling in cell growth was confirmed by treating EJ cells with JAK2 inhibitor tyrphostin AG490. The efficacy and safety of resveratrol instillation were proved by the findings from nude mouse orthotopic xenograft models, because this treatment caused growth suppression, distinctive apoptosis and STAT3 inactivation of the transplanted tumors without affecting normal urothelium. Our results thus suggest for the first time the practical values of resveratrol as a safe and effective agent in the post-operative treatment of TCCs.

  17. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC of the urinary bladder: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colarossi Cristina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare entity, accounting less then 1% of urinary bladder malignancies. The vast majority of the neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder is represented by small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma while just few cases of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC have been reported. In this cases report we describe a rare case of primary bladder LCNEC. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2474700528951562.

  18. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder in transplant recipients: a report of 2 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Katkoori, Devendar; Cohen, Brian L.; Soloway, Mark S.; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2010-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the urinary bladder is a rare disease accounting for 0.5% to 0.7% of all primary bladder cancers. Transplant recipients are a special subset of patients with increased risk for various urologic malignancies, including transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. However, to the best of our knowledge, a SCC of the urinary bladder has not been reported in transplant recipients. We report what we believe are the first 2 reported cases of transplant recipients with SC...

  19. Impact of diabetes mellitus on bladder uroepithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T.; Ruiz, Giovanni W.; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency, and incontinence. As DBD is commonly diagnosed late, it is important to understand the chronic impact of DM on bladder tissues. While changes in bladder smooth muscle and innervation have been reported in diabetic patients, the impact of DM on the specialized epithelial lining of the urinary bladder, the urothelium (UT),...

  20. Immunohistochemical study of the expression of cell cycle regulating proteins at different stages of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Hanne; Maase, Hans von der; Sørensen, Flemming B.; Wolf, Hans; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The cell cycle is known to be deregulated in cancer. We therefore analyzed the expression of the cell cycle related proteins p21, p27, p16, Rb, and L-myc by immunohistochemical staining of bladder tumors. METHODS: The tissue material consisted of bladder tumors from three groups of...

  1. Spontaneous Electrical Activity of Cultured Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Mouse Urinary Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sun-Ouck; Jeong, Han-Seong; Jang, Sujeong; Wu, Mei-Jin; Park, Jong Kyu; Jiao, Han-Yi; Jun, Jae Yeoul; Park, Jong-Seong

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) from the urinary bladder regulate detrusor smooth muscle activities. We cultured ICCs from the urinary bladder of mice and performed patch clamp and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) imaging to investigate whether cultured ICCs can be a valuable tool for cellular functional studies. The cultured ICCs displayed two types of spontaneous electrical activities which are similar to those recorded in intact bladder tissues. Spontaneous electrical activities of cultured...

  2. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: A case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ismaili Nabil; Ghanem Samia; Mellas Nawfel; Afqir Said; Taleb Meriem; Amrani Meryem; Gamra Lamia; Errihani Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) is extremely rare. In this paper, we present a case of metastatic SCCB managed by chemotherapy and we would provide a brief review of the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, pathologic features, staging, treatment, and prognosis of SCCB. A 52-year-old man was admitted with signs and symptoms suggestive of a bladder cancer. Computed tomography of the pelvis and abdomen showed a large tumor at the right bladder wall, measuring 10 cm in diameter...

  3. Cytological Diagnosis of Small Cell Carcinoma of Urinary Bladder in a Patient with CLL

    OpenAIRE

    Gülçin Güler Şimşek; Servet Güreşçi; Ural Oğuz; Ali Ünsal

    2014-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB) is an extremely rare bladder malignancy characterized by an aggressive clinical behavior. So, it is important to diagnose this high grade disease by urinary cytology. We report a case of SCCUB in an old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in remission, while bladder tumor was diagnosed by cytology. With this article, we aimed to review and to update the literature concerning this tumor.

  4. Cytological Diagnosis of Small Cell Carcinoma of Urinary Bladder in a Patient with CLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülçin Güler Şimşek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB is an extremely rare bladder malignancy characterized by an aggressive clinical behavior. So, it is important to diagnose this high grade disease by urinary cytology. We report a case of SCCUB in an old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in remission, while bladder tumor was diagnosed by cytology. With this article, we aimed to review and to update the literature concerning this tumor.

  5. Animal model of naturally occurring bladder cancer: Characterization of four new canine transitional cell carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Development and further characterization of animal models for human cancers is important for the improvement of cancer detection and therapy. Canine bladder cancer closely resembles human bladder cancer in many aspects. In this study, we isolated and characterized four primary transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) cell lines to be used for future in vitro validation of novel therapeutic agents for bladder cancer. Methods Four K9TCC cell lines were established from naturally-occurring...

  6. What Is Bladder Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urothelial carcinoma, also known as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), is by far the most common type of ... cancer (other than sarcoma) are treated similar to TCCs, especially for early stage tumors, but if chemotherapy ...

  7. Partial cystectomy in a 76 year old patient suffering from small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Starownik, Radosław; Korolczuk, Agnieszka; Bar, Krzysztof; Płaza, Paweł; Kiś, Jacek; Muc, Kamil; Bar, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder originating from the neuroendocrine cells are extremely rare. We present a case of a 76–year–old patient with small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. The patient had hematuria and cystoscopy revealed a tumor located in a urinary bladder diverticulum. Partial resection of the bladder wall with diverticulectomy was performed. Microscopic examination established the diagnosis of neuroendocrine carcinoma, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistr...

  8. Urinary Bladder Cancer in Yemen

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Saleh Al-Samawi; Saleh Mansoor Aulaqi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study are to highlight the clinicopathological features of urinary bladder cancer in Yemen, and to describe the histological grading of urothelial neoplasms according to the World Health Organization and International Society of Urologic pathology (WHO/ISUP 1998) classification.Methods: This is a descriptive record-based study of 316 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed by two pathologists at the Department of pathology, Sana'a University from 1st January 2005 to 30t...

  9. Comprehensive profiling and localisation of the matrix metalloproteinases in urothelial carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wallard, M J; Pennington, C. J.; Veerakumarasivam, A.; Burtt, G; Mills, I G; Warren, A.; Leung, H Y; Murphy, G; Edwards, D. R.; Neal, D E; Kelly, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases which break down the extracellular matrix and regulate cytokine and growth factor activity. Several MMPs have been implicated in the promotion of invasion and metastasis in a broad range of tumours including urothelial carcinoma. In this study, RNA from 132 normal bladder and urothelial carcinoma specimens was profiled for each of the 24 human MMPs, the four endogenous tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) and several key growth factors and ...

  10. Taurine modulates neutrophil function but potentiates uropathogenic E. coli infection in the murine bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Condron, Claire

    2010-08-01

    Eradication of a urinary tract infection (UTI) appears to be related to a number of innate host defence mechanisms and their interactions with invading bacteria. Recurrent UTIs (rUTIs) pose a difficult problem in that these bacteria use both host and bacterial factors to evade elimination. Neutrophil bactericidal function is depressed, both systemically and in urine, in patients with a history of recurrent UTI. Taurine is a semi-essential amino acid and is successful in preserving neutrophil bactericidal function in urine. Taurine may preserve neutrophil function at the urothelium and thus aid UTI resolution. Adult female (6 weeks old) C57Bl\\/6 mice were randomised into three groups: a saline gavage only control group, a saline gavage + E. coli group, and a taurine gavage + E. coli group [21 g\\/70 kg taurine in 0.9% normal saline (N\\/S) for 5 days]. Whilst taurine gavage pre-treatment resulted in increased serum neutrophils respiratory burst activity, at the urothelial-endothelial interface it caused higher colony forming units in the urine and a higher incidence of E. coli invasion in the bladder wall with no evidence of increased bladder wall neutrophils infiltration on MPO assay of histological assessment. Histologically there was also evidence of reduced bladder inflammation and urothelial cell apoptosis. In conclusion, taurine effectively increases neutrophils activity but given its anti-inflammatory properties, at the expense of decreased urothelial-endothelial activation thus preventing clearance of active E. coli infection in the bladder. Despite the negative results, this study demonstrates the importance of modulating interactions at the urothelial interface.

  11. Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in childhood: radiological findings and differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a case of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in an 11-year-old boy. The rarity of these tumors during childhood is pointed out. The radiological and ultrasonographic findings are described and the differential diagnosis is discussed with respect to other bladder tumors occurring in childhood. (Author) 11 refs

  12. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: Virtual CT cystoscopic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsili A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old man underwent multidetector CT virtual cystoscopy due to macroscopic hematuria. A large, irregularly-surfaced, solid bladder mass was detected, infiltrating the perivesical fat, the seminal vesicles and the prostate. CT examination of the chest and abdomen showed no distant metastases. Radical cystectomy was performed and pathology reported pure small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

  13. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: Virtual CT cystoscopic findings

    OpenAIRE

    Tsili A; Giannakis D; Sofikitis N; Tsampoulas K

    2009-01-01

    A 74-year-old man underwent multidetector CT virtual cystoscopy due to macroscopic hematuria. A large, irregularly-surfaced, solid bladder mass was detected, infiltrating the perivesical fat, the seminal vesicles and the prostate. CT examination of the chest and abdomen showed no distant metastases. Radical cystectomy was performed and pathology reported pure small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

  14. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jiajia [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhu, Xi [Department of Urology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jie, E-mail: zhangjiebjmu@163.com [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We first demonstrated CXCL5 is highly expressed in human bladder tumor tissues and cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits proliferation, migration and promotes apoptosis in T24 cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in T24 cells. • CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression. - Abstract: CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  15. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We first demonstrated CXCL5 is highly expressed in human bladder tumor tissues and cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits proliferation, migration and promotes apoptosis in T24 cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in T24 cells. • CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression. - Abstract: CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy

  16. Inhibition of macrophage migration inhibitory factor decreases proliferation and cytokine expression in bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of various inflammatory cytokines in maintaining tumor cell growth and viability is well established. Increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has previously been associated with various types of adenocarcinoma. MIF IHC was used to localize MIF in human bladder tissue. ELISA and Western blot analysis determined the synthesis and secretion of MIF by human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cells. The effects of MIF inhibitors (high molecular weight hyaluronate (HA), anti-MIF antibody or MIF anti-sense) on cell growth and cytokine expression were analyzed. Human bladder cancer cells (HT-1376) secrete detectable amounts of MIF protein. Treatment with HA, anti-MIF antibody and MIF anti-sense reduced HT-1376 cell proliferation, MIF protein secretion, MIF gene expression and secreted inflammatory cytokines. Our evidence suggests MIF interacts with the invariant chain, CD74 and the major cell surface receptor for HA, CD44. This study is the first to report MIF expression in the human bladder and these findings support a role for MIF in tumor cell proliferation. Since MIF participates in the inflammatory response and bladder cancer is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, these new findings suggest that neutralizing bladder tumor MIF may serve as a novel therapeutic treatment for bladder carcinoma

  17. Reduced LAK cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Petersen, K R; Steven, K; Zeuthen, J

    1990-01-01

    determined in healthy controls. The differences in the cytotoxicities were correlated with specific changes in the subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PBMC from 37 patients and 13 healthy controls were tested against the bladder cancer cell line T24 in 51Cr-release assays. The PBMC subsets......The cytotoxicity of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (US-PBMC), phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC (PS-PBMC) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated PBMC (LAK cells) was assessed in patients with noninvasive and invasive transitional-cell bladder cancer and compared with those...... the reduced ability of bladder cancer patient PBMC to develop LAK-cell cytotoxicity is a result of a low incidence of CD56+ and CD57+ cells in the blood. These findings indicate that IL-2 therapy alone might not be a sufficient therapy of bladder cancer patients....

  18. Analysis of failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess prognostic factors for bladder relapse and distant failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of patients treated in the period 1977 to 1990 by definitive radiotherapy. The factors studied included age, sex, T stage, histological grade, tumor multiplicity, ureteric obstruction, total radiation dose, and use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The endpoints studied were bladder relapse and distant failure. Results: There were 342 patients with a mean follow-up time of 7.9 years. Bladder relapse was observed in 159 patients. The overall actuarial bladder relapse rate at 5 years was 55% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher bladder relapse rate were: tumor multiplicity (p < 0.001), presence of ureteric obstruction (p = 0.001), and higher T stage (p 0.044). Distant failure occurred in 39 patients. The overall actuarial distant failure rate at 5 years was 28% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher distant failure rate were: ureteric obstruction (p = 0.003) and higher T stage (p = 0.030). Conclusion: In our study, patients with invasive bladder TCC fell into distinct prognostic groups determined by the three independent factors, ureteric obstruction, tumor multiplicity, and T stage. These factors provided estimated risks of bladder relapse by 5 years which ranged from 34% to 91%. Knowledge of these prognostic factors can help in the selection of patients more suited for bladder preservation by definitive radiotherapy

  19. Mature cystic teratoma with malignant transformation of teratomatous urothelial cells: Rare case presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Senjuti Dasgupta; Debdas Bose; Nirmal Kumar Bhattacharyya; Pranab Kumar Biswas

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of malignancies in somatic elements of mature cystic teratoma of ovary is rare. The malignancies that may be encountered in dermoid cyst include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma, melanoma, sarcoma, carcinoid, and germ cell neoplasms. The development of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in dermoid cyst is extremely rare with only four such cases having been reported in literature so far. Here we report the fifth case of such an occurrence in a 50-...

  20. A rare case of pure small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the second most common urologic malignancy. Up to 95% of the urinary bladder tumors are of epithelial origin, from which 90% are transitional neoplasms. However, small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is rare tumor accounting for<0.7% of bladder cancer, of which the pure form is extremely rare. A 53‑year‑old female presented to urosurgery outpatient department complaining of hematuria and burning micturition since 3 months. Ultrsonography showed a large heteroechoic mass filling whole of the bladder. Histopathological examination of the transurethral debulked tumor mass revealed small cell carcinoma, which was confirmed on immunohistochemistry. We report this case due to its rarity and to add on to literature

  1. Changing trends in the management of small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuma Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma (SCC of the urinary bladder is a rare presentation, accounting for <1% of all bladder carcinomas. It has been considered as an aggressive variant of bladder carcinoma, with high incidence of distant relapse. Though cisplatin-based chemotherapy is considered the gold standard approach for this variety of bladder tumor, the role of radical cystectomy and radiotherapy cannot be neglected, due to its frequent association with transitional cell carcinoma. Different management strategies have been adopted by oncologists worldwide, in an effort to obtain survival benefits. Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery has been tried and the results are encouraging. This review article particularly focuses on the treatment evolution of SCC of bladder, various treatment options and their effects on the outcome, so that an optimal management can be planned for individual cases.

  2. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB is extremely rare. In this paper, we present a case of metastatic SCCB managed by chemotherapy and we would provide a brief review of the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, pathologic features, staging, treatment, and prognosis of SCCB. A 52-year-old man was admitted with signs and symptoms suggestive of a bladder cancer. Computed tomography of the pelvis and abdomen showed a large tumor at the right bladder wall, measuring 10 cm in diameter, and a multinodular liver disease. Diagnosis of small cell carcinoma was established from the histological study of the transurethral resection of the bladder tumor. The patient received 12 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy with a good partial response of bladder tumor and liver metastasis. The patient is still alive, 18 months after diagnosis.

  3. Urinary bladder tumors among atomic bomb survivors Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1961-1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the relationship of radiation dose to the incidence of urinary bladder tumors among atomic bomb survivors and controls in the RERF Life Span Study extended sample. A total of 112 cases of urinary bladder tumors was identified among approximately 99,000 subjects in this fixed cohort during 1961-72. Morphologic diagnoses were available for 86 cases (76.8%), cystoscopy alone for 21 cases (18.7%), and only the cause of death recorded on death certificates for 5 cases (4.5%). Urothelial carcinoma (transitional cell carcinoma) is the most common type of urinary bladder tumor for which morphologic diagnoses are available. The 1961-72 incidence rate was calculated using 106 cases identified as urinary bladder tumors. Although the crude annual incidence rate in the high dose group (100 rad or more) is elevated in both cities and both sexes, all nine cases with this dose were aged 40 years or more at the time of the bomb (ATB). The standardized relative risk adjusted for city and sex for those of age 40 or more ATB in the high dose group is 1.8 in comparison with the control group and this is a suggestive statistical difference. A statistically significant elevation of risk occurs in the high dose group for urothelial carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder among those aged 40 or more ATB. (author)

  4. Sperm associated antigen 9 plays an important role in bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Kanojia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Majority of bladder cancer deaths are caused due to transitional cell carcinoma (TCC which is the most prevalent and chemoresistant malignancy of urinary bladder. Therefore, we analyzed the role of Sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9 in bladder TCC. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We examined SPAG9 expression and humoral response in 125 bladder TCC patients. Four bladder cancer cell lines were assessed for SPAG9 expression. In addition, we investigated the effect of SPAG9 ablation on cellular proliferation, cell cycle, migration and invasion in UM-UC-3 bladder cancer cells by employing gene silencing approach. Our SPAG9 gene and protein expression analysis revealed SPAG9 expression in 81% of bladder TCC tissue specimens. High SPAG9 expression (>60% SPAG9 positive cells was found to be significantly associated with superficial non-muscle invasive stage (P = 0.042 and low grade tumors (P = 0.002 suggesting SPAG9 putative role in early spread and tumorigenesis. Humoral response against SPAG9 was observed in 95% of patients found positive for SPAG9 expression. All four bladder cancer cell lines revealed SPAG9 expression. In addition, SPAG9 gene silencing in UM-UC-3 cells resulted in induction of G0-G1 arrest characterized by up-regulation of p16 and p21 and consequent down-regulation of cyclin E, cyclin D and cyclin B, CDK4 and CDK1. Further, SPAG9 gene silencing also resulted in reduction in cellular growth, and migration and invasion ability of cancer cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data in clinical specimens indicated that SPAG9 is potential biomarker and therapeutic target for bladder TCC.

  5. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder: KIT and PDGFRA Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Nuket Eliyakin; Hakan Postaci; Yasemin Baskin; Zafer Kozacioğlu

    2015-01-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. A 72-year-old was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Cystoscopy revealed a bladder full of multiple, solid and papillary tumors. Biopsies from the deep and papillary tumors were taken. Histologically, tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, CD56, CD117 and Ki67 (labeling 70%). The tumo...

  6. Small Cell Carcinomas of the Bladder Highly Express Somatostatin Receptor Type 2A: Impact on Prognosis and Treatment-A Multicenter Study of Urooncology Society, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neşe, Nalan; Kumbaraci, Banu S; Baydar, Dilek E; Kiliçaslan, Işin; Sari, Ayşegül A; Şen, Sait; Gönül, Ipek I; Kankaya, Duygu; Özlük, Yasemin; Ermete, Murat; Özağari, Ayşim; Bal, Nebil; Kiremitçi, Saba; Yildiz, Kürşat; Tuna, Burçin; Şen, Nilay; Yörükoğlu, Kutsal

    2016-04-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SmCC) is a rare and aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the bladder. Neuroendocrine carcinomas expressing somatostatin receptors (SSTR) in other viscera such as lung, pancreas, and gastrointestinal system respond to therapy with somatostatin analogs. In the present study, expressions of SSTRs 1 to 5 including type 2A are investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and their relationship with clinicopathologic factors was evaluated. Hundred primary bladder SmCC cases were collected from 12 centers in Turkey. Forty-three cases were pure SmCC. Other cases had mostly papillary urothelial carcinoma as a second component. The percentage of the SmCC component ranged from 5% to 100%. SSTR-2A expression was membranous, whereas the other receptors showed cytoplasmic staining. The percentages of positive cases for SSTR-1, SSTR-2A, SSTR-3, SSTR-4, and SSTR-5 were 4% (3/75), 61.4% (54/88), 2.4% (2/84), 24.4% (20/82), and 6.25% (5/80), respectively. The percentage of SmCC component was positively correlated with the percentage of SSTR-2A expression (P=0.003) while negatively correlated with patient age (P=0.032). SSTR-2A expression was correlated with survival as a bad prognostic factor (P=0.018). SSTR-1, SSTR-3, SSTR-4, and SSTR-5 expressions did not show any statistical significance with any parameter. In conclusion, although the limited number of cases with adequate term follow-up, SSTR-2A expression could be a prognostic factor and somatostatin analogs therapeutic candidate for SmCCs of the bladder as these tumors show high percentage of SSTR-2A expression. PMID:25906124

  7. Comprehensive Transcriptional Analysis of Early-Stage Urothelial Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Jakob; Lamy, Philippe; Nordentoft, Iver;

    2016-01-01

    Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is a heterogeneous disease with widely different outcomes. We performed a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of 460 early-stage urothelial carcinomas and showed that NMIBC can be subgrouped into three major classes with basal- and luminal-like charac......Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is a heterogeneous disease with widely different outcomes. We performed a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of 460 early-stage urothelial carcinomas and showed that NMIBC can be subgrouped into three major classes with basal- and luminal...... cytoskeletal functions. Furthermore, mutations in well-known cancer driver genes (e.g., TP53 and ERBB2) were primarily found in high-risk tumors, together with APOBEC-related mutational signatures. The identification of subclasses in NMIBC may offer better prognostication and treatment selection based on...

  8. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder without gross hematuria: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wanqiu; Luan, Yang; Jin, Lu; Wang, Tao; Chen, Ruibao; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Lan, Ruzhu

    2015-09-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCB) is a rare and aggressive form of bladder cancer with poor prognosis. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy, and most patients have a history of smoking. The disease incidence of malignant bladder tumors in China is approximately 0.74%. Early and accurate diagnosis of SCCB can ensure timely and appropriate treatment of this malignant disease. Oncologic surgery is the standard treatment; however, it may not be a curative approach. Chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy should be performed following surgical removal. This case report describes a patient with a single neoplasm diagnosed as SCCB that arose because of recurrence of bladder cancer after bladder tumor resection. In contrast to previously reported cases, this patient had no gross hematuria and no history of smoking. PMID:26271292

  9. Mature cystic teratoma with malignant transformation of teratomatous urothelial cells: Rare case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senjuti Dasgupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of malignancies in somatic elements of mature cystic teratoma of ovary is rare. The malignancies that may be encountered in dermoid cyst include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma, melanoma, sarcoma, carcinoid, and germ cell neoplasms. The development of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC in dermoid cyst is extremely rare with only four such cases having been reported in literature so far. Here we report the fifth case of such an occurrence in a 50-year-old postmenopausal multiparous female patient. She presented with pain and gradual swelling of abdomen for 1 month. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a solid space occupying lesion with few cystic components at right pelvis, raising the possibility of an ovarian neoplasm. The level of CA-125 was slightly raised (56∙45 U/ml. Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy was performed. Microscopic examination showed cyst wall lined by stratified squamous epithelium. Beneath the cyst wall, a tumor mass was present, histological features of which resembled that of high-grade TCC (stage pT1aNXMX. On immunohistochemical analysis, the tumor was found to be positive for CK7 and CK20 and negative for WT-1. These results were consistent with a diagnosis of TCC arising in urothelium of mature cystic teratoma. Reporting of such extremely rare cases is important for the assessment of prognostic factors and treatment protocols.

  10. Identification of differentially expressed genes in two new human bladder carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To screen and identify differentially expressed genes in two new human urothelial carcinoma cell lines, BLS-211 and BLX. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to createa subtracted library, and clones were sequenced. Results Totally 13 over-expressed genes in BLX and 9 in BLS-211 cells were obtained, respectively. Among them, 18 were known genes and 4 were new ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tag), and were collected by GenBank dbEST database (The access number was EB390424-7). Conc...

  11. HLA-A, B and DR in Caucasians with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, P H; Anderson, S A; Stogdill, V D; Lamm, D L

    1983-11-01

    When HLA-A, B and DR antigens in Caucasian patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder were compared with controls, no significant alterations in antigen frequencies were found. PMID:6581580

  12. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: A case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Wen-Ting; Liang, Qi-Lian; Huang, Xin; Li, Zhou-yu; LIU, QIU-LONG

    2014-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCBC) is a type of rare malignant tumor of the urinary tract. As it does not have specific symptoms and its epidemiological features are similar to transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, it is often misdiagnosed. SCBC is highly aggressive, metastasizes very early and has a poor prognosis, and consequently, it has become a focus for urological surgeons and oncologists. An 82-year-old male visited the Department of Urinary Surgery, in the Affili...

  13. Oncogenic activation of Pak1-dependent pathway of macropinocytosis determines BCG entry into bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Iyer, Gopa; Solit, David; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that is used widely as a vaccine for tuberculosis and is used as an effective treatment for superficial bladder carcinoma. Despite being the most successful cancer biotherapy, its mechanism of action and response determinants remain obscure. Here we establish a model system to analyze BCG interaction with bladder cancer cells, using it to show that these cells vary dramatically in their susceptibility to BCG infectio...

  14. Potential of HSV-TK gene in gene-radiotherapy for human bladder carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the killing effect of retrovirus-mediated HSV-TK/GCV system combined with radiotherapy on human bladder carcinoma cells. Methods: By using retrovirus-mediated gene transfer technique, hygromycin phosphotransferase-thymidine kinase fusion gene (HyTK) was transferred into EJ bladder carcinoma cells. Antitumor effects were observed after irradiation with 60Co γ-rays as well as gancyclovir treatment. Results: EJ bladder carcinoma cells transduced with HyTK gene and treated with low concentrations of gancyclovir, which alone showed little cytotoxicity, were highly sensitive to radiation. The sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was 1.36. Conclusion: The combination of retrovirus-mediated HyTK/GCV gene therapy with standard radiation therapy might improve the therapeutic effectiveness for bladder carcinoma in clinical practice

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells protect against the tissue fibrosis of ketamine-induced cystitis in rat bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aram; Yu, Hwan Yeul; Heo, Jinbeom; Song, Miho; Shin, Jung-Hyun; Lim, Jisun; Yoon, Soo-Jung; Kim, YongHwan; Lee, Seungun; Kim, Seong Who; Oh, Wonil; Choi, Soo Jin; Shin, Dong-Myung; Choo, Myung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abuse of the hallucinogenic drug ketamine promotes the development of lower urinary tract symptoms that resemble interstitial cystitis. The pathophysiology of ketamine-induced cystitis (KC) is largely unknown and effective therapies are lacking. Here, using a KC rat model, we show the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord-blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Daily injection of ketamine to Sprague-Dawley rats for 2-weeks resulted in defective bladder function, indicated by irregular voiding frequency, increased maximum contraction pressure, and decreased intercontraction intervals and bladder capacity. KC bladders were characterized by severe mast-cell infiltration, tissue fibrosis, apoptosis, upregulation of transforming growth factor-β signaling related genes, and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 proteins. A single administration of MSCs (1 × 10(6)) into bladder tissue not only significantly ameliorated the aforementioned bladder voiding parameters, but also reversed the characteristic histological and gene-expression alterations of KC bladder. Treatment with the antifibrotic compound N-acetylcysteine also alleviated the symptoms and pathological characteristics of KC bladder, indicating that the antifibrotic capacity of MSC therapy underlies its benefits. Thus, this study for the first-time shows that MSC therapy might help to cure KC by protecting against tissue fibrosis in a KC animal model and provides a foundation for clinical trials of MSC therapy. PMID:27481042

  16. HIF-1α activates hypoxia-induced PFKFB4 expression in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Lu, Chengyin; Fang, Meng; Yan, Wangjun; Chen, Mo; Ji, Yingzheng; He, Shaohui; Liu, Tielong; Chen, Tianrui; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-07-29

    PFKFB4 is reported to regulate glycolysis by synthesizing fructose-2, 6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP) and has proved to be associated with most malignancies. However, the underlying mechanism for increased PFKFB4 expression in bladder cancer remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that PFKFB4 was overexpressed in bladder cancer tissues. In addition, the expression of PFKFB4 elevated in bladder cancer cells in the hypoxic condition, while in nomoxic condition, the expression of PFKFB4 still very low. Furthermore, we identified the hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE)-D from five putative HREs in the promoter region of PFKFB4 and demonstrated that the HRE-D was transactivated by the HIF-1α in bladder cancer cells. By using the Double-immunofluorescence co-localization assay, we revealed that the HIF-1α expression was associated with PFKFB4 expression in human bladder cancer specimens. Altogether, our study for the first time identified the pivotal role of HIF-1α in the connection between PFKFB4 and hypoxia in bladder cancer, which may prove to be a potential target for the treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:27181362

  17. A Large Bladder Tumor Covered With a Thick “Shell” of Necrotic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Zhe; Gong, Miao-zi; Pan, Dong-liang; Zhang, Xiang-hua; Li, Ning-chen; Na, Yan-qun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bladder tumor arising in a spina bifida patient is rare and may be clinically latent. We report the case of a 61-year-old female patient with spina bifida, neurogenic bladder, and a history of recurrent urinary tract infections. A B-ultrasound and non-contrast computed tomography scan did not reveal any bladder mass, but an unexplained “well-filled” bladder was observed, which was confusing as the catheter was present and open. However, a subsequent cystoscopic evaluation revealed a large bladder mass measuring 9.5 × 9.0 × 6.5 cm3, which almost filled the entire bladder. The mass had coarse and flocculent surface and seemed to be free from each observed wall of the urinary bladder. It was diagnosed as an infectious necrotic mass based on its appearance. During transurethral resection of the mass, a bladder tumor was suspected as small blood vessels and bleeding appeared within the inner layer of the mass. Pathological examination revealed necrotic material, inflammatory cells, and urothelial carcinoma cells. Then, a radical cystectomy was performed, and the pathological results indicated stage pT3bN0M0 transitional cell carcinoma. In the gross specimen, the base of the tumor measured 3 × 3 cm2 on the top of the back wall of the bladder. Bladder tumors may have atypical presentations in patients with spina bifida. Regular screening is helpful for earlier detection and improving outcomes of bladder tumors in such patients. PMID:27100442

  18. Application of urinary proteomics in early diagnosis of bladder urothelial carcinoma%尿液蛋白质组学在膀胱尿路上皮癌早期诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏杰; 李常颖; 张婷; 王世鑫; 畅继武; 蒋守芳; 章广玲; 李建民

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference in urinary proteome between patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC) and healthy volunteers and to provide a basis for the early diagnosis of BUC.Methods The urine samples from BUC patients and healthy volunteers (controls) were treated by 25%ethanol precipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE),and the obtained urinary proteins were subjected to Coomassie brilliant blue staining and analysis by PDQuest 8.0 (2-DE image analysis software); the differentially expressed proteins were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry and identified using the Swiss-Prot database; the differential expression of these proteins was verified by western blot.Results High-resolution and high-reproducibility 2-DE images were obtained from the urine samples of BUC patients and controls,with 789 ±18 and 762 ±14 protein spots,respectively.Compared with the control group,the BUC grouPhad significantly decreased expression of 6 protein spots and significantly increased expression of 11 protein spots.The mass spectrometry revealed five proteins with increased expression in the BUC group,including fibrinogen,lactate dehydrogenase B,apolipoprotein A1,clusterin,and haptoglobin,and the results were confirmed by western blot.Conclusion There is significant difference in urinary proteome between BUC patients and healthy volunteers; the identification of differentially expressed proteins in urine lays the foundation for identifying potential molecular markers in early diagnosis of BUC.%目的 寻找膀胱尿路上皮癌(BUC)患者与健康志愿者尿液蛋白质组学差异,为BUC的早期诊断奠定基础.方法 采用25%乙醇沉淀法制备尿液双向电泳样品,尿液蛋白经双向凝胶电泳(2-DE)分离后行考马斯亮蓝染色,利用PDQuest8.0 2D凝胶图像分析软件进行分析,所得差异蛋白点用基质辅助激光解吸电离飞行时间串联

  19. Bladder Tumor Recurrence after Primary Surgery for Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Urinary Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Oehlschläger, Sven; Baldauf, Anka; Wiessner, Diana; Gellrich, Jörg; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Wirth, Manfred P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the upper urinary tract represents 6–8% of all TCC cases. Nephroureterectomy with removal of a bladder cuff is the treatment of choice. The rates of TCC recurrence in the bladder after primary upper urinary tract surgery described in the literature range between 12.5 and 37.5%. In a retrospective analysis we examined the occurrence of TCC after nephroureterectomy for upper tract TCC in patients without a previous history of bladder TCC a...

  20. Cost-effectiveness and budget impact analysis of vinflunine used in the treatment of patients with urothelial transitional cell carcinoma resistant to platinum-based regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Kulikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As of now, vinflunine is the only second-line chemotherapy drug showing an advantage over the best maintenance therapy in a Phase IIIrandomized study treating patients with urothelial transitional cell carcinoma. Due to the advent of this drug, it was relevant to make a pharmacoeconomic analysis comparing therapy with vinflunine in combination with the best maintenance therapy and the latter only. A budget impact analysis showed that the use of the new drug required additional expenditures. The ICER reflecting the cost of one additional year of life and estimating vinflunine therapy as cost-effective was determined by the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis.

  1. Bladder uptake of liposomes after intravesical administration occurs by endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharathi Raja Rajaganapathy

    Full Text Available Liposomes have been used therapeutically and as a local drug delivery system in the bladder. However, the exact mechanism for the uptake of liposomes by bladder cells is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of endocytosis in the uptake of liposomes by cultured human UROtsa cells of urothelium and rat bladder. UROtsa cells were incubated in serum-free media with liposomes containing colloidal gold particles for 2 h either at 37°C or at 4°C. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM images of cells incubated at 37°C found endocytic vesicles containing gold inside the cells. In contrast, only extracellular binding was noticed in cells incubated with liposomes at 4°C. Absence of liposome internalization at 4°C indicates the need of energy dependent endocytosis as the primary mechanism of entry of liposomes into the urothelium. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the uptake of liposomes at 37°C occurs via clathrin mediated endocytosis. Based on these observations, we propose that clathrin mediated endocytosis is the main route of entry for liposomes into the urothelial layer of the bladder and the findings here support the usefulness of liposomes in intravesical drug delivery.

  2. Microelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Human Urothelial Cell Lines: Real-Time Electrical Impedance Measurement at an Optimal Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangkyu Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To distinguish between normal (SV-HUC-1 and cancerous (TCCSUP human urothelial cell lines using microelectrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS. Materials and Methods. Two types of μEIS devices were designed and used in combination to measure the impedance of SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells flowing through the channels of the devices. The first device (μEIS-OF was designed to determine the optimal frequency at which the impedance of two cell lines is most distinguishable. The μEIS-OF trapped the flowing cells and measured their impedance at a frequency ranging from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The second device (μEIS-RT was designed for real-time impedance measurement of the cells at the optimal frequency. The impedance was measured instantaneously as the cells passed the sensing electrodes of μEIS-RT. Results. The optimal frequency, which maximized the average difference of the amplitude and phase angle between the two cell lines (p<0.001, was determined to be 119 kHz. The real-time impedance of the cell lines was measured at 119 kHz; the two cell lines differed significantly in terms of amplitude and phase angle (p<0.001. Conclusion. The μEIS-RT can discriminate SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells by measuring the impedance at the optimal frequency determined by the μEIS-OF.

  3. Microelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Human Urothelial Cell Lines: Real-Time Electrical Impedance Measurement at an Optimal Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yangkyu; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Yun, Joho; Seo, Seungwan; Park, Chang-Ju; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To distinguish between normal (SV-HUC-1) and cancerous (TCCSUP) human urothelial cell lines using microelectrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS). Materials and Methods. Two types of μEIS devices were designed and used in combination to measure the impedance of SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells flowing through the channels of the devices. The first device (μEIS-OF) was designed to determine the optimal frequency at which the impedance of two cell lines is most distinguishable. The μEIS-OF trapped the flowing cells and measured their impedance at a frequency ranging from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The second device (μEIS-RT) was designed for real-time impedance measurement of the cells at the optimal frequency. The impedance was measured instantaneously as the cells passed the sensing electrodes of μEIS-RT. Results. The optimal frequency, which maximized the average difference of the amplitude and phase angle between the two cell lines (p < 0.001), was determined to be 119 kHz. The real-time impedance of the cell lines was measured at 119 kHz; the two cell lines differed significantly in terms of amplitude and phase angle (p < 0.001). Conclusion. The μEIS-RT can discriminate SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells by measuring the impedance at the optimal frequency determined by the μEIS-OF. PMID:26998490

  4. Preoperative lymph-node staging of invasive urothelial bladder cancer with ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed axial tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: correlation with histopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thor Knak; Holt, Per; Gerke, Oke;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The treatment and prognosis of bladder cancer are based on the depth of primary tumour invasion and the presence of metastases. A highly accurate preoperative tumour, node, metastasis (TNM) staging is critical to proper patient management and treatment. This study retrospectively...... investigated the value of ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed axial tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative N staging of bladder cancer. Material and methods. From June 2006 to January 2008, 48 consecutive patients diagnosed with bladder...

  5. Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinomas in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Relationship with Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and upper tract urothelial carcinomas display a bidirectional relationship. Review of the literature indicates that early diagnosis and correct localization of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients are important but problematic. Urine cytology and cystoscopy have limited sensitivity for the diagnosis of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could prove useful for the detection and staging of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Renal ultrasound can detect hydronephrosis caused by upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients but cannot visualize the carcinomas themselves. High detection rates for upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients have recently been demonstrated using computed tomography urography, which appears to be a promising tool. To detect carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients as early as possible, regular screening in asymptomatic patients and diagnostic work-up in symptomatic patients should be performed using a combination of urological and imaging methods. Careful assessment of subsequent recurrence within the contralateral upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder is necessary for dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients with upper tract urothelial carcinomas.

  6. Outcome of recurrent and metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder small cell carcinoma is an uncommon tumour. Through a retrospective study we will present the evolution of recurrent and metastatic disease and outcome of patients treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre. Methods Only 15 patients having recurrent or metastatic bladder small cell carcinoma were treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre between 1996 and 2007. The patients were divided in two groups: a mixed small cell carcinoma group (9 patients and a pure small cell carcinoma group (6 patients. All the records and informations related to treatment and outcome of the 15 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Various characteristics of small cell carcinoma were investigated. Results The median age of the 15 patients having recurrent or metastatic bladder small cell carcinoma and treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre was 63 years and the disease was at stage IV for all cases. Nine patients were treated by chemotherapy. Four patients were treated by local radiotherapy (3 with radiotherapy without previous surgery and 1 with surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One patient was treated by whole brain radiotherapy. And one patient died before treatment. After 52.4 months median follow up, 12 patients died. Median overall survival was 7.6 months. Survival probability at 1 year was 33%. Median overall survival was 9.9 months in the mixed small cell carcinoma group, and was only 4.6 months in the pure small cell carcinoma group. Survival probability at 1 year in the mixed small cell carcinoma group was 44% as compared to 17% in the pure small cell carcinoma group (Log-rank test: p = 0.228. Conclusion Recurrent and metastatic bladder small cell carcinoma is associated with very poor prognosis. The pure bladder small cell carcinoma appears to have poorer outcome than the mixed bladder small cell carcinoma. Chemotherapy using platinum drugs is a mainstay treatment.

  7. Loss of β1-integrin from urothelium results in overactive bladder and incontinence in mice: a mechanosensory rather than structural phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanasaki, Keizo; Yu, Weiqun; von Bodungen, Maximilian; Larigakis, John D; Kanasaki, Megumi; Ayala de la Pena, Francisco; Kalluri, Raghu; Hill, Warren G

    2013-05-01

    Bladder urothelium senses and communicates information about bladder fullness. However, the mechanoreceptors that respond to tissue stretch are poorly defined. Integrins are mechanotransducers in other tissues. Therefore, we eliminated β1-integrin selectively in urothelium of mice using Cre-LoxP targeted gene deletion. β1-Integrin localized to basal/intermediate urothelial cells by confocal microscopy. β1-Integrin conditional-knockout (β1-cKO) mice lacking urothelial β1-integrin exhibited down-regulation and mislocalization of α3- and α5-integrins by immunohistochemistry but, surprisingly, had normal morphology, permeability, and transepithelial resistance when compared with Cre-negative littermate controls. β1-cKO mice were incontinent, as judged by random urine leakage on filter paper (4-fold higher spotting, Pbladder overfilling with 80% longer intercontractile intervals (Phyperactivity (3-fold more prevoid contractions, Pbladder due to abnormal mechanotransduction; more broadly, our findings indicate that urothelium itself directly modulates voiding. PMID:23395910

  8. Upregulation of cell adhesion through delta Np63 silencing in human 5637 bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Feng He; Dai-Yin Tian; Zheng-Jin Yi; Zhi-Kang Yin; Chun-Li Luo; Wei Tang; Xiao-Hou Wu

    2012-01-01

    Some researchs have demonstrated that the loss of delta Np63 is associated with aggressive phenotypes and poor prognosis.However,other research indicates that delta Np63 is considered to have oncogenic properties,Delta Np63 overexpression is often observed in association with the oncogenic growth of squamous cell carcinomas and bladder cancer.In this study,we investigated the oocogenic role of delta Np63 in regulating cell adhesion in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (TCCB).The Cells were stably transfected with the delta Np63 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) plasmid.Immunocytochemistry was performed to determine the knockdown efficiency.Tumour cells were studied for their ability to adhere to vascular endothelial cells.Confocal microscopy was used to analyse the changes in cytoskeletal F-actin.F-actin expression was measured by flow cytometry.Cell invasion ability was assessed using transwell chambers.fhe delta Np63-silenced tumour cells were shown to adhere more tightly than controls to vascular endothelial cells (P<0.05).The content of F-actin in the delta Np63-silenced cells was enhanced (P<0.05),The Matrigel invasion assays showed that human 5637 bladder cancer cells had a lower degree of motility when transfected with pdetta Np63-shRNA ( P< 0.05).In conclusion,silencing of the delta Np63 expression can enhance the adhesiveness of 5637 cells by inducing F-actin cytoskeleton production,and it will possibly inhibit the TCCB invasion and metastasis.

  9. Fibronectin-mediated Calmette-Guerin bacillus attachment to murine bladder mucosa. Requirement for the expression of an antitumor response.

    OpenAIRE

    Kavoussi, L R; Brown, E J; Ritchey, J K; Ratliff, T L

    1990-01-01

    Adjuvant intravesical Calmette-Guerin bacillus (BCG) is an effective treatment for superficial bladder cancer. The mechanisms by which BCG mediates antitumor activity are not known. We investigated the initial interaction of BCG with the bladder mucosa to determine whether binding was essential for the development of antitumor activity. Herein, we show that bladder urothelial disruption induced by acrolein, adriamycin, or electrocautery resulted in BCG binding in areas of urothelial damage. B...

  10. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  11. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Neuroendocrine Bladder Cancer: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelaj, Arsela; Rebuzzi, Sara Elena; Magliocca, Fabio Massimo; Speranza, Iolanda; Corongiu, Emanuele; Borgoni, Giuseppe; Perugia, Giacomo; Liberti, Marcello; Bianco, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare and aggressive form of bladder cancer that mainly presents at an advanced stage. As a result of its rarity, it has been described in many case reports and reviews but few retrospective and prospective trials, showing there is no standard therapeutic approach. In the literature the best therapeutic strategy for limited disease is the multimodality treatment and most authors have extrapolated treatment algorithms from the therapy recommendations of small cell lung cancer. CASE REPORT A 71-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital with gross hematuria and dysuria. Imaging and cystoscopy revealed a vegetative lesion of the bladder wall. A transurethral resection of the bladder was performed. Pathological examination revealed a pT2 high-grade urothelial carcinoma with widespread neuroendocrine differentiation. Multimodal treatment with neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy was performed. A CT scan performed after chemotherapy demonstrated a radiological complete response. The patient underwent radical cystectomy and lymphadenectomy. The histopathological finding of bladder and node specimen confirmed a pathological complete response. A post-surgery CT scan showed no evidence of local or systemic disease. Six months after surgery, the patient is still alive and disease-free. CONCLUSIONS A standard treatment strategy of small cell cancer of the urinary bladder is not yet well established, but a multimodal treatment of this disease is the best option compared to surgical therapy alone. The authors confirm the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in limited disease of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. PMID:27072610

  12. Uroplakin 1b is critical in urinary tract development and urothelial differentiation and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Ashley R; Becknell, M Brian; Ching, Christina B; Cuaresma, Edward J; Chen, Xi; Hains, David S; McHugh, Kirk M

    2016-03-01

    Proper development and maintenance of urothelium is critical to its function. Uroplakins are expressed in developing and mature urothelium where they establish plaques associated with the permeability barrier. Their precise functional role in development and disease is unknown. Here, we disrupted Upk1b in vivo where its loss resulted in urothelial plaque disruption in the bladder and kidney. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) bladder urothelium appeared dysplastic with expansion of the progenitor cell markers, Krt14 and Krt5, increased Shh expression, and loss of terminal differentiation markers Krt20 and uroplakins. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) renal urothelium became stratified with altered cellular composition. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) mice developed age-dependent progressive hydronephrosis. Interestingly, 16% of Upk1b(RFP/RFP) mice possessed unilateral duplex kidneys. Our study expands the role of uroplakins, mechanistically links plaque formation to urinary tract development and function, and provides a tantalizing connection between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract along with functional deficits observed in a variety of urinary tract diseases. Thus, kidney and bladder urothelium are regionally distinct and remain highly plastic, capable of expansion through tissue-specific progenitor populations. Furthermore, Upk1b plays a previously unknown role in early kidney development representing a novel genetic target for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. PMID:26880456

  13. Polarized ATP distribution in urothelial mucosal and serosal space is differentially regulated by stretch and ectonucleotidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiqun

    2015-11-15

    Purinergic signaling is a major pathway in regulating bladder function, and mechanical force stimulates urothelial ATP release, which plays an important role in bladder mechanotransduction. Although urothelial ATP release was first reported almost 20 years ago, the way in which release is regulated by mechanical force, and the presence of ATP-converting enzymes in regulating the availability of released ATP is still not well understood. Using a set of custom-designed Ussing chambers with the ability to manipulate mechanical forces applied on the urothelial tissue, we have demonstrated that it is stretch and not hydrostatic pressure that induces urothelial ATP release. The experiments reveal that urothelial ATP release is tightly controlled by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction. We have further shown that stretch-induced urothelial ATP release is insensitive to temperature (4°C). Interestingly, stretch-induced ATP release shows polarized distribution, with the ATP concentration in mucosal chamber (nanomolar level) about 10 times higher than the ATP concentration in serosal chamber (subnanomolar level). Furthermore, we have consistently observed differential ATP lifetime kinetics in the mucosal and serosal chambers, which is consistent with our immunofluorescent localization data, showing that ATP-converting enzymes ENTPD3 and alkaline phosphatase are expressed on urothelial basal surface, but not on the apical membrane. In summary, our data indicate that urothelial ATP release is finely regulated by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction, and extracellular ATP signaling is likely to be differentially regulated by ectonucleotidase, which results in temporally and spatially distinct ATP kinetics in response to mechanical stretch. PMID:26336160

  14. Pathologic bladder microenvironment attenuates smooth muscle differentiation of skin derived precursor cells: implications for tissue regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Tolg

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cell containing organs (bladder, heart, blood vessels are damaged by a variety of pathological conditions necessitating surgery or organ replacement. Currently, regeneration of contractile tissues is hampered by lack of functional smooth muscle cells. Multipotent skin derived progenitor cells (SKPs can easily be isolated from adult skin and can be differentiated in vitro into contractile smooth muscle cells by exposure to FBS. Here we demonstrate an inhibitory effect of a pathologic contractile organ microenvironment on smooth muscle cell differentiation of SKPs. In vivo, urinary bladder strain induces microenvironmental changes leading to de-differentiation of fully differentiated bladder smooth muscle cells. Co-culture of SKPs with organoids isolated from ex vivo stretched bladders or exposure of SKPs to diffusible factors released by stretched bladders (e.g. bFGF suppresses expression of smooth muscle markers (alpha SMactin, calponin, myocardin, myosin heavy chain as demonstrated by qPCR and immunofluorescent staining. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR signalling, previously observed to prevent bladder strain induced de-differentiation of fully differentiated smooth muscle cells in vitro, inhibits FBS-induced smooth muscle cell differentiation of undifferentiated SKPs. These results suggest that intended precursor cell differentiation may be paradoxically suppressed by the disease context for which regeneration may be required. Organ-specific microenvironment contexts, particularly prevailing disease, may play a significant role in modulating or attenuating an intended stem cell phenotypic fate, possibly explaining the variable and inefficient differentiation of stem cell constructs in in vivo settings. These observations must be considered in drafting any regeneration strategies.

  15. Outcome of recurrent and metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Ismaili Nabil; Heudel Pierre; Elkarak Fadi; Kaikani Wafaa; Bajard Agathe; Ismaili Mohammed; Errihani Hassan; Droz Jean; Flechon Aude

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Bladder small cell carcinoma is an uncommon tumour. Through a retrospective study we will present the evolution of recurrent and metastatic disease and outcome of patients treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre. Methods Only 15 patients having recurrent or metastatic bladder small cell carcinoma were treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre between 1996 and 2007. The patients were divided in two groups: a mixed small cell carcinoma group (9 patients) and a pure small cell carcin...

  16. Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Induced Cell Apoptosis and S Phase Arrest in Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs on the viability and apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells. EJ and T24 cells were cocultured with ADSCs or cultured with conditioned medium of ADSCs (ADSC-CM, respectively. The cell counting and colony formation assay showed ADSCs inhibited the proliferation of EJ and T24 cells. Cell viability assessment revealed that the secretions of ADSCs, in the form of conditioned medium, were able to decrease cancer cell viability. Wound-healing assay suggested ADSC-CM suppressed migration of T24 and EJ cells. Moreover, the results of the flow cytometry indicated that ADSC-CM was capable of inducing apoptosis of T24 cells and inducing S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot revealed ADSC-CM increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, indicating that ADSC-CM induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins were involved in the mechanism of this reaction. Our study indicated that ADSCs may provide a promising and practicable manner for bladder tumor therapy.

  17. Mandatory role of proteinase-activated receptor 1 in experimental bladder inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Carole A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, inflammation plays a role in most bladder pathologies and represents a defense reaction to injury that often times is two edged. In particular, bladder neurogenic inflammation involves the participation of mast cells and sensory nerves. Increased mast cell numbers and tryptase release represent one of the prevalent etiologic theories for interstitial cystitis and other urinary bladder inflammatory conditions. The activity of mast cell-derived tryptase as well as thrombin is significantly increased during inflammation. Those enzymes activate specific G-protein coupled proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. Four PARs have been cloned so far, and not only are all four receptors highly expressed in different cell types of the mouse urinary bladder, but their expression is altered during experimental bladder inflammation. We hypothesize that PARs may link mast cell-derived proteases to bladder inflammation and, therefore, play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. Results Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the mouse urinary bladder, all four PA receptors are also expressed in the J82 human urothelial cell line. Intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides in mice leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1-, and to a lesser extent, by PAR2-deficiency. Conclusion Our results reveal an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provide a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evoke testable hypotheses regarding the role of PARs in bladder inflammation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestations of cystitis.

  18. Nomograms for Prediction of Disease Recurrence in Patients with Primary Ta, T1 Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Sung Joon; Cho, Kang Su; Han, Mooyoung; Rhew, Hyun Yul; Kim, Choung-Soo; Ryu, Soo Bang; Sul, Chong Koo; Chung, Moon Kee; Park, Tong Choon; Kim, Hyung Jin; ,

    2008-01-01

    We developed nomograms to predict disease recurrence in patients with Ta, T1 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Thirty-eight training hospitals participated in this retrospective multicenter study. Between 1998 and 2002, a total of 1,587 patients with newly diagnosed non-muscle invasive bladder cancer were enrolled in this study. Patients with prior histories of bladder cancer, non-transitional cell carcinoma, or a follow-up duration of less than 12 months were excluded. With univari...

  19. Mode of action of pulegone on the urinary bladder of F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli S; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Arnold, Lora L; Pennington, Karen L; Anwar, Muhammad M; Adams, Bret R; Taylor, Sean V; Wermes, Clint; Adams, Timothy B; Cohen, Samuel M

    2012-07-01

    Essential oils from mint plants, including peppermint and pennyroyal oils, are used at low levels as flavoring agents in various foods and beverages. Pulegone is a component of these oils. In a 2-year bioassay, oral administration of pulegone slightly increased the urothelial tumor incidence in female rats. We hypothesized that its mode of action (MOA) involved urothelial cytotoxicity and increased cell proliferation, ultimately leading to tumors. Pulegone was administered by gavage at 0, 75, or 150 mg/kg body weight to female rats for 4 and 6 weeks. Fresh void urine and 18-h urine were collected for crystal and metabolite analyses. Urinary bladders were evaluated by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling index. Pulegone and its metabolites, piperitenone, piperitone, menthofuran, and menthone, were tested for cytotoxicity in rat (MYP3) and human (1T1) urothelial cells by the 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. No abnormal urinary crystals were observed by light microscopy. Urine samples (18-h) showed the presence of pulegone, piperitone, piperitenone, and menthofuran in both treated groups. By SEM, bladders from treated rats showed superficial necrosis and exfoliation. There was a significant increase in the BrdU labeling index in the high-dose group. In vitro studies indicated that pulegone and its metabolites, especially piperitenone, are excreted and concentrated in the urine at cytotoxic levels when pulegone is administered at high doses to female rats. The present study supports the hypothesis that cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell proliferation is the MOA for pulegone-induced urothelial tumors in female rats. PMID:22499580

  20. Diuron metabolites and urothelial cytotoxicity: In vivo, in vitro and molecular approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diuron is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels. The proposed mode of action (MOA) for diuron is urothelial cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative urothelial hyperplasia. Diuron-induced urothelial cytotoxicity is not due to urinary solids. Diuron is extensively metabolized, and in rats, N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea (DCPU) and 4,5-dichloro-2-hydroxyphenyl urea (2-OH-DCPU) were the predominant urinary metabolites; lesser metabolites included N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea (DCPMU) and trace levels of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). In humans, DCPMU and DCPU have been found in the urine after a case of product abuse. To aid in elucidating the MOA of diuron and to evaluate the metabolites that are responsible for the diuron toxicity in the bladder epithelium, we investigated the urinary concentrations of metabolites in male Wistar rats treated with 2500 ppm of diuron, the urothelial cytotoxicity in vitro of the metabolites and their gene expression profiles. DCPU was found in rat urine at concentrations substantially greater than the in vitro IC50 and induced more gene expression alterations than the other metabolites tested. 2-OH-DCPU was present in urine at a concentration approximately half of the in vitro IC50, whereas DCPMU and DCA were present in urine at concentrations well below the IC50. For the diuron-induced MOA for the rat bladder, we suggest that DCPU is the primary metabolite responsible for the urothelial cytotoxicity with some contribution also by 2-OH-DCPU. This study supports a MOA for diuron-induced bladder effects in rats consisting of metabolism to DCPU (and 2-OH-DCPU to a lesser extent), concentration and excretion in urine, urothelial cytotoxicity, and regenerative proliferation

  1. Cyproheptadine exhibits antitumor activity in urothelial carcinoma cells by targeting GSK3β to suppress mTOR and β-catenin signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Lin, Ru-Inn; Feng, Yu-Min; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wu, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Cheng-Da; Chan, Michael W Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyproheptadine, a serotonin antagonist, has recently been reported to function as a novel therapeutic agent by inhibiting PI3K/AKT signaling in several human cancers. However, the therapeutic effect of cyproheptadine in urothelial carcinoma (UC) has never been explored. In this study, we determined the effect of cyproheptadine on the growth of five human UC cell lines and an in vivo xenograft model. The results showed that cyproheptadine exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of UC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Cyproheptadine also induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, subsequently followed by apoptosis and necrosis. The underlying mechanisms of cell cycle arrest were associated with the reduction of c-Myc, induction of p21 and p27, and the stabilization of Rb expression. In addition, the suppression of the GSK3β/TSC2/mTOR pathway and deregulation of the GSK3β/β-catenin signaling were observed in cyproheptadine-treated UC cells. Furthermore, cyproheptadine-induced apoptosis was associated with ANGPTL4 expression followed by activation of caspase3 and PARP in UC cells. Our experimental results provide evidence that cyproheptadine is a suitable therapeutic agent for the treatment of UC. PMID:26454215

  2. Concomitant Urothelial Cancer and Renal Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Sheray N.; Tanya Foster; Gurendra Char; Audene Garrison

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of coexisting urothelial cancer and renal tuberculosis in the same kidney. The patient is a 72-year-old female with a remote history of treated pulmonary tuberculosis who presented with haematuria, initial investigation of which elucidated no definitive cause. Almost 1 year later, a diagnosis of metastatic urinary tract cancer was made. The patient received chemotherapy for advanced collecting duct type renal cell carcinoma, based on histological features of renal biopsy. Sub...

  3. MANAGEMENT OF CARCINOMA BLADDER: A REVIEW LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurinderjit Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the bladder is a disease of the elderly. Bladder cancer is three times more common in males than in females and more common in whites than in blacks. Patients with bladder cancer have a 1% to 4% incidence of synchronous or metachronous upper t ract urothelial tumors. There are many risk factors for urothelial cancer, classified into (1 Genetic (2 chemical exposure, and (3 chronic irritation. Genetic abnormalities associated with CIS include alterations in the retinoblastoma gene (Rb, p53, an d PTEN. Chemical exposure has the most epidemiologic evidence to support it as an inciting agent (Aromatic amines, aniline dyes, and nitrites and nitrates. Chronic irritants include catheters, recurrent urinary track infections, Schistosoma haematobium, a nd irradiation. There are many studies that suggest high water consumption, vitamin intake, and various diets that are beneficial in preventing bladder cancer. However, none of these have shown any clear benefit with respect to prevention.

  4. Local control rate and prognosis after sequential chemoradiation for small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to assess the long-term outcome and the risk for local recurrence of patients with small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by external beam radiotherapy (sequential chemoradiation). All consecutive patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the bladder (n=66), treated in our institution between 1993 and 2011 were retrospectively evaluated from an institutional database. Only patients with limited disease (Tx-4N0-1M0) small cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with sequential chemoradiation (n=27) were included in this study. Recurrence rates, overall survival and cancer-specific survival were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median time to recurrence was 20 months, median overall survival 26 months, 5-year overall survival 22.2%, median cancer-specific survival 47 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 39.6%. For complete responders after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (n=19), median cancer-specific survival was 52 months with a 5-year cancer-specific survival 45.9% versus a median cancer-specific survival of 22 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 0.0% for incomplete responders (n=8; P=0.034). Eight patients (29.6%) underwent transurethral resections (TUR-BT) for local recurrences in the bladder. At the end of follow up, four patients had undergone cystectomy for recurrence of disease resulting in a bladder-preservation rate of 85.2%. Median time to local recurrence was 29 months and median time to distant recurrence was 10 months. Sequential chemoradiation for limited disease small cell carcinoma of the bladder results in a reasonable outcome with a high bladder preservation rate. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy represents a significant prognostic factor in this patient population. (author)

  5. Hemorrhagic irradiation cystitis associated with bladder transitional cell carcinoma and effects of aluminium-ammonium sulfate irrigation for massive bladder hemorrage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although pelvic irradiation is carried out widely on patients with uterine cancer, a few reports have dealt with the occurence of secondary bladder tumors due to pelvic irradiation. Herein, we report a case of radiation induced bladder transitional cell carcinoma. A 72-year-old woman suffered hemorrhagic irradiation cystitis for 2 years in duration following 8000 rads radiotherapy received 4 years before. Primary uterine cervical cancer was well controlled and residual tumor or recurrence of tumor was excluded by clinical examination. Cystoscopic and cytologic examination was initiated in 1981 when first episode of hematuria occurred and was repeated there-after to check for neoplasm in the bladder until June 1983, when a bladder tumor was identified. Cystoscopy revealed a small papillary tumor in trigone, and hyperemic edema and bleeding in almost the whole bladder mucosa. The pathology of the tumor was transitional cell carcinoma. Hemorrhagic cystitis was treated successfully with bladder irrigation of 3 litres of 1% aluminium-ammonium sulfate solution after 3 courses of irrigation. (author)

  6. Overexpression of Bcl-2 enhances metastatic potential of human bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, H; Hara, I.; Yamanaka, K.; Gohji, K.; Arakawa, S; Kamidono, S.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Bcl-2 expression on the metastatic process of bladder cancer cells by using the Bcl-2-transfected human bladder cancer cell lines (KoTCC-1/BH) and the control vector only-transfected cell line (KoTCC-1/C), which were generated in our previous study (Miyake et al (1998) Oncogene 16: 933–934). When they were injected intravenously into athymic nude mice, KoTCC-1/BH formed more than three times as many tumour nodules in the lungs as did KoTCC-1/C. In addition, tumou...

  7. A comparison of cell-collecting methods for the Comet assay in urinary bladders of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kunio; Ohnuma, Aya; Kojima, Sayuri; Yoshida, Toshinori; Matsumoto, Kyomu

    2012-02-18

    Conducting the single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay in the urinary bladders of rodents is technically problematic because the bladder is small and thin, which makes it difficult to collect its mucosal cells by scraping. We performed the Comet assay using a simple mincing method in which tissues are minced with scissors. We then compared data obtained with this method with data obtained using the scraping method. Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were orally given twice the known carcinogens N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), or o-anisidine (OA). Three hours after the second administration, the bladder of each rat was divided into two parts and each part was processed by either the mincing or the scraping method. Both mincing and scraping methods detected DNA damage in MNU-, EMS-, but not OA-treated rats, and thus the mincing method had a sufficient capability to detect DNA damaging agents. The morphological analysis of the prepared cell suspensions revealed that more than 80% of the cells collected by the mincing method were from the epithelium. Because the mincing method requires only one-half of a bladder, the other half remains intact and can be used for histopathological examination. We conclude that the mincing method is easier and more appropriate for the Comet assay in urinary bladder tissue than the scraping method. PMID:22155339

  8. Risk factors for transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the role of various known risk factors for the development of Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of urinary bladder in our set up. Study design: Case control study Place and duration of the study: Department of Radiology CMH Rawalpindi, from March 2007 to December 2007. Material and methods: 70 patients with TCC urinary bladder were included in the study. 70 controls were included. The patients were enquired about the risk factors. The data was analysed on SPSS version 12. Odds ratio for each factor was carried out. p value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Smoking was the most important factor in the development of TCC of urinary bladder with odds ratio of 3:1. Driving was the next common factor. Low socioeconomic conditions appear to be an important factor in our set up. The role of chemicals in industrial work could not be established. Conclusion: Differences from the West exist regarding the etiological factors for the development of TCC of urinary bladder. Males outnumber the females by a significant ratio. Smoking is an important factor in the development of TCC of urinary bladder. Most bladder cancers arise in low socioeconomic group in our set up. (author)

  9. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene array profiles in female patients with involuntary bladder contractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bluth MH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Wellman Cheung1, Mark J Bluth1, Sohail Khan2, Christopher Johns2, Martin H Bluth31State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA; 2Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory – Microarray Shared Resource, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA; 3Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USABackground: Patients with urgency represent a group of incontinence sufferers whose diagnosis remains difficult to establish. Urodynamic testing demonstrating involuntary bladder contraction provides objective confirmation but represents an invasive approach. We have previously demonstrated that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC can provide a reporter function in solid organ disease toward biomarker discovery. Here we investigated the utility of using PBMC as marker for patients with confirmed involuntary bladder contraction.Methods: Fifteen female patients were evaluated for involuntary bladder contractions and stress urinary incontinence as demonstrated by urodynamics and also assessed for pelvic prolapse, stress incontinence by history, bladder neck dysfunction, and bladder capacity. PBMC were obtained from patients’ whole blood, and RNA was subjected to microarray gene chip analysis.Results: Microarray analysis revealed that eleven genes were differentially regulated (five upregulated and six downregulated. Of these, PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1, EIF2S3 (eukaryotic initiation factor, C3AR1 (complement receptor, and three unknown genes were downregulated. Upregulated genes included MYOM2 (myomesin M-protein, a cytoskeletal protein; KTN1 (kinectin; and AAK 1 (AP2 associated kinase.Conclusions: Microarray analysis revealed many genes that were differentially regulated in PBMC from patients with involuntary detrusor contractions. These genes may be important in regulating structural integrity of bladder and supporting tissues. These data suggest that PBMC can provide a reporter function for patients with

  10. DNA methylation patterns in bladder cancer and washing cell sediments: a perspective for tumor recurrence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic alterations are a hallmark of human cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes is related to urinary bladder cancer recurrence. A set of 4 genes, including CDH1 (E-cadherin), SFN (stratifin), RARB (retinoic acid receptor, beta) and RASSF1A (Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family 1), had their methylation patterns evaluated by MSP (Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis in 49 fresh urinary bladder carcinoma tissues (including 14 cases paired with adjacent normal bladder epithelium, 3 squamous cell carcinomas and 2 adenocarcinomas) and 24 cell sediment samples from bladder washings of patients classified as cancer-free by cytological analysis (control group). A third set of samples included 39 archived tumor fragments and 23 matched washouts from 20 urinary bladder cancer patients in post-surgical monitoring. After genomic DNA isolation and sodium bisulfite modification, methylation patterns were determined and correlated with standard clinic-histopathological parameters. CDH1 and SFN genes were methylated at high frequencies in bladder cancer as well as in paired normal adjacent tissue and exfoliated cells from cancer-free patients. Although no statistically significant differences were found between RARB and RASSF1A methylation and the clinical and histopathological parameters in bladder cancer, a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 71% were observed for RARB methylation (Fisher's Exact test (p < 0.0001; OR = 48.89) and, 58% and 17% (p < 0.05; OR = 0.29) for RASSF1A gene, respectively, in relation to the control group. Indistinct DNA hypermethylation of CDH1 and SFN genes between tumoral and normal urinary bladder samples suggests that these epigenetic features are not suitable biomarkers for urinary bladder cancer. However, RARB and RASSF1A gene methylation appears to be an initial event in urinary bladder carcinogenesis and should be considered as defining a

  11. Expression of the Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Correlates with Disease Progression in Bladder Cancer and Is Contained in Bladder Cancer Patient Urinary Exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Berrondo, Claudia; Flax, Jonathan; Kucherov, Victor; Siebert, Aisha; Osinski, Thomas; Rosenberg, Alex; Fucile, Christopher; Richheimer, Samuel; Beckham, Carla J.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are 30-150nM membrane-bound secreted vesicles that are readily isolated from biological fluids such as urine (UEs). Exosomes contain proteins, micro RNA (miRNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) from their cells of origin. Although miRNA, protein and lncRNA have been isolated from serum as potential biomarkers for benign and malignant disease, it is unknown if lncRNAs in UEs from urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) patients can serve as biomarkers. lncRNAs are > 200...

  12. A Large Bladder Tumor Covered With a Thick "Shell" of Necrotic Material: Misdiagnosis of a Patient With Spina Bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Zhe; Gong, Miao-Zi; Pan, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Li, Ning-Chen; Na, Yan-Qun

    2016-04-01

    Bladder tumor arising in a spina bifida patient is rare and may be clinically latent.We report the case of a 61-year-old female patient with spina bifida, neurogenic bladder, and a history of recurrent urinary tract infections. A B-ultrasound and non-contrast computed tomography scan did not reveal any bladder mass, but an unexplained "well-filled" bladder was observed, which was confusing as the catheter was present and open. However, a subsequent cystoscopic evaluation revealed a large bladder mass measuring 9.5 × 9.0 × 6.5 cm, which almost filled the entire bladder. The mass had coarse and flocculent surface and seemed to be free from each observed wall of the urinary bladder. It was diagnosed as an infectious necrotic mass based on its appearance.During transurethral resection of the mass, a bladder tumor was suspected as small blood vessels and bleeding appeared within the inner layer of the mass. Pathological examination revealed necrotic material, inflammatory cells, and urothelial carcinoma cells. Then, a radical cystectomy was performed, and the pathological results indicated stage pT3bN0M0 transitional cell carcinoma. In the gross specimen, the base of the tumor measured 3 × 3 cm on the top of the back wall of the bladder.Bladder tumors may have atypical presentations in patients with spina bifida. Regular screening is helpful for earlier detection and improving outcomes of bladder tumors in such patients. PMID:27100442

  13. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: CT and MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary small cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare aggressive malignancy of the urinary bladder, with identical histopathology to that of the lung. The treatment and prognosis of bladder SCC are somewhat different from those of more frequent transitional cell carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT and MR imaging findings of bladder SCC. Six adult patients (five males and one female) with pathologically proven SCC of the urinary bladder who had undergone pelvic CT and/or MR imaging were included in this study. The radiologic findings were retrospectively evaluated in terms of tumor location, texture, calcification, depth of invasion, perivesical extension, lymph node involvement, and local or distant metastasis, by two radiologists, who established a consensus. CT and MR images depicted all tumors as large, ill-defined, relatively well enhancing, broad-based polypoid intramural masses with (n=3) or without (n=3) cystic portions. Their frequent location was posterior and trigonal (n=3). Calcification was found within one tumor, and lymphadenopathy in four. At T2- weighted MR images, the solid portion of the tumor was relatively hypointense. The stage at the time of diagnosis was C in three patients, and D1 in three. Follow-up imaging showed brain metastasis in one patient and liver metastasis in two. On CT and MR images, SCC of the urinary bladder appeared as a large, enhancing, broad-based polypoid mass. It was stage C or higher, and lymph nodes and distant metastasis were frequent. T2-weighted MR images showed that the solid portion of the tumor was relatively hypointense. When radiologic examinations demonstrate a bladder tumor of this kind in adults, SCC of the urinary bladder should be included in the differential diagnosis

  14. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: CT and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Chul [Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kie Hwan [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seungeun [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare aggressive malignancy of the urinary bladder, with identical histopathology to that of the lung. The treatment and prognosis of bladder SCC are somewhat different from those of more frequent transitional cell carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT and MR imaging findings of bladder SCC. Six adult patients (five males and one female) with pathologically proven SCC of the urinary bladder who had undergone pelvic CT and/or MR imaging were included in this study. The radiologic findings were retrospectively evaluated in terms of tumor location, texture, calcification, depth of invasion, perivesical extension, lymph node involvement, and local or distant metastasis, by two radiologists, who established a consensus. CT and MR images depicted all tumors as large, ill-defined, relatively well enhancing, broad-based polypoid intramural masses with (n=3) or without (n=3) cystic portions. Their frequent location was posterior and trigonal (n=3). Calcification was found within one tumor, and lymphadenopathy in four. At T2- weighted MR images, the solid portion of the tumor was relatively hypointense. The stage at the time of diagnosis was C in three patients, and D1 in three. Follow-up imaging showed brain metastasis in one patient and liver metastasis in two. On CT and MR images, SCC of the urinary bladder appeared as a large, enhancing, broad-based polypoid mass. It was stage C or higher, and lymph nodes and distant metastasis were frequent. T2-weighted MR images showed that the solid portion of the tumor was relatively hypointense. When radiologic examinations demonstrate a bladder tumor of this kind in adults, SCC of the urinary bladder should be included in the differential diagnosis.

  15. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma urinary bladder coexisting with tuberculosis in pelvic lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Jacob, Sajini Elizabeth; Murugan, P Puvai

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the urinary bladder is usually associated with Schistosoma haematobium and chronic bladder irritation. We report a case of coexistent metastatic SCC and tuberculosis in obturator lymph nodes in radical cystoprostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy specimens. Though tubercular iliac lymphadenitis and metastatic transitional carcinoma following intravesical BCG has been reported, the concurrent presence of non-transitional cell cancer and primary lymph nodal tuberculosis in regional lymph nodes is rare. This case is reported to highlight the paucity of management guidelines available presently in the treatment of such patients who require systemic chemotherapy and antitubercular therapy. PMID:24296773

  16. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Materials and Methods Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort ...

  17. Precursor T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma with rare presentation in the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the 16th reported case of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL with involvement in the bladder. Our patient was a 22 yearold man with T-cell ALL with a mediastinal mass. He received hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone (HyperCVAD with mediastinal radiation. Prior to starting maintenance, he relapsed in the bladder and marrow. He received a nelarabine- based induction regimen and achieved remission. This was followed by an unrelated 11/12 HLA-matched myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplant. He is in complete remission for the past 409 days.

  18. Transfection of promyelocytic leukemia in retrovirus vector inhibits growth of human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei LI; Da-lin HE

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To construct a recombinant retrovirus vector carrying human promyelocytic leukemia (PML) cDNA and identify its expression and biology role in bladder cancer UM-UC-2 cells for future gene therapy. Methods: PML full-length cDNA was inserted into the EcoR I and BamHI site of pLXSN vector containing the long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. The vector was identified by restriction enzyme digestion and then transfected into PA317 packaging cell line by calcium phosphate coprecipitation. PML cDNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the protein was identified by laser confocal microscopy and Western blot in bladder cancer cells, respectively. The morphology was observed by inverted phase contrast microscope, and MTT assay determined growth curve of the bladder cancer cells. Results: Restriction enzyme digestion proved that a 2.1kb PML cDNA was inserted into the pLXSN vector. PCR assay demonstrated that 304 bp fragments were found in UM-UC-2/pLPMLSN transfects. Laser confocal microscopy showed speck dots fluorescence in the UM-UC-2/pLPMLSN nucleus.A 90 kD specific brand was found by Western blot. MTT assay demonstrated the UM-UC-2/pLPMLSN bladder cancer growth inhibition. Conclusion: The retrovirus pLPMLSN vector was successfully constructed and could generate high effective expression of human PML in bladder cancer cell UM-UC-2, suggesting that PML recombinant retrovirus have potential utility in the gene therapy for bladder cancer.

  19. Antiproliferative factor regulates connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) expression in T24 bladder carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Matika, Christina A.; Wasilewski, Melissa; Arnott, John A.; Planey, Sonia Lobo

    2012-01-01

    Antiproliferative factor (APF) is a sialoglycopeptide elevated in the urine of patients with interstitial cystitis (IC)—a chronic, painful bladder disease of unknown etiology. APF inhibits the proliferation of normal bladder epithelial and T24 bladder carcinoma cells in vitro by binding to cytoskeleton-associated protein 4 (CKAP4) and altering the transcription of genes involved in proliferation, cellular adhesion, and tumorigenesis; however, specific molecular mechanisms and effector genes t...

  20. Single-cell sequencing analysis characterizes common and cell-lineage-specific mutations in a muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Xu, Xun; Song, Luting;

    2012-01-01

    sequencing of 66 individual tumor cells from a muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Analyses of the somatic mutant allele frequency spectrum and clonal structure revealed that the tumor cells were derived from a single ancestral cell, but that subsequent evolution occurred, leading to...... two distinct tumor cell subpopulations. By analyzing recurrently mutant genes in an additional cohort of 99 TCC tumors, we identified genes that might play roles in the maintenance of the ancestral clone and in the muscle-invasive capability of subclones of this bladder cancer, respectively...

  1. Recurrent and multiple bladder tumors show conserved expression profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urothelial carcinomas originate from the epithelial cells of the inner lining of the bladder and may appear as single or as multiple synchronous tumors. Patients with urothelial carcinomas frequently show recurrences after treatment making follow-up necessary. The leading hypothesis explaining the origin of meta- and synchronous tumors assumes a monoclonal origin. However, the genetic relationship among consecutive tumors has been shown to be complex in as much as the genetic evolution does not adhere to the chronological appearance of the metachronous tumors. Consequently, genetically less evolved tumors may appear chronologically later than genetically related but more evolved tumors. Forty-nine meta- or synchronous urothelial tumors from 22 patients were analyzed using expression profiling, conventional CGH, LOH, and mutation analyses. We show by CGH that partial chromosomal losses in the initial tumors may not be present in the recurring tumors, by LOH that different haplotypes may be lost and that detected regions of LOH may be smaller in recurring tumors, and that mutations present in the initial tumor may not be present in the recurring ones. In contrast we show that despite apparent genomic differences, the recurrent and multiple bladder tumors from the same patients display remarkably similar expression profiles. Our findings show that even though the vast majority of the analyzed meta- and synchronous tumors from the same patients are not likely to have originated directly from the preceding tumor they still show remarkably similar expressions profiles. The presented data suggests that an expression profile is established early in tumor development and that this profile is stable and maintained in recurring tumors

  2. Recurrent and multiple bladder tumors show conserved expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuutila Sakari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urothelial carcinomas originate from the epithelial cells of the inner lining of the bladder and may appear as single or as multiple synchronous tumors. Patients with urothelial carcinomas frequently show recurrences after treatment making follow-up necessary. The leading hypothesis explaining the origin of meta- and synchronous tumors assumes a monoclonal origin. However, the genetic relationship among consecutive tumors has been shown to be complex in as much as the genetic evolution does not adhere to the chronological appearance of the metachronous tumors. Consequently, genetically less evolved tumors may appear chronologically later than genetically related but more evolved tumors. Methods Forty-nine meta- or synchronous urothelial tumors from 22 patients were analyzed using expression profiling, conventional CGH, LOH, and mutation analyses. Results We show by CGH that partial chromosomal losses in the initial tumors may not be present in the recurring tumors, by LOH that different haplotypes may be lost and that detected regions of LOH may be smaller in recurring tumors, and that mutations present in the initial tumor may not be present in the recurring ones. In contrast we show that despite apparent genomic differences, the recurrent and multiple bladder tumors from the same patients display remarkably similar expression profiles. Conclusion Our findings show that even though the vast majority of the analyzed meta- and synchronous tumors from the same patients are not likely to have originated directly from the preceding tumor they still show remarkably similar expressions profiles. The presented data suggests that an expression profile is established early in tumor development and that this profile is stable and maintained in recurring tumors.

  3. The Role of Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Urinary Bladder Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon C Snow-Lisy

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs combined with CD34+ hematopoietic/stem progenitor cells (HSPCs can function as surrogate urinary bladder cells to synergistically promote multi-faceted bladder tissue regeneration. However, the molecular pathways governing these events are unknown. The pleiotropic effects of Wnt5a and Cyr61 are known to affect aspects of hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and muscle and nerve regeneration. Within this study, the effects of Cyr61 and Wnt5a on bladder tissue regeneration were evaluated by grafting scaffolds containing modified human bone marrow derived MSCs. These cell lines were engineered to independently over-express Wnt5a or Cyr61, or to exhibit reduced expression of Cyr61 within the context of a nude rat bladder augmentation model. At 4 weeks post-surgery, data demonstrated increased vessel number (~250 vs ~109 vessels/mm2 and bladder smooth muscle content (~42% vs ~36% in Cyr61OX (over-expressing vs Cyr61KD (knock-down groups. Muscle content decreased to ~25% at 10 weeks in Cyr61KD groups. Wnt5aOX resulted in high numbers of vessels and muscle content (~206 vessels/mm2 and ~51%, respectively at 4 weeks. Over-expressing cell constructs resulted in peripheral nerve regeneration while Cyr61KD animals were devoid of peripheral nerve regeneration at 4 weeks. At 10 weeks post-grafting, peripheral nerve regeneration was at a minimal level for both Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines. Blood vessel and bladder functionality were evident at both time-points in all animals. Results from this study indicate that MSC-based Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines play pivotal roles with regards to increasing the levels of functional vasculature, influencing muscle regeneration, and the regeneration of peripheral nerves in a model of bladder augmentation. Wnt5aOX constructs closely approximated the outcomes previously observed with the co-transplantation of MSCs with CD34+ HSPCs and may be specifically

  4. Prognostic factors for primary superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder: a retrospective cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tu-bao; ZENG Fu-hua; SUN Zhen-qiu

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that the prognostic factors for superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder varied with the findings of different cohorts. Few multivariate analyses of prognostic factors for superficial bladder tumors have been reported in China and bladder preservation as a prognostic index of superficial bladder tumors is limited and scarce in Chinese patients. This study was conducted to analyze a group of risk factors for prognostic outcomes for patients with primary superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.Methods Between January 1980 to December 2000, 198 patients [172 men and 26 women; mean age (52.98±11.28) years] with primary superficial transitional cell carcinoma who were pathologically classified as Ta or T1 in Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital (Changsha, China) were enrolled in this study. Surgical methods included local resection and electric coagulation of bladder tumors, transurethral resection of bladder tumors and partial cystectomy. After initial surgical treatment, patients were followed through a cystoscopy every three months during the first two years and every six months thereafter in the design of retrospective cohort. Survival analysis was performed to analyze risk factors of the prognostic outcomes for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.Canonical correlation analysis was conducted to present and interpret synthetically the multi-correlation between all kinds of prognostic outcomes and risk factor in multiply dimensions.Results The average follow-up period was (6.65±4.74) years. Assessments at three, five, and 10 years showed recurrence rates, respectively, of (28.32 ± 3.45)%, (35.31 ± 3.83)%, and (42.48 ± 4.40)%; progression rates of (8.89±2.14)%, (15.16±2.94)%, and (23.88±4.19)%; bladder-preservation rates of (94.68± 1.74)%, (93.87±1.91)%, and (91.51±2.49)%; metastasis rates of (8.25±2.05)%, (11.24±2.47)%, and (28.94±4.93)%; and cancer-related survival rates of (95.02 ±1

  5. A rare case of primary malignant small cell carcinoma combined with urothelial cell carcinoma in the ureter

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Hoon; Yuk, Seung Mo; Kim, Jong Ok; Han, Dong Seok

    2013-01-01

    Background Extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas have been reported in a variety of organs, and their incidence in the genitourinary tract is second only to that in the gastrointestinal tract. To date, however, only a few cases of small cell carcinoma of the ureter have been reported. Because the extreme rarity of this type of carcinoma, its clinical behaviour, diagnostic methods, and effective treatment modalities have not yet been determined. Case presentation A 59-year-old man presented wit...

  6. Electroporation enhances mitomycin C cytotoxicity on T24 bladder cancer cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasquez, Juan Luis; Gehl, Julie; Hermann, Gregers G

    2012-01-01

    Intravesical mitomycin instillation combined with electric pulses is being used experimentally for the treatment of T1 bladder tumors, in patients unfit for surgery. Electroporation may enhance the uptake of chemotherapeutics by permeabilization of cell membranes. We investigated if electroporation...... improves the cytotoxicity of mitomycin. In two cell lines, T24 (bladder cancer cell line) and DC3F (Chinese hamster fibroblast), exposure to different concentrations of mitomycin (0.01-2000μM) was tested with and without electroporation (6 pulses of 1kV/cm, duration: 99μs, frequency: 1Hz). Cell viability...... was assessed by colorimetric assay (MTT). For both cell lines, mitomycin's IC_50 was approximately 1000μM in both pulsed and unpulsed cells. On T24 cells, electroporation and mitomycin caused (relative reduction) RR of survival of: 25%, 31% and 29%, by concentrations 0μM, 500μM and 1000μM respectively...

  7. Plasmacytoid Transitional Cell Carcinoma of Bladder: A Clinico-pathological Study and Review of Literatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xiaoli; ZHANG Hongtu; SUN Yuntian; LIU Xiuyun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathologic features of plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, and to analyze the diagnostic features, criteria for differential diagnosis and the clinical significance of the tumor. Methods: Two cases of bladder plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma were studied. Routine paraffin sections with HE staining, Pap smear and immunohistochemistry by S-P method were observed under a light microscope. Pathological and clinical data were analyzed by comparison with early reported cases in literatures. Results: A characteristic feature of this tumor was of deep invasion in the lamina propria and/or muscularis propria, in addition to the component of carcinoma in situ in the mucosa, when tumors were diagnosed. The histological pattern and cytological features showed similarity to a plasmacytoid tumor. The tumor cells were strongly positive for AE1/AE3, CEA and CK18. The prognosis appeared to be worse than ordinary transitional cell carcinoma. Conclusion: The plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma of bladder is rare but has typical pathological, immunohistological and clinical features. Pathologists should be aware of this kind of primary tumor of bladder.

  8. The TREK2 Channel Is Involved in the Proliferation of 253J Cell, a Human Bladder Carcinoma Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyung-Sun; Han, Min Ho; Jang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Kyung-A; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Yangmi

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the seventh most common cancer in men that smoke, and the incidence of disease increases with age. The mechanism of occurrence has not yet been established. Potassium channels have been linked with cell proliferation. Some two-pore domain K+ channels (K2P), such as TASK3 and TREK1, have recently been shown to be overexpressed in cancer cells. Here we focused on the relationship between cell growth and the mechanosensitive K2P channel, TREK2, in the human bladder cancer cell ...

  9. Clinical experience of MRI in two dogs with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kija; Choi, Sooyoung; Choi, Hojung; Lee, Youngwon

    2016-09-01

    This study described high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) characteristics of muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in two dogs. Ultrasonography revealed a urinary bladder mass with ambiguous result about invasion to the muscular layer. Contrast-enhanced CT showed that the bladder wall in which the mass was attached was more intensely enhanced than the normal bladder walls, supporting invasion to the muscular layer. The mass revealed an intermediate signal intensity with interruption of the hypointense muscular layer on T2-weighted MRI and showed greater enhancement compared with the normal bladder wall on postcontrast T1-weighted images. T2-weighted MRI, postcontrast T1-weighted MRI and contrast-enhanced dual-phasic CT were useful for evaluating muscle-invasive bladder TCC in dogs. PMID:27149892

  10. Evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall obtained by transurethral intravesical echotomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Radovan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the most frequent tumor of the bladder and represents 95−98% of blader neoplasams and 2−3% of all carcinomas in the body. In urogenital oncology more frequent is only prostatic cancer. Evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall represents the clinical base in treatment planning and prognosis. Clinical investigation and convential radiological procedures have a low level of accuracy in estimating the local growth of the tumor. The aims of our investigation were to determine the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall in the investigated group of patients by transurethral intravesical echotomography (TIE and computerised tomography (CT scan and to compare results obtained by both methods with pathohistological (PH results, and, based on the difference of the results determine which method was more accurate in the evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall. Methods. Thirty patients with TCC of the bladder both genders, aged 51−81 years were involved in our investigation. In all of these patients, radical cystectomy (RC was performed. This was neccessary to provide the defintive PH result. Transurethral intravesical echotomography was performed by ultrasound scanner type 1846 Bruel and Kjaer, sond type 1850, and the CT scan was perfomed by Pace plus, General Electric, U.S.A. The specimen for the definitive PH result obtained by RC includes all standards of the TNM classification. Results. Using CT scan, the most frequent was T1 stage (17 patients or 56.68%. Using TIE, the most frequent was T2 stage (22 patients or 73.33%. After RC the most frequent was T2 stage (21 patients or 70%. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, showed a high significant difference between the results obtained using CT and definitive PH results after RC. The same test showed no statistically significant difference between

  11. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The c...

  12. Expression of a inhibitor of apoptosis protein livin in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the expression of two isoforms (i.e. Livin-α and Livin-β) of Livin, a novel inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family member in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder (TCC) and to see whether or not the gegen's expression correlate with the grading and staging the TCC. Methods: In the carcinoma tissue of 30 patients with TCC and bladder mucosa from 3 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 2 patients with traumatic bladder rupture expression of livin-α and livin-β mRNA were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR). Results: Livin mRNA was expressed in 5 of 30 TCC case (16.7%), and in these 5 TCC cases all deep muscle was invasived and whose pathologic grades belonged to III. No livin expression was detected in bladder mucosa in 3 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 2 patients with traumatic bladder rupture. Conclusion: Livin can be a molecular marker of TCC, and can be used in judging the malignancy degree of TCC and the prognosis of TCC. (authors)

  13. Clinical outcome of primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Hou CP; Lin YH; Chen CL; Chang PL; Tsui KH

    2013-01-01

    Chen-Pang Hou,1,2 Yu-Hsiang Lin,1,2 Chien-Lun Chen,1,2 Phei-Lang Chang,1,2 Ke-Hung Tsui1,2 1Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linko, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare malignant disease. It accounts for less than 1% of all urinary bladder carcinomas. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical features, the treatment modalities, and th...

  14. Clinical outcome of primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, Ke-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Chen-Pang Hou,1,2 Yu-Hsiang Lin,1,2 Chien-Lun Chen,1,2 Phei-Lang Chang,1,2 Ke-Hung Tsui1,2 1Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linko, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare malignant disease. It accounts for less than 1% of all urinary bladder carcinomas. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical features, the treatment modalities, and t...

  15. The Expression of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor in Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Tae Jung; Kim, Sung Woo; Lee, Kyung Seop

    2012-01-01

    Background Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is an anti-angiogenic factor. The purpose of this study is to examine the involvement of PEDF in the angiogenesis and biological behavior of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Methods We examined the expression of PEDF in 99 bladder TCCs and ten non-neoplastic tissues, and evaluated microvessel density (MVD). Results The positive immunoreactivity for PEDF was seen in normal urothelium in 60% (6/10) and TCC in 13% (13/99). The PEDF ex...

  16. Frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gui, Yaoting; Guo, Guangwu; Huang, Yi;

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer. Here we sequenced the exomes of nine individuals with TCC and screened all the somatically mutated genes in a prevalence set of 88 additional individuals with TCC with different tumor stages and grades. In our study, we...... discovered a variety of genes previously unknown to be mutated in TCC. Notably, we identified genetic aberrations of the chromatin remodeling genes (UTX, MLL-MLL3, CREBBP-EP300, NCOR1, ARID1A and CHD6) in 59% of our 97 subjects with TCC. Of these genes, we showed UTX to be altered substantially more...... frequently in tumors of low stages and grades, highlighting its potential role in the classification and diagnosis of bladder cancer. Our results provide an overview of the genetic basis of TCC and suggest that aberration of chromatin regulation might be a hallmark of bladder cancer....

  17. Treatment Trends and Outcomes of Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Treatment for small-cell carcinoma of the bladder is largely guided by case reports, retrospective reviews, and small prospective trials. This study aimed to study outcomes using a large population-based database. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database (1991–2005) was used to analyze how different treatment combinations of specific bladder surgeries, chemotherapy, and radiation affected patient outcomes. Trends in the use of these combinations over time were also analyzed. Results: A total of 533 patients were retrieved from the database. A bladder-sparing approach involving transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) combined with chemotherapy and radiation yielded no significant difference in overall survival compared with patients undergoing at least a cystectomy (of whom over 90% received radical cystectomy) with chemotherapy (p > 0.05). The analysis of treatment trends indicated that these two general strategies for cure combined to account for fewer than 20% of patients. A majority of patients (54%) received TURBT as their only surgical treatment, and a subset analysis of these patients indicated that chemotherapy played a role in all stages of disease (p < 0.05) whereas radiation improved overall survival in regional-stage disease (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Relatively few patients with small-cell carcinoma of the bladder receive potentially curative therapies. Chemotherapy should be a major component of treatment. Cystectomy and bladder-sparing approaches represent two viable strategies and deserve further investigation to identify the patients who may benefit from organ preservation or not. In addition, the role of radiation in regional-stage disease should be investigated further, because it positively affects survival after TURBT.

  18. Treatment Trends and Outcomes of Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koay, Eugene J. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Teh, Bin S., E-mail: bteh@tmh.org [Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C.; Butler, E. Brian [Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Treatment for small-cell carcinoma of the bladder is largely guided by case reports, retrospective reviews, and small prospective trials. This study aimed to study outcomes using a large population-based database. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database (1991-2005) was used to analyze how different treatment combinations of specific bladder surgeries, chemotherapy, and radiation affected patient outcomes. Trends in the use of these combinations over time were also analyzed. Results: A total of 533 patients were retrieved from the database. A bladder-sparing approach involving transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) combined with chemotherapy and radiation yielded no significant difference in overall survival compared with patients undergoing at least a cystectomy (of whom over 90% received radical cystectomy) with chemotherapy (p > 0.05). The analysis of treatment trends indicated that these two general strategies for cure combined to account for fewer than 20% of patients. A majority of patients (54%) received TURBT as their only surgical treatment, and a subset analysis of these patients indicated that chemotherapy played a role in all stages of disease (p < 0.05) whereas radiation improved overall survival in regional-stage disease (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Relatively few patients with small-cell carcinoma of the bladder receive potentially curative therapies. Chemotherapy should be a major component of treatment. Cystectomy and bladder-sparing approaches represent two viable strategies and deserve further investigation to identify the patients who may benefit from organ preservation or not. In addition, the role of radiation in regional-stage disease should be investigated further, because it positively affects survival after TURBT.

  19. Afatinib inhibits proliferation and invasion and promotes apoptosis of the T24 bladder cancer cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yunhua; Zhang, XiangYang; QI, FAN; CHEN, MINGFENG; Li, Yuan; Liu, Longfei; He, Wei; Li, Zhuo; Zu, Xiongbing

    2015-01-01

    Afatinib is a highly selective, irreversible inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human EGFR 2 (HER-2). Although preclinical and clinical studies have indicated that afatinib has antitumor activity and clinical efficacy in non-small cell lung carcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and breast cancer, there are few studies investigating its inhibitory effect on human bladder carcinoma cells. In this study, the antitumor effect of afatinib was investigated on th...

  20. Morphometric and flow cytometric analysis of small cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the bladder.

    OpenAIRE

    Blomjous, C E; Vos, W; Schipper, N W; de Voogt, H J; Baak, J P; Meijer, C J

    1989-01-01

    Eighteen cases of primary small cell carcinoma of the bladder were studied. Three patients survived for two years and one survived for five years, which was significantly worse when compared with poorly differentiated transitional cell carcinoma (WHO grade 3). Aggressive tumour behaviour was independent of the presence of neuroendocrine characteristics. Morphometric analysis showed that the nuclear size, which was comparable with that reported in pulmonary small cell carcinoma, was significan...

  1. Bladder cancer cells re-educate TAMs through lactate shuttling in the microfluidic cancer microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Degui; Xu, Ting; Liu, Pengfei; Cao, Yanwei; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Xuecheng; Xu, Xiaodong; Wang, XinSheng; Niu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Background In the present study, we aimed to investigate the influence of lactate shuttling on the functional polarization and spatial distribution of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (TCCB) cells and macrophages. Methods We designed a microfluidic coculture chip for real-time integrative assays. The effect of lactate shuttling on the re-education of macrophages by TCCB cells was explored by measuring the levels of NO using a total NO assay kit and by evaluating the protein expressi...

  2. Research on the bioactivity of isoquercetin extracted from marestail on bladder cancer EJ cell and the mechanism of its occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Juhong; Wang, Yanping; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Minyu; Zhang, Haiying

    2016-05-01

    Research studies in recent years have found that isoquercetin has an inhibiting effect on multiple carcinogens, but research studies filed on isoquercetin in bladder cancer are quite few. This paper observed the influence of isoquercetin on biological activity of the EJ cell of bladder cancer through HC dyeing and trypan blue counting, studied the EJ cell cycle by flow cytometry (FCM), and then analyzed the influence of isoquercetin and its effect on the protein expression of STAT3 and STAT3-inhibiting factors (PIAS3) in EJ cells. Research has shown that isoquercetin has an inhibitory effect on the EJ cells of bladder cancer, but it is not obvious. PMID:25650648

  3. From Clinical Trials to the Front Line: Vinflunine for Treatment of Urothelial Cell Carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute of Naples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Gaetano; Della Pepa, Chiara; Cavaliere, Carla; Cecere, Sabrina C.; Di Napoli, Marilena; D'Aniello, Carmine; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Maiolino, Piera; Tramontano, Teresa; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Pisconti, Salvatore; Montella, Maurizio; Berretta, Massimiliano; Sorrentino, Domenico; Perdonà, Sisto; Pignata, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of Vinflunine, after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Urothelial Tract, TCCU, has been demonstrated in an international, randomized, phase III trial comparing Vinflunine plus Best Supportive Care, BSC, with BSC alone. On the basis of that study vinflunine has been approved by the European Medicine Association, EMA, for treatment of TCCU patients after failure of a platinum treatment. However, since data in clinical trials often differ from routine clinical practice due to unselected population and less strict monitoring, “real life” experiences are very helpful to verify the efficacy of a new therapy. Methods: This was a spontaneous, observational, retrospective study involving 43 patients with metastatic TCCU treated with vinflunine at our cancer center, data about demographics, disease characteristics, and previous treatments were collected and outcome and toxicities of vinflunine were analyzed. Results: 41 of 43 patients were eligible for RR analysis, the Overall RR was 12%, the Disease Control Rate was 29%; when including only patients treated in II line the DCR rose to 33%; the median PFS and the median OS were 2.2 and 6.9 months, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings were consistent with the outcome data emerged in the phase III randomized trial and in the other observational studies conducted all around Europe in the last 2–3 years. This experience supports the use of vinflunine in patients with advanced TTCU as effective and manageable antineoplastic drug. PMID:27199753

  4. A phase II trial of R115777, an oral farnesyl transferase inhibitor, in      patients with advanced urothelial tract transitional cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Maase, Hans von der; Seigne, John D.;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: R115777 is a potent farnesyl transferase inhibitor and has       significant antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The objective       of the current study was to determine the objective response proportion in       patients with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC......) of the       urothelial tract who received treatment with R115777 at a dose of 300 mg       orally given twice daily for 21 days followed by 7 days of rest for every       4-week cycle. Thirty-four patients with TCC were enrolled in this Phase II       study. Patients were allowed to have received a....... No complete responses were       observed. CONCLUSIONS: The objective response rate of R115777 was not       sufficient to warrant future investigation in TCC as a single agent.       Preliminary evidence of the activity of R115777 in 2 chemotherapy-naive       patients may warrant further...

  5. Gold Nanotheranostics: Photothermal Therapy and Imaging of Mucin 7 Conjugated Antibody Nanoparticles for Urothelial Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chieh Hsiao Chen; Yi-Jhen Wu; Jia-Jin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To kill urothelial cancer cells while preserving healthy cells, this study used photothermal therapy (PTT). PTT techniques target urothelial cancer cells using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and a green light laser. Materials and Methods. The GNPs were conjugated with anti-Mucin 7 antibodies, which acted as a probe for targeting tumor cells. Conjugated GNPs were exposed to a green light laser (532 nm) with sufficient thermal energy to kill the transitional cell carcinomas (TCCs). Result...

  6. Sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma component of the urinary bladder: a case report with review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an uncommon neoplasm characterized histopathologically by the presence of malignant spindle cell and epithelial components. Albeit extremely rare, sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma has been reported. Herein, we describe an additional case of sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and review the clinicopathological features of this type of tumor. An 82-year-old Japanese mal...

  7. Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis Induced by Retinoic Acid Combined with Interferon Alpha-2a on Transitional Cell Carcinoma of Bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANLi-xin; LIUXun-liang; ZHOUJian-wei; MonicaLiebert; ZOUChang-chun; ZOUChang-ping

    2004-01-01

    To identify new favorable agents and develop novel approaches for the chemoprevention and treatment of superficial bladder cancer and invesligate the effects of combination of relinoids and interferon α-2a on growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in bladder cancer cell lines. Methods: Four bladder cancer cell lines, grade 1 to 3,and two retinoids, all-trans-retinoic acid(ATRA) ,9.cis retinoic acid(9cRA) ,combined with inteferon α-2a(INF),were used in the study.We compared the competence of these agents to inhibit growth, induce apoptosis, affect the exptession of nuclear retinoid receptors, and modulate STAT1 protein. Resu/ts: Most of the bladder cancer cell lines were resistant to the effect of ATRA and 9cRA on growth inhibition and apoptosis induction, even at higher concentration (10-5M).The effects of ATRA and 9c RA on cell growth and apoptosis were enhanced by INF α-2a.Combination of ATRA and IFNa-2a induced ~ and Slat 1 expression in three bladder cancer cell lines, ~: The results demonstrated that INFw2a synergize with the inhibitory effect of ATRA and 9c RA on the growth intn'bition and apoptosis of bladder cancer cells in vitro, which suggested that it has a potenlJal intexest for the trealment of transitimml cell carcinmna of bladder.

  8. Prostate-derived ets factor represses tumorigenesis and modulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in bladder carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Chung, Li-Chuan; Chuang, Sung-Ting; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Chang, Phei-Lang; Yeh, Chi-Ju; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2016-05-28

    Prostate-derived Ets (E-twenty six) factor (PDEF), an epithelium-specific member of the Ets family of transcription factors, has been shown to play a role in suppressing the development of many epithelium-derived cancers such as prostate and breast cancer. It is not clear, however, whether PDEF is involved in the development or progression of bladder cancer. In a comparison between normal urothelium and bladder tumor tissue, we identified significant decreases of PDEF in the tumor tissue. Further, the immunohistochemistry assays indicated a significantly higher immunostaining of PDEF in low-grade bladder tumors. Additionally, the highly differentiated transitional-cell bladder carcinoma RT-4 cells expressed significantly more PDEF levels than the bladder carcinoma HT1376 and the T24 cells. Ectopic overexpression of PDEF attenuated proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenesis of bladder carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PDEF enhanced the expression levels of mammary serine protease inhibitor (MASPIN), N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), KAI1, and B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2). PDEF modulated epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) by upregulating E-cadherin expression and downregulating the expression of N-cadherin, SNAIL, SLUG, and vimentin, leading to lower migration and invasion abilities of bladder carcinoma cells. Filamentous actin (F-actin) polarization and remodeling were observed in PDEF-knockdown RT-4 cells. Our results suggest that PDEF gene expression is associated with the extent of bladder neoplasia and PDEF modulated the expressions of EMT-related genes. The induction of BTG2, NDRG1, MASPIN, and KAI1 gene expressions by PDEF may explain the inhibitory functions of PDEF on the proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenesis in bladder carcinoma cells. PMID:26965996

  9. Single cell-type comparative metabolomics of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Jane Barkla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the remarkable adaptive features of the halophyte and facultative CAM plant Mesembryathemum crystallinum are the specialized modified trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC which cover the leaves, stems, and peduncle of the plant. They are present from an early developmental stage but upon salt stress rapidly expand due to the accumulation of water and sodium. This particular plant feature makes it an attractive system for single cell type studies, with recent proteomics and transcriptomics studies of the EBC establishing that these cells are metabolically active and have roles other than sodium sequestration. To continue our investigation into the function of these unusual cells we carried out a comprehensive global analysis of the metabolites present in the EBC extract by gas chromatography Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF and identified 194 known and 722 total molecular features. Statistical analysis of the metabolic changes between control and salt-treated samples was used to identify 352 significantly differing metabolites (268 after correction for FDR. Principal components analysis provided an unbiased evaluation of the data variance structure. Biochemical pathway enrichment analysis suggested significant perturbations in 13 biochemical pathways as defined in KEGG. More than 50% of the metabolites that show significant changes in the EBC, can be classified as compatible solutes and include sugars, sugar alcohols, protein and non-protein amino acids, and organic acids, highlighting the need to maintain osmotic homeostasis to balance the accumulation of Na and Cl ions. Overall, the comparison of metabolic changes in salt treated relative to control samples suggest large alterations in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum epidermal bladder cells.

  10. Role of reactive oxygen species in cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum-induced cytotoxicity on bladder cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyajima, A; Nakashima, J.; Yoshioka, K; Tachibana, M.; Tazaki, H.; Murai, M

    1997-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the intracellular induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (CDDP) and the augmentation of their cytotoxicity in bladder cancer cells (KU7) by enhancement of ROS generation by the glutathione (GSH) depletors buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) and diethylmaleate (DEM). CDDP-induced cytotoxicity in KU7 cells and its modulation by GSH depletors were determined using spectrophotometric measurement with crystal violet staining. T...

  11. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    S. Lukacs; Szabo, N; Woodhams, S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM) and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN) are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a leng...

  12. Gecko proteins induce the apoptosis of bladder cancer 5637 cells by inhibiting Akt and activating the intrinsic caspase cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Geun-Young; Park, Soon Yong; Jo, Ara; Kim, Mira; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jun, Woo-Jin; Shim, Sang In; Lee, Sang Chul; Chung, Jin Woong

    2015-01-01

    Gecko proteins have long been used as anti-tumor agents in oriental medicine, without any scientific background. Although anti-tumor effects of Gecko proteins on several cancers were recently reported, their effect on bladder cancer has not been investigated. Thus, we explored the anti-tumor effect of Gecko proteins and its cellular mechanisms in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. Gecko proteins significantly reduced the viability of 5637 cells without any cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Thes...

  13. Global gene expression profiling identifies ALDH2, CCNE1 and SMAD3 as potential prognostic markers in upper tract urothelial carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Song; Chen, Jiahao; Dong, Pei; Zhang, Shiqiang; He, YingYing; Sun, Liang; Zhu, Jialou; Cheng, Yanbing; Li, Xianxin; Tang, Aifa; Huang, Yi; Gui, Yaoting; Liu, Chunxiao; Yang, Guosheng; Zhou, Fangjian

    2014-01-01

    Background Current knowledge about the molecular properties and prognostic markers of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is sparse and often based on bladder urothelial carcinoma (UC), which is thought to share common risk factors with UTUC. However, studies have suggested that differences exist regarding tumor behavior and molecular biology of these cancers, comprehensive investigations are needed to guide the clinical management of UTUC. In recent years, massively parallel sequencing h...

  14. Individualized management of advanced bladder cancer: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Earle F

    2015-04-01

    Despite recent progress in the development of novel targeted therapies in various malignancies, the management of advanced urothelial cancer has changed little over the past 2 decades. Comorbidities inherent to patients with bladder cancer often preclude the use of standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy and underscore the need for individualized treatment recommendations and the development of more effective therapies. This review discusses current issues relevant to the management of patients with locally advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and highlights recent advances in defining molecular aberrations that may ultimately lead to personalized therapeutic decision making. PMID:24332641

  15. The Antidiabetic Drug Metformin Inhibits the Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that metformin, a widely used antidiabetic agent, may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis of certain malignancies. However, the mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of metformin remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effects of metformin on human bladder cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. Metformin significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of 5637 and T24 cells in vitro; specifically, metformin induced an apparent cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases, accompanied by a strong decrease of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4, E2F1 and an increase of p21waf-1. Further experiments revealed that metformin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and suppressed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, the central regulator of protein synthesis and cell growth. Moreover, daily treatment of metformin led to a substantial inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft model with concomitant decrease in the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclin D1 and p-mTOR. The in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that metformin efficiently suppresses the proliferation of bladder cancer cells and suggest that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  16. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Materials and Methods Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. Results The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (p<0.001). The expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA in BC patients was also significantly higher than that in noncancer patient controls and hematuria patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). High expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA was also detected in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. Conclusions In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC. PMID:26981592

  17. Whyever bladder tissue engineering clinical applications still remain unusual even though many intriguing technological advances have been reached?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALBERTI, C.

    2016-01-01

    To prevent problematic outcomes of bowel-based bladder reconstructive surgery, such as prosthetic tumors and systemic metabolic complications, research works, to either regenerate and strengthen failing organ or build organ replacement biosubstitute, have been turned, from 90s of the last century, to both regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Various types of acellular matrices, naturally-derived materials, synthetic polymers have been used for either “unseeded” (cell free) or autologous “cell seeded” tissue engineering scaffolds. Different categories of cell sources – from autologous differentiated urothelial and smooth muscle cells to natural or laboratory procedure-derived stem cells – have been taken into consideration to reach the construction of suitable “cell seeded” templates. Current clinically validated bladder tissue engineering approaches essentially consist of augmentation cystoplasty in patients suffering from poorly compliant neuropathic bladder. No clinical applications of wholly tissue engineered neobladder have been carried out to radical-reconstructive surgical treatment of bladder malignancies or chronic inflammation-due vesical coarctation. Reliable reasons why bladder tissue engineering clinical applications so far remain unusual, particularly imply the risk of graft ischemia, hence its both fibrous contraction and even worse perforation. Therefore, the achievement of graft vascular network (vasculogenesis) could allow, together with the promotion of host surrounding vessel sprouting (angiogenesis), an effective graft blood supply, so avoiding the ischemia-related serious complications. PMID:27142819

  18. Photokilling of T-24 human bladder cancer cells with titanium dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Y; Shuin, T; Kawasaki, C.; Hosaka, M; Kitamura, H.; Cai, R.; Sakai, H.; Hashimoto, K; Fujishima, A

    1994-01-01

    A photoexcited titanium dioxide surface has a strong ability to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen. We have studied this effect in order to use it to kill cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. A distinct cell killing effect was observed on cultured T-24 human bladder cancer cells treated with titanium dioxide particles and 300-400 nm UV light irradiation. Titanium dioxide plus UV light also dramatically suppressed the tumour growth of T-24 cells that were implanted in nude mice. Cells cult...

  19. Effect of salinomycin on metastasis and invasion of bladder cancer cell line T24

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu; Qu; Bo; Ma; Hao-Feng; Yuan; Zhong-Yang; Wang; Sheng-Jie; Guo; Jing; Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of salinomycin on the metastasis and invasion of bladder cancer cell line T24 by regulating the related protein expression in the process of epithelialmesenchymal transition(EMT), and to provide experimental basis for the treatment of urological tumors. Methods: The bladder cancer cell line T24 was cultured in vitro. The rat bladder tumor model was established in vivo. The rats were randomized into two groups, among which the rats in the experiment group were given intraperitoneal injection of salinomycin, while the rats in the control group were given intraperitoneal injection of normal saline. The change of tumor cells in the two groups was observed. Transwell was used to detect the cell migration and invasion abilities, Real-time PCR was used to detect the expression of m RNA, while Western-blot was utilized for the determination of the expressions of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins. Results: The metastasis and invasion abilities of serum bladder cancer cell line T24 after salinomycin treatment in the experiment group were significantly reduced when compared with those in the control group, and the tumor metastasis lesions were decreased from an average of 1.59 to 0.6(P<0.05). T24 cell proliferation in the experiment group was gradually decreasing. T24 cell proliferation at 48 h was significantly lower than that at 12 h and 24 h(P<0.05). T24 cell proliferation at 24 h was significantly lower than that at 12 h(P<0.05). T24 cell proliferation at each timing point in the experiment group was significantly lower than that in the control group(P<0.05). The serum m RNA level and E-cadherin expression in the tumor tissues in the experiment group were significantly higher than those in the control group, while vimentin expression level was significantly lower than that in the control group(P<0.05). Conclusions: Salinomycin can suppress the metastasis and invasion of bladder cancer cells, of which the mechanism is probably associated

  20. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: KIT and PDGFRA gene mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuket Eliyakin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. A 72-year-old was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Cystoscopy revealed a bladder full of multiple, solid and papillary tumors. Biopsies from the deep and papillary tumors were taken. Histologically, tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, CD56, CD117 and Ki67 (labeling 70%. The tumor cells were negative for CK7, CK20, CD3, CD20, LCA, CDX2, uroplakin, thyroid transcription factor 1, PSA and p63. Metastatic workup was performed an no primary or metastatic lung lesions were noted. Due to the clinical, radiologic and immunohistochemical findings, the patient was diagnosed as primary small cell carcinoma of bladder. A molecular genetic analysis for KIT (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17 and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18 genes was performed, in paraffin micro dissection specimens, by the PCR-direct sequencing method. According to the sequencing analyses, two mutations were found at positions 558 (p.K558N and 562 (p.E562D in KIT gene exon 11 in our case. The another hand the same case presented two mutations in PDGFRA gene exon 14 at position 631 (p.P631A and 638 (p.638Q_639AinsC. The disease process was fulminant and the patient was lost due to several complications prior to any chemotherapy.

  1. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder: KIT and PDGFRA Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyakin, Nuket; Postaci, Hakan; Baskin, Yasemin; Kozacioğlu, Zafer

    2015-12-29

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. A 72-year-old was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Cystoscopy revealed a bladder full of multiple, solid and papillary tumors. Biopsies from the deep and papillary tumors were taken. Histologically, tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, chromo-granin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, CD56, CD117 and Ki67 (labeling 70%). The tumor cells were negative for CK7, CK20, CD3, CD20, LCA, CDX2, uroplakin, thyroid transcription factor 1, PSA and p63. Metastatic workup was performed an no primary or metastatic lung lesions were noted. Due to the clinical, radiologic and immunohistochemical findings, the patient was diagnosed as primary small cell carcinoma of bladder. A molecular genetic analysis for KIT (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17) and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18) genes was performed, in paraffin micro dissection specimens, by the PCR-direct sequencing method. According to the sequencing analyses, two mutations were found at positions 558 (p.K558N) and 562 (p.E562D) in KIT gene exon 11 in our case. The another hand the same case presented two mutations in PDGFRA gene exon 14 at position 631 (p.P631A) and 638 (p.638Q_639AinsC). The disease process was fulminant and the patient was lost due to several complications prior to any chemotherapy. PMID:26788274

  2. Selective arterial embolization for control of haematuria secondary to advanced or recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2014-05-02

    Haematuria is a common symptom in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. We report our experience of selective pelvic embolization using gelfoam as an embolic agent to treat intractable haematuria in these patients.

  3. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: changing trends in the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Gökmen Umut; Özdemir, Nuriye Yıldırım; Demirci, Nebi Serkan; Şahin, Süleyman; Bozkaya, Yakup; Zengin, Nurullah

    2016-06-01

    Background Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma (SmCC), also known as oat cell carcinoma or small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, is characterized by an aggressive clinical course with early metastasis pattern and a short life expectancy. So far, there is no prospective, data-based case-control study due to its low incidence. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the epidemiology, morphopathology, clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis and treatment of bladder SmCC in the light of the literature. Scope PubMed and American Society of Clinical Oncology Meeting abstracts were searched according to the following keywords: 'extrapulmonary SmCC', 'bladder cancer', and 'therapeutic approach'. The last search was performed on 1 October 2015. Some additional papers were determined by reviewing references of the appropriate articles. Most of the data regarding small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SmCCB) were found to be based on the retrospective trials. Findings Bladder SmCC is more frequent in men and usually appears in the seventh to eighth decades. Macroscopic hematuria is the most common clinical symptom. The diagnosis of SmCCB is performed based on the same criteria determined by the WHO classification for the diagnosis of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Prognosis is closely correlated with the stage at presentation. Although the prognosis of the disease is poor, a long survival can be achieved particularly by radical surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early stage tumors. Cystectomy is still the current standard local treatment. However, cystectomy alone is not sufficient. Chemotherapy and definitive radiotherapy should be preferred for limited disease in patients who are not candidate for surgery. Conclusion Considering the poor prognosis of the disease, further studies are needed to determine the optimal treatment options and new molecular markers in the way of early diagnosis and favorable outcomes. Prospective

  4. Synergistic Cytotoxic Effects of Ganoderma lucidum and Bacillus Calmette Guérin on Premalignant Urothelial HUC-PC Cells and Its Regulation on Proinflammatory Cytokine Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wai-man Yuen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG is conventionally used as an adjuvant immunotherapy to reduce the recurrence of bladder cancer. To address the issues of efficacy and safety, an ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum (GLe was evaluated for its interaction with BCG. In a model of premalignant human uroepithelial cells (HUC-PC, GLe exerted immediate cytotoxic effects while BCG showed a delayed response, given that both were immunological active in inducing the secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1. Synergistic cytotoxic effects were observed when cells were either coincubated with both drugs or firstly preincubated with GLe. Synergism between GLe and BCG was demonstrated to achieve a complete cytostasis in 24 hours, and such effects were progressed in the subsequent 5 days. However, the pretreatment of GLe resulted in suppression of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 secretions without affecting the cytotoxicity. Given that numerous proinflammatory cytokines are associated with the high side effects toll of BCG, results herein suggested the potential implications of GL to supplement the BCG immunotherapy in bladder cancer, for better efficacy and reducing side effects.

  5. Tissue responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment in syngeneic orthotopic rat bladder cancer model: possible pathways of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Gederaas, Odrun A.; Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Hjelde, Astrid; Krokan, Hans E.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Chen, Duan; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2011-02-01

    Orthotopic bladder cancer model in rats mimics human bladder cancer with respect to urothelial tumorigenesis and progression. Utilizing this model at pT1 (superficial stage), we analyze the tissue responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic therapy (HAL-PDT). In comparison to untreated rats, HAL-PDT causes little change in tumor-free rat bladder but induces inflammatory changes with increased lymphocytes and mononuclear cell infiltration in rat bladders with tumor. Immunohistochemistry reveals that HAL-PDT is without effect on proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression within the tumor and increases caspase-3 expression in both normal urothelium and the tumor. Transmission electron microscopy reveals severe mitochondrial damage, formations of apoptotic bodies, vacuoles, and lipofuscin bodies, but no microvillus-formed niches in HAL-PDT-treated bladder cancer rats. Bioinformatics analysis of the gene expression profile indicates an activation of T-cell receptor signaling pathway in bladder cancer rats without PDT. HAL-PDT increases the expression of CD3 and CD45RA in the tumor (determined by immunohistochemistry). We suggest that pathways of action of HAL-PDT may include, at least, activations of mitochondrial apoptosis and autophagy, breakdown of cancer stem cell niches, and importantly, enhancement of T-cell activation.

  6. THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF MELATONIN ON THE GROWTH OF HUMAN BLADDER CARCINOMA T24 CELL LINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白艳红; 慕慧; 赵晏; 蔡晓宏; 王中秋; 郭瑗

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study the inhibitory effects of melatonin and its inhibitory mechanism on the growth of human bladder carcinoma T24. Methods The inhibitory effects of melatonin with various concentrations on the human bladder carcinoma T24 lines in vitro were determined by MTT assay. The mechanism of the inhibition was observed by flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results The 30% inhibition concentration (IC30) value was 0.71mmol·L-1 and the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) value was 1.20mmol·L-1. The population doubling time of T24 cells treated with melatonin at 0.71mmol·L-1 was 43.2 hours, which was significant different from that of 34.6 hours of the control group. Using FCM, we found that the cell percentage increased during the G1 phase, but decreased during the S stage. The degenerated ultra-structure of the cell treated with melatonin was also observed by TEM. Conclusion The results suggest that melatonin can inhibit the growth of human bladder carcinoma T24. The inhibitory effects of melatonin might be the prolonging of the staging from G1 to S in the cell cycle.

  7. Study of wavy laminar growth of human urinary bladder cancer cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Guo-hong; CONG Yan-guang; LIU Jun-kang; XU Qi-wang; YUAN Ze-tao

    2001-01-01

    To observe the ordered growth behavior of human urinary bladder cancer cell line (BIU) under culture in vitro. Methods: The suspension of BIU cells was spread locally in a culture container. When the cells grew along the wall to form a cellular colony, macroscopic and microscopic observations complemented with measurements of the parameters including expanding diameter, expanding rate, cell shape, average cell density, average cell size, dehydrogenase activity and sensitivity to pH were conducted dynamically. Results: During cell culture, obvious laminar characteristics appeared in localized growing BIU cell colonies and there was difference between the cells of different zones in shape, size, density, dehydrogenase activity and sensitivity to pH. Conclusion: Space closing and bio-dissipation result in self-organization of BIU cells with ordered growth behavior. The present experiment offers a simple, controllable model for the study of wavy growth of human cells.

  8. Effects of steroid sex hormones and adriamycin on human bladder cancer cells in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimoto,Jun

    1982-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of steroid sex hormones on the established cell lines derived from human urinary bladder cancer, T24, and from human transitional cell cancer of the urinary tract, 253J, were examined using the colony formation method. Of the seven kinds of steroid hormones tested, estradiol-17 beta was intensively cytotoxic for both cells. The cytotoxic effect was depended on the dose and time of treatment. The combined effect of Adriamycin and estradiol-17 beta on T24 cells could be recognized at low concentrations of Adriamycin (less than or equal to 10(-3 micrograms/ml after exposure for 24 h.

  9. Experimental bladder defect in rabbit repaired with homologous bladder extracellular matrix graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Si-xing; SHEN Fu-jin; HU Yun-fei; JIN Hua-min; WANG Ling-long

    2005-01-01

    @@ Approximately 400 million people worldwide suffer from bladder disease such as congenital abnormalities, cancer, trauma, infection, iatrogenic injuries or other conditions which may lead to painful bladder damage or loss, so eventual bladder augmentation or substitution should be required. Gastrointestinal segments are commonly used as tissues for bladder replacement or repair, but have been associated with multiple complications such as infection, metabolic disturbances, increased mucus production, and malignancy.1 Because of the problems encountered with the use of gastrointestinal segments, several bladder substitutes have been attempted with both organic materials (skin, dura mater, peritoneum or fascia) and synthetics (such as poly vinyl, sponge, silicone). These attempts have usually failed due to mechanical, structural or biocompatibility problems. Permanent synthetic materials succumb to mechanical failure and urinary stone formation. Degradable materials lead to fibroblast deposition, scarring, and a reduced reservoir volume.2,3 It is evident that bladder tissue cannot be replaced easily due to its elastic properties and urothelial permeability function.

  10. Differential repair of platinum-DNA adducts in human bladder and testicular tumor continuous cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and removal of four platinum-DNA adducts were immunochemically quantitated in cultured cells derived from a human bladder carcinoma cell line (RT112) and from two lines derived from germ cell tumors of the testis (833K and SUSA), following exposure in vitro to 16.7 microM (5 micrograms/ml) cisplatin. RT112 cells were least sensitive to the drug and were proficient in the repair of all four adducts, whereas SUSA cells, which were 5-fold more sensitive, were deficient in the repair of DNA-DNA intrastrand cross-links in the sequences pApG and pGpG. Despite expressing a similar sensitivity to SUSA cells, 833K cells were proficient in the repair of all four adducts, although less so than the RT112 bladder tumor cells. In addition, SUSA cells were unable to repair DNA-DNA interstrand cross-links whereas 50-85% of these lesions were removed in RT112 and 833K cells 24 h following drug exposure. It is possible that the inability of SuSa cells to repair platinated DNA may account for their hypersensitivity to cisplatin

  11. Subclinical miliary Mycobacterium bovis following BCG immunotherapy for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Chang-ho Ryan; Lee, Sang Oh; Smith, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The authors present an unusual case of a 51-year-old man who developed relatively mild non-specific symptoms following intravesical BCG instillation for superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, with radiological investigations demonstrating typical features of miliary tuberculosis (TB). Transbronchial biopsy showed small foci of poorly formed granuloma suggestive of Mycobacterium infection. The patient's respiratory symptoms only became apparent 7 days after discharge having ha...

  12. Type 1 pilus-mediated bacterial invasion of bladder epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Juan J.; Mulvey, Matthew A.; Schilling, Joel D.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2000-01-01

    Most strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) encode filamentous adhesive organelles called type 1 pili. We have determined that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, mediates not only bacterial adherence, but also invasion of human bladder epithelial cells. In contrast, adherence mediated by another pilus adhesin, PapG, did not initiate bacterial internalization. FimH-mediated invasion required localized host actin reorganization, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activation and host...

  13. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and 3H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection.3H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  14. Evaluation of energy deposition to the urinary bladder wall considering radiosensitive basal cells by beta-ray emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes the dose evaluation of the urinary bladder since its absorbed dose from radiopharmaceuticals tends to be higher than other organs. For an accurate dose evaluation, a simple bladder model considering radiosensitive basal cells was used to calculate SAF (specific absorbed fractions) for the basal cells and the whole bladder wall from mono energetic photon and electron sources using Monte Carlo simulation. Furthermore, S values (the mean absorbed doses for the target organ per unit cumulated activity in the source organ) were evaluated for 36 beta-ray emitters. Consequently, considering basal cells and beta particle spectra in the evaluation of absorbed dose for the urinary bladder are very important for an accurate evaluation. (author)

  15. System-Level Biochip for Impedance Sensing and Programmable Manipulation of Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsin Chuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a dielectrophoretic (DEP chip with multi-layer electrodes and a micro-cavity array for programmable manipulations of cells and impedance measurement. The DEP chip consists of an ITO top electrode, flow chamber, middle electrode on an SU-8 surface, micro-cavity arrays of SU-8 and distributed electrodes at the bottom of the micro-cavity. Impedance sensing of single cells could be performed as follows: firstly, cells were trapped in a micro-cavity array by negative DEP force provided by top and middle electrodes; then, the impedance measurement for discrimination of different stage of bladder cancer cells was accomplished by the middle and bottom electrodes. After impedance sensing, the individual releasing of trapped cells was achieved by negative DEP force using the top and bottom electrodes in order to collect the identified cells once more. Both cell manipulations and impedance measurement had been integrated within a system controlled by a PC-based LabVIEW program. In the experiments, two different stages of bladder cancer cell lines (grade III: T24 and grade II: TSGH8301 were utilized for the demonstration of programmable manipulation and impedance sensing; as the results show, the lower-grade bladder cancer cells (TSGH8301 possess higher impedance than the higher-grade ones (T24. In general, the multi-step manipulations of cells can be easily programmed by controlling the electrical signal in our design, which provides an excellent platform technology for lab-on-a-chip (LOC or a micro-total-analysis-system (Micro TAS.

  16. Different glycosylation of cadherins from human bladder non-malignant and cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lityńska Anna

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to determine whether stage of invasiveness of bladder cancer cell lines contributes to alterations in glycan pattern of their cadherins. Results Human non-malignant epithelial cell of ureter HCV29, v-raf transfected HCV29 line (BC3726 and transitional cell cancers of urine bladder Hu456 and T24 were grown in cell culture. Equal amounts of protein from each cell extracts were separated by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and were blotted on an Immobilon P membrane. Cadherins were immunodetected using anti-pan cadherin mAb and lectin blotting assays were performed, in parallel. N-oligosaccharides were analysed by specific reaction with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA, Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA, Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA, Aleuria aurantia agglutinin (AAA, Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA. The cadherin from HCV29 cell line possessed bi- and/or 2,4-branched triantennary complex type glycans, some of which were α2,6-sialylated. The cadherin from BC3726 cell line exhibited exclusively high mannose type glycans. Cadherins from Hu456 and T24 cell lines expressed high mannose type glycans as well as β1,6-branched oligosaccharides with poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures and α2,3-linked sialic acid residues. Additionally, the presence of fucose and α2,6-sialic acid residues on the cadherin from T24 cell line was detected. Conclusions These results indicate that N-glycosylation pattern of cadherin from bladder cancer cell line undergoes modification during carcinogenesis.

  17. Frankincense oil derived from Boswellia carteri induces tumor cell specific cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Richard A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Originating from Africa, India, and the Middle East, frankincense oil has been important both socially and economically as an ingredient in incense and perfumes for thousands of years. Frankincense oil is prepared from aromatic hardened gum resins obtained by tapping Boswellia trees. One of the main components of frankincense oil is boswellic acid, a component known to have anti-neoplastic properties. The goal of this study was to evaluate frankincense oil for its anti-tumor activity and signaling pathways in bladder cancer cells. Methods Frankincense oil-induced cell viability was investigated in human bladder cancer J82 cells and immortalized normal bladder urothelial UROtsa cells. Temporal regulation of frankincense oil-activated gene expression in bladder cancer cells was identified by microarray and bioinformatics analysis. Results Within a range of concentration, frankincense oil suppressed cell viability in bladder transitional carcinoma J82 cells but not in UROtsa cells. Comprehensive gene expression analysis confirmed that frankincense oil activates genes that are responsible for cell cycle arrest, cell growth suppression, and apoptosis in J82 cells. However, frankincense oil-induced cell death in J82 cells did not result in DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis. Conclusion Frankincense oil appears to distinguish cancerous from normal bladder cells and suppress cancer cell viability. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis proposed multiple pathways that can be activated by frankincense oil to induce bladder cancer cell death. Frankincense oil might represent an alternative intravesical agent for bladder cancer treatment.

  18. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and prostate: Cytological analyses of four cases with emphasis on the usefulness of cytological examination

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Keiko; ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; Kagotani, Akiko; Iwamoto, Nozomi; Iwai, Muneo; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of small cell carcinoma in the urinary bladder and prostate is rare. Only a few reports on the cytological features of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in the urine specimen have been documented and, moreover, the urinary cytological features of prostate small cell carcinoma have been rarely reported. In this study, we analyzed the cytological features of four cases of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and prostate, and discussed the usefulness of cytologic...

  19. EHMT2 inhibitor BIX-01294 induces apoptosis through PMAIP1-USP9X-MCL1 axis in human bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Jing; Sun, Wendong; Hao, Xuexi; Wei, Minli; Su, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yajing; Su, Ling; Liu, Xiangguo

    2015-01-01

    BIX-01294, an euchromatic histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 2 (EHMT2) inhibitor, has been reported to induce apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cells and inhibit the proliferation of bladder cancer cells. However, the definite mechanism of the apoptosis mediated by BIX-01294 in bladder cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that BIX-01294 induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells. Moreover, our data show BIX-01294 stimulates endoplasmic reticulum s...

  20. Growth inhibiting effects of antisense eukaryotic expression vector of proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene on human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童强松; 曾甫清; 林晨; 赵军; 鲁功成

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the growth inhibiting effects on human bladder cancer by antisense RNA targeting the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene. Methods The eukaryotic expression vector for antisense PCNA cDNA was constructed and transferred into a bladder cancer EJ cell line. The PCNA expression in the cancer cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting assays. The in vitro proliferation activities of the transferred cells were observed by growth curve, tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetry, tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR)incorporation, flow cytometry and clone formation testing, while its in vivo anti-tumor effects were detected on nude mice allograft models.Results After the antisense vector, pLAPSN, was transferred, cellular PCNA expression was inhibited at both protein and mRNA levels. The growth rates of EJ cells were reduced from 27.91% to 62.07% (P<0.01), with an inhibition of DNA synthesis rate by 52.31% (P<0.01). Transferred cells were blocked at G0/G1 phases in cell-cycle assay, with the clone formation ability decreased by 50.81% (P<0.01). The in vivo carcinogenic abilities of the transferred cancer cells were decreased by 54.23% (P<0.05). Conclusions Antisense PCNA gene transfer could inhibit the growth of bladder cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which provided an ideal strategy for gene therapy of human cancers.

  1. Independent Component Analysis Uncovers the Landscape of the Bladder Tumor Transcriptome and Reveals Insights into Luminal and Basal Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Biton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracting relevant information from large-scale data offers unprecedented opportunities in cancerology. We applied independent component analysis (ICA to bladder cancer transcriptome data sets and interpreted the components using gene enrichment analysis and tumor-associated molecular, clinicopathological, and processing information. We identified components associated with biological processes of tumor cells or the tumor microenvironment, and other components revealed technical biases. Applying ICA to nine cancer types identified cancer-shared and bladder-cancer-specific components. We characterized the luminal and basal-like subtypes of muscle-invasive bladder cancers according to the components identified. The study of the urothelial differentiation component, specific to the luminal subtypes, showed that a molecular urothelial differentiation program was maintained even in those luminal tumors that had lost morphological differentiation. Study of the genomic alterations associated with this component coupled with functional studies revealed a protumorigenic role for PPARG in luminal tumors. Our results support the inclusion of ICA in the exploitation of multiscale data sets.

  2. Translocation of NF-κB and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 are enhanced by ketamine-induced ulcerative cystitis in rat bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Yung-Shun; Lee, Yi-Lun; Long, Cheng-Yu; Wong, Jhen-Hong; Jang, Mei-Yu; Lu, Jian-He; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Yen-Shun; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chuang, Shu-Mien

    2015-08-01

    The number of ketamine abusers has increased significantly recently. Ketamine abusers exhibit urinary frequency, urgency, and at times urinary incontinence. Our aim was to investigate the role of transcription factor NF-κB and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in ketamine-induced cystitis. Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into three groups, which received saline or treatment with ketamine or ketamine combined with a Cox-2 inhibitor (parecoxib). In addition, the toxic effect of ketamine and its metabolites were examined by primary urothelial cell culture. The ketamine-treated group displayed bladder hyperactivity and decreased bladder capacity. Treatment with ketamine + COX-2 inhibitor prevented these bladder dysfunctions. These bladder dysfunctions were accompanied by increases in the expression of NF-κB and COX-2 at the protein and mRNA levels. Ketamine treatment also enhanced bladder interstitial fibrosis, whereas ketamine + Cox-2 inhibitor decreased the intensity of fibrosis. Treatment of primary urothelial cells in vitro with ketamine or urine obtained from ketamine-treated rats stimulated the expression of NF-κB p65 and COX-2. Ketamine also initiated NF-κB translocation from cell cytoplasm to nucleus. Treatment with NF-κB inhibitor suppressed Cox-2 mRNA expression. Promoter-deletion analysis revealed that NF-κB was a necessary transcription factor for COX-2 gene (Ptgs2) activation. These results demonstrate that the regulation of COX-2 via the NF-κB pathway is involved in the inflammatory signaling of ketamine-induced cystitis in rat urinary bladder. PMID:26073037

  3. Primary apocrine adenocarcinoma of scrotum suspected as urothelial carcinoma metastasis: A clinical and pathological dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 78-year-old man presented with an enlarging, tender mass in the scrotum separate to the testes. This was on the background of radical cystoprostatectomy, urethrectomy, and ileal conduit formation for high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the bladder invading submucosa 3 years prior. Examination revealed a 4 × 5 cm lesion, which was hard, fixed to the overlying skin and nodular to palpation. Ultrasound confirmed a solid mass in the scrotum extending into the perineum. Computerized tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis revealed enlargement of inguinal lymph nodes but no other metastases. Complete resection of the scrotal lesion and selective removal of regional lymph nodes was performed. Rather than a cutaneous scrotal metastasis from the bladder urothelial carcinoma, histological examination suggested a primary apocrine adenocarcinoma of the scrotum. This case report explores the clinical and pathological features associated with both of these unusual differential diagnoses.

  4. Primary apocrine adenocarcinoma of scrotum suspected as urothelial carcinoma metastasis: A clinical and pathological dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sean; Frydenberg, Mark; Pham, Alan; Grummet, Jeremy P

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old man presented with an enlarging, tender mass in the scrotum separate to the testes. This was on the background of radical cystoprostatectomy, urethrectomy, and ileal conduit formation for high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the bladder invading submucosa 3 years prior. Examination revealed a 4 × 5 cm lesion, which was hard, fixed to the overlying skin and nodular to palpation. Ultrasound confirmed a solid mass in the scrotum extending into the perineum. Computerized tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis revealed enlargement of inguinal lymph nodes but no other metastases. Complete resection of the scrotal lesion and selective removal of regional lymph nodes was performed. Rather than a cutaneous scrotal metastasis from the bladder urothelial carcinoma, histological examination suggested a primary apocrine adenocarcinoma of the scrotum. This case report explores the clinical and pathological features associated with both of these unusual differential diagnoses. PMID:25657556

  5. White blood cell DNA adducts and fruit and vegetable consumption in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, M; Airoldi, L; Magagnotti, C; Fiorini, L; Munnia, A; Hautefeuille, A; Malaveille, C; Vineis, P

    2000-02-01

    The 'Mediterranean diet', a diet rich in cereals, fruit and vegetables, has been associated with lowering the risk of a variety of cancers of the digestive tract and the bladder. In a previous study, we showed that the high phenolic content these dietary components produce in the urine could be associated with higher antimutagenic properties of the urine and lower arylamine-DNA adducts in exfoliated bladder cells. We have conducted a case-control study on 162 bladder cancer patients and 104 hospital controls. Total aromatic DNA adducts were measured in white blood cells (WBC) of all subjects by (32)P-post-labelling. Genetically based metabolic polymorphisms were analysed by PCR-RFLP (NAT2, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, COMT and NQO1). All subjects were interviewed about their tobacco use, dietary habits and other risk factors. The odds ratio (OR) for the risk of bladder cancer according to the presence/absence of WBC DNA adducts (detection limit 0.1 RALx10(8)) was 3.7 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-6.3] and a dose-response relationship with levels of adducts was apparent. The association between case/control status and the presence of WBC DNA adducts was significantly stronger in the subjects who consumed fewer portions of fruit or vegetables per day (OR 7.80, 95% CI 3.0-20.30 for 0-1 portions of vegetables) than in the heavy consumers (OR 4.98 for consumers of 2 portions daily, OR 1.97 for consumers of > or =3 portions; similar but lower estimates were found for the intake of fruit). No association was noticed between tobacco smoking and WBC DNA adducts. Only NAT-2, among the several genotypes considered, was associated in a statistically significant way with the risk of bladder cancer (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.03-2.87) and with the levels of WBC DNA adducts. Our report suggests that fruit and vegetables could protect against bladder cancer by inhibiting the formation of DNA adducts. PMID:10657956

  6. Evidence for toxicity differences between inorganic arsenite and thioarsenicals in human bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic toxicity is dependent on its chemical species. In humans, the bladder is one of the primary target organs for arsenic-induced carcinogenicity. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying arsenic-induced carcinogenicity, and what arsenic species are responsible for this carcinogenicity. The present study aimed at comparing the toxic effect of DMMTAV with that of inorganic arsenite (iAsIII) on cell viability, uptake efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) toward human bladder cancer EJ-1 cells. The results were compared with those of a previous study using human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Although iAsIII was known to be toxic to most cells, here we show that iAsIII (LC50 = 112 μM) was much less cytotoxic than DMMTAV (LC50 = 16.7 μM) in human bladder EJ-1 cells. Interestingly, pentavalent sulfur-containing DMMTAV generated a high level of intracellular ROS in EJ-1 cells. However, this was not observed in the cells exposed to trivalent inorganic iAsIII at their respective LC50 dose. Furthermore, the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine completely inhibited the cytotoxicity of DMMTAV but not iAsIII, suggesting that production of ROS was the main cause of cell death from exposure to DMMTAV, but not iAsIII. Because the cellular uptake of iAsIII is mediated by aquaporin proteins, and because the resistance of cells to arsenite can be influenced by lower arsenic uptake due to lower expression of aquaporin proteins (AQP 3, 7 and 9), the expression of several members of the aquaporin family was also examined. In human bladder EJ-1 cells, mRNA/proteins of AQP3, 7 and 9 were not detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)/western blotting. In A431 cells, only mRNA and protein of AQP3 were detected. The large difference in toxicity between the two cell lines could be related to their differences in uptake of arsenic species.

  7. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Michael Reiter; Igor Tsaur; Georg Bartsch; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regu...

  8. AB169. CCDC34 is up-regulated in bladder cancer and its silencing suppresses bladder cancer cell proliferation and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Yanqing; Zhou, Liqun; Li, Xuesong; Guo, Yinglu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The coiled coil is a superhelical structural protein motif that has been thoroughly investigated in recent years and coiled-coil domain-containing proteins have exhibited a large diversity of function in biological systems (e.g., gene regulation, cell division, membrane fusion, drug extrusion). The aim of this study was to investigate the critical role of coiled-coil domain-containing protein 34 (CCDC34) in bladder carcinogenesis, which has never been reported to date. Methods Immun...

  9. Simultaneous Penile and Signet Ring Cell Bladder Carcinoma in Renal Transplant Recipient: A First Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Manassero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of cancer increase with time after transplantation. Therefore, a risk-adapted screening process is very important in order to identify low-grade malignancies early in their development. This provides the opportunity to initiate appropriate immunosuppressive regimens depending on the tumor type and stage of development. The first case presented is one of a 65-year-old patient with a double genitourinary carcinoma (penis and bladder. The patient received kidney transplantation 7 years prior to this event. After adequate surgical treatment (partial amputation of the penis for squamous cell carcinoma and complete transurethral resection of bladder adenocarcinoma, the patient was noted to be free of tumor recurrence and had functioning renal graft with a 2-year follow-up.

  10. [Linitis plastica type of primary signet cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Sandid, Marwan; Peraldi, Renaud; Pernin, François

    2002-04-01

    Primary adenocarcinoma represent 0.5 to 2% of all bladder tumours and are classified according to whether or not they are derived from the urachus, although, histologically, this classification now appears to be obsolete. The authors report a very rare case of linitis plastica type of primary signet cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder in a 53-year-old patient. This carcinoma, with very unusual histological features, needs to be distinguished. Due to the delayed diagnosis, it has a poor prognosis despite the most aggressive treatment modalities, as reported in the literature. The elevated CA 19-9 observed in the present case may be a useful marker for follow-up. PMID:12108351

  11. In vitro evaluation of endothelial progenitor cells from adipose tissue as potential angiogenic cell sources for bladder angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuhua Zhou

    Full Text Available Autologous endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs might be alternative angiogenic cell sources for vascularization of tissue-engineered bladder, while isolation and culture of EPCs from peripheral blood in adult are usually time-consuming and highly inefficient. Recent evidence has shown that EPCs also exist in the adipose tissue. As adipose tissue is plentiful in the human body and can be easily harvested through a minimally invasive method, the aim of this study was to culture and characterize EPCs from adipose tissue (ADEPCs and investigate their potential for the neovascularization of tissue-engineered bladder. Adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF was isolated and used for the culture of ADEPCs and adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs. After SVF was cultured for one week, ADEPCs with typical cobblestone morphology emerged and could be isolated from ADSCs according to their different responses to trypsinization. Rat bladder smooth muscle cells (RBSMCs were isolated and cultured from rat bladder. RBSMCs exhibited typical spindle-shaped morphology. ADEPCs had higher proliferative potential than ADSCs and RBSMCs. ADEPCs stained positive for CD34, Stro-1, VEGFR-2, eNOS and CD31 but negative for α-SMA, CD14 and CD45. ADSCs stained positive for CD34, Stro-1 and α-SMA but negative for VEGFR-2, eNOS, CD31, CD14 and CD45. RBSMCs stained only positive for α-SMA. ADEPCs could be expanded from a single cell at an early passage to a cell cluster containing more than 10,000 cells. ADEPCs were able to uptake DiI-Ac-LDL, bind UEA-1 and form capillary-like structures in three-dimensional scaffolds (Matrigel and bladder acellular matrix. ADEPCs were also able to enhance the human umbilical vein endothelial cells' capability of capillary-like tube formation on Matrigel. Additionally, significantly higher levels of mRNA and protein of vascular endothelial growth factor were found in ADEPCs than in RBSMCs. These results suggest the potential use of ADEPCs as

  12. TOX3 (TNRC9) Over Expression in Bladder Cancer Cells Decreases Cellular Proliferation and Triggers an Interferon-Like Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Mansilla Castaño, Francisco; Dyrskjøt, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    identification and immunoprecipitation studies were used for DNA binding studies. Results: Microarray transcript profiling of 89 bladder biopsies showed a significant up-regulation of TOX3 (p<10-4) in non-muscle invasive (Ta-T1) bladder tumors compared to muscle-invasive (T2-T4) bladder tumors and normal...... urothelium. Microarray expression profiling of human bladder cancer cells over expressing TOX3 followed by Pathway analysis showed that TOX3 Overexpression mainly affected the Interferon Signaling Pathway. TOX3 up regulation induced the expression of several genes with a gamma interferon activation site (GAS...... expressing cell extracts with an artificial “GAS”- DNA element resulted in an enrichment of the GAS containing DNA-sequence, providing evidence for a potential interaction of TOX3 with the GAS-sequence of STAT1. Conclusions: These results provide evidence for an alternative activation of the downstream...

  13. Quantifying mast cells in bladder pain syndrome by immunohistochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.S.; Mortensen, S.; Nordling, J.;

    2008-01-01

    . frequency and nocturia), as > 28 mast cells/mm(2) is defined as mastocytosis and correlated with clinical outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS The current enzymatic staining method (naphtolesterase) on 10 mu m sections for quantifying mast cells is complicated. In the present study, 61 patients had detrusor...... sections between, respectively. Mast cells were counted according to a well-defined procedure. RESULTS The old and the new methods, on 10 and 3 mu m sections, showed a good correlation between mast cell counts. When using tryptase staining and 3 mu m sections, the mast cell number correlated well with the...... clinical score (Spearman's. 0.576; 95% confidence interval 0.155-0.820) and 27 mast cells/mm(2) was the threshold suggesting mastocytosis. CONCLUSIONS We recommend taking biopsies from the detrusor of patients with suspected BPS and examining them with tryptase-stained 3 mu m thick sections, with every...

  14. Triple cancer: chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bladder and prostate carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Sharma, Rashi; Sahoo, Manas Kumar

    2015-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) is a common lymphoproliferative disorder with an increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The decreased immunity and B-cell dysfunction in CLL probably accounts for this emergence of second malignancies. We report a case of synchronous bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma with CLL. A 74-year-old male who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia 2 years before, presented with recurrent urinary tract infection. Peripheral blood smear revealed leukocytosis with absolute lymphocytosis (absolute lymphocyte count: 37870 cells/mm³). Flow cytometric immunophenotyping revealed 75% abnormal lymphoid cells which were positive for CD 19, CD5, CD23, CD22, CD200, CD20 (moderate) with lambda light chain restriction and negative for CD3, CD10, FMC7, CD38, CD138, IgM, CD103, CD123. F Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed increased metabolic activity of the left lateral wall of the urinary bladder extending to the left UV junction, adjacent part of trigone and bladder neck region along with multiple heterogeneous enhancing areas with increased FDG avidity within the prostate. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumour by cystoscopy was performed. Histopathology showed high grade, muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. Due to presence of uptake in the prostate, transurethral resection of the prostate was done and histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma of prostate (prostate specific antigen- positive), Gleason grade III+III and Gleason score 6. A high index of suspicion is required to detect synchronous and metachronous malignancies. Ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and PET/CT are often essential for detection and an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26277675

  15. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  16. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  17. Low Dose BCG Regimen in T1 Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder: Long Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BCG has been used for more than 30 years and is currently the most effective agent for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer therapy after transurethral resection. The high-grade T1 lesion treated by transurethral resection alone is reported to progress to muscle invasion in 30% to 50% of the patients. Until now, optimal treatment schedule and optimal dose have not been defined as the toxicity related to BCG therapy is significant. In this study we tried to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of 60 mg intravesical BCG (Pasteur strain) therapy in patients with T1 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Patients and Methods: From January 2000 till December 2007, 74 patients with single T1 transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder (grade 3 in 24 patients and grade 2 in 50 patients) were treated by complete transurethral resection followed by a 6-weeks course of 60 mg BCG intravesically. Follow-up ranged from 26- 96 months with median of 61 months. Results: Nine patients (12.1%) exhibited recurrence with muscle invasion after 6-18 months (5 with grade 3 tumors and 4 with grade 2), all were subjected to radical cystectomy and urine diversion. Whereas 19 patients (29.2%) showed recurrent T1 tumor after 16-45 months (7 with grade 3 tumors and 12 with grade 2) and were treated by TUR-T followed by a second 6-weeks course of 60 mg BCG intravesically. Recurrence index was 0.82/100 patients/month and the median tumor free period was 20 months. Regarding toxicity; irritative symptoms occurred in 24% of patients, fever in 9%, microscopic hematuria in 14%; which appeared to be significantly low when compared with the rates reported for higher doses of BCG. Conclusion: Intravesical therapy of 60 mg BCG is effective in prophylaxis against recurrence and progression of T1 TCC of the bladder. Decreasing the dose resulted

  18. Immunohistochemical Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Urinary Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Niki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC is the most common type of urinary bladder cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, a key enzyme in prostaglandins biosynthesis, has been introduced as a new candidate for targeted therapy in this cancer. In this study, we investigated the expression of COX-2 in urinary bladder TCCs and its relationship with clinicopathological parameters such as tumor grade and stage. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Pathology department of Sina Hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2006-2011. Pathology reports of patients with definite diagnosis of urinary bladder TCCs who had undergone Transurethral Resection (TUR were reviewed and 40 cases were selected. Subsequently, COX-2 expression was assessed immunohistochemically by the examination of paraffin embedded tissue blocks. Staining in more than 5% of tumor cells was considered as positive expression. Results: COX-2 was expressed in 52.5% of the patients. High-grade tumors revealed a higher (87.5% COX-2 expression versus other grades of the lesions and there was a statistically significant difference in COX-2 expression between them (P<0.001. Patients age was also related to the expression of this marker (P=0.03. In contrast, this marker did not correlate with other characteristics including gender, lymphatic invasion or tumor stage. In addition, perineurial or vascular invasions were not detected in any of the patients. Conclusion: COX-2 expression was seen in more than half of our patients and it had a marked relation to tumor differentiation. Accordingly, this molecule may be a useful tumor marker in the assessment of urinary bladder cancers.

  19. Keystone Symposia "ncRNAs in Development and Cancer", Vancouver, Canada: Increased release of exosomes and export of invasion-modulating miRNAs miR921, -23b, -and -224 from metastatic urothelial carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Laurberg, Jens Reumert;

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells secrete soluble factors and various extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, into their tissue microenvironment. The secretion of exosomes is speculated to facilitate local invasion and increase the propensity of tumors to form distant metastases. Here we present a characterization...... of exosome vesicles from isogenic urothelial carcinoma cell lines, with different metastatic propensity by western blotting, electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering, and profiling of 671 miRNAs by qRT-PCR. An increase in the number of multivesicular bodies and exosomes...... was observed for metastatic FL3 cells compared to isogenic non-metastatic T24 cells. The release was significantly inhibited by knockdown of Rab27b and pharmacological inhibition of nsmase2 by GW4869. miRNA profiling was conducted on parental cells and their secreted exosomes. Here, selective export of miR921...

  20. Genetic Variant as a Selection Marker for Anti–Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Immunotherapy of Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kohaar, Indu; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Lenz, Petra; Fu, Yi-Ping; Mumy, Adam; Tang, Wei; Apolo, Andrea B.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Baris, Dalsu; Schned, Alan R.; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Jones, Michael; Kida, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody against prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) has emerged as a novel cancer therapy currently being tested in clinical trials for prostate and pancreatic cancers, but this treatment is likely to be efficient only in patients with PSCA-expressing tumors. The present study demonstrates that a genetic variant (rs2294008) discovered by bladder cancer genome-wide association studies is a strong predictor of PSCA protein expression in bladder tumors, as measured by two-sided multi...

  1. Downregulation of glutathione S-transferase M1 protein in N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced mouse bladder carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Jing-Jing [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biopharmaceuticals, College of Life Sciences, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Dai, Yuan-Chang [Department of Pathology, Chiayi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yung-Lun; Chen, Yang-Yi; Lin, Wei-Han [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biopharmaceuticals, College of Life Sciences, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Chan, Hong-Lin [Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology and Department of Medical Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Wen, E-mail: ywlss@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biopharmaceuticals, College of Life Sciences, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-15

    Bladder cancer is highly recurrent following specific transurethral resection and intravesical chemotherapy, which has prompted continuing efforts to develop novel therapeutic agents and early-stage diagnostic tools. Specific changes in protein expression can provide a diagnostic marker. In our present study, we investigated changes in protein expression during urothelial carcinogenesis. The carcinogen BBN was used to induce mouse bladder tumor formation. Mouse bladder mucosa proteins were collected and analyzed by 2D electrophoresis from 6 to 20 weeks after commencing continuous BBN treatment. By histological examination, the connective layer of the submucosa showed gradual thickening and the number of submucosal capillaries gradually increased after BBN treatment. At 12-weeks after the start of BBN treatment, the urothelia became moderately dysplastic and tumors arose after 20-weeks of treatment. These induced bladder lesions included carcinoma in situ and connective tissue invasive cancer. In protein 2D analysis, the sequentially downregulated proteins from 6 to 20 weeks included GSTM1, L-lactate dehydrogenase B chain, keratin 8, keratin 18 and major urinary proteins 2 and 11/8. In contrast, the sequentially upregulated proteins identified were GSTO1, keratin 15 and myosin light polypeptide 6. Western blotting confirmed that GSTM1 and NQO-1 were decreased, while GSTO1 and Sp1 were increased, after BBN treatment. In human bladder cancer cells, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased the GSTM1 mRNA and protein expression. These data suggest that the downregulation of GSTM1 in the urothelia is a biomarker of bladder carcinogenesis and that this may be mediated by DNA CpG methylation. - Highlights: • GSTM1 and NQO-1 proteins decreased in the mouse bladder mucosa after BBN treatment. • BBN induced GSTO1 and Sp1 protein expression in the mouse bladder mucosa. • 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased GSTM1 mRNA and protein in human bladder cancer cell. • GSTM1

  2. Luminal DMSO: Effects on Detrusor and Urothelial/Lamina Propria Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina J. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DMSO is used as a treatment for interstitial cystitis and this study examined the effects of luminal DMSO treatment on bladder function and histology. Porcine bladder was incubated without (controls or with DMSO (50% applied to the luminal surface and the release of ATP, acetylcholine, and LDH assessed during incubation and in tissues strips after DMSO incubation. Luminally applied DMSO caused ATP, Ach, and LDH release from the urothelial surface during treatment, with loss of urothelial layers also evident histologically. In strips of urothelium/lamina propria from DMSO pretreated bladders the release of both ATP and Ach was depressed, while contractile responses to carbachol were enhanced. Detrusor muscle contractile responses to carbachol were not affected by DMSO pretreatment, but neurogenic responses to electrical field stimulation were enhanced. The presence of an intact urothelium/lamina propria inhibited detrusor contraction to carbachol by 53% and this inhibition was significantly reduced in DMSO pretreated tissues. Detection of LDH in the treatment medium suggests that DMSO permeabilised urothelial membranes causing leakage of cytosolic contents including ATP and Ach rather than enhancing release of these mediators. The increase in contractile response and high levels of ATP are consistent with initial flare up in IC/PBS symptoms after DMSO treatment.

  3. Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Coexist with Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder and Prostate-A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TongZhang; YongXu; ShuminZhang

    2004-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma(PAC) with transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) of the bladder and prostate is a rare clinicopathological entity, presentation is usually late. We report a case with obstructive voiding symptoms and lumbago. Prostatic and cystic biopsy revealed PAC and TCC of bladder. Bone scan showed multiple bone metastases. He underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and bladder tumor and was found to have PAC with TCC of the bladder and prostate. We discuss the cases of PAC with TCC of the bladder and prostate.

  4. Botulinum toxin type A normalizes alterations in urothelial ATP and NO release induced by chronic spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Christopher P.; Gangitano, David A; Munoz, Alvaro; Salas, Nilson A.; Boone, Timothy B.; Aoki, K Roger; Francis, Joseph; Somogyi, George T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to simultaneously examine changes in urothelial ATP and NO release in normal and spinal cord injured animals as well as in spinal cord injured animals treated with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A). Furthermore we correlated changes in transmitter release with functional changes in bladder contraction frequency, and determined the effects of BoNT-A on bladder efferent nerve function. Normal and spinal cord injured rat bladders were injected on day 0 with either veh...

  5. Characteristics of Patients With Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder in Kermanshah Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Payandeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Iran, bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancy sites among men, ranking as the fifth with age-specific incidence rate of about 11.2 per 100,000 males. It causes 8% of all malignancies in men and 3% of all malignancies in women. Objectives: The aim of this study was to report the epidemiological, clinical, and pathological features of bladder cancer in Western Iran compared to other studies. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective study between 2003 and 2014 when forty-four patients with bladder cancer referred to Hematology Clinic of Kermanshah, Kermanshah, Iran. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC was in 39 patients. Results: In the patients with TCC, the mean age in diagnosis for them was 65.43 years (± 11.64, range of age 42 to 88 years , thirty-three patients (84.6% were male, and six patients (15.4% were female. Of 39 patients with TCC, 16 patients (41% had metastasis. 21 patients (53.8% were smoker and 16 patients (41% had muscle invasive. 35 patients (89.7% were histological high grade and the rest of patients were low grade. In the TCC patients with increasing age, metastasis and muscle invasive increased. Conclusions: The age presentation of TCC in West Iran was similar to other studies. Percentage of patients with high grade is more than other studies, and also the number of patients with bladder cancer has increased during last 4 years. For better results, studies must be conducted with more patients in this area, and other areas of Iran with checking of genetics, race and environmental factors.

  6. Bladder Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  7. TOX3 (TNRC9) overexpression in bladder cancer cells decreases cellular proliferation and triggers an interferon-like response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Mansilla, Francisco; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Thorsen, Kasper; Fristrup, Niels; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie; Madsen, Pia Pinholt; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Borre, Michael; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2013-01-01

    cell extracts with an artificial “GAS”-DNA element resulted in an enrichment of the GAS containing DNA-sequence, providing evidence for a potential interaction of TOX3 with the GAS-sequence of STAT1. Conclusions These results provide evidence for an alternative activation of the downstream interferon......Background Human TOX3 (TOX high mobility group box family member 3) regulates Ca2+-dependent transcription in neurons and has been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Aim of the study was to investigate the expression of TOX3 in bladder cancer tissue samples and to identify genes and...... identification and immunoprecipitation studies were used for DNA binding studies. Results Microarray transcript profiling of 89 bladder biopsies showed a significant upregulation of TOX3 (p< 10-4) in non-muscle invasive (Ta-T1) bladder tumors compared to muscle-invasive (T2-T4) bladder tumors and normal...

  8. Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder successfully managed with cisplatin and gemcitabine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ammari Jalal Eddine

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare variant of mucus-producing adenocarcinoma constituting approximately 0.5% to 2.0% of all primary carcinomas of the bladder. This tumor initially presents as a high-grade, high-stage lesion and diffusely invades the bladder wall without forming intraluminal growth. The patients have no specific symptoms, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor prognosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 51-year-old Moroccan Berber man consulting for gross hematuria. Ultrasonography and a computed tomography scan found a bladder tumor diffusely invading the bladder wall. A histopathological examination of the tumor chips from a transurethral resection of the bladder revealed signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma. The gastrointestinal tract exploration did not reveal any other tumor localization. A radical cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy were therefore performed resulting in 18 months of survival without metastasis and a good quality of life within that time. Conclusion The rarity and the successful management with carboplatin and gemcitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy of this entity, which is rarely reported in the literature, are two remarkable characteristics described in this case report.

  9. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25–10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug. PMID:25136960

  10. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP. Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  11. Modification of Alternative Splicing of Bcl-x Pre-mRNA in Bladder Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhaohui; XING Shi'an; CHENG Ping; ZENG Fuqing; LU Gongcheng

    2006-01-01

    To modify the splicing pattern of Bcl-x and compare the effect of this approach with that of the antisense gene therapy in BIU-87 cell line of bladder cancer, by using 5'-Bcl-x AS to target downstream alternative 5'-Bcl-x splice site to shift splicing from Bcl-xL to Bcl-xS and 3'-Bcl-x AS antisense to the 3'-splice site of exon Ⅲ in Bcl-x pre- mRNA to down regulation of Bcl-xL expression,the inhibitory effects on cancer cells by modification of alternative splicing and antisense gene therapy were observed and compared by microscopy, MTT Assay, RT-PCR, FACS, Westhern bloting and clone formation. The growth of cells BIU-87 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Its inhibitory effect began 12 h after the exposure, reaching a maximum value after 72h. The number of cells decreased in S phase and the number increased in G1 phase. The ability to form foci was reduced and the antisense gene therapy was approximately half as efficient as modification of alternative splicing in inducing apoptosis. It is concluded that modification of splicing pattern of Bcl-x pre-mRNA in bladder cancer cell BIU-87 is better than antisense gene therapy in terms of tumor inhibition.

  12. Use of cell proliferation data in modeling urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, S M; Ellwein, L. B.

    1993-01-01

    A multistage, probabilistic, biologically based model of carcinogenesis has been developed involving qualitative and quantitative aspects of the process. A chemical can affect the risk of cancer by directly damaging DNA and/or increasing the number of cell divisions during which errors in DNA replication can occur. Based on this model, carcinogens are classified as genotoxic versus nongenotoxic; nongenotoxic chemicals are further divided on the basis of whether or not they act through a speci...

  13. UBE2C is a marker of unfavorable prognosis in bladder cancer after radical cystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Morikawa, Teppei; Kawai, Taketo; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C (UBE2C, also known as UBCH10) represents a promising cancer biomarker. However, the clinicopathological or prognostic significance as well as the functions of UBE2C in bladder cancer are largely unknown. To investigate the significance of UBE2C expression in bladder cancer, immunohistochemical analysis was performed using a tissue microarray. UBE2C positivity was observed in 51 of 82 (62%) bladder urothelial carcinoma cases treated w...

  14. GATA3 in the urinary bladder: suppression of neoplastic transformation and down-regulation by androgens

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yi; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yurina; Izumi, Koji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the involvement of sex hormone receptors in bladder cancer initiation, while precise functions of androgens and estrogens in the carcinogenesis step remain poorly understood. We recently found down-regulation of GATA3, a zinc-finger transcription factor and a new urothelial marker, in bladder cancer, which also correlated with expression status of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptors (ERs). We here assessed whether GATA3 acted as a suppressor of bladder tumor...

  15. Hedyotis diffusa plus Scutellaria barbata Induce Bladder Cancer Cell Apoptosis by Inhibiting Akt Signaling Pathway through Downregulating miR-155 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Tao Pan; Yip Sheung; Wen-Peng Guo; Zhi-Bin Rong; Zhi-Ming Cai

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine is increasingly used to treat cancer. Our clinical experiences identify Hedyotis diffusa plus Scutellaria barbata as the most common herb-pair (couplet medicinal) used for the core treatment of bladder cancer. This study aims to investigate the antitumor effect of the herb-pair in bladder cancer cells. The results show that Hedyotis diffusa plus Scutellaria barbata inhibited bladder cancer cell growth and clone formation in a dose-dependent and time-dependent mann...

  16. T24 human bladder carcinoma cells with activated Ha-ras protooncogene: nontumorigenic cells susceptible to malignant transformation with carcinogen.

    OpenAIRE

    Senger, D. R.; Perruzzi, C A; Ali, I U

    1988-01-01

    A comparative analysis of T24 human bladder carcinoma cells and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MeNNG)-transformed derivatives (MeNNG-T24 cells) revealed the following: (i) The presence of an activated c-Ha-ras gene (in the absence of the normal allele) is insufficient to confer upon T24 cells a tumor-associated phenotype. (ii) MeNNG-transformed T24 cells not only acquire tumor-associated (in vitro) traits (growth in soft agar and rhodamine retention) but, are highly tumorigenic in nude...

  17. G9a Inhibition Induces Autophagic Cell Death via AMPK/mTOR Pathway in Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Li; Jin Zeng; Yang Gao; Zhenfeng Guan; Zhenkun Ma; Qi Shi; Chong Du; Jing Jia; Shan Xu; Xinyang Wang; Luke Chang; Dalin He; Peng Guo

    2015-01-01

    G9a has been reported to highly express in bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and G9a inhibition significantly attenuates cell proliferation, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The present study aimed at examining the potential role of autophagy in the anti-proliferation effect of G9a inhibition on TCC T24 and UMUC-3 cell lines in vitro. We found that both pharmaceutical and genetical G9a inhibition significantly attenuated cell proliferation by MTT assay, Brdu incor...

  18. Loss of Sh3gl2/Endophilin A1 Is a Common Event in Urothelial Carcinoma that Promotes Malignant Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyama Majumdar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial carcinoma (UC causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying urothelial cancer development and tumor progression are still largely unknown. Using informatics analysis, we identified Sh3gl2 (endophilin A1 as a bladder urothelium-enriched transcript. The gene encoding Sh3gl2 is located on chromosome 9p, a region frequently altered in UC. Sh3gl2 is known to regulate endocytosis of receptor tyrosine kinases implicated in oncogenesis, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and c-Met. However, its role in UC pathogenesis is unknown. Informatics analysis of expression profiles as well as immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays revealed Sh3gl2 expression to be decreased in UC specimens compared to nontumor tissues. Loss of Sh3gl2 was associated with increasing tumor grade and with muscle invasion, which is a reliable predictor of metastatic disease and cancer-derived mortality. Sh3gl2 expression was undetectable in 19 of 20 human UC cell lines but preserved in the low-grade cell line RT4. Stable silencing of Sh3gl2 in RT4 cells by RNA interference 1 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in vitro, 2 inhibited EGF-induced EGFR internalization and increased EGFR activation, 3 stimulated phosphorylation of Src family kinases and STAT3, and 4 promoted growth of RT4 xenografts in subrenal capsule tissue recombination experiments. Conversely, forced re-expression of Sh3gl2 in T24 cells and silenced RT4 clones attenuated oncogenic behaviors, including growth and migration. Together, these findings identify loss of Sh3gl2 as a frequent event in UC development that promotes disease progression.

  19. Licochalcone A induces T24 bladder cancer cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular calcium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinhui; Jiang, Jiangtao; Yang, Xinyan; Han, Jichun; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-07-01

    Licochalcone A (LCA) has been reported to significantly inhibit cell proliferation, increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induce apoptosis of T24 human bladder cancer cells via mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-triggered signaling pathways. Based on these findings, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which LCA induces apoptosis of T24 cells. Cultured T24 cells were treated with LCA, and cell viability was measured using the sulforhodamine B assay. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry with Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, and by fluorescent microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. The levels of intracellular free calcium ions were determined using Fluo-3 AM dye marker. Intracellular ROS levels were assessed using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate probe assay. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl benzimidazole carbocyanine iodide. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of B‑cell lymphoma (Bcl)‑extra large, Bcl‑2‑associated X protein, Bcl‑2‑interacting mediator of cell death, apoptotic protease activating factor‑1 (Apaf‑1), calpain 2, cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase (caspase)‑3, caspase‑4 and caspase‑9 were determined using reverse transcription semiquantitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses. Treatment with LCA inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of T24 cells, and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and ROS production. Furthermore, LCA induced mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased the mRNA expression levels of Apaf‑1, caspase‑9 and caspase‑3. Exposure of T24 cells to LCA also triggered calpain 2 and caspase‑4 activation, resulting in apoptosis. These findings indicated that LCA increased intracellular Ca2+ levels, which may be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, the ER stress pathway may be

  20. Co-localization of GSTP1 and JNK in transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Pljesa-Ercegovac; Ana Savic-Radojevic; Tamara Kravic-Stevovic; Vladimir Bumbasirevic; Jasmina Mimic-Oka; Tatiana Simic

    2010-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of urinary bladder belongs to glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) overexpressing tumors. Upregulated GSTP1 in TCC is related to apoptosis inhibition. This antiapoptotic effects of GSTP1 might be mediated through protein:protein interaction with c-Jun NH2 -terminal kinase (JNK). Herein, we analyzed whether a direct link between GSTP1 and JNK exists in TCC. The presence of GSTP1/JNK complexes was analyzed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting in 20 TCC s...

  1. Beneficial effects of urine-derived stem cells on fibrosis and apoptosis of myocardial, glomerular and bladder cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xingyou; Zhang, Teng; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Jingzhen; Zhao, Jiang; Li, Jia; Sun, Bishao; Ding, Guolin; Hu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Longkun

    2016-05-15

    Urine-derived stem cells (USCs) are isolated from voided urine and display high proliferative activity and multiple differentiation potentials. The applicability of USCs in the treatment of bladder dysfunction and in cell-based urological tissue engineering has been demonstrated. Whether they could serve as a potential stem cell source for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications has not been investigated. Here, we report the repairing and protective effects of USCs on pancreatic islets, the myocardium, the renal glomerulus and the bladder detrusor in diabetic rat models. Type 2 diabetic rat models were induced by means of a high fat diet and intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin. USCs isolated from voided urine were administered via tail veins. The functional changes of pancreatic islets, left ventricle, glomerulus and bladder micturition were assessed by means of insulin tolerance tests, echocardiography, urine biochemical indexes and cystometry. The histologic changes were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TUNEL staining. Treatment with USCs significantly alleviated the histological destruction and functional decline. Although the USC treatment did not decrease fasting blood glucose to a significantly different level, the fibrosis and apoptosis of the myocardium, glomerulus and detrusor were significantly inhibited. This study indicates that administration of USCs may be useful for the treatment of the complications of DM. PMID:26952874

  2. Initial Results of Bladder Preserving Approach by Chemo-Radiotherapy in Patients with Muscle Invading Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to test the efficacy and tolerability of trimodality treatment for invasive bladder cancer and to test the possibility of bladder sparing. Methods: This study had been carried out on 50 patients with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) stage T2- T3 tumors with adequate performance status and renal function. All patients were subjected to maximum transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT). Patients were then subjected to chemo-radiation that was executed in two treatment phases. Phase I was external radiotherapy in the form of 46 Gy /23 fractions /5 weeks to whole pelvis with concurrent cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly. Phase II was 20 Gy /10 fractions /2 weeks to the bladder tumor with concurrent cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly. After phase I, patients who had complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) were subjected to phase II and patients who had stationary disease (SD) were subjected to salvage cystectomy. After the end of treatment, patients who had CR were subjected to bladder preservation. Radiological and cystoscopic reevaluation was done to assess the tumor response after phase I and phase II. After completion of the scheduled treatment, patients were under follow up for clinical examination, radiological, and cystoscopic assessment. Results: The treatment schedule was tolerable and was associated with infrequent incidence of moderate toxicity that was easily controlled without interruption of treatment. Bladder preservation was achieved in 72% of patients. The actuarial relapse free survival and overall survival at a median follow up 18 months for patients who were candidate for bladder preservation were 81% and 100%; respectively. Invasive recurrence (16%) sal-Jvaged with cystectomy and superficial recurrence (6%) successfully treated with Bacilles bilie de Calmette- Guerin. Conclusions: This study indicates that in spite of a relatively small number of patients and short follow-up period; the trimodality treatment could be an

  3. The probability of involvement of human papillomavirus in the carcinogenesis of bladder small cell carcinoma, prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and penile squamous cell carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Soichiro; Yasui, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazumi; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus is associated with urogenital carcinogenesis such as penile and uterine cervix cancer. On the other hand, association between human papillomavirus infection and risk of bladder and prostatic cancer remains controversial. Case presentation We report a rare case of a 67-year-old Japanese man with synchronous triple urogenital cancer including bladder small cell carcinoma, prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and penile squamous cell carcinoma, who presented with a hi...

  4. Inhibition of inducible heat shock protein-70 (hsp72 enhances bortezomib-induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qi

    Full Text Available The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade is a promising new agent for bladder cancer therapy, but inducible cytoprotective mechanisms may limit its potential efficacy. We used whole genome mRNA expression profiling to study the effects of bortezomib on stress-induced gene expression in a panel of human bladder cancer cell lines. Bortezomib induced strong upregulation of the inducible HSP70 isoforms HSPA1A and HSPA1B isoforms of Hsp72 in 253J B-V and SW780 (HSPA1A(high cells, but only induced the HSPA1B isoform in UM-UC10 and UM-UC13 (HSPA1A(low cells. Bortezomib stimulated the binding of heat shock factor-1 (HSF1 to the HSPA1A promoter in 253JB-V but not in UM-UC13 cells. Methylation-specific PCR revealed that the HSPA1A promoter was methylated in the HSPA1A(low cell lines (UM-UC10 and UM-UC13, and exposure to the chromatin demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored HSPA1A expression. Overexpression of Hsp72 promoted bortezomib resistance in the UM-UC10 and UM-UC13 cells, whereas transient knockdown of HSPA1B further sensitized these cells to bortezomib, and exposure to the chemical HSF1 inhibitor KNK-437 promoted bortezomib sensitivity in the 253J B-V cells. Finally, shRNA-mediated stable knockdown of Hsp72 in 253J B-V promoted sensitivity to bortezomib in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo. Together, our results provide proof-of-concept for using Hsp72 inhibitors to promote bortezomib sensitivity in bladder cancers and suggest that selective targeting of HSPA1B could produce synthetic lethality in tumors that display HSPA1A promoter methylation.

  5. Inhibition of bladder cancer cell proliferation by allyl isothiocyanate (mustard essential oil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sávio, André Luiz Ventura, E-mail: savio.alv@gmail.com [UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Patologia, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Nicioli da Silva, Glenda [UFOP – Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Escola de Farmácia, Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero [UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Patologia, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • AITC inhibits mutant and wild-type TP53 cell proliferation. • Morphological changes and cells debris were observed after AITC treatment in both cells. • BAX and BCL2 expression modulation was observed in wild-type TP53 cells. • BCL2, BAX and ANLN increased and S100P decreased expression was detected in mutated TP53 cells. • AITC effects in gene modulation are dependent TP53 gene status. - Abstract: Natural compounds hold great promise for combating antibiotic resistance, the failure to control some diseases, the emergence of new diseases and the toxicity of some contemporary medical products. Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which is abundant in cruciferous vegetables and mustard seeds and is commonly referred to as mustard essential oil, exhibits promising antineoplastic activity against bladder cancer, although its mechanism of action is not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AITC activity on bladder cancer cell lines carrying a wild type (wt; RT4) or mutated (T24) TP53 gene. Morphological changes, cell cycle kinetics and CDK1, SMAD4, BAX, BCL2, ANLN and S100P gene expression were evaluated. In both cell lines, treatment with AITC inhibited cell proliferation (at 62.5, 72.5, 82.5 and 92.5 μM AITC) and induced morphological changes, including scattered and elongated cells and cellular debris. Gene expression profiles revealed increased S100P and BAX and decreased BCL2 expression in RT4 cells following AITC treatment. T24 cells displayed increased BCL2, BAX and ANLN and decreased S100P expression. No changes in SMAD4 and CDK1 expression were observed in either cell line. In conclusion, AITC inhibits cell proliferation independent of TP53 status. However, the mechanism of action of AITC differed in the two cell lines; in RT4 cells, it mainly acted via the classical BAX/BCL2 pathway, while in T24 cells, AITC modulated the activities of ANLN (related to cytokinesis) and S100P. These data confirm

  6. Inhibition of bladder cancer cell proliferation by allyl isothiocyanate (mustard essential oil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • AITC inhibits mutant and wild-type TP53 cell proliferation. • Morphological changes and cells debris were observed after AITC treatment in both cells. • BAX and BCL2 expression modulation was observed in wild-type TP53 cells. • BCL2, BAX and ANLN increased and S100P decreased expression was detected in mutated TP53 cells. • AITC effects in gene modulation are dependent TP53 gene status. - Abstract: Natural compounds hold great promise for combating antibiotic resistance, the failure to control some diseases, the emergence of new diseases and the toxicity of some contemporary medical products. Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which is abundant in cruciferous vegetables and mustard seeds and is commonly referred to as mustard essential oil, exhibits promising antineoplastic activity against bladder cancer, although its mechanism of action is not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AITC activity on bladder cancer cell lines carrying a wild type (wt; RT4) or mutated (T24) TP53 gene. Morphological changes, cell cycle kinetics and CDK1, SMAD4, BAX, BCL2, ANLN and S100P gene expression were evaluated. In both cell lines, treatment with AITC inhibited cell proliferation (at 62.5, 72.5, 82.5 and 92.5 μM AITC) and induced morphological changes, including scattered and elongated cells and cellular debris. Gene expression profiles revealed increased S100P and BAX and decreased BCL2 expression in RT4 cells following AITC treatment. T24 cells displayed increased BCL2, BAX and ANLN and decreased S100P expression. No changes in SMAD4 and CDK1 expression were observed in either cell line. In conclusion, AITC inhibits cell proliferation independent of TP53 status. However, the mechanism of action of AITC differed in the two cell lines; in RT4 cells, it mainly acted via the classical BAX/BCL2 pathway, while in T24 cells, AITC modulated the activities of ANLN (related to cytokinesis) and S100P. These data confirm

  7. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kuiqing; Chen, Xu [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Liu, Cheng [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Gu, Peng; Li, Zhuohang; Wu, Shaoxu [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Xu, Kewei [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Lin, Tianxin, E-mail: tianxinl@sina.com [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Huang, Jian, E-mail: urolhj@sina.com [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway.

  8. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway

  9. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lukacs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a length-dependent “glove and stocking” distribution. Central nervous system symptoms included cognitive problems, personality change, and truncal ataxia. Case notes and the literature were reviewed. Result. Autoantibody screening was positive for anti-Hu antibody (recently renamed antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA-1. The diagnosis of PEM and SSN was supported by MRI and lumbar puncture results. A superficial bladder TCC was demonstrated on CT and subsequently confirmed on histology. No other primary neoplasm was found on full-body imaging. The neurological symptoms were considered to be an antibody-mediated paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and improved after resection of the tumour. Discussion. The association of anti-Hu positive paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and TCC has not been described in the literature previously. We emphasize the need for detailed clinical examination and the importance of a multidisciplinary thought process and encourage further awareness of this rare association.

  10. Activation of Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Bα by Methylene-Substituted Diindolylmethanes in Bladder Cancer Cells Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Tumor GrowthS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Dae Cho, Sung; Lee, Syng-Ook; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Abdelrahim, Maen; Khan, Shaheen; Yoon, Kyungsil; Kamat, Ashish M.; Safe, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) genes are orphan nuclear receptors, and NGFI-Bα (Nur77, TR3) is overexpressed in bladder tumors and bladder cancer cells compared with nontumorous bladder tissue. 1,1-Bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-methoxyphenyl)-methane (DIM-C-pPhOCH3) and 1,1-bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-phenyl)methane have previously been identified as activators of Nur77, and both compound...

  11. Apoptosis inducing effects of arsenic trioxide on human bladder cancer cell line BIU-87

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童强松; 曾甫清; 赵军; 鲁功成; 郑丽端

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the apoptosis inducing effects of arsenictrioxide (As2O3) on human bladder cancer cells and elucidate possible mechanisms. Methods After treatment with As2O3, the growth inhibition rates of human bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 were studied by MTT and cell counts methods. DNA synthesis rates were detected by 3 H-TdR assay. The morphological changes of cancer cells were observed by light and electronic microscopy and cell apoptosis rates were detected by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). bcl-2 gene expression of BIU-87 cells was observed by strept avidin-biotin complex (SABC) immunohistochemical method. Results As2O3 could effectively inhibit the growth of BIU-87 (P<0.05), which were time and concentration dependent. The inhibition rate of 4.0?μmol/L As2O3 for DNA synthesis of cancer cells was 55.64% (P<0.01). Partial cancer cells presented the characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis which depended on the time of exposure to drug (P<0.05). bcl-2 expression of BIU-87 cells was decreased significantly (P<0.05). Conclusion As2O3 can significantly induce apoptosis in bladder cancer cells by down-regulating the expression of the bcl-2 gene and inhibiting DNA synthesis. This provides a potentially effective method for prevention and cure of human bladder cancer.%目的观察三氧化二砷(As2O3)对人膀胱癌细胞的诱导凋亡作用并探讨其机制。方法采用细胞计数和MTT法检测As2O3对人膀胱癌细胞株BIU-87的生长抑制作用;采用3H-TdR掺入法 检测癌细胞DNA合成速率;采用普通光镜、透射电镜观察癌细胞形态学变化;采用TUNEL检测癌细胞凋 亡比率;采用SABC免疫组化观察BIU-87细胞中bcl-2的表达变化。 结果As2O3可有效地抑制BIU-87细胞的体外生长(P<0.05),并具有时间及浓度依赖性的特点。经 4μmol/LAs2O3作用后,癌细胞DNA合成抑制率为55.64%。部分膀胱癌细胞体积缩小、核固缩、染色质核 膜下聚

  12. Silencing of RTKN2 by siRNA suppresses proliferation, and induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi-Xiang; Zeng, Jin-Min; Zhou, Jia-Jie; Yang, Guang-Hua; Ding, Kun; Zhang, Xian-Jue

    2016-06-01

    Human bladder cancer is the most common urological malignancy in China. One of the causes of carcinogenesis in the cancer may be gene mutation. Therefore, the present study investigated the expression levels of Rhotekin 2 (RTKN2), a Rho effector protein, in human bladder cancer tissues and cell lines, and examined the effect of RTKN2 on the proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and invasion of human bladder cancer cell lines. The mRNA expression levels of RTKN2 in 30 human bladder cancer tissue samples were significantly higher, compared with those in 30 normal human bladder tissue samples. The protein expression levels of RTKN2 was markedly higher in T24 and 5637 cells, compared with those in four other human bladder cancer cell lines. The silencing of RTKN2 by small interfering (si)RNA inhibited cell proliferation and arrested cell cycle at the G1 phase, via reducing the expression levels of the MCM10, CDK2, CDC24A and CDC6 cell cycle‑associated proteins in the T24 and 5637 cells. Furthermore, RTKN2 knockdown in the cells led to cell apoptosis and the suppression of invasion. These results suggested that RTKN2 is involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of human bladder cancer, indicating that RTKN2 may be a molecular target in cancer therapy. PMID:27082503

  13. A case of Choriocarcinoma primarily located in the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Türkcü

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Choriocarcinoma is a tumor with poor prognosis which usually develops in the uterus and ovaries in females and testes in males. Choriocarcinomas primarily located in the urinary bladder occur extremely rare. In the radiological examination of the 28 year old male patient presented with cough, difficulty in breathing, dysuria and hematuria; lung lesions compatible with metastasis and a mass which was extending inside of the lumen in the anterior wall of the urinary bladder were determined. During the cystoscopic investigation, an incomplete transurethral resection was applied to the tumor. In the histopathological evaluation of the tumor tissue, cells compatible with syncytiotrophoblasts were observed among the polyhedral large mononuclear cells. While positive staining with pancytokeratin, cytokeratin 7, high molecular weight cytokeratin, human plasental lactogen, and human corionic gonadotrophin was observed in the tumor tissue, there was not any staining with epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen, CD30, p63, and cytokeratin 20. Present histopathological and immunohistochemical findings were evaluated as compatible with coriocarcinoma. Because of being seen rarely, having poor prognosis, causing death due to metastasis, the necessity of holding in mind in the differential diagnosis of high grade urothelial carcinomas, it is purposed to present the case accompanied by literature information.

  14. Bladder transitional cell carcinoma: correlation of contrast enhancement on computed tomography with histological grade and tumour angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between the degree of contrast enhancement of bladder cancer in the early enhanced phase of helical computed tomography (CT) and microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and histological grade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-five patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were examined by incremental unenhanced CT and helical CT at 40-45 s after initiation of intravenous administration of contrast medium before surgery. The CT density in Hounsfield units of bladder carcinomas were measured in the middle of the maximum diameter section of the cancer lesions on unenhanced and enhanced CT. The degree of contrast enhancement of the tumour was determined as the absolute increase in Hounsfield units. Histological grade, VEGF and MVD were analysed for each cancer. The Pearson and Spearman correlation tests were used to determine the strength of the relationships between CT enhancement and histological grade, VEGF expression and MVD. RESULTS: Different degrees of enhancement were observed in 91 cancers during the early enhanced phase of helical CT. Mean MVDs and mean CT enhancing values of different histological grade groups were statistically different (p<0.001). A positive correlation was found in the CT-enhancing value of bladder cancer and MVD (Pearson correlation test; r=0.938, p<0.001) and histological grade (Spearman rank correlation; r=0.734, p<0.001). VEGF of bladder cancer did not correlate with the change in CT attenuation (Spearman rank correlation; r=0.087, p=0.410) and MVD (Spearman rank correlation, r=0.103, p=0.330). CONCLUSION: In bladder cancer, the degree of contrast enhancement during the early enhanced helical CT is correlated with the MVD and histological grade of tumour. It is possible that MVD is the histopathological basis of early contrast enhancement of bladder cancer

  15. HSD3B and gene-gene interactions in a pathway-based analysis of genetic susceptibility to bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline S Andrew

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the 4(th most common cancer among men in the U.S. We analyzed variant genotypes hypothesized to modify major biological processes involved in bladder carcinogenesis, including hormone regulation, apoptosis, DNA repair, immune surveillance, metabolism, proliferation, and telomere maintenance. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between genetic variation affecting these processes and susceptibility in 563 genotyped urothelial cell carcinoma cases and 863 controls enrolled in a case-control study of incident bladder cancer conducted in New Hampshire, U.S. We evaluated gene-gene interactions using Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Statistical Epistasis Network analysis. The 3'UTR flanking variant form of the hormone regulation gene HSD3B2 was associated with increased bladder cancer risk in the New Hampshire population (adjusted OR 1.85 95%CI 1.31-2.62. This finding was successfully replicated in the Texas Bladder Cancer Study with 957 controls, 497 cases (adjusted OR 3.66 95%CI 1.06-12.63. The effect of this prevalent SNP was stronger among males (OR 2.13 95%CI 1.40-3.25 than females (OR 1.56 95%CI 0.83-2.95, (SNP-gender interaction P = 0.048. We also identified a SNP-SNP interaction between T-cell activation related genes GATA3 and CD81 (interaction P = 0.0003. The fact that bladder cancer incidence is 3-4 times higher in males suggests the involvement of hormone levels. This biologic process-based analysis suggests candidate susceptibility markers and supports the theory that disrupted hormone regulation plays a role in bladder carcinogenesis.

  16. Differences of response of human bladder cancer cells to photodynamic therapy (PDT) with Hypericum perforantum L extract and Photofrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseyo, Unyime; Kim, Albert; Stavropoulos, Nikos E.; Skalkos, Dimitris; Nseyo, Unwana U.; Chung, Theodore D.

    2005-04-01

    Refractory carcinoma in situ and resistant multifocal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the human urinary bladder respond modestly to PHOTOFRIN (PII) PDT. Hypericum perforatum L., (St. John"s wort /Epirus" Vasalmo, Greece), a medicinal plant used for many human ailments, is under investigation as a new photosensitizer. We have reported on the antiproliferative activity of the lipophilic extract of the Hypericum perforatum L. (HP) against cultured T-24, and NBT-11 bladder cancer cells. We investigated response of the polar methanolic fraction (PMF) of the HP extract versus PHOTOFRIN in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of human bladder cancer cells, RT-4 and T-24.The PMF was extracted from the dry herb with methanol, followed by liquid extraction with petroleum ether. RT-4/T-24, were plated (105 cells/well) and placed in the incubator (370 C, 5%CO) for 24 hours prior to addition of drugs. PII 2ug/ml, or PMF 60ug /ml was added and incubation continued. After 24 hours, the cells were treated with laser light (630nm) with 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules. The cells were then washed and reincubated for another 24 hours. After this incubation cell survival was assessed by the MTT assay. PMF-PDT induced percent cell kill of 0%, 0%, 0%, 29% and 75%, in RT-4 cells (primary noninvasive urinary bladder TCC) versus 5%, 9%, 13%, 69% and 86%, in T-24 cells(metastatic TTC) at 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules respectively. PII-PDT induced cell kill of 0 %, 0% ,0%,0% and 9 %, in RT-4 cells versus 0%,10%,0%,21% and 77%, in T-24 cells at 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules respectively.RT-24 cells were relatively more resistant than T-24 cells to PMF and PII-PDT. Understanding mechanisms of such differential responses might prove useful

  17. Effects of ADH on the apical and basolateral membranes of toad urinary bladder epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, P J; Leader, J P

    1993-11-01

    Short-circuited urinary bladders from Bufo marinus were supported on their apical surface by an agar mounting method and impaled with microelectrodes via their basolateral membrane. This arrangement provided stable and long-lasting impalements of epithelial cells and yielded reliable membrane potentials and voltage divider ratios (Ra/Rb), where Ra and Rb are apical and basolateral membrane resistances respectively. The membrane potential under short-circuit conditions (Vsc) was -51.4 +/- 2.2 mV (n = 59), while under open-circuit conditions apical membrane potential (Va) and basolateral membrane potential (Vb) were -31.0 +/- 2.4 and 59.5 +/- 2.4 mV, respectively. This yields a "well-shaped" potential profile across the toad urinary bladder, where Va is inversely related to the rate of transport, Isc. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) produced a hyperpolarisation of Vsc and Vb but had no significant effect on Va. In addition, Ra/Rb was significantly increased by ADH (4.6 +/- 0.5 to 10.2 +/- 3.6). Calculation of individual membrane resistances following the addition of amiloride showed that ADH produced a parallel decrease in Ra and Rb membrane resistance, with the observed increase in Ra/Rb being due to a greater percentage decrease in Rb than in Ra. The ability of ADH to effect parallel changes in apical and basolateral membrane conductance helps to maintain a constant cellular volume despite an increase in transepithelial transport. PMID:8309781

  18. RECURRENCE RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF BLADDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Xiang-hui; YANG Xiao-hong; ZHENG Fu-qing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study recurrence factors and set up a model to evaluate the prognosis of patients with bladder cancer.Methods: An analysis on recurrence-related factors was made by Cox's proportional hazards model analysis and logistic multiple linear regression model analysis in 212 patients with transitional cell carcinoma treated surgically from 1995~2001.These factors included clinical and pathologic figures. Results: The most important factor is metastasis to the regional lymph nodes, the Hazards ratio is 6.6 (P=0.0004), followed by multiple tumors (Hr=2.255, P<0.0001), tumor in trigone and bladder neck (Hr=2.053, P<0.0001), stage (Hr=2.057, P<0.0001), grade (Hr=1.569, P=0.0081), intravesical chemotherapeutic instillations (Hr-0.559, P=0.0011) and hematuria (Hr=0.762, P=0.0076). A predicting equation was established, and the predicting values were calculated according to the individual features of patients. The predicting and actual values were compared, and the sensitivity, specificity and overall concordance were 83.5%, 67.6% and 80.1% respectively. Conclusion:The evaluation of prognosis could be made quite accurately based on these factors.

  19. Antiproliferative factor decreases Akt phosphorylation and alters gene expression via CKAP4 in T24 bladder carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chen-Ou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary bladder cancer is a common malignancy worldwide, and outcomes for patients with advanced bladder cancer remain poor. Antiproliferative factor (APF is a potent glycopeptide inhibitor of epithelial cell proliferation that was discovered in the urine of patients with interstitial cystitis, a disorder with bladder epithelial thinning and ulceration. APF mediates its antiproliferative activity in primary normal bladder epithelial cells via cytoskeletal associated protein 4 (CKAP4. Because synthetic asialo-APF (as-APF has also been shown to inhibit T24 bladder cancer cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations in vitro, and because the peptide segment of APF is 100% homologous to part of frizzled 8, we determined whether CKAP4 mediates as-APF inhibition of proliferation and/or downstream Wnt/frizzled signaling events in T24 cells. Methods T24 cells were transfected with double-stranded siRNAs against CKAP4 and treated with synthetic as-APF or inactive control peptide; cells that did not undergo electroporation and cells transfected with non-target (scrambled double-stranded siRNA served as negative controls. Cell proliferation was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Expression of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β, β-catenin, p53, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 mRNA was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Akt, GSK-3β, MMP2, β-catenin, and p53 protein expression, plus Akt, GSK-3β, and β-catenin phosphorylation, were determined by Western blot. Results T24 cell proliferation, MMP2 expression, Akt ser473 and thr308 phosphorylation, GSK3β tyr216 phosphorylation, and β-catenin ser45/thr41 phosphorylation were all decreased by APF, whereas p53 expression, and β-catenin ser33,37/thr41 phosphorylation, were increased by APF treatment in non-electroporated and non-target siRNA-transfected cells. Neither mRNA nor total protein expression of Akt, GSK3β, or

  20. Loss of MTUS1/ATIP expression is associated with adverse outcome in advanced bladder carcinomas: data from a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy percent of all bladder tumours tend to recur and need intensive surveillance, and a subset of tumours progress to muscle-invasive and metastatic disease. However, it is still difficult to find the adequate treatment for every individual patient as it is a very heterogeneous disease and reliable biomarkers are still missing. In our study we searched for new target genes in the critical chromosomal region 8p and investigated the potential tumour suppressor gene candidate MTUS1/ATIP in bladder cancer. MTUS1 was identified to be the most promising deleted target gene at 8p in aCGH analysis with 19 papillary bladder tumours. A correlation with bladder cancer was further validated using immunohistochemistry of 85 papillary and 236 advanced bladder tumours and in functional experiments. Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox-regression addressed overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) as a function of MTUS1/ATIP expression. Bivariate correlations investigated associations between MTUS1/ATIP expression, patient characteristics and histopathology. MTUS1 expression was analysed in cell lines and overexpressed in RT112, where impact on viability, proliferation and migration was measured. MTUS1 protein expression was lost in almost 50% of all papillary and advanced bladder cancers. Survival, however, was only influenced in advanced carcinomas, where loss of MTUS1 was associated with adverse OS and DSS. In this cohort, there was also a significant correlation of MTUS1 expression and histological subtype: positive expression was detected in all micropapillary tumours and aberrant nuclear staining was detected in a subset of plasmocytoid urothelial carcinomas. MTUS1 was expressed in all investigated bladder cell lines and overexpression in RT112 led to significantly decreased viability. MTUS1 is a tumour suppressor gene in cultured bladder cancer cells and in advanced bladder tumours. It might represent one new target gene at chromosome 8p and can be

  1. Clinico-pathological pattern, classification and staging of urinary bladder carcinomas - a five years experience at a tertiary care hospital in central punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Pakistan, urinary bladder carcinoma is the 8th commonest malignancy while being the fourth commonest cancer in men. The relative occurrence of a particular histological type of bladder carcinoma depends on the clinical setting. Both grade and stage of these cancers are highly correlated with recurrence, progression and patient survival rates. Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised of 122 patients with newly diagnosed operable primary bladder carcinomas who underwent cystoscopy associated transurethral resection of bladder tumour at the Urology Department of Punjab Employees Social Security Hospital, Lahore. All participants completed a detailed questionnaire and underwent an in-depth interview to obtain data. The surgical specimens were referred to the Pathology department. Gross observations of the tumour recorded. Result: A total of 114 cases, classified according to WHO/ISUP criteria, low-grade papillary lesions, comprising Papillary Urothelial Neoplasm of Low Malignant Potential (PUNLMP) and Papillary Low Grade carcinomas, accounted for 43% of tumours. Male to female ratio being 5.3:1 (74%). Lateral walls were involved in 44%, posterior wall in 25.3%, trigone in 10.7%, bladder neck in 7.2%, dome in 5.8%, ureteric orifice in 4.13%, anterior wall in 2% and left ureter in 0.87% cases. Tumour staging revealed an overall 11.5% of tumours with stage Ta and 31.5% with stage T3-4. About 29% tumours were non invasive. About n=13 of low-grade carcinomas and n=68 of high-grade carcinomas were invasive. For tumours classified by WHO/ISUP criteria, the percentage of women was larger for PUNLMP than for the other categories of urothelial tumours (p-value 0.006); no statistically significant difference was found by age or gender with respect to tumour stage (p-value 0.138 and 0.452). Conclusion: Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC) is the commonest among middle aged men. (author)

  2. Primary bladder lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell type: Case report and literature review of 26 cases

    OpenAIRE

    W Greg Simpson; Armando Lopez; Paurush Babbar; Lynnetta Faith Payne

    2015-01-01

    Primary lymphoma of the urinary bladder is exceedingly rare, representing 0.2% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma. Although Matsuno et al. and others state the most common type is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 20% of all the primary lymphomas of the urinary bladder are considered to be high grade neoplasms; the majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This is a case report of a 48-year-old man that presented with hematuria, frequency, nocturia, and flan...

  3. Large bowel obstruction resulting from bladder transitional cell carcinoma metastasis: a common cancer presenting in an uncommon manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohloff, Matthew; VandenBerg, Todd; MacMath, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and large bowel obstructions are both common disease processes typically considered unrelated. Presented below is the case of a 49-year-old male with a large bowel obstruction caused by a bladder TCC metastasis. One year prior to large bowel obstruction presentation, the patient had a T2, Grade III TCC of the bladder with no nodal involvement or metastasis, which was removed via radical cystoprostatectomy. This case serves as a reminder that cancer, despite common pathogenesis patterns, can present in atypical ways. PMID:26197806

  4. Epithelioid Angiosarcoma of the Bladder: A Series of 9 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoso, Andres; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2015-10-01

    Primary angiosarcoma of the bladder is very rare, with approximately 30 cases reported in the literature. Those with epithelioid morphology are even rarer, with only single-case reports published. We describe the histopathologic features and clinical follow-up of 9 patients with epithelioid angiosarcoma (EA) of the bladder retrieved from our Surgical Pathology files from 1998 to 2014. Eight cases were consults. The mean age at presentation was 65 years (range, 39 to 85 y). The M:F ratio was 8:1. The clinical presentation was hematuria and bladder mass in all cases. Six patients had a history of radiotherapy to the pelvis, 5 to treat prostate cancer and 1 to treat uterine cervical cancer. The time from radiotherapy to the diagnosis of EA ranged from 6 to 15 years. The average size of the tumor was 4 cm. (range, 1 to 8 cm.). The submitting diagnoses were poorly differentiated carcinoma (n=5), high-grade invasive urothelial carcinoma (n=3), and atypical vascular proliferation (n=1). Morphologically, the tumors were composed of nests and sheets of highly atypical cells with high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, occasional intracytoplasmic lumens, and a hemorrhagic background. None of the cases showed any urothelial carcinoma component. Three patients showed in addition usual angiosarcoma in the resection specimen. By immunohistochemistry, 5/9 cases were positive for cytokeratins, including CK7 (n=3), AE1/AE3 (n=3), and Cam5.2 (n=1). All cases were positive for at least 1 endothelial marker, including CD31 (n=7), CD34 (n=2), FVIII (n=3), and ERG (n=2). Urothelial markers (p63 and GATA3) were consistently negative. Surgical treatment included transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) only (n=5), TURB followed by cystoprostatectomy (n=2), TURB followed by partial cystectomy (n=1), and cystoprostatectomy only (n=1). The tumor involved the muscularis propria in 5/9 patients, the periureteric adipose tissue in 1 patient, and the prostate and seminal vesicles in 1 patient

  5. Structure of the major membrane protein complex from urinary bladder epithelial cells by cryo-electron crystallography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostergetel, GT; Keegstra, W; Brisson, A

    2001-01-01

    Numerous protein plaques cover the apical surface of mammalian urinary bladder epithelial cells. These plaques contain four integral membrane proteins, called uroplakins, which form a well-ordered array of hexameric complexes. The 3D structure of these naturally occurring 2D crystals was studied by

  6. Speciation of arsenic in exfoliated urinary bladder epithelial cells from individuals exposed to arsenic in drinking water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hernández-Zavala, A.; Valenzuela, O.L.; Matoušek, Tomáš; Drobná, Z.; Dědina, Jiří; Garcia-Vargas, G.G.; Thomas, D. J.; Del Razo, L.M.; Stýblo, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 12 (2008), s. 1656-1660. ISSN 0091-6765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400310507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : arsenic species * drinking water * exfoliated human urinary bladder epithelial cells Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 6.123, year: 2008

  7. Qualitative and quantitative histopathology in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. An international investigation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Sasaki, M; Fukuzawa, S;

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histopathologic, prognosis-related grading of malignancy by means of morphologic examination in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder (TCC) may be subject to observer variation, resulting in a reduced level of reproducibility. This may confound comparisons of treatment...

  8. Calcification in transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: Does it have any implication on calcium metabolism and its management?

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Kumar; Modi, Pranjal R.; Pal, Bipin C.; Jayesh Modi

    2015-01-01

    Although transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is most common histological subtype, calcification in TCC is rarely seen. We report a 64-year-old gentleman who on evaluation found to have calcification in TCC of urinary bladder and its implication on calcium metabolism and management.

  9. Co-delivery of VEGF and bFGF via a PLGA nanoparticle-modified BAM for effective contracture inhibition of regenerated bladder tissue in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xincheng; Lin, Houwei; Jiang, Dapeng; Xu, Guofeng; Fang, Xiaoliang; He, Lei; Xu, Maosheng; Tang, Bingqiang; Wang, Zhiyong; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Fang; Geng, Hongquan

    2016-02-01

    Graft contracture is a common problem associated with the regeneration processes of tissue-engineered bladders. Currently, most strategies used for incorporating bioactive molecules into biomaterial designs do not work during all phases of tissue regeneration. In this study, we used a growth factor-PLGA nanoparticle thermo-sensitive gel system (i.e., BAM with incorporated VEGF and bFGF-loaded PLGA nanoparticles and mixed with a hydrophilic gel) to promote bladder tissue regeneration in a rabbit model. At 4 and 12 weeks after surgery, contracture rate assessment and histological examination were conducted to evaluate bladder tissue regeneration. The results indicated that the functional composite scaffold continuously and effectively released VEGF and bFGF and promoted bladder reconstruction with a significant decrease in graft contracture. In addition, the number and arrangement of regenerated urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells as well as microvascular density and maturity were improved in the VEGF/bFGF nanoparticle group compared with the single factor VEGF or bFGF nanoparticle group and BAM alone. The nanoparticle thermo-sensitive gel system, which exhibited favourable performance, may effectively inhibit graft contracture and promote bladder tissue regeneration in rabbits.

  10. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M

    2016-08-01

    Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples.Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland-Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers.Although the Bland-Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs.Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder urothelial carcinoma obtained from TMA-based samples can be susceptible to systematic bias, and the lack

  11. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P.; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples. Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland–Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers. Although the Bland–Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, positive correlations between KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs. Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder

  12. G9a Inhibition Induces Autophagic Cell Death via AMPK/mTOR Pathway in Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    Full Text Available G9a has been reported to highly express in bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC and G9a inhibition significantly attenuates cell proliferation, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The present study aimed at examining the potential role of autophagy in the anti-proliferation effect of G9a inhibition on TCC T24 and UMUC-3 cell lines in vitro. We found that both pharmaceutical and genetical G9a inhibition significantly attenuated cell proliferation by MTT assay, Brdu incorporation assay and colony formation assay. G9a inhibition induced autophagy like morphology as determined by transmission electron microscope and LC-3 fluorescence assay. In addition, autophagy flux was induced by G9a inhibition in TCC cells, as determined by p62 turnover assay and LC-3 turnover assay. The autophagy induced positively contributed to the inhibition of cell proliferation because the growth attenuation capacity of G9a inhibition was reversed by autophagy inhibitors 3-MA. Mechanically, AMPK/mTOR pathway was identified to be involved in the regulation of G9a inhibition induced autophagy. Intensively activating mTOR by Rheb overexpression attenuated autophagy and autophagic cell death induced by G9a inhibition. In addition, pre-inhibiting AMPK by Compound C attenuated autophagy together with the anti-proliferation effect induced by G9a inhibition while pre-activating AMPK by AICAR enhanced them. In conclusion, our results indicate that G9a inhibition induces autophagy through activating AMPK/mTOR pathway and the autophagy induced positively contributes to the inhibition of cell proliferation in TCC cells. These findings shed some light on the functional role of G9a in cell metabolism and suggest that G9a might be a therapeutic target in bladder TCC in the future.

  13. Pre-cancerous changes in urothelial endocytic vesicle leakage, fatty acid composition, and As and associated element concentrations after arsenic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The urothelium covering the luminal surface of the urinary bladder has developed an efficient permeability barrier that protects it against the back-flow of toxins eliminated in the urine. The subapical endocytic vesicles containing the urinary bladder fluid phase are formed during the micturition cycle by endocytosis processes of the superficial cells. In normal conditions, the permeability barrier of the endocytic vesicles blocks the passage of the fluid phase to the cellular cytoplasm and the fluid is recycled to the bladder lumen. The aim of this work was to investigate the alteration of the endocytic vesicle membrane permeability barrier to toxins such as iAs (inorganic arsenic) administered in drinking water. By using an induced endocytosis model and the fluorescence requenching technique, it is shown that the exposure of rats to ingestion of water containing iAs not only induced pre-cancerous morphological changes, but allowed the differential leakage of an endocytosed fluorescent marker, HPTS, and its quencher, DPX, (hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid and p-xylene-bis-pyridinium bromide, respectively) out of the vesicular lumen. The leakage of the cationic DPX was almost complete, while the release of the anionic HPTS molecule was partial and higher in arsenic-treated-rats than in controls. Such membrane alteration would allow the toxins to elude the permeability barrier and to leak out of the endocytic vesicles, thus establishing a 'bypass' to the permeability barrier. The retention of As in the urinary bladder, assessed by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-μXRF), was lower than the kidney accumulation of arsenic previously observed by our group and was accompanied by altered concentrations of K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn, all ions related to cellular metabolism. The results support the hypothesis that low amounts of endocytosed As can accumulate in the interior of the urothelial superficial cells and initiate the cytotoxic effects

  14. Effect of dietary treatment with dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII) on the urinary bladder epithelium of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) knockout and C57BL/6 wild type female mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► As3mt KO and WT mice were treated with DMAIII for 4 weeks in drinking water. ► No treatment-related death or whole body toxicity observed in any of the groups. ► Urothelium showed simple hyperplasia in treated KO and WT mice. ► BrdU labeling index of urothelium was significantly increased in treated KO mice. - Abstract: Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is carcinogenic to the human urinary bladder. It produces urothelial cytotoxicity and proliferation in rats and mice. DMAV, a major methylated urinary metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder carcinogen, but without effects on the mouse urothelium. DMAIII was shown to be the likely urinary metabolite of DMAV inducing urothelial changes and is also postulated to be one of the active metabolites of iAs. To evaluate potential DMAIII-induced urothelial effects, it was administered to As3mt knockout mice which cannot methylate arsenicals. Female C57BL/6 wild type and As3mt knockout mice (10/group) were administered DMAIII, 77.3 ppm in water for four weeks. Urothelial effects were evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy (EM) and immunohistochemical detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. EM findings were rated 1–5, with higher rating indicating greater extent of cytotoxicity visualized. DMAIII significantly increased the BrdU labeling index, a ratio of BrdU labeled cells to non-labeled cells, in the treated knockout group compared to control and wild type treated groups. DMAIII induced simple hyperplasia in more knockout mice (4/10) compared to wild type mice (2/10). All treated knockout mice had more and larger intracytoplasmic granules compared to the treated wild type mice. Changes in EM classification were not significant. In conclusion, DMAIII induces urothelial toxicity and regenerative hyperplasia in mice and most likely plays a role in inorganic arsenic-induced urothelial changes. However, DMAV does not induce hyperplasia in mice, suggesting that urinary

  15. Bladder Retraining

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a better voiding pattern around the clock. Do Kegel Exercises Help People with IC? Some bladder retraining programs recommend practicing Kegel exercises as part of bladder retraining. Kegel exercises ...

  16. Urinary Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the symphysis pubis, and below the parietal peritoneum . The size and shape of the urinary bladder ... outer layer of the bladder wall is parietal peritoneum. In all other regions, the outer layer is ...

  17. Bladder Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life (the person’s level of health, comfort, and happiness). In fact, people with bladder problems may have a lower quality of life than people with diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Bladder problems ...

  18. A droplet-based building block approach for bladder smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue engineering based on building blocks is an emerging method to fabricate 3D tissue constructs. This method requires depositing and assembling building blocks (cell-laden microgels) at high throughput. The current technologies (e.g., molding and photolithography) to fabricate microgels have throughput challenges and provide limited control over building block properties (e.g., cell density). The cell-encapsulating droplet generation technique has potential to address these challenges. In this study, we monitored individual building blocks for viability, proliferation and cell density. The results showed that (i) SMCs can be encapsulated in collagen droplets with high viability (>94.2 ± 3.2%) for four cases of initial number of cells per building block (i.e. 7 ± 2, 16 ± 2, 26 ± 3 and 37 ± 3 cells/building block). (ii) Encapsulated SMCs can proliferate in building blocks at rates that are consistent (1.49 ± 0.29) across all four cases, compared to that of the controls. (iii) By assembling these building blocks, we created an SMC patch (5 mm x 5 mm x 20 μm), which was cultured for 51 days forming a 3D tissue-like construct. The histology of the cultured patch was compared to that of a native rat bladder. These results indicate the potential of creating 3D tissue models at high throughput in vitro using building blocks.

  19. MicroRNA-3713 regulates bladder cell invasion via MMP9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Bo; Wang, Wei; Du, Yi-Heng; Li, Hao; Xia, Shu-Jie; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer but its carcinogenesis remains not completely elucidated. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is well known to be involved in the development of various cancers, including TCC, whereas a role of miR-3713 in the pathogenesis of TCC has not been appreciated. Here, we reported that significantly higher levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and significantly lower levels of miR-3713 were detected in TCC tissue, compared to the adjacent non-tumor tissue, and were inversely correlated. Moreover, the low miR-3713 levels in TCC specimens were associated with poor survival of the patients. In vitro, overexpression of miR-3713 significantly decreased cell invasion, and depletion of miR-3713 increased cell invasion in TCC cells. The effects of miR-3713 on TCC cell growth appeared to result from its modification of MMP9 levels, in which miR-3713 was found to bind to the 3'-UTR of MMP9 mRNA to inhibit its protein translation in TCC cells. This study highlights miR-3713 as a previously unrecognized factor that controls TCC invasiveness, which may be important for developing innovative therapeutic targets for TCC treatment. PMID:27577949

  20. The prognostic value of pretreatment of systemic inflammatory responses in patients with urothelial carcinoma undergoing radical cystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, J H; Kang, M.; Kim, H S; Jeong, C. W.; Kwak, C; H.H. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Systemic inflammatory response (SIR) is important in the relationship between the tumour, the host, and outcome in cancer patients. However, limited data exist regarding the prognostic significance of SIR in bladder cancer. We investigate the utility of pretreatment SIR in patients with urothelial carcinoma undergoing radical cystectomy. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 419 patients with a median follow-up of 37.7 months. The SIRs used for each described prognostic nomogram ...

  1. Advances in intravesical therapy for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Michael D; Li, Qingdi Quentin; Agarwal, Piyush K

    2014-09-01

    The knowledge of tumor biology and the biomechanical properties of the urothelium have led to significant advances in the development of intravesical therapy for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Targeted therapy improves the efficacy and decreases the side effects of antineoplastic agents. Nanoparticles that target antitumor agents to the urothelial cells have allowed for improved delivery of these agents to tumor cells. Gene therapy is another strategy that has allowed for a targeted induction of an antitumor response. Finally, engineering of the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine aimed to minimize the potential side effects associated with this treatment. These novel approaches hold promise for decreasing the rate of progression and recurrence of NMIBC. PMID:25054027

  2. Quantitative histopathology in the prognostic evaluation of patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Fukuzawa, S;

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morphologic grading of malignancy is considered to be of prognostic value in patients with transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder (TCC). This qualitative approach is, however, associated with low reproducibility. Grading of malignancy can be carried out on a reproducible......, quantitative scale. METHODS: A retrospective, prognostic study of 110 patients treated for TCC in clinical Stages Ta-T4 (median follow-up time, 6 years) was performed, evaluating various grading techniques. Unbiased estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (nuclear vV), nuclear volume fraction...... nuclear vV are prognostically superior to morphologic grading of malignancy in noninvasive TCC, whereas both morphologically and quantitatively based malignancy grading are without prognostic value in invasive TCC....

  3. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin or High-Dose Methotrexate, Vinblastine, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-27

    Anterior Urethral Cancer; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Posterior Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  4. Pathological Characteristics of Primary Bladder Carcinoma Treated at a Tertiary Care Hospital and Changing Demographics of Bladder Cancer in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, S; Wijayarathna, K S N; Karunaratne, K A M S; Gobi, U; Pathmeswaran, A; Abeygunasekera, Anuruddha M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to compare demographics and pathological features of bladder carcinoma treated in a urology unit with findings of previous studies done in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods. Data of newly diagnosed patients with bladder cancer in a tertiary referral centre from 2011 to 2014 were analysed. Data on bladder cancers diagnosed from 1993 to 2014 were obtained from previous publications and Sri Lanka Cancer Registry. Results. There were 148 patients and mean age was 65 years. Male to female ratio was 4.1 : 1. Urothelial carcinoma (UC) was found in 89.2% of patients. Muscle invasion was noted in 35% of patients compared to 48.4% two decades ago. In patients with UC, 16.5% were found to have pT1 high grade tumour. It was 5.3% from 1993 to 2000. Pure squamous cell carcinoma was found in 8.1% of patients while primary or de novo carcinoma in situ (not associated with high grade pT1 tumours) was seen in one patient only. Conclusions. The percentage of squamous carcinoma is higher among Sri Lankan patients while primary carcinoma in situ is a rarity. The percentage of muscle invasive disease has decreased while the percentage of pT1 high grade tumours has increased during the last two decades in Sri Lanka. PMID:26884756

  5. [Risk factors for urothelial carcinoma: drinking measures, smoking and other life style-related risk factors--results of the Berlin Urothelial Study (BUS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmert, U; Bronder, E; Klimpel, A; Molzahn, M; Pommer, W

    2000-05-01

    With the exception of smoking and several occupational exposures there is little knowledge about risk factors for urothelial cancer. A case control study in the area of former West Berlin was performed from 1990-1995 to investigate the role of several lifestyle risk factors, such as smoking, drinking behaviour and regular intake of analgesics and laxatives. The study includes 647 hospital-based incident cases with bladder cancer (n = 571), renal pelvis cancer (n = 51), and ureter cancer (n = 25), and 647 population-based controls which were matched individually by sex and age. Data analyses were carried out using standard methods for case control studies (conditional multiple logistic regression analysis). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were applied as effect parameter. Statistically significantly increased odds ratios were observed for current smoking (OR: 3.46, 95% CI: 2.50-4.78), previous but now abandoned smoking (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.09-2.81), and for regular intake of laxatives (OR: 2.52, 95% CI: 1.56-4.09). Furthermore, an increased risk for urothelial cancer was observed for daily consumption of three and more litres of cold drinks (OR: 2.65 95% CI: 1.12-6.24). The results underline that lifestyle factors other than smoking may contribute to a higher risk of urothelial cancer. PMID:10893874

  6. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin induces downregulation of critical Hsp90 protein clients and results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human urinary bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic, specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone that maintains the structural and functional integrity of various protein clients involved in cellular signaling. In this study, we have investigated the effect of 17-AAG on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. We have used MTT-based assays, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and scratch-wound assay in RT4, RT112 and T24 human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. We have demonstrated that, upon 17-AAG treatment, bladder cancer cells are arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, 17-AAG administration was shown to induce a pronounced downregulation of multiple Hsp90 protein clients and other downstream effectors, such as IGF-IR, Akt, IKK-α, IKK-β, FOXO1, ERK1/2 and c-Met, resulting in sequestration-mediated inactivation of NF-κB, reduced cell proliferation and decline of cell motility. In total, we have clearly evinced a dose-dependent and cell type-specific effect of 17-AAG on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of multiple Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling integrity

  7. Twisted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition promotes progression of surviving bladder cancer T24 cells with hTERT-dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cancer cells maintain telomeres to protect cells from senescence through telomerase activity (TA or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT in different cell types. Moreover, cellular senescence can be bypassed by Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT during cancer progression in diverse solid tumors. However, it has not been elucidated the characteristics of telomere maintenance and progression ability after long-term culture in bladder cancer T24 cells with hTERT dysfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, by using a dominant negative mutant human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT vector to inhibit TA in bladder cancer T24 cells, we observed the appearance of long phenotype of telomere length and the ALT-associated PML body (APB complex after the 27(th passage, indicating the occurrence of ALT-like pathway in surviving T24/DN868A cells with telomerase inhibition. Meanwhile, telomerase inhibition resulted in significant EMT as shown by change in cellular morphology concomitant with variation of EMT markers. Consistently, the surviving T24/DN868A cells showed increased progression ability in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found Twist was activated to mediate EMT in surviving T24/DN868A samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings indicate that bladder cancer T24 cells may undergo the telomerase-to-ALT-like conversion and promote cancer progression at advanced stages through promoting EMT, thus providing novel possible insight into the mechanism of resistance to telomerase inhibitors in cancer treatment.

  8. An Investigation into the Cytotoxic Effects of 13-Acetoxysarcocrassolide from the Soft Coral Sarcophyton crassocaule on Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Wu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Active compounds from natural products have been widely studied. The anti-tumor effects of 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide isolated from Formosan soft coral Sarcophyton crassocaule on bladder cancer cells were examined in this study. An MTT assay showed that 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide was cytotoxic to bladder female transitional cancer (BFTC cells. We determined that the BFTC cells underwent cell death through apoptosis by flow cytometry. Due to the highly-migratory nature of the BFTC cells, the ability of 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide to stop their migration was assessed by a wound healing assay. To determine which proteins were affected in the BFTC cells upon treatment, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed. By LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified that 19 proteins were up-regulated and eight were down-regulated. Seven of the proteins were confirmed by western blotting analysis. This study reveals clues to the potential mechanism of the cytotoxic effects of 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide on BFTC cells. Moreover, it suggests that PPT1 and hnRNP F could be new biomarkers for bladder cancer. The results of this study are also helpful for the diagnosis, progression monitoring and therapeutic strategies of transitional cell tumors.

  9. Screening biomarkers of bladder cancer using combined miRNA and mRNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ning; Jin, Xuefei; Gu, Xinquan; Na, Wanli; Zhang, Muchun; Zhao, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Biomarkers, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) may be useful for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying bladder cancer, differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRNAs) and their target genes in bladder cancer were analyzed. In the present study, miRNA and mRNA expression profiles (GSE40355) were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus. These consisted of healthy bladder samples (n=8) and urothelial carcinoma samples (low-grade, n=8 and high-grade, n=8). DE-miRNAs and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the limma package and the Benjamin and Hochberg method from the multtest package in R. Target genes of DE-miRNAs were screened. Associations between DEGs were investigated using STRING, and an interaction network was constructed using Cytoscape. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed for DEGs from the interaction network. 87 DE-miRNAs and 2058 DEGs were screened from low-grade bladder cancer samples, and 40 DE-miRNAs and 2477 DEGs were screened from high-grade bladder cancer samples. DE-target genes were significantly associated with the regulation of cell apoptosis. Bladder cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer biological pathways were found to be enriched. The results of the present study demonstrated that E2F transcription factor 1, which is targeted by miR-106b, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) and V-Erb-B2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog-2, which are targeted by miR-125b, participate in the bladder cancer pathway. In conclusion, DE-miRNAs in bladder cancer tissue samples and DE-targeted genes, such as miR-106b and CDKN2A, which were identified in the present study, may provide the basis for targeted therapy for breast cancer and enhance understanding of its pathogenesis. PMID:25955758

  10. Quantitative evaluation of CART-containing cells in urinary bladder of rats with renovascular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Janiuk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent biological advances make it possible to discover new peptides associated with hypertension. The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART is a known factor in appetite and feeding behaviour. Various lines of evidence suggest that this peptide participates not only in control of feeding behaviour but also in the regulation of the cardiovascular and sympathetic systems and blood pressure. The role of CART in blood pressure regulation led us to undertake a study aimed at analysing quantitative changes in CART-containing cells in urinary bladders (UB of rats with renovascular hypertension. We used the Goldblatt model of arterial hypertension (two-kidney, one clip to evaluate quantitative changes. This model provides researchers with a commonly used tool to analyse the renin-angiotensin system of blood pressure control and, eventually, to develop drugs for the treatment of chronic hypertension. The study was performed on sections of urinary bladders of rats after 3-, 14-, 28-, 42 and 91 days from hypertension induction. Immunohistochemical identification of CART cells was performed on paraffin for the UBs of all the study animals. CART was detected in the endocrine cells, especially numerous in the submucosa and muscularis layers, with a few found in the transitional epithelium and only occasionally in serosa. Hypertension significantly increased the number of CART-positive cells in the rat UBs. After 3 and 42 days following the procedure, statistically significantly higher numbers of CART-positive cells were identified in comparison with the control animals. The differences between the hypertensive rats and the control animals concerned not only the number density of CART-immunoreactive cells but also their localization. After a 6-week period, each of the rats subjected to the renal artery clipping procedure developed stable hypertension. CART appeared in numerous transitional epithelium cells. As this study provides novel findings

  11. Liposome-administered tetramethylhematoporphyrin (TMHP) as a photodynamic agent for bladder tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Ella D.; Bachor, Ruediger; Miller, Kurt; Koenig, Karsten; Hautmann, Richard E.

    1993-06-01

    This study was made in order to determine whether liposomes can bind and deliver the photosensitizer to human bladder carcinoma cells and how effective the photodynamic activity of this photosensitizer is. TMHP (synthesized by Prof. Muller v.d. Haegen) was incorporated into small unilamellar vesicles of DPPC, following the procedure described by Jori et al TMHP was used in a dosage of 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 (mu) g/ml on two different cell lines. Cellular uptake of TMHP in liposomes was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Dark toxicity became evident, when doses of 10 and 20 (mu) g/ml TMHP encapsulated in liposomes were compared to control liposomes without photosensitizer. PDT was performed after sensitization of cells for one hour using an argon-pumped dye laser at 630 nm and a power density of 30 mW/cm2. Irradiation with 3,6 and 7,2 Joule/cm2 resulted in a decreasing survival rate. This study demonstrates PDT-efficiency being dependent on the dose of liposome-encapsulated TMHP as well as the fluence rate. There is also a difference in cell survival according to the cell line.

  12. Evaluation of transforming growth factor-β1 suppress Pokemon/epithelial-mesenchymal transition expression in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Hu, Yangyang; Guo, Changcheng; Liu, Min; Yao, Xudong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Peng, Bo; Zheng, Junhua

    2015-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) plays a dual role in apoptosis and in proapoptotic responses in the support of survival in a variety of cells. The aim of this study was to determine the function of TGF-β1 in bladder cancer cells and the relationship with POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (Pokemon). TGF-β1 and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell proliferation, migration, and survival of bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells T24 were treated with different levels of TGF-β1. Levels of Pokemon, E-cadherin, Snail, MMP2, MMP9, Twist, VEGF, and β-catenin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were examined by real-time quantitative fluorescent PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The effects of TGF-β1 on epithelial-mesenchymal transition of T24 cells were evaluated with wound-healing assay, proliferation of T24 was evaluated with reference to growth curves with MTT assay, and cell invasive ability was investigated by Transwell assay. Data show that Pokemon was inhibited by TGF-β1 treatment; the gene and protein of E-cadherin and β-catenin expression level showed decreased markedly after TGF-β1 treatment (P Pokemon, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. The high expression of TGF-β1 leads to an increase in the phenotype and apical-base polarity of epithelial cells. These changes of cells may result in the recurrence and progression of bladder cancer at last. Related mechanism is worthy of further investigation. PMID:25722217

  13. Effects of Combined siRNA-TR and-TERT on Telomerase Activity and Growth of Bladder Transitional Cell Cancer BIU-87 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程文; 位志峰; 高建平; 张征宇; 葛京平; 景抗震; 徐锋; 解鹏

    2010-01-01

    The effects of combined RNA interference(RNAi) of human telomerase RNA(hTR) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT) genes on telomerase activity in a bladder cancer cell line(BIU-87 cells) were investigated by using gene chip technology in vitro with an attempt to evaluate the role of RNAi in the gene therapy of bladder transitional cell cancer(BTCC).Three TR-specific double-stranded small interfering RNAs(siRNAs) and three TERT-specific double-stranded siRNAs were designed to target different reg...

  14. Steroid Receptor Coactivator-3 Regulates Glucose Metabolism in Bladder Cancer Cells through Coactivation of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Chang, Cunjie; Cui, Yangyan; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yang, Jun; Shen, Lan; Zhou, Ji; Hou, Zhibo; Zhang, Zhen; Ye, Changxiao; Hasenmayer, Donald; Perkins, Robert; Huang, Xiaojing; Yao, Xin; Yu, Like; Huang, Ruimin; Zhang, Dianzheng; Guo, Hongqian; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process, requiring high glycolysis, which is known as “Warburg effect,” to support anabolic growth. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3), a steroid receptor coactivator, is overexpressed and/or amplified in multiple cancer types, including non-steroid targeted cancers, such as urinary bladder cancer (UBC). However, whether SRC-3 regulates the metabolic reprogramming for cancer cell growth is unknown. Here, we reported that overexpression of SRC-3 accelerated UBC cell growth, accompanied by the increased expression of genes involved in glycolysis. Knockdown of SRC-3 reduced the UBC cell glycolytic rate under hypoxia, decreased tumor growth in nude mice, with reduction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and lactate dehydrogenase expression levels. We further revealed that SRC-3 could interact with hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), which is a key transcription factor required for glycolysis, and coactivate its transcriptional activity. SRC-3 was recruited to the promoters of HIF1α-target genes, such as glut1 and pgk1. The positive correlation of expression levels between SRC-3 and Glut1 proteins was demonstrated in human UBC patient samples. Inhibition of glycolysis through targeting HK2 or LDHA decelerated SRC-3 overexpression-induced cell growth. In summary, overexpression of SRC-3 promoted glycolysis in bladder cancer cells through HIF1α to facilitate tumorigenesis, which may be an intriguing drug target for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:24584933

  15. Different distribution of c-kit positive interstitial cells of Cajal-like in children’s urinary bladders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Danilewicz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the presence of c-kit positive interstitial cells of Cajal-like (ICCs-like in the walls of the urinary bladders of children. An immunohistochemical study of specimens, obtained at autopsy from either the trigonum (Group A or the corpus (Group B, was performed using antibodies against c-kit (CD 117. Histological morphometry of the immunoexpression of c-kit positive ICCs-like was performed by means of image analysis system. The c-kit positive ICCs-like were identified by their morphology and counted in the vesical muscle layer in ten adjacent high power fields, each of 0.0479 mm2. The areas of the epithelial and subepithelial layers containing c-kit positive mast cells (rounded body with no dendritic processes were neglected. The results were expressed as the number of ICCs-like cells per mm2. Differences between groups were tested using unpaired Student’s t-test preceded by evaluation of normality and Levene’s test. Results were considered statistically significant if p < 0.05. In Group A, the mean number of ICCs-like cells was statistically significantly higher (41.5 cells/mm2 than in Group B (30.4 cells/mm2, p < 0.05. ICCs-like cells were found within the smooth muscle layer of the urinary bladder. There was a different distribution of these cells in particular parts of the bladder, which was probably due to the different roles of the trigonum and the corpus in the bladders of children. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 3, pp. 431–435

  16. Urothelial carcinoma involving the distal penis

    OpenAIRE

    Dason, Shawn; Sheikh, Adeel; Wang, Jing Gennie; Tauqir, Syeda; Davies, Timothy O.; Shayegan, Bobby

    2012-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) rarely metastasizes to the penis and skin. We report the case of a 73-year-old man with UC metastases to the corpus spongiosum and dermis of the distal penis. We also review the clinicopathologic characteristics and management options for UC metastasizing to the penis. The patient presented with priapism and edema of the genital region. This follows a 5-year history of urothelial carcinoma in situ that progressed to invasive cancer despite intravesical immunotherapy....

  17. Co-localization of GSTP1 and JNK in transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Pljesa-Ercegovac

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of urinary bladder belongs to glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1 overexpressing tumors. Upregulated GSTP1 in TCC is related to apoptosis inhibition. This antiapoptotic effects of GSTP1 might be mediated through protein:protein interaction with c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK. Herein, we analyzed whether a direct link between GSTP1 and JNK exists in TCC. The presence of GSTP1/JNK complexes was analyzed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting in 20 TCC specimens, obtained after surgery. Co-localization of GSTP1 and JNK was also investigated in the 5637 TCC cell line by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. By means of immunoprecipitation we show for the first time the presence of GSTP1/JNK complexes in all TCC samples studied. A co-localization of GSTP1 and JNK was also demonstrated in the 5637 TCC cell line by means of confocal microscopy. Protein-protein interactions, together with co-localization between GSTP1 and JNK provide evidence that GSTP1 most probably inhibits apoptosis in TCC cells by non-covalent binding to JNK.

  18. Evaluation of the Efficacy of the H. pylori Protein HP-NAP as a Therapeutic Tool for Treatment of Bladder Cancer in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codolo, Gaia; Munari, Fabio; Fassan, Matteo; de Bernard, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the urogenital tract. Intravesical injection of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the gold standard treatment for the high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, since the treatment-related side effects are relevant, newer biological response modifiers with a better benefit/side effects ratio are needed. The tumour microenvironment can influence both tumour development and therapy efficacy. In order to obtain a good model, it is desirable to implant tumour cells in the organ from which the cancer originates. In this protocol, we describe a method for establishing a tumour in the bladder cavity of female mice and subsequent delivery of therapeutic agents; the latter are exemplified by our use of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein (HP-NAP). A preliminary chemical burn of the mucosa, followed by the injection of mouse urothelial carcinoma cell line MB49 via urethral catheterization, enables the cells to attach to the bladder mucosa. After a period, required to allow an initial proliferation of the cells, mice are treated with HP-NAP, administrated again via catheterization. The anti-tumour activity of HP-NAP is evaluated comparing the tumour volume, the extent of necrosis and the degree of vascularization between vehicle- and HP-NAP-treated animals. PMID:26068073

  19. Gecko proteins induce the apoptosis of bladder cancer 5637 cells by inhibiting Akt and activating the intrinsic caspase cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geun-Young; Park, Soon Yong; Jo, Ara; Kim, Mira; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jun, Woo-Jin; Shim, Sang In; Lee, Sang Chul; Chung,