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Sample records for bladder urothelial cells

  1. Regulation of ACh release from guinea pig bladder urothelial cells: potential role in bladder filling sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLatchie, L M; Young, J S; Fry, C H

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and characterize the mechanism of non-neuronal ACh release from bladder urothelial cells and to determine if urothelial cells could be a site of action of anti-muscarinic drugs. A novel technique was developed whereby ACh could be measured from freshly isolated guinea pig urothelial cells in suspension following mechanical stimulation. Various agents were used to manipulate possible ACh release pathways in turn and to study the effects of muscarinic receptor activation and inhibition on urothelial ATP release. Minimal mechanical stimulus achieved full ACh release, indicating a small dynamic range and possible all-or-none signal. ACh release involved a mechanism dependent on the anion channel CFTR and intracellular calcium concentration, but was independent of extracellular calcium, vesicular trafficking, connexins or pannexins, organic cation transporters and was not affected by botulinum-A toxin. Stimulating ACh receptors increased ATP production and antagonizing them reduced ATP release, suggesting a link between ACh and ATP release. These results suggest that release of non-neuronal ACh from the urothelium is large enough and well located to act as a modulator of ATP release. It is hypothesized that this pathway may contribute to the actions of anti-muscarinic drugs in reducing the symptoms of lower urinary tract syndromes. Additionally the involvement of CFTR in ACh release suggests an exciting new direction for the treatment of these conditions. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Susan K.; Birder, Lori A.; Chai, Toby C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology. PMID:24900993

  3. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Keay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC, feline interstitial cystitis (FIC, and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB. These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology.

  4. Clear cell urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knez, Virginia M; Barrow, Willis; Lucia, M Scott; Wilson, Shandra; La Rosa, Francisco G

    2014-08-14

    The occurrence of clear cell tumors in the bladder is not uncommon. Clear cell dysplasia is well-described and characterized by focal replacement of transitional mucosa by cells with abundant clear cytoplasm, nuclear enlargement, and a granular chromatin pattern. Clear cells can also be seen in clear cell adenocarcinoma, which is rare, comprising 0.5% to 2.0% of the reported bladder carcinomas. Other clear cell tumors found in the bladder to be considered in the differential diagnosis are tumors of Müllerian origin and metastatic lesions, such as renal cell carcinoma, clear cell sarcoma, and malignant melanoma. Clear cell urothelial carcinoma is exceedingly rare, with only nine clinical cases described in the literature. We report the case of a 75-year-old Caucasian man who presented with intermittent hematuria, in whom a bladder tumor was identified. A final histopathology examination of a cystoprostatectomy specimen revealed a pT3b, G3 urothelial carcinoma of clear cell type (>90% clear cells) and a prostatic adenocarcinoma of Gleason grade 3+3 (score=6). The bladder tumor consisted of sheets of malignant cells with severe nuclear atypia and abundant clear cytoplasm; no glandular or tubular structures were identified. Tumor cells were periodic acid-Schiff positive and negative after diastase treatment; additional mucicarmine and oil red O stains were negative. Immunohistochemical stains showed the tumor cells positive for cytokeratin 7 (CK7), p63 (>80% nuclei), p53 (about 30% nuclei), vimentin, E-cadherin, cluster of differentiation (CD10), and Ki-67 (>70% nuclei). Stains for cell adhesion molecule 5.2 (CAM 5.2), CD117, cytokeratin 20 (CK20), human melanoma black 45 (HMB-45), paired box protein (PAX 8), placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), prostate specific antigen (PSA), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), cancer antigen 25 (CA25), leukocyte common antigen (LC), S-100 protein, and uroplakin III were all negative. The tumor marker profile was consistent with clear

  5. The UBC-40 Urothelial Bladder Cancer cell line index: a genomic resource for functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Julie; Rico, Daniel; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Auer, Herbert; Gómez, Gonzalo; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Pisano, David G; Schulz, Wolfgang A; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Carrato, Alfredo; Theodorescu, Dan; Chanock, Stephen; Valencia, Alfonso; Real, Francisco X

    2015-05-22

    Urothelial bladder cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease. Cancer cell lines are useful tools for its study. This is a comprehensive genomic characterization of 40 urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC) cell lines including information on origin, mutation status of genes implicated in bladder cancer (FGFR3, PIK3CA, TP53, and RAS), copy number alterations assessed using high density SNP arrays, uniparental disomy (UPD) events, and gene expression. Based on gene mutation patterns and genomic changes we identify lines representative of the FGFR3-driven tumor pathway and of the TP53/RB tumor suppressor-driven pathway. High-density array copy number analysis identified significant focal gains (1q32, 5p13.1-12, 7q11, and 7q33) and losses (i.e. 6p22.1) in regions altered in tumors but not previously described as affected in bladder cell lines. We also identify new evidence for frequent regions of UPD, often coinciding with regions reported to be lost in tumors. Previously undescribed chromosome X losses found in UBC lines also point to potential tumor suppressor genes. Cell lines representative of the FGFR3-driven pathway showed a lower number of UPD events. Overall, there is a predominance of more aggressive tumor subtypes among the cell lines. We provide a cell line classification that establishes their relatedness to the major molecularly-defined bladder tumor subtypes. The compiled information should serve as a useful reference to the bladder cancer research community and should help to select cell lines appropriate for the functional analysis of bladder cancer genes, for example those being identified through massive parallel sequencing.

  6. Urothelial atypia and survival rate of 500 unselected patients with primary transitional-cell tumour of the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde Olsen, P; Wolf, H; Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 500 unselected patients with primary urinary bladder tumours the influence of urothelial atypia on the 5 years survival-rate was examined. All tumours were transitional-cell tumours categorized according to the T-classification. Mucosal biopsies from 7 pre-selected sites...... were taken at the initial cystoscopy in 391 patients (78%) to identify urothelial atypia. The over-all cumulative 5 years survival-rate was 48%. Submucosal and muscle invasion had major influence on survival, whereas tumour grade was less important. Patients with urothelial atypia fared significantly...... worse than those with normal bladder mucosa (5 years survival 42% versus 62%). This difference in survival-rate became apparent first after two years of observation. Grade II atypia in the bladder mucosa and grade III (carcinoma in situ) had equal significance assessed by the survival-rates....

  7. Clear-cell variant urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a case report and review of the literature

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    Hossein Tezval

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell variants of transitional cell carcinomas (TCC of the bladder are extremely rare tumors. Only 6 cases have been reported until now. We report of a 67 year old man who presented with fast growing tumor disease. While initial diagnosis showed localized bladder tumor, final histopathology revealed pT4, G3, L1 urothelial carcinoma with clear cell differentiation. No more than 14 weeks after initial diagnosis the patient died from multi-organ failure after unsuccessful salvage laparotomy which showed massive tumor burden within the pelvis and peritoneal carcinosis. This case demonstrated an extremely fast tumor growth. Therefore, patients with clear cell urothelial carcinoma should be treated vigorously and without time delay. We present a case of clear cell variant of TCC which exhibited an extremely aggressive behavior. To our knowledge this is the fifth report of this rare disease.

  8. Characterization of HGF/Met Signaling in Cell Lines Derived From Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

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    Lee, Young H. [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Apolo, Andrea B. [Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Agarwal, Piyush K.; Bottaro, Donald P., E-mail: dbottaro@helix.nih.gov [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2014-11-25

    There is mounting evidence of oncogenic hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. The effects of three kinase inhibitors, cabozantinib, crizotinib and EMD1214063, on HGF-driven signaling and cell growth, invasion and tumorigenicity were analyzed in cultured UC cell lines. SW780 xenograft growth in SCID and human HGF knock-in SCID (hHGF/SCID) mice treated with cabozantinib or vehicle, as well as tumor levels of Met and pMet, were also determined. Met content was robust in most UC-derived cell lines. Basal pMet content and effector activation state in quiescent cells were low, but significantly enhanced by added HGF, as were cell invasion, proliferation and anchorage independent growth. These HGF-driven effects were reversed by Met inhibitor treatment. Tumor xenograft growth was significantly higher in hHGF/SCID mice vs. SCID mice and significantly inhibited by cabozantinib, as was tumor phospho-Met content. These studies indicate the prevalence and functionality of the HGF/Met signaling pathway in UC cells, suggest that paracrine HGF may contribute to UC tumor growth and progression, and that support further preclinical investigation of Met inhibitors for the treatment of UC is warranted.

  9. Corticotropin-releasing factor family peptide signaling in feline bladder urothelial cells.

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    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Wolf-Johnston, Amanda; Roppolo, James R; Buffington, Tony C A; Birder, Lori A

    2014-07-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) plays a central role in the orchestration of behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress. The family of CRF-related peptides (CRF and paralogs: urocortin (Ucn)-I, -II, and -III) and associated receptors (CRFR1 and CRFR2) are also expressed in peripheral tissues such as the skin and gastrointestinal tract. Local signaling may exert multiple effects of stress-induced exacerbation of many complex syndromes, including psoriasis and visceral hypersensitivity. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS), a chronic visceral pain syndrome characterized by urinary frequency, urgency, and pelvic pain, is reported to be exacerbated by stress. Functional changes in the epithelial lining of the bladder, a vital blood-urine barrier called the urothelium, may play a role in IC/PBS. This study investigated the expression and functional activity of CRF-related peptides in the urothelium of normal cats and cats with feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), a chronic idiopathic cystitis exhibiting similarities to humans diagnosed with IC/PBS. Western blots analysis showed urothelial (UT) expression of CRFR1 and CRFR2. Enzyme immunoassay revealed release of endogenous ligands (CRF and Ucn) by UT cells in culture. Evidence of functional activation of CRFR1 and CRFR2 by receptor-selective agonists (CRF and UCN3 respectively) was shown by i) the measurement of ATP release using the luciferin-luciferase assay and ii) the use of membrane-impermeant fluorescent dyes (FM dyes) for fluorescence microscopy to assess membrane exocytotic responses in real time. Our findings show evidence of CRF-related peptide signaling in the urothelium. Differences in functional responses between FIC and normal UT indicate that this system is altered in IC/PBS. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Diagnostic value of circulating tumor cell detection in bladder and urothelial cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Msaouel, Pavlos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The diagnostic value and prognostic significance of circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection in patients with bladder cancer is controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to consolidate current evidence regarding the use of CTC detection assays to diagnose bladder and other urothelial cancers and the association of CTC positivity with advanced, remote disease. Studies that investigated the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with bladder cancer and/or urothelial cancer were identified and reviewed. Sensitivities, specificities, and positive (LR+) and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) of CTC detection in individual studies were calculated and meta-analyzed by random effects model. Overall odds ratio of CTC positivity in patients with advanced disease versus those with organ-confined cancer was also calculated. Overall sensitivity of CTC detection assays was 35.1% (95%CI, 32.4-38%); specificity, LR+, and LR- was 89.4% (95%CI, 87.2-91.3%), 3.77 (95%CI, 1.95-7.30) and 0.72 (95%CI, 0.64-0.81). CTC-positive patients were significantly more likely to have advanced (stage III-IV) disease compared with CTC-negative patients (OR, 5.05; 95%CI, 2.49-10.26). CTC evaluation can confirm tumor diagnosis and identify patients with advanced bladder cancer. However, due to the low overall sensitivity, CTC detection assays should not be used as initial screening tests

  11. Suppression of urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma cell by the ethanol extract of pomegranate fruit through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

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    Lee, Song-Tay; Lu, Min-Hua; Chien, Lan-Hsiang; Wu, Ting-Feng; Huang, Li-Chien; Liao, Gwo-Ing

    2013-12-21

    Pomegranate possesses many medicinal properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammation and antitumor. It has been extensively used as a folk medicine by many cultures. Pomegranate fruit has been shown to have the inhibitory efficacy against prostate cancer and lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. It can be exploited in chemoprevention and chemotherapy of prostate cancer. In this study we examined the anti-cancer efficacy of pomegranate fruit grown in Taiwan against urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC) and its mechanism of action. Edible portion of Taiwanese pomegranate was extracted using ethanol and the anti-cancer effectiveness of ethanol extract was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry and western immunoblotting were exploited to uncover the molecular pathways underlying anti-UBUC activity of Taiwanese pomegranate ethanol extract. This study demonstrated that Taiwanese pomegranate fruit ethanol extract (PEE) could effectively restrict the proliferation of UBUC T24 and J82 cells. Cell cycle analyses indicated that the S phase arrest induced by PEE treatment might be caused by an increase in cyclin A protein level and a decrease in the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 1. The results of western immunoblotting demonstrated that PEE treatment could not only evoke the activation of pro-caspase-3, -8,-9 but also increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in T24 cells. The above observations implicated that PEE administration might trigger the apoptosis in T24 cells through death receptor signaling and mitochondrial damage pathway. Besides we found that PEE exposure to T24 cells could provoke intensive activation of procaspase-12 and enhance the expressions of CHOP and Bip, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker, suggesting that ER stress might be the cardinal apoptotic mechanism of PEE-induced inhibition of bladder cancer cell. The analytical results of this study help to provide insight into the molecular mechanism

  12. Acrolein- and 4-Aminobiphenyl-DNA adducts in human bladder mucosa and tumor tissue and their mutagenicity in human urothelial cells.

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    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Weng, Mao-wen; Hu, Yu; Chen, Wei-sheng; Chou, David; Liu, Yan; Donin, Nicholas; Huang, William C; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Wang, Hailin; Beland, Frederick A; Tang, Moon-shong

    2014-06-15

    Tobacco smoke (TS) is a major cause of human bladder cancer (BC). Two components in TS, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and acrolein, which also are environmental contaminants, can cause bladder tumor in rat models. Their role in TS related BC has not been forthcoming. To establish the relationship between acrolein and 4-ABP exposure and BC, we analyzed acrolein-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 4-ABP-DNA adducts in normal human urothelial mucosa (NHUM) and bladder tumor tissues (BTT), and measured their mutagenicity in human urothelial cells. We found that the acrolein-dG levels in NHUM and BTT are 10-30 fold higher than 4-ABP-DNA adduct levels and that the acrolein-dG levels in BTT are 2 fold higher than in NHUM. Both acrolein-dG and 4-ABP-DNA adducts are mutagenic; however, the former are 5 fold more mutagenic than the latter. These two types of DNA adducts induce different mutational signatures and spectra. We found that acrolein inhibits nucleotide excision and base excision repair and induces repair protein degradation in urothelial cells. Since acrolein is abundant in TS, inhaled acrolein is excreted into urine and accumulates in the bladder and because acrolein inhibits DNA repair and acrolein-dG DNA adducts are mutagenic, we propose that acrolein is a major bladder carcinogen in TS.

  13. Long intergenic non-coding RNA TUG1 is overexpressed in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

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    Han, Yonghua; Liu, Yuchen; Gui, Yaoting; Cai, Zhiming

    2013-04-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression via chromatin reprogramming. Taurine Up-regulated Gene 1 (TUG1) is a lincRNA that is associated with chromatin-modifying complexes and plays roles in gene regulation. In this study, we determined the expression patterns of TUG1 and the cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induced by silencing TUG1 in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. The expression levels of TUG1 were determined using Real-Time qPCR in a total of 44 patients with bladder urothelial carcinomas. Bladder urothelial carcinoma T24 and 5637 cells were transfected with TUG1 siRNA or negative control siRNA. Cell proliferation was evaluated using MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined using ELISA assay. TUG1 was up-regulated in bladder urothelial carcinoma compared to paired normal urothelium. High TUG1 expression levels were associated with high grade and stage carcinomas. Cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction were observed in TUG1 siRNA-transfected bladder urothelial carcinoma T24 and 5637 cells. Our data suggest that lincRNA TUG1 is emerging as a novel player in the disease state of bladder urothelial carcinoma. TUG1 may have potential roles as a biomarker and/or a therapeutic target in bladder urothelial carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

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    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  15. The role of polymer nanosurface roughness and submicron pores in improving bladder urothelial cell density and inhibiting calcium oxalate stone formation

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    Chun, Young Wook; Khang, Dongwoo; Haberstroh, Karen M.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2009-02-01

    Synthetic polymers have been proposed for replacing resected cancerous bladder tissue. However, conventional (or nanosmooth) polymers used in such applications (such as poly(ether) urethane (PU) and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)) often fail clinically due to poor bladder tissue regeneration, low cytocompatibility properties, and excessive calcium stone formation. For the successful reconstruction of bladder tissue, polymer surfaces should be modified to combat these common problems. Along these lines, implementing nanoscale surface features that mimic the natural roughness of bladder tissue on polymer surfaces can promote appropriate cell growth, accelerate bladder tissue regeneration and inhibit bladder calcium stone formation. To test this hypothesis, in this study, the cytocompatibility properties of both a non-biodegradable polymer (PU) and a biodegradable polymer (PLGA) were investigated after etching in chemicals (HNO3 and NaOH, respectively) to create nanoscale surface features. After chemical etching, PU possessed submicron sized pores and numerous nanometer surface features while PLGA possessed few pores and large amounts of nanometer surface roughness. Results from this study strongly supported the assertion that nanometer scale surface roughness produced on PU and PLGA promoted the density of urothelial cells (cells that line the interior of the bladder), with the greatest urothelial cell densities observed on nanorough PLGA. In addition, compared to respective conventional polymers, the results provided evidence that nanorough PU and PLGA inhibited calcium oxalate stone formation; submicron pored nanorough PU inhibited calcium oxalate stone formation the most. Thus, results from the present study suggest the importance of nanometer topographical cues for designing better materials for bladder tissue engineering applications.

  16. Urine and bladder washing cytology for detection of urothelial carcinoma: standard test with new possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flezar, Margareta Strojan

    2010-01-01

    Light microscopic evaluation of cell morphology in preparations from urine or bladder washing containing exfoliated cells is a standard and primary method for the detection of bladder cancer and also malignancy from other parts of the urinary tract. The cytopathologic examination is a valuable method to detect an early recurrence of malignancy or new primary carcinoma during the follow-up of patients after the treatment of bladder cancer. Characteristic cellular and nuclear signs of malignancy indicate invasive or in situ urothelial carcinoma or high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma. However, low sensitivity of the method reflects the unreliable cytopathologic diagnosis of low-grade urothelial neoplasms as cellular and nuclear signs of malignancy in these neoplasms are poorly manifested. Many different markers were developed to improve the diagnosis of bladder carcinoma on urinary samples. UroVysion™ test is among the newest and most promising tests. By the method of in situ hybridization one can detect specific cytogenetic changes of urothelial carcinoma

  17. Discrimination of bladder cancer cells from normal urothelial cells with high specificity and sensitivity: combined application of atomic force microscopy and modulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Riches, Andrew; Borger, Eva; Herrington, Simon; Dholakia, Kishan; Adya, Ashok K

    2014-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modulated Raman spectroscopy (MRS) were used to discriminate between living normal human urothelial cells (SV-HUC-1) and bladder tumour cells (MGH-U1) with high specificity and sensitivity. MGH-U1 cells were 1.5-fold smaller, 1.7-fold thicker and 1.4-fold rougher than normal SV-HUC-1 cells. The adhesion energy was 2.6-fold higher in the MGH-U1 cells compared to normal SV-HUC-1 cells, which possibly indicates that bladder tumour cells are more deformable than normal cells. The elastic modulus of MGH-U1 cells was 12-fold lower than SV-HUC-1 cells, suggesting a higher elasticity of the bladder cancer cell membranes. The biochemical fingerprints of cancer cells displayed a higher DNA and lipid content, probably due to an increase in the nuclear to cytoplasm ratio. Normal cells were characterized by higher protein contents. AFM studies revealed a decrease in the lateral dimensions and an increase in thickness of cancer cells compared to normal cells; these studies authenticate the observations from MRS. Nanostructural, nanomechanical and biochemical profiles of bladder cells provide qualitative and quantitative markers to differentiate between normal and cancerous cells at the single cellular level. AFM and MRS allow discrimination between adhesion energy, elasticity and Raman spectra of SV-HUC-1 and MGH-U1 cells with high specificity (83, 98 and 95%) and sensitivity (97, 93 and 98%). Such single-cell-level studies could have a pivotal impact on the development of AFM-Raman combined methodologies for cancer profiling and screening with translational significance. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of urothelial cells in BCG immunotherapy for superficial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, R. F. M.; Kurth, K.-H.; Schamhart, D. H. J.

    2004-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is used for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer, both to reduce the recurrence rate of bladder tumour and to diminish the risk of progression. Since its first therapeutic application in 1976, major research efforts have been

  19. Transcriptional Modulation of the ERK1/2 MAPK and NF-kB pathways in Human Urothelial cells after trivalent arsenical exposure: Implications for urinary bladder cancer

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    Chronic exposure to drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with an increased risk ofurinary bladder (DB) cancers in humans. Rodent models administered particular arsenicals have indicated urothelial necrosis followed by regenerative proliferation i...

  20. Differentiation of human endometrial stem cells into urothelial cells on a three-dimensional nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffold: an autologous cell resource for reconstruction of the urinary bladder wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Sharif, Shiva; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus; Azimi, Alireza; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Verdi, Javad

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the bladder wall via in vitro differentiated stem cells on an appropriate scaffold could be used in such conditions as cancer and neurogenic urinary bladder. This study aimed to examine the potential of human endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) to form urinary bladder epithelial cells (urothelium) on nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds, for construction of the urinary bladder wall. After passage 4, EnSCs were induced by keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) and seeded on electrospun collagen-V, silk and silk-collagen nanofibres. Later we tested urothelium-specific genes and proteins (uroplakin-Ia, uroplakin-Ib, uroplakin-II, uroplakin-III and cytokeratin 20) by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histology were used to detect cell-matrix interactions. DMEM/F12 supplemented by KGF and EGF induced EnSCs to express urothelial cell-specific genes and proteins. Either collagen, silk or silk-collagen scaffolds promoted cell proliferation. The nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds provided a three-dimensional (3D) structure to maximize cell-matrix penetration and increase differentiation of the EnSCs. Human EnSCs seeded on 3D nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds and differentiated to urothelial cells provide a suitable source for potential use in bladder wall reconstruction in women. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Urothelial carcinoma associated 1 is a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-targeted long noncoding RNA that enhances hypoxic bladder cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

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    Xue, Mei; Li, Xu; Li, Zhengkun; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Urothelial carcinoma associated 1 (UCA1) has been identified as an oncogenic long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is involved in bladder cancer progression and acts as a diagnostic biomarker for bladder carcinoma. Here, we studied the expression and function of lncRNA-UCA1 in the hypoxic microenvironment of bladder cancer. The expression and transcriptional activity of lncRNA-UCA1 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and luciferase assays. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assays and flow cytometry. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing, migration, and invasion assays. The binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) to hypoxia response elements (HREs) in the lncRNA-UCA1 promoter was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. HRE mutations were generated by using a site-directed mutagenesis kit, and HIF-1α knockdown was mediated by small interfering RNA. The effect of HIF-1α inhibition by YC-1 on lncRNA-UCA1 expression was also examined. LncRNA-UCA1 was upregulated by hypoxia in bladder cancer cells. Under hypoxic conditions, lncRNA-UCA1 upregulation increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and inhibited apoptosis. The underlying mechanism of hypoxia-upregulated lncRNA-UCA1 expression was that HIF-1α specifically bound to HREs in the lncRNA-UCA1 promoter. Furthermore, HIF-1α knockdown or inhibition could prevent lncRNA-UCA1 upregulation under hypoxia. These findings revealed the mechanism of lncRNA-UCA1 upregulation in hypoxic bladder cancer cells and suggested that effective blocking of lncRNA-UCA1 expression in the hypoxic microenvironment of bladder cancer could be a novel therapeutic strategy.

  2. Pathogenic and Diagnostic Potential of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 Nuclear Proteins in Urothelial Cell Carcinoma of Human Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Santoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder is one of the most common malignancies of genitourinary tract. Patients with bladder cancer need a life-long surveillance, directly due to the relatively high recurrence rate of this tumor. The use of cystoscopy represents the gold standard for the followup of previously treated patients. Nevertheless, several factors, including cost and invasiveness, render cystoscopy not ideal for routine controls. Advances in the identification of specific alterations in the nuclear structure of bladder cancer cells have opened novel diagnostic landscapes. The members of nuclear matrix protein family BLCA-1 and BLCA-4, are currently under evaluation as bladder cancer urinary markers. They are involved in tumour cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In this paper, we illustrate the role of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 in bladder carcinogenesis and their potential exploitation as biomarkers in this cancer.

  3. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Wise, John Pierce Sr.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium is genotoxic to human urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium induces aneuploidy in human urothelial cells. • hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells model the effects seen in primary urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium has a strong likelihood of being carcinogenic for bladder tissue.

  4. Productive infection of bovine papillomavirus type 2 in the urothelial cells of naturally occurring urinary bladder tumors in cattle and water buffaloes.

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    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Papillomaviruses (PVs are highly epitheliotropic as they usually establish productive infections within squamous epithelia of the skin, the anogenital tract and the oral cavity. In this study, early (E and late (L protein expression of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2 in the urothelium of the urinary bladder is described in cows and water buffaloes suffering from naturally occurring papillomavirus-associated urothelial bladder tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: E5 protein, the major oncoprotein of the BPV-2, was detected in all tumors. L1 DNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced and confirmed to be L1 DNA. The major capsid protein, L1, believed to be only expressed in productive papillomavirus infection was detected by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical investigations confirmed the presence of L1 protein both in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells of the neoplastic urothelium. Finally, the early protein E2, required for viral DNA replication and known to be a pivotal factor for both productive and persistent infection, was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemically. Electron microscopic investigations detected electron dense particles, the shape and size of which are consistent with submicroscopic features of viral particles, in nuclei of neoplastic urothelium. CONCLUSION: This study shows that both active and productive infections by BPV-2 in the urothelium of the bovine and bubaline urinary bladder can occur in vivo.

  5. Epidemiology and risk factors of urothelial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, M.; Catto, J.W.; Dalbagni, G.; Grossman, H.B.; Herr, H.; Karakiewicz, P.; Kassouf, W.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; La Vecchia, C.; Shariat, S.; Lotan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) is a disease of significant morbidity and mortality. It is important to understand the risk factors of this disease. OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence, prevalence, and mortality of UBC and to review and interpret the current evidence on and impact of the

  6. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  7. Urothelial Tight Junction Barrier Dysfunction Sensitizes Bladder Afferents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rued, Anna C.; Taiclet, Stefanie N.; Birder, Lori A.; Kullmann, F. Aura

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a chronic voiding disorder that presents with pain in the urinary bladder and surrounding pelvic region. A growing body of evidence suggests that an increase in the permeability of the urothelium, the epithelial barrier that lines the interior of the bladder, contributes to the symptoms of IC/BPS. To examine the consequence of increased urothelial permeability on pelvic pain and afferent excitability, we overexpressed in the urothelium claudin 2 (Cldn2), a tight junction (TJ)-associated protein whose message is significantly upregulated in biopsies of IC/BPS patients. Consistent with the presence of bladder-derived pain, rats overexpressing Cldn2 showed hypersensitivity to von Frey filaments applied to the pelvic region. Overexpression of Cldn2 increased the expression of c-Fos and promoted the activation of ERK1/2 in spinal cord segments receiving bladder input, which we conceive is the result of noxious stimulation of afferent pathways. To determine whether the mechanical allodynia observed in rats with reduced urothelial barrier function results from altered afferent activity, we examined the firing of acutely isolated bladder sensory neurons. In patch-clamp recordings, about 30% of the bladder sensory neurons from rats transduced with Cldn2, but not controls transduced with GFP, displayed spontaneous activity. Furthermore, bladder sensory neurons with tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) action potentials from rats transduced with Cldn2 showed hyperexcitability in response to suprathreshold electrical stimulation. These findings suggest that as a result of a leaky urothelium, the diffusion of urinary solutes through the urothelial barrier sensitizes bladders afferents, promoting voiding at low filling volumes and pain. PMID:28560313

  8. Expression profile of urothelial transcription factors in bladder biopsies with interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaga, Kanya; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Kaga, Mayuko; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2017-08-01

    To characterize interstitial cystitis pathology based on the expression profile of urothelial tissue-specific master transcription factors. Bladder carcinoma cell lines derived from the urothelial stem cells (epithelial or mesenchymal) were used to identify candidate urothelial master transcription factors. Gene expression was measured with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. From the initial screening of 170 transcription factors (human homologs of Drosophila segmentation genes and known master transcription factors from a database), 28 transcription factors were selected. Subsequently, messenger ribonucleic acid from bladder biopsies of interstitial cystitis patients was purified, and gene expression levels of known urothelial marker genes and candidate master transcription factors were measured. Multivariate expression data were analyzed with spss software. Factor analysis decomposed the expression profile into four axes: principal axis 1 included retinoic acid receptors and 17 candidate master transcription factors. Principal axis 2 included KRT5 and five candidates. Principal axis 3 included transcription factor TP63 and two candidates. Principal axis 4 included SHH and two candidates. Principal component analysis segregated biopsies from Hunner's lesion in the principal component 1 (retinoic acid)/principal component 2 (SOX13)/principal component 3 (TP63) space. Urothelial master transcription factors could serve as novel diagnostic markers and potentially explain the molecular pathology of interstitial cystitis. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Mincle, an Innate Immune Receptor, Is Expressed in Urothelial Cancer Cells of Papillomavirus-Associated Urothelial Tumors of Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available Mincle, macrophage-inducible C-type lectin, is a member of C-type lectin receptors. It plays an important role in anti-mycobacterial and anti-fungal immunity. Furthermore it senses dead cells through its primary ligand SAP130.We examined ten urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of cattle. Eight of them expressed E5 cDNA of bovine papillomaviruses type 2 (BPV-2 and type 13 (BPV-13 that belong to Deltapapillomavirus genus. Two of them were not examined for detection of E5 cDNA. Mincle expression appeared to occur in urothelial neoplastic cells only. No mincle expression was detected in urothelial cells from healthy cattle. Mincle expression was characterized by a membranous pattern in papillary urothelial cancers; isolated and/or clustered urothelial cells showing a strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity were primarily seen in invasive urothelial cancers.This is the first study about the expression of mincle in veterinary oncology and the first report which describes the expression of functional mincle receptor in neoplastic cells in medical literature. As it has been shown that urothelial cancer cells have the ability to function as antigen-presenting cells (APCs, it is conceivable that mincle expression is involved in the presentation of cancer cell antigens to cells of the immune system. Furthermore, since expression of mincle contributes to the control of Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection, this study has exciting clinical implications in comparative medicine keeping in mind that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG immunotherapy is currently the most effective treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in man. Mincle expression in urothelial tumor cells warrants further study to better understand the role, if any, of this receptor in bladder cancer. Future studies will provide insights in the role of mincle receptor of urothelial cancer cells in antitumor immunotherapy.

  10. Urothelial Tumours of the Urinary Bladder: A Histopathological Study of Cystoscopic Biopsies

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    Sujan Vaidya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Bladder tumours constitute one of the most common urological conditions. Urothelial (transitional cell carcinoma accounts for 90% of all primary tumours of the bladder. These tumours are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to present the histopathological patterns of urothelial tumours and to determine the grade and stage of these tumours. Methods: This is a 3 year retrospective study of urothelial tumours carried out in the Department of Pathology, Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS, Lalitpur, Nepal. Data of all cystoscopic biopsies collected during this period were analyzed. Results: Urothelial (transitional cell tumours accounted for 97.59% (81 cases of all bladder tumours. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC was the most common tumour which was present in 67 cases (80.72%. Of these, 32 (47.76% were low grade TCC while 35 (52.24% were high grade TCC. Maximum number of tumours (70.37% were superficial (pTa and pT1 while (29.63% were muscle invasive (pT2. Sixteen percent of low grade and 76.92% of high grade tumours showed muscle invasion. Detrusor muscle was absent in 23.88% cases (16/67. Conclusion: Transitional cell carcinoma was the most common bladder cancer. Most of these tumours were high grade. A large percentage of high grade carcinomas presented with muscle invasion. Pathological grade and muscle invasion are the most valuable prognostic predictors of survival. The importance of including smooth muscle in the biopsy specimens needs to be emphasized Key words: cancer, high grade, low grade, transitional, tumour, urinary bladder.

  11. Compensatory Paracrine Mechanisms That Define The Urothelial Response to Injury in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

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    Bassuk, James; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Sweet, Robert; Han, Chang-Hee; Soygur, Tarkan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Plaire, J. Chadwick; Charleston, Jay S.; Charleston, Lynne B.; Bagai, Shelly; Cochrane, Kimberly; Rubio, Eric; Bassuk, James A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-06-21

    Diseases and conditions affecting the lower urinary tract are a leading cause of dysfunctional sexual health, incontinence, infection, and kidney failure. The growth, differentiation, and repair of the bladder's epithelial lining are regulated, in part, by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7 and -10 via a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the receptor for FGF-7 and -10 within the transitional epithelium (urothelium). The FGF-7 gene is located at the 15q15-q21.1 locus on chromosome 15 and four exons generate a 3.852-kb mRNA. Five duplicated FGF-7 gene sequences that localized to chromosome 9 were predicted not to generate functional protein products, thus validating the use of FGF-7-null mice as an experimental model. Recombinant FGF-7 and -10 induced proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice in vivo.To determine the extent that induction of urothelial cell proliferation during the bladder response to injury is dependent on FGF-7, an animal model of partial bladder outlet obstruction was developed. Unbiased stereology was used to measure the percentage of proliferating urothelial cells between obstructed groups of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice. The stereological analysis indicated that a statistical significant difference did not exist between the two groups, suggesting that FGF-7 is not essential for urothelial cell proliferation in response to partial outlet obstruction. In contrast, a significant increase in FGF-10 expression was observed in the obstructed FGF-7-null group, indicating that the compensatory pathway that functions in this model results in urothelial repair.

  12. Urothelial cells in smears from cervix uteri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaoro, Luis Alberto; Guerra, Fernando; Angeleri, Anabela; Palamas, Marta; Melba, Sardi-Segovia; Rocher, Adriana Esther

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To establish the cytological criteria to identify the urothelial cells in cervical smears in order to avoid mistakes in the cytological diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Cervical smears from 34 post menopausal women with vesicovaginal fistulas, advanced bladder prolapse and genital erosive lichen planes (vulvar kraurosis) (Group 1) and transitional cell metaplasia of the cervix (TCM, Group 2) were stained with Papanicolaou technique. The cervical samples were taken during the routine annual examination for prevention of the uterine cancer. Results: The smears of cervix from Group 1 showed urothelial cells from the three layers of the transitional epithelium. The umbrella cells are the bigger ones with relatively large nuclei. Frequently, they are multinucleated with single or multiple nucleoli and a typical “frothy” cytoplasm (cytoplasmic vacuoles). The cells of the Group 2 showed nuclei with oval to spindled shapes, some tapered ends, less cytoplasm than squamous metaplastic cells, powdery chromatin, small nucleoli and nuclear grooves. Conclusions: The umbrella cells may be mistaken for dysplastic cells originating in low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions lesions (LSILs) due to their nuclear and cytoplasm sizes. Therefore, it is important to know the possibility of their appearance in the cervical smears, especially in post menopausal patients in order to avoid a false diagnosis of an intraepithelial lesion. It is unlikely that deeper cells of urothelium would be confused with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cells. However, their presence might be a reason of mistake in the diagnosis. TCM is an under-recognized metaplastic phenomenon of the cervix and vagina, which is a mimicker of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The differential characteristic between umbrella cells, cells from TCM and the deeper urothelial cells, and LSIL and HSIL are detailed in the present paper. PMID:22438615

  13. Muscarinic receptors of the urinary bladder: detrusor, urothelial and prejunctional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess-Williams, R

    2002-06-01

    1. The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for maintaining normal bladder function, contracting the bladder smooth muscle (detrusor) and relaxing the bladder outlet during micturition. 2. Contraction of the bladder involves direct contraction via M3 receptors and an indirect 're-contraction' via M2-receptors whereby a reduction in adenylate cyclase activity reverses the relaxation induced by beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. 3. Muscarinic receptors are also located on the epithelial lining of the bladder (urothelium) where they induce the release of a diffusible factor responsible for inhibiting contraction of the underlying detrusor smooth muscle. The factor remains unidentified but is not nitric oxide, a cyclooxygenase product or adenosine triphosphate. 4. Finally, muscarinic receptors are also located prejunctionally in the bladder on cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals, where M1-receptors facilitate transmitter release and M2 or M4-receptors inhibit transmitter release. 5. In pathological states, changes may occur in these receptor systems resulting in bladder dysfunction. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the main therapeutic agents available for treatment of the overactive bladder, but whether their therapeutic effect involves actions at all three locations (detrusor, prejunctional, urothelial) has yet to be established.

  14. Advanced small cell carcinoma of the bladder: clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes in 960 patients and comparison with urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geynisman, Daniel M.; Handorf, Elizabeth; Wong, Yu-Ning; Doyle, Jamie; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Canter, Daniel J.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Kutikov, Alexander; Smaldone, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes in advanced small cell bladder cancer (aSCBC) patients and compare to those with urothelial carcinoma (UC). Individuals in the National Cancer Data Base with a diagnosis of either nodal (TxN+M0) or distant metastatic (TxNxM1) disease were identified from 1998 to 2010. We assessed the relationships between stage, treatment modalities and survival in the aSCBC cohort and compared these to UC patients. In the 960 patient aSCBC cohort (62% M1), 50% received palliative therapy alone, 68% in M1 versus 21% in M0 groups (P < 0.0001). Single modality local therapy (15%) and surgical (21%) or radiation-based (14%) multimodal therapy (MMT) were used in the other 50%. Cystectomy-based MMT was utilized in 45% of N+M0 versus 6.4% of NxM1 patients (P < 0.0001). Median overall survival (OS) for aSCBC patients was 8.6 months; 13.0 months in N+M0 versus 5.3 months in NxM1 patients (P < 0.0001). Survival was similar between TxN1M0 and TxN2-3M0 patients (14.8 months vs. 12.1 months, P = 0.15). Urothelial carcinoma patients (n = 27,796, 45% M1) lived longer compared to aSCBC patients in the N+M0 group (17.3 months vs. 13.0 months, P = 0.0007). There were not clinically significant differences in OS between UC and aSCBC patients in the M1 group. Advanced SCBC is a rare disease with a poor survival and palliative therapy is common, especially in M1 patients. In comparison to UC, the outcomes for aSCBC patients are worse in those with lymph node only involvement but similar in those with distant disease

  15. Dual effects of radiation bystander signaling in urothelial cancer: purinergic-activation of apoptosis attenuates survival of urothelial cancer and normal urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Malgorzata A; Srivastava, Kirtiman; Breen, Conor; Butterworth, Karl T; McMahon, Stephen J; Prise, Kevin M; McCloskey, Karen D

    2017-11-14

    Radiation therapy (RT) delivers tumour kill, directly and often via bystander mechanisms. Bladder toxicity is a dose limiting constraint in pelvic RT, manifested as radiation cystitis and urinary symptoms. We aimed to investigate the impact of radiation-induced bystander signaling on normal/cancer urothelial cells. Human urothelial cancer cells T24, HT1376 and normal urothelial cells HUC, SV-HUC were used. Cells were irradiated and studied directly, or conditioned medium from irradiated cells (CM) was transferred to naïve, cells. T24 or SV-HUC cells in the shielded half of irradiated flasks had increased numbers of DNA damage foci vs non-irradiated cells. A physical barrier blocked this response, indicating release of transmitters from irradiated cells. Clonogenic survival of shielded T24 or SV-HUC was also reduced; a physical barrier prevented this phenomenon. CM-transfer increased pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activity, increased cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP expression and reduced survival protein XIAP expression. This effect was mimicked by ATP. ATP or CM evoked suramin-sensitive Ca 2+ -signals. Irradiation increased [ATP] in CM from T24. The CM-inhibitory effect on T24 clonogenic survival was blocked by apyrase, or mimicked by ATP. We conclude that radiation-induced bystander signaling enhances urothelial cancer cell killing via activation of purinergic pro-apoptotic pathways. This benefit is accompanied by normal urothelial damage indicating RT bladder toxicity is also bystander-mediated.

  16. The potential effect of age on the natural behavior of bladder cancer: Does urothelial cell carcinoma progress differently in various age groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunlusoy, Bulent; Ceylan, Yasin; Degirmenci, Tansu; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Yonguc, Tarik; Sen, Volkan; Kozacioglu, Zafer

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to evaluate the potential effect of age on the natural behavior of bladder cancer and to compare these findings between different age groups. The clinical and pathologic data of 239 patients treated at our institution between 1994 and 2014 were analyzed. The patients were classified into three groups according to age: ≤ 40 years (Group 1), 41-59 years (Group 2), and ≥ 60 years (Group 3). The following data were collected: characteristics of the patients, initial pathological findings after transurethral resection, tumor stage and grade, tumor size and multiplicity, and disease recurrence and progression. The mean age of the patients at initial diagnosis was 34.2±5.5 years, 53±5.1 years, and 71.1±7 years in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There were 207 (86.6%) patients with nonmuscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer and 32 (13.4%) patients with muscle-invasive disease. Tumor recurrence was significantly lower in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p=0.001) and Group 3 (p=0.001). Although the time to tumor recurrence was significantly different between the three groups (p=0.001), no significant difference was noted in the time to progression (p=0.349). Patients with urothelial cancer younger than 40 years tend to have single and small tumors. The tumor recurrence rate is lower in the younger age group, but tumor progression is similar in older and younger patients. Therefore, the findings indicate that clinicians should be careful when assessing the invasiveness of urothelial tumors in younger patients and start treatment as soon as possible. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  17. Urothelial Functional Protein and Sensory Receptors in Patients With Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome With and Without Hunner's Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the urothelium function and sensory receptors difference between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) patients with or without Hunner's lesion. Fourteen female IC/BPS patients with Hunner's lesion (Hunner IC) and 14 age-matched IC/BPS patients without Hunner's lesions (non-Hunner IC) were enrolled. Bladder mucosa biopsies were obtained. Bladder inflammation, eosinophil infiltration, and urothelial denudation were graded on a 4-point scale after staining with hematoxylin and eosin. Adhesive protein E-cadherin, tryptase, and zonula occuldens-1 in the bladder tissues were assessed with immunofluorescence staining. Urothelial muscarinic receptors M2, M3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and purinergic receptor P2X3 were evaluated by Western blotting. Hunner IC patients had a significantly higher mean visual analog scale pain score and smaller cystometric bladder capacity than non-Hunner IC patients. The Hunner IC bladder specimens showed more severe or moderate eosinophilic infiltration and urothelial denudation than the non-Hunner IC bladder specimens did. The E-cadherin expression was significantly lower, and eNOS expression was significantly higher in the Hunner IC bladder samples than in the non-Hunner IC samples. The other functional proteins or sensory receptors did not differ between groups. Bladder inflammation and urothelial cell adhesion defects were more severe in the Hunner IC than that in the non-Hunner IC patients. eNOS was significantly higher in the Hunner IC than in the non-Hunner IC bladder samples, suggesting that eNOS expression difference may implicate different pathogenesis in 2 types of IC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MORPHOMETRY, DENSITOMETRY AND PATTERN-ANALYSIS OF PLASTIC-EMBEDDED HISTOLOGIC MATERIAL FROM UROTHELIAL CELL-CARCINOMA OF THE BLADDER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERPOEL, HG; BOON, ME; KOK, LP; VANDERMEULEN, EA; VANCAUBERGH, RD; DEBRUIJN, WC; DEBRUYNE, FMJ

    1991-01-01

    An image analysis method of grading histologic sections of bladder carcinoma was tested. The method was new in four respects. First, fixation of the biopsies a coagulant fixative was used. Second, 2-mu-m plastic sections were used to ensure the reproductibility of nuclear imaging. Third, a new

  19. New therapeutic targets in the management of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverrisson, Einar F; Espiritu, Patrick N; Spiess, Philippe E

    2013-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, despite the myriad of treatment approaches and our progressively increasing knowledge into its disease processes, remains one of the most clinically challenging problems in modern urological clinical practice. New therapies target biomolecular pathways and cellular mediators responsible for regulating cell growth and metabolism, both of which are frequently overexpressed in malignant urothelial cells, with the intent of inducing cell death by limiting cellular metabolism and growth, creating an immune response, or selectively delivering or activating a cytotoxic agent. These new and novel therapies may offer a potential for reduced toxicity and an encouraging hope for better treatment outcomes, particularly for a disease often refractory or not amenable to the current therapeutic approaches. PMID:24400235

  20. New therapeutic targets in the management of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverrisson EF

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Einar F Sverrisson, Patrick N Espiritu, Philippe E SpiessDepartment of Genitourinary Oncology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, despite the myriad of treatment approaches and our progressively increasing knowledge into its disease processes, remains one of the most clinically challenging problems in modern urological clinical practice. New therapies target biomolecular pathways and cellular mediators responsible for regulating cell growth and metabolism, both of which are frequently overexpressed in malignant urothelial cells, with the intent of inducing cell death by limiting cellular metabolism and growth, creating an immune response, or selectively delivering or activating a cytotoxic agent. These new and novel therapies may offer a potential for reduced toxicity and an encouraging hope for better treatment outcomes, particularly for a disease often refractory or not amenable to the current therapeutic approaches.Keywords: targeted therapy, intravesical agents, systemic therapies

  1. Fibroblast growth factor-10 is a mitogen for urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagai, Shelly; Rubio, Eric; Cheng, Jang-Fang; Sweet, Robert; Thomas, Regi; Fuchs, Elaine; Grady, Richard; Mitchell, Michael; Bassuk, James A.

    2002-02-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF)-10 plays an important role in regulating growth, differentiation, and repair of the urothelium. This process occurs through a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the epithelium (urothelium). In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that (i) fibroblasts of the human lamina propria were the cell type that synthesized FGF-10 RNA and (ii) the FGF-10 gene is located at the 5p12-p13 locus of chromosome 5. Recombinant (r) preparations of human FGF-10 were found to induce proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and of transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF7-null mice in vivo. Mechanistic studies with human cells indicated two modes of FGF-10 action: (i) translocation of rFGF-10 into urothelial cell nuclei and (ii) a signaling cascade that begins with the heparin-dependent phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of surface transmembrane receptors. The normal urothelial phenotype, that of quiescence, is proposed to be typified by negligible levels of FGF-10. During proliferative phases, levels of FGF-10 rise at the urothelial cell surface and/or within urothelial cell nuclei. An understanding of how FGF-10 works in conjunction with these other processes will lead to better management of many diseases of the bladder and urinary tract.

  2. Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Associate with Tumour Stage in Urothelial Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koti, Madhuri; Xu, Amanda Shou; Ren, Kevin Yi Mi; Visram, Kash; Ren, Runhan; Berman, David M; Siemens, D Robert

    2017-10-27

    Urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) is a highly prevalent disease in North America, however its optimal management remains elusive. The contribution of B cell associated responses is poorly understood in bladder cancer. Lymphoid neogenesis is a hallmark of an active immune response at tumor sites that sometimes leads to formation of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) that resemble germinal centers formed in secondary lymphoid organs. This study was conducted with an aim to investigate the presence and characteristics of TLS in UBC with a focus to compare and contrast the TLS formation in treatment naive low grade non-muscle invasive (NMIBC) and muscle invasive bladder cancers (MIBC). The study cohort consisted of transurethral bladder resection tumour (TURBT) specimens from 28 patients. Sections showing lymphoid aggregates in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained TURBT specimens were further subjected to multi-color immunohistochemistry using immune cell markers specific to CD20 + B cells, CD3 + and CD8 + T cells, PNAd + high endothelial venules, CD208 + mature dendritic cells, CD21 + follicular dendritic cells to confirm the hallmarks of classical germinal centers. Our pilot study investigating the presence of TLS in bladder cancer patients is the first to demonstrate that well-formed TLS are more common in aggressive high grade MIBC tumors compared to low grade NIMBC. These novel findings suggest B cell mediated anti-tumour humoral immune responses in bladder cancer progression.

  3. Urothelial Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder in Young Adults — Clinical Experience at Taipei Veterans General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ching Wen

    2005-06-01

    Conclusion: Urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder in young adults is usually associated with low grade and low stage. Invasive bladder cancer had no worse a survival rate than superficial bladder cancer.

  4. Liposomal inhibition of acrolein-induced injury in rat cultured urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, J; Wolf-Johnston, A S; Chancellor, M B; Tyagi, P; Anthony, M; Kaufman, J; Birder, L A

    2014-10-01

    To study the protection offered by empty liposomes (LPs) alone against acrolein-induced changes in urothelial cell viability and explored uptake of LPs by primary (rat) urothelial cells. Acrolein was used as a means to induce cellular damage and reduce urothelial cellular viability. The effect of acrolein or liposomal treatment on cellular proliferation was studied using 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine assay. Cytokine release was measured after urothelial cells were exposed to acrolein. Temperature-dependent uptake study was carried out for fluorescent-labeled LPs using confocal microscopy. Liposome pretreatment protected against acrolein-induced decrease in urothelial cell proliferation. LPs also significantly affected the acrolein-induced cytokine (interferon-gamma) release offering protection to the urothelial cells against acrolein damage. We also observed a temperature-dependent urothelial uptake of fluorescent-labeled LPs occurred at 37 °C (but not at 4 °C). Empty LPs alone provide a therapeutic efficacy against acrolein-induced changes in urothelial cell viability and may be a promising local therapy for bladder diseases. Hence, our preliminary evidence provides support for liposome-therapy for urothelial protection and possible repair.

  5. Urothelial cancer of bladder in young versus older adults: clinical and pathological characteristics and outcomes.

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    Telli, Onur; Sarici, Hasmet; Ozgur, Berat Cem; Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Sunay, Mehmet Melih; Bozkurt, Selen; Eroglu, Muzaffer

    2014-09-01

    Bladder urothelial carcinoma is rare in young adults and occurs more commonly in older individuals. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical behavior, pathologic characteristics, and prognosis of urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder in young versus older adults. A retrospective review of our records between 2007 and 2013 identified 56 patients (42 males and 14 females) with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder who were less than 40 years old. Clinical and pathological parameters of patients who were less than 40 years of age were compared with those of a series of patients older than 40 years of age (the control group) during the same period. A survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test, and Cox regression was performed to identify clinical parameters that affected the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 29.21 years (range, 5-40 years) for patients less than 40 years old and 61.66 years (range, 41-75) for those older than 40 years. The mean follow-up was 40.26 months (range, 12-65 months) for young patients and 42.57 months (range, 12-72 months) for the older patients. Young bladder cancer patients had smaller-sized tumors (less than 3 cm), less high-grade cancers, higher papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential, and low-grade tumors than patients older than 40 years. Multivariate logistic regression analysis predicted tumor recurrence in young patients with high-grade tumors [odds ratio (OR), 1.959; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.235-2.965; p = 0.046] and tumors larger than 3 cm (OR, 1.772; 95% CI, 1.416-1.942; p = 0.032). The 5-year overall survival rate was 100% for young patients and 88.1% for older patients. No difference was observed in the recurrence-free (p = 0.321) and progression-free (p = 0.422) survival rates between the two groups. We concluded that although the clinical stage distribution, natural history, and outcomes of bladder urothelial cancer in young adults are

  6. Vaginal metastasis of bladder urothelial carcinoma: Description of a case and revision of literature.

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    Di Franco, Carmelo A; Porru, Daniele; Giliberto, Giovanni; Viglio, Alessandra; Rovereto, Bruno

    2017-06-30

    Vaginal metastases from urothelial cancer are a rare entity and in literature, few cases are described. We report a case of a 68 year-old woman with history of bladder urothelial carcinoma underwent to radical cystectomy who came in our department after 5 months for pelvic pain and vaginal bleeding. Objective examination revealed an ulcerative, solid vaginal lesion in the upper vaginal wall. We performed a vaginal biopsy that showed urothelial carcinoma compatible with the primitive bladder cancer. The patient underwent to surgery and was sent to oncological evaluation.

  7. Orthotopic AY-27 rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma model presented an elevated methemoglobin proportion in the increased total hemoglobin content when evaluated in vivo by single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy

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    Sun, Tengfei; Davis, Carole A.; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel W.; Piao, Daqing

    2017-02-01

    In vivo single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy (SfRS) was performed on an orthotopic AY-27 rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma model to explore potential spectroscopic features revealing neoplastic changes. AY-27 bladder tumor cells were intravesically instilled in four rats and allowed to implant and grow for one week, with two additional rats as the control. A total of 107 SfRS measurements were taken from 27 sites on two control bladders and 80 from four AY-27 treated bladders. The spectral profiles obtained from AY-27 treated bladders revealed various levels of a methemoglobin (MetHb) characteristic spectral feature around 635nm. A multisegment spectral analysis method estimated concentrations of five chromophore compositions including oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, MetHb, lipid and water. The total hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]), the MetHb proportion in the total hemoglobin and the lipid volume content showed possible correlations. The 80 measurements from the AY-27 treated bladders could separate to three sub-sets according to the MetHb proportion. Specifically, 72 were in subset 1 with low proportion (5.3%30%). When grouped according to [MetHB], the [HbT] increased from 368 μM of subset 1 to 488 μM of subset 2 to 541 μM of subset 3, in comparison to the 285 μM of the control. The increased total hemoglobin and the elevation of MetHb proportion may signify angiogenesis and degradation in hemoglobin oxygen-transport. Additionally, the lipid volume content decreased from 2.58% in the control to <0.2% in the tumor groups, indicating disruption of subepithelium tissue architecture.

  8. Loss of the urothelial differentiation marker FOXA1 is associated with high grade, late stage bladder cancer and increased tumor proliferation.

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    David J DeGraff

    Full Text Available Approximately 50% of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC develop metastatic disease, which is almost invariably lethal. However, our understanding of pathways that drive aggressive behavior of MIBC is incomplete. Members of the FOXA subfamily of transcription factors are implicated in normal urogenital development and urologic malignancies. FOXA proteins are implicated in normal urothelial differentiation, but their role in bladder cancer is unknown. We examined FOXA expression in commonly used in vitro models of bladder cancer and in human bladder cancer specimens, and used a novel in vivo tissue recombination system to determine the functional significance of FOXA1 expression in bladder cancer. Logistic regression analysis showed decreased FOXA1 expression is associated with increasing tumor stage (p<0.001, and loss of FOXA1 is associated with high histologic grade (p<0.001. Also, we found that bladder urothelium that has undergone keratinizing squamous metaplasia, a precursor to the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC exhibited loss of FOXA1 expression. Furthermore, 81% of cases of SCC of the bladder were negative for FOXA1 staining compared to only 40% of urothelial cell carcinomas. In addition, we showed that a subpopulation of FOXA1 negative urothelial tumor cells are highly proliferative. Knockdown of FOXA1 in RT4 bladder cancer cells resulted in increased expression of UPK1B, UPK2, UPK3A, and UPK3B, decreased E-cadherin expression and significantly increased cell proliferation, while overexpression of FOXA1 in T24 cells increased E-cadherin expression and significantly decreased cell growth and invasion. In vivo recombination of bladder cancer cells engineered to exhibit reduced FOXA1 expression with embryonic rat bladder mesenchyme and subsequent renal capsule engraftment resulted in enhanced tumor proliferation. These findings provide the first evidence linking loss of FOXA1 expression with histological subtypes

  9. Urothelial carcinoma with prominent squamous differentiation in the setting of neurogenic bladder: role of human papillomavirus infection.

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    Blochin, Elen B; Park, Kay J; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat

    2012-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are rare in the Western world; the majority of cases are reported in countries endemic to Schistosoma parasitic infections. Unlike squamous tumors of the uterine cervix or oropharynx, the human papillomavirus (HPV) is not commonly associated with bladder squamous cell carcinomas. We report on two cases of HPV-positive urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder with extensive squamous differentiation showing the typical basaloid, poorly differentiated morphology of HPV-associated tumors. These occurred in patients with neurogenic bladders who had long-standing histories of self-catheterization with tumors that tested positive for HPV by in situ hybridization. A retrospective review of our institutional database revealed four additional patients with bladder tumors showing squamous differentiation arising in the setting of neurogenic bladder. Review of these cases showed the more common well-differentiated keratinizing appearance of squamous cell carcinomas of the bladder. These tumors showed only patchy positivity for p16 immunohistochemical stain (not the diffuse strong staining seen in HPV-positive tumors), and the one tested case was negative for HPV by in situ hybridization. HPV infection and neurogenic bladder have been independently associated with increased risk of developing carcinoma in the urinary bladder; however, this is the first report of squamous tumors arising in the setting of concurrent neurogenic bladder and HPV infection. The morphology of these tumors is similar to that of other high-risk HPV-associated squamous carcinomas with a basaloid, poorly differentiated appearance and little to no keratin formation.

  10. Significance of pigmented urothelial and non-urothelial cells in voided urine specimens: A case report and review

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    Joseph Alan Kagan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of metastatic malignant melanoma to the urinary bladder diagnosed on a voided urinary cytology specimen in a patient who visited the emergency department complaining of right flank pain, and dark urine. The patient reported having previous episodes of kidney stones. Additionally, more detailed clinical history obtained after the cytological diagnosis, revealed a previous excision of malignant melanoma on the back 10 years ago. The diagnosis of metastatic malignant melanoma was based solely on voided urine cytology. While metastases of malignant melanoma to urinary bladder are well known, the significance of pigmented cells in voided urine specimens is not well documented. In this article we provide a discussion as well as a review of the literature about possible disease entities associated with pigment containing urothelial as well as non-urothelial cells.

  11. Immunohistochemical Differentiation between Urothelial Papillomas and Papillary Neoplasms of Low Malignant Potential of the Urinary Bladder.

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    Alrashidy, Mohammed; Atef, Aliaa; Baky, Tarek Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial papilloma and non-invasive papillary carcinoma are common neoplasms of the urinary bladder. Distinguishing papillomas and papillary carcinomas, especially the low grade type, is often debatable on the basis of histological features alone. We investigated immunohistochemical expression of cytokeratin 20 (CK20), p53, and Ki-67 in a group of 20 urothelial papilloma cases and 30 noninvasive papillary neoplasms of low malignant potential (PNLMP) of the urinary bladder. Whole tissue sections were examined. Among the 30 carcinoma cases, 12 (40%) showed strong reactivity for the whole panel, 16 (53%) reacted positively for two markers, and 2 (7%) reacted just to one of them. Ki-67 was considered positive in 27 cases (90%) and p53 in 24 (80%), CK20 showed positive reactivity in 21 cases (70%). Only small percentages of papillomas were positive, and then only weakly. We concluded that the intense positivity of suspicious cells for at least one of these markers would confirm the presence of malignant changes and favours the diagnosis of carcinoma.

  12. Interleukin-17-positive mast cells influence outcomes from BCG for patients with CIS: Data from a comprehensive characterisation of the immune microenvironment of urothelial bladder cancer.

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    Alexander C Dowell

    Full Text Available The tumour immune microenvironment is considered to influence cancer behaviour and outcome. Using a panel of markers for innate and adaptive immune cells we set out to characterise and understand the bladder tumour microenvironment of 114 patients from a prospective multicentre cohort of newly-diagnosed bladder cancer patients, followed-up for 4.33±1.71 years. We found IL-17-positive cells were significantly increased in primary and concomitant carcinoma in situ (CIS, p<0.0001, a highly malignant lesion which is the most significant single risk factor for disease progression. Further characterisation of the tumour immunophenotype identified IL-17+ cells as predominantly mast cells rather than T-cells, in contrast to most other tumour types. Expression of the IL-17-receptor in bladder tumours, and functional effects and gene expression changes induced by IL-17 in bladder tumour cells in vitro suggest a role in tumour behaviour. Finally, we assessed the effects of IL-17 in the context of patient outcome, following intravesical BCG immunotherapy which is the standard of care; higher numbers of IL-17+ cells were associated with improved event-free survival (p = 0.0449, HR 0.2918, 95% CI 0.08762-0.9721 in patients with primary and concomitant CIS (n = 41, we propose a model of IL-17+ Mast cells mechanism of action. Thus, in the context of bladder CIS, IL-17+ mast cells predict favourable outcome following BCG immunotherapy indicative of a novel mechanism of BCG immunotherapy in UBC and could form the basis of a stratified approach to treatment.

  13. The Role of Structural Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Urothelial Bladder Cancer

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    Andrea Brunner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM plays a key role in the modulation of cancer cell invasion. In urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UC the role of ECM proteins has been widely studied. The mechanisms, which are involved in the development of invasion, progression and generalization, are complex, depending on the interaction of ECM proteins with each other as well as with cancer cells. The following review will focus on the pathogenetic role and prognostic value of structural proteins, such as laminins, collagens, fi bronectin (FN, tenascin (Tn-C and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 in UC. In addition, the role of integrins mediating the interaction of ECM molecules and cancer cells will be addressed, since integrin-mediated FN, Tn-C and TSP1 interactions seem to play an important role during tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis.

  14. Proteome and phosphoproteome of primary cultured pig urothelial cells.

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    Verma, Nisha; Bäuerlein, Carolin; Pink, Mario; Rettenmeier, Albert W; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2011-12-01

    Epithelial tissue lining the inner side of the urinary bladder is the most common target for bladder cancer-related diseases. Bladders of freshly slaughtered pigs were utilised for a comprehensive analysis of the proteome and phosphoproteome of bladder epithelial cells. Following protein separation by 2-D gel electrophoresis and identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) the first proteome and phosphoproteome maps of pig urinary bladder epithelial cells (PUBEC) were established. A total of 120 selected protein spots were identified. By using the La(3+) enrichment method further developed in our laboratory we identified 31 phosphoproteins with minimal contamination by non-phosphopeptides. The 2-DE map of pig urothelial cells may prove as a useful tool for studies on uroepithelial biology, and the analysed phosphoproteins expression pattern, together with the whole cell proteome, will be helpful for identifying the proteins involved in bladder-related diseases. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a contemporary clinicopathologic analysis of 37 cases.

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    Fatima, Nazneen; Canter, Daniel J; Carthon, Bradley C; Kucuk, Omer; Master, Viraj A; Nieh, Peter T; Ogan, Kenneth; Osunkoya, Adeboye O

    2015-06-01

    Sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma is a dedifferentiated biphasic tumor that exhibits morphological and/or immunohistochemical evidence of epithelial and mesenchymal differentiation. In this series, we analyzed the clinicopathologic features of this rare variant of urothelial carcinoma. A search was made through our surgical pathology files and consultation files of the senior author for cases of sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder from 2005-2014. All the slides were retrieved and re-reviewed, and clinical data was also obtained including follow up. Thirty-seven cases of sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder were identified. Mean patient age was 71 years (range: 51 to 88 years). Twenty-six of 37 (70%) patients were male and 11/37 (30%) patients were female. Twenty-five cases were from cystectomy/cystoprostatectomy specimens, 8 cases from transurethral resection of bladder tumor specimens and 4 cases were from biopsy specimens. The mean tumor size was 5 cm (range: 1.4 cm to 13.0 cm). Four of 37 (10%) cases had focal heterologous components; 1 case with both chondroid and osteoid, 2 cases with chondroid and 1 case rhabdoid elements. Twenty-one of 37 (56%) patients died within a year of presentation. Sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is more prevalent in males, with the mean age of 71 years in our series. Smoking is an important risk factor. Sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma is an aggressive variant of urothelial carcinoma which commonly presents at an advanced stage, and over 50% of patients in our series died of disease within 1 year of presentation.

  16. Substance P Increases Cell-Surface Expression of CD74 (Receptor for Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor: In Vivo Biotinylation of Urothelial Cell-Surface Proteins

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    Katherine L. Meyer-Siegler

    2009-01-01

    N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide biotin ester-labeled surface urothelial proteins in rats treated either with saline or substance P (SP, 40 μg/kg. The bladder was examined by histology and confocal microscopy. Biotinylated proteins were purified by avidin agarose, immunoprecipitated with anti-MIF or anti-CD74 antibodies, and detected with strepavidin-HRP. Only superficial urothelial cells were biotinylated. These cells contained a biotinylated MIF/CD74 cell-surface complex that was increased in SP-treated animals. SP treatment increased MIF and CD74 mRNA in urothelial cells. Our data indicate that intraluminal MIF, released from urothelial cells as a consequence of SP treatment, interacts with urothelial cell-surface CD74. These results document that our previously described MIF-CD74 interaction occurs at the urothelial cell surface.

  17. Urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder with exclusive heterologous component of epithelioid rhabdomyosarcoma at metastatic site.

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    Agarwal, Poojan; Pasricha, Sunil; Gupta, Gurudutt; Sharma, Anila; Mehta, Anurag

    2018-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder with divergent differentiation into rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an extremely uncommon aggressive phenomenon. We present a case of a 74-year-old male with bladder carcinoma which metastasized to the abdominal wall as epithelioid RMS. To the best knowledge of our literature searches, an oligometastasis of exclusive heterologous component has not been described before. The clinical, radiological, and immunohistochemistry profile of the patient supported the monoclonal nature of the tumor.

  18. Status of Her2 over expression in muscle invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma: Report of 21 cases

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    Nesrine Mejri

    2014-01-01

    Four patients died from disease, one of them had Her2 3+ score. Conclusion: Her2 overexpression can be observed in muscle invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma in an important number of patients. Evaluation criteria must be standardized, especially with heterogeneous cases. Metastases tests can also readdress the expression of Her2, which gives the patient a supplementary therapeutic tool.

  19. Genomic predictors of survival in patients with high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

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    Kim, Philip H; Cha, Eugene K; Sfakianos, John P; Iyer, Gopa; Zabor, Emily C; Scott, Sasinya N; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sun, Arony; Shah, Ronak; Yee, Alyssa M; Reuter, Victor E; Bajorin, Dean F; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Schultz, Nikolaus; Berger, Michael F; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Solit, David B; Bochner, Bernard H

    2015-02-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) is genomically heterogeneous, with frequent alterations in genes regulating chromatin state, cell cycle control, and receptor kinase signaling. To identify prognostic genomic markers in high-grade UCB, we used capture-based massively parallel sequencing to analyze 109 tumors. Mutations were detected in 240 genes, with 23 genes mutated in ≥5% of cases. The presence of a recurrent phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation was associated with improved recurrence-free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.35; p=0.014) and improved cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR: 0.35; p=0.040) in patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC). In multivariable analyses controlling for pT and pN stages, PIK3CA mutation remained associated with RFS (HR: 0.39; p=0.032). The most frequent alteration, TP53 mutation (57%), was more common in extravesical disease (69% vs 32%, p=0.005) and lymph node-positive disease (77% vs 56%, p=0.025). Patients with cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A)-altered tumors experienced worse RFS (HR: 5.76; pHR: 2.94; p=0.029) in multivariable analyses. Mutations in chromatin-modifying genes were highly prevalent but not associated with outcomes. In UCB patients treated with RC, PIK3CA mutations are associated with favorable outcomes, whereas TP53 and CDKN2A alterations are associated with poor outcomes. Genomic profiling may aid in the identification of UCB patients at highest risk following RC. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified genomic subsets of high-grade urothelial bladder cancer associated with favorable and unfavorable outcomes. These findings may aid in the selection of patients most likely to benefit from novel combined modality approaches. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression profiles of variation integration genes in bladder urothelial carcinoma.

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    Wang, J M; Wang, Y Q; Gao, Z L; Wu, J T; Shi, B K; Yu, C C

    2014-04-30

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide and its incidence continues to increase. There are approximately 261,000 cases of bladder cancer resulting in 115,000 deaths annually. This study aimed to integrate bladder cancer genome copy number variation information and bladder cancer gene transcription level expression data to construct a causal-target module network of the range of bladder cancer-related genomes. Here, we explored the control mechanism underlying bladder cancer phenotype expression regulation by the major bladder cancer genes. We selected 22 modules as the initial module network to expand the search to screen more networks. After bootstrapping 100 times, we obtained 16 key regulators. These 16 key candidate regulatory genes were further expanded to identify the expression changes of 11,676 genes in 275 modules, which may all have the same regulation. In conclusion, a series of modules associated with the terms 'cancer' or 'bladder' were considered to constitute a potential network.

  1. Effect of Inflammatory Mediators on ATP Release of Human Urothelial RT4 Cells

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    Kylie J. Mansfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important contributor to the aetiology of a number of bladder dysfunctions including interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome, and overactive bladder. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on urothelial ATP release. Human urothelial RT4 cells were exposed to normal buffer or varying concentrations of inflammatory mediators (bradykinin, histamine, and serotonin in the presence or absence of hypotonic stretch stimuli (1 : 2 dilution of Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Others have demonstrated that bradykinin increased stretch-induced ATP release; however, we observed no change in control or stretch-induced ATP release with bradykinin. Pretreatment of RT4 cells with histamine or serotonin decreased stretch-induced ATP release (P=0.037, P=0.040, resp.. Previous studies have demonstrated increased ATP release in response to inflammation utilising whole bladder preparations in contrast to our simple model of cultured urothelial cells. The current study suggests that it is unlikely that there is a direct interaction between the release of inflammatory mediators and increased ATP release, but rather more complex interactions occurring in response to inflammation that lead to increased bladder sensation.

  2. Metabolism of 4-nitrobiphenyl (NBP) by cultured rat urothelial cells

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    Swaminathan, S.; Lang, D.B.; Reznikoff, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of rat urothelial cells to metabolize NBP was evaluated by incubating 4.3 x 10 7 viable cells with 20 μM [ 3 H]NBP in a serum free medium for 48 hours. The culture medium was examined for metabolites of NBP by extraction with ethyl acetate and subsequent chromatographic analysis. High pressure liquid chromatography of the solvent extract using a Whatman ODS-3, C-18 column in 70% methanol-water at a flow rate of 1 ml/min revealed two major peaks at retention times of approximately 8 and 13 min. Thin layer chromatography showed two regions of radioactivity at Rf values of 0.35 and 0.83, the latter corresponding with NBP. Based on the chromatographic data the metabolite with the retention time of 8.0 min in HPLC and an Rf of 0.35 in TLC has been tentatively identified as 4-acetylaminobiphenyl. Analysis of binding to proteins and nucleic acids following exposure to [ 3 H]NBP revealed a significant amount (0.03% of initially applied radioactivity) in the protein fractions. Control samples of NBP incubated in medium, without the urothelial cells revealed only the parent compound. These data suggest that rat bladder cells possess the metabolic capability to reduce NBP and to generate reactive metabolites that bind to cellular macromolecules

  3. Identification of key pathways and genes influencing prognosis in bladder urothelial carcinoma

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    Ning X

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xin Ning, Yaoliang Deng Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Province, People’s Republic of China Background: Genomic profiling can be used to identify the predictive effect of genomic subsets for determining prognosis in bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC after radical cystectomy. This study aimed to investigate potential gene and pathway markers associated with prognosis in BUC.Methods: A microarray dataset of BUC was obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified by DESeq of the R platform. Kaplan–Meier analysis was applied for prognostic markers. Key pathways and genes were identified using bioinformatics tools, such as gene set enrichment analysis, gene ontology, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, gene multiple association network integration algorithm (GeneMANIA, Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins, and Molecular Complex Detection.Results: A comparative gene set enrichment analysis of tumor and adjacent normal tissues suggested BUC tumorigenesis resulted mainly from enrichment of cell cycle and DNA damage and repair-related biological processes and pathways, including TP53 and mitotic recombination. Two hundred and fifty-six genes were identified as potential prognosis-related DEGs. Gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses showed that the potential prognosis-related DEGs were enriched in angiogenesis, including the cyclic adenosine monophosphate biosynthetic process, cyclic guanosine monophosphate-protein kinase G, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Rap1, and phosphoinositide-3-kinase-AKT signaling pathway. Nine hub genes, TAGLN, ACTA2, MYH11, CALD1, MYLK, GEM, PRELP, TPM2, and OGN, were identified from the intersection of protein–protein interaction and GeneMANIA networks. Module analysis of protein–protein interaction and GeneMANIA networks mainly showed

  4. Calpain3 is expressed in a proteolitically active form in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder in cattle.

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    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Calpain 3 (Capn3, also named p94, is a skeletal muscle tissue-specific protein known to be responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A. Recent experimental studies have hypothesized a pro-apoptotic role of Capn3 in some melanoma cell lines. So far the link between calpain3 and tumors comes from in vitro studies. The objective of this study was to describe Capn3 activation in naturally occurring urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder in cattle. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we describe, for the first time in veterinary and comparative oncology, the activation of Capn3 in twelve urothelial tumor cells of the urinary bladder of cattle. Capn3 protein was initially identified with nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS in a co-immunoprecipitation experiment on E2F3, known to be a transcription factor playing a crucial role in bladder carcinogenesis in humans. Capn3 expression was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Finally, the Ca(2+-dependent proteolytic activity of Capn3 was assayed following ion exchange chromatography. Morphologically, Capn3 expression was documented by immunohistochemical methods. In fact numerous tumor cells showed an intracytoplasmic immunoreactivity, which was more rarely evident also at nuclear level. In urothelial tumors, bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2 DNA was amplified by PCR and the expression of E5 protein, the major oncogenic protein of BVP-2, was detected by western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. E2F3 overexpression and pRb protein downregulation were shown by western blotting. CONCLUSION: The role of capn3 protein in urothelial cancer of the urinary bladder remains to be elucidated: further studies would be required to determine the precise function of this protease in tumor development and progression. However, we suggest that activated Capn3 may be involved in molecular

  5. Electron tomography of fusiform vesicles and their organization in urothelial cells.

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    Samo Hudoklin

    Full Text Available The formation of fusiform vesicles (FVs is one of the most distinctive features in the urothelium of the urinary bladder. FVs represent compartments for intracellular transport of urothelial plaques, which modulate the surface area of the superficial urothelial (umbrella cells during the distension-contraction cycle. We have analysed the three-dimensional (3D structure of FVs and their organization in umbrella cells of mouse urinary bladders. Compared to chemical fixation, high pressure freezing gave a new insight into the ultrastructure of urothelial cells. Electron tomography on serial sections revealed that mature FVs had a shape of flattened discs, with a diameter of up to 1.2 µm. The lumen between the two opposing asymmetrically thickened membranes was very narrow, ranging from 5 nm to 10 nm. Freeze-fracturing and immunolabelling confirmed that FVs contain two opposing urothelial plaques connected by a hinge region that made an omega shaped curvature. In the central cytoplasm, 4-15 FVs were often organized into stacks. In the subapical cytoplasm, FVs were mainly organized as individual vesicles. Distension-contraction cycles did not affect the shape of mature FVs; however, their orientation changed from parallel in distended to perpendicular in contracted bladder with respect to the apical plasma membrane. In the intermediate cells, shorter and more dilated immature FVs were present. The salient outcome from this research is the first comprehensive, high resolution 3D view of the ultrastructure of FVs and how they are organized differently depending on their location in the cytoplasm of umbrella cells. The shape of mature FVs and their organization into tightly packed stacks makes them a perfect storage compartment, which transports large amounts of urothelial plaques while occupying a small volume of umbrella cell cytoplasm.

  6. A STUDY OF P53 EXPRESSION IN UROTHELIAL NEOPLASMS OF URINARY BLADDER

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    G. Sathish Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Urothelial Cell Carcinoma (UCC of urinary bladder is the seventh commonest cancer wordwide.1 At initial diagnosis, 30% of UCC display solid and invasive growth patterns and are locally advanced or metastatic at the time of diagnosis. 70% of tumours are noninvasive papillary UCC confined to the epithelium and subepithelial connective tissue,2 which can be managed by endoscopic resection. A significant number of post-resected cases, progress for recurrence of tumour and infiltration to muscle layers. Invasive bladder cancer has high morbidity and uniform mortality when it is metastatic. There are no effective tools to predict aggressiveness of tumour, so that these cases can be managed more successfully. Mutated Tp53/p53 is the genetic abnormality most frequently associated with UCC and related to cell transformation, malignancy and high recurrence rates.2 MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a descriptive study conducted in the departments of urology and pathology and during the period of March 2014 to February 2015. All consecutive cystoscopic biopsies, Trans urethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT and radical cystectomy specimens histopathologically diagnosed as UCC were included in the study. p53 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Positive and negative controls were used. Bivariate analysis was done using Chi-square test in all cases. RESULTS A total of 80 cases were analysed. Significant association of p53 expression was found in higher grades of tumour. Also, noted relation of p53 mutation with tumour size, multifocality, multiplicity, muscle invasion and tumour stage, which were statistically not significant. CONCLUSION Bladder tumour grade shows significant association to p53 expression. Papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP tumours are negative for p53, and in the present study, there was significant difference in p53 over expression low-grade papillary UCC compared with PUNLMP. 90% of low

  7. Evaluation of her-2/neu expression by immunohistochemistry in urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder

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    Nasim, A.; Salim, B.; Niazi, S.; Fatima, N.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the HER-2/NEU expression by immunohistochemistry in Urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Histopathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from 15th August 2011 to 14th August 2012. Patients and Methods: Bladder cancer tissue specimens from 70 patients were selected in one year as per the inclusion criterion. Immunohistochemistry results were interpreted on light microscope using high power field objective and Her 2/ neu expression was recorded. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for quantitative variables. Frequencies and percentages were calculated for qualitative variables. Results: Out of 70 cases of urothelial carcinoma, Her 2/ neu expression was found to be positive in 24 cases, out of which 5 were of low grade and 19 were of high grade while 16 were invasive and 8 were non invasive. The expression of Her 2/neu was detected in 16 out of 33 cases of invasive carcinoma (48.4%) and in 8 out of 37 cases of non invasive carcinoma (21.6%). As far as grade is concerned, Her 2/ neu was found to be positive in 5 out of 30 cases of low grade carcinoma (16.6%) and 19 out of 40 cases of high grade carcinoma (47.5%). Conclusion: The expression of Her 2/neu has been shown to be related to the stage and grade of urothelial carcinoma. Her 2/neu expression is increased in high grade and invasive urothelial carcinoma. Molecular targeted therapy targeting Her 2/neu can be beneficial in patients after assessment of Her 2/neu expression. (author)

  8. Expression of OCT4A: The First Step to the Next Stage of Urothelial Bladder Cancer Progression

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    Wojciech Jóźwicki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor is a transcription factor responsible for maintaining the pluripotent properties of embryonic stem cells. In this paper, we present the results of studies to investigate the role of the OCT4 splicing variant in urothelial bladder cancer and the relationship between the OCT4 phenotype and the morphological parameters of tumor malignancy. Ninety patients who received a cystectomy for bladder cancer were enrolled. The expression of OCT4 protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The ratio of OCT4-positive cells was the lowest in pT1 (pathological assessment (p—tumor extent confined to mucosa (T1 tumors and the highest in pTis (non-papillary tumor extent confined to urothelium and pT2 (tumor extent including muscularis propria tumors. Information about the percentage of OCT4A-positive tumor cells could facilitate choosing the treatment mode in borderline pTis–pT1 (crossing the border of the basement membrane; the first stage of progression and pT1–pT2 (crossing the border of the muscularis propria; the second stage of progression cases: a higher percentage of OCT4A-positive cells should support more radical therapy. A significantly higher percentage of cases with moderate OCT4 intensity was found in metastasizing (the third stage of progression cases with >2 positive lymph nodes. The percentage of OCT4-positive cells was significantly higher for cancers with a high grade, higher non-classic differentiation number and greater aggressiveness of invasion. The differentiation, maturation and aggressiveness of tumor invasion appear to depend on the expression of the OCT4 phenotype in cancer cells, similar to the successive stages of malignancy progression in urothelial cancer.

  9. A Case of Early Stage Bladder Carcinosarcoma in Late Recurrence of Urothelial Carcinoma after Transurethral Resection

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    Daisaku Hirano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinosarcomas of the urinary bladder are rare biphasic neoplasms, consisting of both malignant epithelial and malignant mesenchymal components, and the prognosis of this tumor is unfavorable in most patients with even possibility of resection of disease. A 77-year-old male with a history of transurethral resection (TUR of urothelial carcinoma (UC of the bladder and adjuvant intravesical chemotherapy with pirarubicin 10 years ago revisited our department with a gross hematuria. Cystoscopy demonstrated an approximately 2.5 cm nonpapillary tumor on the right wall of the bladder. Pelvic MRI showed the tumor without extending the base of the bladder wall. The tumor could be completely removed with TUR. The malignant epithelial elements consisted of high-grade UC and the majority of mesenchymal components were fibrosarcomatous differentiation based on immunohistochemical studies. The tumor could be pathologically also suspected to be an early stage on TUR specimens. Although he has received no additional intervention due to the occurrence of myocardial infarction at three weeks after the TUR, he has been alive with no evidence of recurrence of the disease 27 months after the TUR. Some early stages of bladder carcinosarcoma might have a favorable prognosis without aggressive treatments.

  10. Alterations of mTOR and PTEN protein expression in schistosomal squamous cell carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma.

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    Makboul, Rania; Refaiy, Abeer; Abdelkawi, Islam F; Hameed, D A; Elderwy, Ahmad A; Shalaby, Mahmoud M; Merseburger, Axel S; Hussein, Mahmoud Rezk Abdelwahed

    2016-05-01

    mTOR signaling pathway is commonly activated in cancer. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, is a potent inhibitor of this pathway. To date the expression pattern of mTOR and PTEN in schistosomal bladder squamous cell carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma was not investigated. Also, whether alterations of these proteins are associated with pathological parameters was not established. We hypothesize that "expression of mTOR and/or PTEN will be altered in schistosomal-related urothelial and squamous cell carcinomas". To test our hypothesis we examined the expression pattern of mTOR and PTEN in normal and hyperplastic urothelium, squamous metaplasia, schistosomal urothelial carcinomas (70 cases) and squamous cell carcinomas (47 cases) using immunohistochemical methods. mTOR protein expression was absent in the normal, hyperplastic urothelium and metaplastic squamous epithelium. mTOR was over-expressed in muscle invasive urothelial and high grade squamous cell carcinomas. In contrast, PTEN protein expression was seen in the normal and hyperplastic urothelium. The expression was reduced (metaplastic squamous epithelium) or lost in muscle invasive urothelial and high grade squamous carcinomas. Alterations of these proteins were associated with some clinicopathological features. mTOR expression was negatively correlated with PTEN expression in urothelial carcinoma only. We report, for the first time, altered expression of mTOR and PTEN proteins in schistosomal urothelial and squamous cell carcinomas. Alterations of these proteins may contribute to the progression and aggressive behavior of schistosomal bladder carcinoma. Targeting mTOR, may be a promising therapeutic strategy in these tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Prognostic Value of Beta-Tubulin-3 and c-Myc in Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

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    Massari, Francesco; Bria, Emilio; Ciccarese, Chiara; Munari, Enrico; Modena, Alessandra; Zambonin, Valentina; Sperduti, Isabella; Artibani, Walter; Cheng, Liang; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo; Brunelli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, putative prognostic biomarkers have shown limited utility from the clinical perspective for bladder urothelial carcinoma. Herein, the expression of beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc was evaluated to determine their prognostic potential. Methods In formalin fixed-paraffin embedded blocks, immunohistochemical expression of c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 was evaluated. H score ranging from 0 to 300 was obtained by multiplying the percentage of positive cells by intensity (0–3); c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 expression was defined: 0: negative, 1: weakly positive, 2: strongly positive. Results beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc immunoexpression was available for 46 cases. At the univariate analysis, node-involvement, beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc overexpression discriminate shorter DFS (HR 2.19, p = 0.043; HR 3.10, p = 0.24 and HR 3.05, p = 0.011, respectively); 2-yrs DFS log-rank analysis according to low versus high level of immunoexpression were statistically significant; beta-tubulin-3, 53% low vs 12.7% high (p = value 0.02) and c-Myc 28 low vs 8 high (p-value 0.007). Patients displaying negative beta-tubulin-3/c-Myc had statistically significant better 2-yrs DFS than those with mixed expression or double positivity (54.5% versus 18.7% versus 0%, log-rank p = 0.006). Conclusions c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 show improvement for prognostic risk stratification in patients with muscle invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma. These molecular pathways may also be candidate to improve predictiveness to targeted therapies. PMID:26046361

  12. Prognostic Value of Beta-Tubulin-3 and c-Myc in Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder.

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    Francesco Massari

    Full Text Available To date, putative prognostic biomarkers have shown limited utility from the clinical perspective for bladder urothelial carcinoma. Herein, the expression of beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc was evaluated to determine their prognostic potential.In formalin fixed-paraffin embedded blocks, immunohistochemical expression of c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 was evaluated. H score ranging from 0 to 300 was obtained by multiplying the percentage of positive cells by intensity (0-3; c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 expression was defined: 0: negative, 1: weakly positive, 2: strongly positive.beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc immunoexpression was available for 46 cases. At the univariate analysis, node-involvement, beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc overexpression discriminate shorter DFS (HR 2.19, p = 0.043; HR 3.10, p = 0.24 and HR 3.05, p = 0.011, respectively; 2-yrs DFS log-rank analysis according to low versus high level of immunoexpression were statistically significant; beta-tubulin-3, 53% low vs 12.7% high (p = value 0.02 and c-Myc 28 low vs 8 high (p-value 0.007. Patients displaying negative beta-tubulin-3/c-Myc had statistically significant better 2-yrs DFS than those with mixed expression or double positivity (54.5% versus 18.7% versus 0%, log-rank p = 0.006.c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 show improvement for prognostic risk stratification in patients with muscle invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma. These molecular pathways may also be candidate to improve predictiveness to targeted therapies.

  13. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Provide Significant Prognostic Information in Urothelial Bladder Cancer.

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    Minna M Boström

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important feature of carcinogenesis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs can be associated with either poor or improved prognosis, depending on their properties and polarization. Current knowledge of the prognostic significance of TAMs in bladder cancer is limited and was investigated in this study. We analyzed 184 urothelial bladder cancer patients undergoing transurethral resection of a bladder tumor or radical cystectomy. CD68 (pan-macrophage marker, MAC387 (polarized towards type 1 macrophages, and CLEVER-1/Stabilin-1 (type 2 macrophages and lymphatic/blood vessels were detected immunohistochemically. The median follow-up time was 6.0 years. High macrophage counts associated with a higher pT category and grade. Among patients undergoing transurethral resection, all studied markers apart from CLEVER-1/Stabilin-1 were associated with increased risk of progression and poorer disease-specific and overall survival in univariate analyses. High levels of two macrophage markers (CD68/MAC387+/+ or CD68/CLEVER-1+/+ groups had an independent prognostic role after transurethral resection in multivariate analyses. In the cystectomy cohort, MAC387, alone and in combination with CD68, was associated with poorer survival in univariate analyses, but none of the markers were independent predictors of outcome in multivariate analyses. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that macrophage phenotypes provide significant independent prognostic information, particularly in bladder cancers undergoing transurethral resection.

  14. The effect of photochemical internalization of bleomycin in the treatment of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: an in vitro study.

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    Arentsen, Harm C; Falke, Johannes; Høgset, Anders; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Alfred Witjes, J

    2014-01-01

    In this in vitro study, we determined whether meso-tetraphenyl chlorin disulphonate (TPCS2a)-based photochemical delivery of bleomycin was able to potentiate the cytotoxicity of bleomycin on bladder cancer cells. The human RT4, RT112, 253J, T24, and rat AY-27 urothelial carcinoma cell lines were used. Cells were seeded in 96-well plates. TPCS2a was added to the growth medium and the plates were incubated overnight. Cells were then resuspended in TPCS2a-free culture medium and incubated for 3 hours. Subsequently, cells were treated for 60 minutes with increasing doses of epirubicin, gemcitabine, mitomycin C, or bleomycin followed by illumination for different periods. Cell viability was measured with a colorimetric assay after 72 hours. For the single treatments, in all 5 cell lines a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation was observed. This was seen both after treatment with TPCS2a-based photodynamic therapy (PDT), as well as after treatment with either bleomycin or one of the control chemotherapeutic agents. After treatment with PDT (240-s illumination), bleomycin 9.0 µM, and the combination of these treatments, relative survival percentages were 89.2 ± 13.0, 70.2 ± 8.9, and 30.5 ± 6.1, respectively, in the T24 cell line. After treatment with PDT (120-s illumination), bleomycin 27 µM and the combination of these treatments, relative survival percentages were 93.6 ± 15.7, 74.7 ± 9.6, and 30.0 ± 11.1, respectively, in the AY-27 cell line. In both cell lines, PDT combined with bleomycin showed significantly (Pinternalization effect. TPCS2a-based photochemical internalization of bleomycin showed a significant, at least, additive antiproliferative activity against human and rat urothelial carcinoma cells in vitro. Thus, photochemical internalization may have therapeutic potential as an intravesical strategy against bladder cancer. As the effect is heterogeneous, biomarker studies are warranted to be able to predict the effects of a photochemical

  15. Quantitative molecular grading of bladder tumours: a tool for objective assessment of the biological potential of urothelial neoplasias.

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    Bollmann, Daniel; Bollmann, Magdolna; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heller, Hildegard; Bollmann, Reinhard; Pajor, Gabor; Hildenbrand, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess whether patients with bladder urothelial tumours can be more objectively stratified into low- and high-risk groups for recurrence and progression using a 2-tired molecular grading scheme, than by subjective histopathological grading alone. Biopsy material from 45 consecutive patients with urothelial bladder neoplasias (2 papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potentials, 18 pTa, 1 pTis, 19 pT1 and 5 pT2) was analysed for immunohistochemical Ki-67 and p53 expression. Labelling indices were assessed by automated cellular image analysis. UroVysion FISH test results were evaluated by automated signal counting, and DNA ploidy of single nuclei preparations were measured by image cytometry. Sixty-nine percent of cases showed >10% Ki-67 LI, 64% had >10% p53 LI, 53% revealed DNA aneuploidy and 56% expressed a high-risk FISH pattern. Based on a combination of single molecular markers, 75% of neoplasias were classified as high molecular grade. Tumour stage and histopathological grade were significantly associated with FISH pattern, DNA ploidy and MIB1 LI. Stage was also related with molecular grade. Clinical outcome showed a significant correlation with MIB1 LI and molecular grade. P53 had neither diagnostic nor prognostic relevance, nor was there any correlation between histological and molecular grade. Our preliminary data strongly suggest that the combination of quantitative biomarkers provides superior and objective prognostic tools in bladder urothelial neoplasias compared to classic clinicopathological features and indices.

  16. Resolution of hypercalcemia of malignancy following radical cystectomy in a patient with paraneoplastic syndrome associated with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

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    Alfredo Harb-De La Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common finding associated with different types of cancers; however, its association with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is rare. We report a case of a 69-year-old male with nonmetastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder who developed hypercalcemia that failed to respond to medical management, but resolved completely after undergoing resection of the tumor through radical cystectomy.

  17. A case of brain and leptomeningeal metastases from urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

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    Erhamamcı, S; Reyhan, M; Altinkaya, N

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastases are unusual from urethelial carcinoma of bladder and particularly the occurrence of leptomeningeal metastases is extremely rare, with few cases described in the literature. We present a case of a 45-year-old man with a rare brain metastases as the first metastatic manifestation secondary to urethelial carcinoma of bladder followed by leptomeningeal metastases without any other organ involvement. Eleven months after the diagnosis of high-grade urethelial carcinoma of bladder (T2N0M0), the patient was detected having brain metastases by MRI. FDG PET/CT images for the metastatic evaluation showed no abnormal FDG uptake elsewhere in the body except the brain. Histopathology examination from brain lesion demonstrated the cerebral lesion to be a metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Two months later, the patient was diagnosed to have leptomeningeal metastases by MRI. Our patient's condition gradually worsened, and he died 3 months after the diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. Pure primary small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: A rare diagnostic entity

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    Sonia Gon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm accounting for only 0.3-0.7% of all bladder tumors. Since the tumor is very rare, pathogenesis is uncertain. Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are mixed with classic urothelial carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the bladder in 68% cases, making pure primary small cell carcinoma even a rarer entity. The unknown etiology and natural history of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder represent a challenge both to the pathologist and urologists for its diagnosis and treatment, respectively.

  19. The Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Particulate and Soluble Cobalt in Human Urothelial Cells.

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    Speer, Rachel M; The, Therry; Xie, Hong; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-11-01

    Cobalt use is increasing particularly due to its use as one of the primary metals in cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal-on-metal prosthetics. CoCrMo is a high-strength, wear-resistant alloy with reduced risk for prosthetic loosening and device fracture. More than 500,000 people receive hip implants each year in the USA which puts them at potential risk for exposure to metal ions and particles released by the prosthetic implants. Data show cobalt ions released from prosthetics reach the bloodstream and accumulate in the bladder. As patients with failed hip implants show increased urinary and blood cobalt levels, no studies have considered the effects of cobalt on human urothelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of particulate and soluble cobalt in urothelial cells. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ions. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found, when compared to particulate cobalt, soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic, but induced similar levels of genotoxicity. Interestingly, at similar intracellular cobalt ion concentrations, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by a lack of metaphases not observed after particulate cobalt treatment. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human urothelial cells and solubility may play a key role in cobalt-induced toxicity.

  20. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montella, Maurizio; Di Maso, Matteo; Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; Bosetti, Cristina; Turati, Federica; Giudice, Aldo; Libra, Massimo; Serraino, Diego; La Vecchia, Carlo; Tambaro, Rosa; Cavalcanti, Ernesta; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Polesel, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    The Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an emerging condition worldwide, consistently associated with an increased risk of several cancers. Some information exists on urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) and MetS. This study aims at further evaluating the association between the MetS and UCB. Between 2003 and 2014 in Italy, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study, enrolling 690 incident UCB patients and 665 cancer-free matched patients. The MetS was defined as the presence of at least three of the four selected indicators: abdominal obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetes. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for MetS and its components were estimated through multiple logistic regression models, adjusting for potential confounders. Patients with MetS were at a 2-fold higher risk of UCB (95 % CI:1.38–3.19), compared to those without the MetS. In particular, ORs for bladder cancer were 2.20 (95 % CI:1.42–3.38) for diabetes, 0.88 (95 % CI: 0.66-1.17) for hypertension, 1.16 (95 % CI: 0.80-1.67) for hypercholesterolemia, and 1.63 (95 % CI:1.22–2.19) for abdominal obesity. No heterogeneity in risks emerged across strata of sex, age, education, geographical area, and smoking habits. Overall, 8.1 % (95 % CI: 3.9-12.4 %) of UCB cases were attributable to the MetS. This study supports a positive association between the MetS and bladder cancer risk

  1. Asthma status is associated with decreased risk of aggressive urothelial bladder cancer.

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    Rava, Marta; Czachorowski, Maciej J; Silverman, Debra; Márquez, Mirari; Kishore, Sirish; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; García-Closas, Montse; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Carrato, Alfredo; Rothman, Nathaniel; Real, Francisco X; Kogevinas, Manolis; Malats, Núria

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies suggested an association between atopic conditions and specific cancers. The results on the association with urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) are scarce and inconsistent. To evaluate the association between asthma and risk of UBC, we considered 936 cases and 1,022 controls from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO Study (86% males, mean age 65.4 years), a multicenter and hospital-based case-control study conducted during 1998-2001. Participants were asked whether they had asthma and detailed information about occupational exposures, smoking habits, dietary factors, medical conditions and history of medication was collected through face-to-face questionnaires performed by trained interviewers. Since asthma and UBC might share risk factors, association between patients' characteristics and asthma was studied in UBC controls. Association between UBC and asthma was assessed using logistic regression unadjusted and adjusted for potential confounders. The complex interrelationships, direct and mediating effect of asthma on UBC, were appraised using counterfactual mediation models. Asthma was associated with a reduced risk of UBC (odds ratio (OR) = 0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37, 0.79) after adjusting for a wide range of confounders. No mediating effect was identified. The reduced risk associated with asthma was restricted to patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive (OR = 0.25, 95%CI 0.10, 0.62) and muscle invasive UBC (OR = 0.32, 95%CI 0.15, 0.69). Our results support that asthma is associated with a decreased risk of UBC, especially among aggressive tumors. Further work on the relationship between asthma and other atopic conditions and cancer risk should shed light on the relationship between immune response mechanisms and bladder carcinogenesis. © 2017 UICC.

  2. Molecular targets in urothelial cancer: detection, treatment, and animal models of bladder cancer

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    Smolensky D

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dmitriy Smolensky,1,2 Kusum Rathore,1 Maria Cekanova1,2 1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2UT-ORNL Graduate School of Genome Science and Technology, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Abstract: Bladder cancer remains one of the most expensive cancers to treat in the United States due to the length of required treatment and degree of recurrence. In order to treat bladder cancer more effectively, targeted therapies are being investigated. In order to use targeted therapy in a patient, it is important to provide a genetic background of the patient. Recent advances in genome sequencing, as well as transcriptome analysis, have identified major pathway components altered in bladder cancer. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad background on bladder cancer, including its causes, diagnosis, stages, treatments, animal models, as well as signaling pathways in bladder cancer. The major focus is given to the PI3K/AKT pathway, p53/pRb signaling pathways, and the histone modification machinery. Because several promising immunological therapies are also emerging in the treatment of bladder cancer, focus is also given on general activation of the immune system for the treatment of bladder cancer. Keywords: bladder cancer, transitional cell carcinoma, signaling pathways, clinical trials

  3. Urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder occurring in young adult and pediatric patients: a comprehensive review of literature with implications for patient management.

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    Paner, Gladell P; Zehnder, Pascal; Amin, Anmol M; Husain, Aliya N; Desai, Mihir M

    2011-01-01

    Bladder urothelial carcinoma is typically a disease of older individuals and rarely occurs below the age of 40 years. There is debate and uncertainty in the literature regarding the clinicopathologic characteristics of bladder urothelial neoplasms in younger patients compared with older patients, although no consistent age criteria have been used to define "younger" age group categories. Use of the World Health Organization 2004/International Society of Urological Pathology 1998 grading nomenclature and recent molecular studies highlight certain unique features of bladder urothelial neoplasms in young patients, particularly in patients below 20 years of age. In this meta-analysis and review, the clinical, pathologic, and molecular features and risk factors of bladder urothelial neoplasms in patients 40 years or less are presented and analyzed according to decades of presentation. Similar to older patients, bladder urothelial neoplasms in patients 40 years or younger occur more common in male patients, present mainly with gross painless hematuria, and are more commonly located at bladder trigone/ureteral orifices, but in contrast have a greater chance for unifocality. Delay in diagnosis of bladder urothelial neoplasms seems not to be uncommon in younger patients probably because of its relative rarity and the predominance of benign causes of hematuria in this age group causing hesitancy for an aggressive work-up. Most tumors in patients younger than 40 years were low grade. The incidence of low-grade tumors was the lowest in the first 2 decades of life, with incremental increase of the percentage of high-grade tumors with increasing age decades. Classification according to the World Health Organization 2004/International Society of Urological Pathology grading system identified papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential to be relatively frequent among bladder tumors of young patients particularly in the teenage years. Similar to grade, there was

  4. Dose and temporal effects on gene expression profiles of urothelial cells from rats exposed to diuron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihlaseh-Catalano, Shadia M.; Bailey, Kathryn A.; Cardoso, Ana Paula F.; Ren, Hongzu; Fry, Rebecca C.; Camargo, João Lauro V.de; Wolf, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a substituted urea herbicide that at high dietary levels (2500 ppm) induces rat urinary bladder hyperplasia after 20 weeks of exposure and neoplasia after 2 years. The effects on the urothelium after short-term exposure have not been described. The present 7-day study evaluated the dose-dependency of urothelial alterations in the urinary bladder using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Male Wistar rats were fed 0, 125, 500, 2500 ppm diuron for 7 days. The urinary bladder and isolated urothelial cells of these animals were processed for microscopic examination and gene expression profiling, respectively. No significant treatment-related morphologic effects were observed. The number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the exposed groups increased with diuron levels. Diuron-altered genes involved in cell-to-cell interactions and tissue organization were identified in all treatment groups. After 7 days of diuron exposure, transcriptional responses were observed in the urothelium in the absence of clear morphologic changes. These morphological findings are different from those observed in a previous study in which 20 weeks of diuron exposure was associated with simple hyperplasia secondary to the persistent cytotoxicity and necrosis associated with continuous cellular regeneration. Comparison of the gene expression profiles of rats exposed to the 2500 ppm carcinogenic diuron dose for 7 days versus 20 weeks revealed few similarities between these two time points at the gene or pathway level. Taken together, these data provide insight into the dose- and temporal-dependent morphological and transcriptional changes associated with diuron exposure that may lead to the development of tumors in the rat urinary bladder

  5. Dose and temporal effects on gene expression profiles of urothelial cells from rats exposed to diuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlaseh-Catalano, Shadia M; Bailey, Kathryn A; Cardoso, Ana Paula F; Ren, Hongzu; Fry, Rebecca C; de Camargo, João Lauro V; Wolf, Douglas C

    2014-11-05

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a substituted urea herbicide that at high dietary levels (2500 ppm) induces rat urinary bladder hyperplasia after 20 weeks of exposure and neoplasia after 2 years. The effects on the urothelium after short-term exposure have not been described. The present 7-day study evaluated the dose-dependency of urothelial alterations in the urinary bladder using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Male Wistar rats were fed 0, 125, 500, 2500 ppm diuron for 7 days. The urinary bladder and isolated urothelial cells of these animals were processed for microscopic examination and gene expression profiling, respectively. No significant treatment-related morphologic effects were observed. The number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the exposed groups increased with diuron levels. Diuron-altered genes involved in cell-to-cell interactions and tissue organization were identified in all treatment groups. After 7 days of diuron exposure, transcriptional responses were observed in the urothelium in the absence of clear morphologic changes. These morphological findings are different from those observed in a previous study in which 20 weeks of diuron exposure was associated with simple hyperplasia secondary to the persistent cytotoxicity and necrosis associated with continuous cellular regeneration. Comparison of the gene expression profiles of rats exposed to the 2500 ppm carcinogenic diuron dose for 7 days versus 20 weeks revealed few similarities between these two time points at the gene or pathway level. Taken together, these data provide insight into the dose- and temporal-dependent morphological and transcriptional changes associated with diuron exposure that may lead to the development of tumors in the rat urinary bladder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CEA-producing urothelial cell carcinoma with metastasis presenting as a rectal adenocarcinoma

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    Ming-Hsin Yang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of a 61-year-old male who presented with difficult defecation for 1 month. A circumferential submucosal rectal tumor was noted on a digital rectal examination and colonoscopy. Laboratory examination revealed high serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; 43.75 ng/mL and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9; 11,790 U/mL. In addition, tumor biopsies revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the rectum with intact mucosa. The patient had history of advanced stage-T2 urothelial cell carcinoma of bladder, which had been downstaged to T0 by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy 1 year prior. After investigating the initial bladder tumor specimens, a small portion of the tumor with high CEA expression comparable to the submucosal rectal tumor was found. The size of the tumor was reduced and the levels of the tumor markers decreased after administering FOLFIRI chemotherapy targeted at the adenocarcinoma. Although neoadjuvant chemotherapy may have a selective pressure to eliminate most urothelial cell carcinoma, physicians should be aware that it can lead to rectal metastasis via CEA-producing components.

  7. Integrated epigenome profiling of repressive histone modifications, DNA methylation and gene expression in normal and malignant urothelial cells.

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    Ewa Dudziec

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is commonly altered in human cancer. We have observed alterations of DNA methylation and microRNA expression that reflect the biology of bladder cancer. This common disease arises by distinct pathways with low and high-grade differentiation. We hypothesized that epigenetic gene regulation reflects an interaction between histone and DNA modifications, and differences between normal and malignant urothelial cells represent carcinogenic events within bladder cancer. To test this we profiled two repressive histone modifications (H3K9m3 and H3K27m3 using ChIP-Seq, cytosine methylation using MeDIP and mRNA expression in normal and malignant urothelial cell lines. In genes with low expression we identified H3K27m3 and DNA methylation each in 20-30% of genes and both marks in 5% of genes. H3K9m3 was detected in 5-10% of genes but was not associated with overall expression. DNA methylation was more closely related to gene expression in malignant than normal cells. H3K27m3 was the epigenetic mark most specifically correlated to gene silencing. Our data suggest that urothelial carcinogenesis is accompanied by a loss of control of both DNA methylation and H3k27 methylation. From our observations we identified a panel of genes with cancer specific-epigenetic mediated aberrant expression including those with reported carcinogenic functions and members potentially mediating a positive epigenetic feedback loop. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed genes marked by H3K9m3 were involved with cell homeostasis, those marked by H3K27m3 mediated pro-carcinogenic processes and those marked with cytosine methylation were mixed in function. In 150 normal and malignant urothelial samples, our gene panel correctly estimated expression in 65% of its members. Hierarchical clustering revealed that this gene panel stratified samples according to the presence and phenotype of bladder cancer.

  8. TRPV2 mediates adrenomedullin stimulation of prostate and urothelial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion.

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    Agathe Oulidi

    Full Text Available Adrenomedullin (AM is a 52-amino acid peptide initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. AM is expressed in a variety of malignant tissues and cancer cell lines and was shown to be a mitogenic factor capable of stimulating growth of several cancer cell types. In addition, AM is a survival factor for certain cancer cells. Some data suggest that AM might be involved in the progression cancer metastasis via angiogenesis and cell migration and invasion control. The Transient Receptor Potential channel TRPV2 is known to promote in prostate cancer cell migration and invasive phenotype and is correlated with the stage and grade of bladder cancer. In this work we show that AM induces prostate and urothelial cancer cell migration and invasion through TRPV2 translocation to plasma membrane and the subsequent increase in resting calcium level.

  9. Intravesical therapy for urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a critical review

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    Daher C. Chade

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB is a challenge for physicians and patients alike. This is largely due to the heterogeneous natural history of this disease, in which tumors range from indolent to rapidly progressive and eventually fatal. Moreover, the high rate of recurrence and progression cause significant morbidity, expense, and detriment to quality of life. The advent of effective and safe intravesical therapies has improved the management of non-muscle-invasive UCB. Nevertheless, despite over 30 years of research and clinical experience, the mechanism, risks, benefits, and optimal regimens and treatment algorithms remain unclear. Although immunotherapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG has been the mainstay of intravesical treatment and represents a significant advance in the interaction of immunology and oncology, its clinical effectiveness is accompanied by a wide range of adverse events. Here, we review the literature on intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy with the aim of evaluating the clinical utility of the different treatments and providing recommendations. Many studies over the years have compared efficacy and toxicities of different agents and regimens, and certain conclusions are now well supported by high-level evidence. Future perspectives and promising advances in drug development are discussed and areas of improvement are identified in order to promote better cancer control and decrease the rate and severity of side-effects.

  10. CD73 Predicts Favorable Prognosis in Patients with Nonmuscle-Invasive Urothelial Bladder Cancer

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    Marian S. Wettstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. CD73 is a membrane associated 5′-ectonucleotidase that has been proposed as prognostic biomarker in various solid tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate CD73 expression in a cohort of patients with primary bladder cancer in regard to its association with clinicopathological features and disease course. Methods. Tissue samples from 174 patients with a primary urothelial carcinoma were immunohistochemically assessed on a tissue microarray. Associations between CD73 expression and retrospectively obtained clinicopathological data were evaluated by contingency analysis. Survival analysis was performed to investigate the predictive value of CD73 within the subgroup of pTa and pT1 tumors in regard to progression-free survival (PFS. Results. High CD73 expression was found in 46 (26.4% patients and was significantly associated with lower stage, lower grade, less adjacent carcinoma in situ and with lower Ki-67 proliferation index. High CD73 immunoreactivity in the subgroup of pTa and pT1 tumors (n=158 was significantly associated with longer PFS (HR: 0.228; p=0.047 in univariable Cox regression analysis. Conclusion. High CD73 immunoreactivity was associated with favorable clinicopathological features. Furthermore, it predicts better outcome in the subgroup of pTa and pT1 tumors and may thus serve as additional tool for the selection of patients with favorable prognosis.

  11. Spectrum of bacterial colonization associated with urothelial cells from patients with chronic lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasriya, Rajvinder; Sathiananthamoorthy, Sanchutha; Ismail, Salim; Kelsey, Michael; Wilson, Mike; Rohn, Jennifer L; Malone-Lee, James

    2013-07-01

    Chronic lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), such as urgency and incontinence, are common, especially among the elderly, but their etiology is often obscure. Recent studies of acute urinary tract infections implicated invasion by Escherichia coli into the cytoplasm of urothelial cells, with persistence of long-term bacterial reservoirs, but the role of infection in chronic LUTS is unknown. We conducted a large prospective study with eligible patients with LUTS and controls over a 3-year period, comparing routine urine cultures of planktonic bacteria with cultures of shed urothelial cells concentrated in centrifuged urinary sediments. This comparison revealed large numbers of bacteria undetected by routine cultures. Next, we typed the bacterial species cultured from patient and control sediments under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we found that the two groups had complex but significantly distinct profiles of bacteria associated with their shed bladder epithelial cells. Strikingly, E. coli, the organism most responsible for acute urinary tract infections, was not the only or even the main offending pathogen in this more-chronic condition. Antibiotic protection assays with shed patient cells and in vitro infection studies using patient-derived strains in cell culture suggested that LUTS-associated bacteria are within or extremely closely associated with shed epithelial cells, which explains how routine cultures might fail to detect them. These data have strong implications for the need to rethink our common diagnoses and treatments of chronic urinary tract symptoms.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder and Upper Urinary Tract

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    Ji Yun Lee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A better understanding of the molecular basis of urothelial carcinoma (UC is needed to refine the clinical decision-making process. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We performed next-generation sequencing to investigate the mutational and transcriptional profiles of commonly mutated genes in UC using Ampliseq v2. Copy number variations (CNVs were detected with nCounter assay. Genetic alterations between upper tract UC (UTUC and urinary bladder UC (UBUC were compared. RESULTS: Tumor samples from 31 UTUC and 61 UBUC patients were included in analysis. The two groups showed similar clinicopathologic features including tumor grade and stage. Median survival was longer in UTUC than UBUC patients, though this was statistically nonsignificant (59 vs 41 months, P = .137. In total, we found 982 genetic alterations from 92 samples: single nucleotide variants were the most common type of somatic mutation (479/508, 94.3%. Frequently detected somatic mutations included TP53 (68.5%, KDR (41.3%, and PIK3CA (17.4%. Notably, RB1 mutations were the only mutations significantly different between the UBUC and UTUC groups (19.7% vs. 0%, P = .020. The most common types of CNVs included amplifications (56/62, 90.3%: 17.7% of patients identified amplifications in NOTCH1. We also identified five translocations in the entire study population, including one case with FGFR3-TACC3 (Chr4 fusion. CONCLUSION: Within a small study population, we identified similar genetic alterations in both UTUC and UBUC patients, indicating a basis for similar management strategies.

  13. A Smac mimetic augments the response of urothelial cancer cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin.

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    Lee, Eugene K; Jinesh G, Goodwin; Laing, Naomi M; Choi, Woonyoung; McConkey, David J; Kamat, Ashish M

    2013-09-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is considered the gold standard for patients with advanced bladder cancer. However, despite initial response, many patients will relapse; therefore, novel salvage treatment strategies are desperately needed. Herein, we studied a mechanism based treatment combination using a Smac mimetic with standard chemotherapy. Using a panel of 10 urothelial cancer cell lines, we exposed them to a combination of gemcitabine, cisplatin, and a Smac mimetic. Sensitivity was determined using a DNA fragmentation assay. We determined that three cell lines (UMUC-3, UMUC-13, and RT4v6) were considered sensitive to the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin and an additional three cell lines were sensitized to gemcitabine and cisplatin with the addition of the Smac mimetic (UMUC-6, UMUC-12, and UMUC-18). We next explored the constitutive expression of selected members of the IAP family (XIAP, cIAP-1, cIAP-2, and Survivin), the BCL family (BCL-2, BCLXL, and BAX) and Smac using gene expression profiling and western blotting. We determined that RNA and protein expression of SMAC, selected members of the IAP family and members of the BCL family did not correlate to drug sensitivity. Lastly, using an in vivo mouse model, we determined that treatment with the Smac mimetic in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin resulted in increased apoptosis, decreased microvessel density and decreased cellular proliferation. This novel treatment strategy may be effective in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma and warrants further investigation.

  14. Proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma

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    Cao Yan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aimed to facilitate candidate biomarkers selection and improve network-based multi-target therapy, we perform comparative proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Laser capture microdissection was used to harvest purified muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells from 4 paired samples. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteome expression profile. The differential proteins were further analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared with the published literature. Results A total of 885/890 proteins commonly appeared in 4 paired samples. 295/337 of the 488/493 proteins that specific expressed in tumor/normal cells own gene ontology (GO cellular component annotation. Compared with the entire list of the international protein index (IPI, there are 42/45 GO terms exhibited as enriched and 9/5 exhibited as depleted, respectively. Several pathways exhibit significantly changes between cancer and normal cells, mainly including spliceosome, endocytosis, oxidative phosphorylation, etc. Finally, descriptive statistics show that the PI Distribution of candidate biomarkers have certain regularity. Conclusions The present study identified the proteome expression profile of muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells, providing information for subcellular pattern research of cancer and offer candidate proteins for biomarker panel and network-based multi-target therapy.

  15. Exosomal protein interactors as emerging therapeutic targets in urothelial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, N.; Saxena, S.; Agrawal, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exosomes are rich sources of biological material (proteins and nucleic acids) secreted by both tumor and normal cells, and found in urine of urinary bladder cancer patients. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify interacting exosomal proteins in bladder cancer for future use in targeted therapy. Methods: The Exocarta database (www.exocarta.org) was mined for urinary bladder cancer specific exosomal proteins. The urinary bladder cancer specific exosomal proteins (n = 248) were analyzed to identify enriched pathways by Onto-tool Pathway Express (http://vortex.cs.wayne.edu/ ontoexpress). Results: Enriched pathways included cellular architecture, motility, cell to cell adhesion, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Proteins in the 9 top-ranked pathways included CTNNA1 (alpha-catenin), CTNNB1 (beta-catenin), VSAP, ITGA4, PAK1, DDR1, CDC42, RHOA, NRAS, RHO, PIK3AR1, MLC1, MMRN1, and CTTNBP2 and network analysis revealed 10 important hub proteins and identified inferred interactor NF2. Conclusions: The importance of identifying interactors is that that they can be used as targets for therapy, for example, using Bevacizumab (avastin - an angiogenesis inhibitor) against NF2 to inhibit protein-protein interactions will inhibit tumor growth and progression by hindering the exosome biogenesis

  16. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is associated with T-stage and survival in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Line Hammer; Illemann, Martin; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    during cancer invasion and metastasis and is an established prognostic marker in cancer. The expression and localization of uPAR and its prognostic significance is only limitedly investigated in urothelial bladder neoplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression-and localization pattern of u......PAR was investigated in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue from 149 patients treated with radical cystectomy between 1988 and 2005. uPAR expression was determined by immunohistochemistry and scored as either negative or positive. Separate values were obtained for cancer cells, macrophages...... comparisons). In univariate analysis, the uPAR positive group had a shorter survival than the uPAR negative group (hazard ratio = 2.39; 95% CI: 1.15-5.01; P = 0.020). CONCLUSIONS: The expression of uPAR is a possible prognostic marker that could be useful in identification of patients with aggressive, highly...

  17. Tumour front inflammation and necrosis are independent prognostic predictors in high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Anjelica; Xu, Bin; Satkunasivam, Raj; Downes, Michelle R

    2018-02-01

    Inflammation and necrosis have been associated with prognosis in multiple epithelial malignancies. Our objective was to evaluate inflammation and necrosis in a cohort of patients with high-grade urothelial carcinomas of the bladder to determine their association with pathological parameters and their prognostic effect on relapse-free and disease-specific survival. A retrospective cohort that underwent radical cystectomy for urothelial carcinomas (n=235) was evaluated for invasive front and central inflammation using the Klintrup-Makinen assessment method. Necrosis was scored using a four-point scale. The relationship of inflammation and necrosis with stage, nodal status, carcinoma in situ, tumour size, margin status and vascular space invasion and the impact on relapse-free and disease-specific survival were calculated using appropriate statistical tests. On multivariate analysis, invasive front inflammation (p=0.003) and necrosis (p=0.000) were independent predictors of relapse-free survival. Both invasive front inflammation (p=0.009) and necrosis (p=0.002) again were independent predictors of disease-specific survival. For pathological features, low invasive front inflammation was associated with lymphovascular space invasion (p=0.008), a positive soft tissue margin (p=0.028) and carcinoma in situ (p=0.042). Necrosis was statistically associated with tumours >3 cm in size (p=0.013) and carcinoma in situ (pinflammation are additional histological variables with independent prognostic relevance in high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Modulation of intra-epithelial expansion of human T24 bladder-carcinoma cells in murine urothelium by growth factors and extracellular-matrix components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.J. Rebel (Annemarie); C.D.E.M. Thijssen (C. D E M); M. Vermey; E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe high recurrence rate of bladder cancer is probably due to an efficient repopulation of the bladder by residual transformed cells after resection of the tumour. However, the regenerating capacity of the normal urothelial cells is very high. To study the balance between regenerating

  19. Histological grading of papillary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: prognostic value of the 1998 WHO/ISUP classification system and comparison with conventional grading systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, J. W. A.; Schapers, R. F. M.; Janssen-Heijnen, M. L. G.; Pauwels, R. P. E.; Newling, D. W.; ten Kate, F.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To test the prognostic value of the 1998 WHO/ISUP (World Health Organisation/International Society of Urologic Pathology) consensus classification system in Ta papillary urothelial neoplasms of the bladder. METHODS: The histological slides of 322 patients with a primary Ta tumour were

  20. Correlation between Urothelial Differentiation and Sensory Proteins P2X3, P2X5, TRPV1, and TRPV4 in Normal Urothelium and Papillary Carcinoma of Human Bladder

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    Igor Sterle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminal differentiation of urothelium is a prerequisite for blood-urine barrier formation and enables normal sensory function of the urinary bladder. In this study, urothelial differentiation of normal human urothelium and of low and high grade papillary urothelial carcinomas was correlated with the expression and localization of purinergic receptors (P2X3, and P2X5 and transient receptor potential vanilloid channels (TRPV1, and TRPV4. Western blotting and immunofluorescence of uroplakins together with scanning electron microscopy of urothelial apical surface demonstrated terminal differentiation of normal urothelium, partial differentiation of low grade carcinoma, and poor differentiation of high grade carcinoma. P2X3 was expressed in normal urothelium as well as in low grade carcinoma and in both cases immunolabeling was stronger in the superficial cells. P2X3 expression decreased in high grade carcinoma. P2X5 expression was detected in normal urothelium and in high grade carcinoma, while in low grade carcinoma its expression was diminished. The expression of TRPV1 decreased in low grade and even more in high grade carcinoma when compared with normal urothelium, while TRPV4 expression was unchanged in all samples. Our results suggest that sensory proteins P2X3 and TRPV1 are in correlation with urothelial differentiation, while P2X5 and TRPV4 have unique expression patterns.

  1. Knockdown of long non-coding RNA Taurine Up-Regulated 1 inhibited doxorubicin resistance of bladder urothelial carcinoma via Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dalong; Zhang, Hui; Hu, Xuanhao; Shang, Chao

    2017-10-24

    In genitourinary system, bladder cancer (BC) is the most common and lethal malignant tumor, which most common type is bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC). Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) Taurine Up-Regulated 1 (TUG1) gene is high-expressed in several malignant tumors, including BC. In this study, over-expression of TUG1 was found in BUC tissues and cell line resistant to doxorubicin (Dox). Knockdown of TUG1 inhibited the Dox resistance and promoted the cytotoxicity induced by Dox in T24/Dox cells. TUG1 knockdown also depressed the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and the activation the Wnt/β-catenin pathway partly reversed the inhibitory effects of TUG1 knockdown on Dox resistance in T24/Dox cells. In conclusion, up-regulation of lncRNA TUG1 was related with the poor response of BUC patients to Dox chemotherapy, knockdown of TUG1 inhibited the Dox resistance of BUC cells via Wnt/β-catenin pathway. These findings might assist in the discovery of novel potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for BUC, thereby improve the effects of clinical treatment in patients.

  2. Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder with extensive scrotal wall invasion

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    Yong Gang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma (PUC is an extremely rare and aggressive variant of urothelial carcinoma. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who presented with a rapid spread of PUC to involve his entire scrotal wall after failed surgery and chemotherapy. The second course of chemotherapy was effective in providing symptom control. We believe this is the first case report of PUC causing such rapid and extensive scrotal invasion. This case highlights the important features of PUC including the pattern of tumor spread along fascial planes, the tendency for initial understaging, and the rapid recurrence after initially response to chemotherapy.

  3. Clinical usefulness of CEA, CA19-9, and CYFRA 21-1 as tumor markers for urothelial bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washino, Satoshi; Hirai, Masaru; Matsuzaki, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of measuring serum CEA, CA19-9, and CYFRA 21-1 levels for the diagnosis and monitoring of bladder cancer. Serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, and CYFRA 21-1 were measured in 85 patients with bladder cancer. The absolute level of each marker and the positive rate were compared with the clinical stage and histological grade of the tumor. Changes of the markers were assessed in patients with or without disease progression, and the correlations between survival and positivity/negativity of these markers were also evaluated. A higher serum level of CYFRA 21-1 was significantly correlated with higher tumor stage (p CEA and CA19-9 levels did not differ significantly among each stage and grade. The CYFRA 21-1 level increased significantly along with disease progression (from 7.33 ± 13.3 to 55.9 ± 127 ng/ml, p marker of advanced- and high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. It is useful for monitoring this disease and for predicting the prognosis. In contrast, the clinical usefulness of CEA and CA19-9 as tumor markers was not demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Serum Cystatin C Level Is Not a Promising Biomarker for Predicting Clinicopathological Characteristics of Bladder Urothelial Tumors

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    Hui Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of cystatin C (Cys-C in tumorigenesis and progression of bladder urothelial tumors (BUT is still indefinite. We retrospectively collected the clinical information from the records of 425 BUT patients. Pretreatment serum Cys-C levels were compared across the various groups. Then we subgroup the patients with GFR ≥ 90 mg/min/1.73 m2, to exclude the effects of lower renal function on cystatin C. No statistically significant differences in the levels of serum Cys-C were found among the tumor characteristics (all P>0.05. In conclusion, circulating Cys-C was not a reliable predictor for clinicopathological characteristics of BUT patients.

  5. Urothelial dysfunction and sensory protein expressions in patients with urological or systemic diseases and hypersensitive bladder

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    Hueih-Ling Ong

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Patients with OAB or HSB showed increased urothelial inflammation and lower barrier protein expression. Increased M3/β3-AR or M2/β3-AR in the urothelium was associated with OAB, whereas decreased M3/β3-AR or M2/β3-AR was associated with poor voiding efficiency and large PVR in LUTD.

  6. Gene expression of muscarinic, tachykinin and purinergic receptors in porcine bladder: comparison with cultured cells

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    Forough eBahadory

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells are important cell types contributing to bladder function. Multiple receptors including muscarinic (M3/M5, tachykinin (NK1/NK2 and purinergic (P2X1/P2Y6 receptors are involved in bladder motor and sensory actions. Using female pig bladder, our aim was to differentiate between various cell types in bladder by genetic markers. We compared the molecular expression pattern between the fresh tissue layers and their cultured cell counterparts. We also examined responses to agonists for these receptors in cultured cells. Urothelial, suburothelial (myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells isolated from pig bladder were cultured (10-14 days and identified by marker antibodies. Gene (mRNA expression level was demonstrated by real-time PCR. The receptor expression pattern was very similar between suburothelium and detrusor, and higher than urothelium. The gene expression of all receptors decreased in culture compared with the fresh tissue, although the reduction in cultured urothelial cells appeared less significant compared to suburothelial and detrusor cells. Cultured myofibroblasts and detrusor cells did not contract in response to the agonists acetylcholine, neurokinin A and β,γ-MeATP, up to concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. The significant reduction of M3, NK2 and P2X1 receptors under culture conditions may be associated with the unresponsiveness of cultured suburothelial and detrusor cells to their respective agonists. These results suggest that under culture conditions, bladder cells lose the receptors that are involved in contraction, as this function is no longer required. The study provides further evidence that cultured cells do not necessarily mimic the actions exerted by intact tissues.

  7. Review: Application of Nanoparticles in Urothelial Cancer of the Urinary Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chieh-Hsiao; Chan, Tzu-Min; Wu, Yi-Jhen; Chen, Jia-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common malignancy of the urinary tract, which generally develops in the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder. The specific course of treatment depends on the stage of bladder cancer; however, therapeutic strategies typically involve intravesical drug delivery to reduce toxicity and increase therapeutic effects. Recently, metallic, polymeric, lipid, and protein nanoparticles have been introduced to aid in the treatment of bladder cancer. Nanoparticles are also commonly ...

  8. Functional genomic studies of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and host urothelial cells when intracellular bacterial communities are assembled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigstad, Christopher S; Hultgren, Scott J; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2007-07-20

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the principal cause of urinary tract infection in women, colonizes the gut as well as the genitourinary tract. Studies of mice inoculated with UTI89, a sequenced isolate, have revealed a complex life cycle that includes formation of intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) in bladder urothelial cells. To understand how UPEC adapts to life in IBCs, we have used GeneChips and/or quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR to study UTI89 recovered from the distal gut of gnotobiotic mice and from IBCs harvested by laser capture microdissection from the bladder urothelium of infected C3H/HeJ female mice. Host responses were characterized in laser capture microdissected urothelial cells that do or do not contain IBCs. The results reveal components of ferric iron acquisition systems in UTI89 that are expressed at significantly higher levels in IBCs compared with the intestine, including the hemin receptor chuA (1,390 +/- 188-fold). Localized urothelial responses to IBCs help oppose bacterial salvage of host cell iron (e.g. up-regulation of Tfrc (transferrin receptor) and Lcn2 (lipocalin 2)), facilitate glucose import (e.g. Hk2 (hexokinase 2)), and maintain epithelial structural integrity (e.g. Ivl (involucrin) and Sbsn (suprabasin)). DeltachuA mutants produce significantly smaller IBCs compared with wild type UTI89. This difference was not observed in strains lacking sitA (ABC-type iron/manganese transporter subunit), iroN (salmochelin receptor), hlyA (alpha-hemolysin), or entF (enterobactin synthetase subunit). Together, these studies indicate that heme- and siderophore-associated iron play key roles in IBC development and provide a series of microbial and host biomarkers for comparing UPEC strains isolated from humans.

  9. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the urinary bladder in a patient with bladder cancer previously treated with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numakura, Satoe; Morikawa, Teppei; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Toyoaki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    We report an extremely rare case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the urinary bladder. A 68-year-old man presented with gross hematuria. Cystoscopy showed multiple papillary tumors in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Pathological diagnosis was high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma with lamina propria invasion. The patient received six treatments with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy. Seven months after surgery, follow-up cystoscopy showed three elevated lesions in the urinary bladder, two of which were identified histologically as recurrent urothelial carcinoma. Microscopic examination of the lesion at the anterior wall revealed diffuse infiltration of medium to large histiocytoid cells in the lamina propria, many of which had distorted nuclei and nuclear grooves. Dense eosinophilic infiltration was also observed. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were diffusely positive for S-100 and CD1a, but negative for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and melanosome-associated antigen recognized by HMB-45. Based on the histological and immunohistochemical features, we diagnosed the lesion as LCH of the urinary bladder. There was no evidence of recurrence of either bladder cancer or LCH after an 18-month follow-up. To avoid misdiagnosis, urologists and pathologists should be aware that LCH may develop in the urinary bladder after intravesical BCG therapy for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Urinary pH Levels are Strongly Associated with Bladder Recurrence After Nephroureterectomy in Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma Patients with a Smoking History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Hiroki; Kikuchi, Eiji; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Nozomi; Hongo, Hiroshi; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-12-01

    Aromatic amines, well-known bladder carcinogens, derived from cigarette smoke are activated by acidic urine. We herein determined whether urinary pH levels are associated with bladder recurrence in upper tract urothelial carcinoma patients with a positive smoking history. A total of 256 upper tract urothelial carcinoma patients who were surgically treated at our institution between 1990 and 2013 were included. Urinary pH levels were defined as the median of at least two consecutive measurements within 1 month of surgery. Ninety-six patients (37.5 %) had pH pH ≥5.5, and urinary pH levels were identified as one of the significant predictors for bladder recurrence in univariate but not multivariate Cox regression analysis in overall. In patients with a positive smoking history among those without a history of bladder tumor (N = 110), the 5-year bladder recurrence-free survival rate was 52.5 % in patients with pH ≥5.5, which was significantly higher than that in those with pH pH pH pH for urine alkalization may prevent bladder recurrence.

  11. Functional TRP and ASIC-like channels in cultured urothelial cells from the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, F Aura; Shah, M A; Birder, L A; de Groat, W C

    2009-04-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) are molecular detectors of chemical, mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli in sensory neurons. They have been identified in the urothelium, a tissue considered part of bladder sensory pathways, where they might play a role in bladder function. This study investigated functional properties of TRP and ASIC channels in cultured urothelial cells from the rat using patch-clamp and fura 2 Ca(2+) imaging techniques. The TRPV4 agonist 4alpha-phorbol-12,13 didecanoate (4alpha-PDD; 1-5 microM) and the TRPA1/TRPM8 agonist icilin (50-100 microM) elicited transient currents in a high percentage of cells (>70%). 4alpha-PDD responses were suppressed by the TRPV4 antagonist HC-010961 (10 microM). The TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (1-100 microM) and the TRPA1/TRPM8 agonist menthol (5-200 microM) elicited transient currents in a moderate percentage of cells ( approximately 25%). All of these agonists increased intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Most cells responded to more than one TRP agonist (e.g., capsaicin and 4alpha-PDD), indicating coexpression of different TRP channels. In the presence of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (10 microM), changes in pH induced by HCl elicited ionic currents (pH 5.5) and increased [Ca(2+)](i) (pH 6.5) in approximately 50% of cells. Changes in pH using acetic acid (pH 5.5) elicited biphasic-like currents. Responses induced by acid were sensitive to amiloride (10 microM). In summary, urothelial cells express multiple TRP and ASIC channels, whose activation elicits ionic currents and Ca(2+) influx. These "neuron-like" properties might be involved in transmitter release, such as ATP, that can act on afferent nerves or smooth muscle to modulate their responses to different stimuli.

  12. BCG-induced interleukin-6 upregulation and BCG internalization in well and poorly differentiated human bladder cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, R. F.; de Boer, E. C.; Kurth, K. H.; Schamhart, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is a successful therapy for superficial bladder cancer. However, the working mechanism of BCG after intravesical instillation is not completely understood. A functional role of urothelial (tumor) cells in the initiation of the BCG-induced immune reaction

  13. Molecular targets in urothelial cancer: detection, treatment, and animal models of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, Dmitriy; Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer remains one of the most expensive cancers to treat in the United States due to the length of required treatment and degree of recurrence. In order to treat bladder cancer more effectively, targeted therapies are being investigated. In order to use targeted therapy in a patient, it is important to provide a genetic background of the patient. Recent advances in genome sequencing, as well as transcriptome analysis, have identified major pathway components altered in bladder cancer. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad background on bladder cancer, including its causes, diagnosis, stages, treatments, animal models, as well as signaling pathways in bladder cancer. The major focus is given to the PI3K/AKT pathway, p53/pRb signaling pathways, and the histone modification machinery. Because several promising immunological therapies are also emerging in the treatment of bladder cancer, focus is also given on general activation of the immune system for the treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:27784990

  14. Combination of CK20 and Ki-67 immunostaining analysis predicts recurrence, progression, and cancer-specific survival in pT1 urothelial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, Simone; Otto, Wolfgang; Denzinger, Stefan; Wieland, Wolf F; Burger, Maximilian; Stöhr, Robert; Link, Stefan; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Hartmann, Arndt

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic value of CK20, Ki-67, and p53 has been investigated for non-muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancers but not for the distinct and clinically challenging subset of pT1 bladder cancers. To evaluate the prognostic value of CK20, Ki-67, and p53 within the largest series of pT1 urothelial bladder cancers. Data from 309 patients with pT1 urothelial bladder cancer from one single urologic centre were collected. Adjuvant instillation of bacillus Calmette-Guérin was performed in each patient. A second resection was performed after 4-8 wk. A total of 76 patients underwent cystectomy. We conducted histomorphologic analysis; immunohistochemistry for CK20, Ki-67, and p53; and univariate and multivariate Cox regression models including recurrence-free survival (RFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS). At a median follow-up of 49 mo, we found recurrence and progression and disease-specific mortality rates of 22.7%, 20.1%, and 15.9%, respectively. CK20 expression was significantly correlated with RFS in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-24.15; p=0.014). In multivariate analysis, Ki-67 was the only marker significantly correlated with PFS (HR: 2.80; 95% CI, 1.45-5.43, p=0.002). Ki-67 (HR: 3.83; 95% CI, 1.59-9.26; p=0.003), and CK20 (HR: 8.44; 95% CI,1.16-61.34; p=0.035) were significantly correlated with CSS in multivariate analysis. The combination of CK20 and Ki-67 showed significantly worse RFS (p=0.026), PFS (p=0.003), and CSS (plimitation of this study. Our present analysis of the largest series of patients with pT1 urothelial bladder cancer published to date found Ki-67 and CK20 to be potential prognostic markers improving the risk stratification of pT1 bladder tumours. They are reliable indicators of biologic aggressiveness and may contribute to decision making on therapeutic strategy for pT1 bladder carcinomas. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by

  15. A Novel Risk Stratification to Predict Local-Regional Failures in Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder After Radical Cystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Brian C.; Guzzo, Thomas J.; He Jiwei; Keefe, Stephen M.; Tucker, Kai; Bekelman, Justin E.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Vaughn, David J.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Local-regional failures (LF) following radical cystectomy (RC) plus pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) with or without chemotherapy for invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma are more common than previously reported. Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) could reduce LF but currently has no defined role because of previously reported morbidity. Modern techniques with improved normal tissue sparing have rekindled interest in RT. We assessed the risk of LF and determined those factors that predict recurrence to facilitate patient selection for future adjuvant RT trials. Methods and Materials: From 1990-2008, 442 patients with urothelial bladder carcinoma at University of Pennsylvania were prospectively followed after RC plus PLND with or without chemotherapy with routine pelvic computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred thirty (29%) patients received chemotherapy. LF was any pelvic failure detected before or within 3 months of distant failure. Competing risk analyses identified factors predicting increased LF risk. Results: On univariate analysis, pathologic stage ≥pT3, <10 nodes removed, positive margins, positive nodes, hydronephrosis, lymphovascular invasion, and mixed histology significantly predicted LF; node density was marginally predictive, but use of chemotherapy, number of positive nodes, type of surgical diversion, age, gender, race, smoking history, and body mass index were not. On multivariate analysis, only stage ≥pT3 and <10 nodes removed were significant independent LF predictors with hazard ratios of 3.17 and 2.37, respectively (P<.01). Analysis identified 3 patient subgroups with significantly different LF risks: low-risk (≤pT2), intermediate-risk (≥pT3 and ≥10 nodes removed), and high-risk (≥pT3 and <10 nodes) with 5-year LF rates of 8%, 23%, and 42%, respectively (P<.01). Conclusions: This series using routine CT and MRI surveillance to detect LF confirms that such failures are relatively common in

  16. A Giant Pedunculated Urothelial Polyp Mimicking Bladder Mass in a Child: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kaba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral fibroepithelial polyps are rarely seen benign tumors with mesodermal origin. These polyps can involve kidney, pelvis, ureter, bladder, and urethra. The most common symptoms are hematuria and flank pain. The choice of treatment is either endoscopic or surgical resection of polyp by sparing kidney. Here, we presented a pediatric case with giant, fibroepithelial polyp that mimics bladder tumor, originating from middle segment of the ureter.

  17. Urothelial mucosal signaling and the overactive bladder-ICI-RS 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birder, Lori A; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Kanai, Anthony J; Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Fry, Chris H

    2014-06-01

    There is abundant evidence that the lower urinary tract (LUT) mucosal layer is involved both in mechanosensory functions that regulate bladder contractile activity and in urethral sensation. Changes to the mucosa can be associated with a number of bladder pathologies. For example, alterations of the urothelium and underlying lamina propria at both the molecular and structural levels have been reported in both patients and animals associated with disorders such as bladder pain syndrome and diabetic cystopathy. In contrast to the urinary bladder, much less is known about the urothelium/lamina propria of the bladder neck/proximal urethra. There are important gender differences in the outflow region both anatomically and with respect to innervation, hormonal sensitivity, and location of the external urethral sphincter. There is reasonable evidence to support the view that the mucosal signaling pathway in the proximal urethra is important for normal voiding, but it has also been speculated that the proximal urethra can initiate bladder overactivity. When dysfunctional, the proximal urethra may be an interesting target, for example, botulinum toxin injections aiming at eliminating both urgency and incontinence due to detrusor overactivity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Urothelial Cancer With Occult Bone Marrow Metastases and Isolated Thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajjai Alva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer rarely presents clinically with a myelophthisic picture from diffuse bone marrow infiltration especially in the absence of detectable skeletal metastases. A 75-year old man presented with newly diagnosed urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pathology from transurethral resection of bladder tumor demonstrated muscle-invasive disease. Pre-therapy imaging including CT abdomen/pelvis, CXR and bone scan demonstrated liver lesions concerning for metastatic disease but no skeletal metastases. Labs were notable for isolated thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury prompting hospitalization. Hematologic work-up including bone marrow aspiration and biopsy revealed diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by urothelial cancer. The case illustrates the importance of fully investigating otherwise unexplained clinical findings in patients with clinically localized urothelial cancer prior to curative intent surgery.

  19. [Construction of a capsular tissue-engineered ureteral stent seeded with autologous urothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Haisong; Fu, Weijun; Li, Jianqiang; Wang, Zhongxin; Li, Gang; Ma, Xin; Dong, Jun; Gao, Jiangping; Wang, Xiaoxiong; Zhang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of constructing a capsular poly L-lactic acid (PLLA) ureteral stent seeded with autologous urothelial cells using tissue engineering methods. The capsular ureteral stent was constructed by subcutaneously embedding PLLA ureteral stent in the back of beagles for 3 weeks to induce the formation of connective tissue on the surfaces. After decellularization of the stent, the expanded autologous urothelial cells were seeded on the stent. The surface structure and cell adhesion of the stent were observed using HE staining, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and immunocytochemical staining. MTT assay was used to evaluate urothelial cell proliferation on the capsular PLLA ureteral stent and on circumferential small intestinal submucosa graft. HE staining and VIII factor immunohistochemistry revealed numerous capillaries in the connective tissue encapsulating the stent without obvious local inflammatory response. The results of SEM and immunocytochemical staining showed that the capsule contained rich collagenic fibers forming three-dimensional structures, and the seeded autologous urothelial cells could adhere and well aligned on the surface. MTT assay showed normal growth of the cells on the stent as compared with the cells grown on circumferential small intestinal submucosa graft. The capsular PLLA ureteral stent allows adhesion and proliferation of autologous urothelial cells and shows a potential in applications of constructing tissue-engineered ureter.

  20. Impact of lymphovascular invasion on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nan Sha,* Linguo Xie,* Tao Chen,* Chen Xing, Xiaoteng Liu, Yu Zhang, Zhonghua Shen, Hao Xu, Zhouliang Wu, Hailong Hu, Changli Wu Department of Urology, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Urology, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To evaluate the clinical significance of lymphovascular invasion (LVI on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection.Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 155 patients with newly diagnosed pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder who were treated with transurethral resection of bladder tumor at our institution from January 2006 to January 2010. The presence or absence of LVI was examined by pathologists. Chi-square test was performed to identify the correlations between LVI and other clinical and pathological features. Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate the recurrence-free survival (RFS and progression-free survival curves and difference was determined by the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive factors through a Cox proportional hazards analysis model.Results: LVI was detected in a total of 34 patients (21.9%. While LVI was associated with high-grade tumors (P<0.001 and intravesical therapy (P=0.009. Correlations with age (P=0.227, sex (P=0.376, tumor size (P=0.969, tumor multiplicity (P=0.196, carcinoma in situ (P=0.321, and smoking (P=0.438 were not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant tendency toward higher recurrence rate and shorter RFS time in LVI-positive patients. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in progression rate between the two groups. Moreover, multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that LVI, tumor size, and smoking were independent prognostic predictors of

  1. Crude mortality and loss of life expectancy of patients diagnosed with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Bettina K; Myklebust, Tor Å; Haug, Erik S

    2017-02-01

    Reports from cancer registries often lack clinically relevant information, which would be useful in estimating the prognosis of individual patients with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder (UCB). This article presents estimates of crude probabilities of death due to UCB and the expected loss of lifetime stratified for patient characteristics. In Norway, 10,332 patients were diagnosed with UCB between 2001 and 2010. The crude probabilities of death due to UCB were estimated, stratified by gender, age and T stage, using flexible parametric survival models. Based on these models, the loss in expectation of lifetime due to UCB was also estimated for the different strata. There is large variation in the estimated crude probabilities of death due to UCB (from 0.03 to 0.76 within 10 years since diagnosis) depending on age, gender and T stage. Furthermore, the expected loss of life expectancy is more than a decade for younger patients with muscle-invasive UCB and between a few months and 5 years for nonmuscle-invasive UCB. The suggested framework leads to clinically relevant prognostic risk estimates for individual patients diagnosed with UCB and the consequence in terms of loss of lifetime expectation. The published probability tables can be used in clinical praxis for risk communication.

  2. Preoperative anemia is associated with adverse outcome in patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder following radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierth, M; Mayr, R; Aziz, A; Krieger, S; Wullich, B; Pycha, A; Lodde, M; Salvadori, U; Bründl, J; Fritsche, H M; Hofstädter, F; Pawlik, M T; Otto, W; May, M; Burger, M; Denzinger, S

    2015-10-01

    Radical cystectomy (RC) can be associated with significant blood loss, whereas many patients are presenting with anemia preoperatively. To date, there is a lack of data addressing the impact of preoperative anemia (PA) on survival of patients undergoing RC for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). This retrospective multicenter study includes 684 patients with UCB undergoing RC with pelvic lymph node dissection. The median follow-up was 50 (IQR 29,78) months. Anemia was defined in line with the WHO classification (hemoglobin (Hb): male ≤13 g/dL, female ≤12 g/dL) and based on contemporary gender- and age-adjusted classification (Hb: white male aged classification versus contemporary classification. Age, increased ECOG performance status, advanced tumor stages, lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin and anemia were associated with disease recurrence (DR), cancer-specific mortality (CSM) and all-cause mortality (ACM). In multivariable analysis, anemia was an independent predictor of DR, CSM and ACM (WHO and/or contemporary classification). Blood transfusion was significantly associated with ACM in both classifications of anemia. PA is significantly associated with worse oncological outcome in patients undergoing RC. Based on the additional unfavorable influence of blood transfusion, this emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and correction of anemia and implementation of alternative methods of blood volume management.

  3. Genetic and immunologic determinants of intravesical BCG therapy in non-muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Krajewski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BCA is one of the most common cancers. In 2010 in Poland, 6296 people developed bladder cancer and 3110 people died of it. Immunotherapy with BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin is by far the most effective adjuvant therapy. Noninfiltrating muscle membrane changes, that is, stages Ta, Tis and T1 qualify for BCG immunotherapy. BCG immunotherapy comprises series of bladder instillations, containing attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis. The effectiveness of immunotherapy in non-invasive bladder cancer is 70% 5-year survival without recurrence of the tumor. The treatment leads to a reduction of the residual tumor mass, but also to the delay and/or prevention of relapse, disease progression and ultimately death. Cytokines, as key mediators of immune response, play an important role in the pathogenesis of bladder cancer, which occurrence is stimulated by the inflammatory process. BCG immunotherapy provokes an intensive immunological response by the increase of cytokine production. Genetic variants determine inter-individual differences in the incidence of this cancer, as well as the response to the therapy. This is evidenced by the presence of differences in genetic variants of cytokines correlated with the varied risk of bladder cancer incidence. It is believed that concentrations of particular cytokines in urine after installation of BCG may indicate response to the therapy. Increased levels of Th1 cytokines – IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α are correlated with longer survival time without recurrence, whereas high levels of Th2 cytokines such as IL-10, predict unsuccessful BCG therapy.

  4. Bladder cancer and schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer was believed, for several decades, to be a completely unique entity of disease, different from urothelial cancer. This was probably due to its distinct clinico pathologic and demographic features that varied from those of urothelial entity. The carcinogenesis is an extremely complex process resulting from the accumulation of many genetic and epigenetic changes leading to alterations in the cell proliferation regulation process. In bladder cancer, many of these carcinogenic cascades were not fully documented or somewhat conflicting. In spite of the efforts performed, much is still needed to explore the presence or absence of the carcinogenic difference with a different etiology. The control of schistosomiasis in certain countries and the subsequent decrease in the intensity of infestation showed changing of features approaching that of urothelial tumors. However the schistosoma-associated bladder cancer presented in more advanced stages than schistosoma-non associated urothelial cancer. More recently, data are gathered that, upon applying the same treatment protocol and management care, stage by stage comparison of the treatment end-results were found to be similar in bladder cancer patients with a different etiology. All treatment options; including radical cystectomy with or without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy or tri modality bladder preserving treatment seem to lead to similar end-results regardless of etiologic factor(s) implicated in bladder cancer development.

  5. Performance of Urinary Markers for Detection of Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: Is Upper Tract Urine More Accurate than Urine from the Bladder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Bier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the performance of urine markers determined in urine samples from the bladder compared to samples collected from the upper urinary tract (UUT for diagnosis of UUT urothelial carcinoma (UC. Patients and Methods. The study comprised 758 urine samples either collected from the bladder (n=373 or UUT (n=385. All patients underwent urethrocystoscopy and UUT imaging or ureterorenoscopy. Cytology, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, immunocytology (uCyt+, and nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22 were performed. Results. UUT UC was diagnosed in 59 patients (19.1% (UUT urine and 27 patients (7.2% (bladder-derived urine. For UUT-derived samples, sensitivities for cytology, FISH, NMP22, and uCyt+ were 74.6, 79.0, 100.0, and 100.0, while specificities were 66.6, 50.7, 5.9, and 66.7%, respectively. In bladder-derived samples, sensitivities were 59.3, 52.9, 62.5, and 50.0% whereas specificities were 82.9, 85.0, 31.3, and 69.8%. In UUT-derived samples, concomitant bladder cancer led to increased false-positive rates of cytology and FISH. Conclusions. Urine markers determined in urine collected from the UUT exhibit better sensitivity but lower specificity compared to markers determined in bladder-derived urine. Concomitant or recent diagnosis of UC of the bladder can further influence markers determined in UUT urine.

  6. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Mediates PAR-Induced Bladder Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios E Kouzoukas

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is constitutively expressed in urothelial cells that also express protease-activated receptors (PAR. Urothelial PAR1 receptors were shown to mediate bladder inflammation. We showed that PAR1 and PAR4 activator, thrombin, also mediates urothelial MIF release. We hypothesized that stimulation of urothelial PAR1 or PAR4 receptors elicits release of urothelial MIF that acts on MIF receptors in the urothelium to mediate bladder inflammation and pain. Thus, we examined the effect of activation of specific bladder PAR receptors on MIF release, bladder pain, micturition and histological changes.MIF release was measured in vitro after exposing immortalized human urothelial cells (UROtsa to PAR1 or PAR4 activating peptides (AP. Female C57BL/6 mice received intravesical PAR1- or PAR4-AP for one hour to determine: 1 bladder MIF release in vivo within one hour; 2 abdominal hypersensitivity (allodynia to von Frey filament stimulation 24 hours after treatment; 3 micturition parameters 24 hours after treatment; 4 histological changes in the bladder as a result of treatment; 5 changes in expression of bladder MIF and MIF receptors using real-time RT-PCR; 6 changes in urothelial MIF and MIF receptor, CXCR4, protein levels using quantitative immunofluorescence; 7 effect of MIF or CXCR4 antagonism.PAR1- or PAR4-AP triggered MIF release from both human urothelial cells in vitro and mouse urothelium in vivo. Twenty-four hours after intravesical PAR1- or PAR4-AP, we observed abdominal hypersensitivity in mice without changes in micturition or bladder histology. PAR4-AP was more effective and also increased expression of bladder MIF and urothelium MIF receptor, CXCR4. Bladder CXCR4 localized to the urothelium. Antagonizing MIF with ISO-1 eliminated PAR4- and reduced PAR1-induced hypersensitivity, while antagonizing CXCR4 with AMD3100 only partially prevented PAR4-induced hypersensitivity.Bladder

  7. Matched-pair analysis of open versus laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmur, James P; Stewart, Grant D; Egong, Eric A; Cutress, Mark L; Tolley, David A; Riddick, Anthony C P; McNeill, S Alan

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (LNU) offers a superior morbidity profile compared with open nephroureterectomy (ONU) in treating upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma. Evidence of oncological equivalence between LNU and ONU is limited. We compare operative and oncological outcomes for LNU and ONU using matched-pair analysis. Of 159 patients who underwent a nephroureterectomy at a single institution between April 1992 and April 2010, 13 pairs of ONU and LNU patients were matched for gender, age, tumour location, tumour grade and stage. Operative details, post-operative characteristics and recurrences were collated and survival rates analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. There was no significant difference in mean operation time between LNU (191 min) and ONU (194 min, p=0.92). There was no significant difference in the 5-year survival rate between LNU and ONU (overall survival 59.1% vs. 73.5%, p=0.18; progression-free survival 24.0% vs. 56.0%, p=0.14; cancer-specific survival 60.9% vs. 73.5%, p=0.56; bladder cancer recurrence-free survival 8.7% vs. 0.0%, p=0.09). Amidst limited RCT and comparative studies, this study presents further evidence of oncological equivalence between LNU and ONU. There was a trend towards poorer outcomes following LNU though, which merits further study. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Cytotoxic and toxicogenomic effects of silibinin in bladder cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silibinin is a natural phenol found in the seeds of the milk thistle plant. Recent data have shown its effectiveness forpreventing/treating bladder tumours. Therefore, in this study we investigated the cytotoxic and toxicogenetic activityof silibinin in bladder cancer cells with different TP53 statuses. Two bladder urothelial ...

  9. Cytotoxic and toxicogenomic effects of silibinin in bladder cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silibinin is a natural phenol found in the seeds of the milk thistle plant. Recent data have shown its effectiveness forpreventing/treating bladder tumours. Therefore, in this study we investigated the cytotoxic and toxicogenetic activityof silibinin in bladder cancer cells with different TP53 statuses. Two bladder urothelial ...

  10. Dose-Dependent Response to 3-Nitrobenzanthrone Exposure in Human Urothelial Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Mario; Verma, Nisha; Zerries, Anna; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2017-10-16

    A product of incomplete combustion of diesel fuel, 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), has been classified as a cancer-causing substance. It first gained attention as a potential urinary bladder carcinogen due to the presence of its metabolite in urine and formation of DNA adducts. The aim of the present study was to characterize the dose-response relationship of 3-NBA in human urothelial cancer cell line (RT4) exposed to concentrations ranging from 0.0003 μM (environmentally relevant) to 80 μM by utilizing toxicological and metabolomic approaches. We observed that the RT4 cells were capable of bioactivation of 3-NBA within 30 min of exposure. Activity measurements of various enzymes involved in the conversion of 3-NBA in RT4 cells demonstrated NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) as the main contributor for its bioactivation. Moreover, cytotoxicity assessment exhibited an initiation of adaptive mechanisms at low dosages, which diminished at higher doses, indicating that the capacity of these mechanisms no longer suffices, resulting in increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, reduced proliferation, and hyperpolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane. To characterize the underlying mechanisms of this cellular response, the metabolism of 3-NBA and metabolomic changes in the cells were analyzed. The metabolomic analysis of the cells (0.0003, 0.01, 0.08, 10, and 80 μM 3-NBA) showed elevated levels of various antioxidants at low concentrations of 3-NBA. However, at higher exposure concentrations, it appeared that the cells reprogrammed their metabolism to maintain the cell homeostasis via activation of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP).

  11. Sensitivity of Bladder Cancer Cells to Curcumin and Its Derivatives Depends on the Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul J.; Han, Zhiyong; Sindhwani, Puneet; Hurst, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Because the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents depends upon the supporting extracellular matrix (ECM), the response in vivo may not be reproduced in 2-dimensional cell culture. The dose-response to curcumin and two derivatives by bladder cancer cells grown on both normal (SISgel) and cancer-derived ECM (Matrigel) and on plastic were contrasted. Cells grown on Matrigel were resistant to curcumins, but cells growing on SISgel, which mimic cancer cells suppressed by normal ECM, were nearly as sensitive as cells grown on plastic. SV40-immortalized urothelial cells, which are models for premalignant cells, were the most sensitive, but even aggressive cell lines were nearly as sensitive when grown on SISgel as on plastic. Curcumin response depends highly on the supporting ECM, and cells grown on plastic poorly models cells growing on natural ECM. Curcumin could prove an effective chemopreventive for bladder cancer recurrence when administered intravesically post-therapy. PMID:17465196

  12. Curcumin reverses benzidine-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition via suppression of ERK5/AP-1 in SV-40 immortalized human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiqi; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Li; Geng, Hao; Ma, Jiaxing; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Dexin; Zhong, Caiyun

    2017-04-01

    Overexposure to benzidine has been manifested as an important cause of bladder cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of benzidine-induced malignancy is still insufficiently interpreted. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial pathophysiological process in embryonic development as well as initiation and development of epithelium-originated malignant tumors. The role of extracellular regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5) in benzidine-meditated bladder cancer development has not been explored. In the present study, we explored the role of ERK5/AP-1 pathway in benzidine-induced EMT in human normal urothelial cells and the intervention effect of curcumin on bezidine-induced EMT. We found that benzidine-induced EMT in SV-40 immortalized human urothelial cells (SV-HUC-1) at low concentrations. We detected that ERK5/AP-1 pathway was notably activated. Specific ERK5 inhibitor, XMD8-92 was applied to determine the role of ERK5 in benzidine-induced EMT. Results indicated that XMD8-92 reversed the EMT process. Furthermore, curcumin effectively attenuated benzidine-induced urocystic EMT by suppressing ERK5/AP-1 pathway. In conclusion, the present study revealed the positive role of ERK5/AP-1 in benzidine-provoked urocystic EMT and the curcumin promising use in bladder cancer prevention and intervention via ERK5/AP-1 pathway.

  13. Low-level Ki-67 expression as an independent predictor of bladder tumour recurrence in patients with primary upper tract urothelial carcinoma after radical nephroureterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pengjie; Liu, Shengjie; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yaoguang; Zhu, Gang; Wei, Dong; Wan, Ben; Wang, Jianye

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the association of molecular markers and conventional clinicopathological factors with bladder tumour recurrence in patients with primary upper tract urothelial carcinoma after radical nephroureterectomy. The expressions of Ki-67 and P53 were measured by immunohistochemical staining prospectively in 115 consecutive patients with primary upper tract urothelial carcinoma from March 2004 to February 2014. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to identify independent predictors. The association between Ki-67 expression and clinicopathological variables was assessed by the χ(2) test. Intravesical recurrence occurred in 13 out of 115 (11.3%) patients with a mean follow-up of 54.2 months (range: 7-130). Low-level Ki-67 expression (P = 0.010), older age (>65, P = 0.040) and lower ureter tumour (P = 0.001) were independent predictors of bladder tumour recurrence in Cox regression analysis. Ki-67 expression was elevated with the progression of tumour grade (P = 0.004) but not with stage (P = 0.186). Ki-67 overexpression was also significantly higher in aggressive pathological types (P = 0.008), but only shows an inclination towards poor oncologic outcomes in the cancer-specific survival rate (P = 0.107) and the overall survival rate (P = 0.063). Low-level Ki-67 expression was an independent predictor for bladder tumour recurrence, while Ki-67 overexpression was associated with adverse clinicopathological parameters and poor prognosis in patients with primary upper tract urothelial carcinoma after radical nephroureterectomy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Long non-coding RNA urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 as a tumor biomarker for the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zichun; Wang, Xiaoxiong; Zhang, Daming; Yu, Yongchun; Cai, Licheng; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 as a urine biomarker in urinary bladder cancer patients by performing a comprehensive meta-analysis. A comprehensive literature search was conducted by the databases PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated, and Web of Science. The quality of eligible studies was scored with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies. The bivariate meta-analysis model was used to pool the sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio. Receiver operating characteristic curves and hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic models were employed to check the overall test performance in this meta-analysis. Seven publications involving 678 patients and 563 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity was 0.84 (95% confidence interval: 0.80-0.88), specificity was 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.75-0.94), positive likelihood ratio was 6.5 (95% confidence interval: 3.10-13.62), negative likelihood ratio was 0.18 (95% confidence interval: 0.13-0.25), and diagnostic odds ratio was 36 (95% confidence interval: 13-99). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.89 (95% confidence interval: 0.86-0.91). Our results indicated that urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 was a potential diagnostic biomarker with good specificity and sensitivity in urinary bladder cancer. Further prospective studies with larger cohorts are necessary to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 for urinary bladder cancer.

  15. The effect of photochemical internalization of bleomycin in the treatment of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: an in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arentsen, H.C.; Falke, J.; Hogset, A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Witjes, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this in vitro study, we determined whether meso-tetraphenyl chlorin disulphonate (TPCS2a)-based photochemical delivery of bleomycin was able to potentiate the cytotoxicity of bleomycin on bladder cancer cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The human RT4, RT112, 253J, T24, and rat AY-27

  16. A subpopulation of human urothelial cells is stimulated to proliferate by treatment in vitro with lipoteichoic acid, a cell wall component of Streptococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgavish, A; Lloyd, K; Reed, R

    1996-10-01

    Urinary tract infection with gram-positive bacteria is common. Avenues for ingress of bacteria into the bladder include luminal and suburothelial infection. Terminally differentiated superficial urothelial cells lining the lumen of the bladder are often shed in response to infection. In contrast, infection-induced altered function of progenitors of urothelial cells residing in the basal layer of the urothelium is likely to have long lasting effects on the structure and function of the urothelium. The main objective of the present studies was to investigate in vitro the possibility that exposure to lipoteichoic acid, a cell wall component of the gram-positive Streptococcus faecalis (LT-2), stimulates basal urothelial cells to proliferate. To simulate conditions that restrict proliferation and inhibit terminal differentiation of urothelial cells in the basal layer, secondary cultures of urothelial cells (UT) were grown on collagen or fibronectin coated substrate in medium containing low levels of Ca2+ (0.2 mM) and growth factors (0.005% bovine pituitary extract [BPE]). Under these conditions, UT cultures displayed a highly reproducible colony size distribution, possibly due to the fact that colonies were progeny of basal cells with various proliferative potentials, retained in vitro. In cultures grown under growth-restricting conditions the majority of progenitors appeared to be quiescent, just like stem cells in the basal layer of the urothelium. Thus, the population of large colonies (more than six cells/colony), was small when a steady state of growth was achieved, 3-7 days after seeding. Growth factors (0.005-0.5% BPE) caused a dose-dependent increase in this population of large colonies. Moreover, treatment of UT grown under growth-restricting conditions (0.005% BPE) with LT-2 increased steady-state levels of the population of large colonies to levels obtained in cultures growing under optimal conditions with respect to growth factors. These results indicated

  17. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder diverticulum: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xu Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a mass with swiftly aggressive and metastatic, and with a poor prognosis. Due to its scarcity, no forward-looking researches assessing the most effective treatment have been issued in the medical literature. It can happen either in connection with urothelial (transitional cell carcinoma or in a pure form. Its treatment should include surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article,we report a case occurring in a mixed form in the urinary bladder diverticulum and we concisely review the published literature with respect to the clinical manifestation, pathology,differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.

  18. Characterization of Tight Junction Proteins in Cultured Human Urothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Alice; Dorokhov, Nikolay; Ryerse, Jan; Klumpp, David J.; McHowat, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are essential for normal function of epithelia, restricting paracellular diffusion and contributing to the maintainance of cell surface polarity. Superficial cells of the urothelium develop TJs, the basis for the paracellular permeability barrier of the bladder against diffusion of urinary solutes. Focusing on the superficial cell layer of stratified cell cultures of an immortalized human ureteral cell line, TEU-2 cells, we have examined the presence of TJ and TJ-associated proteins. TEU-2 cells were treated with calcium chloride and fetal bovine serum culture conditions used to induce stratification that resembles the normal transitional epithelial phenotype. Cultures were examined for TJ and TJ-associated proteins by confocal immuno-fluorescence microscopy and evaluated for TJ mRNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR). TEU-2 cultures exhibited immunoreactivity at intercellular margins for claudins 1, 4, 5, 7, 14 and 16 whereas claudins 2, 8 and 12 were intracellular. RT-PCR corroborated the presence of these claudins at the mRNA level. The TJ-associated proteins occludin, JAM-1, and zonula occludens (ZO-1, ZO-2 and ZO-3) were localized at cell margins. We have found that numerous TJs and TJ-associated proteins are expressed in stratified TEU-2 cultures. Further, we propose TEU-2s provide a useful ureteral model for future studies on the involvement of TJs proteins in the normal and pathological physiology of the human urinary system. PMID:18553212

  19. Construction of ureteral grafts by seeding urothelial cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into polycaprolactone-lecithin electrospun fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Fu, Xiaoling; Ou, Lailiang; Zhang, Min; Guan, Yong; Wang, Kai; Che, Yongzhe; Kong, Deling; Steinhof, Gustav; Li, Wenzhong; Yu, Yaoting; Ma, Nan

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigated the construction of polycaprolactone-lecithin (PCL-L) electrospun fibers as a novel scaffold material for a tissue-engineered ureter. The effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on the neovascularization of the scaffolds and the viability of planted urothelial cells (UCs) on PCL-L were also studied. UCs were obtained from New Zealand rabbit bladders, cultured and then seeded onto the lumen of the tubular scaffolds before being subcutaneously transplanted into the space of nude mice. The cultured UCs showed vacuolar degeneration after 7 days of transplantation and they gradually degraded thereafter. To facilitate the regeneration of the tissue-engineered ureter and the survival of UCs in the implant, MSCs were seeded into the tubular grafts by rolling up the nanofibrous membrane, followed by the seeding of UCs. This facilitated the survival of the UCs, which formed several cellular layers after 30 days. The mean microvessel density was significantly increased in tissues seeded with MSCs. Cell-tracking experiments revealed that the transplanted MSCs did not integrate directly into capillaries for angiogenesis. Our results demonstrated that the PCL-L electrospun fibrous scaffold has a high potential for a tissue-engineered ureter especially when seeded with BM-MSCs, which enhanced angiogenesis.

  20. Tumor-infiltrating CD8+ lymphocytes predict different clinical outcomes in organ- and non-organ-confined urothelial carcinoma of the bladder following radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiqiang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xinyu; Zhou, Fangjian

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are associated with better clinical outcomes in many tumors. TILs represent a cell-mediated immune response against the carcinoma. CD8+ TILs are a crucial component of cell-mediated immunity. The significance of CD8+ TILs has not been reported respectively in organ- and non-organ-confined urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. We explored the prognostic value of CD8+ TILs in the two groups. The presence of CD8+ TILs was assessed by immunohistochemical staining of whole tissue sections from 75 organ and 51 non-organ-confined disease patients with long-term follow-up, and its correlation with clinicopathological features and overall survival (OS) was determined. The CD8+ TIL immunohistochemical staining score was 0 (CD8 negative if the score was 0. There were no associations between CD8+ TILs and age, sex, nuclear grade, and adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy in organ- and non-organ-confined disease. The presence of CD8+ TILs was seen more frequently in pTa- 1 than pT 2 stage ( p  = 0.033) in organ-confined disease. No associations between CD8+ TILs and pT stage, pN stage were found in non-organ-confined disease. CD8+ TILs were associated with better OS (log-rank test, P  = 0.036) in non-organ-confined disease, but with poorer OS (log-rank test, P  = 0.040) in organ-confined disease by the Kaplan-Meier method. In multivariate analysis, CD8+ TILs were an independent favorable prognostic factor in non-organ-confined disease, but were an independent unfavorable prognostic factor in organ-confined disease. These results suggest that CD8+ TILs have clinically significant anti-tumor activity in non-organ-confined disease, but may have pro-tumor activity in organ-confined disease. Therefore, we should be cautious if CD8+ TILs are aimed to be exploited in the treatment of bladder cancer.

  1. 2-methoxyestradiol induces mitotic arrest, apoptosis, and synergistic cytotoxicity with arsenic trioxide in human urothelial carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Lin Kuo

    Full Text Available 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME, an endogenous derivative of 17β-estradiol, has been reported to elicit antiproliferative responses in various tumors. In this study, we investigated the effects of 2-ME on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in human urothelial carcinoma (UC cell lines. We used two high-grade human bladder UC cell lines (NTUB1 and T24. After treatment with 2-ME, the cell viability and apoptosis were measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorting, with annexin V-FITC staining and propidium iodide (PI labeling. DNA fragmentation was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Flow cytometry with PI labeling was used for the cell cycle analyses. The protein levels of caspase activations, poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, phospho-histone H2A.X, phospho-Bad, and cell cycle regulatory molecules were measured by Western blot. The effects of the drug combinations were analyzed using the computer software, CalcuSyn. We demonstrated that 2-ME effectively induces dose-dependent cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human UC cells after 24 h exposure. DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, and caspase-3, 7, 8, 9 activations can be observed with 2-ME-induced apoptosis. The decreased phospho-Bad (Ser136 and Ser155 and mitotic arrest of the cell cycle in the process of apoptosis after 2-ME treatment was remarkable. In response to mitotic arrest, the mitotic forms of cdc25C, phospho-cdc2, cyclin B1, and phospho-histone H3 (Ser10 were activated. In combination with arsenic trioxide (As2O3, 2-ME elicited synergistic cytotoxicity (combination index <1 in UC cells. We concluded that 2-ME significantly induces apoptosis through decreased phospho-Bad and arrests bladder UC cells at the mitotic phase. The synergistic antitumor effect with As2O3 provides a novel implication in clinical treatment of UC.

  2. Genotyping of high-risk human papillomaviruses in p16/Ki-67-positive urothelial carcinoma cells: even a worm will turn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advenier, A-S; Casalegno, J-S; Mekki, Y; Decaussin-Petrucci, M; Mège-Lechevallier, F; Ruffion, A; Piaton, E

    2015-04-01

    Co-expression of p16INK4a protein and Ki-67 (p16/Ki-67) is noted in almost all high-grade urothelial lesions. However, the aetiological role or, conversely, the absence of causative effect of high-risk human papillomaviruses (hr-HPVs) has not been documented. The purpose of this study is to evaluate HPV DNA in p16/Ki-67-positive, high-grade urothelial tumour cells. Fifty-seven urine samples collected from 50 patients, including 55 histologically proven high-grade proliferations and two cases with clinical evidence of malignancy, were analysed for p16/Ki-67. Immunolabelling was performed in destained Papanicolaou-stained slides after ThinPrep(®) processing. HPV genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a DNA microarray for 35 HPV types. Confirmation of the presence (or absence) of HPV in tissue samples was verified using a reasoned approach combining PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) for hr-HPVs. Co-expression of p16/Ki-67 was noted in 43 of 57 (75.4%) cases. In these, hr-HPVs 16, 31 and 70, and low risk HPV 84, were detected in the urine in four patients (8%). Upregulation of p16INK4a protein was confirmed on bladder biopsy or transurethral resection specimens, but PCR and ISH for hr-HPVs were both negative on the tissue sections. Our results show a low prevalence of HPV infection in the urinary tract of patients with p16/Ki-67-positive urothelial malignancy. The study confirms that the deregulated cell cycle, as demonstrated by p16/Ki-67 dual labelling, is independent of the oncogenic action of hr-HPVs in high-grade urothelial proliferations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. High frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 protein expression in human bladder cancer is associated with disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egerod, Frederikke Lihme; Bartels, Annette; Fristrup, Niels; Borre, Michael; Ørntoft, Torben F; Oleksiewicz, Martin B; Brünner, Nils; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Egr-1 (early growth response-1 transcription factor) has been proposed to be involved in invasion and metastasis processes of human bladder cancer, but Egr-1 protein expression levels in human bladder cancer have not been investigated. In the present study we investigated the expression levels of Egr-1 protein in early stages of human bladder cancer and correlated it to later progression. Expression of Egr-1 protein in human bladder cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry, on a tissue microarray constructed from tumors from 289 patients with non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer. The frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling correlated to bladder cancer stage, grade and to later progression to muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-4). Stage T1 tumors exhibited significantly higher frequencies of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling than Ta tumors (P = 0.001). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that a high frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling was significantly associated with a higher risk of progression to stage T2-4 (log-rank test, P = 0.035). Tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling were found to localize at the tumor front in some of the tumor biopsies. The results from this study support a potential involvement of Egr-1 in the progression from non-muscle invasive bladder cancers to muscle invasive bladder cancer

  4. Pathogenesis of acute radiation effects in the urinary bladder. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, W.; Eckhardt, M.; Ehme, A.; Koi, S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The present review summarizes experimental studies of the pathogenesis of acute radiation-induced changes in urinary bladder function. Material and methods: Transurethral cystometry was used for longitudinal assessment of bladder function in mice. With this technique, radiation-induced changes in storage capacity can be quantified. In histological studies, changes in urothelial cell density and in urothelial protein expression during the acute radiation response were determined. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used for the treatment of acute functional changes. Results: The histological studies did not reveal any systematic fluctuations in urothelial cell density during the time of the acute radiation response. However, characteristic changes in the expression of proteins associated with urothelial cell function, differentiation and cell contact were observed, which correlated with the functional impairment. By local or systemical application of ASA, a significant restoration of bladder function compared to placebo treatment could be achieved. Conclusion: Acute functional radiation effects in the urinary bladder are not based on urothelial denudation. However, changes in protein expression indicate an impairment of the urothelial barrier function. The results of ASA treatment demonstrate that prostaglandins are involved in the response. Alterations in urothelial or endothelial prostaglandin metabolism may be primarily radiation-induced or secondary because of the impaired urothelial barrier. (orig.) [de

  5. Urinary bladder carcinoma with divergent differentiation featuring small cell carcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma, and liposarcomatous component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Mariko; Morikawa, Teppei; Nakagawa, Tohru; Miyakawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Daichi; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Both small cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder are highly aggressive tumors, and a concurrence of these tumors is extremely rare. We report a case of urinary bladder cancer with small cell carcinoma as a predominant component, accompanied by sarcomatoid carcinoma and conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC). Although the small cell carcinoma component had resolved on receiving chemoradiotherapy, rapid growth of the residual tumor led to a fatal outcome. A 47-year-old man presented with occasional bladder irritation and had a 2-year history of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a huge mass in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Microscopically, small cell carcinoma was detected as the major tumor component. Spindle-shaped sarcomatoid cells were also observed that were intermingled with small cell carcinoma and conventional UC. In addition, a sheet-like growth of the lipoblast-like neoplastic cells was observed focally. Initially, by providing chemoradiotherapy, we achieved a marked tumor regression; however, the tumor rapidly regrew after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, and the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Only conventional UC and sarcomatoid carcinoma were identified in the cystectomy specimen. The patient died of the disease 4 months after cystectomy. Urinary bladder cancer may include a combination of multiple aggressive histologies as in the present case. Because the variation in the tumor components may affect the efficacy of therapy, a correct diagnosis of every tumor component is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. LncROR Promotes Bladder Cancer Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: LncRNA ROR, a tumor oncogene associated with various human cancers, has been reported to be involved in regulating various cellular processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis and invasion through targeting multiple genes. However, the molecular biological function in bladder cancer has not been clearly elucidated. The aim of this study is to explore ROR expression levels and evaluated its function in bladder cancer. Methods: LncRNA ROR expression levels in the 36 pairs of bladder cancer tissues (and corresponding non-tumor tissues and bladder cancer cells were assessed by qRT-PCR. MTT assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometric analysis, wound healing assay, cell transwell assays, attachment/detachment and western blotting were performed to assess the effects of ROR on proliferation, apoptosis, migration/invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT phenotypes in BC cells in vitro. ZEB1 is target of ROR. Rescue assays were performed to further confirm that ROR contributes to the progression of BC cells through targeting ZEB1. Results: LncRNA ROR was up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues (compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues and was almost overexpression in bladder cancer cells (compared with normal urothelial cell line SVHUC-1 cells. Increased lncRNA ROR expression significantly promoted tumor cells proliferation, inhibited cells apoptosis, facilitated cells metastasis and contributed to the formation of EMT phenotype. While down-regulated ROR could obviously inhibit cells proliferation, promote cells apoptosis, inhibit metastasis and reverse EMT to MET. ZEB1 was a target gene of ROR and was positive correlation with the level of ROR in cancer tissues. Conclusion: These results indicated that lncRNA ROR was associated with tumor progression in bladder cancer cells.

  7. Ferritinophagy drives uropathogenic Escherichia coli persistence in bladder epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauckman, Kyle A.; Mysorekar, Indira U.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a cellular recycling pathway, which in many cases, protects host cells from infections by degrading pathogens. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), persist within the urinary tract epithelium (urothelium) by forming reservoirs within autophagosomes. Iron is a critical nutrient for both host and pathogen, and regulation of iron availability is a key host defense against pathogens. Iron homeostasis depends on the shuttling of iron-bound ferritin to the lysosome for recycling, a process termed ferritinophagy (a form of selective autophagy). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that UPEC shuttles with ferritin-bound iron into the autophagosomal and lysosomal compartments within the urothelium. Iron overload in urothelial cells induces ferritinophagy in an NCOA4-dependent manner causing increased iron availability for UPEC, triggering bacterial overproliferation and host cell death. Addition of even moderate levels of iron is sufficient to increase and prolong bacterial burden. Furthermore, we show that lysosomal damage due to iron overload is the specific mechanism causing host cell death. Significantly, we demonstrate that host cell death and bacterial burden can be reversed by inhibition of autophagy or inhibition of iron-regulatory proteins, or chelation of iron. Together, our findings suggest that UPEC persist in host cells by taking advantage of ferritinophagy. Thus, modulation of iron levels in the bladder may provide a therapeutic avenue to controlling UPEC persistence, epithelial cell death, and recurrent UTIs. PMID:27002654

  8. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for the Diagnosis of Urothelial Carcinoma in the Bladder and the Upper Urinary Tract: Protocols for Two Prospective Explorative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Esmee Iml; Freund, Jan Erik; Baard, Joyce; de Bruin, D Martijn; Laguna Pes, M Pilar; Savci-Heijink, C Dilara; van Leeuwen, Ton G; de Reijke, Theo M; de la Rosette, Jean Jmch

    2018-02-07

    Visual confirmation of a suspicious lesion in the urinary tract is a major corner stone in diagnosing urothelial carcinoma. However, during cystoscopy (for bladder tumors) and ureterorenoscopy (for tumors of the upper urinary tract) no real-time histopathologic information can be obtained. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an optical imaging technique that allows for in vivo high-resolution imaging and may allow real-time tumor grading of urothelial lesions. The primary objective of both studies is to develop descriptive criteria for in vivo CLE images of urothelial carcinoma (low-grade, high-grade, carcinoma in situ) and normal urothelium by comparing CLE images with corresponding histopathology. In these two prospective clinical trials, CLE imaging will be performed of suspicious lesions and normal tissue in the urinary tract during surgery, prior to resection or biopsy. In the bladder study, CLE will be performed in 60 patients using the Cystoflex UHD-R probe. In the upper urinary tract study, CLE will be performed in 25 patients during ureterorenoscopy, who will undergo radical treatment (nephroureterectomy or segmental ureter resection) thereafter. All CLE images will be analyzed frame by frame by three independent, blinded observers. Histopathology and CLE-based diagnosis of the lesions will be evaluated. Both studies comply with the IDEAL stage 2b recommendations. Presently, recruitment of patients is ongoing in both studies. Results and outcomes are expected in 2018. For development of CLE-based diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma in the bladder and the upper urinary tract, a structured conduct of research is required. This study will provide more insight in tissue-specific CLE criteria for real-time tumor grading of urothelial carcinoma. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03013894; https://clinicaltrials.gov /ct2/show/NCT03013894?term=NCT03013894&rank=1 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6wiPZ378I); and Dutch Central

  9. Sensory Hyperinnervation Distinguishes Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis from Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regauer, Sigrid; Gamper, Marianne; Fehr, Mathias K; Viereck, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Pain is the key symptom that distinguishes bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis from overactive bladder syndrome but overlap occurs. To find a discriminating marker for these bladder diseases we examined sensory hyperinnervation and neurotrophin receptor expression in bladder biopsies as well as nerve growth factor levels in urine. Bladder biopsies from patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, including 12 with and 19 without Hunner lesions, 13 with overactive bladder syndrome and 12 healthy controls, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry with antibodies to the nerve cell marker PGP9.5 (neuron-specific protein gene product 9.5), p75 NTR (p75 neurotrophin receptor), the B-lymphocyte marker CD20 and mast cell tryptase. Urinary nerve growth factor was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Subepithelial sensory hyperinnervation on PGP9.5 staining had 97% sensitivity and 76% specificity, increased lymphocytic infiltration had 90% sensitivity and 80% specificity, and urothelial defects had 97% sensitivity and 76% specificity to distinguish bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with and without Hunner lesions from overactive bladder syndrome and healthy controls. Increased sensory innervation was associated with submucosal mast cell localization. Staining of p75 NTR in basal urothelial cells was indicative of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Urinary nerve growth factor levels were below the detection level and did not differentiate bladder diseases from healthy controls. Sensory hyperinnervation and basal urothelial p75 NTR staining together with assessment of inflammatory lymphocytes and urothelial integrity allow for the differentiation of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and overactive bladder syndrome even in the absence of Hunner lesions. Furthermore, these histopathological criteria enable the identification of early disease stages or oligosymptomatic/asymptomatic cases and may permit timely treatment

  10. Clinical Significance of ErbB Receptor Family in Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyan Tsai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prognostic importance of examining ErbB receptor family expression in human bladder cancer remains uncertain. Using published evidence, we examined the clinical value and the updated results of clinical trials targeting ErbB receptor family members. Twenty-seven articles from 65 references related to ErbB receptor expression assessment in bladder cancer were reviewed. The estimates included the association significance, hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs from actuarial curves and survival analyses. A meta-analysis was done on those reports using univariate log-rank tests or a Cox-regression model. The methods of analysis and study subjects chosen varied widely among studies. The overall risks of disease progression for patients with EGFR or ErbB2 overexpression were 4.5 (95% CI: 2.5–8.4 and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.6–1.9, and the risks of mortality were 3.0 (95% CI: 1.6–5.9 and 1.1 (95% CI: 1.0–1.2, respectively. However, the significance of coexpression patterns of the ErbB receptor family remains controversial. None of six clinical trials yielded convincing results for blockading ErbB receptor signaling in urothelial carcinoma. The results of this analysis suggest that assessing co-expression patterns of the ErbB family may provide better prognostic information for bladder cancer patients.

  11. Localized inhibition of P2X7R at the spinal cord injury site improves neurogenic bladder dysfunction by decreasing urothelial P2X3R expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Alvaro; Yazdi, Iman K; Tang, Xiufeng; Rivera, Carolina; Taghipour, Nima; Grossman, Robert G; Boone, Timothy B; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-02-15

    Reestablishment of bladder function in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) is a clinical priority. Our objectives were to determine whether SCI-localized inhibition of purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) improve bladder function by decreasing afferent signals mediated by urothelial P2X3R. Systemic inhibition of P2X7R may improve locomotion in rodent SCI models; however, beneficial effects on bladder function and its physiological mechanisms have not been evaluated. We designed a thermosensitive nanohydrogel (NHG) consisting of the P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue-G (BBG) loaded into silica nanoparticles, embedded with poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic) acid, and resuspended in 20% pluronic acid. Female Sprague-Dawley rats with a bilateral dorsal lesion at the thoracic T8/T9 region received either 100μl of an empty NHG, or a NHG containing BBG (BBG-NHG) on top of the spinal tissue. Cystometric properties, spinal immunohistochemistry for P2X7R, and bladder immunohistochemistry for P2X3R were evaluated at four weeks post-SCI. After SCI animals recovered hind-legs use but neurogenic bladder dysfunction remained. SCI rats treated with BBG-NHG for a period of at least two weeks post-SCI experienced fewer non-voiding contractions. The localized inhibition of P2X7R decreased microglia activation. At the lower urinary tract level we observed, unexpectedly, a concomitant reduction of urothelial P2X3 receptors, which are involved in initiation of bladder afferent transmission to start micturition. Localized inhibition of P2X7R for two weeks can be associated with reduced number of microglia and attenuated bladder hyperexcitability mediated by downregulation of urothelial P2X3R in rats with neurogenic bladder dysfunction and independently of locomotor improvements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma in bladder extrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral-Ribeiro, J; Silva, C; Sousa, L; Pérez García, D; Ribeiro dos Santos, A

    2005-01-01

    Bladder extrophy is a rare congenital malformation that nowadays is surgically corrected in neonatal period. We present a case report of a 71-year-old male with a verrucous squamous cell carcinoma arising in a classical uncorrected form of bladder extrophy.

  13. Tumor associated macrophages polarization dictates the efficacy of BCG instillation in non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriano, Francesca; Santini, Daniele; Perrone, Giuseppe; Amato, Michela; Vincenzi, Bruno; Tonini, Giuseppe; Muda, Andrea; Boggia, Sara; Buscarini, Maurizio; Pantano, Francesco

    2013-11-05

    To evaluate the prognostic role of TAMs in patients affected by non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), undergone Trans Urethral Resection of Bladder (TURB) and Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy. Data from 40 patients (36 men, 4 women), mean age 69 years (40-83 years), treated for NMIBC with TURB and BCG instillation were collected. Two different groups were considered: group with and group without bladder cancer recurrence. Correlations between immunofluorescence measured Mtot, M1 and M2 infiltration and clinicopathological parameters were evaluated using Spearman and Mann-Whitney methods. The recurrence-free survival rate was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. CD68 positive cells (Mtot) were observed in all specimens tested. High Mtot, M1 and M2 infiltration was observed in patients with disease recurrence, even before endovescical BCG instillation. Significant value for M2 infiltration (p = 0,042) was found calculating significativity between two group medians before BCG therapy. p = 0,072 and p = 0,180 were observed correlating median of Mtot and M1 between two groups of patients respectively. Values of p = 0,44, p = 0,23 and p = 0,64 from correlation between DFS and Mtot, M1 and M2 median in patients before endovescical BCG instillation, were calculated respectively. Comparing DFS and Mtot, M1 and M2 median in patients group after endovescical BCG instillation significant values were obtained (p = 0,020; p = 0,02; and p = 0,029 respectively). M2 tumor infiltration could be a prognostic value of recurrence in patients with NMIBC.

  14. Global gene expression changes in human urothelial cells exposed to low-level monomethylarsonous acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Matthew; Zheng, Xinghui; Novak, Petr; Wnek, Shawn M.; Chyan, Vivian; Escudero-Lourdes, Claudia; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid in UROtsa was investigated. ► At 3 months of exposure substantial changes were observed in gene expression. ► Notable changes occurred in mitogenic signaling, stress, immune and inflammatory responses. ► Gene expression changes correlate with phenotypic changes from previous studies. -- Abstract: Bladder cancer has been associated with chronic arsenic exposure. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a metabolite of inorganic arsenic and has been shown to transform an immortalized urothelial cell line (UROtsa) at concentrations 20-fold less than arsenite. MMA(III) was used as a model arsenical to examine the mechanisms of arsenical-induced transformation of urothelium. A microarray analysis was performed to assess the transcriptional changes in UROtsa during the critical window of chronic 50 nM MMA(III) exposure that leads to transformation at 3 months of exposure. The analysis revealed only minor changes in gene expression at 1 and 2 months of exposure, contrasting with substantial changes observed at 3 months of exposure. The gene expression changes at 3 months were analyzed showing distinct alterations in biological processes and pathways such as a response to oxidative stress, enhanced cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, MAPK signaling, as well as inflammation. Twelve genes selected as markers of these particular biological processes were used to validate the microarray and these genes showed a time-dependent changes at 1 and 2 months of exposure, with the most substantial changes occurring at 3 months of exposure. These results indicate that there is a strong association between the acquired phenotypic changes that occur with chronic MMA(III) exposure and the observed gene expression patterns that are indicative of a malignant transformation. Although the substantial changes that occur at 3 months of exposure may be a consequence of transformation, there are common occurrences of altered

  15. Reduced immunohistochemical PTEN staining is associated with higher progression rate and recurrence episodes in non-invasive low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulac, Ibrahim; Arslankoz, Sehbal; Netto, George J; Ertoy Baydar, Dilek

    2018-01-24

    Non-invasive low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma (NILGPUC) of the bladder is regarded as a relatively indolent disease. However, its propensity for frequent recurrences constitutes a major clinical problem. Additionally, there is a progression risk of 10-15% to either a higher grade and/or a higher stage disease in these tumors. The molecular factors that will predict recurrence and progression in low-grade pTa bladder carcinoma have not yet been elucidated. Herein, we investigated the association of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) alterations with recurrence and progression in NILGPUC using immunohistochemistry. Eighty-one cases of bladder cancer initially diagnosed as NILGPUC in a single institution with follow-up were encountered after searching medical records. Tissue microarrays (TMA) that contained both tumor and non-neoplastic mucosa from each case were constructed using paraffin blocks of transurethral resections. Sections from TMA blocks were stained immunohistochemically for PTEN protein and were evaluable in 76 cases. Any absence of staining was recorded and correlated with clinical findings. Ten patients (13.2%) showed progression and 41 (53.9%) showed recurrence. Reduced PTEN expression was observed in 29 cases (38.1%). Cases with reduced PTEN had higher progression rate compared to cases with intact PTEN (p = 0.026). Tumor relapse was more frequent in cases with reduced PTEN (65.5 vs 46.8%), but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.112). On the other hand, decreased PTEN expression was associated with higher number of recurrence episodes (p = 0.002). PTEN seems to have a link with the disease course in NILGPUC of the bladder.

  16. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients with Muscle-invasive Urothelial Bladder Cancer Candidates for Curative Surgery: A Prospective Clinical Trial Based on Cisplatin Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, Giovanni; Monterisi, Santa; Pierconti, Francesco; Nazzicone, Giulia; Marandino, Laura; Orlandi, Armando; Racioppi, Marco; Cassano, Alessandra; Bassi, Pierfrancesco; Barone, Carlo; Rossi, Ernesto

    2017-11-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy demonstrated a survival benefit versus cystectomy alone in muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer. Despite this advantage, preoperative chemotherapy is not widely employed. When patients are unfit for cisplatin-based regimen, they are often candidates for immediate surgery. In our study, patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The principal objective was the rate of complete pathological response (pCR). Secondary end-points were disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity. Patients (n=72) with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0-1, clinical stage cT3-4, and/or N+ muscle-invasive bladder cancer were enrolled. The chemotherapy regimen was established according to the cisplatin feasibility. Thirty patients were treated with cisplatin/gemcitabine (Gem) and 42 with carboplatin/Gem. The rate of pCR was 29.2%, 36% with cisplatin-based treatment and 23.8% with carboplatin (p=0.3574). DFS and OS were longer in pCR patients, while no difference was reported between cisplatin/Gem and Carboplatin/Gem groups. Our results confirm the prognostic value of pCR in neoadjuvant chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. When the patients are not fit for cisplatin, a carboplatin/Gem regimen represents a valid option because of comparable long-term outcome. When cisplatin is not feasible, the exclusion of a preoperative treatment is not justified. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Primary signet cell adenocarcinoma of bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Kinra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary signet cell cancer of the urinary bladder is a relatively rare entity. Since there is no mucinous epithelium in the bladder, It is proposed that the tumor arises from metaplastic urothelium. Two thirds of the tumours are mucin secreting, in most of which the site of the deposition is either extracellular or intracellular displacing the nucleus to a peripheral crescent, giving the cells a signet ring appearance. The tumours are most often infiltrative and diffusely involving the majority of the bladder akin to its name sake in stomach. It is essential to distinguish this carcinoma from gastrointestinal metastases as different therapeutic strategies are often necessary.

  18. Pannexin 1 channels play essential roles in urothelial mechanotransduction and intercellular signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Negoro

    Full Text Available Urothelial cells respond to bladder distension with ATP release, and ATP signaling within the bladder and from the bladder to the CNS is essential for proper bladder function. In other cell types, pannexin 1 (Panx1 channels provide a pathway for mechanically-induced ATP efflux and for ATP-induced ATP release through interaction with P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs. We report that Panx1 and P2X7R are functionally expressed in the bladder mucosa and in immortalized human urothelial cells (TRT-HU1, and participate in urothelial ATP release and signaling. ATP release from isolated rat bladders induced by distention was reduced by the Panx1 channel blocker mefloquine (MFQ and was blunted in mice lacking Panx1 or P2X7R expression. Hypoosmotic shock induced YoPro dye uptake was inhibited by MFQ and the P2X7R blocker A438079 in TRT-HU1 cells, and was also blunted in primary urothelial cells derived from mice lacking Panx1 or P2X7R expression. Rinsing-induced mechanical stimulation of TRT-HU1 cells triggered ATP release, which was reduced by MFQ and potentiated in low divalent cation solution (LDPBS, a condition known to enhance P2X7R activation. ATP signaling evaluated as intercellular Ca2+ wave radius was significantly larger in LDPBS, reduced by MFQ and by apyrase (ATP scavenger. These findings indicate that Panx1 participates in urothelial mechanotransduction and signaling by providing a direct pathway for mechanically-induced ATP release and by functionally interacting with P2X7Rs.

  19. Roles of ERβ and GPR30 in Proliferative Response of Human Bladder Cancer Cell to Estrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiren Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer belongs to one of the most common cancers and is a leading cause of deaths in our society. Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB is the main type of this cancer, and the estrogen receptors in UCB remain to be studied. Our experiment aimed to investigate the possible biological effect of 17β-estradiol on human bladder-derived T24 carcinoma cells and to indicate its related mechanisms. T24 cells were treated with various doses of 17β-estradiol, and cell proliferation was detected using MTT assays. 17β-estradiol promoted T24 cell proliferation independent of ERβ/GPR30-regulated EGFR-MAPK pathway, while it inhibited cell growth via GPR30. Furthermore, the expression levels of downstream genes (c-FOS, BCL-2, and CYCLIN D1 were increased by 17β-estradiol and this effect was independently associated with activity of the EGFR-MAPK pathway. The two estrogen receptors might be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  20. ABO Blood Group and Rhesus Factor Are Not Associated with Outcomes After Radical Cystectomy for Non-metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, David; Moschini, Marco; Soria, Francesco; Gust, Kilian M; Briganti, Alberto; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Rouprêt, Morgan; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the role of ABO blood group and Rhesus factor as a predictor of outcome in patients undergoing radical cystectomy (RC) for non-metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Data of 463 consecutive patients treated with RC between 1988 and 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. The effect on recurrence-free survival, and cancer-specific and overall mortality were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression methods. Overall, 185 (41.3%), 190 (42.4%), 46 (10.3%) and 27 (6%) patients expressed O, A, B and AB phenotypes, respectively; 65 (14.5%) were Rhesus-negative. Median follow-up was 14.2 years (interquartile range=10.2-17.1 years). No individual blood group was associated with any clinicopathological characteristics whereas Rhesus-positive patients had a higher rate of pT4 disease (11% vs. 22%; p=0.02). ABO blood groups were not associated with outcomes. Rhesus-positive patients had an increased risk of shorter recurrence-free survival, and of cancer-specific and overall mortality compared to Rhesus-negative patients (all pABO blood group nor Rhesus factor are associated with oncological outcomes. The clinical relevance of blood groups and Rhesus factor in bladder cancer remains questionable. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. The nested variant of bladder transitional cell carcinoma: Review of 12 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion-Ballardo, C J; Gala-Solana, L; Portillo-Martin, J A; Azueta-Etxebarria, A; Truan-Cacho, D; Campos-Juanatey, F

    2015-01-01

    The nested variant of bladder transitional cell carcinoma is extremely rare and has a different biological behavior to other bladder tumors. The aim of this study is to analize if their behavior is as aggressive as has been described in the literature. Review of 12 diagnosed cases with nested variant of bladder transitional cell carcinoma and analysis of demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, tumor characteristics, treatment options, analysis of recurrence and cancer-specific survival between January 1997 and December 2010 in our hospital. 50% of the cases had a pathologic stage ≥T2, with grade of differentiation G2 (50%) or G3 (50%). After the pathological result of the TUR (transurethral resection) Bladder, 5 cases underwent radical cystoprostatectomy, 3 a second TUR bladder and 4 cases with treatment chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy (RT). Five out of 12 cases (41.7%) died due to bladder cancer and 3 died (25%) of other causes (urinary sepsis, respiratory failure, renal failure). With a median follow up of 40 months, the overall survival was 50% and cancer-specific survival of 65.6%. The nested variant of bladder transitional cell carcinoma is a disease with an advanced-stage presentation, with high recurrence and mortality rates despite the use of different treatments. So far there is not a clinical practice guideline for this variety of urothelial tumor. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. A theoretical model of cytosolic calcium elevation following wounding in urothelial cell monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, Peter A; Walker, Dawn; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Scratch wounding of a urothelial cell monolayer triggers a number of events including the release of soluble, diffusible signalling factors and mechanical stimulation of cells at the wound edge. These events cause a sustained elevation in cytosolic calcium concentration in the cells surrounding the wound and a transient rise in those further away. The precise form of this calcium transient is believed to play a central role in determining the subsequent response of individual cells and ultimately leads to a co-ordinated, population-level response that rapidly closes the wound. Here we present a framework for modelling the initial phases of this process. We combine a PDE model of diffusion in the extracellular medium and an ODE model of calcium signalling that has been tailored to represent urothelial cells. The ODE model is capable of generating a wide range of calcium transients, including spikes, bursts, oscillations and sustained elevations in the cytosolic calcium concentration. In multi-cell simulations of scratch wounding in a perfusion flow we find that the spatial position of the cells relative to the wound site leads to distinct classes of calcium response, with cells proximal to the wound exhibiting a sustained elevation and cells distal to the wound exhibiting a more transient elevation. We compare these results to existing experimental data and generate a number of novel predictions that could be used to test the model experimentally.

  3. Immediate versus deferred chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (EORTC 30994)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Skoneczna, Iwona; Kerst, J Martijn

    2015-01-01

    carcinoma of the bladder. METHODS: This intergroup, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial recruited patients from hospitals across Europe and Canada. Eligible patients had histologically proven urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, pT3-pT4 disease or node positive (pN1-3) M0 disease after radical cystectomy......; all analyses were by intention to treat. The trial was closed after recruitment of 284 of the planned 660 patients. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00028756. FINDINGS: From April 29, 2002, to Aug 14, 2008, 284 patients were randomly assigned (141 to immediate treatment...

  4. Three-dimensional organoid culture reveals involvement of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in proliferation of bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takahiro; Sopko, Nikolai A; Kates, Max; Liu, Xiaopu; Joice, Gregory; McConkey, David J; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2018-02-16

    There has been increasing awareness of the importance of three-dimensional culture of cancer cells. Tumor cells growing as multicellular spheroids in three-dimensional culture, alternatively called organoids, are widely believed to more closely mimic solid tumors in situ . Previous studies concluded that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for regeneration of the normal urothelium after injury and that β-catenin is upregulated in human bladder cancers, but no clear evidence has been advanced to support the idea that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is directly involved in deregulated proliferation and the other malignant characteristics of bladder cancer cells. Here we report that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway activator, CHIR99021, promoted proliferation of established human bladder cancer cell lines when they were grown in organoid culture but not when they were grown in conventional adherent cultures. CHIR99021 activated Wnt/β-catenin pathway in bladder cancer cell lines in organoid culture. CHIR99021 also stimulated proliferation and the Wnt/b-catenin pathway in primary human bladder cancer organoids. RNAi-mediated knockdown of β-catenin blocked growth of organoids. The effects of CHIR99021 were associated with decreased expression of the urothelial terminal differentiation marker, cytokeratin 20. Our data suggest that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for the proliferation of bladder cancer cells in three-dimensional organoid culture and provide a concrete example of why organoid culture is important for cancer research.

  5. Ptaquiloside-induced early-stage urothelial lesions show increased cell proliferation and intact β-catenin and E-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil da Costa, Rui M; Oliveira, Paula A; Bastos, Margarida M S M; Lopes, Célia C; Lopes, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) is a carcinogenic plant whose main toxin, ptaquiloside, causes cancer in farm and laboratory animals. Ptaquiloside contaminates underground waters as well as meat and milk from bracken-grazing animals and is a suspected human carcinogen. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis can be achieved by studying the early stages of this process. Unfortunately, most research on ptaquiloside has focused on the late, malignant, lesions, so the early changes of ptaquiloside-induced carcinogenesis remain largely unknown. This study aims to characterize early-stage ptaquiloside-induced urinary bladder lesions both morphologically and immunohistochemically. 12 male CD-1 mice were administered 0.5 mg ptaquiloside intraperitoneally, weekly, for 15 weeks, followed by 15 weeks without treatment. 12 control animals were administered saline. Bladders were tested immunohistochemically for antibodies against a cell proliferation marker (Ki-67), and two cell adhesion markers (E-cadherin and β-catenin). Two exposed animals died during the work. Six ptaquiloside-exposed mice developed low-grade and two developed high grade urothelial dysplasia. No lesions were detected on control animals. Significantly, increased (p < 0.05) Ki-67 labeling indices were found on dysplastic urothelium from ptaquiloside-exposed mice, compared with controls. No differences were found concerning E-cadherin and β-catenin expression. Early-stage ptaquiloside-induced urothelial lesions show increased cell proliferation but there is no evidence for reduced intercellular adhesiveness, though this may be a later event in tumor progression. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  6. The association of ABO blood type with disease recurrence and mortality among patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder undergoing radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Boris; Moreira, Daniel M; Tollefson, Matthew K; Frank, Igor; Cheville, John C; Thapa, Prabin; Tarrell, Robert F; Thompson, Robert Houston; Boorjian, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association of ABO blood type with clinicopathologic outcomes and mortality among patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder treated with radical cystectomy (RC). We identified 2,086 consecutive patients who underwent RC between 1980 and 2008. Postoperative recurrence-free survival (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were estimated using the Kaplan Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate the association of ABO blood type with outcomes. A total of 913 (44%), 881 (42%), 216 (10%), and 76 (4%) patients had blood type O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Median postoperative follow-up among survivors was 11.0 years (interquartile range: 7.7-15.9y). Overall, 1,561 patients died, with 770 deaths attributable to bladder cancer. Non-O blood type was associated with significantly worse 5-year RFS (65% vs. 69%; P = 0.04) and/or CSS (64% vs. 70%; P = 0.02). In particular, among patients with≤pT2N0 disease, the 5-year RFS for those with non-O vs. O blood type was 75% vs. 82%, respectively (P = 0.002), whereas the 5-year CSS was 77% vs. 85%, respectively (P = 0.001). Moreover, on multivariable analysis, blood type A remained independently associated with an increased risk of cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio = 1.22; P = 0.01). Non-O blood type, particularly blood type A, is associated with a significantly increased risk of death from bladder cancer among patients undergoing RC. If validated, the utility of a multimodal therapy approach, including perioperative chemotherapy, or more frequent postoperative surveillance in this cohort warrants further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Loss of BCG Viability Adversely Affects the Direct Response of Urothelial Carcinoma Cells to BCG Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gopitkumar; Zhang, Guangjian; Chen, Fanghong; Cao, YanLi; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; See, William

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The attenuated mycobacterium Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) is widely utilized as intravesical “immunotherapy” for the treatment of non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. Previous studies have demonstrated that in both the laboratory and clinical setting, BCG viability is a variable that correlates with anti-tumor efficacy. This study evaluated how loss of BCG viability impacted a number of molecular and phenotypic intermediate endpoints that characterize, and/or contribute to, the direct effect of BCG on Urothelial carcinoma (UC) cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two human UC cell lines were used to study the effect of loss of BCG viability on the tumor cell response to BCG. The cellular response to BCG rendered non-viable by heat killing (hk) was compared to the response to viable BCG. The response endpoints evaluated included the induction of oxidative stress, activation of intracellular signaling pathways, gene transactivation, and phenotypic changes. RESULTS Loss of viability resulted in a quantitative decrease in the tumor cell response, relative to viable BCG, for all of the measured endpoints. The decrease in response varied by cell line, ranging from 15% to 100% of the response to viable BCG. While quantitatively different, non-viable BCG continued to induce responses that were qualitatively similar to BCG relative to untreated controls. CONCLUSIONS BCG viability is an important variable influencing the direct tumor cell response to BCG. Although the magnitude of it effects are attenuated, hkBCG remains active for the induction of BCG responsive biologic endpoints. PMID:24035882

  8. Bladder reconstruction--from cells to materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, J; Cross, W; Eardley, I; Thomas, D F M; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    2003-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the urinary bladder is performed on patients of all ages for a diverse range of conditions, including congenital abnormalities, bladder dysfunction, trauma and cancer. The most common material utilized to augment or replace the bladder during these procedures is a segment of the patient's own intestine. However, this procedure ('enterocytoplasty') is associated with significant clinical complications that arise due to the exposure of the epithelial lining of the intestine to urine. A number of alternative approaches are being actively developed to find a practical and functional substitute for native bladder tissue. These range from 'composite enterocystoplasty', where the de-epithelialized intestine wall is lined with bladder epithelial cells that have been propagated in vitro, to augmenting the urinary system with natural or synthetic biomaterials that may incorporate in vitro-propagated cells. However, if tissue-engineered products are to have therapeutic application in bladder reconstruction, a number of issues remain to be addressed; these issues are discussed briefly below.

  9. Putrescine importer PlaP contributes to swarming motility and urothelial cell invasion in Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Shin; Sakai, Yumi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Muth, Aaron; Phanstiel, Otto; Rather, Philip N

    2013-05-31

    Previously, we reported that the speA gene, encoding arginine decarboxylase, is required for swarming in the urinary tract pathogen Proteus mirabilis. In addition, this previous study suggested that putrescine may act as a cell-to-cell signaling molecule (Sturgill, G., and Rather, P. N. (2004) Mol. Microbiol. 51, 437-446). In this new study, PlaP, a putative putrescine importer, was characterized in P. mirabilis. In a wild-type background, a plaP null mutation resulted in a modest swarming defect and slightly decreased levels of intracellular putrescine. In a P. mirabilis speA mutant with greatly reduced levels of intracellular putrescine, plaP was required for the putrescine-dependent rescue of swarming motility. When a speA/plaP double mutant was grown in the presence of extracellular putrescine, the intracellular levels of putrescine were greatly reduced compared with the speA mutant alone, indicating that PlaP functioned as the primary putrescine importer. In urothelial cell invasion assays, a speA mutant exhibited a 50% reduction in invasion when compared with wild type, and this defect could be restored by putrescine in a PlaP-dependent manner. The putrescine analog Triamide-44 partially inhibited the uptake of putrescine by PlaP and decreased both putrescine stimulated swarming and urothelial cell invasion in a speA mutant.

  10. [CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF TUMOR CELLS AND PROSPECTS FOR SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR BLADDER CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavyanskaya, T; -Salnikova, S; Sepiashvili, R

    2017-05-01

    Specific antitumor immunotherapy with autologous dendritic cell vaccines is one of the new approaches of modern medicine. For activation of dendritic cells highly immunogenic antigens are used, however optimal antigens in case of bladder cancer (BC) are still not researched. Cancer-testis antigens (CTA) are the most promising target in the context of creation of antitumor vaccines, because they are distinguished by pronounced immunogenicity, they are detected in different types of tumors and have limited pattern of expression in healthy tissues of grown-up organism. Regarding the level of mutational load, bladder cancer (BC) holds the third position among all malignant growths, which creates particular opportunities for use of immunotherapy in case of this disease. At chromosomal level most times the following cytogenetic anomalies specific for BC are detected: hyperploidies at 3, 7 and 17 chromosomes and deletion of 9p 21 locus. Besides, in the literature there is information about possible monosomy at 2, 3, 6, 8, 13, 14, 17 and frequent loss of Y chromosome in case of BC. Development of personified dendritic cell antitumor vaccines (PDAV) against bladder cancer (BC) is a relevant problem, which covers many aspects, necessary for its standardization. In particular, in case of cultivation of tumor cells under in vitro conditions their transformation goes at higher pace in comparison with in vivo tumor development. Moreover, the article presents the results of the study of molecular-genetic features of BC of tumor cultures in case of long-term cultivation, the level of expression of CTA (MAGE, NY-ESO-1, GAGE, BAGE) by urothelial carcinoma cells (UCC). There has been described the karyotypes of cells of urothelial low differentiated carcinoma of high malignant potential at various passages with prolonged cultivation, as well as the correlation between cytogenetic profile and expression of tumor-specific cancer-testis antigens has been identified. There have been

  11. Differential induction of micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes and exfoliated urothelial cells of workers exposed to 4,4'-methylenebis-(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA) and bitumen fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, E B; Edwards, J W

    2005-01-01

    Cytogenetic end-points used to estimate risk of genotoxic events in workers include the measurement of micronuclei (MN) in exfoliated cells, lymphocytes, and other tissues. Micronuclei are chromatin-containing bodies outside the cell nucleus resulting from contaminant-induced DNA damage. A review of 71 reports of human genotoxic responses to chemical or physical agents published between 1999 and 2001 revealed that 14% of such studies measured genotoxicity endpoints in specific target tissues relevant to the site of disease for the agent examined; 18% used endpoints in surrogate or non-target tissues but considered the relations between endpoints in surrogate and disease target tissues, and 68% measured genotoxicity endpoints in accessible tissues without reference to specific targets for disease. Methylenebis-(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA), used in polyurethane manufacture, is a suspected bladder carcinogen. Bitumen, used in road surfacing, contains skin and lung carcinogens. In this study, we aimed to compare genotoxicity in urothelial cells and in lymphocytes of workers exposed to these materials. Twelve men employed in polyurethane manufacture, twelve bitumen road layers, and eighteen hospital stores personnel (controls) were recruited and all provided blood and urine samples on the same day. Blood cultures were prepared using a cytochalasin B-block method. Exfoliated urothelial cells were collected from urine and stained for light microscopy. The number of MN in urothelial cells was higher in MOCA-exposed (14.27 +/- 0.56 MN/1000, 9.69 +/- 0.32 MN cells/1000) than in bitumen exposed workers (11.99 +/- 0.65 MN/1000, 8.66 +/- 0.46 MN cells/1000) or in control subjects (6.88 +/- 0.18 MN/1000, 5.17 +/- 0.11 MN cells/1000). Conversely, in lymphocytes, MN were higher in bitumen-exposed (16.24 +/- 0.63 MN/1000, 10.65 +/- 0.24 MN cells/1000) than in MOCA-exposed workers (13.25 +/- 0.48 MN/1000, 8.54 +/- 0.14 MN cells/1000) or in control subjects (9.24 +/- 0.29 MN/ 1000, 5

  12. Unusual manifestations of secondary urothelial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohui Lisa Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma regularly invades the bladder wall, adjacent prostate, seminal vesicles, ureters, vagina, rectum, retroperitoneum, and regional lymph nodes. In advanced stages, it may disseminate to the liver, lungs, and bone marrow. On rare occasions, unusual metastatic foci like skin have been reported. The incidence of urothelial carcinoma has increased with associated rise in variants of urothelial carcinoma and unusual metastatic foci. It is imperative that urologists and pathologists are aware of the unusual variants and unusual metastatic locations to expedite the diagnostic process. Hereby we report an unusual case of secondary involvement of spinal nerve by conventional urothelial carcinoma. Also a second case of rhabdoid variant of urothelial carcinoma showing synchronous involvement of bladder and subcutaneous tissue of upper extremity is presented.

  13. Orally administered nicotine induces urothelial hyperplasia in rats and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodmane, Puttappa R.; Arnold, Lora L.; Pennington, Karen L.; Cohen, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Rats and mice orally administered with nicotine tartrate for total of 4 weeks. • No treatment-related death or whole body toxicity observed in any of the groups. • Urothelium showed simple hyperplasia in treated rats and mice. • No significant change in BrdU labeling index or SEM classification of urothelium. - Abstract: Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for multiple human cancers including urinary bladder carcinoma. Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture containing chemicals that are known carcinogens in humans and/or animals. Aromatic amines a major class of DNA-reactive carcinogens in cigarette smoke, are not present at sufficiently high levels to fully explain the incidence of bladder cancer in cigarette smokers. Other agents in tobacco smoke could be excreted in urine and enhance the carcinogenic process by increasing urothelial cell proliferation. Nicotine is one such major component, as it has been shown to induce cell proliferation in multiple cell types in vitro. However, in vivo evidence specifically for the urothelium is lacking. We previously showed that cigarette smoke induces increased urothelial cell proliferation in mice. In the present study, urothelial proliferative and cytotoxic effects were examined after nicotine treatment in mice and rats. Nicotine hydrogen tartrate was administered in drinking water to rats (52 ppm nicotine) and mice (514 ppm nicotine) for 4 weeks and urothelial changes were evaluated. Histopathologically, 7/10 rats and 4/10 mice showed simple hyperplasia following nicotine treatment compared to none in the controls. Rats had an increased mean BrdU labeling index compared to controls, although it was not statistically significantly elevated in either species. Scanning electron microscopic visualization of the urothelium did not reveal significant cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that oral nicotine administration induced urothelial hyperplasia (increased cell proliferation), possibly due to a

  14. Lymph node dissection during laparoscopic (LRC) and open (ORC) radical cystectomy due to muscle invasive bladder urothelial cancer (pT2-3, TCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlosta, Piotr; Drewa, Tomasz; Siekiera, Jerzy; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Petrus, Andrzej; Kamecki, Krzysztof; Mikołajczak, Witold; Obarzanowski, Mateusz; Wronczewski, Andrzej; Krasnicki, Krzysztof; Jasinski, Milosz

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the number of nodes dissected during laparoscopic and open radical cystoprostatectomy in men or anterior exenteration in women due to muscle invasive bladder urothelial cancer (IBC). Fifty-one patients treated with laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) and 63 with open radical cystectomy (ORC) were compared. The LRC group consisted of 47 pT2 tumours and 4 pT3, while the ORC group was composed of 27 pT2 tumours and 36 pT3. During ORC external, internal, common iliac and obturator lymph nodes were removed separately, but were added and analysed together for each side. Nodes dissected from one side during ORC were compared to en bloc dissected nodes in the LRC group. There were no complications associated with extended pelvic lymph node dissection during LRC or ORC. There were significant differences in the mean number of resected lymph nodes between LRC and ORC for pT2 tumours. The laparoscopic approach allowed about 8-9 more lymph nodes to be removed than open surgery in the pT2 group. In 15% of patients with pT2 disease treated with open radical cystectomy node metastases were observed. Active disease was detected in 18% of nodes resected laparoscopically due to pT2 disease. Fourty-seven percentage of patients with pT3 disease treated with open surgery were diagnosed as harbouring metastatic lymph nodes. The laparoscopic group with pT3 disease was too small to analyse. We have found that laparoscopic radical cystectomy can be performed without any compromise in lymph node dissection. The technique of lymph node dissection (LND) during laparoscopic cystectomy (LRC) resulted in sufficient resected lymphatic tissue, especially in patients with bladder-confined tumours with a low volume of lymph nodes.

  15. Lymph node dissection during laparoscopic (LRC and open (ORC radical cystectomy due to muscle invasive bladder urothelial cancer (pT2-3, TCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Krasnicki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the number of nodes dissected during laparoscopic and open radical cystoprostatectomyin men or anterior exenteration in women due to muscle invasive bladder urothelial cancer (IBC.Material and methods: Fifty-one patients treated with laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC and 63 with open radicalcystectomy (ORC were compared. The LRC group consisted of 47 pT2 tumours and 4 pT3, while the ORC groupwas composed of 27 pT2 tumours and 36 pT3. During ORC external, internal, common iliac and obturator lymphnodes were removed separately, but were added and analysed together for each side. Nodes dissected from one sideduring ORC were compared to en bloc dissected nodes in the LRC group.Results: There were no complications associated with extended pelvic lymph node dissection during LRC or ORC.There were significant differences in the mean number of resected lymph nodes between LRC and ORC for pT2tumours. The laparoscopic approach allowed about 8-9 more lymph nodes to be removed than open surgery in thepT2 group. In 15% of patients with pT2 disease treated with open radical cystectomy node metastases were observed. Active disease was detected in 18% of nodes resected laparoscopically due to pT2 disease. Fourty-seven percentageof patients with pT3 disease treated with open surgery were diagnosed as harbouring metastatic lymph nodes. Thelaparoscopic group with pT3 disease was too small to analyse.Conclusions: We have found that laparoscopic radical cystectomy can be performed without any compromise inlymph node dissection. The technique of lymph node dissection (LND during laparoscopic cystectomy (LRC resultedin sufficient resected lymphatic tissue, especially in patients with bladder-confined tumours with a low volume oflymph nodes.

  16. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Li, Dao-bing; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu-chun; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-jie

    2011-02-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study. This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition. The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90 ± 1.22)% vs. (93.14 ± 1.78)%, P > 0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41 ± 1.49)% vs. (92.61 ± 1.34)%, P > 0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane. This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder. Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells, resulting in

  17. Evaluation of silk biomaterials in combination with extracellular matrix coatings for bladder tissue engineering with primary and pluripotent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Debra; Gil, Eun Seok; Adam, Rosalyn M; Kaplan, David L; Chung, Yeun Goo; Estrada, Carlos R; Mauney, Joshua R

    2013-01-01

    Silk-based biomaterials in combination with extracellular matrix (ECM) coatings were assessed as templates for cell-seeded bladder tissue engineering approaches. Two structurally diverse groups of silk scaffolds were produced by a gel spinning process and consisted of either smooth, compact multi-laminates (Group 1) or rough, porous lamellar-like sheets (Group 2). Scaffolds alone or coated with collagen types I or IV or fibronectin were assessed independently for their ability to support attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of primary cell lines including human bladder smooth muscle cells (SMC) and urothelial cells as well as pluripotent cell populations, such as murine embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. AlamarBlue evaluations revealed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds promoted the highest degree of primary SMC and urothelial cell attachment in comparison to uncoated Group 2 controls and all Group 1 scaffold variants. Real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses demonstrated that both fibronectin-coated silk groups were permissive for SMC contractile differentiation as determined by significant upregulation of α-actin and SM22α mRNA and protein expression levels following TGFβ1 stimulation. Prominent expression of epithelial differentiation markers, cytokeratins, was observed in urothelial cells cultured on both control and fibronectin-coated groups following IHC analysis. Evaluation of silk matrices for ESC and iPS cell attachment by alamarBlue showed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds promoted the highest levels in comparison to all other scaffold formulations. In addition, real time RT-PCR and IHC analyses showed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds facilitated ESC and iPS cell differentiation toward both urothelial and smooth muscle lineages in response to all trans retinoic acid as assessed by induction of uroplakin and contractile gene and protein expression. These results

  18. INCREASED URINARY ALBUMIN INDICATING UROTHELIAL LEAKAGE FOLLOWING INTRAVESICAL BACILLUS-CALMETTE-GUERIN THERAPY FOR SUPERFICIAL BLADDER-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, E. C.; de Reijke, T. M.; Schamhart, D. H.; Vos, P. C.; Kurth, K. H.

    1993-01-01

    This study on the increase in albumin in the urine of patients with superficial bladder cancer after intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) treatment was initiated on the basis of two facts. First, extravasation of serum albumin could be expected as a result of the BCG-induced delayed-type

  19. A Systematic Review of the Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Urinary Protein Biomarkers in Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Costa, Jamie J.; Goldsmith, James C.; Wilson, Jayne S.; Bryan, Richard T.; Ward, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    For over 80 years, cystoscopy has remained the gold-standard for detecting tumours of the urinary bladder. Since bladder tumours have a tendency to recur and progress, many patients are subjected to repeated cystoscopies during long-term surveillance, with the procedure being both unpleasant for the patient and expensive for healthcare providers. The identification and validation of bladder tumour specific molecular markers in urine could enable tumour detection and reduce reliance on cystoscopy, and numerous classes of biomarkers have been studied. Proteins represent the most intensively studied class of biomolecule in this setting. As an aid to researchers searching for better urinary biomarkers, we report a comprehensive systematic review of the literature and a searchable database of proteins that have been investigated to date. Our objective was to classify these proteins as: 1) those with robustly characterised sensitivity and specificity for bladder cancer detection; 2) those that show potential but further investigation is required; 3) those unlikely to warrant further investigation; and 4) those investigated as prognostic markers. This work should help to prioritise certain biomarkers for rigorous validation, whilst preventing wasted effort on proteins that have shown no association whatsoever with the disease, or only modest biomarker performance despite large-scale efforts at validation. PMID:27500198

  20. Evaluation of viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells cultured onto xenogenic tissue-engineered extracellular matrices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells (HUCs) cultured on tissue-engineered extracellular matrix scaffolds and to assess the potential of extracellular matrixes to support the growth of HUCs in their expected in vivo urine environment.

  1. Granular cell tumour of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph von Klot

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With only 16 cases reported in the literature, the mostly benign granular cell tumour of the urinary bladder is exceptionally rare. We present the case of a 68-year old patient with one of these lesions demonstrating our histological findings including several immunohistochemical stainings used to differentiate between other more common entities.

  2. Comparative Gene Expression Analyses Identify Luminal and Basal Subtypes of Canine Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma That Mimic Patterns in Human Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Dhawan

    Full Text Available More than 160,000 people are expected to die from invasive urothelial carcinoma (iUC this year worldwide. Research in relevant animal models is essential to improving iUC management. Naturally-occurring canine iUC closely resembles human iUC in histopathology, metastatic behavior, and treatment response, and could provide a relevant model for human iUC. The molecular characterization of canine iUC, however, has been limited. Work was conducted to compare gene expression array results between tissue samples from iUC and normal bladder in dogs, with comparison to similar expression array data from human iUC and normal bladder in the literature. Considerable similarities between enrichment patterns of genes in canine and human iUC were observed. These included patterns mirroring basal and luminal subtypes initially observed in human breast cancer and more recently noted in human iUC. Canine iUC samples also exhibited enrichment for genes involved in P53 pathways, as has been reported in human iUC. This is particularly relevant as drugs targeting these genes/pathways in other cancers could be repurposed to treat iUC, with dogs providing a model to optimize therapy. As part of the validation of the results and proof of principal for evaluating individualized targeted therapy, the overexpression of EGFR in canine bladder iUC was confirmed. The similarities in gene expression patterns between dogs and humans add considerably to the value of naturally-occurring canine iUC as a relevant and much needed animal model for human iUC. Furthermore, the finding of expression patterns that cross different pathologically-defined cancers could allow studies of dogs with iUC to help optimize cancer management across multiple cancer types. The work is also expected to lead to a better understanding of the biological importance of the gene expression patterns, and the potential application of the cross-species comparisons approach to other cancer types as well.

  3. Prima-1 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cell lines by activating p53

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    Camila B. Piantino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bladder cancer represents 3% of all carcinomas in the Brazilian population and ranks second in incidence among urological tumors, after prostate cancer. The loss of p53 function is the main genetic alteration related to the development of high-grade muscle-invasive disease. Prima-1 is a small molecule that restores tumor suppressor function to mutant p53 and induces cancer cell death in various cancer types. Our aim was to investigate the ability of Prima-1 to induce apoptosis after DNA damage in bladder cancer cell lines. METHOD: The therapeutic effect of Prima-1 was studied in two bladder cancer cell lines: T24, which is characterized by a p53 mutation, and RT4, which is the wild-type for the p53 gene. Morphological features of apoptosis induced by p53, including mitochondrial membrane potential changes and the expression of thirteen genes involved in apoptosis, were assessed by microscopic observation and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. RESULTS: Prima-1 was able to reactivate p53 function in the T24 (p53 mt bladder cancer cell line and promote apoptosis via the induction of Bax and Puma expression, activation of the caspase cascade and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane in a BAK-independent manner. CONCLUSION: Prima-1 is able to restore the transcriptional activity of p53. Experimental studies in vivo may be conducted to test this molecule as a new therapeutic agent for urothelial carcinomas of the bladder, which characteristically harbor p53 mutations.

  4. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 Induces Bladder Pain through High Mobility Group Box-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios E Kouzoukas

    Full Text Available Pain is the significant presenting symptom in Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS. Activation of urothelial protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4 causes pain through release of urothelial macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF. High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1, a chromatin-binding protein, mediates bladder pain (but not inflammation in an experimental model (cyclophosphamide of cystitis. To determine if PAR4-induced bladder hypersensitivity depends on HMGB1 downstream, we tested whether: 1 bladder PAR4 stimulation affected urothelial HMGB1 release; 2 blocking MIF inhibited urothelial HMGB1 release; and 3 blocking HMGB1 prevented PAR4-induced bladder hypersensitivity. HMGB1 release was examined in immortalized human urothelial cultures (UROtsa exposed to PAR4-activating peptide (PAR4-AP; 100 μM; 2 hours or scrambled control peptide. Female C57BL/6 mice, pretreated with a HMGB1 inhibitor (glycyrrhizin: 50 mg/kg; i.p. or vehicle, received intravesical PAR4-AP or a control peptide (100 μM; 1 hour to determine 1 HMGB1 levels at 1 hour in the intravesical fluid (released HMGB1 and urothelium, and 2 abdominal hypersensitivity to von Frey filament stimulation 24 hours later. We also tested mice pretreated with a MIF blocker (ISO-1: 20 mg/kg; i.p. to determine whether MIF mediated PAR4-induced urothelial HMGB1 release. PAR4-AP triggered HMGB1 release from human (in vitro and mice (in vivo urothelial cells. Intravesical PAR4 activation elicited abdominal hypersensitivity in mice that was prevented by blocking HMGB1. MIF inhibition prevented PAR4-mediated HMGB1 release from mouse urothelium. Urothelial MIF and HGMB1 represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention in bladder pain conditions.

  5. Dietary intake of nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Brinkman, Maree T; Hodge, Allison M; Bassett, Julie K; Bolton, Damien; Longano, Anthony; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; English, Dallas R; Milne, Roger L; Giles, Graham G

    2018-02-15

    Nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism may play a role in carcinogenesis through DNA replication, repair and methylation mechanisms. Most studies on urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) have focused on folate. We sought to examine the association between B-group vitamins and methionine intake and UCC risk, overall and by subtype, and to test whether these associations are different for population subgroups whose nutritional status may be compromised. We followed participants in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (N = 41,513) for over 20 years and observed 500 UCC cases (89% originating in the bladder; superficial: 279, invasive: 221). Energy-adjusted dietary intakes of B vitamins (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B8, B9 and B12) and methionine were estimated from a 121-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline (1990-1994), using the residuals method. We used Cox regression models to compute hazard ratios (HRs) of UCC risk per standard deviation (SD) of log-transformed nutrient intakes and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for potential confounders. We investigated associations by tumor subtype, and tested interactions with sex, country of birth, smoking and alcohol drinking. The risk of UCC appeared not to be associated with intake of B-group vitamins or methionine, and findings were consistent across tumor subtypes and across demographic and lifestyle characteristics of the participants. A potential interaction between vitamin B1 and alcohol drinking was observed (all participants: HR per 1 SD = 0.99 (0.91-1.09), never drinkers: HR = 0.81 (0.69-0.97), p-interaction = 0.02), which needs to be confirmed by other studies. Our findings do not indicate that dietary intake of nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism are associated with UCC risk. © 2018 UICC.

  6. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  7. Arsenic treatment increase Aurora-A overexpression through E2F1 activation in bladder cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Ting; Wu, Chin-Han; Wu, Shan-Ying; Lan, Sheng-Hui; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Tseng, Ya-Shih

    2017-04-18

    Arsenic is a widely distributed metalloid compound that has biphasic effects on cultured cells. In large doses, arsenic can be toxic enough to trigger cell death. In smaller amounts, non-toxic doses may promote cell proliferation and induces carcinogenesis. Aberration of chromosome is frequently detected in epithelial cells and lymphocytes of individuals from arsenic contaminated areas. Overexpression of Aurora-A, a mitotic kinase, results in chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We have reported that low concentration (≦1 μM) of arsenic treatment increases Aurora-A expression in immortalized bladder urothelial E7 cells. However, how arsenic induces carcinogenesis through Aurora-A activation remaining unclear. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) staining, MTT assay, and flow cytometry assay were conducted to determine cell proliferation. Messenger RNA and protein expression levels of Aurora-A were detected by reverse transcriptional-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Centrosome of cells was observed by immunofluorescent staining. The transcription factor of Aurora-A was investigated by promoter activity, chromosome immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and small interfering RNA (shRNA) assays. Mouse model was utilized to confirm the relationship between arsenic and Aurora-A. We reveal that low dosage of arsenic treatment increased cell proliferation is associated with accumulated cell population at S phase. We also detected increased Aurora-A expression at mRNA and protein levels in immortalized bladder urothelial E7 cells exposed to low doses of arsenic. Arsenic-treated cells displayed increased multiple centrosome which is resulted from overexpressed Aurora-A. Furthermore, the transcription factor, E2F1, is responsible for Aurora-A overexpression after arsenic treatment. We further disclosed that Aurora-A expression and cell proliferation were increased in bladder and uterus tissues of the BALB/c mice after long-term arsenic (1 mg/L) exposure for 2 months. We

  8. Long-term treatment with lipoteichoic acid from Streptococcus faecalis affects differentiation and expression and cellular distribution of beta 1 integrins in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgavish, A; Pattanaik, A; Couchman, J; Woods, A; Lloyd, K; Lindsey, R; Reed, R

    1996-10-01

    intense cytokeratin 8 expression, was increased; (2) steady-state level of beta mRNA and expression of beta 1 subunit of integrins at the protein level were inhibited; (3) in contrast to large colonies in control cultures, the entire population of LT-2-treated large colonies contained beta 1 integrins distributed at cell-cell contacts. Raising extracellular Ca2+ concentration to 2 mM induced similar effects, suggesting that LT-2 may act by stimulating an increase in intracellular levels of Ca2+. However, further studies will be needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the stimulatory effect of LT-2 on proliferation of progenitors of urothelial cells in the basal layer of the urothelium and subsequent differentiation of their progeny. We propose that these processes may have a causative role in the pathological changes that occur in the aftermath of chronic or recurrent suburothelial infection in the urinary bladder.

  9. Expression of RFC/SLC19A1 is associated with tumor type in bladder cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa M Abdel-Haleem

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder cancer (UBC ranks ninth in worldwide cancer. In Egypt, the pattern of bladder cancer is unique in that both the transitional and squamous cell types prevail. Despite much research on the topic, it is still difficult to predict tumor progression, optimal therapy and clinical outcome. The reduced folate carrier (RFC/SLC19A1 is the major transport system for folates in mammalian cells and tissues. RFC is also the primary means of cellular uptake for antifolate cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, however, membrane transport of antifolates by RFC is considered as limiting to antitumor activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression level of RFC/SLC19A1 in urothelial and non-urothelial variants of bladder carcinomas. Quantification of RFC mRNA in the mucosa of 41 untreated bladder cancer patients was performed using RT-qPCR. RFC mRNA steady-state levels were ∼9-fold higher (N = 39; P<0.0001 in bladder tumor specimens relative to normal bladder mRNA. RFC upregulation was strongly correlated with tumor type (urothelial vs. non-urothelial; p<0.05 where median RFC mRNA expression was significantly (p<0.05 higher in the urothelial (∼14-fold compared to the non-urothelial (∼4-fold variant. This may account for the variation in response to antifolate-containing regimens used in the treatment of either type. RFC mRNA levels were not associated with tumor grade (I, II and III or stage (muscle-invasive vs. non-muscle invasive implying that RFC cannot be used for prognostic purposes in bladder carcinomas and its increased expression is an early event in human bladder tumors pathogenesis. Further, RFC can be considered as a potential marker for predicting response to antifolate chemotherapy in urothelial carcinomas.

  10. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1. After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering.

  11. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering.

  12. Analysis of the interaction of extracellular matrix and phenotype of bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Kyker, Kimberly D; Saban, Ricardo; Knowlton, Nicholas; Dozmorov, Igor; Centola, Michael B; Hurst, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix has a major effect upon the malignant properties of bladder cancer cells both in vitro in 3-dimensional culture and in vivo. Comparing gene expression of several bladder cancer cells lines grown under permissive and suppressive conditions in 3-dimensional growth on cancer-derived and normal-derived basement membrane gels respectively and on plastic in conventional tissue culture provides a model system for investigating the interaction of malignancy and extracellular matrix. Understanding how the extracellular matrix affects the phenotype of bladder cancer cells may provide important clues to identify new markers or targets for therapy. Five bladder cancer cell lines and one immortalized, but non-tumorigenic, urothelial line were grown on Matrigel, a cancer-derived ECM, on SISgel, a normal-derived ECM, and on plastic, where the only ECM is derived from the cells themselves. The transcriptomes were analyzed on an array of 1186 well-annotated cancer derived cDNAs containing most of the major pathways for malignancy. Hypervariable genes expressing more variability across cell lines than a set expressing technical variability were analyzed further. Expression values were clustered, and to identify genes most likely to represent biological factors, statistically over-represented ontologies and transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. Approximately 400 of the 1186 total genes were expressed 2 SD above background. Approximately 100 genes were hypervariable in cells grown on each ECM, but the pattern was different in each case. A core of 20 were identified as hypervariable under all 3 growth conditions, and 33 were hypervariable on both SISgel and Matrigel, but not on plastic. Clustering of the hypervariable genes showed very different patterns for the same 6 cell types on the different ECM. Even when loss of cell cycle regulation was identified, different genes were involved, depending on the ECM. Under the most permissive conditions

  13. Valproic acid decreases urothelial cancer cell proliferation and induces thrombospondin-1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Prevention of bladder cancer recurrence is a central challenge in the management of this highly prevalent disease. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (sodium valproate) has anti-angiogenic properties and has been shown to decrease bladder cancer growth in model systems. We have previously shown reduced expression of thrombospondin-1 in a mouse model and in human bladder cancer relative to normal urothelium. We speculated that inhibition of angiogenesis by valproate might be mediated by this anti-angiogenic protein. Methods Bladder cancer cell lines UMUC3 and T24 were treated with valproate or another histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, in culture for a period of three days. Proliferation was assessed by alamar blue reduction. Gene expression was evaluated by reverse transcription of RNA and quantitative PCR. Results Proliferation assays showed treatment with valproate or vorinostat decreased proliferation in both cell lines. Histone deacetylase inhibition also increased relative expression of thrombospondin-1 up to 8 fold at 5 mM valproate. Conclusions Histone deacetylase inhibitors warrant further study for the prevention or treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:22898175

  14. Valproic acid decreases urothelial cancer cell proliferation and induces thrombospondin-1 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byler Timothy K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of bladder cancer recurrence is a central challenge in the management of this highly prevalent disease. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (sodium valproate has anti-angiogenic properties and has been shown to decrease bladder cancer growth in model systems. We have previously shown reduced expression of thrombospondin-1 in a mouse model and in human bladder cancer relative to normal urothelium. We speculated that inhibition of angiogenesis by valproate might be mediated by this anti-angiogenic protein. Methods Bladder cancer cell lines UMUC3 and T24 were treated with valproate or another histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, in culture for a period of three days. Proliferation was assessed by alamar blue reduction. Gene expression was evaluated by reverse transcription of RNA and quantitative PCR. Results Proliferation assays showed treatment with valproate or vorinostat decreased proliferation in both cell lines. Histone deacetylase inhibition also increased relative expression of thrombospondin-1 up to 8 fold at 5 mM valproate. Conclusions Histone deacetylase inhibitors warrant further study for the prevention or treatment of bladder cancer.

  15. A Stratified Meta-Analysis of the Association between Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke during Childhood and Adulthood and Urothelial Bladder Cancer Risk

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    Frits H. M. van Osch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Active smoking is a major risk factor for urothelial bladder cancer (UBC. However, the evidence that exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS either in childhood or adult life is also associated with UBC risk is ambiguous. With this meta-analysis, we aim to summarise how exposure to ETS is associated with UBC risk. Methods: In total, 11 studies (3 cohort studies, 8 case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis and summary odds ratios (SORs for UBC risk were calculated for never smokers who were exposed to ETS during childhood at home, during adulthood at home, or during adulthood in a work environment compared to never smokers who were never exposed to ETS. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to test the robustness of findings. Results: Never smokers exposed to ETS during childhood (SOR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.82–1.26, during adulthood at work (SOR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.78–1.18 or at home (SOR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.83–1.15 were at a similar risk of UBC compared to never smokers who were never exposed to ETS. Results for males and females were similar. Also, when pooling all estimates during both childhood and adulthood, no effect was observed (SOR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.89–1.10. Conclusions: Although measurement of exposure to ETS was imprecise, there does not seem to be an association between UBC risk and exposure to ETS during childhood or adulthood. However, the current body of evidence mostly overlooks the duration and intensity of exposure to ETS.

  16. Bladder tumours in children: An interesting case report of TCC with a partial inverted growth pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rahman, Davide Abed; Salvo, Giuseppe; Palumbo, Carlotta; Rocco, Bernardo; Rocco, Francesco

    2014-09-30

    Bladder urothelial carcinoma is typically a disease of older individuals and rarely occurs below the age of 40 years. There is debate and uncertainty in the literature regarding the clinicopathologic and prognostic characteristics of bladder urothelial neoplasms in younger patients compared with older patients, although no consistent age criteria have been used to define "younger" age group categories. We report on a 16 years old girl with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder with a partial inverted growth pattern who presented with gross hematuria. Ultrasonography revealed a papillary lesion in the bladder; cystoscopic evaluation showed a 15 mm papillary lesion with a thick stalk located in the left bladder wall. Pathologic evaluation of the specimen was reported as "low grade transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder with a partial inverted growth pattern".

  17. Forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3) expression serves as an early chronic inflammation marker of squamous cell differentiation and aggressive pathology of urothelial carcinomas in neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phé, Véronique; Rouprêt, Morgan; Cussenot, Olivier; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Gamé, Xavier; Compérat, Eva

    2015-04-01

    To establish whether the expression of forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3) provides specific diagnostic information about neurological patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). UCB tissue samples from neurological patients were retrieved and compared with control samples. The expression of Foxp3 was analysed via immunohistochemistry of microarray tissue sections. The correlation between Foxp3 expression, histological parameters and tumour stage was assessed. Overall, 20 UCB tissue samples and 20 others without UCB from neurological patients, and 46 UCB tissue samples from non-neurological patients were analysed. The distribution of pT of UCB in the neurological patients was as follows: one low-grade pTa (5%), three high-grade pTa (15%), three pT1(15%), one pT2(5%), seven pT3(35%) and five pT4(25%). Squamous cell differentiation was seen in nine UCB samples (45%). Foxp3 expression was detected in tumour tissues, including one pTa high grade, one pT1, one pT2, five pT3 and five pT4 tumours. Foxp3 was expressed in 11/13 muscle-invasive tumours. All tumours displaying squamous cell differentiation expressed Foxp3. Foxp3 was not expressed in the pT3 tumours that displayed sarcomatoid and micropapillary properties. Among the bladder samples without UCB from neurological patients, no expression of Foxp3 was observed. Among the UCB samples from the non-neurological patients, only seven displayed squamous cell differentiation. All tumours that displayed squamous cell differentiation expressed Foxp3, including one pTa high grade, four pT3 and two pT4 tumours. Other tumours displaying urothelial differentiation did not express Foxp3. The expression of Foxp3 correlated to squamous cell differentiation in neurological (P = 0.004) and non-neurological UCB tissue (P differentiation. Targeting Foxp3 may represent a novel strategy to improve anti-tumour immunotherapy for UCB. © 2015 The Authors. BJU International © 2015 BJU International.

  18. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) over-production and autocrine cell activation are key factors in monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]-induced malignant transformation of urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero-Lourdes, C; Wu, T; Camarillo, J M; Gandolfi, A J

    2012-01-01

    The association between chronic human exposure to arsenicals and bladder cancer development is well recognized; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully determined. We propose that inflammatory responses can play a pathogenic role in arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis. In previous studies, it was demonstrated that chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsenous acid [MMA(III)] leads to malignant transformation of an immortalized model of urothelial cells (UROtsa), with only 3 mo of exposure necessary to trigger the transformation-related changes. In the three-month window of exposure, the cells over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8), consistent with the sustained activation of NFKβ and AP1/c-jun, ERK2, and STAT3. IL-8 was over-expressed within hours after exposure to MMA(III), and sustained over-expression was observed during chronic exposure. In this study, we profiled IL-8 expression in UROtsa cells exposed to 50 nM MMA(III) for 1 to 5 mo. IL-8 expression was increased mainly in cells after 3 mo MMA(III) exposure, and its production was also found increased in tumors derived from these cells after heterotransplantation in SCID mice. UROtsa cells do express both receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, suggesting that autocrine cell activation could be important in cell transformation. Supporting this observation and consistent with IL-8 over-expression, CXCR1 internalization was significantly increased after three months of exposure to MMA(III). The expression of MMP-9, cyclin D1, bcl-2, and VGEF was significantly increased in cells exposed to MMA(III) for 3 mo, but these mitogen-activated kinases were significantly decreased after IL-8 gene silencing, together with a decrease in cell proliferation rate and in anchorage-independent colony formation. These results suggest a relevant role of IL-8 in MMA(III)-induced UROtsa cell transformation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Surfactant Protein D Inhibits Adherence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli to the Bladder Epithelial Cells and the Bacterium-induced Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimura, Yuichiro; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Saito, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Motoko; Hashimoto, Jiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    The adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the host urothelial surface is the first step for establishing UPEC infection. Uroplakin Ia (UPIa), a glycoprotein expressed on bladder urothelium, serves as a receptor for FimH, a lectin located at bacterial pili, and their interaction initiates UPEC infection. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is known to be expressed on mucosal surfaces in various tissues besides the lung. However, the functions of SP-D in the non-pulmonary tissues are poorly understood. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible function of SP-D expressed in the bladder urothelium and the mechanisms by which SP-D functions. SP-D was expressed in human bladder mucosa, and its mRNA was increased in the bladder of the UPEC infection model in mice. SP-D directly bound to UPEC and strongly agglutinated them in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Co-incubation of SP-D with UPEC decreased the bacterial adherence to 5637 cells, the human bladder cell line, and the UPEC-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, preincubation of SP-D with 5637 cells resulted in the decreased adherence of UPEC to the cells and in a reduced number of cells injured by UPEC. SP-D directly bound to UPIa and competed with FimH for UPIa binding. Consistent with the in vitro data, the exogenous administration of SP-D inhibited UPEC adherence to the bladder and dampened UPEC-induced inflammation in mice. These results support the conclusion that SP-D can protect the bladder urothelium against UPEC infection and suggest a possible function of SP-D in urinary tract. PMID:23012359

  20. Loss of prostasin (PRSS8 in human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cell lines is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT

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    Chai Karl X

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored epithelial extracellular membrane serine protease prostasin (PRSS8 is expressed abundantly in normal epithelia and essential for terminal epithelial differentiation, but down-regulated in human prostate, breast, and gastric cancers and invasive cancer cell lines. Prostasin is involved in the extracellular proteolytic modulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and is an invasion suppressor. The aim of this study was to evaluate prostasin expression states in the transitional cell carcinomas (TCC of the human bladder and in human TCC cell lines. Methods Normal human bladder tissues and TCC on a bladder cancer tissue microarray (TMA were evaluated for prostasin expression by means of immunohistochemistry. A panel of 16 urothelial and TCC cell lines were evaluated for prostasin and E-cadherin expression by western blot and quantitative PCR, and for prostasin gene promoter region CpG methylation by methylation-specific PCR (MSP. Results Prostasin is expressed in the normal human urothelium and in a normal human urothelial cell line, but is significantly down-regulated in high-grade TCC and lost in 9 (of 15 TCC cell lines. Loss of prostasin expression in the TCC cell lines correlated with loss of or reduced E-cadherin expression, loss of epithelial morphology, and promoter DNA hypermethylation. Prostasin expression could be reactivated by demethylation or inhibition of histone deacetylase. Re-expression of prostasin or a serine protease-inactive variant resulted in transcriptional up-regulation of E-cadherin. Conclusion Loss of prostasin expression in bladder transitional cell carcinomas is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and may have functional implications in tumor invasion and resistance to chemotherapy.

  1. Global gene expression changes in human urothelial cells exposed to low-level monomethylarsonous acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medeiros, M.; Zheng, X.; Novák, Petr; Wnek, S.M.; Chyan, V.; Escudero-Lourdes, C.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 291, 1-3 (2012), s. 102-112 ISSN 0300-483X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : HUMAN BLADDER CELLS * METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS * MALIGNANT-TRANSFORMATION0300 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.017, year: 2012

  2. Hydronephrotic urine in the obstructed kidney promotes urothelial carcinoma cell proliferation, migration, invasion through the activation of mTORC2-AKT and ERK signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hao Chang

    Full Text Available Obstructive nephropathy is the most common presentation of urothelial carcinoma. The role of the urine in the obstructed kidney namely "hydronephrotic urine" in urothelial carcinoma has not been extensively explored. This study aims to evaluate whether hydronephrotic urine in the obstructed kidney could promote urothelial carcinoma. The hydronephrotic urine was collected from the obstructed kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats induced by different periods of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO. By the inhibition of LY294002 and PD184352, we confirm that hydronephrotic urine promotes urothelial carcinoma cell (T24 and immortalized normal urothelial cells (E6 proliferation, migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner through the activation of the mTORC2-AKT and ERK signaling pathways. Hydronephrotic urine also increases the expression of cyclin-D2, cyclin-B and CDK2. It also decreases the expression of p27 and p21 in both urothelial carcinoma cells and normal urothelial cells. By the protein array study, we demonstrate that many growth factors which promote tumor cell survival and metastasis are over-expressed in a time-dependent manner in the hydronephrotic urine, including beta-FGF, IFN-γ, PDGF-BB, PIGF, TGF-β, VEGF-A, VEGF-D and EGF. These results suggest that hydronephrotic urine promotes normal and malignant urothelial cells proliferation, migration and invasion, through the activation of the mTORC2-AKT and ERK signaling pathways. Further investigation using live animal models of tumor growth may be needed to clarify aspects of these statements.

  3. Vulvar Metastasis from Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is a very rare entity; few cases are reported in the English literature. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological characteristics, evolution, and treatment of a patient with vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder followed by a brief review of the reported cases in the literature.

  4. Expression of selected pathway-marker genes in human urothelial cells exposed chronically to a non-cytotoxic concentration of monomethylarsonous acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer has been associated with chronic arsenic exposure. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III] is a metabolite of inorganic arsenic and has been shown to transform an immortalized urothelial cell line (UROtsa at concentrations 20-fold less than arsenite. MMA(III was used as a model arsenical to examine the mechanisms of arsenical-induced transformation of urothelium. A previous microarray analysis revealed only minor changes in gene expression at 1 and 2 months of chronic exposure to MMA(III, contrasting with substantial changes observed at 3 months of exposure. To address the lack of information between 2 and 3 months of exposure (the critical period of transformation, the expression of select pathway marker genes was measured by PCR array analysis on a weekly basis. Cell proliferation rate, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity in SCID mice were also assessed to determine the early, persistent phenotypic changes and their association with the changes in expression of these selected marker genes. A very similar pattern of alterations in these genes was observed when compared to the microarray results, and suggested that early perturbations in cell signaling cascades, immunological pathways, cytokine expression, and MAPK pathway are particularly important in driving malignant transformation. These results showed a strong association between the acquired phenotypic changes that occurred as early as 1–2 months of chronic MMA(III exposure, and the observed gene expression pattern that is indicative of the earliest stages in carcinogenesis.

  5. Hazard assessment of three haloacetic acids, as byproducts of water disinfection, in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsà, Alicia; Cortés, Constanza; Hernández, Alba; Marcos, Ricard

    2018-04-07

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are compounds produced in the raw water disinfection processes. Although increased cancer incidence has been associated with exposure to this complex mixture, the carcinogenic potential of individual DBPs remains not well known; thus, further studies are required. Haloacetic acids (HAAs) constitute an important group among DBPs. In this study, we have assessed the in vitro carcinogenic potential of three HAAs namely chloro-, bromo-, and iodoacetic acids. Using a long-term (8 weeks) and sub-toxic doses exposure scenario, different in vitro transformation markers were evaluated using a human urothelial cell line (T24). Our results indicate that long-term exposure to low doses of HAAs did not reproduce the genotoxic effects observed in acute treatments, where oxidative DNA damage was induced. No changes in the transformation endpoints analyzed were observed, as implied by the absence of significant morphological, cell growth rate and anchorage-independent cell growth pattern modifications. Interestingly, HAA-long-term exposed cells developed resistance to oxidative stress damage, what would explain the observed differences between acute and long-term exposure conditions. Accordingly, data obtained under long-term exposure to sub-toxic doses of HAAs could be more accurate, in terms of risk assessment, than under acute exposure scenarios. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 enhances the cytotoxic effect of gemcitabine in urothelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Makito; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Anai, Satoshi; Ohnishi, Sayuri; Nakai, Yasushi; Inoue, Takeshi; Matsumura, Yoshiaki; Tomioka, Atsushi; Ikeda, Tomohiro; Okajima, Eijiro; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2010-06-01

    Elevated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is associated with resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy through anti-apoptotic function. The present study evaluated whether the HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), enhances the cytotoxic effect of gemcitabine in urothelial carcinoma (UC). The in vitro cytotoxic effect of combination treatment of gemcitabine and ZnPP on UC cells was examined. The in vivo growth inhibitory effects of intraperitoneal administration of gemcitabine and/or ZnPP on mouse subcutaneous tumours were examined. The apoptotic changes were analysed with the detection of DNA fragmentation and cleaved caspase-3. HO-1 was up-regulated by both gemcitabine and irradiation treatment in vitro. ZnPP sensitised the UC cells to both therapies. Enhanced apoptosis was induced by the ZnPP combined with gemicitabine. ZnPP enhanced the antitumour effect of gemcitabine in vivo along with decreased numbers of proliferating cells and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. These findings suggest that ZnPP combined with gemcitabine or irradiation therapy may be an effective therapeutic modality for UC patients.

  7. Giant urothelial carcinoma of unknown origin invading the sigmoid mesocolon - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolacinska, A.; Howaniec, J.; Stanczyk, M.; Pawlak, M.; Morawiec, Z.; Rykala, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Transitional cell carcinoma, also called urothelial carcinoma, is the most common malignancy of the urinary bladder. Additionally, it can develop in the lining of the renal pelvis, ureter, prostate and urethra. Exceptionally, cancer can arise from the urachus. Also primary transitional cell carcinoma of the endometrium or ovary is a rare entity. Aim: The aim of this article was to present a case of giant urothelial carcinoma of unknown origin invading the sigmoid mesocolon. We report a rare case of urothelial carcinoma invading the sigmoid mesocolon in a 60-year-old female admitted to our department. The patient presented with a 25-cm intra-abdominal mass and 6-cm ulcerated lesion at the top of the umbilicus. Laparotomy was performed which demonstrated a huge polycystic and solid tumour of the sigmoid mesentery infiltrating the sigmoid colon and appendix. Appendectomy and resection of the tumour with an infiltrated sigmoid loop were performed. A right ovarian cyst - not contiguous to the aforementioned tumour - was found at the time of the operation and excised. We also removed the 6-cm skin lesion in the umbilical area. Histopathological examination revealed urothelial carcinoma with squamous cell metaplasia of the sigmoid mesocolon with bowel and umbilical invasion. Concurrent desmoid cyst (mature teratoma) of the right ovary was found. In conclusion, this patient with a sigmoid mesocolon invasion from urothelial carcinoma of unknown origin posed a diagnostic dilemma. (authors)

  8. Dose-response of diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] in the urothelial mucosa of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Ana Paula Ferragut; Ihlaseh Catalano, Shadia Muhammad; da Rocha, Mitscheli Sanches; Nascimento E Pontes, Merielen Garcia; de Camargo, João Lauro Viana; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor

    2013-10-04

    Diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] is a herbicide that induced urothelial tumors in the urinary bladder of Wistar rats fed 2500ppm during a long-term study. The currently suggested non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA) of diuron encompasses in succession urothelial necrosis induced by direct cytotoxicity, regenerative cell proliferation and sustained urothelial hyperplasia that increases the likelihood of neoplasia development. This study evaluated the dose-response profile of urothelial histological and ultrastructural lesions induced by diuron. Sixty male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum diuron mixed in the diet at 0, 60, 125, 500, 1250, or 2500ppm for 20 weeks. The incidences of urothelial simple hyperplasia and the cell proliferation index were significantly increased in the diuron-fed 1250 and 2500ppm groups. By scanning electron microscopy, the incidences and severity of lesions were significantly increased in the 500 and 1250ppm groups. The incidences of urothelial hyperplasia in the kidney pelvis were significantly increased in the 500, 1250 and 2500ppm groups. The present study documents the dose-response influence of diuron on the rat urothelium, with a no observed effect level (NOEL) at 125ppm; 1250ppm was as effective as 2500ppm at inducing urothelial lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose–response of diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] in the urothelial mucosa of Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferragut Cardoso, Ana Paula; Ihlaseh Catalano, Shadia Muhammad; Sanches da Rocha, Mitscheli; Nascimento e Pontes, Merielen Garcia; Viana de Camargo, João Lauro; Cotrim Sartor de Oliveira, Maria Luiza

    2013-01-01

    Diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] is a herbicide that induced urothelial tumors in the urinary bladder of Wistar rats fed 2500 ppm during a long-term study. The currently suggested non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA) of diuron encompasses in succession urothelial necrosis induced by direct cytotoxicity, regenerative cell proliferation and sustained urothelial hyperplasia that increases the likelihood of neoplasia development. This study evaluated the dose–response profile of urothelial histological and ultrastructural lesions induced by diuron. Sixty male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum diuron mixed in the diet at 0, 60, 125, 500, 1250, or 2500 ppm for 20 weeks. The incidences of urothelial simple hyperplasia and the cell proliferation index were significantly increased in the diuron-fed 1250 and 2500 ppm groups. By scanning electron microscopy, the incidences and severity of lesions were significantly increased in the 500 and 1250 ppm groups. The incidences of urothelial hyperplasia in the kidney pelvis were significantly increased in the 500, 1250 and 2500 ppm groups. The present study documents the dose–response influence of diuron on the rat urothelium, with a no observed effect level (NOEL) at 125 ppm; 1250 ppm was as effective as 2500 ppm at inducing urothelial lesions

  10. Precystectomy serum levels of carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carbohydrate antigen 125, and carcinoembryonic antigen: prognostic value in invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Djaladat, Hooman; Cai, Jie; Miranda, Gus; Daneshmand, Siamak

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of precystectomy carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA 125), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). Preoperatively collected serum samples from patients with invasive UCB who underwent radical cystectomy between 2004 and 2009 were used to measure CA 19-9, CA 125, and CEA levels. Laboratory cutoff points were used to define elevated marker levels (CA 19-9>37 U/ml, CA 125>35 U/ml, and CEA>3.8 U/ml). The Cox regression model was used to identify independent predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 186 patients with the mean age of 69 years (range: 36-89) and median follow-up of 4 years (range: 0.1-7.2) were included in the study. Overall, 94 (51%) patients had pathologic organ-confined disease (≤T2) and 92 (49%) had pathologic locally advanced UCB (pT3-T4 or positive lymph node or both). The mean CA 19-9, CA 125, and CEA levels were 11.6 U/ml (range:<0.6-111), 11.5 U/ml (range: 3-56), and 2.2 ng/ml (range: 0.3-30.2), respectively. Levels of CA 19-9, CEA, and CA 125 were elevated in 7 (3%), 25 (13%), and 3 (1%) patients, respectively. Median 3-year RFS and OS were 72%. Using the multivariate Cox regression model, elevated levels of CA 19-9 and CEA were found to be independent predictors of worse 3-year OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.7, P = 0.05 and HR = 2, P = 0.03, respectively), and an elevated level of CA 19-9 was an independent predictor of worse 3-year RFS (HR = 2.8, P = 0.05). Precystectomy CA 125 level was not associated with oncological outcome. Elevated precystectomy serum levels of CA 19-9 and CEA are independent predictors of worse oncological outcome in patients with invasive UCB. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of these markers in the management of UCB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3) is a molecular target for Edelfosine to reduce the invasive potential of urothelial carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinestel, Konrad; Eder, Stefan; Ehinger, Konstantin; Schneider, Juliane; Genze, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Wardelmann, Eva; Schrader, Andres J; Steinestel, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is the survival-determining factor in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the urinary bladder. The small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3) enhances tumor cell invasion in breast cancer and malignant melanoma. Since Edelfosine, a glycerophospholipid with antitumoral properties, effectively inhibits SK3 channel activity, our goal was to evaluate SK3 as a potential molecular target to inhibit the gain of an invasive phenotype in UC. SK3 protein expression was analyzed in 208 tissue samples and UC cell lines. Effects of Edelfosine on SK3 expression and intracellular calcium levels as well as on cell morphology, cell survival and proliferation were assessed using immunoblotting, potentiometric fluorescence microscopy, and clonogenic/cell survival assay; furthermore, we analyzed the effect of Edelfosine and SK3 RNAi knockdown on tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. We found that SK3 is strongly expressed in muscle-invasive UC and in the RT112 cellular tumor model. Higher concentrations of Edelfosine have a strong antitumoral effect on UC cells, while 1 μM effectively inhibits migration/invasion of UC cells in vitro and in vivo comparable to the SK3 knockdown phenotype. Taken together, our results show strong expression of SK3 in muscle-invasive UC, consistent with the postulated role of the protein in tumor cell invasion. Edelfosine is able to effectively inhibit migration and invasion of UC cells in vitro and in vivo in an SK3-dependent way, pointing towards a possible role for Edelfosine as an antiinvasive drug to effectively inhibit UC cell invasion and metastasis.

  12. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Tsukamoto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  13. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hkitamu@sapmed.ac.jp; Tsukamoto, Taiji [Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South 1 West 16, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8543 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8{sup +} T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  14. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2011-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8 + T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules

  15. Intact urothelial barrier function in a mouse model of ketamine-induced voiding dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajandram, Retnagowri; Ong, Teng Aik; Razack, Azad H. A.; MacIver, Bryce; Zeidel, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is a popular choice for young drug abusers. Ketamine abuse causes lower urinary tract symptoms, with the underlying pathophysiology poorly understood. Disruption of urothelial barrier function has been hypothesized to be a major mechanism for ketamine cystitis, yet the direct evidence of impaired urothelial barrier function is still lacking. To address this question, 8-wk-old female C57BL/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with 30 mg·kg−1·day−1 ketamine for 12 wk to induce ketamine cystitis. A spontaneous voiding spot assay showed that ketamine-treated mice had increased primary voiding spot numbers and smaller primary voiding spot sizes than control mice (P ketamine-treated mice on cystometrograms. These functional experiments indicate that ketamine induces voiding dysfunction in mice. Surprisingly, urothelial permeability in ketamine-treated mice was not changed when measured using an Ussing chamber system with isotopic urea and water. Mouse urothelial structure was also not altered, and intact umbrella cell structure was observed by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, immunostaining and confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of a well-defined distribution of zonula occuldens-1 in tight junctions and uroplakin in umbrella cells. In conclusion, these data indicate that ketamine injection induces voiding dysfunction in mice but does not necessarily disrupt mouse bladder barrier function. Disruption of urothelial barrier function may not be the major mechanism in ketamine cystitis. PMID:26911853

  16. Metastatic Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder to the Testis: A Case Report

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    Gregory N. Kozak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An 84-year-old gentleman presented with onset of gross hematuria in September 2010. Follow-up investigations revealed T1 superficially invasive, poorly differentiated, papillary urothelial carcinoma. He subsequently had GreenLight laser for BPH and bladder neck contracture on two occasions. He developed a right hydrocele 16 months after initial presentation and during his hydrocelectomy, a rock-hard right epididymis and testicle were discovered. Pathology revealed metastatic urothelial carcinoma replacing nearly the entire testis with lymphovascular invasion.

  17. Pulsating electromagnetic field stimulation of urothelial cells induces apoptosis and diminishes necrosis: new insight to magnetic therapy in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczak, K; Kaszuba-Zwoinska, J; Thor, P J

    2012-08-01

    The evidence of electromagnetic therapy (EMT) efficacy in stress and/or urge urinary incontinence, as well as in detrusor overactivity is generally lacking in the literature. The potential EMT action of neuromuscular tissue depolarization has been described. Because there is no data on the influence of pulsating electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on the urothelium, we evaluated the effect of PEMF stimulation on rat urothelial cultured cells (RUCC). In our study 15 Wistar rats were used for RUCC preparation. RUCC were exposed to PEMF (50 Hz, 45±5 mT) three times for 4 hours each with 24-hour intervals. The unexposed RUCC was in the same incubator, but in a distance of 35 cm from the PEMF generator. Annexin V-APC (AnV+) labelled was used to determine the percentage of apoptotic cells and propidium iodide (PI+), as standard flow cytometric viability probe to distinguish necrotic cells from viable ones. The results are presented in percentage values. The flow cytometric analysis was carried out on a FACS calibur flow cytometer using Cell-Quest software. In PEMF-unstimulated RUCC, the percentage of AnV+, PI+, and AnV+PI+ positive cells were 1.24±0.34%, 11.03±1.55%, and 12.43±1.96%, respectively. The percentages of AnV+, PI+, and AnV+PI+ positive cells obtained after PEMF stimulation were 1.45±0.16% (p=0.027), 7.03±1.76% (p<0.001), and 9.48±3.40% (p=0.003), respectively. The PEMF stimulation of RUCC induces apoptosis (increase of AnV+ cells) and inhibits necrosis (decrease of PI+ cells) of urothelial cells. This leads us to the conclusion that a low-frequency pulsating electromagnetic field stimulation induces apoptosis and diminishes necrosis of rat urothelial cells in culture.

  18. Impacts of CA9 gene polymorphisms on urothelial cell carcinoma susceptibility and clinicopathologic characteristics in Taiwan.

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    Shian-Shiang Wang

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 is reportedly overexpressed in several types of carcinomas and is generally considered a marker of malignancy. The current study explored the effect of CA9 gene polymorphisms on the susceptibility of developing urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC and the clinicopathological status.A total of 442 participants, including 221 healthy people and 221 patients with UCC, were recruited for this study. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the CA9 gene were assessed by a real-time PCR with the TaqMan assay. After adjusting for other co-variants, the individuals carrying at least one A allele at CA9 rs1048638 had a 2.303-fold risk of developing UCC than did wild-type (CC carriers. Furthermore, UCC patients who carried at least one A allele at rs1048638 had a higher invasive stage risk (p< 0.05 than did patients carrying the wild-type allele. Moreover, among the UCC patients with smoker, people with at least one A allele of CA9 polymorphisms (rs1048638 had a 4.75-fold (95% CI = 1.204-18.746 increased risk of invasive cancer.The rs1048638 polymorphic genotypes of CA9 might contribute to the prediction of susceptibility to and pathological development of UCC. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with CA9 variants in carcinogenesis of UCC in Taiwan.

  19. Tumour cell expansion in bladder epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.J. Rebel (Annemarie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBladder cancer is common in western society. The major problem of patients with superficial bladder cancer is the high recurrence rate and multifocality of these tumours. In 70 % of the patients superficial bladder cancer recurs after local resection of the tumour within 15 years. The

  20. Granular cell tumors of the urinary bladder

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    Kayani Naila

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granular cell tumors (GCTs are extremely rare lesions of the urinary bladder with only nine cases being reported in world literature of which one was malignant. Generally believed to be of neural origin based on histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural studies; they mostly follow a clinically benign course but are commonly mistaken for malignant tumors since they are solid looking, ulcerated tumors with ill-defined margins. Materials and methods We herein report two cases of GCTs, one benign and one malignant, presenting with gross hematuria in a 14- and a 47-year-old female, respectively. Results Histopathology revealed characteristic GCTs with positive immunostaining for neural marker (S-100 and negative immunostaining for epithelial (cytokeratin, Cam 5.2, AE/A13, neuroendocrine (neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and sarcoma (desmin, vimentin markers. The benign tumor was successfully managed conservatively with transurethral resection alone while for the malignant tumor, radical cystectomy, hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, anterior vaginectomy, plus lymph node dissection was done. Both cases show long-term disease free survival. Conclusion We recommend careful pathologic assessment for establishing the appropriate diagnosis and either a conservative or aggressive surgical treatment for benign or localized malignant GCT of the urinary bladder, respectively.

  1. Transitional Cell Carcinoma within a Portion of Inguinally Herniated Bladder

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    Matthew A. Uhlman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder herniation within the inguinal canal is a relatively uncommon finding. We report an even less-common occurrence of transitional cell carcinoma located within a portion of inguinally herniated bladder. Fewer than 20 reports exist in the literature describing this scenario.

  2. Quantifying mast cells in bladder pain syndrome by immunohistochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.S.; Mortensen, S.; Nordling, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate a simple method for counting mast cells, thought to have a role in the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome (BPS, formerly interstitial cystitis, a syndrome of pelvic pain perceived to be related to the urinary bladder and accompanied by other urinary symptoms, e. g...

  3. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Nicolas; Göke, Friederike; Splittstößer, Vera; Lankat-Buttgereit, Brigitte; Müller, Stefan C.; Ellinger, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. ► We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. ► We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2–T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  4. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nicolas, E-mail: simplissimus@gmx.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Goeke, Friederike, E-mail: Friederike.goeke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Splittstoesser, Vera, E-mail: Veri.sp@web.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Lankat-Buttgereit, Brigitte, E-mail: Lankatbu@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Internal Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); Mueller, Stefan C., E-mail: Stefan.mueller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Ellinger, Joerg, E-mail: Joerg.ellinger@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2-T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  5. Pathomechanism of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome and Mapping the Heterogeneity of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a heterogeneous syndrome which is usually characterized by urinary frequency, nocturia, and bladder pain. Several pathomechanisms have been proposed, including uroepithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation, autoimmunity, and occult urinary tract infections. It is possible that an inflammatory process alters regulation of urothelial homeostasis and results in dysfunction of the bladder epithelium. Different phenotypes of IC/BPS have been explored including Hunner and non-Hunner type IC, hypersensitive bladder, and bladder pain both with and without functional somatic syndrome. Different gene expressions have also been found in different IC phenotypes. Abnormal expressions of uroplakin, chondroitin sulfate and adhesive protein E-cadherin, tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 in IC/BPS bladder suggest abnormal epithelial differentiation in this bladder disease. Analysis of inflammatory proteins, or cytokines in the urine or serum provides another diagnostic foundation forIC/BPS subtypes. The involvement of IC/BPS in systemic functional somatic syndrome and other pelvic organ diseases might also subdivide subtypes of IC/BPS. Chronic inflammation, increased urothelial apoptosis, and abnormal urothelial function are closely associated in IC bladders. This article reviews recent research on the pathomechanisms of IC, which might help us in mapping the heterogeneity of the disease. PMID:27915472

  6. Management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in dogs: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Christopher M; Knapp, Deborah W

    2015-08-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), also referred to as urothelial carcinoma, is the most common form of urinary bladder cancer in dogs, affecting tens of thousands of dogs worldwide each year. Canine TCC is usually a high grade invasive cancer. Problems associated with TCC include urinary tract obstruction, distant metastases in >50% of affected dogs, and clinical signs that are troubling both to the dogs and to their owners. Risk factors for TCC include exposure to older types of flea control products and lawn chemicals, obesity, female sex, and a very strong breed-associated risk. This knowledge is allowing pet owners to take steps to reduce the risk of TCC in their dog. The diagnosis of TCC is made by histopathology of tissue biopsies obtained by cystoscopy, surgery, or catheter. Percutaneous aspirates and biopsies should be avoided due to the risk of tumor seeding. TCC is most commonly located in the trigone region of the bladder precluding complete surgical resection. Medical treatment is the mainstay for TCC therapy in dogs. Although TCC is not usually curable in dogs, multiple drugs have activity against it. Approximately 75% of dogs respond favorably to TCC treatment and can enjoy several months to a year or more of good quality life. Many promising new therapies for TCC are emerging and with the close similarity between TCC in dogs and high grade invasive bladder cancer in humans, new treatment strategies found to be successful in canine studies are expected to help dogs and to be subsequently translated to humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tolerability of Repeat Use of Blue Light Cystoscopy with Hexaminolevulinate for Patients with Urothelial Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Giulia I; Downs, Tracy M; Soubra, Ayman; Rao, Amrita; Hemsley, Lauren; Laylan, Christopher; Shi, Fangfang; Konety, Badrinath

    2017-03-01

    Hexaminolevulinate hydrochloride with blue light cystoscopy is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an adjunct to white light cystoscopy for the detection of urothelial cell carcinoma. In this study we examined the tolerability of the repeat use of white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who underwent white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy using hexaminolevulinate hydrochloride during a 34-month period at 2 institutions. We compared the incidence of adverse events after initial and subsequent procedures. We grouped, graded and assigned the degree of attribution for all adverse events. A total of 180 patients underwent 269 white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy procedures. Of those 180 patients 118 (65%) underwent white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy only 1 time. The other 62 (35%) patients underwent white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy 2 or more times, including 43 (24%) 2 times and 19 (10%) 3 or more times. We noted 89 adverse events out of 269 procedures (33%), of which 66 (74%) occurred after the first white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy; 14 (16%) after the second time and 9 (10%) after the third time or more. We found no statistically significant difference in adverse events between those patients undergoing 1 vs 2 or more white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy procedures (p=0.134). We observed 1 grade 3 adverse event and no grade 4 or 5 adverse events. None of the adverse events were classified as probably or definitely related to hexaminolevulinate hydrochloride. In this retrospective study we found no statistically significant difference in the frequency or the grade of adverse events between first and repeat use of white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy using hexaminolevulinate hydrochloride. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier

  8. Maintenance by saccharin of membrane alterations of rat bladder cells induced by subcarcinogenic treatment with bladder carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizoe, T; Komatsu, H; Niijima, T; Kawachi, T; Sugimura, T

    1981-11-01

    Saccharin is known to have a tumor-promoting effect on bladder cancer in rats, but its mechanism of action is unknown. We demonstrated that the increased agglutinability of isolated epithelial cells of the bladder in the presence of concanavalin A caused by a subcarcinogenic dose of bladder carcinogens disappeared shortly after the end of their administration. However, saccharin maintained the increased agglutinability when given continuously after administration of carcinogen. Moreover, the agglutinability of bladder cells previously exposed to a subcarcinogenic dose of bladder carcinogens increased again when saccharin was given after the agglutinability had disappeared completely.

  9. Differences in the epigenetic regulation of MT-3 gene expression between parental and Cd+2 or As+3 transformed human urothelial cells

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    Ajjimaporn Amornpan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that metallothionein 3 (MT-3 is not expressed in normal urothelium or in the UROtsa cell line, but is expressed in urothelial cancer and in tumors generated from the UROtsa cells that have been transformed by cadmium (Cd+2 or arsenite (As+3.The present study had two major goals. One, to determine if epigenetic modifications control urothelial MT-3 gene expression and if regulation is altered by malignant transformation by Cd+2 or As+3. Two, to determine if MT-3 expression might translate clinically as a biomarker for malignant urothelial cells released into the urine. Results The histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 induced MT-3 mRNA expression in both parental UROtsa cells and their transformed counterparts. The demethylating agent, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZC had no effect on MT-3 mRNA expression. ChIP analysis showed that metal-responsive transformation factor-1 (MTF-1 binding to metal response elements (MRE elements of the MT-3 promoter was restricted in parental UROtsa cells, but MTF-1 binding to the MREs was unrestricted in the transformed cell lines. Histone modifications at acetyl H4, trimethyl H3K4, trimethyl H3K27, and trimethyl H3K9 were compared between the parental and transformed cell lines in the presence and absence of MS-275. The pattern of histone modifications suggested that the MT-3 promoter in the Cd+2 and As+3 transformed cells has gained bivalent chromatin structure, having elements of being "transcriptionally repressed" and "transcription ready", when compared to parental cells. An analysis of MT-3 staining in urinary cytologies showed that a subset of both active and non-active patients with urothelial cancer shed positive cells in their urine, but that control patients only rarely shed MT-3 positive cells. Conclusion The MT-3 gene is silenced in non-transformed urothelial cells by a mechanism involving histone modification of the MT-3 promoter. In contrast, transformation of the

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method.

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    Ganglong Yang

    Full Text Available The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia, KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC, and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer.

  11. The Mystery of the Interstitial Cells in the Urinary Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sang Don; Lee, Haeyeong; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2018-01-06

    Intrinsic mechanisms to restrain smooth muscle excitability are present in the bladder, and premature contractions during filling indicate a pathological phenotype. Some investigators have proposed that c-Kit + interstitial cells (ICs) are pacemakers and intermediaries in efferent and afferent neural activity, but recent findings suggest these cells have been misidentified and their functions have been misinterpreted. Cells reported to be c-Kit + cells colabel with vimentin antibodies, but vimentin is not a specific marker for c-Kit + cells. A recent report shows that c-Kit + cells in several species coexpress mast cell tryptase, suggesting that they are likely to be mast cells. In fact, most bladder ICs labeled with vimentin antibodies coexpress platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Rather than an excitatory phenotype, PDGFRα + cells convey inhibitory regulation in the detrusor, and inhibitory mechanisms are activated by purines and stretch. PDGFRα + cells restrain premature development of contractions during bladder filling, and overactive behavior develops when the inhibitory pathways in these cells are blocked. PDGFRα + cells are also a prominent cell type in the submucosa and lamina propria, but little is known about their function in these locations. Effective pharmacological manipulation of bladder ICs depends on proper identification and further study of the pathways in these cells that affect bladder functions.

  12. Surfactant protein D inhibits adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to the bladder epithelial cells and the bacterium-induced cytotoxicity: a possible function in urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimura, Yuichiro; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Saito, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Motoko; Hashimoto, Jiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2012-11-16

    The adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the host urothelial surface is the first step for establishing UPEC infection. Uroplakin Ia (UPIa), a glycoprotein expressed on bladder urothelium, serves as a receptor for FimH, a lectin located at bacterial pili, and their interaction initiates UPEC infection. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is known to be expressed on mucosal surfaces in various tissues besides the lung. However, the functions of SP-D in the non-pulmonary tissues are poorly understood. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible function of SP-D expressed in the bladder urothelium and the mechanisms by which SP-D functions. SP-D was expressed in human bladder mucosa, and its mRNA was increased in the bladder of the UPEC infection model in mice. SP-D directly bound to UPEC and strongly agglutinated them in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Co-incubation of SP-D with UPEC decreased the bacterial adherence to 5637 cells, the human bladder cell line, and the UPEC-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, preincubation of SP-D with 5637 cells resulted in the decreased adherence of UPEC to the cells and in a reduced number of cells injured by UPEC. SP-D directly bound to UPIa and competed with FimH for UPIa binding. Consistent with the in vitro data, the exogenous administration of SP-D inhibited UPEC adherence to the bladder and dampened UPEC-induced inflammation in mice. These results support the conclusion that SP-D can protect the bladder urothelium against UPEC infection and suggest a possible function of SP-D in urinary tract.

  13. Extra virgin olive oil phenols suppress migration and invasion of T24 human bladder cancer cells through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, Andrea; Bastianelli, Daniela; Mosca, Luciana; Monticolo, Roberto; Panuccio, Isabella; Carbone, Antonio; Calogero, Antonella; Lendaro, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), a common dietary habit of the Mediterranean people, seems to be related to a lower incidence of certain types of cancer including bladder neoplasm. Metastases are the major cause of bladder cancer-related deaths and targeting cell motility has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to prevent cancer spread. This study aimed to investigate the potential antimetastatic effect of total phenols extracted from EVOO against the human transitional bladder carcinoma cell line T24. We also aimed at verifying that EVOO extract exerts cytotoxic effect on tumor cells without affecting normal urothelial fibroblasts. Our results show that EVOO extract can significantly inhibit the proliferation and motility of T24 bladder cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the same experimental conditions fibroblast proliferation and motility were not significantly modified. Furthermore the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 was inhibited at nontoxic EVOO extract doses only in T24 cells. The qRT-PCR revealed a decrease of the MMP-2 expression and a simultaneous increase of the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases expression. Our results may support the epidemiological evidences that link olive oil consumption to health benefits and may represent a starting point for the development of new anticancer strategies.

  14. Genome-wide methylation profiling and the PI3K-AKT pathway analysis associated with smoking in urothelial cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brait, Mariana; Munari, Enrico; LeBron, Cynthia; Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Begum, Shahnaz; Michailidi, Christina; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Maldonado, Leonel; Sen, Tanusree; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Cope, Leslie; Parrella, Paola; Fazio, VitoMichele; Ha, Patrick K.; Netto, George J.; Sidransky, David; Hoque, Mohammad O.

    2013-01-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is the second most common genitourinary malignant disease in the USA, and tobacco smoking is the major known risk factor for UCC development. Exposure to carcinogens, such as those contained in tobacco smoke, is known to directly or indirectly damage DNA, causing

  15. Urinary bladder adenocarcinoma arising in a spina bifida patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Mireille; Mandel, Edmund; Kirschenbaum, Alexander M; Unger, Pamela D

    2007-12-01

    Urinary bladder adenocarcinomas are rare malignancies accounting for approximately 2.5% of all urothelial neoplasms. Intestinal metaplasia of the urothelium indicates the presence of intestinal-type goblet cells and was generally observed to coexist with or to precede the diagnosis of bladder adenocarcinomas. Controversy continues of whether intestinal metaplasia is an acquired precancerous lesion, secondary to different insults to the urothelium, or a concomitant lesion in glandular carcinogenesis. Patients with neurogenic bladders are particularly at risk for developing bladder cancer, mostly squamous cell carcinoma and rarely adenocarcinoma. In these patients, chronic irritation of the urothelium as well as long-term indwelling urinary catheters were the most significant risk factors. Spina bifida is a congenital developmental abnormality that may result in neurogenic bladder. There is only one previously reported case of urothelial carcinoma with associated squamous metaplasia of the bladder occurring in a spina bifida patient. We report the first case of bladder adenocarcinoma associated with intestinal metaplasia occurring in a spina bifida occulta patient. The patient had a complicated clinical course and suffered recurrent urinary tract infections, renal calculi, and urinary incontinence and was managed with intermittent as well as indwelling catheterization.

  16. iNOS EXPRESSION AND NO PRODUCTION CONTRIBUTE TO THE DIRECT EFFECTS OF BCG ON UROTHELIAL CARCINOMA CELL BIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gopitkumar; Zhang, Guangjian; Chen, Fanghong; Cao, YanLi; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; See, William A.

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Evidence suggests that oxidative stress occurring as a consequence of inducible nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide (iNOS/NO) contributes to the biologic effects of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG). Objective of the current study is to examine iNOS expression, NO production and the biologic impact of NO, on established intermediate end points for the human urothelial carcinoma cell response to BCG. MATERIALS AND METHODS Quantitative rt-PCR and real time measurement of NO was used to assess iNOS and NO production respectively, in two human urothelial carcinoma (UC) cell lines, in response to BCG. The effect of blocking NO production using the specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W was determined for multiple intermediate end points characterizing BCGs direct effects on tumor cell biology. Activation of NF-κB and NRF2 signaling pathways, transactivation of genes including p21, CD54, IL6, IL8, CXCL1, CXCL3, CCL20 and cytotoxicity as measured by vital dye exclusion, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and MTT assay were measured in response to BCG with and without iNOS inhibition. RESULTS Exposure of UC cells to BCG significantly increased both iNOS expression and NO production. Inhibition of iNOS activity with 1400W significantly inhibited BCG’s direct biologic effect on UC cells for all of the end points evaluated. CONCLUSIONS iNOS expression, NO production and the associated oxidative stress play a central role in the response of UC cells to BCG exposure. Manipulation of oxidative stress may afford an opportunity to enhance the antitumor effects of BCG. PMID:24054867

  17. The Circadian expression of Piezo1, TRPV4, Connexin26, and VNUT, associated with the expression levels of the clock genes in mouse primary cultured urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Tatsuya; Mitsui, Takahiko; Nakamura, Yuki; Kanda, Mie; Tsuchiya, Sachiko; Kira, Satoru; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Norifumi; Hirayama, Yuri; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Yoichi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Nakao, Atsuhito; Takeda, Masayuki; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2017-09-07

    To investigate circadian gene expressions in the mouse bladder urothelium to establish an experimental model and study the functions of the circadian rhythm. The gene expression rhythms of the clock genes, mechano-sensors such as Piezo1 and TRPV4, ATP release mediated molecules (ARMM) such as Cx26 and VNUT were investigated in mouse primary cultured urothelial cells (UCs) of wild-type (WT) and Clock mutant (Clock Δ19 /Δ 19 ) mice using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting analysis. The long-term oscillation of the clock genes in UC was investigated by measuring bioluminescence from UC isolated from Period2 luciferase knock-in mice (Per2::luc) and Per2::luc with Clock Δ19 /Δ 19 using a luminometer. The mRNA expression rhythms after treatment with Clock short interfering RNA (siRNA) were also measured to compare differences between Clock point mutations and Clock deficiency. The UCs from WT mice showed the time-dependent gene expressions for clock genes, mechano-sensors, and ARMM. The abundances of the products of these genes also correlated with the mRNA expression rhythms in UCs. The bioluminescence of Per2::Luc in UCs showed a circadian rhythm. By contrast, all the gene expressions rhythms observed in WT mice were abrogated in the Clock Δ19 /Δ 19 mice. Transfection with Clock siRNA in UCs had the same effect as the Clock mutation. We demonstrated that the time-dependent gene expressions, including clock genes, mechano-sensors, and ARMM, were reproducible in UCs. These findings demonstrated that UCs have the potential to progress research into the circadian functions of the lower urinary tract regulated by clock genes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Long-term comparative outcomes of open versus laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for upper urinary tract urothelial-cell carcinoma after a median follow-up of 13 years*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Grant D; Humphries, Katie J; Cutress, Mark L; Riddick, Antony C P; McNeill, S Alan; Tolley, David A

    2011-08-01

    Open nephroureterectomy (ONU) rather than laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (LNU) is still regarded as the standard of care for extirpative surgical management of upper urinary tract urothelial-cell carcinoma (UUT-UCC). The longest published follow-up of LNU is 7 years. We report outcomes for patients having surgery ≥10 years ago. Consecutive patients with UUT-UCC who were treated with ONU (n=39) or LNU (n=23) between April 1992 to September 2000 were included. Preoperative, tumor, operative and postoperative characteristics, recurrence, and outcomes were collated. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median follow-up of censored patients was 163 months (13.6 y). Estimated mean overall survival (OS) was 111 months for ONU and 103 months for LNU. Mean progression free survival (PFS) was 175 months for ONU and 143 months for LNU. Probability of PFS at 10 years was 79% for ONU and 76% for LNU and was unchanged at 15 years. There was no significant difference between ONU and LNU in terms of OS (P=0.51, log-rank test), PFS (P=0.70) or cancer-specific survival (CSS; P=0.43). There were no prognostic differences between ONU and LNU after correcting for confounding variables. There was no increase in the probability of a bladder cancer recurrence from 10 to 15 years postoperation. Long-term follow-up of patients who were operated on more than 10 years ago suggests that LNU has oncologic equivalence to ONU because there were no significant differences in OS, PFS, or CSS between ONU and LNU patients followed for a median of 13 years.

  19. The dual effects of polar methanolic extract of Hypericum perforatum L. in bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseyo, U. O.; Nseyo, O. U.; Shiverick, K. T.; Medrano, T.; Mejia, M.; Stavropoulos, N.; Tsimaris, I.; Skalkos, D.

    2007-02-01

    g/ml) + light at 630nm induced DNA fragmentation in a light dose-dependent manner; in contrast, PMF or light alone did not induce DNA fragmentation. In separate experiments, PMF alone treatment produced a dose-dependent DNA synthesis with a 90% inhibition at a concentration of 25μg/ml (IC90 = 25μg/ml). Expression of p53 and p27 cell cycle regulatory proteins was not altered by PMF alone, however, a dose-dependent increase in p21 expression was observed that correlates with PMF concentrations. Cyclin A and cyclin B protein levels showed a clear decrease inverse to the concentration of PMF. In the absence of light treatment, flow cytometry analysis showed that PMF alone results in G 0/G I cell cycle arrest, with a 2-fold increase in G 0/G I cells concomitant with 50% decrease in cells in both S and G II/M phases. However, flow cytometry on PMF alone-treated cells did not show sub G 0/G I peak, further evidence of the lack of apoptosis as a mechanism of effect of PMF in the dark. Conclusions: With respect to light treatment, apoptosis appears to play a vital role in PDT-induced cytotoxicity. The flow cytometry and DNA laddering results revealed that T24 cells demonstrated apoptotic responses in PMF-mediated PDT. Experiments conducted with PMF alone showed a dose-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis associated with G 0/G I cell cycle arrest and the extract is able to coordinate changes in key cell cycle regulatory proteins in human bladder cancer cells. Both experimental conditions suggest PMF as a potent and effect anti-proliferative agent in cancer chemoprevention and therapy of human urothelial carcinoma cells.

  20. Corticotropin-releasing factor family peptide signaling in feline bladder urothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T.; Wolf-Johnston, Amanda; Roppolo, James R.; Tony Buffington, C. A.; Birder, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing (CRF) factor plays a central role in the orchestration of behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress. The family of CRF-related peptides (CRF and paralogs: Urocortin (Ucn) -I,-II and -III) and associated receptors (CRF-R1 and CRF-R2) are also expressed in peripheral tissues such as the skin and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Local signaling may exert multiple effects of stress-induced exacerbation of many complex syndromes including psoriasis and visceral hyperse...

  1. Microcystic Variant of Urothelial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Microcystic variant of urothelial carcinoma is one of the new variants of urothelial carcinoma that was added to the WHO classification in 2004. Aims. To review the literature on microcystic variant of urothelial carcinoma. Methods. Various internet search engines were used to identify reported cases of the tumour. Results. Microscopic features of the tumour include: (i Conspicuous intracellular and intercellular lumina/microcysts encompassed by malignant urothelial or squamous cells. (ii The lumina are usually empty; may contain granular eosinophilic debris, mucin, or necrotic cells. (iii The cysts may be variable in size; round, or oval, up to 2 mm; lined by urothelium which are either flattened cells or low columnar cells however, they do not contain colonic epithelium or goblet cells; are infiltrative; invade the muscularis propria; mimic cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis; occasionally exhibit neuroendocrine differentiation. (iv Elongated and irregular branching spaces are usually seen. About 17 cases of the tumour have been reported with only 2 patients who have survived. The tumour tends to be of high-grade and high-stage. There is no consensus opinion on the best option of treatment of the tumour. Conclusions. It would prove difficult at the moment to be dogmatic regarding its prognosis but it is a highly aggressive tumour. New cases of the tumour should be reported in order to document its biological behaviour.

  2. Thrombin induces macrophage migration inhibitory factor release and upregulation in urothelium: a possible contribution to bladder inflammation.

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    Pedro L Vera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed by urothelial cells that mediates bladder inflammation. We investigated the effect of stimulation with thrombin, a Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR1 agonist, on MIF release and MIF mRNA upregulation in urothelial cells.MIF and PAR1 expression was examined in normal human immortalized urothelial cells (UROtsa using real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting and dual immunostaining. MIF and PAR1 immunostaining was also examined in rat urothelium. The effect of thrombin stimulation (100 nM on urothelial MIF release was examined in UROtsa cells (in vitro and in rats (in vivo. UROtsa cells were stimulated with thrombin, culture media were collected at different time points and MIF amounts were determined by ELISA. Pentobarbital anesthetized rats received intravesical saline (control, thrombin, or thrombin +2% lidocaine (to block nerve activity for 1 hr, intraluminal fluid was collected and MIF amounts determined by ELISA. Bladder or UROtsa MIF mRNA was measured using real time RT-PCR.UROtsa cells constitutively express MIF and PAR1 and immunostaining for both was observed in these cells and in the basal and intermediate layers of rat urothelium. Thrombin stimulation of urothelial cells resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent increase in MIF release both in vitro (UROtsa; 2.8-fold increase at 1 hr and in vivo (rat; 4.5-fold while heat-inactivated thrombin had no effect. In rats, thrombin-induced MIF release was reduced but not abolished by intravesical lidocaine treatment. Thrombin also upregulated MIF mRNA in UROtsa cells (3.3-fold increase and in the rat bladder (2-fold increase where the effect was reduced (1.4-fold by lidocaine treatment.Urothelial cells express both MIF and PAR1. Activation of urothelial PAR1 receptors, either by locally generated thrombin or proteases present in the urine, may mediate bladder inflammation by inducing urothelial MIF release and

  3. Curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development by suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Binqiang; Zhao, Yingmei; Liang, Tao; Ye, Xuxiao; Li, Zuowei; Yan, Dongliang; Fu, Qiang; Li, Yonghui

    2017-08-01

    We have previously reported that curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development in a rat bladder carcinogenesis model. In this study, we report that curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development by suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Curcumin inhibits IGF2 expression at the transcriptional level and decreases the phosphorylation levels of IGF1R and IRS-1 in bladder cancer cells and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced urothelial tumor tissue. Ectopic expression of IGF2 and IGF1R, but not IGF1, in bladder cancer cells restored this process, suggesting that IGF2 is a target of curcumin. Moreover, introduction of constitutively active AKT1 abolished the inhibitory effect of curcumin on cell proliferation, migration, and restored the phosphorylation levels of 4E-BP1 and S6K1, suggesting that curcumin functions via suppressing IGF2-mediated AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In summary, our results reveal that suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway is one of the mechanisms of action of curcumin. Our findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy against human bladder cancer caused by aberrant activation of IGF2, which are useful for translational application of curcumin.

  4. A systematic analysis on DNA methylation and the expression of both mRNA and microRNA in bladder cancer.

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    Jialou Zhu

    Full Text Available DNA methylation aberration and microRNA (miRNA deregulation have been observed in many types of cancers. A systematic study of methylome and transcriptome in bladder urothelial carcinoma has never been reported.The DNA methylation was profiled by modified methylation-specific digital karyotyping (MMSDK and the expression of mRNAs and miRNAs was analyzed by digital gene expression (DGE sequencing in tumors and matched normal adjacent tissues obtained from 9 bladder urothelial carcinoma patients. We found that a set of significantly enriched pathways disrupted in bladder urothelial carcinoma primarily related to "neurogenesis" and "cell differentiation" by integrated analysis of -omics data. Furthermore, we identified an intriguing collection of cancer-related genes that were deregulated at the levels of DNA methylation and mRNA expression, and we validated several of these genes (HIC1, SLIT2, RASAL1, and KRT17 by Bisulfite Sequencing PCR and Reverse Transcription qPCR in a panel of 33 bladder cancer samples.We characterized the profiles between methylome and transcriptome in bladder urothelial carcinoma, identified a set of significantly enriched key pathways, and screened four aberrantly methylated and expressed genes. Conclusively, our findings shed light on a new avenue for basic bladder cancer research.

  5. Cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation as the mode of action for diuron-induced urothelial carcinogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Mitscheli S; Nascimento, Merielen G; Cardoso, Ana Paula F; de Lima, Patrícia L A; Zelandi, Edneia A; de Camargo, João Lauro V; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza C S

    2010-01-01

    Diuron, a substituted urea herbicide, is carcinogenic to the urinary bladder of rats at high dietary levels. Its proposed carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) includes urothelial cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative cell proliferation and sustained urothelial hyperplasia. Cytotoxicity could be induced either by urinary solids or by chemical toxicity by diuron and/or metabolites excreted in the urine. Diuron was not genotoxic in a previous single-cell gel (comet) assay, but possible cross-linking activity remained to be evaluated. The present study explored the MOA of diuron and the effect of urinary acidification on the development of urothelial lesions. Male Wistar rats were fed diuron (2500 ppm, about 130 mg/kg of body weight) either with or without NH(4)Cl 10,000 ppm to acidify the urine. Reversibility of urothelial changes was also examined. The animals were euthanized after 15, 25, or 30 weeks. Diuron-fed rats had urinary amorphous precipitate and magnesium ammonium phosphate crystals similar to control animals. Groups treated with diuron + NH(4)Cl showed decreased urinary pH and reduced amounts of urinary crystals and precipitate. Urothelial necrosis and simple hyperplasia were observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy both in diuron- and in diuron + NH(4)Cl-treated groups. Cytotoxicity and proliferative changes were mostly reversible. A modified comet assay developed in vitro with Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that diuron did not induce DNA cross-links. These data suggest that cytotoxicity with consequent regenerative cell proliferation is the predominant MOA for diuron rat urothelial carcinogenesis, the cytotoxicity being chemically induced and not due to urinary solids.

  6. Nuclear E-cadherin expression is associated with the loss of membranous E-cadherin, plasmacytoid differentiation and reduced overall survival in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Bastian; Wach, Sven; Kunath, Frank; Bertz, Simone; Taubert, Helge; Lehmann, Jan; Stöckle, Michael; Wullich, Bernd; Hartmann, Arndt

    2013-07-01

    Loss of E-cadherin represents a hallmark of plasmacytoid differentiation. We analyzed the effect of membranous E-cadherin loss and its nuclear accumulation in patients with locally advanced conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC) who were treated with radical cystectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. A total of 247 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were reviewed to detect histological variants of UC. Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin was performed and analyzed for membranous and nuclear expression. The correlation between E-cadherin expression and histology was assessed, and overall survival (OS) was analyzed with univariate and multivariate Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. Correlation of nuclear E-cadherin to tumor stage (pT), lymph node metastasis (pN), histologic subtype, and chemotherapy was performed by Fisher's exact test. Membranous and nuclear E-cadherin expression was strongly correlated to plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma (PUC) (p Nuclear accumulation was found in 47.6 % of PUCs, 10 % of MPCs, and 1.8 % of UCs. Sixty-two percent of all tumors with negative membranous E-cadherin expression and nuclear accumulation were PUCs (p = 0.035). In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, mean survival with nuclear E-cadherin expression was 31.9 months [95 % confidence interval (CI) 16.1-47.6] of patients without nuclear staining 61 months (95 % CI 53.5-67.7; p = 0.045). A univariate Cox regression analysis showed that nuclear E-cadherin accumulation was associated with a 2-fold increase in risk of death (95 % CI 1.03-4.06; p = 0.04). In multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusted to type of chemotherapy, tumor stage, and tumor grade, the hazard ratio for patients with nuclear E-cadherin was 2.03 (95 % CI 1.00-4.121; p = 0.050). Nuclear E-cadherin is associated with PUCs and is suggested to be an independent prognostic factor in advanced UC.

  7. Histopathological characterization of a syngeneic orthotopic murine bladder cancer model

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    Daher C. Chade

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We developed and characterized by histopathology and immunohistochemistry a syngeneic murine bladder tumor model derived from the MB49 tumor cell line. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bladder tumor implantation was achieved by intravesical instillation of 5 x 10(5 MB49 tumor cells in C57BL/6 mice. A chemical lesion of the bladder was performed in order to promote intravesical tumor implantation. The bladder wall lesion was accomplished by transurethral instillation of silver nitrate (AgNO3. After 15 days, the animals were sacrificed, examined macroscopically for intravesical tumor and bladder weight. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed using cytokeratin 7 (CK7, carcinoembrionic antigen (Dako-CEA, p53 and c-erbB2 oncoprotein (Her2/neu. RESULTS: Twenty-nine out of 30 animals (96.7% developed intravesical tumors in a 15-day period. Macroscopically, the mean bladder weight was 0.196g (0.069-0.538g, 10 to 15 times the normal bladder weight. The immunohistochemical analysis showed significant membrane expression of CEA and CK7: a similar finding for human urothelial cancer. We also characterized absence of expression of p53 and anti-Her2/neu in the murine model. CONCLUSIONS: High tumor take rates were achieved by using the chemical induction of the bladder tumor. Although electric cauterization is widely described in the literature for syngeneic orthotopic animal models, the technique described in this study represents an alternative for intravesical bladder tumor implantation. Moreover, the histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis of the murine bladder tumor model derived from the MB49 cell line showed a resemblance to human infiltrating urothelial carcinoma, allowing clinical inference from experimental immunotherapy testing.

  8. Molecular analysis of urothelial cancer cell lines for modeling tumor biology and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, M L; Witte, N; Im, K M; Turan, S; Owens, C; Misner, K; Tsang, S X; Cai, Z; Wu, S; Dean, M; Costello, J C; Theodorescu, D

    2017-01-05

    The utility of tumor-derived cell lines is dependent on their ability to recapitulate underlying genomic aberrations and primary tumor biology. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 25 bladder cancer (BCa) cell lines and compared mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs), gene expression and drug response to BCa patient profiles in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We observed a mutation pattern associated with altered CpGs and APOBEC-family cytosine deaminases similar to mutation signatures derived from somatic alterations in muscle-invasive (MI) primary tumors, highlighting a major mechanism(s) contributing to cancer-associated alterations in the BCa cell line exomes. Non-silent sequence alterations were confirmed in 76 cancer-associated genes, including mutations that likely activate oncogenes TERT and PIK3CA, and alter chromatin-associated proteins (MLL3, ARID1A, CHD6 and KDM6A) and established BCa genes (TP53, RB1, CDKN2A and TSC1). We identified alterations in signaling pathways and proteins with related functions, including the PI3K/mTOR pathway, altered in 60% of lines; BRCA DNA repair, 44%; and SYNE1-SYNE2, 60%. Homozygous deletions of chromosome 9p21 are known to target the cell cycle regulators CDKN2A and CDKN2B. This loci was commonly lost in BCa cell lines and we show the deletions extended to the polyamine enzyme methylthioadenosine (MTA) phosphorylase (MTAP) in 36% of lines, transcription factor DMRTA1 (27%) and antiviral interferon epsilon (IFNE, 19%). Overall, the BCa cell line genomic aberrations were concordant with those found in BCa patient tumors. We used gene expression and copy number data to infer pathway activities for cell lines, then used the inferred pathway activities to build a predictive model of cisplatin response. When applied to platinum-treated patients gathered from TCGA, the model predicted treatment-specific response. Together, these data and analysis represent a valuable community resource to model basic tumor biology and to study

  9. Pure Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma Originating from the Urinary Bladder

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    Takashi Nagai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder (LELCB is a rare variant of infiltrating urothelial carcinoma. We report a case of LELCB in a 43-year-old man. Ultrasonography and cystoscopy revealed two bladder tumors, one on the left side of the trigone and the other on the right side of the trigone. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumors was performed and pathological analysis revealed undifferentiated carcinoma. We therefore performed radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Immunohistochemically the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, but negative for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization as found for previous cases of LELCB. The final pathological diagnosis was a lymphoepithelioma-like variant of urothelial carcinoma with perivesical soft tissue invasion. For adjuvant systemic chemotherapy, three courses of cisplatin were administered. The patient subsequently became free of cancer 72 months postoperatively. Based on the literature, pure or predominant LELCB types show favorable prognoses due to their sensitivity to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. An analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values of bladder tumors examined in our institution revealed that the ADC value measured for this LELCB was relatively low compared to conventional urothelial carcinomas. This suggests that measuring the ADC value of a lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma prior to operation may be helpful in predicting LELCB.

  10. An uncommon manifestation of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with high grade urothelial, carcinoma with squamous differentiation: A case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yaofeng; Chen, Shouzhen; Chen, Songyu; Song, Jing; Chen, Fan; Guo, Hu; Shang, Zhenhua; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Changkuo; Shi, Benkang

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are rare disorders associated with malignant tumours, which are triggered by autoimmune reactions. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is the PNS type most commonly associated with ovarian and breast cancer. Two bladder cancers manifesting in PCD were previously reported. However, the cancers in these cases had poor outcomes. Here, we present a 68-year old man with history of high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. The patient suffered from persistent cerebellar ataxia accompanied by bladder cancer recurrence five months after transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBt). Laboratory screening for the specific antibodies of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes revealed no positive results. Symptoms were not remitted after a 7-day-course of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. To our surprise, the patient recovered fully after laparoscopic radical cystectomy. Postoperative pathology revealed that surgical specimens were urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder. The patient remained asymptomatic and there was no evidence of recurrence after the followup period of 11 months. To our knowledge, this is the third report of PCD in a patient with bladder cancer. This case showed that tumour resection cured the PCD. To assist clinical evaluation and management, literature regarding basic PNS characteristics and bladder cancers was reviewed

  11. Differential effects of selective frankincense (Ru Xiang) essential oil versus non-selective sandalwood (Tan Xiang) essential oil on cultured bladder cancer cells: a microarray and bioinformatics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Frankincense (Boswellia carterii, known as Ru Xiang in Chinese) and sandalwood (Santalum album, known as Tan Xiang in Chinese) are cancer preventive and therapeutic agents in Chinese medicine. Their biologically active ingredients are usually extracted from frankincense by hydrodistillation and sandalwood by distillation. This study aims to investigate the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of frankincense and sandalwood essential oils in cultured human bladder cancer cells. Methods The effects of frankincense (1,400–600 dilutions) (v/v) and sandalwood (16,000–7,000 dilutions) (v/v) essential oils on cell viability were studied in established human bladder cancer J82 cells and immortalized normal human bladder urothelial UROtsa cells using a colorimetric XTT cell viability assay. Genes that responded to essential oil treatments in human bladder cancer J82 cells were identified using the Illumina Expression BeadChip platform and analyzed for enriched functions and pathways. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results Human bladder cancer J82 cells were more sensitive to the pro-apoptotic effects of frankincense essential oil than the immortalized normal bladder UROtsa cells. In contrast, sandalwood essential oil exhibited a similar potency in suppressing the viability of both J82 and UROtsa cells. Although frankincense and sandalwood essential oils activated common pathways such as inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 signaling), each essential oil had a unique molecular action on the bladder cancer cells. Heat shock proteins and histone core proteins were activated by frankincense essential oil, whereas negative regulation of protein kinase activity and G protein-coupled receptors were activated by sandalwood essential oil treatment. Conclusion The effects of frankincense and sandalwood essential oils on J82 cells and UROtsa cells involved different mechanisms leading to

  12. Dual ligand/receptor interactions activate urothelial defenses against uropathogenic E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Mémet, Sylvie; Saban, Ricardo; Kong, Xiangpeng; Aprikian, Pavel; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-01-01

    During urinary tract infection (UTI), the second most common bacterial infection, dynamic interactions take place between uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and host urothelial cells. While significant strides have been made in the identification of the virulence factors of UPEC, our understanding of how the urothelial cells mobilize innate defenses against the invading UPEC remains rudimentary. Here we show that mouse urothelium responds to the adhesion of type 1-fimbriated UPEC by rapidly activating the canonical NF-κB selectively in terminally differentiated, superficial (umbrella) cells. This activation depends on a dual ligand/receptor system, one between FimH adhesin and uroplakin Ia and another between lipopolysaccharide and Toll-like receptor 4. When activated, all the nuclei (up to 11) of a multinucleated umbrella cell are affected, leading to significant amplification of proinflammatory signals. Intermediate and basal cells of the urothelium undergo NF-κB activation only if the umbrella cells are detached or if the UPEC persistently express type 1-fimbriae. Inhibition of NF-κB prevents the urothelium from clearing the intracellular bacterial communities, leading to prolonged bladder colonization by UPEC. Based on these data, we propose a model of dual ligand/receptor system in innate urothelial defenses against UPEC. PMID:26549759

  13. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Liu, Ke J. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Lau, Serrine S. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Gandolfi, A.J., E-mail: wnek@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  14. Are mast cells still good biomarkers for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Marianne; Regauer, Sigrid; Welter, JoEllen; Eberhard, Jakob; Viereck, Volker

    2015-06-01

    ESSIC identifies mast cell infiltrates of detrusor muscle as a diagnostic criterion for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. However, an increased mast cell count is also characteristic of overactive bladder syndrome. The lack of uniformity in mast cell detection methods hampers data comparison. Using state-of-the-art techniques we investigated whether mast cells differ among bladder conditions. We analyzed bladder biopsies from 56 patients, including 31 with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with (12) or without (19) Hunner lesions, 13 with overactive bladder syndrome and 12 without bladder symptoms to determine the quantity, location, distribution and activation of mast cells using immunohistochemistry with anti-mast cell tryptase. Patients were allocated to study groups by key bladder symptoms commonly used to define conditions (pain and major urgency). Subepithelial mast cell localization (p interstitial cystitis with Hunner lesions. The optimal cutoff of 32 detrusor mast cells per mm(2) achieved only 68% accuracy with 38% positive predictive value. No difference was observed between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis without Hunner lesions and overactive bladder syndrome. Patient groups differed in lymphocyte infiltration (p = 0.001), nodular lymphocyte aggregates (p interstitial cystitis with Hunner lesions. Detrusor mastocytosis had poor predictive value for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Mast cell assessment did not distinguish bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis without Hunner lesions from overactive bladder syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression of RFC/SLC19A1 is associated with tumor type in bladder cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M; El-Zeiry, Maha I; Mahran, Laila G; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; Rady, Mona H; Rohde, Jan; Mostageer, Marwa; Spahn-Langguth, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) ranks ninth in worldwide cancer. In Egypt, the pattern of bladder cancer is unique in that both the transitional and squamous cell types prevail. Despite much research on the topic, it is still difficult to predict tumor progression, optimal therapy and clinical outcome. The reduced folate carrier (RFC/SLC19A1) is the major transport system for folates in mammalian cells and tissues. RFC is also the primary means of cellular uptake for antifolate cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, however, membrane transport of antifolates by RFC is considered as limiting to antitumor activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression level of RFC/SLC19A1 in urothelial and non-urothelial variants of bladder carcinomas. Quantification of RFC mRNA in the mucosa of 41 untreated bladder cancer patients was performed using RT-qPCR. RFC mRNA steady-state levels were ∼9-fold higher (N = 39; PRFC upregulation was strongly correlated with tumor type (urothelial vs. non-urothelial; pRFC mRNA expression was significantly (pRFC mRNA levels were not associated with tumor grade (I, II and III) or stage (muscle-invasive vs. non-muscle invasive) implying that RFC cannot be used for prognostic purposes in bladder carcinomas and its increased expression is an early event in human bladder tumors pathogenesis. Further, RFC can be considered as a potential marker for predicting response to antifolate chemotherapy in urothelial carcinomas.

  16. PDT-induced apoptosis in bladder carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachor, Ruediger; Reich, Ella D.; Kleinschmidt, Klaus; Repassy, Denes; Hautmann, Richard E.

    1999-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a highly efficient inducer of apoptosis in EY-28 bladder carcinoma cells, resulting in extensive DNA fragmentation. Bladder carcinoma cells EY-28 (Tumorbank Heidelberg, Germany) were incubated for 1 h with 1 (mu) g AamTPPn/ml or 2 (mu) g AamTPPn/ml. After incubation cells were refed with complete medium and irradiated with 0.75 J/cm2. To identify apoptotic cells, a in situ cell death detection kit POD (Boehringer Mannheim, Germany) was used. The chromatin condensation characteristic to apoptotic cells was detected by transmission electron microscopy. Using 1 (mu) g AamTPPn/ml and 2 (mu) g AamTPPn/ml (9-Acetamido-2,7,12,17- tetra-n-Porpylporphycene), respectively, and irradiation at 0.75 J/cm2, a percentage of 36.9% and 54.7%, respectively, of apoptotic cells was detected.

  17. Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group: 2011 consensus guidelines for curative radiotherapy for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindson, Benjamin R.; Turner, Sandra L.; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2012-01-01

    Curative radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, is recognized as a standard treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. It is commonly used for two distinct groups of patients: either for those medically unfit for surgery, or as part of a 'bladder preserving' management plan incorporating the possibility of salvage cystectomy. However, in both situations, the approach to radiotherapy varies widely around the world. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group recognised a need to develop consistent, evidence-based guidelines for patient selection and radiotherapy technique in the delivery of curative radiotherapy. Following a workshop convened in May 2009, a working party collated opinions and conducted a wide literature appraisal linking each recommendation with the best available evidence. This process was subject to ongoing re-presentation to the Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group members prior to final endorsement. These Guidelines include patient selection, radiation target delineation, dose and fractionation schedules, normal tissue constraints and investigational techniques. Particular emphasis is given to the rationale for the target volumes described. These Guidelines provide a consensus-based framework for the delivery of curative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Widespread input from radiation oncologists treating bladder cancer ensures that these techniques are feasible in practice. We recommend these Guidelines be adopted widely in order to encourage a uniformly high standard of radiotherapy in this setting, and to allow for better comparison of outcomes.

  18. Impact of Methadone on Cisplatin Treatment of Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Marta; Schultze-Seemann, Susanne; Kuckuck, Irina; Katzenwadel, Arndt; Wolf, Philipp

    2018-03-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for advanced bladder cancer. Since many tumor cells show inherent or acquired cisplatin resistance, research is needed to improve the therapeutic efficacy. Since the analgesic methadone is discussed as being a sensitizer for chemotherapy, we tested its effects on the cisplatin treatment of bladder cancer cells. T24 and HT-1376 bladder cancer cells were incubated with cisplatin in combination with methadone. Cytotoxicity was examined using the WST-1 viability assay and induction of apoptosis was analyzed via phase-contrast microscopy, flow cytometry, and western blot analysis. Methadone was shown to enhance the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on T24 cells based on the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, HT-1376 cells were identified as non-responders to methadone. Methadone could act as a chemosensitizer in the future treatment of advanced bladder cancer. Further research is needed to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Peristomal pagetoid spread of urothelial carcinoma of the ureter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Ito

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with ostomy including urinary stoma often develop peristomal complications, especially skin damage. The patient in this case was a 69-year old female with a history of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and left ureter who underwent transurethral resection of a bladder tumor, nephroureterectomy and cystectomy combined with ureterocutaneostomy. Later, she had recurrence of urothelial carcinoma in the remaining ureter that spread to the peristomal epidermis, with a skin appearance resembling Paget’s disease. We report this case based on its clinical significance since we believe it is the first description of this condition in the literature.

  20. A Case of Giant Bladder Carcinosarcoma without Submucosal Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Zaitsu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinosarcoma is a rare biphasic neoplasia containing both malignant mesenchymal and epithelial elements. Bladder carcinosarcoma commonly presented as high-grade, advanced stage, and aggressive behavior with a poor prognosis. An 83-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria to our hospital. Cystoscopy revealed massive nonpapillary bladder tumor on the right wall. The 91 g tumor could be completely removed with transurethral resection. Histology of the tumor was diagnosed as carcinosarcoma with no submucosal invasion composed of biphasic malignant epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Epithelial malignancy was urothelial cancer and mesenchymal one was chondrosarcoma and leiomyosarcoma. The specimens taken at the second-look TUR-Bt revealed that carcinoma in situ (urothelial cancer but not sarcoma existed at the mucosa surrounding the previous tumor site. 80 mg of BCG instillation intravesically every week for six weeks was successfully administered to the patient. There is no tumor recurrence for 6 months after treatments.

  1. Pathogenesis of acute radiation effects in the urinary bladder. Experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, W.; Eckhardt, M.; Ehme, A.; Koi, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Purpose: The present review summarizes experimental studies of the pathogenesis of acute radiation-induced changes in urinary bladder function. Material and methods: Transurethral cystometry was used for longitudinal assessment of bladder function in mice. With this technique, radition-induced changes in storage capacity can be quantified. In histological studies, changes in urothelial cell density and in urothelial protein expression during the acute radiation response were determined. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used for the treatment of acute functional changes. Results: The histological studies did not reveal any systematic fluctuations in urothelial cell density during the time of the acute radiation response. However, characteristic changes in the expression of proteins associated with urothelial cell function, differentiation and cell contact were observed, which correlated with the functional impairment. By local or systemical application of ASA, a significant restoration of bladder function compared to placebo treatment could be achieved. Conclusion: Acute functional radiation effects in the urinary bladder are not based on urothelial denudation. However, changes in protein expression indicate an impairment of the urothelial barrier function. The results of ASA treatment demonstrate that prostaglandins are involved in the response. Alterations in urothelial or endothelial prostaglandin metabolism may be primarily radiation-induced or secondary because of the impaired urothelial barrier. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Die vorliegende Arbeit soll tierexperimentelle Ergebnisse zur Pathogenese akuter Funktionsstoerungen der Harnblase nach Bestrahlung zusammenfassen. Material und Methoden: Transurethrale zystometrische Messungen dienen zur longitudinalen Erfassung der Harnblasenfunktion bei der Maus. Mit dieser Methode koennen strahlenbedingte Stoerungen der Speicherkapazitaet quantifiziert werden. In histologischen Untersuchungen wurden Veraenderungen in der

  2. A phase II monocentric study of oxaliplatin in combination with gemcitabine (GEMOX) in patients with advanced/metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urothelial tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, C; Bidault, F; Bouvet-Forteau, N; Abdelatif, M; Fizazi, K; di Palma, M; Wibault, P; de Crevoisier, R; Laplanche, A

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the activity and the safety of the gemcitabine-oxaliplatin (GEMOX) combination as first-line treatment in advanced/metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urothelial tract. Patients with metastatic or unresectable TCC, PS TCC with minimal toxicity and needs to be evaluated in a selected population of unfit patients and compared with other non-cisplatin-containing regimens.

  3. Transitional cell carcinoma developing in a bladder diverticulum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography confirmed a left-sided narrow neck urinary bladder diverticulum, with wall thickening, in a 56-year-old man. These findings were initially detected on ultrasonographic investigation. Transitional cell carcinoma was confirmed histologically. There is an increased incidence of neoplastic transformation in ...

  4. Management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. C G Waihenya, P N Mungai. Abstract. No Abstract. East African Medical Journal Vol. 83 (12) 2006: pp. 679-683. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  5. Squamous Cell Papilloma of the Urinary Bladder Endoscopically Mimicking Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimosthenis Miliaras

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell lesions of the urinary bladder are generally rare. Herein we describe a case of 74-year-old male patient with a benign squamous cell papilloma. Histologically, the tumor presented extensive keratinization at its surface and showed no nuclear atypia or stromal invasion. The tumor cells were negative for HPV DNA. These lesions are extremely rare, and even though they are considered benign and non-HPV related, they should be followed, since recurrence has been reported.

  6. Thrombomodulin expression regulates tumorigenesis in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Te; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Lin, Paul- Yang; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potential tumor markers will help improve therapeutic planning and patient management. Thrombomodulin (TM) is a sensitive urothelial marker. TM was reported to be one of the endogenous anti-metastatic factors and has diagnostic and prognostic values for the progression of carcinoma. In the present study, we examine the role of TM in bladder cancer. We studied the role of TM in tumor behavior and related signaling pathways in vitro using the human bladder cancer cell lines HT1376, HT1197, J82 and T24, and in vivo using animal models. We also selected clinical specimens from 100 patients with bladder cancer for immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the predictive capacity of TM in tumor invasiveness. The data revealed that positive immunoreactivity for TM was inversely correlated with clinical stage and DNA methyltransferase 1 immunoreactivity. Decreased TM expression could predict the aggressive tumor growth and advanced clinical stage in bladder cancer. When TM was inhibited, tumor growth rate and invasion ability were augmented in vitro and in vivo. The underlying changes included increased cell proliferation, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB activation significantly increased TM expression and attenuated tumor aggressiveness in bladder cancer. TM plays an important role in bladder cancer tumor aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo and is a clinically significant predictor that may represent a suitable therapeutic target for bladder cancer

  7. miR-34a Inhibits Proliferation and Invasion of Bladder Cancer Cells by Targeting Orphan Nuclear Receptor HNF4G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaibin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available miR-34a is a member of the miR-34 family and acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. This study explored the regulative role of miR-34a on an orphan nuclear receptor HNF4G, which has a well-confirmed role in bladder tumor growth and invasion. qRT-PCR analysis was applied to measure miR-34a expression in two tumorigenic bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and T24 and one normal human urothelial cell line SV-HUC-1. Luciferase assay was performed to verify the putative binding between miR-34a and HNF4G. The influence of miR-34a-HNF4G axis on cell viability, colony formation, and invasion was assessed with loss- and gain-of-function analysis. This study observed that the miR-34a expressions in 5637 and T24 cells were significantly lower than in SV-HUC-1, while the muscle invasive cell sublines 5637-M and T24-M had even lower miR-34a expression than in the nonmuscle invasive sublines. HNF4G has a 3′-UTR binding site with miR-34a and is a direct downstream target of miR-34a. miR-34a can directly downregulate the expression of HNF4G and thus inhibit tumor cell viability, colony formation, and invasion. Therefore, miR-34a-HNF4G axis is an important pathway modulating cell viability, proliferation, and invasion of bladder cancer cells.

  8. Study of Proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and Angiogenesis in Urothelial neoplasms: Correlation with tumor grade and stage

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    Poojan Agarwal

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: PCNA and CD31 when used together are valuable markers to help classify urothelial neoplasms in limited tumor material. However, larger prospective studies are required for better prognostication.

  9. Abnormal Akt signalling in bladder epithelial cell explants from patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome can be induced by antiproliferative factor treatment of normal bladder cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Susan K; Zhang, Chen-Ou

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether protein kinase B (Akt) signalling and secretion of specific downstream effector proteins are abnormal in specific cell fractions of bladder epithelial cells from patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), as explanted bladder epithelial cells from patients with IC/BPS produce a frizzled 8-related glycopeptide antiproliferative factor (APF) that inhibits normal bladder epithelial cell proliferation and expression of several proteins known to be regulated by Akt signalling. A related secondary objective was to determine whether treatment of normal bladder epithelial cells with active synthetic asialo-antiproliferative factor (as-APF) induces similar changes in Akt signalling and specific downstream effector proteins/mRNAs. Cell proteins were extracted into four subcellular fractions from primary bladder epithelial explants of six patients who fulfilled modified National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) criteria for IC/BPS and six age- and gender-matched controls. Total and/or phosphorylated cellular Akt, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), and β-catenin; total cellular JunB; and secreted matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) levels were determined by Western blot. MMP2, JunB, p53, uroplakin 3 (UPK3), and β-actin mRNAs were quantified by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Akt activity was determined by nonradioactive assay. IC/BPS cells had lower Akt activity, along with lower Akt ser473- and GSK3β ser9-phosphorylation and higher β-catenin ser33,37/thr41-phosphorylation in specific fractions as compared with matched control cells. IC/BPS explants also had evidence of additional downstream abnormalities compared with control cells, including lower nuclear JunB; lower secreted MMP2 and HB-EGF; plus lower MMP2, JunB, and UPK3 mRNAs but higher p53 mRNA relative to β-actin. Each of these IC

  10. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudino, Mário Angelo; Leiria, Luiz Osório Silveira; da Silva, Fábio Henrique; Alexandre, Eduardo Costa; Renno, Andre; Mónica, Fabiola Zakia; de Nucci, Gilberto; Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto; Antunes, Edson; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Franco-Penteado, Carla Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS). Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g). Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM), relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM) and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM), KCl (1 mM-300mM), CaCl2 (1μM-100mM), α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz) were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM) was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder. SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo), compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron) and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol) agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration. Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections

  11. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Angelo Claudino

    Full Text Available Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD, include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking.Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS.Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g. Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM, relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM, KCl (1 mM-300mM, CaCl2 (1μM-100mM, α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder.SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo, compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration.Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections

  12. TERT Promoter Mutations Occur Early in Urothelial Neoplasia and are Biomarkers of Early Disease and Disease Recurrence in Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinde, Isaac; Munari, Enrico; Faraj, Sheila F.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Schoenberg, Mark; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Allaf, Mohamad; Springer, Simeon; Wang, Yuxuan; Diaz, Luis A.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Netto, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations occur in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene in 66% of muscle-invasive urothelial carcinomas. To explore their role in bladder cancer development, and to assess their utility as urine markers for early detection, we sequenced the TERT promoter in 76 well-characterized papillary and flat noninvasive urothelial carcinomas, including 28 pTa low-grade (pTa LG) transitional cell carcinomas (TCC), 31 pTa high-grade (pTa HG) TCCs, and 17 pTis carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesions. We also evaluated the sequence of the TERT promoter in a separate series of 14 early bladder neoplasms and matched follow-up urine samples to determine if urine TERT status was an indicator of disease recurrence. A high rate of TERT promoter mutation was observed in both papillary and flat lesions, as well as in low- and high-grade noninvasive urothelial neoplasms (mean: 74%). Additionally, among patients whose tumors harbored TERT promoter mutations, the same mutations were present in follow-up urines in seven of eight patients that recurred but in none of 6 patients that did not recur (P <0.001). TERT promoter mutations occur in both papillary and flat lesions, are the most frequent genetic alterations identified to date in noninvasive precursor lesions of the bladder, are detectable in urine, and appear to be strongly associated with bladder cancer recurrence. These provocative results suggest that TERT promoter mutations may offer a useful urinary biomarker, for both early detection and monitoring of bladder neoplasia. PMID:24121487

  13. Molecular Diagnosis in Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Zuiverloon (Tahlita)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEpidemiologyBladder cancer (BC) is the most prevalent type of urothelial cancer and is associated with thehighest costs of all cancer types due to intensive patient surveillance. Because bladder tumorsfrequently recur, patients need to be monitored extensively [1-4]. Incidence increases

  14. Low Grade Lymphoma Mimicking Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma: When Do We Need Further Histologic Staging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azka Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder often present with metastases to regional lymph nodes, with lymphadenopathy on physical examination or radiographic imaging. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 73-year-old Caucasian man with presumed metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder to regional pelvic and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. He underwent systemic chemotherapy for treatment of urothelial carcinoma and was discovered on restaging to have findings suggestive of disease progression but ultimately was found to have a concurrent secondary malignancy. Conclusion. Our case suggests that in patients with urothelial carcinoma, the concurrent presentation of regional lymphadenopathy may not be metastatic urothelial carcinoma and may warrant further investigation.

  15. The current status and clinical value of circulating tumor cells and circulating cell-free tumor DNA in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethdorf, Sabine; Soave, Armin; Rink, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) is a complex disease, which is associated with highly aggressive tumor biologic behavior, especially in patients with muscle-invasive and advanced tumors. Despite multimodal therapy options including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, UCB patients frequently suffer from poor clinical outcome. Indeed, the potential of diverse opportunities for modern targeted therapies is not sufficiently elucidated in UCB yet. To improve the suboptimal treatment situation in UCB, biomarkers are urgently needed that help detecting minimal residual disease (MRD), predicting therapy response and subsequently prognosis as well as enabling patient stratification for further therapies and therapy monitoring, respectively. To date, decision making regarding treatment planning is mainly based on histopathologic evaluation of biopsies predominantly derived from the primary tumors and on clinical staging. However, both methods are imperfect for sufficient outcome prediction. During disease progression, individual disseminated tumor cells and consecutively metastases can acquire characteristics that do not match those of the corresponding primary tumors, and often are only hardly assessable for further evaluation. Therefore, during recent years, strong efforts were directed to establish non-invasive biomarkers from liquid biopsies. Urine cytology and serum tumor markers have been established for diagnostic purposes, but are still insufficient as universal biomarkers for decision-making and treatment of UCB patients. To date, the clinical relevance of various newly established blood-based biomarkers comprising circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating cell-free nucleic acids or tumor-educated platelets is being tested in cancer patients. In this review we summarize the current state and clinical application of CTCs and circulating cell-free tumor DNA originating from blood as biomarkers in patients with different UCB stages.

  16. The current status and clinical value of circulating tumor cells and circulating cell-free tumor DNA in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soave, Armin; Rink, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) is a complex disease, which is associated with highly aggressive tumor biologic behavior, especially in patients with muscle-invasive and advanced tumors. Despite multimodal therapy options including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, UCB patients frequently suffer from poor clinical outcome. Indeed, the potential of diverse opportunities for modern targeted therapies is not sufficiently elucidated in UCB yet. To improve the suboptimal treatment situation in UCB, biomarkers are urgently needed that help detecting minimal residual disease (MRD), predicting therapy response and subsequently prognosis as well as enabling patient stratification for further therapies and therapy monitoring, respectively. To date, decision making regarding treatment planning is mainly based on histopathologic evaluation of biopsies predominantly derived from the primary tumors and on clinical staging. However, both methods are imperfect for sufficient outcome prediction. During disease progression, individual disseminated tumor cells and consecutively metastases can acquire characteristics that do not match those of the corresponding primary tumors, and often are only hardly assessable for further evaluation. Therefore, during recent years, strong efforts were directed to establish non-invasive biomarkers from liquid biopsies. Urine cytology and serum tumor markers have been established for diagnostic purposes, but are still insufficient as universal biomarkers for decision-making and treatment of UCB patients. To date, the clinical relevance of various newly established blood-based biomarkers comprising circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating cell-free nucleic acids or tumor-educated platelets is being tested in cancer patients. In this review we summarize the current state and clinical application of CTCs and circulating cell-free tumor DNA originating from blood as biomarkers in patients with different UCB stages. PMID:29354496

  17. Growth inhibitory effects of quercetin on bladder cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Feugang, Jean Magloire; Konarski, Patricia; Wang, Jian; Lu, Jianzhong; Fu, Shengjun; Ma, Baoliang; Tian, Binqiang; Zou, Changping; Wang, Zhingping

    2006-09-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in many fruits and vegetables, belongs to an extensive class of polyphenolic compounds. Previous studies reported that quercetin inhibits the proliferation of various cancer cells and tumor growth in animal models. We investigated the growth inhibition and colony formation of quercetin on three bladder cancer cells (EJ, J82 and T24). The expression of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes such as P53, Survivin, PTEN, as well as the methylation status of these genes was also evaluated. We observed that quercetin induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Quercetin (100 micromolars) significantly inhibited EJ, T24 and J82 cell growth accompanied by an increase in the G0/G1 phase. In all cell lines, quercetin decreased the expression of mutant P53 and Survivin proteins. However, there was no change in the level of PTEN protein. Moreover, the DNA methylation levels of the estrogen receptor (Er-beta), P16INK4a and RASSF1A were strongly decreased (from 35 to 70%) in the quercetin-treated group compared to the control. In conclusion, our study suggested that quercetin inhibits growth, colony formation and hypermethylation of bladder cancer cell lines. Quercetin-induced apoptosis might be associated with a decrease in mutant P53 and Survivin proteins.

  18. The nested variant of urothelial carcinoma arising in a fibroepithelial polyp: Report of a case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadira Mamoon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nested variant of urothelial carcinoma is a rare but very important histological entity due to its deceptively bland-looking appearance and aggressive behavior. We present a case of a 30-year-old man who was found to have a solitary polypoid growth in the bladder. It was resected and found to be a fibroepithelial polyp; a rare entity in itself, harboring the above tumor. The lesion also showed a second population of scattered bizarre stromal cells. To our knowledge, this is the first instance of a nested variant of urothelial carcinoma arising in a fibroepithelial polyp. The presence of atypical stromal cells has also not been described previously.

  19. CXCL1-Mediated Interaction of Cancer Cells with Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Promotes Tumor Progression in Human Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Miyake

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs are reported to be associated with poor prognosis, depending on their pro-tumoral roles. Current knowledge of TAMs and CAFs in the tumor microenvironment of urothelial cancer of the bladder (UCB is limited. Therefore, we investigated the paracrine effect induced by TAMs and CAFs in the tumor microenvironment of human UCB. For this, we first carried out immunohistochemical analysis for CXCL1, CD204 (TAM marker, αSMA (CAF marker, E-cadherin, and MMP2 using 155 UBC tissue samples. Next, CXCL1-overexpressing clones of THP-1-derived TAMs and NIH3T3-derived CAFs were developed by lentiviral vector infection. The immunohistochemical study showed high CXCL1 levels in UCB cells to be associated with enhanced recruitment of TAMs/CAFs, higher metastatic potential, and poor prognosis. Three-dimensional (3D co-culture of UCB cells and TAMs/CAFs suggested that CXCL1 production in TAMs/CAFs play an important role in cell-to-cell adhesion and interaction among cancer cells and these stromal cells. CXCL1-expressing TAMs/CAFs enhanced tumor growth of subcutaneous UCB tumors in nude mice when injected together. In addition, an experiment using the orthotopic bladder cancer model revealed that CXCL1 production in TAMs/CAFs supported tumor implantation into the murine bladder wall and UCB growth when injected together, which was confirmed by clinical data of patients with bladder cancer. Thus, CXCL1 signaling in the tumor microenvironment is highly responsible for repeated intravesical recurrence, disease progression, and drug resistance through enhanced invasion ability. In conclusion, disrupting CXCL1 signaling to dysregulate this chemokine is a promising therapeutic approach for human UCB.

  20. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathologic spectrum of a series of 14 cases emphasizing diagnostic dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Santosh; Goyal, Pankaj; Suryawanshi, Pallavi; Tongaonkar, Hemant; Joshi, Amit; Bakshi, Ganesh; Desai, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Paraganglioma (PG) of the urinary bladder is a rare neuroendocrine neoplasm, accounting for bladder tumours. Distinction from urothelial carcinoma is imperative as management and prognosis vary markedly. In this report, we describe our experience with the histopathology of paragangliomas of the urinary bladder with emphasis on the histologic features that have led to their being misdiagnosed as conventional urothelial cancer and, most importantly, those that will help pathologists recognize this rare tumor of the bladder. All cases of PG of urinary bladder diagnosed at our institute from 2002-2012 were retrieved and diagnosis confirmed in accordance with WHO classification. Clinical and treatment details were obtained from hospital medical records. Fourteen cases of PG of urinary bladder including 5 consult cases were analysed. These included 11 transurethral resections ± partial cystectomies, 2 partial cystectomies and 1 radical cystectomy. Two out of the 5 consult cases had been submitted with a diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma and 1 with that of a rhabdomyosarcoma. Age ranged from 15-84 years (median, 43 years) with a male to female ratio of 1:2.5. Presenting symptoms were haematuria, dysuria and flank pain; only 1 case had antecedent hypertension. Histologically, typical 'zellballen' (72%), diffuse (21%) and ribbon-like (7%) growth patterns amidst a richly vascularised stroma were seen. Muscularis propria invasion and necrosis was present in 72% and 21%, respectively. Substantial cautery artifacts led to misdiagnosis in the 3 erroneous cases. Tumour cells were positive for chromogranin, synaptophysin; sustentacular cells were S-100 positive. Follow up was available in 6 patients; median follow-up was 29 months (8-120 months). One patient developed distant metastasis in cervical lymph node 10 years after diagnosis; remaining were alive without evidence of disease. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder is a rare tumor and may be misdiagnosed as urothelial cancer

  1. Metabolism and toxicity of arsenic in human urothelial cells expressing rat arsenic (+3 oxidation state)-methyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobna, Zuzana; Waters, Stephen B.; Devesa, Vicenta; Harmon, Anne W.; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    The enzymatic methylation of inorganic As (iAs) is catalyzed by As(+3 oxidation state)-methyltransferase (AS3MT). AS3MT is expressed in rat liver and in human hepatocytes. However, AS3MT is not expressed in UROtsa, human urothelial cells that do not methylate iAs. Thus, UROtsa cells are an ideal null background in which the role of iAs methylation in modulation of toxic and cancer-promoting effects of this metalloid can be examined. A retroviral gene delivery system was used in this study to create a clonal UROtsa cell line (UROtsa/F35) that expresses rat AS3MT. Here, we characterize the metabolism and cytotoxicity of arsenite (iAs III ) and methylated trivalent arsenicals in parental cells and clonal cells expressing AS3MT. In contrast to parental cells, UROtsa/F35 cells effectively methylated iAs III , yielding methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs) containing either As III or As V . When exposed to MAs III , UROtsa/F35 cells produced DMAs III and DMAs V . MAs III and DMAs III were more cytotoxic than iAs III in UROtsa and UROtsa/F35 cells. The greater cytotoxicity of MAs III or DMAs III than of iAs III was associated with greater cellular uptake and retention of each methylated trivalent arsenical. Notably, UROtsa/F35 cells were more sensitive than parental cells to the cytotoxic effects of iAs III but were more resistant to cytotoxicity of MAs III . The increased sensitivity of UROtsa/F35 cells to iAs III was associated with inhibition of DMAs production and intracellular accumulation of MAs. The resistance of UROtsa/F35 cells to moderate concentrations of MAs III was linked to its rapid conversion to DMAs and efflux of DMAs. However, concentrations of MAs III that inhibited DMAs production by UROtsa/F35 cells were equally toxic for parental and clonal cell lines. Thus, the production and accumulation of MAs III is a key factor contributing to the toxicity of acute iAs exposures in methylating cells

  2. Comprehensive genomic profiling of 295 cases of clinically advanced urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder reveals a high frequency of clinically relevant genomic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Kai; Khaira, Depinder; Ali, Siraj M; Fisher, Huge A G; Mian, Badar; Nazeer, Tipu; Elvin, Julia A; Palma, Norma; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Philip J; Subbiah, Vivek; Pal, Sumanta K

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, the authors present a comprehensive genomic profile (CGP)-based study of advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC) designed to detect clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGAs). DNA was extracted from 40 µm of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 295 consecutive cases of recurrent/metastatic UC. CGP was performed on hybridization-captured, adaptor ligation-based libraries to a mean coverage depth of 688X for all coding exons of 236 cancer-related genes plus 47 introns from 19 genes frequently rearranged in cancer, using process-matched normal control samples as a reference. CRGAs were defined as GAs linked to drugs on the market or currently under evaluation in mechanism-driven clinical trials. All 295 patients assessed were classified with high-grade (International Society of Urological Pathology classification) and advanced stage (stage III/IV American Joint Committee on Cancer) disease, and 294 of 295 patients (99.7%) had at least 1 GA on CGP with a mean of 6.4 GAs per UC (61% substitutions/insertions/deletions, 37% copy number alterations, and 2% fusions). Furthermore, 275 patients (93%) had at least 1 CRGA involving 75 individual genes with a mean of 2.6 CRGAs per UC. The most common CRGAs involved cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) (34%), fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) (21%), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) (20%), and ERBB2 (17%). FGFR3 GAs were diverse types and included 10% fusions. ERBB2 GAs were equally divided between amplifications and substitutions. ERBB2 substitutions were predominantly within the extracellular domain and were highly enriched in patients with micropapillary UC (38% of 32 cases vs 5% of 263 nonmicropapillary UC cases; P<.0001). Using a CGP assay capable of detecting all classes of GA simultaneously, an extraordinarily high frequency of CRGA was identified in a large series of patients with advanced UC. Cancer 2016;122:702-711. © 2015 American

  3. Paclitaxel with Cisplatin as Salvage Treatment for Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urothelial Tract

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    Ji Eun Uhm

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of paclitaxel with cisplatin as salvage therapy in patients previously treated with gemcitabine and cisplatin (G/C for advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urothelial tract. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with metastatic or locally advanced TCC who had received prior G/C chemotherapy were enrolled. All patients received paclitaxel (175 mg/m2 and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for eight cycles or until disease progression. RESULTS: The median age was 61 years (range, 43–83 years, and the median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1 (range, 0–2. The overall response rate was 36% [95% confidence interval (95% CI = 18–54], with three complete responses and seven partial responses. The median time to progression was 6.2 months (95% CI = 3.9–8.5, and the median overall survival was 10.3 months (95% CI = 6.1–14.1. The most common Grade 3/4 nonhematologic and hematologic toxicities were emesis (10 of 28 patients; 36% and neutropenia (5 of 110 cycles; 5%. CONCLUSIONS: Salvage chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin displayed promising results with tolerable toxicity profiles in patients with metastatic or locally advanced TCC who had been pretreated with G/C.

  4. Identification of nine genomic regions of amplification in urothelial carcinoma, correlation with stage, and potential prognostic and therapeutic value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Chekaluk

    Full Text Available We performed a genome wide analysis of 164 urothelial carcinoma samples and 27 bladder cancer cell lines to identify copy number changes associated with disease characteristics, and examined the association of amplification events with stage and grade of disease. Multiplex inversion probe (MIP analysis, a recently developed genomic technique, was used to study 80 urothelial carcinomas to identify mutations and copy number changes. Selected amplification events were then analyzed in a validation cohort of 84 bladder cancers by multiplex ligation-dependent probe assay (MLPA. In the MIP analysis, 44 regions of significant copy number change were identified using GISTIC. Nine gene-containing regions of amplification were selected for validation in the second cohort by MLPA. Amplification events at these 9 genomic regions were found to correlate strongly with stage, being seen in only 2 of 23 (9% Ta grade 1 or 1-2 cancers, in contrast to 31 of 61 (51% Ta grade 3 and T2 grade 2 cancers, p<0.001. These observations suggest that analysis of genomic amplification of these 9 regions might help distinguish non-invasive from invasive urothelial carcinoma, although further study is required. Both MIP and MLPA methods perform well on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded DNA, enhancing their potential clinical use. Furthermore several of the amplified genes identified here (ERBB2, MDM2, CCND1 are potential therapeutic targets.

  5. Isolated Meningeal Recurrence of Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Butchart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal carcinomatosis occurs in 1–18% of patients with solid tumours, most commonly carcinomas of the breast and lung or melanomas. There are relatively few reports of meningeal carcinomatosis in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Isolated meningeal recurrence is particularly uncommon, and we present an unusual case of this in a 58-year-old man. The case was further complicated by the somewhat atypical presentation with a confirmed ischaemic stroke. The patient died one month after presentation.

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 enhances NF-kappaB activation in Escherichia coli-stimulated urinary bladder cells through TLR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial cells of the urinary tract recognize pathogenic bacteria through pattern recognition receptors on their surface, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs, and mount an immune response through the activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. Some uropathogenic bacteria can subvert these cellular responses, creating problems with how the host eliminates pathogens. Lactobacillus is a genus of lactic acid bacteria that are part of the microbiota and consist of many probiotic strains, some specifically for urogenital infections. Immunomodulation has emerged as an important mode of action of probiotic and commensal lactobacilli and given the importance of epithelial cells, we evaluated the effect of the urogenital probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 on epithelial immune activation. Results Immune activation through the NF-kappaB pathway was initiated by stimulation of T24 urothelial cells with heat-killed Escherichia coli and this was further potentiated when cells were co-cultured with live L. rhamnosus GR-1. Heat-killed lactobacilli were poor activators of NF-kappaB. Concomitant stimulation of bladder cells with E. coli and L. rhamnosus GR-1 increased the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF, whereas IL-6 and CXCL8 levels were reduced. Another probiotic, L. rhamnosus GG, was also able to potentiate NF-kappaB in these cells although at a significantly reduced level compared to the GR-1 strain. The transcript numbers and protein levels of the lipopolysaccharide receptor TLR4 were significantly increased after co-stimulation with E. coli and lactobacilli compared to controls. Furthermore, inhibition of TLR4 activation by polymixin B completely blocked the lactobacilli potentiation of NF-kappaB. Conclusions The immunological outcome of E. coli challenge of bladder cells was influenced by probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1, by enhancing the activation of NF-kappaB and TNF release. Thus the urogenital probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1

  7. Prognostic factors in non-muscle-invasive bladder tumors - I. Clinical prognostic factors: A review of the experience of the EORTC genito-urinary group - II. Biologic prognostic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurth, Karl-Heinz; Sylvester, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To summarize the most important clinical prognostic factors of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, as assessed by the European organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Genito-Urinary Group, to present biologic markers involved in urothelial cell carcinoma, and to address

  8. Mutational profiles of Brenner tumors show distinctive features uncoupling urothelial carcinomas and ovarian carcinoma with transitional cell histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfarr, Nicole; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Leichsenring, Jonas; Taube, Eliane; Boxberg, Melanie; Braicu, Ioana; Jesinghaus, Moritz; Penzel, Roland; Endris, Volker; Noske, Aurelia; Weichert, Wilko; Schirmacher, Peter; Denkert, Carsten; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2017-10-01

    Brenner tumors (BT) are rare ovarian tumors encompassing benign, borderline, and malignant variants. While the histopathology of BTs and their clinical course is well described, little is known about the underlying genetic defects. We employed targeted next generation sequencing to analyze the mutational landscape in a cohort of 23 BT cases (17 benign, 2 borderline, and 4 malignant) and 3 ovarian carcinomas with transitional cell histology (TCC). Copy number variations (CNV) were validated by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative PCR-based copy number assays. Additionally, we analyzed the TERT promotor region by conventional Sanger sequencing. We identified 25 different point mutations in 23 of the analyzed genes in BTs and 10 mutations in 8 genes in TCCs. About 57% percent of mutations occurred in genes involved in cell cycle control, DNA repair, and epigenetic regulation processes. All TCC cases harbored TP53 mutations whereas all BTs were negative and none of the mutations observed in BTs were present in TCCs. CNV analysis revealed recurrent MDM2 amplifications in 3 out of 4 of the malignant BT cases with one case harboring a concomitant amplification of CCND1. No mutations were observed in the TERT promoter region in BTs and TCCs, which is mutated in about 50%-75% of urothelial carcinoma and in 16% of ovarian clear-cell carcinomas. In conclusion, our study highlights distinct genetic features of BTs, and detection of the triplet phenotype MDM2 amplification/TP53 wt/TERT wt may aid diagnosis of malignant BT in difficult cases. Moreover, selected genetic lesions may be clinically exploitable in a metastatic setting. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Urothelial cancers following radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Seiji; Hasumi, Masaru; Sato, Jin; Mayuzumi, Takuji; Kumasaka, Fuminari; Shimizu, Toshihiro.

    1996-01-01

    Some reports have indicated that bladder cancer is induced by radiation therapy for cervical cancer. We encountered 6 cases of urothelial cancer (5 cases of bladder cancer and 1 case of ureter cancer) following radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Age at the time of diagnosis of cervical cancer ranged from 38 to 66 years, and the average was 51.2±11.0 (S.D.) years old. Age at the time of diagnosis of urothelial cancer ranged from 53 to 83 years, and the average was 67.5±10.3 years old. The interval between the diagnosis of cervical cancer and urothelial cancer ranged from 3 to 25 years, averaging 16.3 years. It is impossible to evaluate the risk of development of urothelial cancer after radiation therapy based on our data. However, it is important to make an effort to diagnose urothelial cancer at an early stage by educating patients (e.g., advising regular urine tests) after the follow-up period to cervical cancer. (author)

  10. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. Photo induced hexylaminolevulinate destruction of rat bladder cells AY-27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Gederaas, Odrun Arna; Helander, Linda; Hjelde, Astrid; Melø, Thor Bernt; Johnsson, Anders

    2011-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is of increasing interest as a relevant treatment for human urinary bladder cancer. In the present experiments, the rat bladder transitional carcinoma cell line AY-27 was used as a model to study cell destruction mechanisms induced by PDT. Red LED light (630 nm) PDT with hexylaminolevulinate (HAL) as precursor for the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) was used in treatment of the cells. Flow cytometry with fluorescent markers annexin V, propidium iodide and YO-PRO-1, as well as MTT assay and confocal microscopy, were used to map cell inactivation after PDT. Dark toxicity of HAL alone was low in these procedures and LD(50) (24 h, MTT assay) was approximately 1.6 J cm(-2) for standard red light (LED) irradiation (36 mW cm(-2)). Measurements done 1 h after HAL-PDT showed a maximum apoptotic level of about 10% at 6 J cm(-2), however the dominating mode of cell death was necrosis. Forward light scattering indicated an increase in cell size at low doses, possibly due to necrosis. Survival curves had a dual-slope shape, a fit to single hit, multi-target approximation gave a parameter estimate of n = 10 and D(0) about 2.6 J cm(-2). Replacing continuous light with fractionated light delivery (45 s light/60 s darkness) did not affect the treatment outcome.

  12. Expression of cell cycle regulators, 14-3-3σ and p53 proteins, and vimentin in canine transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Bonnet, Alejandro; Herráez, Pedro; Aguirre, Maria; Suárez-Bonnet, Elena; Andrada, Marisa; Rodríguez, Francisco; Espinosa de Los Monteros, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The study of the expression of 14-3-3σ, p53, and vimentin proteins in canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) evaluating differences with normal bladder tissues, and the association with clinicopathological variables. We analyze by immunohistochemistry in 19 canine TCCs the expression of 14-3-3σ, p53, and vimentin using monoclonal antibodys. A semiquantitative scoring method was employed and statistical analysis was performed to display relationships between variables. In contrast to normal urinary bladder epithelium, which showed high levels of 14-3-3σ, its expression was decreased in 53% of the studied tumors (P = 0.0344). The 14-3-3σ protein was expressed by neoplastic emboli and by highly infiltrative neoplastic cells. The p53 protein was expressed in 26% of TCCs, but no significant association between 14-3-3σ and p53 was detected. Neoplastic epithelial cells displayed vimentin immunoreactivity in 21% of TCCs, and a positive correlation with mitotic index was observed (P = 0.042). Coexpression of vimentin and 14-3-3σ by highly infiltrative neoplastic cells was also observed. 14-3-3σ is deregulated in canine TCCs and its expression by highly infiltrative tumor cells may be related to the acquisition of aggressive behavior. Furthermore, this article reinforce the role of canine TCC as relevant model of human urothelial carcinoma and we suggest 14-3-3σ as a potential therapeutic target. Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of 14-3-3σ in canine TCC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of liposome in treatment of overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ya Hung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical (local therapy of agents has been effective in delaying or preventing recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. This route of drug administration has also shown tremendous promise in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS and overactive bladder without systemic side effects. Liposomes are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core. They can incorporate drug molecules, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic, and show greater uptake into cells via endocytosis. Intravesical liposomes have therapeutic effects on IC/PBS patients, mainly because of their ability to form a protective lipid film on the urothelial surface. Recent studies have shown the sustained efficacy and safety of intravesical instillation of botulinum toxin formulated with liposomes (lipo-BoNT for the treatment of refractory overactive bladder This review considers the current status of intravesical liposomes or liposomal mediated drug delivery for the treatment of IC/PBS and overactive bladder.

  14. Surgical management of bladder transitional cell carcinoma in a vesicular diverticulum: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of a bladder diverticum along with a literature review. A 55-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria. A histological diagnosis of TCC within a bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopical examination. Initially transurethral resection of bladder tumour with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy followed. As a result of recurrence and in view of bladder-sparing therapy, a distal partial cystectomy was performed. This report demonstrates that conservative bladder-sparing treatment can be achieved and subsequently followed by vigilant cystoscopy.

  15. Surgical management of bladder transitional cell carcinoma in a vesicular diverticulum: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of a bladder diverticum along with a literature review. A 55-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria. A histological diagnosis of TCC within a bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopical examination. Initially transurethral resection of bladder tumour with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy followed. As a result of recurrence and in view of bladder-sparing therapy, a distal partial cystectomy was performed. This report demonstrates that conservative bladder-sparing treatment can be achieved and subsequently followed by vigilant cystoscopy.

  16. Frequency of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells in peripheral blood in relation to urinary bladder cancer malignancy indicators before and after surgical removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwicki, Wojciech; Brożyna, Anna A; Siekiera, Jerzy; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2016-03-08

    Tumor cells communicate with stromal cells, including cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), to form microenvironment inhibiting immune responses. Regulatory T cells (Tregs, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) stimulate immune tolerance and facilitate tumor progression. We analyzed the changes in Treg frequencies assessed using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of patients with urothelial bladder cancer before and after tumor-removal. Changes in Treg frequency were investigated in relation to clinicopathomorphological indicators of tumor malignancy and expression of RCAS1 on CAFs and TAMs. Higher Treg frequencies were observed in early phase of tumor growth (pTa-pT2), in larger tumors, with more aggressive type of invasion, and with expression of RCAS1. The later phase of tumor development, accompanied by a nonclassic differentiations and pT3-pT4 advancement, had lower number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and lower Treg frequency. Furthermore, in pT2-pT4 tumors, a decreased post-surgery Treg frequency was associated with poorer prognosis: patients with the lowest frequency of Tregs died first. These findings strongly suggest that the Treg frequencies at later phase of tumor growth, associated with a low anti-tumor response, represent a new and important prognostic indicator in urinary bladder cancer.

  17. Gender-specific differences in cancer-specific survival after radical cystectomy for patients with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder in pathologic tumor stage T4a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias; Bastian, Patrick J; Brookman-May, Sabine; Fritsche, Hans-Martin; Tilki, Derya; Otto, Wolfgang; Bolenz, Christian; Gilfrich, Christian; Trojan, Lutz; Herrmann, Edwin; Moritz, Rudolf; Tiemann, Arne; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Buchner, Alexander; Stief, Christian G; Wieland, Wolf F; Höfner, Thomas; Hohenfellner, Markus; Haferkamp, Axel; Roigas, Jan; Zacharias, Mario; Nuhn, Philipp; Burger, Maximilian

    2013-10-01

    Bladder cancer (UCB) staged pT4a show heterogeneous outcome after radical cystectomy (RC). No risk model has been established to date. Despite gender-specific differences, no comparative studies exist for this tumor stage. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) of 245 UCB patients without neoadjuvant chemotherapy staged pT4a, pN0-2, M0 after RC were analyzed in a retrospective multi-center study. Seventeen patients were excluded from further analysis due to carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the prostatic urethra and/or positive surgical margins. Average follow-up period was 30 months (IQR: 14-45). The influence of different clinical and histopathologic variables on CSS was determined through uni- and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Two risk groups were generated using factors with independent effect in multivariate models. Internal validity of the prediction model was evaluated by bootstrapping. Eighty-four percent of the patients (n = 192) were male; 72% (n = 165) showed lymphovascular invasion (LVI). The 5-year CSS rate was 31%, and significantly different between male and female (35% vs. 15%, P = 0.003). Multivariate Cox regression modeling, female gender (HR = 1.83, P = 0.008), LVI (HR = 1.92, P = 0.005), and absence of adjuvant chemotherapy (HR = 0.61, P = 0.020) significantly worsened CSS. Two risk groups were generated using these 3 criteria, which differed significantly between each other in CSS (5-year-CSS: 46% vs. 12%, P < 0.001). The c-index value of the risk model was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.53-0.68, P < 0.001). Prognosis in UCB staged pT4a is heterogeneous. Female gender and LVI are adverse factors. Adjuvant chemotherapy seems to improve outcome. The present analysis establishes the first risk model for this demanding tumor stage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An epigenetic marker panel for recurrence risk prediction of low grade papillary urothelial cell carcinoma (LGPUCC) and its potential use for surveillance after transurethral resection using urine

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado, Leonel; Brait, Mariana; Michailidi, Christina; Munari, Enrico; Driscoll, Tina; Schultz, Luciana; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Schoenberg, Mark; Sidransky, David; Netto, George J; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul

    2014-01-01

    By a candidate gene approach, we analyzed the promoter methylation (PM) of 8 genes (ARF, TIMP3, RAR-β2, NID2, CCNA1, AIM1, CALCA and CCND2) by quantitative methylation specific PCR (QMSP) in the DNA of 17 non-recurrent and 19 recurrent noninvasive low grade papillary urothelial cell carcinoma (LGPUCC) archival tissues. Among the genes tested, by establishing an empiric cutoff value, CCND2, CCNA1, NID2, and CALCA showed higher frequency of methylation in recurrent than in non-recurrent LGPUCC:...

  19. OPIUM USE IN TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF THE URINARY BLADDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nourbakhsh

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Opium use is one of the most common forms of substance abuse in Iran and there are some evidence indicating it is a risk factor of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder. The majority of opium users are also cigarette smokers, so consideration of the high prevalence of smoking which is the most important risk factor of TCC of the urinary bladder among opium users is essential to assess the role of opium use as a possible risk factor of TCC. This study was done to evaluate the role of opium as a risk factor of TCC. A case-control study was performed on 255 individuals diagnosed with TCC of the urinary bladder by pathologic light microscopic examination of the tumor biopsies. Control population was chosen from individuals who had no history or presenting signs or symptoms of urinary problems. Case and control groups were matched by sex and age and also by cigarette smoking habits. Forty-one (18.1% of the cases and 12 (5% of controls were recognized to be opium users. Mantel-Haenszel analysis showed an odds ratio of 3.88, with 95% confidence interval of 1.99-7.57 and P value of < 0.001. Results indicate that opium use is a risk factor for TCC. The majority of opium users are also cigarette smokers, which is another important risk factor for TCC. Routine urine cytology and early evaluation in the patients presenting with any of the symptoms of urinary bladder malignancy by means of cystoscopy and urine cytology are highly recommended.

  20. Associations between arsenic species in exfoliated urothelial cells and prevalence of diabetes among residents of Chihuahua, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Jenna M; Ishida, María C; González-Horta, Carmen; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; Ballinas-Casarrubias, Lourdes; Gutiérrez-Torres, Daniela S; Cerón, Roberto Hernández; Morales, Damián Viniegra; Terrazas, Francisco A Baeza; Del Razo, Luz M; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G; Saunders, R Jesse; Drobná, Zuzana; Fry, Rebecca C; Matoušek, Tomáš; Buse, John B; Mendez, Michelle A; Loomis, Dana; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    A growing number of studies link chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) with the risk of diabetes. Many of these studies assessed iAs exposure by measuring arsenic (As) species in urine. However, this approach has been criticized because of uncertainties associated with renal function and urine dilution in diabetic individuals. Our goal was to examine associations between the prevalence of diabetes and concentrations of As species in exfoliated urothelial cells (EUC) as an alternative to the measures of As in urine. We measured concentrations of trivalent and pentavalent iAs methyl-As (MAs) and dimethyl-As (DMAs) species in EUC from 374 residents of Chihuahua, Mexico, who were exposed to iAs in drinking water. We used fasting plasma glucose, glucose tolerance tests, and self-reported diabetes diagnoses or medication to identify diabetic participants. Associations between As species in EUC and diabetes were estimated using logistic and linear regression, adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index. Interquartile-range increases in trivalent, but not pentavalent, As species in EUC were positively and significantly associated with diabetes, with ORs of 1.57 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.07) for iAsIII, 1.63 (1.24, 2.15) for MAsIII, and 1.31 (0.96, 1.84) for DMAsIII. DMAs/MAs and DMAs/iAs ratios were negatively associated with diabetes (OR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.83 and OR = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.96, respectively). Our data suggest that uncertainties associated with measures of As species in urine may be avoided by using As species in EUC as markers of iAs exposure and metabolism. Our results provide additional support to previous findings suggesting that trivalent As species may be responsible for associations between diabetes and chronic iAs exposure.

  1. A rare bladder cancer - small cell carcinoma: review and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB is rare, highly aggressive and diagnosed mainly at advanced stages. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy. The origin of the disease is unknown; however the multipotent stem cell theory applies best to this case. Histology and immunohistochemistry shows a tumour which is indistinguishable from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. Coexistence of SCCB with other types of carcinoma is common. The staging system used is the TNM-staging of bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The treatment is extrapolated from that of SCLC. However, many patients with SCCB undergo radical resection which is rarely performed in SCLC. Patients with surgically resectable disease ( or = cT4bN+M+ should be managed with palliative chemotherapy based on neuroendocrine type regimens comprising a platinum drug (cisplatin in fit patients. The prognosis of the disease is poor mainly in the case of pure small cell carcinoma. Other research programs are needed to improve the outcome of SCCB.

  2. TREATMENT EFFECTS OF WST11 VASCULAR TARGETED PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY IN UROTHELIAL CELL CARCINOMA AND FEASIBILITY, SAFETY, AND LONG TERM OUTCOMES IN THE UPPER URINARY TRACT OF SWINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Katie S; Winter, Ashley G; Corradi, Renato Beluco; LaRosa, Stephen; Jebiwott, Sylvia; Somma, Alexander; Takaki, Haruyuki; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sebastien; Kim, Kwanghee; Scherz, Avigdor; Coleman, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Surgical management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma requires removal of kidney and ureter, compromising renal function. Non-surgical alternatives have potentially prohibitive safety concerns. We examine the feasibility and safety of ablation of the ureter and renal pelvis using endoluminal vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy in a porcine model and report efficacy of WST11 vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy in a murine model. Materials and Methods Following approval, we performed 28 endoluminal ablations in the ureters and renal pelvis of 18 swine. Intravenous infusion of WST11 (4mg/kg) followed by laser illumination (10 minutes) was performed via percutaneous access or retrograde ureteroscopic approach. Animals were followed clinically with laboratory testing, imaging and histology was evaluated at several post-ablation time points. A murine xenograft was created with the 5637 human urothelial cell carcinoma line to determine sensitivity to this therapy. Results At 24 hours, 50 mW/cm laser fluence produced superficial necrosis of the ureter and deeper necrosis (penetrating the muscularis propria or adventitia) was produced by treatment with 200 mW/cm in the ureter and renal pelvis. At 4 weeks, superficial urothelium had regenerated over the treatment site. No symptomatic obstruction, clinically relevant hydronephrosis, or abnormality of lab testing was noted up to 4 weeks. In mice, 80% had no evidence of tumor at 19 days after WST11 vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy. Conclusions Urothelial cell carcinoma appears to be sensitive to WST11 vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy. Depth of WST11 vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy treatment effects can be modulated in a dose-dependent manner by titration of light intensity. Moreover, this treatment modality, applied to the porcine upper urinary tract, is feasible via antegrade and retrograde access. PMID:26860792

  3. Effect of sirolimus on urinary bladder cancer T24 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Paula A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirolimus is recently reported to have antitumour effects on a large variety of cancers. The present study was performed to investigate sirolimus's ability to inhibit growth in T24 bladder cancer cells. Methods T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of sirolimus. MTT assay was used to evaluate the proliferation inhibitory effect on T24 cell line. The viability of T24 cell line was determined by Trypan blue exclusion analysis. Results Sirolimus inhibits the growth of bladder carcinoma cells and decreases their viability. Significant correlations were found between cell proliferation and sirolimus concentration (r = 0.830; p Conclusion Sirolimus has an anti-proliferation effect on the T24 bladder carcinoma cell line. The information from our results is useful for a better understanding sirolimus's anti-proliferative activity in the T24 bladder cancer cell line.

  4. Bladder Cancer Stem-Like Cells: Their Origin and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohishi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BC, the most common cancer arising from the human urinary tract, consists of two major clinicopathological phenotypes: muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC and non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. MIBC frequently metastasizes and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. A certain proportion of patients with metastatic BC can achieve a remission with systemic chemotherapy; however, the disease relapses in most cases. Evidence suggests that MIBC comprises a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs, which may be resistant to these treatments and may be able to form new tumors in the bladder or other organs. Therefore, the unambiguous identification of bladder CSCs and the development of targeted therapies are urgently needed. Nevertheless, it remains unclear where bladder CSCs originate and how they are generated. We review recent studies on bladder CSCs, specifically focusing on their proposed origin and the possible therapeutic options based on the CSC theory.

  5. Construction and evaluation of urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To design and construct a urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes and to compare the viability and proliferative activity of cell-seeded extracellular matrix scaffolds cultured in the bioreactor with conventional static growth conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A urinary bladder bioreactor was designed and constructed to replicate physiologic bladder dynamics. The bioreactor mimicked the filling pressures of the human bladder by way of a cyclical low-delivery pressure regulator. In addition, cell growth was evaluated by culturing human urothelial cells (UCs) on porcine extracellular matrix scaffolds in the bioreactor and in static growth conditions for 5 consecutive days. The attachment, viability, and proliferative potential were assessed and compared with quantitative viability indicators and by fluorescent markers for intracellular esterase activity and plasma membrane integrity. Scaffold integrity was characterized with scanning electron microscopy and 4\\

  6. Telomerase activity, cytokeratin 20 and cytokeratin 19 in urine cells of bladder cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsi, Mohamed I; Youssef, Amany I; Hassouna, Mohamed E E; El-Sedafi, Amal S; Ghazal, Abeer A; Zaher, Ebtessam R

    2006-03-01

    This work aims to search for markers suitable for the screening of bladder cancer, which should be specific, sensitive, reproducible, non-invasive and at acceptable cost. The study included 50 patients diagnosed as bladder cancer (35 TCC, 15 SCC) of different stages and grades, 30 patients with various urothelial diseases, besides 20 apparently healthy subjects of matched age and sex to the malignant group. A random midstream urine sample was collected in a sterile container for the determination of telomerase by RT-PCR, keratin 19 by ELSA CYFRA 21-1 IRMA kit, keratin 20 by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining, and urine cytology. For all parameters (telomerase, K19, K20 and cytology) the malignant group was significantly different from both the benign and the control groups. None of the four studied parameters was correlated to the stage of the disease, and when it comes to grade, only K19 showed a significant positive correlation with grade both in TCC and SCC. When ROC curves for all parameters were compared, K19 had the largest area under the curve, and then comes K20. K 19 may be used as a biological marker for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. K19 could not be used for differential diagnosis of different types of bladder cancer, meanwhile it could be a marker for differentiation that decreases in less differentiated tumors. As a tumor marker, K20 reflects inability to differentiate tumor type or grade in TCC, while in SCC of the bladder it is correlated with the grade. As a method, RT-PCR is superior to immunostaining for the detection of bladder cancer, meanwhile K20 immunohistochemistry (IHC) results were much better than urine cytology as a bladder cancer screening test. Haematuria and inflammation reduced the specificity of telomerase assay, which reduced its validity as a tumor marker of bladder cancer. K19 and K20 are the best candidates as screening tests for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, representing the highest sensitivity and specificity

  7. Telomerase Activity, Cytokeratin 20 and Cytokeratin 19 in Urine Cells of Bladder Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsi, M.I.; Youssef, A.I.; El-Sedafi, A.S.; Ghazal, A.A.; Zaher, E.R.; Hassouna, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Aim of the Study: This work aims to search for markers suitable for the screening of bladder cancer, which should be specific, sensitive, reproducible, non-invasive and at acceptable cost. Patients and Methods: The study included 50 patients diagnosed as bladder cancer (35 TCC, 15 SCC) of different stages and grades, 30 patients with various urothelial diseases, besides 20 apparently healthy subjects of matched age and sex to the malignant group. A random midstream urine sample was collected in a sterile container for the determination of telomerase by RT-PCR, keratin 19 by ELSA CYFRA 21-1 IRMA kit, keratin 20 by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining, and urine cytology. Results: For all parameters (telomerase, K19, K20 and cytology) the malignant group was significantly different from both the benign and the control groups. None of the four studied parameters was correlated to the stage of the disease, and when it comes to grade, only KI9 showed a significant positive correlation with grade both in TCC and SCe. When ROC curves for all parameters were compared, K 19 had the largest area under the curve, and then comes K20 . o Conclusion: K 19 may be used as a biological marker for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. K 19 could not be used for differential diagnosis of different types of bladder cancer, meanwhile it could be a marker for differentiation that decreases in less differentiated tumors. As a tumor marker, K20 reflects inability to differentiate tumor type or grade in TCC, while in SCC of the bladder it is correlated with the grade. As a method, RT-PCR is superior to immunostaining for the detection of bladder cancer, meanwhile K20 immunohistochemistry ([HC) results were much better than urine cytology as a bladder cancer screening test. haematuria and inflammation reduced the specificity of telomerase assay, which reduced its validity as a tumor marker of bladder cancer. K 19 and K20 are the best candidates as screening tests for the diagnosis of bladder

  8. The granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine against metastatic bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-tong Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The MB49 bladder cancer cell vaccine was effective against bladder cancer in the mice model in previous studies. However, part of the tumors regrew as the vaccine could not eliminate the cancer stem cells (CSCs. MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs were isolated by a combination of the limited dilution method and the serum free culture medium method. MCSCs possessed higher expression of CD133, CD44, OCT4, NANOG, and ABCG2, the ability of differentiation, higher proliferative abilities, lower susceptibility to chemotherapy, greater migration in vitro, and stronger tumorigenic abilities in vivo. Then streptavidin–mouse granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor (SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine was prepared. SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine extended the survival of the mice and inhibited the growth of tumor in protective, therapeutic, memorial and specific immune response experiments. The level of immunoglobulin G and the ratio of dendritic cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were highest in the experimental group when compared to those in other four control groups, as well as for the cytotoxicity assay. We demonstrated that SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine induces an antitumor immune response to metastatic bladder cancer.

  9. Stem Cell Therapy for Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aram; Shin, Dong-Myung; Choo, Myung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a disease characterized by pelvic pain, usually with urinary frequency. These symptoms make patients suffer from a poor quality of life. However, there is still a lack of consensus on the pathophysiology and curable treatment of IC/BPS. We have reviewed several candidates for the pathophysiology of this disease and also treatments that have been used. Although several oral medications, bladder instillation therapies, fulguration for Hunner's lesion, and hydrodistention have been tried as IC/BPS treatments, their outcomes have not been satisfactory. As the application of stem cell therapy is expanding into the urologic field, innovative strategies have been tested with animal models of IC/BPS and have shown promising therapeutic effects for reversing the symptoms of this disorder. Although several concerns about stem cell sources and their safety should be addressed before initiating human clinical trials, we introduce stem cell therapy as a valuable future treatment approach for IC/BPS.

  10. Olaparib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Urothelial Cancer With DNA-Repair Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Abnormal DNA Repair; ATM Gene Mutation; ATR Gene Mutation; BAP1 Gene Mutation; BARD1 Gene Mutation; BLM Gene Mutation; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; BRIP1 Gene Mutation; CHEK1 Gene Mutation; CHEK2 Gene Mutation; FANCC Gene Mutation; FANCD2 Gene Mutation; FANCE Gene Mutation; FANCF Gene Mutation; MEN1 Gene Mutation; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma; MLH1 Gene Mutation; MSH2 Gene Mutation; MSH6 Gene Mutation; MUTYH Gene Mutation; NPM1 Gene Mutation; PALB2 Gene Mutation; PMS2 Gene Mutation; POLD1 Gene Mutation; POLE Gene Mutation; PRKDC Gene Mutation; RAD50 Gene Mutation; RAD51 Gene Mutation; SMARCB1 Gene Mutation; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma AJCC v7; STK11 Gene Mutation; Urothelial Carcinoma

  11. Urology and nephrology update: bladder and kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, David C; Fox, Cara-Louise

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that bladder and kidney cancers would be diagnosed in approximately 140,000 Americans in 2013, with approximately 30,000 dying from these cancers. Urinary tract cancers affect men more commonly than they do women, and the median age at diagnosis is 65 years. Major risk factors for these cancers include tobacco smoking, certain chemical exposures, family history, age, and obesity. Unexplained hematuria in adults should be evaluated to exclude bladder and kidney cancer. Staging of bladder and kidney cancer should be based on the TNM staging system, which, along with tumor grade, provides important treatment and prognostic information. Urothelial cell carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer; it also can occur in the kidneys or ureters. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer. Treatment options for bladder cancer vary widely, depending on the grade of the cancer. Early non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer may be removed cystoscopically and/or treated with intravesical immunotherapy or chemotherapy, whereas patients with muscle-invasive bladder tumors typically require surgery. Management of kidney cancer is almost always surgical, unless the patient is too ill to undergo surgery or chooses palliative care. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  12. Animal model of naturally occurring bladder cancer: Characterization of four new canine transitional cell carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Development and further characterization of animal models for human cancers is important for the improvement of cancer detection and therapy. Canine bladder cancer closely resembles human bladder cancer in many aspects. In this study, we isolated and characterized four primary transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) cell lines to be used for future in vitro validation of novel therapeutic agents for bladder cancer. Methods Four K9TCC cell lines were established from naturally-occurring...

  13. A rare case of synchronous renal cell carcinoma of the bladder presenting with gross hematuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Kruck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year old man was referred to the Urology Department due to gross hematuria; abdominal ultrasound revealed an unspecific solid tumor of the left bladder wall. Ultrasound, transurethral resection of the bladder mass with subsequent histological analysis, thoracic and abdominal computed tomography-scan and brain magnetic resonance imaging were performed. He was diagnosed with a bladder metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC with concomitant bone, pulmonary, and cerebral metastatic disease of a primary RCC of the right kidney. Management: Transurethral resection of the bladder mass, cerebral and bone radiotherapy, removal of the primary tumor, targeted systemic therapy with mTOR followed by tyrosine kinase inhibition.

  14. Immunohistochemical study of the expression of cell cycle regulating proteins at different stages of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Hanne; von der Maase, Hans; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The cell cycle is known to be deregulated in cancer. We therefore analyzed the expression of the cell cycle related proteins p21, p27, p16, Rb, and L-myc by immunohistochemical staining of bladder tumors.METHODS: The tissue material consisted of bladder tumors from three groups of patients...

  15. Comprehensive profiling and localisation of the matrix metalloproteinases in urothelial carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wallard, M J; Pennington, C J; Veerakumarasivam, A; Burtt, G; Mills, I G; Warren, A; Leung, H Y; Murphy, G; Edwards, D R; Neal, D E; Kelly, J D

    2006-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases which break down the extracellular matrix and regulate cytokine and growth factor activity. Several MMPs have been implicated in the promotion of invasion and metastasis in a broad range of tumours including urothelial carcinoma. In this study, RNA from 132 normal bladder and urothelial carcinoma specimens was profiled for each of the 24 human MMPs, the four endogenous tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) and several key growth factors and ...

  16. Paraneoplastic syndrome in urothelial carcinoma of the kidney: difficulty in diagnosis and deterioration in prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Mamaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic syndrome is not a common concomitance of urothelial tumors. The literature describes a few tens of clinical cases in which urothelial cancer has become a cause of marked nonspecific tumor-associated reactions, associated with the presence of the tumor. Bladder tumors are at stake in all cases. The given clinical observation describes paraneoplastic manifestations in high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the kidney. It demonstrates difficulties in differential diagnosis and gives a retrospective estimate of diagnostic and therapeutic tactics.

  17. Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 Member, BMI1 Contributes to Urothelial Tumorigenesis through p16-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia E. De Faveri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial carcinoma (UC causes significant morbidity and remains the most expensive cancer to treat because of the need for repeated resections and lifelong monitoring for patients with non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Novel therapeutics and stratification approaches are needed to improve the outlook for both NMIBC and muscle-invasive bladder cancer. We investigated the expression and effects of B Lymphoma Mo-MLV Insertion Region 1 (BMI1 in UC. BMI1 was found to be overexpressed in most UC cell lines and primary tumors by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In contrast to some previous reports, no association with tumor stage or grade was observed in two independent tumor panels. Furthermore, upregulation of BMI1 was detected in premalignant bladder lesions, suggesting a role early in tumorigenesis. BMI1 is not located within a common region of genomic amplification in UC. The CDKN2A locus (which encodes the p16 tumor suppressor gene is a transcriptional target of BMI1 in some cellular contexts. In UC cell lines and primary tissues, no correlation between BMI1 and p16 expression was observed. Retroviral-mediated overexpression of BMI1 immortalized normal human urothelial cells (NHUC in vitro and was associated with induction of telomerase activity, bypass of senescence, and repression of differentiation. The effects of BMI1 on gene expression were identified by expression microarray analysis of NHUC-BMI1. Metacore analysis of the gene expression profile implicated downstream effects of BMI1 on α4/β1 integrin-mediated adhesion, cytoskeleton remodeling, and CREB1-mediated transcription.

  18. Intravesicular taxane-induced dermatotoxicity in a 78-year-old man with urothelial carcinoma and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Daniel; O'Donnell, Michael; Stone, Mary Seabury; Liu, Vincent

    2018-02-27

    Patients treated with intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for urothelial carcinoma often become refractory and experience recurrent disease, thus necessitating alternative intravesical treatment modalities if the patient is to be spared the morbidities associated with radical cystectomy. Intravesical treatment with taxane-based chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, has gained traction in urologic oncology, proving to be an effective salvage therapy in such patients. Systemic taxane-based chemotherapeutic regimens have long been used in several advanced malignancies, and their systemic side effects and associated histologic correlates have been extensively documented. In contrast to adverse effects associated with systemic administration, intravesical taxane administration has thus far proven to be well-tolerated, with little to no systemic absorption. To our knowledge, features of taxane-induced systemic effects have not been reported in this setting. Herein, we report a case of a patient with recurrent urothelial carcinoma treated with intravesical docetaxel, along with primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, who developed characteristic dermatotoxic histologic findings associated with intravenous taxane administration. As such histopathologic findings often represent close mimickers of neoplastic and infectious etiologies, knowledge of the potential for systemic manifestations of taxane therapy in patients treated topically may prevent potentially costly diagnostic pitfalls. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Overexpression in Micropapillary and Other Variants of Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzatoğlu, Kemal; Yörükoğlu, Kutsal; Demir, Hale; Bal, Nebil

    2016-06-21

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein overexpression or gene amplification has been shown in urothelial bladder cancer. This could be helpful when using targeted anti-HER2 therapy on these tumors. To evaluate HER2 immunohistochemical expression in conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC), in situ UC, and UC variants primarily in micropapillary urothelial carcinoma (MPUC). The study evaluated 60 MPUC cases; 25 invasive, 20 low-grade noninvasive, and 10 high-grade noninvasive UC cases; 8 in situ UC cases; and 69 UC variant cases. The immunohistochemistry staining was scored according to recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists 2013 HER2 test guideline established for breast cancer and only 3+ staining was considered HER2 overexpression. HER2 overexpression was determined by 3+ staining. 34 of 60 MPUC cases (56%) showed HER2 overexpression (3+ staining). We observed 3+ staining HER2 overexpression in nine of 25 conventional invasive UC cases (36%), four of eight in situ UC cases (50%), and three of six lipid cell variant cases (50%). 3+ staining HER2 overexpression was not seen in eight glandular, six small cell, and five sarcomatoid variant cases. HER2 overexpression was negative in the 20 low-grade noninvasive UC cases but positive in two of the 10 high-grade noninvasive UC cases (20%). We observed HER2 overexpression most commonly in MPUC cases. We also found HER2 overexpression in conventional invasive and in situ UC cases. Pure in situ UC and conventional invasive UC, especially MPUC, could be candidate tumors for treatment with anti-HER2 antibody (trastuzumab therapy). Targeted therapy has a limited place in treatment of bladder cancer. In this study, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression in bladder carcinomas was evaluated in a large number of cases. Anti-HER2 therapy could be used in bladder cancers, as in breast and gastric cancers. Copyright © 2016 European

  20. Transcriptional profile of diuron-induced toxicity on the urinary bladder of male Wistar rats to inform mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlaseh, Shadia M; Bailey, Kathryn A; Hester, Susan D; Jones, Carlton; Ren, Hongzu; Cardoso, Ana Paula F; Oliveira, Maria Luiza C S; Wolf, Douglas C; de Camargo, João Lauro V

    2011-08-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a substituted urea herbicide that induces rat urinary bladder urothelial tumors at high dietary levels (2500 ppm). The specific mode of action and molecular alterations triggered by diuron, however, have not been clarified. The present study evaluated the dose-dependent effects of mucosal alterations and transcriptional changes in the urinary bladder of rats exposed to diuron. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were treated with 0, 60, 125, 1250, and 2500 ppm of diuron in the diet for 20 weeks. Histologic examination showed urothelial hyperplasia present in rats treated with either 1250 or 2500 ppm of diuron but not 60 or 125 ppm. Comprehensive gene expression analyses of urothelial cell RNA were conducted using Affymetrix microarrays. The numbers of differentially expressed transcripts between each treatment group and control increased with diuron dose. Based on similar histology and gene expression responses, the treatment groups were regrouped into a high-dose (1250 and 2500 ppm) and low-dose group (60 and 125 ppm). These data suggest that persistent exposure to high dietary concentrations of diuron induces oxidative stress, increases cellular metabolism, and enhances cell death that is associated with sustained urothelial hyperplasia.

  1. Taurine modulates neutrophil function but potentiates uropathogenic E. coli infection in the murine bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Condron, Claire

    2010-08-01

    Eradication of a urinary tract infection (UTI) appears to be related to a number of innate host defence mechanisms and their interactions with invading bacteria. Recurrent UTIs (rUTIs) pose a difficult problem in that these bacteria use both host and bacterial factors to evade elimination. Neutrophil bactericidal function is depressed, both systemically and in urine, in patients with a history of recurrent UTI. Taurine is a semi-essential amino acid and is successful in preserving neutrophil bactericidal function in urine. Taurine may preserve neutrophil function at the urothelium and thus aid UTI resolution. Adult female (6 weeks old) C57Bl\\/6 mice were randomised into three groups: a saline gavage only control group, a saline gavage + E. coli group, and a taurine gavage + E. coli group [21 g\\/70 kg taurine in 0.9% normal saline (N\\/S) for 5 days]. Whilst taurine gavage pre-treatment resulted in increased serum neutrophils respiratory burst activity, at the urothelial-endothelial interface it caused higher colony forming units in the urine and a higher incidence of E. coli invasion in the bladder wall with no evidence of increased bladder wall neutrophils infiltration on MPO assay of histological assessment. Histologically there was also evidence of reduced bladder inflammation and urothelial cell apoptosis. In conclusion, taurine effectively increases neutrophils activity but given its anti-inflammatory properties, at the expense of decreased urothelial-endothelial activation thus preventing clearance of active E. coli infection in the bladder. Despite the negative results, this study demonstrates the importance of modulating interactions at the urothelial interface.

  2. Bladder recovery by stem cell based cell therapy in the bladder dysfunction induced by spinal cord injury: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Heon Kim

    Full Text Available Bladder dysfunction induced by spinal cord injury (SCI can become problematic and severely impair the quality of life. Preclinical studies of spinal cord injury have largely focused on the recovery of limb function while neglecting to investigate bladder recovery.The present study was performed to investigate and review the effect of stem cell-based cell therapy on bladder recovery in SCI.We conducted a meta-analysis of urodynamic findings of experimental trials that included studies of stem cell-based cell therapy in SCI. Relevant studies were searched using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (January 1990 - December 2012. Final inclusion was determined by a urodynamic study involving detailed numerical values. Urodynamic parameters for analysis included voiding pressure, residual urine, bladder capacity and non-voiding contraction (NVC. Meta-analysis of the data, including findings from urodynamic studies, was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel method.A total of eight studies were included with a sample size of 224 subjects. The studies were divided into different subgroups by different models of SCI. After a stem cell-based cell therapy, voiding pressure (-6.35, p <0.00001, I2 = 77%, NVC (-3.58, p <0.00001, I2 = 82%, residual urine (-024, p = 0.004, I2 = 95% showed overall significant improvement. Bladder capacity showed improvement after treatment only in the transection type (-0.23, p = 0.0002, I2 = 0%.After stem cell-based cell therapy in SCI, partial bladder recovery including improvement of voiding pressure, NVC, and residual urine was demonstrated. Additional studies are needed to confirm the detailed mechanism and to obtain an ideal treatment strategy for bladder recovery.

  3. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jiajia [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhu, Xi [Department of Urology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jie, E-mail: zhangjiebjmu@163.com [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We first demonstrated CXCL5 is highly expressed in human bladder tumor tissues and cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits proliferation, migration and promotes apoptosis in T24 cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in T24 cells. • CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression. - Abstract: CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  4. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jiajia; Zhu, Xi; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We first demonstrated CXCL5 is highly expressed in human bladder tumor tissues and cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits proliferation, migration and promotes apoptosis in T24 cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in T24 cells. • CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression. - Abstract: CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy

  5. Effects of arsenite on cell cycle progression in a human bladder cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Zavala, A.; Cordova, E.; Razo, L.M. del; Cebrian, M.E.; Garrido, E.

    2005-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most important diseases associated with arsenic (As) exposure in view of its high prevalence and mortality rate. Experimental studies have shown that As exposure induces cell proliferation in the bladder of sodium arsenite (iAsIII) subchronically treated mice. However, there is little available information on its effects on the cell cycle of bladder cells. Thus, our purpose was to evaluate the effects of iAsIII on cell cycle progression and the response of p53 and p21 on the human-derived epithelial bladder cell line HT1197. iAsIII treatment (1-10 μM) for 24 h induced a dose-dependent increase in the proportion of cells in S-phase, which reached 65% at the highest dose. A progressive reduction in cell proliferation was also observed. BrdU was incorporated to cellular DNA in an interrupted form, suggesting an incomplete DNA synthesis. The time-course of iAsIII effects (10 μM) showed an increase in p53 protein content and a transient increase in p21 protein levels accompanying the changes in S-phase. These effects were correlated with iAs concentrations inside the cells, which were not able to metabolize inorganic arsenic. Our findings suggest that p21 was not able to block CDK2-cyclin E complex activity and was therefore unable to arrest cells in G1 allowing their progression into the S-phase. Further studies are needed to ascertain the mechanisms underlying the effects of iAsIII on the G1 to S phase transition in bladder cells

  6. Overactive bladder in adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anele, Uzoma A; Morrison, Belinda F; Reid, Marvin E; Madden, Wendy; Foster, Shara; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-06-01

    To characterize the prevalence and impact of nocturnal enuresis and overactive bladder (OAB) symptomatology in the adult sickle-cell disease (SCD) population. We performed a single-center, cross-sectional study of adult SCD patients from October 2012 to February 2014, using the validated Pfizer OAB short form questionnaire and brief voiding history surveys. Patient responses and scores were compared to that of controls having normal or sickle cell trait hemoglobin genotypes. A group of 239 SCD patients (116 males, 123 females) were compared with 104 normal and 57 sickle cell trait patients. Seven of 239 (2.9%) SCD patients compared to none of the 161 patients without SCD (P = 0.04) reported current nocturnal enuresis. The median age of nocturnal enuresis cessation was higher in SCD patients (12.0, IQR 9.0-15.0 years) compared to that of both normal (7.5, IQR 6.0-9.8 years) and sickle cell trait (7.5, IQR 6.0-8.8 years) groups (P sickle cell trait had scores indicating OAB symptomatology (P symptom severity and lower health-related quality of life (HRQL) scores compared to the normal and sickle cell trait groups (P symptoms in the adult SCD population. An OAB phenotype may be an under-recognized complication of SCD irrespective of age. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:642-646, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis increases bladder CXCR4 expression and CXCR4-macrophage migration inhibitory factor association.

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    Pedro L Vera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in cystitis and a non-cognate ligand of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in vitro. We studied whether CXCR4-MIF associations occur in rat bladder and the effect of experimental cystitis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Twenty male rats received saline or cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg; i.p.; every 3(rd day to induce persistent cystitis. After eight days, urine was collected and bladders excised under anesthesia. Bladder CXCR4 and CXCR4-MIF co-localization were examined with immunhistochemistry. ELISA determined MIF and stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1; cognate ligand for CXCR4 levels. Bladder CXCR4 expression (real-time RTC-PCR and protein levels (Western blotting were examined. Co-immunoprecipitations studied MIF-CXCR4 associations.Urothelial basal and intermediate (but not superficial cells in saline-treated rats contained CXCR4, co-localized with MIF. Cyclophosphamide treatment caused: 1 significant redistribution of CXCR4 immunostaining to all urothelial layers (especially apical surface of superficial cells and increased bladder CXCR4 expression; 2 increased urine MIF with decreased bladder MIF; 3 increased bladder SDF-1; 4 increased CXCR4-MIF associations. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate CXCR4-MIF associations occur in vivo in rat bladder and increase in experimental cystitis. Thus, CXCR4 represents an alternative pathway for MIF-mediated signal transduction during bladder inflammation. In the bladder, MIF may compete with SDF-1 (cognate ligand to activate signal transduction mediated by CXCR4.

  8. Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in childhood: radiological findings and differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, L.; Mansilla, F.; Mansilla, M.D.; Marin, A.

    1998-01-01

    We present a case of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in an 11-year-old boy. The rarity of these tumors during childhood is pointed out. The radiological and ultrasonographic findings are described and the differential diagnosis is discussed with respect to other bladder tumors occurring in childhood. (Author) 11 refs

  9. Primary Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma of the Bladder: Case Report and Literature Review

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    Mansour Ansari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most bladder tumors are epithelial in origin. Nonepithelial cancers are rarely located in the bladder. Sarcomas are the most common malignancies among nonepithelial cancers. Primary bladder lymphoma is rare and mostly low grade. Here, we have reported a case of diffuse large cell lymphoma of the bladder. The patient, a 64-year-old man, had urinary frequency for 18 months. Abdominal sonography indicated a thick bladder wall and transurethral biopsy showed diffuse large cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemistry (IHC results showed that the tumor was positive for CD20, CD45, and Pax-5 and negative for BCL-2, cytokeratin, and S100. He had a normal bone marrow biopsy, abdominal, pelvic and chest CT scans. He had no B symptoms. The patient received 6 cycles of R-CHOP followed by radiotherapy (36 Gy to the pelvis. Six months after treatment, the patient is well and has returned to work. We have searched PubMed for primary diffuse large cell lymphoma. Primary diffuse large cell lymphoma of the bladder is best treated according to treatment for diffuse large cell lymphoma of other sites, which includes chemotherapy and radiotherapy. As seen in our review, primary diffuse large cell lymphoma of the bladder has a similar clinical course to diffuse large cell lymphoma of other sites.

  10. Analysis of failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mameghan, Hedy; Fisher, Richard; Mameghan, Jill; Brook, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess prognostic factors for bladder relapse and distant failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of patients treated in the period 1977 to 1990 by definitive radiotherapy. The factors studied included age, sex, T stage, histological grade, tumor multiplicity, ureteric obstruction, total radiation dose, and use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The endpoints studied were bladder relapse and distant failure. Results: There were 342 patients with a mean follow-up time of 7.9 years. Bladder relapse was observed in 159 patients. The overall actuarial bladder relapse rate at 5 years was 55% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher bladder relapse rate were: tumor multiplicity (p < 0.001), presence of ureteric obstruction (p = 0.001), and higher T stage (p 0.044). Distant failure occurred in 39 patients. The overall actuarial distant failure rate at 5 years was 28% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher distant failure rate were: ureteric obstruction (p = 0.003) and higher T stage (p = 0.030). Conclusion: In our study, patients with invasive bladder TCC fell into distinct prognostic groups determined by the three independent factors, ureteric obstruction, tumor multiplicity, and T stage. These factors provided estimated risks of bladder relapse by 5 years which ranged from 34% to 91%. Knowledge of these prognostic factors can help in the selection of patients more suited for bladder preservation by definitive radiotherapy

  11. Sperm associated antigen 9 plays an important role in bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

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    Deepika Kanojia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Majority of bladder cancer deaths are caused due to transitional cell carcinoma (TCC which is the most prevalent and chemoresistant malignancy of urinary bladder. Therefore, we analyzed the role of Sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9 in bladder TCC. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We examined SPAG9 expression and humoral response in 125 bladder TCC patients. Four bladder cancer cell lines were assessed for SPAG9 expression. In addition, we investigated the effect of SPAG9 ablation on cellular proliferation, cell cycle, migration and invasion in UM-UC-3 bladder cancer cells by employing gene silencing approach. Our SPAG9 gene and protein expression analysis revealed SPAG9 expression in 81% of bladder TCC tissue specimens. High SPAG9 expression (>60% SPAG9 positive cells was found to be significantly associated with superficial non-muscle invasive stage (P = 0.042 and low grade tumors (P = 0.002 suggesting SPAG9 putative role in early spread and tumorigenesis. Humoral response against SPAG9 was observed in 95% of patients found positive for SPAG9 expression. All four bladder cancer cell lines revealed SPAG9 expression. In addition, SPAG9 gene silencing in UM-UC-3 cells resulted in induction of G0-G1 arrest characterized by up-regulation of p16 and p21 and consequent down-regulation of cyclin E, cyclin D and cyclin B, CDK4 and CDK1. Further, SPAG9 gene silencing also resulted in reduction in cellular growth, and migration and invasion ability of cancer cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data in clinical specimens indicated that SPAG9 is potential biomarker and therapeutic target for bladder TCC.

  12. Raman microscopy of bladder cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandair, Gurjit S.; Han, Amy L.; Keller, Evan T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Gene engineering is a commonly used tool in cellular biology to determine changes in function or expression of downstream targets. However, the impact of genetic modulation on biochemical effects is less frequently evaluated. The aim of this study is to use Raman microscopy to assess the biochemical effects of gene silencing on T24 and UMUC-13 bladder cancer cell lines. Cellular biochemical information related to nucleic acid and lipogenic components was obtained from deconvolved Raman spectra. We show that the green fluorescence protein (GFP), the chromophore that served as a fluorescent reporter for gene silencing, could also be detected by Raman microscopy. Only the gene-silenced UMUC-13 cell lines exhibited low-to-moderate GFP fluorescence as determined by fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic studies. Moreover, we show that gene silencing and cell phenotype had a greater effect on nucleic acid and lipogenic components with minimal interference from GFP expression. Gene silencing was also found to perturb cellular protein secondary structure in which the amount of disorderd protein increased at the expense of more ordered protein. Overall, our study identified the spectral signature for cellular GFP expression and elucidated the effects of gene silencing on cancer cell biochemistry and protein secondary structure.

  13. Microelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Human Urothelial Cell Lines: Real-Time Electrical Impedance Measurement at an Optimal Frequency

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    Yangkyu Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To distinguish between normal (SV-HUC-1 and cancerous (TCCSUP human urothelial cell lines using microelectrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS. Materials and Methods. Two types of μEIS devices were designed and used in combination to measure the impedance of SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells flowing through the channels of the devices. The first device (μEIS-OF was designed to determine the optimal frequency at which the impedance of two cell lines is most distinguishable. The μEIS-OF trapped the flowing cells and measured their impedance at a frequency ranging from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The second device (μEIS-RT was designed for real-time impedance measurement of the cells at the optimal frequency. The impedance was measured instantaneously as the cells passed the sensing electrodes of μEIS-RT. Results. The optimal frequency, which maximized the average difference of the amplitude and phase angle between the two cell lines (p<0.001, was determined to be 119 kHz. The real-time impedance of the cell lines was measured at 119 kHz; the two cell lines differed significantly in terms of amplitude and phase angle (p<0.001. Conclusion. The μEIS-RT can discriminate SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells by measuring the impedance at the optimal frequency determined by the μEIS-OF.

  14. Diuron-induced rat bladder epithelial cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli S; Arnold, Lora L; Pennington, Karen L; Muirhead, David; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Anwar, Muhammad M; Battalora, Michael; De Camargo, João Lauro V; Cohen, Samuel M

    2012-12-01

    Diuron, a substituted urea herbicide, is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels (2500 ppm). To further elucidate the mode of action, this study aimed to determine the time course and sequence of bladder cytotoxic and proliferative changes induced by diuron treatment of male Wistar rats. Rats were randomized into two groups (control and 2500 ppm diuron) and treated for 28 days. Ten rats from each group were terminated on each of study days 1, 3, 7, or 28. Scanning electron micro scopy (SEM) showed urothelial cell swelling beginning on day 1, and by day 28, showed extensive necrosis, exfoliation and piling up of cells suggestive of hyperplasia. No difference in the bromo deoxyuridine labeling index was detected. In a second experiment, rats were randomized into control and diuron-treated groups and treated for 7 days or 8 weeks. After 7 days, transmission electron microscopy showed cell degenerative changes and distention of the cytoplasm, organelles, and nuclei characteristic of cytolysis. This resulted in protrusion of the superficial cells into the lumen, corresponding to the cell swelling observed previously by SEM. After 8 weeks, bladders in the diuron-treated group showed an increased incidence of simple hyperplasia by light microscopy (6/10, p diuron exposure in rats.

  15. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder without gross hematuria: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wanqiu; Luan, Yang; Jin, Lu; Wang, Tao; Chen, Ruibao; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Lan, Ruzhu

    2015-09-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCB) is a rare and aggressive form of bladder cancer with poor prognosis. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy, and most patients have a history of smoking. The disease incidence of malignant bladder tumors in China is approximately 0.74%. Early and accurate diagnosis of SCCB can ensure timely and appropriate treatment of this malignant disease. Oncologic surgery is the standard treatment; however, it may not be a curative approach. Chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy should be performed following surgical removal. This case report describes a patient with a single neoplasm diagnosed as SCCB that arose because of recurrence of bladder cancer after bladder tumor resection. In contrast to previously reported cases, this patient had no gross hematuria and no history of smoking.

  16. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. G-protein-coupled receptor 137 accelerates proliferation of urinary bladder cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiheng; Bi, Wenhuan; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Wenbo; Xia, Shujie; Liu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a worldwide concern because of its level of incidence and recurrence. To search an effective therapeutic strategy for urinary bladder cancer, it is important to identify proteins involved in tumorigenesis that could serve as potential targets for diagnosis and treatment. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) constitute a large protein family of receptors that sense molecules outside the cell and activate signal transduction pathways and cellular responses inside the cell. GPR137 is a newly discovered human gene encoding orphan GPRs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the physiological role of GPR137 in urinary bladder cancer. The effect of GPR137 on cell growth was examined via an RNA interference (RNAi) lentivirus system in two human urinary bladder cancer cell lines BT5637 and T24. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi could specifically suppressed GPR137 expression in vitro, resulting in alleviated cell viability and impaired colony formation, as well as blocks G0/G1 and S phases of the cell cycle. These results suggested GPR137 as an essential player in urinary bladder cancer cell growth, and it may serve as a potential target for gene therapy in the treatment of urinary bladder cancer. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Long non-coding RNA ANRIL is up-regulated in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongxue [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Department of Urology, Hospital of Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps, Urumqi 830002 (China); Li, Xuechao; Song, Yarong; Zhang, Peng; Xiao, Yajun [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Xing, Yifei, E-mail: yifei_xing@163.com [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2015-11-13

    Antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) is a member of long non-coding RNAs and has been reported to be dysregulated in several human cancers. However, the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer remains unclear. This present study aimed to investigate whether and how ANRIL involved in bladder cancer. Our results showed up-regulation of ANRIL in bladder cancer tissues versus the corresponding adjacent non-tumor tissues. To explore the specific mechanisms, ANRIL was silenced by small interfering RNA or short hairpin RNA transfection in human bladder cancer T24 and EJ cells. Knockdown of ANRIL repressed cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, along with decreased expression of Bcl-2 and increased expressions of Bax, cytoplasmic cytochrome c and Smac and cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. However, no change of cleaved caspase-8 level was observed. Furthermore, in vivo experiment confirmed that knockdown of ANRIL inhibited tumorigenic ability of EJ cells in nude mice. Meanwhile, in accordance with in vitro study, knockdown of ANRIL inhibited expression of Bcl-2 and up-regulated expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase-9, but did not affect cleaved caspase-8 level. In conclusion, we first report that ANRIL possibly serves as an oncogene in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. - Highlights: • We first report the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer. • ANRIL is obviously up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues. • ANRIL regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and cell apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway.

  19. Long non-coding RNA ANRIL is up-regulated in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Hongxue; Li, Xuechao; Song, Yarong; Zhang, Peng; Xiao, Yajun; Xing, Yifei

    2015-01-01

    Antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) is a member of long non-coding RNAs and has been reported to be dysregulated in several human cancers. However, the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer remains unclear. This present study aimed to investigate whether and how ANRIL involved in bladder cancer. Our results showed up-regulation of ANRIL in bladder cancer tissues versus the corresponding adjacent non-tumor tissues. To explore the specific mechanisms, ANRIL was silenced by small interfering RNA or short hairpin RNA transfection in human bladder cancer T24 and EJ cells. Knockdown of ANRIL repressed cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, along with decreased expression of Bcl-2 and increased expressions of Bax, cytoplasmic cytochrome c and Smac and cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. However, no change of cleaved caspase-8 level was observed. Furthermore, in vivo experiment confirmed that knockdown of ANRIL inhibited tumorigenic ability of EJ cells in nude mice. Meanwhile, in accordance with in vitro study, knockdown of ANRIL inhibited expression of Bcl-2 and up-regulated expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase-9, but did not affect cleaved caspase-8 level. In conclusion, we first report that ANRIL possibly serves as an oncogene in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. - Highlights: • We first report the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer. • ANRIL is obviously up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues. • ANRIL regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and cell apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway.

  20. Effects of Diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] on the urinary bladder of male Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Merielen Garcia; Cotrim Sartor de Oliveira, Maria Luiza; Lima, Adriano Silva; Camargo, Joao Lauro Viana de

    2006-01-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a substituted urea herbicide widely used on agricultural crops such as soy, cotton and sugar cane. In a previous long-term study this herbicide exerted carcinogenic activity on the urinary bladder mucosa of male Wistar rats. In general, the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of Diuron are considered to be negative. The present study aimed to evaluate the mode of action of Diuron on the urinary bladder mucosa of male Wistar rats. Six-week old male Wistar rats were fed pelleted Nuvilab diet mixed with Diuron at 125, 500 and 2500 ppm. As a positive control, 8.3% sodium saccharin (NaS) was fed in the diet. Preceding the sacrifice of the animals at the 20th week, urinary pH was measured and the genotoxic potential of Diuron was evaluated by the comet assay. Histological urothelial lesions in the urinary bladder and in the renal pelvis mucosa, cell proliferation/apoptosis evaluations, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the urinary bladder mucosa were also performed. No DNA changes were found in urothelial or peripheral blood cells, and urinary pH was comparable to controls in all Diuron groups. In the urinary bladder urothelium, the incidence of simple hyperplasia (SH) by light microscopy was significantly increased (7/10; p < 0.005) in the 2500 ppm Diuron group but not at the lower doses. By SEM, three of five animals treated with 2500 ppm Diuron showed urothelial cell necrosis and hyperplasia. In the renal pelvis, the incidence of SH was significantly increased in the Diuron 500 and 2500 ppm and in the NaS 8.3% groups. Cell proliferation was significantly increased in the Diuron 2500 ppm (p < 0.05) and NaS 8.3% (p < 0.05) groups. The results indicate that a high dietary concentration of Diuron is associated with urothelial necrosis and continuous regenerative cell proliferation that leads to urothelial hyperplasia

  1. Characterization of bladder calculi and urinalysis in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus treated with mesenchymal adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs after partial urinary bladder allotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Tadeu Lemos Pinto Filho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bladder calculi associated or not with early crystalluria or salt deposits can be a common finding after reconstructive bladder surgery. The objective of this study was to characterize calculi and urine of domestic rabbits treated with mesenchymal adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs after partial urinary bladder allotransplantation. Twenty-four New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to surgery and treated postoperatively with cyclosporine or ADSCs for immunosuppression. There were no signs of graft rejection in either treatment group 30 days after surgery. Fewer animals presented bladder calculi in the ADSC treated group (33.3% compared to the cyclosporine treated group (58.3%. Calcium was the predominant component of calculi in both groups. Urinalysis revealed no haematuria or bacteriuria in the ADSC group, in contrast to the results obtained for the cyclosporine group. ADSCs may be an attractive alternative to cyclosporine for immunosuppression after bladder allotransplantation.

  2. Systemic Immunotherapy for Urothelial Cancer: Current Trends and Future Directions

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    Shilpa Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial cancer of the bladder, renal pelvis, ureter, and other urinary organs is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, and systemic platinum-based chemotherapy remains the standard of care for first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC. Until recently, there were very limited options for patients who are refractory to chemotherapy, or do not tolerate chemotherapy due to toxicities and overall outcomes have remained very poor. While the role of immunotherapy was first established in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in the 1970s, no systemic immunotherapy was approved for advanced disease until the recent approval of a programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 inhibitor, atezolizumab, in patients with advanced/metastatic UC who have progressed on platinum-containing regimens. This represents a significant milestone in this disease after a void of over 30 years. In addition to atezolizumab, a variety of checkpoint inhibitors have shown a significant activity in advanced/metastatic urothelial carcinoma and are expected to gain Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval in the near future. The introduction of novel immunotherapy agents has led to rapid changes in the field of urothelial carcinoma. Numerous checkpoint inhibitors are being tested alone or in combination in the first and subsequent-line therapies of metastatic disease, as well as neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. They are also being studied in combination with radiation therapy and for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer refractory to BCG. Furthermore, immunotherapy is being utilized for those ineligible for firstline platinum-based chemotherapy. This review outlines the novel immunotherapy agents which have either been approved, or are currently being investigated in clinical trials in UC.

  3. Types of HLA in the bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Erkan; Uğur Özalp, Ali; Cekmen, Arman; Eren, Bülent; Onal, Bülent; Akkuş, Emre; Erdoğan, Ergun

    2013-02-01

    HLA plays a complementary role in the interaction between tumor and body immunology. The aim of this study was to determine the existence of the association between the HLA system and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Using standard micro-lymphocytotoxic method of Terasaki, HLA-A, B, DR and DQ antigen types of 30 patients with TCC of the bladder were compared with the control group (30 healthy people). In the TCC patient group, HLA -DQ6(1) and HLA -DQ7(3) antigens were detected with a significantly higher frequency than in the control group (p=0.018 and p=0.038, respectively), whereas HLA-A10, B4, DR53 and DQ1 antigens were detected with significantly higher frequency in the control group (p less 0.05 in all). It suggests that patients who had the antigens detected were at higher risk of TCC, and the ones who had the antigens displaying protective features as were detected in the control group, were at lesser risk.

  4. Frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gui, Yaoting; Guo, Guangwu; Huang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    frequently in tumors of low stages and grades, highlighting its potential role in the classification and diagnosis of bladder cancer. Our results provide an overview of the genetic basis of TCC and suggest that aberration of chromatin regulation might be a hallmark of bladder cancer.......Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer. Here we sequenced the exomes of nine individuals with TCC and screened all the somatically mutated genes in a prevalence set of 88 additional individuals with TCC with different tumor stages and grades. In our study, we...

  5. Silencing ofECHDC1inhibits growth of gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Seiji; Miura, Noriyoshi; Sawada, Yuichiro; Noda, Terutaka; Kikugawa, Tadahiko; Tanji, Nozomu; Saika, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Combined gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) treatment is a first line chemotherapy for bladder cancer. However, acquired resistance to GC has been a major problem. To address the mechanism of gemcitabine resistance, and to identify potential biomarkers or target proteins for its therapy, we aimed to identify candidate proteins associated with gemcitabine resistance using proteomic analysis. We established gemcitabine-resistant human bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC3GR and HT1376GR) from gemcitabine-sensitive human bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC3 and HT1376). We compared the protein expression of parental and gemcitabine-resistant cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, ethylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase (ECHDC1) expression was significantly increased in both of the gemcitabine-resistant cell lines compared to the respective parental cell lines. Silencing of ECHDC1 reduced ECHDC1 expression and significantly inhibited the proliferation of UMUC3GR cells. Furthermore, silencing of ECHDC1 induced upregulation of p27, which is critical for cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, and induced G1 arrest. In conclusion, ECHDC1 expression is increased in gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer cells, and is involved in their cell growth. ECHDC1, which is a metabolite proofreading enzyme, may be a novel potential target for gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer therapy.

  6. Temporal expression of hyaluronic acid and hyaluronic acid receptors in a porcine small intestinal submucosa-augmented rat bladder regeneration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondalek, Fadee G; Fung, Kar-Ming; Yang, Qing; Wu, Weijuan; Lu, Wenli; Palmer, Blake W; Frimberger, Dominic C; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Hurst, Robert E; Kropp, Bradley P; Lin, Huesh-Kung

    2015-08-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan, is an essential component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Since HA is involved in many phases of wound healing and may play a key role in tissue repair and regeneration, this study was intended to understand temporal and spatial expression of HA and HA receptors (HARs) during the course of bladder regeneration in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to partial cystectomy followed by augmentation with porcine small intestinal submucosal (SIS) prepared from distal sections of the small intestine. SIS-augmented bladders were harvested between postoperative days 2 and 56. Bladder regeneration proceeded without complications. All augmented bladders had complete urothelial lining and smooth muscle bundles by day 56 post-augmentation. Temporal and spatial distributions of HA and HARs were studied by immunohistochemistry in regenerating bladders. The strongest HA immunoreactivity was observed in the ECM on postoperative days 28 and 56. Cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) immunoreactivity was detected in the cytoplasm of urothelial cells on day 56; and LYVE-1 immunoreactivity was exclusively limited to lymphatic vessels on days 28 and 56. We demonstrated that HA was synthesized throughout the course of bladder wound healing and regeneration; and HA deposition coincided with urothelial differentiation. Expression of CD44 and LYVE-1 followed the same temporal pattern as HA deposition. Therapeutic modalities through local delivery of exogenous HA to improve the outcome of SIS-mediated bladder regeneration might need to be coordinated with HAR expression in order to achieve maximal regenerative responses as opposed to fibrosis.

  7. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder Mimicking Interstitial Cystitis and Voiding Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colton Prudnick

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the bladder is a relatively uncommon cause of bladder cancer accounting for <5% of bladder tumors in the western countries. SCC has a slight male predominance and tends to occur in the seventh decade of life. The main presenting symptom of SCC is hematuria, and development of this tumor in the western world is associated most closely with chronic indwelling catheters and spinal cord injuries. A 39-year-old Caucasian female presented with bladder and lower abdominal pain, urinary frequency, and nocturia which was originally believed to be interstitial cystitis (IC but was later diagnosed as SCC of the bladder. Presentation of SCC without hematuria is an uncommon presentation, but the absence of this symptom should not lead a practitioner to exclude the diagnosis of SCC. This case is being reported in an attempt to explain the delay and difficulty of diagnosis. Background on the risk factors for SCC of the bladder and the typical presenting symptoms of bladder SCC and IC are also reviewed.

  8. Diuron metabolites and urothelial cytotoxicity: In vivo, in vitro and molecular approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli S.; Arnold, Lora L.; Dodmane, Puttappa R.; Pennington, Karen L.; Qiu, Fang; De Camargo, João Lauro V.; Cohen, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Diuron is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels. The proposed mode of action (MOA) for diuron is urothelial cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative urothelial hyperplasia. Diuron-induced urothelial cytotoxicity is not due to urinary solids. Diuron is extensively metabolized, and in rats, N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea (DCPU) and 4,5-dichloro-2-hydroxyphenyl urea (2-OH-DCPU) were the predominant urinary metabolites; lesser metabolites included N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea (DCPMU) and trace levels of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). In humans, DCPMU and DCPU have been found in the urine after a case of product abuse. To aid in elucidating the MOA of diuron and to evaluate the metabolites that are responsible for the diuron toxicity in the bladder epithelium, we investigated the urinary concentrations of metabolites in male Wistar rats treated with 2500 ppm of diuron, the urothelial cytotoxicity in vitro of the metabolites and their gene expression profiles. DCPU was found in rat urine at concentrations substantially greater than the in vitro IC50 and induced more gene expression alterations than the other metabolites tested. 2-OH-DCPU was present in urine at a concentration approximately half of the in vitro IC50, whereas DCPMU and DCA were present in urine at concentrations well below the IC50. For the diuron-induced MOA for the rat bladder, we suggest that DCPU is the primary metabolite responsible for the urothelial cytotoxicity with some contribution also by 2-OH-DCPU. This study supports a MOA for diuron-induced bladder effects in rats consisting of metabolism to DCPU (and 2-OH-DCPU to a lesser extent), concentration and excretion in urine, urothelial cytotoxicity, and regenerative proliferation

  9. Diuron metabolites and urothelial cytotoxicity: in vivo, in vitro and molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli S; Arnold, Lora L; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Pennington, Karen L; Qiu, Fang; De Camargo, João Lauro V; Cohen, Samuel M

    2013-12-15

    Diuron is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels. The proposed mode of action (MOA) for diuron is urothelial cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative urothelial hyperplasia. Diuron-induced urothelial cytotoxicity is not due to urinary solids. Diuron is extensively metabolized, and in rats, N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea (DCPU) and 4,5-dichloro-2-hydroxyphenyl urea (2-OH-DCPU) were the predominant urinary metabolites; lesser metabolites included N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea (DCPMU) and trace levels of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). In humans, DCPMU and DCPU have been found in the urine after a case of product abuse. To aid in elucidating the MOA of diuron and to evaluate the metabolites that are responsible for the diuron toxicity in the bladder epithelium, we investigated the urinary concentrations of metabolites in male Wistar rats treated with 2500ppm of diuron, the urothelial cytotoxicity in vitro of the metabolites and their gene expression profiles. DCPU was found in rat urine at concentrations substantially greater than the in vitro IC50 and induced more gene expression alterations than the other metabolites tested. 2-OH-DCPU was present in urine at a concentration approximately half of the in vitro IC50, whereas DCPMU and DCA were present in urine at concentrations well below the IC50. For the diuron-induced MOA for the rat bladder, we suggest that DCPU is the primary metabolite responsible for the urothelial cytotoxicity with some contribution also by 2-OH-DCPU. This study supports a MOA for diuron-induced bladder effects in rats consisting of metabolism to DCPU (and 2-OH-DCPU to a lesser extent), concentration and excretion in urine, urothelial cytotoxicity, and regenerative proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bladder wall injection of mesenchymal stem cells ameliorates bladder inflammation, overactivity, and nociception in a chemically induced interstitial cystitis-like rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akira; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Igarashi, Taro; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Egawa, Shin; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2018-03-06

    We investigated the effects of bladder wall injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on bladder tissues, function, and nociceptive behavior in a chemically induced interstitial cystitis-like rat model. Chemical cystitis of female rats was induced by intravesical instillation of 0.1 N hydrochloride (HCl) once a week for 2 weeks. Bladders were harvested 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after the second application for histological examination. Adipose-derived MSCs (HCl + MSCs) or phosphate-buffered saline (HCl + PBS) was injected into the bladder wall at the time of the second application of HCl. Histological examination, nociceptive behavior, and cystometrograms were evaluated 2 weeks after the injection compared with controls, which received instillation and injection of PBS into the bladder (sham + PBS). The number of mast cells and expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were significantly increased at 1 and 2 weeks, and expression of collagen fibers was significantly increased from 2-4 weeks after the second application of HCl. Significantly increased nociceptive behavior, number of mast cells, expression of TNF-α, TGF-β, and collagen fibers were observed in HCl + PBS compared with sham + PBS, whereas these changes were significantly decreased in HCl + MSCs compared with HCl + PBS. In addition, bladder capacity and voiding threshold pressures were significantly decreased in HCl + PBS but not in HCl + MSCs compared with sham + PBS. The results suggest that bladder injection of MSCs ameliorates inflammation and fibrosis in bladder tissues, bladder overactivity, and nociception in a rat model of chemically induced cystitis.

  11. Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Induced Cell Apoptosis and S Phase Arrest in Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs on the viability and apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells. EJ and T24 cells were cocultured with ADSCs or cultured with conditioned medium of ADSCs (ADSC-CM, respectively. The cell counting and colony formation assay showed ADSCs inhibited the proliferation of EJ and T24 cells. Cell viability assessment revealed that the secretions of ADSCs, in the form of conditioned medium, were able to decrease cancer cell viability. Wound-healing assay suggested ADSC-CM suppressed migration of T24 and EJ cells. Moreover, the results of the flow cytometry indicated that ADSC-CM was capable of inducing apoptosis of T24 cells and inducing S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot revealed ADSC-CM increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, indicating that ADSC-CM induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins were involved in the mechanism of this reaction. Our study indicated that ADSCs may provide a promising and practicable manner for bladder tumor therapy.

  12. Bladder Cancer, Version 5.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Philippe E; Agarwal, Neeraj; Bangs, Rick; Boorjian, Stephen A; Buyyounouski, Mark K; Clark, Peter E; Downs, Tracy M; Efstathiou, Jason A; Flaig, Thomas W; Friedlander, Terence; Greenberg, Richard E; Guru, Khurshid A; Hahn, Noah; Herr, Harry W; Hoimes, Christopher; Inman, Brant A; Jimbo, Masahito; Kader, A Karim; Lele, Subodh M; Meeks, Joshua J; Michalski, Jeff; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Pagliaro, Lance C; Pal, Sumanta K; Patterson, Anthony; Plimack, Elizabeth R; Pohar, Kamal S; Porter, Michael P; Preston, Mark A; Sexton, Wade J; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene O; Sonpavde, Guru; Tward, Jonathan; Wile, Geoffrey; Dwyer, Mary A; Gurski, Lisa A

    2017-10-01

    This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Bladder Cancer focuses on systemic therapy for muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer, as substantial revisions were made in the 2017 updates, such as new recommendations for nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab. The complete version of the NCCN Guidelines for Bladder Cancer addresses additional aspects of the management of bladder cancer, including non-muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer and nonurothelial histologies, as well as staging, evaluation, and follow-up. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  13. Therapy-relevant aberrant expression of MRP3 and BCRP mRNA in TCC-/SCC-bladder cancer tissue of untreated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mona; Mostageer, Marwa; Rohde, Jan; Zaghloul, Ashraf; Knüchel-Clarke, Ruth; Saad, Shady; Attia, Deena; Mahran, Laila; Spahn-Langguth, Hilde

    2017-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a critical factor, which results in suboptimal outcomes in cancer chemotherapy. One principal mechanism of MDR is the increased expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Of these, multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) confer MDR when overexpressed in cancer cell lines. We measured the mRNA expression of MRP3 and BCRP in primary untreated bladder cancer specimens using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in comparison to normal bladder tissue. The MRP3 and BCRP expression in the two major histotypes of bladder cancer; transitional cell carcinoma (TCC; urothelial type of bladder cancer) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 'Schistosoma-induced' bladder cancer) were compared. Furthermore, the association between MRP3 and BCRP expression and tumor grade and stage were investigated. MRP3 mRNA expression in bladder cancer specimens was increased ~13-fold on average compared to normal bladder tissue (n=36, PTCC showed significantly increased MRP3 mRNA expression compared to SCC of the bladder (PTCC and SCC of the bladder (P=0.1072). The increased MRP3 mRNA expression was not related to bladder tumor grade (P=0.3465) but was, however, significantly higher in superficial than in invasive bladder tumors (P=0.0173). The decreased expression of BCRP was not related to bladder tumor grade (P=0.1808) or stage (P=0.8016). The current data show that bladder cancer is associated with perturbed expression of MRP3 and BCRP. Representing drug resistance factors, determining the expression of these transporters in native tumors may be predictive of the outcome of chemotherapy based-treatment of bladder cancer.

  14. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  15. Electroporation enhances mitomycin C cytotoxicity on T24 bladder cancer cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasquez, Juan Luis; Gehl, Julie; Hermann, Gregers G

    2012-01-01

    improves the cytotoxicity of mitomycin. In two cell lines, T24 (bladder cancer cell line) and DC3F (Chinese hamster fibroblast), exposure to different concentrations of mitomycin (0.01-2000μM) was tested with and without electroporation (6 pulses of 1kV/cm, duration: 99μs, frequency: 1Hz). Cell viability...

  16. Polymeric film of 6-arm-poly(ethylene glycol) amine graphene oxide with poly (ε-caprolactone): Adherence and growth of adipose derived mesenchymal stromal cells culture on rat bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Marcela; Durán, Nelson; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Volpe, Bruno B.; Ceragioli, Helder J.; Andrade, Patricia F.; De Souza, Joel G.; Fávaro, Wagner J.

    2017-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been more present in different fields related to health. The need to find a durable material, of easy use, and which does not interfere significantly in the growth and differentiation of stem cells for the construction of a scaffold for use in urologic surgery, with the purpose of reducing infections, regeneration times and even graft rejection during reconstitution in patients with urethral stricture was conducted a broad survey of information about this and came to the consensus of this project: using graphene oxide, a widely studied nanomaterials which has been presenting numerous beneficial results when in contact with the adipose-derived stem cells. Advanced techniques for the growth, differentiation and proliferation of adipose-derived stem cells were used, as well as the characterization of graphene oxide sheets. For this study, it was prepared the graphene oxide/6 ARM-Poly (ethylene glycol) amine films with poly (ε-caprolactone). The graphene suspension in organic solvent was prepared by using an ultrasonicator bath and subsequently, the film was formed by solvent evaporation. Total characterization of graphene oxide/6 ARM-PEG-amine/ poly (ε-caprolactone) film was carried out. It was tested growth and adhesion of adipose-derived stem cells on the film, as well as, were verified the histopathological effects of this scaffold when implanted in the urinary bladder to repair the lesion. Our results demonstrated that this scaffold with adipose-derived stem cells enhanced the repair in rat urinary bladder defect model, resulting in a regular bladder. Improved organized muscle bundles and urothelial layer were observed in animals treated with this scaffold with adipose-derived stem cells compared with those treated only suture thread or scaffold. Thus, our biomaterial could be suitable for tissue engineered urinary tract reconstruction.

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of hTERT in urothelial lesions: a potential adjunct to urine cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalbuss Walid

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urine cytology has a critical role in evaluation for bladder carcinoma. Due to the low sensitivity of this technique, ancillary modalities such as the detection of markers of malignancy by immunochemistry are desirable. Promising factors in this context are components of the human telomerase enzyme complex. Telomerase repairs and extend telomeres, which when eroded beyond a critical limit trigger a senescence checkpoint. Accordingly, while absent in normal somatic cells, telomerase activity has been detected in the great majority of malignant tumor specimens tested, and so has potential value for the recognition of malignant cells in clinical specimens. Methods In this study, we investigated whether the immunohistochemical detection of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT can aid cytology in the diagnosis of bladder lesions. Findings from the retrospective evaluation of over 100 cell blocks, including urine sediments from confirmed malignant and benign conditions, were compared with routine urine cytology data. Results The presence of hTERT protein was indicative of the transformation of urothelia to a malignant phenotype. Nucleolar hTERT was expressed in 27 (93% of 29 samples obtained from patients with confirmed primary bladder cancer. Conversely, hTERT was detectable in only 3 (0.8% of 39 samples from benign conditions. The hTERT assay showed higher diagnostic sensitivity (84.8% than published urine cytology data (~65% for confirmed bladder carcinoma, however, the hTERT assay was less specific than cytology (65.2% vs. ~95% respectively. Conclusion As a highly sensitive marker, immunohistochemical hTERT detection in urine sediments represents a reliable adjunct to cytology in the accurate diagnosis of urothelial neoplasms.

  18. Current status of tissue engineering applied to bladder reconstruction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanz, C; Raventós, C; Morote, J

    2018-01-11

    Bladder reconstruction is performed to replace or expand the bladder. The intestine is used in standard clinical practice for tissue in this procedure. The complications of bladder reconstruction range from those of intestinal resection to those resulting from the continuous contact of urine with tissue not prepared for this contact. In this article, we describe and classify the various biomaterials and cell cultures used in bladder tissue engineering and reviews the studies performed with humans. We conducted a review of literature published in the PubMed database between 1950 and 2017, following the principles of the PRISM declaration. Numerous in vitro and animal model studies have been conducted, but only 18 experiments have been performed with humans, with a total of 169 patients. The current evidence suggests that an acellular matrix, a synthetic polymer with urothelial and autologous smooth muscle cells attached in vitro or stem cells would be the most practical approach for experimental bladder reconstruction. Bladder replacement or expansion without using intestinal tissue is still a challenge, despite progress in the manufacture of biomaterials and the development of cell therapy. Well-designed studies with large numbers of patients and long follow-up times are needed to establish an effective clinical translation and standardisation of the check-up functional tests. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Mandatory role of proteinase-activated receptor 1 in experimental bladder inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Carole A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, inflammation plays a role in most bladder pathologies and represents a defense reaction to injury that often times is two edged. In particular, bladder neurogenic inflammation involves the participation of mast cells and sensory nerves. Increased mast cell numbers and tryptase release represent one of the prevalent etiologic theories for interstitial cystitis and other urinary bladder inflammatory conditions. The activity of mast cell-derived tryptase as well as thrombin is significantly increased during inflammation. Those enzymes activate specific G-protein coupled proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. Four PARs have been cloned so far, and not only are all four receptors highly expressed in different cell types of the mouse urinary bladder, but their expression is altered during experimental bladder inflammation. We hypothesize that PARs may link mast cell-derived proteases to bladder inflammation and, therefore, play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. Results Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the mouse urinary bladder, all four PA receptors are also expressed in the J82 human urothelial cell line. Intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides in mice leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1-, and to a lesser extent, by PAR2-deficiency. Conclusion Our results reveal an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provide a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evoke testable hypotheses regarding the role of PARs in bladder inflammation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestations of cystitis.

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Against Painful Bladder Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V

    2016-11-01

    Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a debilitating chronic bladder disease that primarily affects women. The disease is due to a damage of urothelial cell lining. As a result, potassium particles and other toxic substances in urine can leak into bladder mucosa, causing the symptoms of lower abdominal/pelvic discomfort, pain, increased urination frequency, urgency, nocturia, and so on, all of which can substantially reduce the quality of daily life. There are multiple symptom reliving therapies. Among them, only pentosan polysulfate sodium, sold under the brand name of Elmiron, has been approved for oral use by US Food and Drug Administration. It provides the relief after several months of use. Based on the scientific leads presented in this article, we propose that human chorionic gonadotropin has a therapeutic potential that is worth investigating for the treatment of this disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. In vivo fluorescence imaging of an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model indicates differential uptake of intravesically instilled near-infrared labeled 2-deoxyglucose analog by neoplastic urinary bladder tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Davis, Carole A.; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel W.

    2017-02-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most expensive cancers to manage due to frequent recurrences requiring life-long surveillance and treatment. A near-infrared labeled 2-deoxy-d-glucose probe IRDye800CW-DG targeting glucose metabolism pathway has shown to enhance the sensitivity of diagnosing several types of cancers as tested on tumor models not including bladder tumor. This pilot study has explored differential uptake of intravesically administered IRDye800CW-DG in an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model. Twenty-five female Fischer rats were randomly grouped to four conditions: no-tumor-control (n=3), no-tumor-control intravesically instilled with IRDye800CWDG (n=6), rats bearing GFP-labeled AY-27 rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma cells and washed with saline (n=5), and rats bearing AY-27 tumors and intravesically instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=11). Near-infrared fluorescence was measured from the opened bladder wall of anesthetized rat at an excitation wavelength of 750nm and an emission wavelength of 776nm, by using an in-house fluorescence imaging system. There is no statistically significant difference of the peak fluorescence intensity among the no-tumor-control bladders (n=3), the no-tumorcontrol bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), and the GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders washed by saline (n=5). When compared to that of the no-tumor-control bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), the fluorescence intensity of GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG and with histology confirmed neoplastic bladder tissue (n=11) was remarkably more intense (3.34 fold of over the former) and was also statistically significant (pbladder tissues suggests the potential for cystoscopy-adaptation to enhance diagnosis and guiding surgical management of flat urinary bladder cancer.

  2. Local control rate and prognosis after sequential chemoradiation for small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, Richard P.; Meinhardt, Wim; Poel, Henk G. van der; Rhijn, Bas W. van; Kerst, J. Martijn; Pos, Floris J.; Horenblas, Simon; Bex, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the long-term outcome and the risk for local recurrence of patients with small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by external beam radiotherapy (sequential chemoradiation). All consecutive patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the bladder (n=66), treated in our institution between 1993 and 2011 were retrospectively evaluated from an institutional database. Only patients with limited disease (Tx-4N0-1M0) small cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with sequential chemoradiation (n=27) were included in this study. Recurrence rates, overall survival and cancer-specific survival were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median time to recurrence was 20 months, median overall survival 26 months, 5-year overall survival 22.2%, median cancer-specific survival 47 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 39.6%. For complete responders after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (n=19), median cancer-specific survival was 52 months with a 5-year cancer-specific survival 45.9% versus a median cancer-specific survival of 22 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 0.0% for incomplete responders (n=8; P=0.034). Eight patients (29.6%) underwent transurethral resections (TUR-BT) for local recurrences in the bladder. At the end of follow up, four patients had undergone cystectomy for recurrence of disease resulting in a bladder-preservation rate of 85.2%. Median time to local recurrence was 29 months and median time to distant recurrence was 10 months. Sequential chemoradiation for limited disease small cell carcinoma of the bladder results in a reasonable outcome with a high bladder preservation rate. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy represents a significant prognostic factor in this patient population. (author)

  3. Impaired Na+/K+-ATPase Function in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) is abundantly expressed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, which is necessary for tight junction formation. The tight junction is an urothelial barrier between urine and the underlying bladder. Impairment of tight junctions allows migration of urinary solutes in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). We evaluated NKA expression and activity in bladder samples from patients with IC/PBS. The study group consisted of 85 patients with IC/PBS, and the control group consisted of 20 volunteers. Bladder biopsies were taken from both groups. We determined the expression and distribution of NKA using NKA activity assays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescent staining. The protein levels and activity of NKA in the study group were significantly lower than the control group (1.08 ± 0.06 vs. 2.39 ± 0.29 and 0.60 ± 0.04 vs. 1.81 ± 0.18 µmol ADP/mg protein/hour, respectively; P < 0.05). Additionally, immunofluorescent staining for detection of CK7, a marker of the bladder urothelium, predominantly colocalized with NKA in patients in the study group. Our results demonstrated the expression and activity of NKA were decreased in bladder biopsies of patients with IC/PBS. These findings suggest that NKA function is impaired in the bladders from patients with IC/PBS. PMID:26839484

  4. Impaired Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Function in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jane-Dar; Yang, Wen-Kai; Lee, Ming-Huei

    2016-02-01

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) is abundantly expressed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, which is necessary for tight junction formation. The tight junction is an urothelial barrier between urine and the underlying bladder. Impairment of tight junctions allows migration of urinary solutes in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). We evaluated NKA expression and activity in bladder samples from patients with IC/PBS. The study group consisted of 85 patients with IC/PBS, and the control group consisted of 20 volunteers. Bladder biopsies were taken from both groups. We determined the expression and distribution of NKA using NKA activity assays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescent staining. The protein levels and activity of NKA in the study group were significantly lower than the control group (1.08 ± 0.06 vs. 2.39 ± 0.29 and 0.60 ± 0.04 vs. 1.81 ± 0.18 µmol ADP/mg protein/hour, respectively; P < 0.05). Additionally, immunofluorescent staining for detection of CK7, a marker of the bladder urothelium, predominantly colocalized with NKA in patients in the study group. Our results demonstrated the expression and activity of NKA were decreased in bladder biopsies of patients with IC/PBS. These findings suggest that NKA function is impaired in the bladders from patients with IC/PBS.

  5. Appraisal of diagnostic ability of UCA1 as a biomarker of carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A K; Singh, P K; Rath, S K; Dalela, D; Goel, M M; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-11-01

    Initial diagnosis of carcinoma of the urinary bladder remains to be a challenge. Urine cytology, as an adjunct to cystoscopy, is less sensitive for low-grade tumors. Urothelial cancer associated 1 (UCA1) is a novel non-coding RNA gene, which plays a pivotal role in bladder cancer progression. Our aim is to investigate the significance of urinary UCA1 for the non-invasive diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder. We examined UCA1 expression in a bladder cancer cell line (T24) and in urine of 28 healthy individuals, 46 patients of non-malignant disorders, and 117 cases (69 primary and 48 recurrent cases) of histologically proven TCC prior to transurethral resection by using real-time PCR and compared it with voided urinary cytology. UCA1 expression was found in T24 cell line and also found to be significantly higher in the cancer group as compared to the controls (p0.05). UCA1 can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for TCC bladder as an adjunct to cytology in the early diagnosis of primary urinary bladder cancer.

  6. Independent predictors of metachronous bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) after nephroureterectomy for TCC of the upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Giacomo; De Marco, Vincenzo; Dalpiaz, Orietta; Gottardo, Fedra; Bouygues, Vianney; Galfano, Antonio; Martignoni, Guido; Patard, Jean Jacques; Artibani, Walter; Ficarra, Vincenzo

    2008-06-01

    To identify the prognostic factors predictive of metachronous bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in a multi-institutional dataset of patients who had undergone nephroureterectomy (NU) for nonmetastatic upper urinary tract (UUT) TCC. The clinical and pathological data of 231 patients who had had NU for UUT-TCC from 1989 to 2005 in three European centres were collected retrospectively, and analysed for clinical and pathological variables. The median follow-up was 38 months; during the follow-up, bladder TCC was detected in 109 patients (47.2%), and was significantly more common in patients who had UUT-TCC after previous bladder TCC (P TCC (P = 0.017). On multivariate analysis, a previous history of bladder TCC was the only independent predictor of metachronous bladder TCC (hazard ratio 2.825; P TCC was 45.5%. A history of bladder TCC (P TCC (hazard ratio 2.226; P TCC (1.562; P = 0.036) were independent predictors of the probabilities of being free from metachronous bladder TCC. In this multi-institutional study of patients who had had NU for UUT-TCC, a history of bladder TCC was the only independent predictor of metachronous bladder TCC, while both a history of bladder TCC and the presence of ureteric tumours were predictive of the probabilities of being free from metachronous bladder TCC.

  7. Risk factors for transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, A.; Ilyas, M.; Qayyum, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the role of various known risk factors for the development of Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of urinary bladder in our set up. Study design: Case control study Place and duration of the study: Department of Radiology CMH Rawalpindi, from March 2007 to December 2007. Material and methods: 70 patients with TCC urinary bladder were included in the study. 70 controls were included. The patients were enquired about the risk factors. The data was analysed on SPSS version 12. Odds ratio for each factor was carried out. p value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Smoking was the most important factor in the development of TCC of urinary bladder with odds ratio of 3:1. Driving was the next common factor. Low socioeconomic conditions appear to be an important factor in our set up. The role of chemicals in industrial work could not be established. Conclusion: Differences from the West exist regarding the etiological factors for the development of TCC of urinary bladder. Males outnumber the females by a significant ratio. Smoking is an important factor in the development of TCC of urinary bladder. Most bladder cancers arise in low socioeconomic group in our set up. (author)

  8. DNA methylation patterns in bladder cancer and washing cell sediments: a perspective for tumor recurrence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negraes, Priscilla D; Favaro, Francine P; Camargo, João Lauro V; Oliveira, Maria Luiza CS; Goldberg, José; Rainho, Cláudia A; Salvadori, Daisy MF

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are a hallmark of human cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes is related to urinary bladder cancer recurrence. A set of 4 genes, including CDH1 (E-cadherin), SFN (stratifin), RARB (retinoic acid receptor, beta) and RASSF1A (Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family 1), had their methylation patterns evaluated by MSP (Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis in 49 fresh urinary bladder carcinoma tissues (including 14 cases paired with adjacent normal bladder epithelium, 3 squamous cell carcinomas and 2 adenocarcinomas) and 24 cell sediment samples from bladder washings of patients classified as cancer-free by cytological analysis (control group). A third set of samples included 39 archived tumor fragments and 23 matched washouts from 20 urinary bladder cancer patients in post-surgical monitoring. After genomic DNA isolation and sodium bisulfite modification, methylation patterns were determined and correlated with standard clinic-histopathological parameters. CDH1 and SFN genes were methylated at high frequencies in bladder cancer as well as in paired normal adjacent tissue and exfoliated cells from cancer-free patients. Although no statistically significant differences were found between RARB and RASSF1A methylation and the clinical and histopathological parameters in bladder cancer, a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 71% were observed for RARB methylation (Fisher's Exact test (p < 0.0001; OR = 48.89) and, 58% and 17% (p < 0.05; OR = 0.29) for RASSF1A gene, respectively, in relation to the control group. Indistinct DNA hypermethylation of CDH1 and SFN genes between tumoral and normal urinary bladder samples suggests that these epigenetic features are not suitable biomarkers for urinary bladder cancer. However, RARB and RASSF1A gene methylation appears to be an initial event in urinary bladder carcinogenesis and should be considered as defining a

  9. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  10. Cell length measurements in longitudinal smooth muscle strips of the pig urinary bladder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Asselt (Els); R. Schot (Rachel); R. van Mastrigt (Ron)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the length of smooth muscle cells in muscle bundles of pig urinary bladder wall was determined after dissection in Tyrode buffers with different calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]). Previous studies have shown that the length of isolated smooth muscle cells decreases with an

  11. Single-cell sequencing analysis characterizes common and cell-lineage-specific mutations in a muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Xu, Xun; Song, Luting

    2012-01-01

    sequencing of 66 individual tumor cells from a muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Analyses of the somatic mutant allele frequency spectrum and clonal structure revealed that the tumor cells were derived from a single ancestral cell, but that subsequent evolution occurred, leading...... to two distinct tumor cell subpopulations. By analyzing recurrently mutant genes in an additional cohort of 99 TCC tumors, we identified genes that might play roles in the maintenance of the ancestral clone and in the muscle-invasive capability of subclones of this bladder cancer, respectively...

  12. Evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall obtained by transurethral intravesical echotomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Radovan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the most frequent tumor of the bladder and represents 95−98% of blader neoplasams and 2−3% of all carcinomas in the body. In urogenital oncology more frequent is only prostatic cancer. Evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall represents the clinical base in treatment planning and prognosis. Clinical investigation and convential radiological procedures have a low level of accuracy in estimating the local growth of the tumor. The aims of our investigation were to determine the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall in the investigated group of patients by transurethral intravesical echotomography (TIE and computerised tomography (CT scan and to compare results obtained by both methods with pathohistological (PH results, and, based on the difference of the results determine which method was more accurate in the evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall. Methods. Thirty patients with TCC of the bladder both genders, aged 51−81 years were involved in our investigation. In all of these patients, radical cystectomy (RC was performed. This was neccessary to provide the defintive PH result. Transurethral intravesical echotomography was performed by ultrasound scanner type 1846 Bruel and Kjaer, sond type 1850, and the CT scan was perfomed by Pace plus, General Electric, U.S.A. The specimen for the definitive PH result obtained by RC includes all standards of the TNM classification. Results. Using CT scan, the most frequent was T1 stage (17 patients or 56.68%. Using TIE, the most frequent was T2 stage (22 patients or 73.33%. After RC the most frequent was T2 stage (21 patients or 70%. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, showed a high significant difference between the results obtained using CT and definitive PH results after RC. The same test showed no statistically significant difference between

  13. Risk factors and prognosis of intravesical recurrence after surgical management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma: A 30-year single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamed Elawdy

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: In our present series, bladder cancer recurrence of urothelial malignancy occurred in nearly half of the patients after surgical management of UTUC. Ureteric tumour was the only identifiable risk factor, thus patients with ureteric tumours may benefit from prophylactic intravesical chemoimmunotherapy. Bladder recurrence does not appear to affect the cancer-specific survival after surgical management of UTUC.

  14. Modulating the internalization of bacille Calmette-Guérin by cathelicidin in bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Se Young; Kim, Soon-Ja; Chi, Byung Hoon; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Chang, In Ho

    2015-04-01

    To confirm the role of cathelicidin (LL-37) in the internalization of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) into bladder cancer cells. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis evaluated the changes in protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression with BCG incubation after LL-37 pretreatment in 5637 and T24 human bladder cancer cells. The internalization rate was evaluated by a double immunofluorescence assay, and confocal microscopy confirmed the function of LL-37 in BCG internalization. We also investigated the difference in internalization rates and cell viability between LL-37, anti-LL-37 antibody, and LL-37 plus anti-LL-37 antibody. The levels of LL-37 increased after BCG exposure in bladder cancer cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Increasing LL-37 levels using recombinant LL-37 protein further dose dependently decreased BCG internalization in both cell lines. The internalization rates of BCG after LL-37 instillation were lower compared with the controls, and the internalization rate of BCG after anti-LL-37 antibody instillation was significantly higher compared with the controls in both cell lines (P internalization. Blocking the action of cathelicidin may increase the internalization and effectiveness of BCG in reducing bladder cancer cell proliferation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Precursor T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma with rare presentation in the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the 16th reported case of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL with involvement in the bladder. Our patient was a 22 yearold man with T-cell ALL with a mediastinal mass. He received hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone (HyperCVAD with mediastinal radiation. Prior to starting maintenance, he relapsed in the bladder and marrow. He received a nelarabine- based induction regimen and achieved remission. This was followed by an unrelated 11/12 HLA-matched myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplant. He is in complete remission for the past 409 days.

  16. Reduced LAK cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Petersen, K R; Steven, K

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (US-PBMC), phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC (PS-PBMC) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated PBMC (LAK cells) was assessed in patients with noninvasive and invasive transitional-cell bladder cancer and compared with those...... determined in healthy controls. The differences in the cytotoxicities were correlated with specific changes in the subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PBMC from 37 patients and 13 healthy controls were tested against the bladder cancer cell line T24 in 51Cr-release assays. The PBMC subsets...... were analyzed using monoclonal antibodies against T cells, natural killer (NK) -cells, monocytes, and activation markers. The cytotoxicities of US-PBMC, PS-PBMC, and LAK cells were all significantly lower in the cancer patients than in the controls (P less than 0.05). The percentages of PBMC positive...

  17. Comparative immunohistochemical characterization of interstitial cells in the urinary bladder of human, guinea pig and pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Clara; Gevaert, Thomas; Ganzer, Roman; De Ridder, Dirk; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2018-02-20

    Interstitial cells (ICs) are thought to play a functional role in urinary bladder. Animal models are commonly used to elucidate bladder physiology and pathophysiology. However, inter-species comparative studies on ICs are rare. We therefore analyzed ICs and their distribution in the upper lamina propria (ULP), the deeper lamina propria (DLP) and the detrusor muscular layer (DET) of human, guinea pig (GP) and pig. Paraffin slices were examined by immunohistochemistry and 3D confocal immunofluorescence of the mesenchymal intermediate filament vimentin (VIM), alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) and transient receptor potential cation channel A1 (TRPA1). Image stacks were processed for analysis using Huygens software; quantitative analysis was performed with Fiji macros. ICs were identified by immunoreactivity for VIM (excluding blood vessels). In all species ≥ 75% of ULP ICs were VIM + /PDGFRα + and ≥ 90% were VIM + /TRPA1 + . In human and pig ≥ 74% of ULP ICs were VIM + /αSMA + , while in GP the percentage differed significantly with only 37% VIM + /αSMA + ICs. Additionally, over 90% of αSMA + ICs were also TRPA1 + and PDGFRα + in human, GP and pig. In all three species, TRPA1 + and PDGFRα + ICs point to an active role for these cells in bladder physiology, regarding afferent signaling processes and signal modification. We hypothesize that decline in αSMA-positivity in GP reflects adaptation of bladder histology to smaller bladder size. In our experiments, pig bladder proved to be highly comparable to human urinary bladder and seems to provide safer interpretation of experimental findings than GP.

  18. Recurrent and multiple bladder tumors show conserved expression profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, David; Fioretos, Thoas; Månsson, Wiking; Höglund, Mattias; Gudjonsson, Sigurdur; Jee, Kowan Ja; Liedberg, Fredrik; Aits, Sonja; Andersson, Anna; Chebil, Gunilla; Borg, Åke; Knuutila, Sakari

    2008-01-01

    Urothelial carcinomas originate from the epithelial cells of the inner lining of the bladder and may appear as single or as multiple synchronous tumors. Patients with urothelial carcinomas frequently show recurrences after treatment making follow-up necessary. The leading hypothesis explaining the origin of meta- and synchronous tumors assumes a monoclonal origin. However, the genetic relationship among consecutive tumors has been shown to be complex in as much as the genetic evolution does not adhere to the chronological appearance of the metachronous tumors. Consequently, genetically less evolved tumors may appear chronologically later than genetically related but more evolved tumors. Forty-nine meta- or synchronous urothelial tumors from 22 patients were analyzed using expression profiling, conventional CGH, LOH, and mutation analyses. We show by CGH that partial chromosomal losses in the initial tumors may not be present in the recurring tumors, by LOH that different haplotypes may be lost and that detected regions of LOH may be smaller in recurring tumors, and that mutations present in the initial tumor may not be present in the recurring ones. In contrast we show that despite apparent genomic differences, the recurrent and multiple bladder tumors from the same patients display remarkably similar expression profiles. Our findings show that even though the vast majority of the analyzed meta- and synchronous tumors from the same patients are not likely to have originated directly from the preceding tumor they still show remarkably similar expressions profiles. The presented data suggests that an expression profile is established early in tumor development and that this profile is stable and maintained in recurring tumors

  19. [Influence of hepatocyte cell adhesion molecule on gene expression profile of human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu-ju; Lv, Chang-kun; Tao, Jia; Du, Hong-fei; Fan, Yan-ru; Song, Xue-dong; Luo, Chun-li

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the changes of gene expression file in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder after hepatocyte cell adhesion molecule(hepaCAM) overexpression. Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array was used to investigate the changes of gene expression profile between adenovirus-green fluorescent protein(GFP) -hepaCAM group and GFP group in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder EJ cells.Significant Analysis of Microarray(SAM) was used to screen the differentially expressed genes, DAVID software was used to conduct gene ontology analysis and wikiPathway analysis based on the differentially expressed genes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were applied to verify microarray data. Compared with the GFP group, a total of 2469 genes were up-regulated or down-regulated by more than 2 times in the GFP-hepaCAM group. Among these genes, 1602 genes were up-regulated and 867 were down-regulated.Most of the differentially expressed genes were involved in the function of cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation. The mRNA expressions of nibrin, liver kinase B1, and cyclin D1 detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in three different bladder cancer cell lines were consistent with the microarray data.The protein expressions of nibrin and liver kinase B1 in these three cell lines measured by Western blot were consistent with the mRNA expression. HepaCAM can alter the gene expression profile of bladder cancer EJ cells. The well-known anti-tumor effect of hepaCAM may be mediated by regulating the gene expression via multiple pathways.

  20. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  1. The Role of Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Urinary Bladder Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow-Lisy, Devon C; Diaz, Edward C; Bury, Matthew I; Fuller, Natalie J; Hannick, Jessica H; Ahmad, Nida; Sharma, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with CD34+ hematopoietic/stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) can function as surrogate urinary bladder cells to synergistically promote multi-faceted bladder tissue regeneration. However, the molecular pathways governing these events are unknown. The pleiotropic effects of Wnt5a and Cyr61 are known to affect aspects of hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and muscle and nerve regeneration. Within this study, the effects of Cyr61 and Wnt5a on bladder tissue regeneration were evaluated by grafting scaffolds containing modified human bone marrow derived MSCs. These cell lines were engineered to independently over-express Wnt5a or Cyr61, or to exhibit reduced expression of Cyr61 within the context of a nude rat bladder augmentation model. At 4 weeks post-surgery, data demonstrated increased vessel number (~250 vs ~109 vessels/mm2) and bladder smooth muscle content (~42% vs ~36%) in Cyr61OX (over-expressing) vs Cyr61KD (knock-down) groups. Muscle content decreased to ~25% at 10 weeks in Cyr61KD groups. Wnt5aOX resulted in high numbers of vessels and muscle content (~206 vessels/mm2 and ~51%, respectively) at 4 weeks. Over-expressing cell constructs resulted in peripheral nerve regeneration while Cyr61KD animals were devoid of peripheral nerve regeneration at 4 weeks. At 10 weeks post-grafting, peripheral nerve regeneration was at a minimal level for both Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines. Blood vessel and bladder functionality were evident at both time-points in all animals. Results from this study indicate that MSC-based Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines play pivotal roles with regards to increasing the levels of functional vasculature, influencing muscle regeneration, and the regeneration of peripheral nerves in a model of bladder augmentation. Wnt5aOX constructs closely approximated the outcomes previously observed with the co-transplantation of MSCs with CD34+ HSPCs and may be specifically targeted as an

  2. Urothelial Carcinoma in a 22-Year-Old Female with Angelman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Pugh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old nulligravid white female with Angelman syndrome was noted to have a 4-month history of premenstrual nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. She had an echogenic focus in her bladder noted on ultrasound. She was diagnosed with low grade urothelial carcinoma after cystoscopic evaluation with biopsy and was sent to urology for further treatment. Urothelial carcinoma is rare in individuals younger than age 40. Patients may present with gross hematuria. There is often a delay in diagnosis in younger individuals with different genetic mutations noted upon diagnosis.

  3. Schistosomiasis-induced squamous cell bladder carcinoma in an HIV-infected patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Lis Høy; Øvrehus, Anne Lindebo Holm; Johansen, Isik Somuncu

    2015-01-01

    haematuria for more than a year. Investigations revealed invasive S. haematobium-associated squamous cell bladder cancer. If her origin had been taken into account, the diagnosis might have been made earlier. Awareness of the disease prevalence among HIV co-infected patients from endemic areas and timely...... screening of such patients is important for the early diagnosis of schistosomiasis and related complications, such as S. haematobium-associated squamous cell bladder cancer.......The burden of Schistosoma haematobium-associated bladder cancer is very high in Africa; nevertheless the disease can pose considerable diagnostic challenges in low prevalence countries. We present the case of a 40-year-old HIV co-infected woman, originally from Mozambique, who had persisting...

  4. Synergistic Effect of Carboplatin and Piroxicam on Two Bladder Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jéssica; Arantes-Rodrigues, Regina; Pinto-Leite, Rosário; Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Fidalgo-Gonçalves, Lio; Santos, Lúcio; Oliveira, Paula A

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of carboplatin and piroxicam, both in isolation and combined, against T24 and 5637 human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. Cell viability, drug interaction, cell morphology, cell proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy were analyzed after 72 h of drug exposure. Statistical analysis was performed and values of ppiroxicam produced a more potent antiproliferative effect when compared to single drugs. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. Keystone Symposia "ncRNAs in Development and Cancer", Vancouver, Canada: Increased release of exosomes and export of invasion-modulating miRNAs miR921, -23b, -and -224 from metastatic urothelial carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Laurberg, Jens Reumert

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells secrete soluble factors and various extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, into their tissue microenvironment. The secretion of exosomes is speculated to facilitate local invasion and increase the propensity of tumors to form distant metastases. Here we present a characterization...... of exosome vesicles from isogenic urothelial carcinoma cell lines, with different metastatic propensity by western blotting, electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering, and profiling of 671 miRNAs by qRT-PCR. An increase in the number of multivesicular bodies and exosomes...

  6. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  7. Magnitude-dependent proliferation and contractility modulation of human bladder smooth muscle cells under physiological stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Du, Caigan; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Wei, Tang-Qiang; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and test a kind of stretch pattern which is based on modified BOSE BioDynamic system to produce optimum physiological stretch during bladder cycle. Moreover, we aimed to emphasize the effects of physiological stretch's amplitude upon proliferation and contractility of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). HBSMCs were seeded onto silicone membrane and subjected to stretch simulating bladder cycle at the range of stretches and time according to customized software on modified BOSE BioDynamic bioreactor. Morphological changes were assessed using immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscope. Cell proliferation and cell viability were determined by BrdU incorporation assay and Cell Counting Kit-8, respectively. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. RT-PCR was used to assess phenotypic and contractility markers. HBSMCs were found to show morphologically spindle-shaped and orientation at various elongations in the modified bioreactor. Stretch-induced proliferation and viability depended on the magnitude of stretch, and stretches also regulate contractility and contraction markers in a magnitude-dependent manner. We described and tested a kind of stretch pattern which delivers physiological stretch implemented during bladder cycle. The findings also showed that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent morphological, proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in vitro.

  8. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Urine cytology of micropapillary carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Takahiko; Furuta, Michiko; Mimura, Akihiro; Tanigawa, Naoto; Takamizu, Ryuichi; Kawano, Kiyoshi

    2011-11-01

    A case of micropapillary carcinoma (MPC) of urinary bladder is presented, in which the urine smear was studied in detail in an attempt to better characterize the cytologic findings of MPC. When the voided urine was examined in low power, cancer cells were scattered in the specimens as compact papillary/spheroidal clusters composed of pleomorphic cancer cells. Solitary carcinoma cells were occasionally observed. High power view of the smear revealed that the papillae/spheroids consisted of high-grade urothelial carcinoma cells. The cancer cells had pleomorphic nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin and thickened, irregular nuclear membrane, and thick cytoplasm. Histologically, the tumor in the resected bladder appeared as small nests with surrounding hallo both in the luminal surface and in the site of wall involvement. These tightly bound papillary/spheroidal clusters comprised of highly atypical cancer cells were the most specific cytologic finding in the urine of MPC, which were considered as a key diagnostic clue of MPC. The background of the urine smear showed numerous granulocytes and bacilli compatible with cystitis, which is a previously known complication of MPC. Differential diagnoses of MPC from those with pertinent cytologic findings such as conventional UC (including glandular differentiation), and primary/secondary adenocarcinoma of urinary bladder are discussed with a brief review of literature. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Sorafenib induces cathepsin B-mediated apoptosis of bladder cancer cells by regulating the Akt/PTEN pathway. The Akt inhibitor, perifosine, enhances the sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity against bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amantini, Consuelo; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Santoni, Matteo; Soriani, Alessandra; Cardinali, Claudio; Farfariello, Valerio; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Bonfili, Laura; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Nabissi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated to exert anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on bladder cancer remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanisms responsible for the sorafenib-induced anti-tumor effects on 5637 and T24 bladder cancer cells. We demonstrated that sorafenib reduces cell viability, stimulates lysosome permeabilization and induces apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. These effects are dependent by the activation of cathepsin B released from lysosomes. The sorafenib-increased cathepsin B activity induced the proteolysis of Bid into tBid that stimulates the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis characterized by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxygen radical generation and cytochrome c release. Moreover, we found that cathepsin B enzymatic activity, induced by sorafenib, is dependent on its dephosphorylation via PTEN activation and Akt inactivation. Pretreatment with orthovanadate rescued bladder cancer cells from apoptosis. In addition, the Akt inhibitor perifosine increased the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity. Overall, our results show that apoptotic cell death induced by sorafenib in bladder cancer cells is dependent on cathepsin B activity and involved PTEN and Akt signaling pathways. The Akt inhibitor perifosine increased the cytotoxic effects of sorafenib in bladder cancer cells.

  11. Protoporphyrin IX induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid in bladder cancer cells in voided urine can be extracorporeally quantified using a spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yasushi; Anai, Satoshi; Onishi, Sayuri; Masaomi, Kuwada; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Makito; Chihara, Yoshitomo; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer by spectrophotometric analysis of voided urine samples after extracorporeal treatment with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Sixty-one patients with bladder cancer, confirmed histologically after the transurethral resection of a bladder tumor, were recruited as the bladder cancer group, and 50 outpatients without history of urothelial carcinoma or cancer-related findings were recruited as the control group. Half of the voided urine sample was incubated with ALA (ALA-treated sample), and the rest was incubated without treatment (ALA-untreated sample). For detecting cellular protoporphyrin IX levels, intensity of the samples at the excitation wavelength of 405 nm was measured using a spectrophotometer. The difference between the intensity of the ALA-treated and ALA-untreated samples at 635 nm was calculated. The differences in the bladder cancer group were significantly greater than those in the control group (p spectrophotometer in patients with bladder cancer. Therefore, this cancer detection system has a potential for clinical use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Metastasis of Gastric Signet-Ring Cell Carcinoma to the Urinary Bladder: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Okutur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although signet-ring cell (SRC adenocarcinoma is commonly seen in the stomach, it is a very rarely seen histologic entity in the bladder. It is difficult to distinguish primary SRC adenocarcinoma of the bladder from bladder metastasis of SRC carcinoma of the stomach only based on histological findings. In such cases, clinical findings and immunohistochemical studies may be helpful. We present here a 48-year-old male patient presenting with hematuria and abdominal pain. Computerised tomography of the patient revealed a gastric mass, peritoneal involvement, and thickening of the bladder wall, and histopathological analysis revealed SRC adenocarcinoma in both of the endoscopic biopsies taken from the stomach and bladder. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the diagnosis of SRC adenocarcinoma of the bladder secondary to gastric cancer.

  13. An updated review on primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and report of a case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lendorf, Maria Elisabeth; Dohn, Line Hammer; Á Dunga, Bara

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to emphasize the critical importance of the clinician's awareness of signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the urinary bladder, a rare and aggressive disease entity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of the current literature was conducted and a classic case...... of advanced SRCC of the urinary bladder is reported, clearly demonstrating the severity of this disease and the imperative need for standardized recommendations for the diagnostic work-up and management of urinary bladder SRCC. RESULTS: The prognosis for patients with SRCC of the urinary bladder is poor...

  14. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    with the use of Medline; additional cited works not detected on the initial search regarding neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer were reviewed. Evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management...... the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed......, as is chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. The conference panel consisted of 10 medical oncologists and urologists from 3 continents who are experts in this field and who reviewed the English-language literature through October 2004. Relevant English-language literature was identified...

  15. Phase III trial of vinflunine plus best supportive care compared with best supportive care alone after a platinum-containing regimen in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelial tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; Théodore, Christine; Demkov, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Vinflunine (VFL) is a new microtubule inhibitor that has activity against transitional cell carcinoma of urothelial tract (TCCU). We conducted a randomized phase III study of VFL and best supportive care (BSC) versus BSC alone in the treatment of patients with advanced TCCU who had......) subsequently escalated to 320 mg/m(2)) or BSC. RESULTS: Three hundred seventy patients were randomly assigned (VFL + BSC, n =253; BSC, n = 117). Both arms were well balanced except there were more patients with PS more than 1 (10% difference) in the BSC arm. Main grade 3 or 4 toxicities for VFL + BSC were...

  16. Host-Pathogen Checkpoints and Population Bottlenecks in Persistent and Intracellular Uropathogenic E. coli Bladder Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Totsika, Makrina; Mansfield, Kylie J.; Moore, Kate H.; Schembri, Mark A.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder infections affect millions of people yearly, and recurrent symptomatic infections (cystitis) are very common. The rapid increase in infections caused by multi-drug resistant uropathogens threatens to make recurrent cystitis an increasingly troubling public health concern. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of bladder infections. Upon entry into the lower urinary tract, UPEC face obstacles to colonization that constitute population bottlenecks, reducing diversity and selecting for fit clones. A critical mucosal barrier to bladder infection is the epithelium (urothelium). UPEC bypass this barrier when they invade urothelial cells and form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs), a process which requires type 1 pili. IBCs are transient in nature, occurring primarily during acute infection. Chronic bladder infection is common and can be either latent, in the form of the Quiescent Intracellular Reservoir (QIR), or active, in the form of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB/ABU) or chronic cystitis. In mice, the fate of bladder infection: QIR, ASB, or chronic cystitis, is determined within the first 24 hours of infection and constitutes a putative host-pathogen mucosal checkpoint that contributes to susceptibility to recurrent cystitis. Knowledge of these checkpoints and bottlenecks is critical for our understanding of bladder infection and efforts to devise novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22404313

  17. Human Milk Oligosaccharides Protect Bladder Epithelial Cells Against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Invasion and Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ann E.; Autran, Chloe A.; Espanola, Sophia D.; Bode, Lars; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The invasive pathogen uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recurrent infection that can progress to life-threatening renal failure has remained as a serious global health concern in infants. UPEC adheres to and invades bladder epithelial cells to establish infection. Studies have detected the presence of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in urine of breast-fed, but not formula-fed, neonates. We investigated the mechanisms HMOs deploy to elicit protection in human bladder epithelial cells infected with UPEC CFT073, a prototypic urosepsis-associated strain. We found a significant reduction in UPEC internalization into HMO-pretreated epithelial cells without observing any significant effect in UPEC binding to these cells. This event coincides with a rapid decrease in host cell cytotoxicity, recognized by LIVE/DEAD staining and cell detachment, but independent of caspase-mediated or mitochondrial-mediated programmed cell death pathways. Further investigation revealed HMOs, and particularly the sialic acid-containing fraction, reduced UPEC-mediated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results indicate that HMOs can protect bladder epithelial cells from deleterious cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of UPEC infection, and may be one contributing mechanism underlying the epidemiological evidence of reduced UTI incidence in breast-fed infants. PMID:23990566

  18. Single cell-type comparative metabolomics of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Jane Barkla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the remarkable adaptive features of the halophyte and facultative CAM plant Mesembryathemum crystallinum are the specialized modified trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC which cover the leaves, stems, and peduncle of the plant. They are present from an early developmental stage but upon salt stress rapidly expand due to the accumulation of water and sodium. This particular plant feature makes it an attractive system for single cell type studies, with recent proteomics and transcriptomics studies of the EBC establishing that these cells are metabolically active and have roles other than sodium sequestration. To continue our investigation into the function of these unusual cells we carried out a comprehensive global analysis of the metabolites present in the EBC extract by gas chromatography Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF and identified 194 known and 722 total molecular features. Statistical analysis of the metabolic changes between control and salt-treated samples was used to identify 352 significantly differing metabolites (268 after correction for FDR. Principal components analysis provided an unbiased evaluation of the data variance structure. Biochemical pathway enrichment analysis suggested significant perturbations in 13 biochemical pathways as defined in KEGG. More than 50% of the metabolites that show significant changes in the EBC, can be classified as compatible solutes and include sugars, sugar alcohols, protein and non-protein amino acids, and organic acids, highlighting the need to maintain osmotic homeostasis to balance the accumulation of Na and Cl ions. Overall, the comparison of metabolic changes in salt treated relative to control samples suggest large alterations in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum epidermal bladder cells.

  19. Targeted p53 activation by saRNA suppresses human bladder cancer cells growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenghe; Ge, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Qingsong; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Jia; Li, Fan; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-03-25

    Previous study showed that dsP53-285 has the capacity to induce tumor suppressor gene p53 expression by targeting promoter in non-human primates' cells. And it is well known that TP53 gene is frequently mutant or inactivated in human bladder cancer. Hereby, whether this small RNA can activate the expression of wild-type p53 and inhibit human bladder cancer cells remains to be elucidated. Oligonucleotide and lentivirus were used to overexpress dsP53-285 and dsControl. Real-time PCR and western blot were used to detect genes' mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Cell proliferation assay, colony formation, flow cytometry, transwell assay and wound healing assay were performed to determine the effects on bladder cancer cells proliferation and migration/invasion in vitro. Animal models were carried out to analyze the effects on cells growth and metastasis in vivo. Transfection of dsP53-285 into human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and EJ readily activate wild-type p53 expression by targeting promoter. Moreover, dsP53-285 exhibited robust capacity to inhibit cells proliferation and colony formation, induce cells G0/G1 arrest, suppress migration and invasion. Besides, the Cyclin-CDK genes (Cyclin D1 and CDK4/6) were down-regulated and the EMT-associated genes (E-cadherin, β-catenin, ZEB1 and Vimentin) were also expressed inversely after dsP53-285 treatment. In addition, dsP53-285 could also significantly suppress the growth of bladder cancer xenografts and metastasis in nude mice. Most importantly, the anti-tumor effects mediated by dsP53-285 were mainly achieved by manipulating wild-type p53 expression. Our findings indicate that the dsP53-285 can upregulate wild-type p53 expression in human bladder cancer cells through RNA activation, and suppresses cells proliferation and metastasis in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Immunoglobulin G4-associated inflammatory pseudotumor of urinary bladder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghui; Ro, Jae Y; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Choi, Sun Young; Koo, Heasoo

    2013-12-01

    A previously healthy 72-year old woman was admitted with a chief complaint of gross hematuria and fecaluria for 4 months. On initial computed tomographic examination, a lobulated shaped intravesical protruding mass with adhesion to the sigmoid colon was identified. Under a clinical diagnosis of bladder cancer with vesicosigmoid fistula vs sigmoid colon cancer with vesicosigmoid fistula, a frozen section evaluation of the bladder mass was performed to determine the origin of the tumor. Because the frozen section diagnosis of the bladder mass was an inflammatory origin, a partial cystectomy with segmental resection of the adherent sigmoid colon was elected. The microscopic examination of the partial resection of the urinary bladder revealed suburothelial inflammatory mass lesion, involving the entire wall of bladder with extension to the sigmoid colon, which was composed of spindle cells without significant atypia admixed with many lymphocytes, plasma cells, and some scattered eosinophils. Chronic inflammation around nerve bundles, sclerotic fibrosis, and prominent lymphoid follicles with plasma cells were the main features of the mass. No urothelial dysplasia or malignancy was seen. An average of 57 plasma cells per 1 high-power field was immunoreactive for immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 with IgG4/IgG ratio of more than 40%, a diagnostic feature of IgG4-associated inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT), arising in the bladder with the secondary involvement of the sigmoid colon. Recent studies reported many IPTs associated with IgG4 in other locations; however, to the best of our knowledge, IgG4-associated IPT in the urinary bladder has not been reported. We describe herein the first case of IgG4-associated IPT, lymphoplasmacytic type in the urinary bladder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bladder Cancer in HIV-infected Adults: An Emerging Issue? Case-Reports and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawki, Sylvain; Ploussard, Guillaume; Montlahuc, Claire; Verine, Jérome; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Desgrandchamps, François; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Non-AIDS-related malignancies now represent a frequent cause of death among HIV-infected patients. Albeit bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, it has been rarely reported among HIV-infected patients. We wished to assess the prevalence and characteristics of bladder cancer in HIV-infected patients. We conducted a single center retrospective study from 1998 to 2013 in a university hospital in Paris. Cases of bladder cancer among HIV-infected patients were identified using the electronic records of the hospital database and of the HIV-infected cohort. Patient characteristics and outcomes were retrieved from patients charts. A systematic review of published cases of bladder cancers in patients with HIV-infection was also performed. During the study period we identified 15 HIV-infected patients (0.2% of the cohort) with a bladder cancer. Patients were mostly men (73%) and smokers (67%), with a median age of 56 years at cancer diagnosis. Bladder cancer was diagnosed a median of 14 years after HIV-infection. Most patients were on ART (86%) with median current and nadir CD4 cell counts of 506 and 195 cells/mm3, respectively. Haematuria (73%) was the most frequent presenting symptom and HPV-associated lesions were seen in 6/10 (60%) patients. Histopathology showed transitional cell carcinoma in 80% and a high proportion of tumors with muscle invasion (47%) and high histologic grade (73%). One-year survival rate was 74.6%. The systematic review identified 13 additional cases of urothelial bladder cancers which shared similar features. Bladder cancers in HIV-infected patients remain rare but may occur in relatively young patients with a low nadir CD4 cell count, have aggressive pathological features and can be fatal.

  2. Synergistic Cytotoxic Effects of Ganoderma lucidum and Bacillus Calmette Guérin on Premalignant Urothelial HUC-PC Cells and Its Regulation on Proinflammatory Cytokine Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wai-man Yuen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG is conventionally used as an adjuvant immunotherapy to reduce the recurrence of bladder cancer. To address the issues of efficacy and safety, an ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum (GLe was evaluated for its interaction with BCG. In a model of premalignant human uroepithelial cells (HUC-PC, GLe exerted immediate cytotoxic effects while BCG showed a delayed response, given that both were immunological active in inducing the secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1. Synergistic cytotoxic effects were observed when cells were either coincubated with both drugs or firstly preincubated with GLe. Synergism between GLe and BCG was demonstrated to achieve a complete cytostasis in 24 hours, and such effects were progressed in the subsequent 5 days. However, the pretreatment of GLe resulted in suppression of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 secretions without affecting the cytotoxicity. Given that numerous proinflammatory cytokines are associated with the high side effects toll of BCG, results herein suggested the potential implications of GL to supplement the BCG immunotherapy in bladder cancer, for better efficacy and reducing side effects.

  3. TP53 modulating agent, CP-31398 enhances antitumor effects of ODC inhibitor in mouse model of urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Kumar, Gaurav; Lightfoot, Stan; Wu, Xueru; Steele, Vernon; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor p53 and elevated levels of polyamines are known to play key roles in urothelial tumorigenesis. We investigated the inhibition of polyamines biosynthesis and the restoration of p53 signaling as a possible means of preventing muscle invasive urothelial tumors using DFMO, an ODC-inhibiting agent, and CP-31398 (CP), a p53 stabilizing agent. Transgenic UPII-SV40T male mice at 6weeks age (n=15/group) were fed control diet (AIN-76A) or experimental diets containing DFMO (1000 and 2000 ppm) or 150 ppm CP or both. At 40 weeks of age, all mice were euthanized and urinary bladders were evaluated to determine tumor weight and histopathology. Low-dose DFMO had a moderate significant inhibitory effect on tumor growth (38%, P0.05). CP at 150 ppm alone had a strong inhibitory effect on tumor growth by 80% (PCP (150 ppm) led to significant decrease in tumor weight (70%, PCP and DFMO appears to be a promising strategy for urothelial TCC prevention.

  4. UPEC biomimickry at the urothelial barrier: lectin-functionalized PLGA microparticles for improved intravesical chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutsch, Lukas; Wambacher, Michael; Wirth, Eva-Maria; Spijker, Sylvia; Kählig, Hanspeter; Wirth, Michael; Gabor, Franz

    2013-06-25

    The urgent demand for more potent treatment schedules in bladder cancer (BCa) therapy calls for a refinement of the intravesical administration modalities. However, progress on drug delivery systems tailored to the penetration-hostile urothelial barrier lags behind the advancements in comparable fields. This study reports on a multimodal, carrier-based delivery concept that combines biorecognitive targeting with modified release strategies for improved intravesical chemotherapy. The plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was immobilized on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles (MP) to induce stable cytoadhesion via cellular carbohydrate chains, similar to the specific attachment mechanism utilized by uropathogenic bacteria. A panel of DNA-selective chemotherapeutics with established track record in uro-oncology was screened for physicochemical compatibility with the polymeric carrier formulation. Critical limitations in encapsulation efficiency were found for mitomycin C (MMC), doxorubicin (DOX), and gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM), despite multiparametric optimization of the preparation conditions. In contrast, the amphiphilic 4-(N)-stearoyl prodrug of gemcitabine (GEM-C18) exhibited excellent processability with PLGA. In vitro bioassays on 5637 human BCa cells showed that the enhanced cytoadhesion of WGA-GEM-C18-PGLA-MP traces back to the specific lectin/carbohydrate interaction, and is not easily disrupted by adverse environmental factors. Owing to several synergistic effects, the combined prodrug/targeting approach resulted in strong cytostatic response even when adjusting the exposure scheme to the confined temporal conditions of instillative treatment. Our results highlight the importance of fine-tuning both pharmacokinetic and pharmacologic parameters to gain adequate impact on urothelial cancer cells, and assign promising potential to glycan-targeted delivery concepts for the intravesical route. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  5. Kaempferol Promotes Apoptosis in Human Bladder Cancer Cells by Inducing the Tumor Suppressor, PTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaempferol (Kae, a natural flavonoid, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables. Previous studies have identified Kae as a possible cancer preventive and therapeutic agent. We found Kae to exhibit potent antiproliferation and anti-migration effects in human bladder cancer EJ cells. Kaempferol robustly induced apoptosis in EJ cells in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by increased cleavage of caspase-3. Furthermore, we found Kae-induced apoptosis in EJ cells to be associated with phosphatase and the tensin homolog deleted on the chromosome 10 (PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway. Kae significantly increased PTEN and decreased Akt phosphorylation. Kae-induced apoptosis was partially attenuated in PTEN-knockdown cells. Our findings indicate that Kae could be an alternative medicine for bladder cancer, based on a PTEN activation mechanism.

  6. Tumor-suppressing effects of microRNA-612 in bladder cancer cells by targeting malic enzyme 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengnan; Chen, Yifan; Huang, Bisheng; Mao, Shiyu; Cai, Keke; Wang, Longsheng; Yao, Xudong

    2018-03-29

    The present study investigated the possible tumor-suppressing function of microRNA (miR)-612 and the underlying molecular mechanism of its action in bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) was carried out to quantify the expression levels of miR‑612 in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. The data demonstrated that the level of miR‑612 expression was significantly reduced in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines, as compared with that in non‑cancerous tissues and cells. Reduced miR‑612 expression was associated with advanced tumor, lymph node and metastasis stages, and with distant metastasis of bladder cancer. A functional study revealed that transfection of cells with an miR‑612 mimic suppressed bladder cancer cell growth, colony formation, migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Bioinformatics analysis identified that miR‑612 targeted the expression of malic enzyme 1 (ME1), and this was confirmed by western blot and luciferase reporter assay results. Furthermore, the ME1 expression levels were inversely associated with miR‑612 expression in bladder cancer tissue specimens. In addition, knockdown of ME1 expression using ME1 siRNA mimicked the effect of ectopic miR‑612 overexpression in bladder cancer cells in terms of tumor cell growth, migration and invasion. By contrast, ME1 overexpression weakened the inhibitory effect of the miR‑612 mimic in bladder cancer cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that miR‑612 may function as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer by targeting ME1 expression.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition of Bladder Epithelial Cells Using SILAC Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganglong Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT is an essential biological process involved in embryonic development, cancer progression, and metastatic diseases. EMT has often been used as a model for elucidating the mechanisms that underlie bladder cancer progression. However, no study to date has addressed the quantitative global variation of proteins in EMT using normal and non-malignant bladder cells. We treated normal bladder epithelial HCV29 cells and low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β to establish an EMT model, and studied non-treated and treated HCV29 and KK47 cells by the stable isotope labeling amino acids in cell culture (SILAC method. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography/LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among a total of 2994 unique identified and annotated proteins in HCV29 and KK47 cells undergoing EMT, 48 and 56 proteins, respectively, were significantly upregulated, and 106 and 24 proteins were significantly downregulated. Gene ontology (GO term analysis and pathways analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved mainly in enhancement of DNA maintenance and inhibition of cell-cell adhesion. Proteomes were compared for bladder cell EMT vs. bladder cancer cells, revealing 16 proteins that displayed similar changes in the two situations. Studies are in progress to further characterize these 16 proteins and their biological functions in EMT.

  8. Increased susceptibility to bladder inflammation in smokers: targeting the PAF-PAF receptor interaction to manage inflammatory cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marentette, John; Kolar, Grant; McHowat, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Chronic bladder inflammation can result in a significant reduction in quality of life. Smoking remains a leading preventable risk factor in many diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence supporting the risks of smoking, roughly 45 million people in the United States remain smokers. The impact of cigarette smoking on inflammation is well established, but how smoking promotes bladder inflammation is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if cigarette smoke exposure impacts inflammatory cell adherence to bladder endothelial cells and if targeting the platelet-activating factor (PAF)-PAF receptor (PAFR) interaction could be beneficial in managing bladder inflammation. In response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) incubation, bladder endothelial cells from human or mouse displayed increased PAF accumulation, decreased PAF-AH activity, and increased inflammatory cell adherence. Inhibition of endothelial cell calcium-independent phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β) with (S)-BEL, to block PAF production, prevented adherence of inflammatory cells. Pretreatment of inflammatory cells with PAFR antagonists, ginkgolide B or WEB2086 significantly reduced the number of adhered cells to bladder endothelium. Wild-type mice exposed to cigarette smoke displayed increased presence of inflammatory infiltration which was absent in iPLA2β(-/-) mice and those exposed to room air. In conclusion, cigarette smoke exposure increases endothelial cell PAF accumulation and increased inflammatory cell adherence. Inhibition of PAF accumulation or PAFR antagonism markedly attenuated inflammatory cell adherence to bladder endothelial cells. The results detailed in this study highlight to potential therapeutic targets for managing bladder inflammation. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  9. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    Stem cells;. Bladder tissue engineering;. Decellularization;. Bladder acellular matrix. Abstract. A wide range of injuries could affect the bladder and lead to eventual loss ... Tissue engineering relies upon three essential pillars; the scaffold, the cells seeded on scaffolds and lastly ..... Clinical trials in bladder tissue engineering.

  10. Frankincense oil derived from Boswellia carteri induces tumor cell specific cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Richard A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Originating from Africa, India, and the Middle East, frankincense oil has been important both socially and economically as an ingredient in incense and perfumes for thousands of years. Frankincense oil is prepared from aromatic hardened gum resins obtained by tapping Boswellia trees. One of the main components of frankincense oil is boswellic acid, a component known to have anti-neoplastic properties. The goal of this study was to evaluate frankincense oil for its anti-tumor activity and signaling pathways in bladder cancer cells. Methods Frankincense oil-induced cell viability was investigated in human bladder cancer J82 cells and immortalized normal bladder urothelial UROtsa cells. Temporal regulation of frankincense oil-activated gene expression in bladder cancer cells was identified by microarray and bioinformatics analysis. Results Within a range of concentration, frankincense oil suppressed cell viability in bladder transitional carcinoma J82 cells but not in UROtsa cells. Comprehensive gene expression analysis confirmed that frankincense oil activates genes that are responsible for cell cycle arrest, cell growth suppression, and apoptosis in J82 cells. However, frankincense oil-induced cell death in J82 cells did not result in DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis. Conclusion Frankincense oil appears to distinguish cancerous from normal bladder cells and suppress cancer cell viability. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis proposed multiple pathways that can be activated by frankincense oil to induce bladder cancer cell death. Frankincense oil might represent an alternative intravesical agent for bladder cancer treatment.

  11. The Antidiabetic Drug Metformin Inhibits the Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that metformin, a widely used antidiabetic agent, may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis of certain malignancies. However, the mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of metformin remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effects of metformin on human bladder cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. Metformin significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of 5637 and T24 cells in vitro; specifically, metformin induced an apparent cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases, accompanied by a strong decrease of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4, E2F1 and an increase of p21waf-1. Further experiments revealed that metformin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and suppressed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, the central regulator of protein synthesis and cell growth. Moreover, daily treatment of metformin led to a substantial inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft model with concomitant decrease in the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclin D1 and p-mTOR. The in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that metformin efficiently suppresses the proliferation of bladder cancer cells and suggest that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  12. Additively enhanced antiproliferative effect of interferon combined with proanthocyanidin on bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Andrew I; Johnson, Blake; Alexander, Bobby; Won, John; Choudhury, Muhammad; Konno, Sensuke

    2012-01-01

    Although interferon (IFN) has been often used as immunotherapy for bladder cancer, its efficacy is rather unsatisfactory, demanding further improvement. Combination therapy is one of viable options, and grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) could be such an agent to be used with IFN because it has been shown to have anticancer activity. We thus investigated whether combination of IFN and GSP might enhance the overall antiproliferative effect on bladder cancer cells in vitro. Human bladder cancer T24 cells were employed and treated with the varying concentrations of recombinant IFN-α(2b) (0-100,000 IU/ml), GSP (0-100 μg/ml), or their combinations. IFN-α(2b) alone led to a ~50% growth reduction at 20,000 (20K) IU/ml, which further declined to ~67% at ≥50K IU/ml. Similarly, GSP alone induced a ~35% and ~100% growth reduction at 25 and ≥50 μg/ml, respectively. When IFN-α(2b) and GSP were then combined, combination of 50K IU/ml IFN-α(2b) and 25 μg/ml GSP resulted in a drastic >95% growth reduction. Cell cycle analysis indicated that such an enhanced growth inhibition was accompanied by a G(1) cell cycle arrest. This was further confirmed by Western blot analysis revealing that expressions of G(1)-specific cell cycle regulators (CDK2, CDK4, cyclin E and p27/Kip1) were distinctly modulated with such IFN-α(2b)/GSP treatment. Therefore, these findings support the notion that combination of IFN-α(2b) and GSP is capable of additively enhancing antiproliferative effect on T24 cells with a G(1) cell cycle arrest, implying an adjuvant therapeutic modality for superficial bladder cancer.

  13. Predictive Factors for Time to Progression after Hyperthermic Mitomycin C Treatment for High-Risk Non-Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder: An Observational Cohort Study of 97 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Chiocchia, Virginia; Dutton, Susan; Pai, Aakash; Ayres, Benjamin E; Le Roux, Pieter; Swinn, Michael; Bailey, Michael; Perry, Matthew J A; Issa, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermic mitomycin (HM) is a novel treatment modality for selected patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We sought to determine predictors of response to this therapy. A longitudinal, cohort study of 97 patients with high-risk NMIBC treated with ≥4 HM instillations on a prophylactic schedule was conducted. The primary outcome was time-to-progression survival; secondary outcomes were overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and adverse events. Descriptive statistics, Kaplan-Meier survival analyses, Cox proportional hazards modelling, and univariate and multivariable regression were performed. The presence of initial complete response (CR; no evidence of disease at first check video-cystoscopy and urine cytology) post-HM treatment was an independent predictor of good response to HM. Female patients and those without carcinoma in situ (CIS) also appeared to respond better to the intervention. The overall bladder preservation rate at a median of 27 months was 81.4%; 17/97 (17.5%) patients died during the course of the study. High-risk NMIBC patients can be safely treated with HM and have good oncological outcome. However, those without an initial CR have a poor prognosis and should be counselled towards adopting other treatment methodologies such as cystectomy. Female gender and lack of CIS may be good prognostic indicators for response to HM. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. miRNAs associated with chemo-sensitivity in cell lines and in advanced bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Iver; Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Agerbæk, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNA is a naturally occurring class of non-coding RNA molecules that mediate posttranscriptional gene regulation and are strongly implicated in cellular processes such as cell proliferation, carcinogenesis, cell survival and apoptosis. Consequently there is increasing focus on mi...... guidance. Methods We profiled the expression of 671 miRNAs in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumors from patients with advanced bladder cancer treated with cisplatin based chemotherapy. We delineated differentially expressed miRNAs in tumors from patients with complete response vs. patients...... identified 15 miRNAs that correlated with response to chemotherapy and 5 miRNAs that correlated with survival time. Three miRNAs were associated with both response and survival (886-3p, 923, 944). By changing the cellular level of the response-identified miRNAs in eight bladder cell lines with different...

  15. Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Macrophage Cytotoxicity against Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Luo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many details of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG immunotherapy of bladder cancer have been discovered in the past decades. However, information on a potential role for macrophage cytotoxicity as an effector mechanism is limited. Macrophages play pivotal roles in the host innate immunity and serve as a first line of defense in mycobacterial infection. In addition to their function as professional antigen-presenting cells, the tumoricidal activity of macrophages has also been studied with considerable interest. Studies have shown that activated macrophages are potent in killing malignant cells of various tissue origins. This review summarizes the current understanding of the BCG-induced macrophage cytotoxicity toward bladder cancer cells with an intention to inspire investigation on this important but underdeveloped research field.

  16. [Small cell bladder carcinoma in age extremes: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Benítez, Ana; Rodríguez-Zarco, Enrique; Pabón-Carrasco, Sara; Espinal, Paula Sofía

    2018-03-01

    We report 2 cases of small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (CCP) of the urinary bladder in patients aged 37 and 80 years. CCP is a malignancy with poor prognosis. We review the literature, under the current WHO classification (2016). Paraffin blocks were cut for HE staining and immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of neuroendocrine differentiation. The main diagnosis was based on histopathologic features, which revealed a diffuse growth pattern of small cells with scant cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei. The result of the additional technical immunoreaction was positive for synaptophysin and CD56. Our cases have been reviewed with the literature to discuss the evolution and differential diagnosis of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. This is a rare tumor with very aggressive behavior and its diagnosis lies in its morphology, and immunohistochemical profile.

  17. Free fatty acid palmitate impairs the vitality and function of cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Oberbach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Incidence of urinary tract infections is elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. Those patients show increased levels of the saturated free fatty acid palmitate. As recently shown metabolic alterations induced by palmitate include production and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukine-6 (IL-6 in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC. Here we studied the influence of palmitate on vital cell properties, for example, regulation of cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity in hBSMC, and analyzed the involvement of major cytokine signaling pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HBSMC cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy and stimulated with palmitate. We analyzed cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and antioxidant capacity by ELISA and confocal immunofluorescence. In signal transduction inhibition experiments we evaluated the involvement of NF-κB, JAK/STAT, MEK1, PI3K, and JNK in major cytokine signaling pathway regulation. We found: (i palmitate decreased cell proliferation, increased mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity; (ii direct inhibition of cytokine receptor by AG490 even more strongly suppressed cell proliferation in palmitate-stimulated cells, while counteracting palmitate-induced increase of antioxidant capacity; (iii in contrast knockdown of the STAT3 inhibitor SOCS3 increased cell proliferation and antioxidant capacity; (iv further downstream JAK/STAT3 signaling cascade the inhibition of PI3K or JNK enhanced palmitate induced suppression of cell proliferation; (v increase of mitochondrial enzyme activity by palmitate was enhanced by inhibition of PI3K but counteracted by inhibition of MEK1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Saturated free fatty acids (e.g., palmitate cause massive alterations in vital cell functions of cultured hBSMC involving distinct major cytokine signaling pathways. Thereby

  18. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-03-01

    Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (pbladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC.

  19. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: KIT and PDGFRA gene mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuket Eliyakin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. A 72-year-old was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Cystoscopy revealed a bladder full of multiple, solid and papillary tumors. Biopsies from the deep and papillary tumors were taken. Histologically, tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, CD56, CD117 and Ki67 (labeling 70%. The tumor cells were negative for CK7, CK20, CD3, CD20, LCA, CDX2, uroplakin, thyroid transcription factor 1, PSA and p63. Metastatic workup was performed an no primary or metastatic lung lesions were noted. Due to the clinical, radiologic and immunohistochemical findings, the patient was diagnosed as primary small cell carcinoma of bladder. A molecular genetic analysis for KIT (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17 and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18 genes was performed, in paraffin micro dissection specimens, by the PCR-direct sequencing method. According to the sequencing analyses, two mutations were found at positions 558 (p.K558N and 562 (p.E562D in KIT gene exon 11 in our case. The another hand the same case presented two mutations in PDGFRA gene exon 14 at position 631 (p.P631A and 638 (p.638Q_639AinsC. The disease process was fulminant and the patient was lost due to several complications prior to any chemotherapy.

  20. Urinary Bladder Cancer in Egypt: Are There Gender Differences in Its Histopathological Presentation?

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    Fiorina Kyritsi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated gender differences in the histopathologic presentation of bladder cancer cases in Egypt, where both urothelial cell carcinoma (UC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC types are highly prevalent. We used logistic regression to estimate the unadjusted (OR and adjusted odds ratio (AOR and 95% confidence interval (CI of the associations between gender and different histopathologic and sociodemographic parameters of 2,186 confirmed cases of primary bladder cancer (1,775 males and 411 females; 784 SCC and 1,402 UC. There were no statistically significant gender differences in tumor grade, stage, mucosal ulcer, or inflammatory cystitis, regardless of the cancer type, but men were less likely than women to have undergone cystectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Having Schistosoma haematobium (SH ova in the bladder tissue was significantly associated with male gender in the fully adjusted model of either SCC (AOR (95% CI = 2.12 (1.15–3.89 or UC cases (3.78 (1.89–7.55. Compared to females, male cases were significantly older at time of diagnosis and smokers. In Egypt, regardless of the type of bladder cancer (SCC or UC, male more than female cases had evidence of SH infection, but not other histopathologic differences, in bladder tissue specimens.

  1. Dendritic cells in blood and urine samples from bladder cancer patients undergoing BCG immunotherapy

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    Raffaella Rossi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Immunotherapy with BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin after transurethral resection of the bladder tumor represents a highly effective primary treatment for intermediate and high-risk superficial bladder cancer. The effectiveness of this therapy has been documented, but its mechanism of action is not clear yet. In the present study, we investigated the changes of dendritic cells (DC numbers in peripheral blood and urine of patients with superficial bladder cancer undergoing BCG intravescical therapy Material and method: We have enumerated plasmacytoid and myeloid DCs in the peripheral blood and in the urine of patients with bladder cancer in order to clarify the role of these cells in the evolution of the disease and the effect of therapy. DCs in blood and urine samples were assessed using the single-platform TruCOUNT assay with monoclonal antibodies. The study population included 37 healthy donors and 13 patients with diagnosis of primitive superficial bladder cancer. Results: At the time of diagnosis a reduction of blood DCs was found in patients as opposed to healthy donors, while DCs were not found in the urine in the same way as in healthy subjects. Six of these patients were followed before and after weekly and monthly instillations of BCG. In the peripheral blood, we observed an immunological recovery of DCs from the third weekly instillation up to the sixth. In the urine of patients, we didn’t find mDCs or pDCs at T0, but we found a statistically significant change from the third instillation up to the sixth. On the contrary, we didn’t find mDCs in urine during monthly instillation. Conclusions: DC Count could be used in the monitoring of patients undergoing BCG therapy. Immunological restoration of mDC numbers in peripheral blood and the efflux in urine could be important for confirming the effectiveness of BCG instillation.

  2. Molecular markers in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder: New insights into mechanisms and prognosis

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    Behfar Ehdaie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial carcinoma is potentially life-threatening and expensive to treat since for many patients, the diagnosis entails a lifetime of surveillance to detect recurrent disease. Advancements in technology have provided an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis and defined distinct pathways in tumorigenesis and progression. At the molecular level, urothelial carcinoma is being seen as a disease with distinct pathways of carcinogenesis and progression and thus markers of these processes should be used as both diagnostics and predictors of progression and patient outcome. Herein we present a selective overview of the molecular underpinning of urothelial carcinogenesis and progression and discuss the potential for proteins involved in these processes to serve as biomarkers. The discovery of biomarkers has enabled the elucidation of targets for novel therapeutic agents to disrupt the deregulation underlying the development and progression of urothelial carcinogenesis.

  3. External Beam Radiotherapy for Focal Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma in the Urinary Bladder: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Nobuhiro Kushida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoepithelioma is a malignant epithelial tumor in the nasopharynx characterized by prominent lymphoid infiltration. Carcinomas that resemble lymphoepitheliomas have been called lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas and have been reported in other organs. A tumor in the bladder is categorized by the percentage of the total area occupied by the lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma pattern, with the prognosis dependent on the percentage. We present an 81-year-old man with stage 3 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a history of aortic aneurysm repair. The computed tomography scans indicated thickening and irregularity of the bladder wall, with left external iliac lymph node metastasis. His diagnosis was bladder cancer, and the clinical stage was evaluated as T3N1M0. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumor was performed, and the pathological specimen showed that the tumor was composed of undifferentiated malignant cells with sheets and nests arranged in a syncytial pattern, as well as an urothelial carcinoma lesion. A prominent lymphoid reaction accompanied the tumor. The pathological diagnosis was focal-type lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma containing a component of urothelial carcinoma G3>G2. His general condition was such that he could not tolerate radical cystectomy or systemic chemotherapy. External beam radiotherapy (total 60 Gy was given to the bladder, including the lymph node metastatic lesion. No cancer recurrence was detected by regular follow-up computed tomography and cystoscopy. He eventually died of other causes 48 months later. Although treatment for focal lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma generally requires multifocal therapies, in the present case, the bladder became tumor free. We also summarize previously reported lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma cases treated with radiotherapy.

  4. Curcumin inhibits bladder cancer stem cells by suppressing Sonic Hedgehog pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dengdian; Kong, Xiaochuan; Li, Yuan; Qian, Weiwei; Ma, Jiaxing; Wang, Daming; Yu, Dexin; Zhong, Caiyun

    2017-11-04

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) is responsible for the recurrence of human cancers. Thus, targeting CSCs is considered to be a valid way for human cancer treatment. Curcumin is a major component of phytochemicals that exerts potent anticancer activities. However, the effect of curcumin on bladder cancer stem cells (BCSCs) remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of curcumin suppressing bladder cancer stem cells. In this study, UM-UC-3 and EJ cells were cultured in serum-free medium (SFM) to form cell spheres that was characterized as BCSCs. Then cell spheres were separately treated with different concentrations of curcumin and purmorphamine. Cell cycle analysis were used to determine the percentage of cells in different phases. Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR analysis were used to detect the expression of relative molecules. Immunofluorescence staining analysis were also utilized to measure the protein level of CD44. We found that CSC markers, including CD44, CD133, ALDH1-A1, OCT-4 and Nanog, were obviously highly expressed in cell spheres. Moreover, we observed that curcumin reduced the cell spheres formation, decreased the expression of CSC markers, suppressed cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis. We also found that curcumin inhibited the activation of Shh pathway, while the inhibitory effects of curcumin on BCSCs could be weakened by upregulation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway. Altogether, these data suggested that curcumin inhibited the activities of BCSCs through suppressing Shh pathway, which might be an effective chemopreventive agent for bladder cancer intervention. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Urinary Cell-Free DNA Quantification as Non-Invasive Biomarker in Patients with Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisuda, Antonin; Pazourkova, Eva; Soukup, Viktor; Horinek, Ales; Hrbáček, Jan; Capoun, Otakar; Svobodova, Iveta; Pospisilova, Sarka; Korabecna, Marie; Mares, Jaroslav; Hanuš, Tomáš; Babjuk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of urinary cell-free DNA (ucfDNA) belongs to potential bladder cancer markers, but the reported results are inconsistent due to the use of various non-standardised methodologies. The aim of the study was to standardise the methodology for ucfDNA quantification as a potential non-invasive tumour biomarker. In total, 66 patients and 34 controls were enrolled into the study. Volumes of each urine portion (V) were recorded and ucfDNA concentrations (c) were measured using real-time PCR. Total amounts (TA) of ucfDNA were calculated and compared between patients and controls. Diagnostic accuracy of the TA of ucfDNA was determined. The calculation of TA of ucfDNA in the second urine portion was the most appropriate approach to ucfDNA quantification, as there was logarithmic dependence between the volume and the concentration of a urine portion (p = 0.0001). Using this methodology, we were able to discriminate between bladder cancer patients and subjects without bladder tumours (p = 0.0002) with area under the ROC curve of 0.725. Positive and negative predictive value of the test was 90 and 45%, respectively. Quantification of ucf DNA according to our modified method could provide a potential non-invasive biomarker for diagnosis of patients with bladder cancer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Selective arterial embolization for control of haematuria secondary to advanced or recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2014-05-02

    Haematuria is a common symptom in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. We report our experience of selective pelvic embolization using gelfoam as an embolic agent to treat intractable haematuria in these patients.

  7. Differential repair of platinum-DNA adducts in human bladder and testicular tumor continuous cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, P.; Fichtinger-Schepman, A.M.; Shellard, S.A.; Walker, M.C.; Masters, J.R.; Hill, B.T.

    1988-01-01

    The formation and removal of four platinum-DNA adducts were immunochemically quantitated in cultured cells derived from a human bladder carcinoma cell line (RT112) and from two lines derived from germ cell tumors of the testis (833K and SUSA), following exposure in vitro to 16.7 microM (5 micrograms/ml) cisplatin. RT112 cells were least sensitive to the drug and were proficient in the repair of all four adducts, whereas SUSA cells, which were 5-fold more sensitive, were deficient in the repair of DNA-DNA intrastrand cross-links in the sequences pApG and pGpG. Despite expressing a similar sensitivity to SUSA cells, 833K cells were proficient in the repair of all four adducts, although less so than the RT112 bladder tumor cells. In addition, SUSA cells were unable to repair DNA-DNA interstrand cross-links whereas 50-85% of these lesions were removed in RT112 and 833K cells 24 h following drug exposure. It is possible that the inability of SuSa cells to repair platinated DNA may account for their hypersensitivity to cisplatin

  8. CXCL5 is a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker for bladder cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Qiao, Yan; Liu, Weihua; Wang, Wenying; Shen, Hongliang; Lu, Yi; Hao, Gangyue; Zheng, Jiajia; Tian, Ye

    2016-04-01

    Chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 5 (CXCL5) is critical for bladder cancer growth and progression. Our previous study demonstrated that increase of CXCL5 in bladder cancer cell lines had an effect on tumor growth and progression. This study aims to investigate the expression of CXCL5 in tissue and urine of bladder cancer patients, in relation to clinicopathologic parameters, and as a predictive value in diagnosing and evaluating bladder cancer. Urothelial bladder cancer tissues from 255 patients were profiled for CXCL5 alterations by immunohistochemistry. Urine samples collected from patients with bladder cancer and urinary tract infections as well as healthy volunteers were analyzed by ELISA. High expression of CXCL5 in bladder cancer tissue was correlated with TNM stage (P = 0.012), cancer grade (P = 0.001), and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.007). CXCL5 alterations were associated with overall survival (P = 0.007), progression free survival (P = 0.004), and recurrence free survival in muscle invasive bladder cancers (P = 0.026). CXCL5 expression in the urine of bladder cancer patients was significantly different from urinary tract infection patients (P = 0.001) and healthy volunteers. However, urine leukocytes may predict CXCL5 levels (β = 0.56, P bladder cancer TNM stage (P = 0.039), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.007), and tumor grade (P = 0.005). The sensitivity and specificity for CXCL5/creatinine in predicting bladder cancer were 80.4 and 61.3 %, respectively. These results suggest increased CXCL5 expression in cancer tissue predicts poor survival in bladder cancer patients. CXCL5 expression in urine is useful in a minimally invasive modality for bladder cancer diagnosis. However, urine leukocytes are significant predictors of CXCL5 levels and may affect its result in bladder cancer diagnosis.

  9. Growing Bladder-Cancer Cells In Three-Dimensional Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F.; Prewett, Tacey L.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Artificial growth process helps fill gaps in cancer research. Cell cultures more accurate as models for in vivo studies and as sources of seed cells for in vivo studies. Effected in horizontal rotating bioreactor described in companion article, "Simplified Bioreactor for Growing Mammalian Cells" (MSC-22060). Provides aggregates of cells needed to fill many of gaps.

  10. Growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest effects of epigallocatechin gallate in the NBT-II bladder tumour cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J J; Ye, Z-Q; Koo, M W L

    2004-05-01

    To examine the growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of green tea polyphenols, on the NBT-II bladder tumour cell line. Growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest effects of EGCG were evaluated by the tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry and apoptotic DNA ladder tests. The cell cycle-related oncogene and protein expressions in NBT-II bladder tumour cells, when incubated with EGCG, were detected with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. EGCG inhibited growth of the NBT-II bladder tumour cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed a G0/G1 arrest in cells when cultured with EGCG at doses of 10, 20 or 40 micro mol/L for 48 or 72 h. The apoptotic DNA ladder test showed that EGCG at 10 micro mol/L induced early apoptosis after 48 h of incubation. A down-regulation of cyclin D1 was detected by RT-PCR when the cells were incubated with EGCG (20 micro mol/L for 48 h. EGCG also down-regulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, in both a time- and dose-dependent manner, when detected by Western blot. EGCG had growth inhibition and cell-cycle arrest effects in NBT-II bladder tumour cells by down-regulating the cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 and retinoblastoma protein machinery for regulating cell-cycle progression.

  11. Phosphodiesterase type 2 distribution in the guinea pig urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama'i, M S; Hohnen, R; Van Kerrebroeck, Ph E V; van Koeveringe, G A

    2015-10-01

    Nitric oxide-stimulated cGMP synthesis represents an important signalling pathway in the urinary bladder. Inhibitors of the PDE1 and PDE5 enzyme have been studied to treat storage and voiding disorders in clinical settings. The distribution of PDE2 in the bladder is unknown. This study focuses on the distribution and site of action of PDE2 within the guinea pig urinary bladder wall. Six male guinea pig bladders were dissected and treated in 2 ml Krebs' solution and 10 µM of the specific PDE2 inhibitor, Bay 60-7550 at 36 °C for 30 min. After stimulating tissues with 100 µM of diethylamine-NONOate for 10 min, the tissues were snap frozen and cut in 10 µm sections which were examined for cGMP immune-reactivity, co-stained with either vimentin, synaptic vesicle protein 2, calcitonin gene-related protein and protein gene product 9.5. PDE2 inhibitor Bay 60-7550 inhibits cGMP breakdown the most in the urothelial and suburothelial layers, as well as on the nerve fibres. After inhibition by Bay 60-7550, cGMP was mainly expressed in the intermuscle interstitial cells and the nerve fibres of the outer muscle layers of lateral wall, indicating the presence of PDE2 activity. Our study is the first to show the distribution of PDE2 in the bladder which was shown to be present in the urothelium, mainly umbrella cells, the interstitial cells of the suburothelium and the outer muscle, as well as in nerve fibres.

  12. Allelic deletions of cell growth regulators during progression of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, H; von der Maase, H; Christensen, M

    2000-01-01

    Cell growth regulators include proteins of the p53 pathway encoded by the genes CDKN2A (p16, p14arf), MDM2, TP53, and CDKN1A (p21) as well as proteins encoded by genes like RB1, E2F, and MYCL. In the present study we investigated allelic deletions of all these genes in each recurrent bladder tumor...... difference in the numbers of gene loci hit by deletions muscle-invasive versus noninvasive tumors (P = 0.0000002), with the genes most often hit by deletions in muscle-invasive tumors being TP53, RB1, and MYCL. A number of novel findings were made. Losses of MYCL and RB1 alleles were more pronounced...... that a characteristic difference between recurrent noninvasive and recurrent progressing bladder tumors is loss of cell cycle-regulatory genes in the latter group....

  13. [Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in adolescents: a diagnosis to bear in mind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eduardo; Alarcón Caba, Martín; Toselli, Luzia; Moldes, Juan; Ormaechea, María; de Badiola, Francisco; Christiansen, Silvia

    2009-02-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder has a high incidence in adults, but it is uncommon in children and adolescents. Hematuria is the most common symptom of presentation and vesical ecography the preferred diagnostic method. The diagnosis and treatment is performed with cystoscopy and endoscopic resection. We describe two patients: an 18 years old male, who presented with a pediculated tumor on the posterior bladder wall and a 15 years old female with a 1 cm long tumor on the posterior wall too; both were removed under endoscopic control. In both patients superficial transitional cell carcinoma was the final diagnosis and are disease free 3 and 5 years later. A review of the available literature was performed to clarify if this type of tumors must be considered malignant and try to define how long and by which way these patients must be controlled.

  14. Different glycosylation of cadherins from human bladder non-malignant and cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lityńska Anna

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to determine whether stage of invasiveness of bladder cancer cell lines contributes to alterations in glycan pattern of their cadherins. Results Human non-malignant epithelial cell of ureter HCV29, v-raf transfected HCV29 line (BC3726 and transitional cell cancers of urine bladder Hu456 and T24 were grown in cell culture. Equal amounts of protein from each cell extracts were separated by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and were blotted on an Immobilon P membrane. Cadherins were immunodetected using anti-pan cadherin mAb and lectin blotting assays were performed, in parallel. N-oligosaccharides were analysed by specific reaction with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA, Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA, Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA, Aleuria aurantia agglutinin (AAA, Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA. The cadherin from HCV29 cell line possessed bi- and/or 2,4-branched triantennary complex type glycans, some of which were α2,6-sialylated. The cadherin from BC3726 cell line exhibited exclusively high mannose type glycans. Cadherins from Hu456 and T24 cell lines expressed high mannose type glycans as well as β1,6-branched oligosaccharides with poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures and α2,3-linked sialic acid residues. Additionally, the presence of fucose and α2,6-sialic acid residues on the cadherin from T24 cell line was detected. Conclusions These results indicate that N-glycosylation pattern of cadherin from bladder cancer cell line undergoes modification during carcinogenesis.

  15. B cell infiltration and lymphonodular hyperplasia in bladder submucosa of patients with persistent bacteriuria and recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, T A; LeGallo, Robin; Innes, D; Hendley, J O; Peters, C A

    2011-12-01

    We defined chronic inflammatory cell types in bladder submucosa and the presence of umbrella cells on the surface of bladder epithelium in patients 5 to 21 years old with persistent bacteriuria due to neurogenic bladder and recurrent urinary tract infections associated with vesicoureteral reflux. Bladder mucosa biopsies from 12 patients and 6 controls were fixed in Carnoy's solution and examined for T cells (CD3, CD4, CD8), B cells (CD79) and plasma cells (CD138). The num