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Sample records for bladder outlet obstruction

  1. Bladder outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002238.htm Bladder outlet obstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base ...

  2. Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Causes in Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder outlet obstruction: Causes in men? My doctor says I might have bladder outlet obstruction. What does that mean? Answers from Erik P. Castle, M.D. Bladder outlet obstruction in men is a blockage that slows ...

  3. Anterior colporrhaphy does not induce bladder outlet obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, M. M. E.; Hakvoort, R. A.; van de Weijer, E. P.; Emanuel, M. H.; Roovers, J. P. W. R.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate if anterior colporrhaphy causes incomplete voiding due to bladder outlet obstruction. Women scheduled for anterior colporrhaphy were asked to undergo multichannel urodynamic investigation before surgery and the first postoperative day. Bladder outlet obstruction was assessed

  4. Effect of Naftopidil on Bladder Microcirculation in a Rat Model of Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

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    Majima, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Takai, Shun; Matsukawa, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Masaki; Gotoh, Momokazu

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of naftopidil on bladder capillary blood flow using bladder outlet obstruction model rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control group, bladder-outlet-obstruction group, and bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group. Bladder-outlet-obstruction surgery was performed in the bladder-outlet-obstruction and bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil groups. The control group received sham-operation. The bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group were treated with naftopidil (30 mg/kg) for 14 days after bladder-outlet-obstruction operation, while the control and bladder-outlet-obstruction groups were treated with vehicle. Continuous cystometry was performed 14 days after the surgery. Bladder blood flow was measured after 14 days using a pencil lens charge-coupled device microscopy system. The bladder was then harvested for histology and measuring 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine tissue level by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In cystometry, the bladder-outlet-obstruction rats showed bladder overactivity, while naftopidil treatment improved the cystometric pattern. The blood flow through the submucosal capillaries of the bladder base in the bladder-outlet-obstruction group was lesser than that in the control, whereas the bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group showed significantly greater blood flow than the bladder-outlet-obstruction group. The bladder tissue in the bladder-outlet-obstruction group showed a tendency to contain more hypertrophic detrusor muscle and inflammatory cells compared to those in the control group, while naftopidil treatment suppressed these histological changes. The 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels in the bladder tissue significantly differed among the three groups (the bladder-outlet-obstruction group > the bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group > the control group). Naftopidil improved bladder overactivity as well as the impaired bladder

  5. Enhanced angiogenesis and relaxation of bladder as early response to bladder outlet obstruction.

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    Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun; Doo, Seung Whan; An, Jin; Kim, Seung U

    2013-01-01

    To provide insights into the pathogenesis of bladder insult secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Six-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 80) were divided into eight groups, 10 rats each, according to the duration of bladder outlet obstruction, including 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h and 1 week. Cystometric parameters were evaluated at 72 h and 1 week after bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder tissues were harvested and Masson's trichrome staining was carried out. Each slide was inspected microscopically and the mean percent collagen area was examined. Changes of collagen deposition and pathological expression of several factors including hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1 and nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid of bladders were evaluated. A significant time-dependent increase in the bladder weight after 6 h and the percent of collagen area after 24 h of bladder outlet obstruction were found. Increase in hypoxia inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β1, inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression, time-dependent increase in vascular endothelial growth factor, neuronal nitric oxide synthase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression after 6 h of bladder outlet obstruction was found. The intercontraction interval decreased significantly after 72 h of bladder outlet obstruction. Cellular remodeling in the bladder secondary to bladder outlet obstruction starts in the early hours and it includes enhanced angiogenesis and bladder relaxation. Early relief from bladder outlet obstruction is helpful to preserve bladder structure and function. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Inhibition of HIF Reduces Bladder Hypertrophy and Improves Bladder Function in Murine Model of Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

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    Iguchi, Nao; Malykhina, Anna P; Wilcox, Duncan T

    2016-04-01

    Posterior urethral valves are the most common cause of partial bladder outlet obstruction in the pediatric population. However, to our knowledge the etiology and the detailed mechanisms underlying pathological changes in the bladder following partial bladder outlet obstruction remain to be elucidated. Recent findings suggest that hypoxia and associated up-regulation of HIFs (hypoxia-inducible factors) have a key role in partial bladder outlet obstruction induced pathology in the bladder. We examined the effects of pharmacological inhibition of HIF pathways by 17-DMAG (17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) in pathophysiological phenotypes after partial bladder outlet obstruction. Partial bladder outlet obstruction was surgically created in male C57BL/6J mice. The animals received oral administration of 17-DMAG or vehicle daily starting from the initiation of obstruction up to 5 days. Sham operated mice served as controls. Bladders were harvested from each group 2, 4 and 7 days postoperatively, and analyzed for histological and biochemical changes. Bladder function was assessed by in vitro muscle contractility recordings. Partial bladder outlet obstruction caused a significant increase in the bladder mass accompanying enhanced collagen deposition in the bladder wall while 17-DMAG treatment suppressed those increases. Treatment with 17-DMAG attenuated the degree of up-regulation of HIFs and their target genes involving the development of tissue fibrosis in obstructed bladders. Treatment with 17-DMAG improved the decreased responses of obstructed bladder strips to electrical field stimulation and KCl. In vivo 17-DMAG treatment decreased partial bladder outlet obstruction induced pathophysiological changes in the bladder. HIF pathway inhibition has a potential clinical implication for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat bladder pathology associated with partial bladder outlet obstruction. Copyright © 2016 American Urological

  7. The Patient Burden of Bladder Outlet Obstruction after Prostate Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Daniel; Jarosek, Stephanie; Virnig, Beth A; Chu, Haitao; Elliott, Sean P

    2016-05-01

    Bladder outlet obstruction after prostate cancer therapy imposes a significant burden on health and quality of life in men. Our objective was to describe the burden of bladder outlet obstruction after prostate cancer therapy by detailing the type of procedures performed and how often those procedures were repeated in men with recurrent bladder outlet obstruction. Using SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results)-Medicare linked data from 1992 to 2007 with followup through 2009 we identified 12,676 men who underwent at least 1 bladder outlet obstruction procedure after prostate cancer therapy, including external beam radiotherapy in 3,994, brachytherapy in 1,485, brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy in 1,847, radical prostatectomy in 4,736, radical prostatectomy plus external beam radiotherapy in 369 and cryotherapy in 245. Histogram, incidence rates and Cox proportional hazards models with repeat events analysis were done to describe the burden of repeat bladder outlet obstruction treatments stratified by prostate cancer therapy type. We describe the type of bladder outlet obstruction surgery grouped by level of invasiveness. At a median followup of 8.8 years 44.6% of men underwent 2 or more bladder outlet obstruction procedures. Compared to men who underwent radical prostatectomy those treated with brachytherapy and brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy were at increased adjusted risk for repeat bladder outlet obstruction treatment (HR 1.2 and 1.32, respectively, each p outlet obstruction after prostate cancer therapy undergo more than 1 procedure. Furthermore men with bladder outlet obstruction after radiotherapy undergo more invasive endoscopic therapies and are at higher risk for multiple treatments than men with bladder outlet obstruction after radical prostatectomy. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in female: etiology and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, N.A.; Ahuja, K.; Shaikh, G.S.; Soomro, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the etiology and management outcome of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in female. Methodology: From 2009 to 2012, 37 females with a mean age of 40 (range 20-65) were investigated for etiology and management outcome of BOO. Typical complaints were slow urinary flow, difficulty in emptying bladder, frequency of micturition and urgency. Mean duration of symptoms was 6 month. Results: 15 women were confirmed as atrophic urethritis, 5 had functional bladder, 3 had urethral caruncle, 5 had cystocele, 7 had complete procedentia of uterus, and 2 had impacted urethral stone. Cystoscopy was performed in all patients to exclude other pathology like vesical stone and bladder growth. 12 patients were referred to Gynecology due to complete procedentia of uterus and cystocele. Three cases of urethral caruncle were treated by excision and biopsy, 2 patients with urethral stone were treated by endoscopic push back and litholapaxy while 5 required conservative treatment and 15 cases of atrophic urethritis were kept on Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). Conclusion: BOO is uncommon in female and management depends upon the etiology. (author)

  9. The NLRP3 Inflammasome Mediates Inflammation Produced by Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Francis M; Hill, Hayden M; Wood, Case M; Edmondson, Andrew T; Dumas, Aliya; Foo, Wen-Chi; Oelsen, James M; Rac, Goran; Purves, J Todd

    2016-05-01

    While bladder outlet obstruction is well established to elicit an inflammatory reaction in the bladder that leads to overactive bladder and fibrosis, little is known about the mechanism by which this is initiated. NLRs (NOD-like receptors) and the structures that they form (inflammasomes) have been identified as sensors of cellular damage, including pressure induced damage, and triggers of inflammation. Recently we identified these structures in the urothelium. In this study we assessed the role of the NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3) inflammasome in bladder dysfunction resulting from bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder outlet obstruction was created in female rats by inserting a 1 mm outer diameter transurethral catheter, tying a silk ligature around the urethra and removing the catheter. Untreated and sham operated rats served as controls. Rats with bladder outlet obstruction were given vehicle (10% ethanol) or 10 mg/kg glyburide (a NLRP3 inhibitor) orally daily for 12 days. Inflammasome activity, bladder hypertrophy, inflammation and bladder function (urodynamics) were assessed. Bladder outlet obstruction increased urothelial inflammasome activity, bladder hypertrophy and inflammation, and decreased voided volume. Glyburide blocked inflammasome activation, reduced hypertrophy and prevented inflammation. The decrease in voided volume was also attenuated by glyburide mechanistically as an increase in detrusor contraction duration and voiding period. Results suggest the importance of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the induction of inflammation and bladder dysfunction secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Arresting these processes with NLRP3 inhibitors may prove useful to treat the symptoms that they produce. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Surgical Management of Anatomic Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Males with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordhoff, Toscane C; Groen, Jan; Scheepe, Jeroen R; Blok, Bertil F M

    2018-03-15

    Surgical treatment of anatomic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) may be indicated in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. A bothersome complication after surgery is urinary incontinence. To identify the optimal practice in the surgical treatment of anatomic BOO in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction, due to multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury (SCI), spina bifida, or cerebrovascular accident (CVA). A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. Medline, Embase, Cochrane controlled trial databases, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched for publications until January 2017. A total of 930 abstracts were screened. Eight studies were included. The types of anatomic BOO discussed were benign prostate obstruction, urethral stricture, and bladder neck sclerosis. The identified surgical treatments were transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in patients with Parkinson, CVA or SCI, endoscopic treatment of urethral stricture by laser ablation or urethrotomy (mainly in SCI patients), and bladder neck resection (BNR) in SCI patients. The outcome of TURP may be highly variable, and includes persistent or de novo urinary incontinence, regained normal micturition control, and urinary continence. Good results were seen in BNR and endoscopic urethrotomy studies. Laser ablation and cold knife urethrotomy resulted in restarting intermittent catheterization or adequate voiding. Overall, a high risk of bias was found. This systematic review provides an overview of the current literature on the outcome of several surgical approaches of different types of anatomic BOO in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Identifying the optimal practice was impossible due to limited availability of high-quality studies. The outcome of several surgical approaches in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction with benign prostate obstruction, urethral stricture

  11. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

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    Vivek Venkatramani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy.

  12. Three-dimensional stereology as a tool for evaluating bladder outlet obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijk, J. Van der; Wijk, J. Van der; Horn, T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. In a pilot study we evaluated whether implementation of a novel 3D stereologic technique can prove that bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is associated with morphologic changes in the bladder wall. Material and methods. Ten males (mean age 69.7 years; range 58-84 years) with lower urinary...

  13. Benefits and limitations of animal models in partial bladder outlet obstruction for translational research.

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    Kitta, Takeya; Kanno, Yukiko; Chiba, Hiroki; Higuchi, Madoka; Ouchi, Mifuka; Togo, Mio; Moriya, Kimihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2018-01-01

    The functions of the lower urinary tract have been investigated for more than a century. Lower urinary tract symptoms, such as incomplete bladder emptying, weak urine stream, daytime urinary frequency, urgency, urge incontinence and nocturia after partial bladder outlet obstruction, is a frequent cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia in aging men. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The use of animal models is absolutely imperative for understanding the pathophysiological processes involved in bladder dysfunction. Surgical induction has been used to study lower urinary tract functions of numerous animal species, such as pig, dog, rabbit, guinea pig, rat and mouse, of both sexes. Several morphological and functional modifications under partial bladder outlet obstruction have not only been observed in the bladder, but also in the central nervous system. Understanding the changes of the lower urinary tract functions induced by partial bladder outlet obstruction would also contribute to appropriate drug development for treating these pathophysiological conditions. In the present review, we discuss techniques for creating partial bladder outlet obstruction, the characteristics of several species, as well as issues of each model, and their translational value. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. The Antimuscarinic Agent Tolterodine Regulates Bladder Extracellular Matrix in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Rats

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    Tong-Xin Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Antimuscarinic agents can delay the progression of bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. To date, the relationship between muscarinic receptor activity and the bladder extracellular matrix (ECM remains unclear. Thus, an animal model of partial BOO (PBOO in female rats was established to explore the variation in bladder wall ECM proteins under PBOO conditions with antimuscarinic agent administration. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham, PBOO, and PBOO plus tolterodine. Picrosirius red staining was used to examine the smooth muscle and collagen content of bladder samples. Gene microarray and RT-PCR were performed to survey the expression of ECM proteins, receptors, and metabolism regulators in the rat bladder. Positive results were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Picrosirius red staining showed that smooth muscle volume significantly increased in the PBOO and PBOO plus tolterodine groups (p < 0.05, while collagen significantly increased in the PBOO group (p < 0.05 but not in the PBOO plus tolterodine group. Gene microarray and RT-PCR revealed that none of the collagen subtypes exhibited significant changes after PBOO establishment and tolterodine administration. However, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs increased significantly in the PBOO plus tolterodine group (p < 0.05. Additionally, PBOO inhibited the expression of non-collagen ECM proteins in the rat bladder wall, while tolterodine induced the expression of non-collagen ECM proteins and ECM receptors. Conclusions: Tolterodine decreased the volume of collagen in PBOO rat bladder wall, possibly via MMPs, and regulated the expression of ECM proteins and receptors.

  15. Progressive bladder remodeling due to bladder outlet obstruction: a systematic review of morphological and molecular evidences in humans.

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    Fusco, Ferdinando; Creta, Massimiliano; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Iacovelli, Valerio; Mangiapia, Francesco; Li Marzi, Vincenzo; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2018-03-09

    Bladder outlet obstruction is a common urological condition. We aimed to summarize available evidences about bladder outlet obstruction-induced molecular and morphological alterations occurring in human bladder. We performed a literature search up to December 2017 including clinical and preclinical basic research studies on humans. The following search terms were combined: angiogenesis, apoptosis, bladder outlet obstruction, collagen, electron microscopy, extracellular matrix, fibrosis, hypoxia, histology, inflammation, innervation, ischemia, pressure, proliferation, remodeling, suburothelium, smooth muscle cells, stretch, urothelium. We identified 36 relevant studies. A three-stages model of bladder wall remodeling can be hypothesized involving an initial hypertrophy phase, a subsequent compensation phase and a later decompensation. Histological and molecular alterations occur in the following compartments: urothelium, suburothelium, detrusor smooth muscle cells, detrusor extracellular matrix, nerves. Cyclic stretch, increased hydrostatic and cyclic hydrodynamic pressure and hypoxia are stimuli capable of modulating multiple signaling pathways involved in this remodeling process. Bladder outlet obstruction leads to progressive bladder tissue remodeling in humans. Multiple signaling pathways are involved.

  16. Mir-29 Repression in Bladder Outlet Obstruction Contributes to Matrix Remodeling and Altered Stiffness

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    Ekman, Mari; Bhattachariya, Anirban; Dahan, Diana; Uvelius, Bengt; Albinsson, Sebastian; Swärd, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has uncovered a role of the microRNA (miRNA) miR-29 in remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Partial bladder outlet obstruction is a prevalent condition in older men with prostate enlargement that leads to matrix synthesis in the lower urinary tract and increases bladder stiffness. Here we tested the hypothesis that miR-29 is repressed in the bladder in outlet obstruction and that this has an impact on protein synthesis and matrix remodeling leading to increased bladder stiffness. c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3, all of which repress miR-29, were activated in the rat detrusor following partial bladder outlet obstruction but at different times. c-Myc and NF-κB activation occurred early after obstruction, and SMAD3 phosphorylation increased later, with a significant elevation at 6 weeks. c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3 activation, respectively, correlated with repression of miR-29b and miR-29c at 10 days of obstruction and with repression of miR-29c at 6 weeks. An mRNA microarray analysis showed that the reduction of miR-29 following outlet obstruction was associated with increased levels of miR-29 target mRNAs, including mRNAs for tropoelastin, the matricellular protein Sparc and collagen IV. Outlet obstruction increased protein levels of eight out of eight examined miR-29 targets, including tropoelastin and Sparc. Transfection of human bladder smooth muscle cells with antimiR-29c and miR-29c mimic caused reciprocal changes in target protein levels in vitro. Tamoxifen inducible and smooth muscle-specific deletion of Dicer in mice reduced miR-29 expression and increased tropoelastin and the thickness of the basal lamina surrounding smooth muscle cells in the bladder. It also increased detrusor stiffness independent of outlet obstruction. Taken together, our study supports a model where the combined repressive influences of c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3 reduce miR-29 in bladder outlet obstruction, and where the resulting drop in miR-29 contributes to matrix remodeling and

  17. Giant bladder diverticulum : A rare cause of bladder outlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant bladder diverticula are rare causes of bladder outlet obstruction in children and have rarely been reported. In this paper, we present three children with giant bladder diverticula who presented with bladder outlet obstruction within a year. Micturating cystourethrogram is important for investigating bladder outlet ...

  18. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Patients with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Using Ultrasound Decorrelation Analysis.

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    Arif, Muhammad; Groen, Jan; Boevé, Egbert R; de Korte, Chris L; Idzenga, Tim; van Mastrigt, Ron

    2016-08-01

    We developed a noninvasive method to diagnose bladder outlet obstruction. An ultrasound based decorrelation method was applied in male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. In 60 patients ultrasound data were acquired transperineally while they were voiding while sitting. Each patient also underwent a standard invasive pressure flow study. High frequent sequential ultrasound images were successfully recorded during voiding in 45 patients. The decorrelation (decrease in correlation) between subsequent ultrasound images was higher in patients with bladder outlet obstruction than in unobstructed patients and healthy volunteers. ROC analysis resulted in an AUC of 0.96, 95% specificity and 88% sensitivity. A linear relationship was fitted to the decorrelation values as a function of the degree of obstruction represented by the bladder outlet obstruction index, measured in the separate pressure flow studies. It is possible to noninvasively diagnose bladder outlet obstruction using the ultrasound decorrelation technique. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preventive Effect of Hydrogen Water on the Development of Detrusor Overactivity in a Rat Model of Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

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    Miyazaki, Nozomu; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Nomiya, Masanori; Aikawa, Ken; Kimura, Junko

    2016-03-01

    Bladder ischemia and oxidative stress contribute to the pathogenesis of bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction. H2 reportedly acts as an effective antioxidant. We investigated whether oral ingestion of H2 water would have a beneficial effect on bladder function in a rat model of bladder outlet obstruction. H2 water was made by dissolving H2 gas in ordinary drinking water using a hydrogen water producing apparatus. The bladder outlet obstruction model was surgically induced in male rats. Rats with obstruction were fed H2 water or ordinary drinking water. On week 4 postoperatively cystometry was performed. Oxidative stress markers and the bladder nerve growth factor level were determined. Bladder tissues were processed for pharmacological studies and histological analysis. The micturition interval and micturition volume significantly decreased in obstructed rats given ordinary drinking water. These decreases were significantly suppressed by oral ingestion of H2 water. Increased post-void residual volume in obstructed rats was significantly reduced by H2 water. Obstruction led to a significant increase in bladder weight, oxidative stress markers and nerve growth factor. H2 water significantly suppressed these increases without affecting bladder weight. There was no significant difference in histological findings between rats with bladder obstruction given H2 water and ordinary drinking water. Decreased responses of detrusor muscle strips from obstructed bladders to KCl, carbachol and electrical field stimulation were reversed by H2 water ingestion. Results suggest that H2 water could ameliorate bladder dysfunction secondary to bladder outlet obstruction by attenuating oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Urethral orifice hyaluronic acid injections: a novel animal model of bladder outlet obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongquan; Xiong, Zhiyong; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Zhansong; Lu, Gensheng

    2015-01-01

    Background We produced a novel model of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) by periurethral injection of hyaluronic acid and compared the cystometric features, postoperative complications, and histopathological changes of that model with that of traditional open surgery. Methods Forty female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Fifteen rats were subcutaneously injected with 0.2?ml hyaluronic acid at 5, 7, and 12 o?clock around the urethral orifice. Another fifteen rats underwent t...

  1. Work Capacity of the Bladder During Voiding: A Novel Method to Evaluate Bladder Contractile Function and Bladder Outlet Obstruction

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    Ning Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work in voiding (WIV of the bladder may be used to evaluate bladder status throughout urination rather than at a single time point. Few studies, however, have assessed WIV owing to the complexity of its calculations. We have developed a method of calculating work capacity of the bladder while voiding and analyzed the associations of bladder work parameters with bladder contractile function and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 160 men and 23 women, aged >40 years and with a detrusor pressure at maximal flow rate (P det Q max of ≥40 cmH 2 O in men, who underwent urodynamic testing. The bladder power integration method was used to calculate WIV; WIV per second (WIV/t and WIV per liter of urine voided (WIV/v were also calculated. In men, the relationships between these work capacity parameters and P det Q max and Abrams-Griffiths (AG number were determined using linear-by-linear association tests, and relationships between work capacity parameters and BOO grade were investigated using Spearman′s association test. Results: The mean WIV was 1.15 ± 0.78 J and 1.30 ± 0.88 J, mean WIV/t was 22.95 ± 14.45 mW and 23.78 ± 17.02 mW, and mean WIV/v was 5.59 ± 2.32 J/L and 2.83 ± 1.87 J/L in men and women, respectively. In men, WIV/v showed significant positive associations with P det Q max (r = 0.845, P = 0.000, AG number (r = 0.814, P = 0.000, and Schafer class (r = 0.726, P = 0.000. Conversely, WIV and WIV/t showed no associations with P det Q max or AG number. In patients with BOO (Schafer class > II, WIV/v correlated positively with increasing BOO grade. Conclusions: WIV can be calculated from simple urodynamic parameters using the bladder power integration method. WIV/v may be a marker of BOO grade, and the bladder contractile function can be evaluated by WIV and WIV/t.

  2. Prostatic Cyst with Bladder Outlet Obstruction Symptoms. Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    irritative urinary tract symptoms if located close to the bladder neck or posterior urethra. 1, 3. Prostatic cysts are diagnosed incidentally during un ultrasound examination for any other indication and are classified based on cyst location, shape, and embryogenic origin, interconnection with prostatic urethra or seminal vesicle, ...

  3. Polyarteritis nodosa presenting as a bladder outlet obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acute-on-chronic renal impairment. All virological and serological tests including hepatitis B and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody were negative. A computed tomography scan of the brain revealed small-vessel disease. A bladder neck mass was visualised on cystoscopy. Histological examination of this demonstrated a ...

  4. Botulinum toxin: An emerging therapy in female bladder outlet obstruction

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    Aditya A Pradhan

    2009-01-01

    Discussion: There is a gradual improvement in symptoms over time and the maximal effect occurred at 10-14 days. The duration of improvement was approximately 16.8 weeks. All patients were satisfied by the degree of improvement felt. Conclusions: Botulinum toxin proved successful in improving the voiding characteristics. It possibly acts at the zone of hypertonicity at the bladder neck or midurethra. The only disadvantage is the high cost of the drug.

  5. Testosterone Modifies Alterations to Detrusor Muscle after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Juvenile Mice

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    Andrew S. Flum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to posterior urethral valves (PUV arise in boys during adolescence. The reasons for this have previously been attributed to increased urine output as boys experience increased growth. Additionally, there are few choices for clinicians to effectively treat these complications. We formed the new hypothesis that increased androgen levels at this time of childhood development could play a role at the cellular level in obstructed bladders. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of testosterone on bladder detrusor muscle following injury from partial bladder outlet obstruction (PO in mice. A PO model was surgically created in juvenile male mice. A group of mice were castrated by bilateral orchiectomy at time of obstruction (CPO. Testosterone cypionate was administered to a group of castrated, obstructed mice (CPOT. Bladder function was assessed by voiding stain on paper (VSOP. Bladders were analyzed at 7 and 28 days by weight and histology. Detrusor collagen to smooth muscle ratio (Col/SM was calculated using Masson’s trichrome stain. All obstructed groups had lower max voided volumes (MVV than sham mice at 1 day. Hormonally intact mice (PO continued to have lower MVV at 7 and 28 days while CPO mice improved to sham levels at both time points. In accordance, PO mice had higher bladder-to-body weight ratios than CPO and sham mice demonstrating greater bladder hypertrophy. Histologically, Col/SM was lower in sham and CPO mice. When testosterone was restored in CPOT mice, MVV remained low at 7 and 28 days compared to CPO and bladder-to-body weight ratios were also greater than CPO. Histologic changes were also seen in CPOT mice with higher Col/SM than sham and CPO mice. In conclusion, our findings support a role for testosterone in the fibrotic changes that occur after obstruction in male mice. This suggests that while other changes may occur in adolescent boys that cause complication in boys

  6. Change of Ultrasound Estimated Bladder Weight and Bladder Wall Thickness After Treatment of Bladder Outlet Obstruction With Dutasteride.

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    Lee, Ha Na; Lee, Young-Suk; Han, Deok Hyun; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the change of bladder wall hypertrophy to relieve bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) by treatment with 5α-reductase inhibitor. Men who have BOO confirmed by urodynamic study (BOO index ≥40) were treated with dutasteride 0.5 mg once a day for 6 months. We measured ultrasound estimated bladder weight (UEBW), UEBW divided by body surface area (UEBW/BSA), and bladder wall thickness (BWT) before and after treatment. Changes in LUTS parameters were assessed by using the International Prostate Symptom Score, uroflowmetry, residual urine volume, prostate volume, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and LUTS outcome scores (LOS). Correlation between the change of LUTS parameters and UEBW, UEBW/BSA, and BWT were evaluated. We assessed the changes of bladder wall hypertrophy according to the results of benefit, satisfaction, and willingness to continue (BSW) questionnaire. Thirty patients completed the 6-month study. The mean UEBW was 47.10 ± 7.79 g before and 50.07 ± 5.39 g after dutasteride treatment (P = 0.259). The mean UEBW/BSA was 26.47 ± 4.30 g/m 2 before and 28.2 ± 3.53 g/m 2 after treatment (P = 0.253), and there was no definite change in mean BWT after treatment (P = 0.301). Most LUTS parameters including LOS significantly improved. Increased BOO index value was related to decreased BWT (ρ = 0.361, P = 0.049). There was no definite change in mean UEBW, UEBW/BSA, and BWT according to the results of the BSW questionnaire. There was no change in UEBW, UEBW/BSA and BWT despite improving most clinical parameters suggesting BOO. The changes of bladder wall hypertrophy parameters still have limitations to directly reflect the relief of BOO. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Urethral orifice hyaluronic acid injections: a novel animal model of bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongquan; Xiong, Zhiyong; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Zhansong; Lu, Gensheng

    2015-02-21

    We produced a novel model of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) by periurethral injection of hyaluronic acid and compared the cystometric features, postoperative complications, and histopathological changes of that model with that of traditional open surgery. Forty female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Fifteen rats were subcutaneously injected with 0.2 ml hyaluronic acid at 5, 7, and 12 o'clock around the urethral orifice. Another fifteen rats underwent traditional open partial proximal urethral obstruction surgery, and 10 normal rats used as controls. After 4 weeks, filling cystometry, postoperative complications, and histopathological features were evaluated in each group. Three rats were also observed for 12 weeks after hyaluronic acid injection to evaluate the long-term effect. Hyaluronic acid periurethral injection caused increased maximum cystometric capacity, maximum bladder pressure, micturition interval, and post-void residual urine volume compared with control (p injection group had significantly shorter operative time, less incidence of incision infection and bladder stone formation compared with the surgery group (p injection and surgery bladders; these were not observed in the control group. Bladder weight and thickness of smooth muscle in the injection and surgery groups were significantly greater than those in the control group (p injection or control groups. Rats periurethrally injected hyaluronic acid were stable the compound was not fully absorbed in any rat after 12 weeks. Hyaluronic acid periurethral injection generates a simple, effective, and persistent animal model of BOO with lower complications, compared with traditional surgery.

  8. New generation urethral stents in treatment bladder outlet obstruction caused by prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, B; Markovic, Z; Filimonovic, J; Hadzi Djokic, J

    2005-01-01

    Our clinical trial included until now, 22 patients in whom new generation urethral stent named Allium, were inserted due to bladder outlet obstruction caused in 7 patients (pt) with benign prostate hyperplasia, in 13 pt with bulbar urethral stricture of different ethiology and in 2 pt with prostate cancer. Allium prostatic stents, designed by Daniel Yachia differs in some crucial characteristics from previously used stents: they are covered for the first time in urethra stenting history, without relatively low radiation force and because of that nonirritative. The indications, contraindications and preliminary results in this study are discussed concerning the patients with cancer of the prostate.

  9. Does this man with lower urinary tract symptoms have bladder outlet obstruction?: The Rational Clinical Examination: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Karen A; Dahm, Philipp; Wong, Camilla L

    2014-08-06

    Early, accurate diagnosis of bladder outlet obstruction in men with lower urinary tract symptoms may reduce the need for invasive testing (ie, catheter placement, urodynamics), and prompt early treatment to provide symptomatic relief and avoid complications. To systematically review the evidence on (1) the diagnostic accuracy of office-based tests for bladder outlet obstruction in men with lower urinary tract symptoms; and (2) the accuracy of the bladder scan as a measure of urine volume because management decisions rely on measuring postvoid bladder residual volumes. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1950-March 2014), along with reference lists from retrieved articles were searched to identify studies of diagnostic test accuracy among males with lower urinary tract symptoms due to bladder outlet obstruction. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library (1950-March 2014) were searched to identify studies of urine volumes measured with a bladder scanner vs those measured with bladder catheterization. Prospective studies were selected if they compared 1 or more office-based, noninvasive diagnostic test with the reference test or were invasive urodynamic studies, and if urine volumes were measured with a bladder scanner and bladder catheterization. For the bladder outlet obstruction objective, 8628 unique citations were identified. Ten studies (1262 patients among 9 unique cohorts) met inclusion criteria. For the bladder scan objective, 2254 unique citations were identified. Twenty studies (n = 1397 patients) met inclusion criteria. The first main outcome and measure was the diagnostic accuracy of individual symptoms and questionnaires compared with the reference standard (urodynamic studies) for the diagnosis of bladder outlet obstruction in males with lower urinary tract symptoms. The second was the correlation between urine volumes measured with a bladder scanner and those measured with bladder catheterization. Among

  10. Compensatory Paracrine Mechanisms That Define The Urothelial Response to Injury in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassuk, James; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Sweet, Robert; Han, Chang-Hee; Soygur, Tarkan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Plaire, J. Chadwick; Charleston, Jay S.; Charleston, Lynne B.; Bagai, Shelly; Cochrane, Kimberly; Rubio, Eric; Bassuk, James A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-06-21

    Diseases and conditions affecting the lower urinary tract are a leading cause of dysfunctional sexual health, incontinence, infection, and kidney failure. The growth, differentiation, and repair of the bladder's epithelial lining are regulated, in part, by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7 and -10 via a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the receptor for FGF-7 and -10 within the transitional epithelium (urothelium). The FGF-7 gene is located at the 15q15-q21.1 locus on chromosome 15 and four exons generate a 3.852-kb mRNA. Five duplicated FGF-7 gene sequences that localized to chromosome 9 were predicted not to generate functional protein products, thus validating the use of FGF-7-null mice as an experimental model. Recombinant FGF-7 and -10 induced proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice in vivo.To determine the extent that induction of urothelial cell proliferation during the bladder response to injury is dependent on FGF-7, an animal model of partial bladder outlet obstruction was developed. Unbiased stereology was used to measure the percentage of proliferating urothelial cells between obstructed groups of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice. The stereological analysis indicated that a statistical significant difference did not exist between the two groups, suggesting that FGF-7 is not essential for urothelial cell proliferation in response to partial outlet obstruction. In contrast, a significant increase in FGF-10 expression was observed in the obstructed FGF-7-null group, indicating that the compensatory pathway that functions in this model results in urothelial repair.

  11. The relevance of immune responses to partial bladder outlet obstruction and reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Lin, Yi-Pai; Levin, Robert M; Chen, Miaw-Ling

    2017-06-01

    Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) causes tissue inflammation, a significant increase in markers of systemic oxidative stress, and proliferation of circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Here, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms underlying inflammation and helper T cell involvement in PBOO. Surgical PBOO was performed in four groups of rats: control (C), obstruction at 2 (O2) and 4 (O4) weeks, and 4 weeks after the relief of PBOO (R4) (n = 6 each). The urinary levels of prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM), expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-17) in the bladder, numbers of peripheral blood regulatory T cells (Treg cells), and levels of TGF-β1 were assessed via immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, or ELISA. The levels of urinary PGEM, bladder IL-17, and TGF-β1 and the numbers of peripheral Treg cells (Foxp3) were all significantly increased at 2 and 4 weeks after PBOO. PGEM, IL-17, and Treg cells (Foxp3) were decreased after the relief of PBOO, while the levels of TGF-β1 continued to increase. Transient PBOO triggers an acute, reversible increase in inflammatory cytokines and Treg cells. The distinct dynamics of individual inflammatory markers support their potential use as markers for monitoring bladder inflammation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Autonomic nervous system activity assessement by heart rate variability in experimental bladder outlet obstruction 

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    Łukasz Dobrek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A syndrome with urgency, with or without associated urine incontinence and usually accompanied by higher urinary frequency and nocturia has been named “overactive bladder; OAB”. OAB is an entity with complex pathophysiology, involving both myogenic and neurogenic (afferent / efferent bladder innervation disturbances. OAB symptoms accompany benign prostatic hypertrophy - BPH (“obstructive OAB”. The aim of the study was to estimate the autonomic nervous system activity (ANS in the experimental bladder outlet obstruction (BOO which was an animal model of the human BPH. The study was conducted using 30 female rats, divided into two groups: BOO animals (n=15, with surgically induced BOO (by partial ligation of the proximal urethra and control ones (n=15, which underwent sham procedure (without urethral ligation. Two weeks after the surgery, in both groups, ANS activity was estimated using time- and spectral analysis of the heart rate variability recordings. The bladder overactivity in BOO animals was confirmed using urodynamic recordings and bladder histological assessment, juxtaposed against the results of the control group. The key finding of our study was the development of autonomic disturbances in bladder outlet obstruction (BOO rats. Our study revealed that BOO animals were characterised by diminished rMSSD and spectral HRV parameters: TP, LF and HF, in comparison with the control group. The normalised nLF and nHF parameters did not differ significantly in both groups, although slight changes in the nLF (increased and nHF (decreased were noted in BOO group. The absolute VLF value was almost the same in both studied populations, however, the percentage part of this component in the appropriate HRV spectrum differed considerably in both studied groups. In BOO animals, VLF percentage amounted to about 90�20whereas in control animals this parameter reached only about 53�0of the total power spectrum.Thus, to sum up, our findings suggest

  13. The decompensated detrusor I: the effects of bladder outlet obstruction on the use of intracellular calcium stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, D; Levin, R M; Duckett, J W; Zderic, S A

    1996-08-01

    As in other smooth muscle groups, extracellular calcium influx as well as the release of calcium from intracellular storage sites or sarcoplasmic reticulum occur in response to receptor stimulation. The relative participation of extracellular influx versus intracellular release has recently been shown to be influenced by developmental stage and obstruction. Partial bladder outlet obstruction results in marked hypertrophy of the bladder and produces alterations in contractile function. To understand better how this contractile dysfunction after outlet obstruction is influenced by intracellular calcium handling we tested the effects of 2 drugs with known effects on the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We evaluated ryanodine, which blocks the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and thapsigargin, which blocks the ability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum to pump cytosolic calcium back into the storage sites. Rabbit bladders were obstructed for different periods, after which detrusor muscle strips were harvested and contractile performance was evaluated in the absence and presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin. In the early phases of outlet obstruction the release of intracellular calcium increased significantly. With prolonged obstruction and detrusor decompensation the intracellular storage sites lost the ability to contribute to the generation of contractile force. Alterations in the calcium handling ability of the smooth muscle cell appear to have an important role in the process of decompensation of bladder function in infravesical obstruction.

  14. Diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction can we do away with pressureflow studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Vinod Peedikayil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare pressure-flow study on one hand with BWT, prostate volume, urine flow rate PVR and IPSS index in the other arm for diagnosis of BOO. Materials and methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out in 48 men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. International prostate symptom score was completed by the patient who then underwent free urine flow study. Pressure-Flow study was performed as per recommendations of International continence Society. Abrams-Griffiths nomogram and number were used to diagnose BOO. Patients with diabetes, neurovesical dysfunction, acute urinary retention, prior pelvic surgery and known prostate cancer were excluded. Suprapubic ultrasonography was performed independently by a consultant radiologist, who was blinded to findings of Pressure-Flow study. Prevoid bladder volume, postvoid residue (PVR, prostate volume and bladder wall thickness (BWT were noted. Results: Based on objective evidence from Pressure-Flow study, 35 patients were obstructed, 13 were not. Multivariate analysis was performed using Backward Stepwise Logistic Regression Model. Bladder wall thickness, prostate volume and urine flow rate had statistically significant relationship with BOO. Their coefficients of correlation were +0.794, +0.084 and 0.393 respectively. Bladder outlet obstruction could be defined by using a mathematical formula as detailed in the text (Positive Predictive Value 96.97%. Post-void residue and IPSS index were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: In a select group of patients presenting with LUTS, it should be possible to diagnose BOO without the use of Pressure-Flow study.

  15. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Patients with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Using Ultrasound Decorrelation Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arif, Muhammad; Groen, Jan; Boevé, Egbert R.; de Korte, Chris L.; Idzenga, Tim; van Mastrigt, Ron

    2016-01-01

    We developed a noninvasive method to diagnose bladder outlet obstruction. An ultrasound based decorrelation method was applied in male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. In 60 patients ultrasound data were acquired transperineally while they were voiding while sitting. Each patient also

  16. Heart rate variability after BRL37344, a beta-3 agonist, in experimental bladder outlet obstruction

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    Łukasz Dobrek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bladder overactivity symptoms accompany benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH syndrome. The autonomic nervous system (ANS disturbances may be involved in bladder dysfunction. An ameliorating effect on bladder overactivity is being assigned to the currently investigated β-3 adrenoreceptor agonists. However, little is known about the influence of β-3 agonists on ANS activity. The aim of our study was to estimate ANS activity using heart rate variability (HRV in experimental model of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO, reflecting human BPH.Material/Methods: 30 female rats, divided into control, non-treated BOO (LLBOO, and β-3 agonist (BRL37344 BOO treated (LLBOO β3 agonist were studied. BOO was evoked by 5-week long partial proximal urethra ligation. Next, 20-minute resting HRV recordings were performed in each of the studied groups following i.p. administration of the vehicle (LLBOO or BRL37344 (LLBOO β3 agonist.Results: LLBOO rats were characterized by diminished NN range, SDNN, and rMSSD in time-domain analysis. Similarly, TP and non-normalized spectral HRV parameters were also decreased. Contrary to these findings, normalized spectral parameters were lower (nLF and higher (nHF. The animals treated with BRL37344 demonstrated no significant differences in time--domain HRV parameters. In spectral analysis, a decrease in LF and HF, together with a fall in TP, was found. Moreover, both nLF and nHF reached almost the same values in control and β-3 agonist treated rats.Disscussion: Our data indicates that BRL37344 is an agent abolishing the autonomic imbalance in experimental BOO, which may contribute to relieving the symptoms of bladder overactivity in β-3 agonists treated participants.

  17. Epidemiology and etiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia and bladder outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant D Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a histological diagnosis associated with unregulated proliferation of connective tissue, smooth muscle and glandular epithelium. BPH may compress the urethra and result in anatomic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO; BOO may present as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, infections, retention and other adverse events. BPH and BOO have a significant impact on the health of older men and health-care costs. As the world population ages, the incidence and prevalence of BPH and LUTS have increased rapidly. Although non-modifiable risk factors - including age, genetics and geography - play significant roles in the etiology of BPH and BOO, recent data have revealed modifiable risk factors that present new opportunities for treatment and prevention, including sex steroid hormones, the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, diet, physical activity and inflammation. We review the natural history, definitions and key risk factors of BPH and BOO in epidemiological studies.

  18. Comparison between prostate volume and intravesical prostatic protrusion in detecting bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, A K M S; Alam, A K M K; Habib, A K M K; Rashid, M M; Rahman, H; Islam, A K M A; Jahan, M U

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the correlation of intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP) and prostate volume (PV) with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). This study was conducted in the department of urology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh, between July 2009 to September 2010. Fifty benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients were included in the study. Their evaluation consisted of history along with International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), digital rectal examination (DRE), transabdominal ultrasonography to measure prostate volume, intravesical prostatic protrusion & post voidal residual (PVR) urine and pressure-flow studies to detect bladder outflow obstruction (BOO). Statistical analysis included Unpaired 't' test, Chi-square test and Spearman's Rank correlation test. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the correlation of PV and IPP with BOO. Mean prostate volume was significantly larger in bladder outlet obstructed patients (PProstate volume & intravesical prostatic protrusion measured through transabdominal ultrasonography are noninvasive and accessible method that significantly correlates with bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and the correlation of IPP is much more stronger than that of prostate volume.

  19. Resistive index of prostate capsular arteries: a newly identified parameter to diagnose and assess bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Li, Gang; Wei, Xuedong; Mo, Xiaodong; Hu, Linkun; Zha, Yueqin; Hou, Jianquan

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the association of the resistive index of the prostate capsular arteries and bladder outlet obstruction severity in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. A total of 74 patients histologically diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia were ultimately enrolled in this prospective study. Urodynamics were performed by a urologist to determine bladder outlet obstruction. Baseline parameters measured in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were the prostate capsular artery resistive index, International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life score, total prostate and transition zone volume, and the transition zone index. ROC curves were produced to calculate the ROC AUC and evaluate the diagnostic performance of the prostate capsular artery resistive index, International Prostate Symptom Score, obstructive symptoms, total prostate and transition zone volume, and the transition zone index for bladder outlet obstruction. Significant difference between patients with and without bladder outlet obstruction was observed in the resistive index, which showed the highest coefficient with the degree of obstruction (r = 0.712, p prostate capsular artery resistive index had the maximum AUC of 0.823. The prostate capsular artery resistive index is significantly higher in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia related bladder outlet obstruction than in those without such obstruction. The resistive index might serve as a novel indicator to diagnose and assess bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sulforaphane Ameliorates Bladder Dysfunction through Activation of the Nrf2-ARE Pathway in a Rat Model of Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

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    Chong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the effect of sulforaphane (SFN treatment on the function and changes of expression of Nrf2-ARE pathway in the bladder of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. Materials and Methods. A total of 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats at age of 8 weeks were divided into 3 groups (6 of each: the sham operated group, the BOO group, and the BOO+SFN group. We examined histological alterations and the changes of oxidative stress markers and the protein expression of the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Results. We found that SFN treatment could prolong micturition interval and increase bladder capacity and bladder compliance. However, the peak voiding pressure was lower than BOO group. SFN treatment can ameliorate the increase of collagen fibers induced by obstruction. SFN treatment also increased the activity of SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT compared to the other groups. The level of bladder cell apoptosis was decreased in BOO rats with SFN treatment. Moreover, SFN could reduce the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, SFN could activate the Nrf2 expression with elevation of its target antioxidant proteins. Conclusions. The sulforaphane-mediated decrease of oxidative stress and activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway may ameliorate bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction.

  1. Perirenal fat stranding on CT: is there an association with bladder outlet obstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na Y; Sung, Deuk J; Kim, Min J; Park, Beom J; Sim, Ki C; Cho, Sung B

    2016-07-01

    To determine the association between perirenal fat stranding (PFS) on CT and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). CT scans from 122 patients who had undergone urodynamic study for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were registered after exclusion of patients with renal or retroperitoneal disease. Images were independently reviewed by two radiologists and compared with those of 244 age- and sex-matched control patients without LUTS. The PFS severity was scored on a four-point scale, and the interobserver agreement was assessed with kappa statistics. The severity score and incidence was compared between the groups, and the association with baseline characteristics was analyzed. For the LUTS group, an association between PFS severity and urodynamic and laboratory data was evaluated. PFS was more frequent and more severe in the LUTS group than in the control group (p-value < 0.001); its presence was significantly associated with male gender and older age (p-value < 0.001). PFS was predominantly bilateral in both groups (80.1-93.2%). In the LUTS group, PFS severity scores were significantly correlated with the maximum flow rate, maximum detrusor pressure and estimated glomerular filtration rate (p-value < 0.001). Interobserver agreements were excellent for PFS presence (κ = 0.883) and severity (κ = 0.816). Severe PFS was observed in older, male patients with LUTS. PFS severity was associated with the degree of BOO and impaired renal function. Recognition of PFS on the CT scan may warrant further evaluation of BOO and appropriate management to prevent renal impairment.

  2. Upregulation of heme oxygenase and collagen type III in the rat bladder after partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Mitsuhiko; Ukimura, Osamu; Yaoi, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Fushiki, Shinji; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate possible changes of the gene expression and localization of the enzymes, heme oxygenase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), with reference to increase of collagen type III in response to the partial obstruction of the bladder. Following initial obstruction, whole rat bladders were removed for real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated significantly enhanced expression of HO (p < 0.01) and collagen type III (p < 0.001) gene on postoperative day 14. Enhanced expression of NOS gene was seen only on postoperative day 4 (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry revealed that immunoreactivity to HO-1 had much in common in neural cells and fibers, although immunoreactivity to HO-2 and iNOS was relatively weak. This study suggested gene expression of HO, especially HO-1, was more dramatically changed than NOS, and was upregulated simultaneously with increase of collagen type III after obstruction. HO systems could be involved in the pathogenesis of bladder dysfunction related to increase of collagen type III after obstruction. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Function of the Cold Receptor (TRPM8) Associated with Voiding Dysfunction in Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ji Hee; Kang, Hyo Jin; Jin, Mei Hua; Lee, Hye Young; Im, Young Jae; Jung, Hyun Jin; Han, Sang Won

    2012-06-01

    Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) causes storage and voiding dysfunction in the lower urinary tract. We investigated the expression of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 8 (TRPM8) to evaluate the relationship between TRPM8 expression and overactive bladder (OAB) in a rat model of BOO. Fifty female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups; normal (n=10), normal-menthol (n=10), BOO (n=15), BOO-menthol (n=15). After 3 weeks, cystometry was performed by infusing physiological saline and menthol (3 mM) into the bladder at a slow infusion rate. The histological changes and expression of TRPM8 in the bladder were investigated by Masson's trichrome staining, immunofluorescence and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cystometry showed that the intercontraction interval (ICI; 428.2±23.4 vs. 880.4±51.2, Pstores. The increase of Ca(2+) probably causes contraction of smooth muscle in BOO. However, OAB symptoms were not observed after menthol treatment although the expression of TRPM8 was abundant in the bladder epithelium after menthol treatment. Although OAB in BOO models may be caused by complex pathways, regulation of TRPM8 presents possibilities for OAB treatment.

  4. Male bladder outlet obstruction: Time to re-evaluate the definition and reconsider our diagnostic pathway? ICI-RS 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademakers, Kevin; Drake, Marcus J; Gammie, Andrew; Djurhuus, Jens C; Rosier, Peter F W M; Abrams, Paul; Harding, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The diagnosis of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in the male is dependent on measurements of pressure and flow made during urodynamic studies. The procedure of urodynamics and the indices used to delineate BOO are well standardized largely as a result of the work of the International Continence Society. The clinical utility of the diagnosis of BOO is however, less well defined and there are several shortcomings and gaps in the currently available medical literature. Consequently the International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society (ICI-RS) held a think tank session in 2015 entitled "Male bladder outlet obstruction: Time to re-evaluate the definition and reconsider our diagnostic pathway?" This manuscript details the discussions that took place within that think tank setting out the pros and cons of the current definition of BOO and exploring alternative clinical tests (alone or in combination) which may be useful in the future investigation of male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. The think tank panel concluded that pressure-flow studies remain the diagnostic gold-standard for BOO although there is still a lack of high quality evidence. Newer, less invasive, investigations have shown promise in terms of diagnostic accuracy for BOO but similar criticisms can be levelled against these tests. Therefore, the think tank suggests further research with regard to these alternative indicators to determine their clinical utility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The use of ultrasound-estimated bladder weight in diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction and detrusor overactivity in men with lower urinary tract symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Housami

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Measurement of bladder weight using ultrasound estimates of bladder wall thickness and bladder volume is an emerging clinical measurement technique that may have a role in the diagnosis of lower urinary tract dysfunction. We have reviewed available literature on this technique to assess current clinical status. Methods: A systematic literature search was carried out within PubMed and MedLine to identify relevant publications. These were then screened for relevance. Preliminary results from our clinical experiments using the technique are also included. Results: We identified 17 published papers concerning the technique which covered clinical studies relating ultrasound-estimated bladder wall thickness to urodynamic diagnosis in men, women, and children together with change in response to treatment of bladder outlet obstruction. The original manual technique has been challenged by a commercially available automated technique. Conclusion: Ultrasound-estimated bladder weight is a promising non-invasive technique for the categorization of storage and voiding disorders in both men and women. Further studies are needed to validate the technique and assess accuracy of diagnosis.

  6. The relationship of the International Prostate Symptom Score and objective parameters for diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction. Part I: when statistics fail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadie, B. S.; Ibrahim, E. H.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Gomha, M. A.; Ghoneim, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the International Prostate Symptom Score and correlated it with objective means of determining bladder outlet obstruction. Beginning in May 1996, 460 men 41 to 88 years old (mean age plus or minus standard deviation 60.4 +/- 9.4) were prospectively included in this study. Symptoms were

  7. Combination of intravesical prostatic protrusion and resistive index is useful to predict bladder outlet obstruction in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Otsuka, Atsushi; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2016-11-01

    To examine which parameters obtained from transrectal ultrasonography are accurate predictors of urodynamically-confirmed bladder outlet obstruction in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The records of 350 patients with complaints of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia were reviewed. Baseline parameters were international prostate symptom score, quality of life score, postvoid residual urine volume, prostate-specific antigen, and data obtained from uroflowmetry and transrectal ultrasonography. Urodynamic studies were carried out to determine bladder outlet obstruction. Receiver operator characteristic curves were generated to compare the accuracy of the different parameters, and the area under the curve of each parameter was calculated. Bladder outlet obstruction index positively correlated with intravesical prostatic protrusion, total prostate volume, transition zone volume, transition zone index, resistive index and prostate-specific antigen. Further, resistive index was only a significant independent variable with intravesical prostatic protrusion. Intravesical prostatic protrusion had the highest area under the curve of 0.790 among all variables, and its cut-off value was 10 mm. The positive predictive value of intravesical prostatic protrusion was 76.2%. In addition, the positive predictive value of the combined parameters intravesical prostatic protrusion and resistive index increased to 83.8%. Intravesical prostatic protrusion and resistive index are useful parameters for predicting bladder outlet obstruction in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In clinical practice, the combination of intravesical prostatic protrusion and resistive index on ultrasound can be diagnostic of bladder outlet obstruction. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Assessing the contribution of thrombospondin-4 induction and ATF6α activation to endoplasmic reticulum expansion and phenotypic modulation in bladder outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Katarzyna K.; Ekman, Mari; Rippe, Catarina; Grossi, Mario; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof; Albinsson, Sebastian; Uvelius, Bengt; Swärd, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic modulation of smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of disease. The associated expansion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) volume remains unexplained. Thrombospondin-4 was recently found to promote ATF6α activation leading to ER expansion. Using bladder outlet obstruction as a paradigm for phenotypic modulation, we tested if thrombospondin-4 is induced in association with ATF6α activation and ER expansion. Thrombospondin-4 was induced and ATF6α was activated after outlet obstruction in rodents. Increased abundance of spliced of Xbp1, another ER-stress sensor, and induction of Atf4 and Creb3l2 was also seen. Downstream of ATF6α, Calr, Manf, Sdf2l1 and Pdi increased as did ER size, whereas contractile markers were reduced. Overexpression of ATF6α, but not of thrombospondin-4, increased Calr, Manf, Sdf2l1 and Pdi and caused ER expansion, but the contractile markers were inert. Knockout of thrombospondin-4 neither affected bladder growth nor expression of ATF6α target genes, and repression of contractile markers was the same, even if ATF6α activation was curtailed. Increases of Xbp1s, Atf4 and Creb3l2 were similar. Our findings demonstrate reciprocal regulation of the unfolded protein response, including ATF6α activation and ER expansion, and reduced contractile differentiation in bladder outlet obstruction occurring independently of thrombospondin-4, which however is a sensitive indicator of obstruction. PMID:27581066

  9. Thermo-expandable prostatic stents for bladder outlet obstruction in the frail and elderly population: An underutilized procedure?

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    Kapil Sethi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report our outcomes with the use of a thermo-expandable metallic intraprostatic stent (Memokath for patients with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO secondary to prostatic obstruction, and to assess it is a feasible option for many frail and elderly men unsuitable for surgery. Materials and Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent insertion of a Memokath stent for BOO over 17 years (January 1999 to December 2015 at one regional center over a long follow-up period (median, 7 years. Patients were selected if they had obstructive urinary symptoms or urinary retention with an indwelling catheter in situ, and were ineligible for transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP under general or spinal anesthesia. Primary outcomes assessed were the improvement in urinary symptoms and voiding parameters, as well as the ability to void spontaneously if catheterized, along with complications. Results: One hundred forty-four patients who presented with BOO or urinary retention had a Memokath stent inserted. Ninety patients (62.5% had a successful stent insertion with a significant difference between the median preoperative (550 mL and postoperative residual volume (80 mL, p<0.0001. Nearly two-thirds of men (64% returned to unassisted voiding with no increased risk of complications over time. Fifty-four patients (37.5% experienced stent failure. Main complications requiring stent removal or repositioning were migration, occlusion, refractory urinary retention and irritative voiding symptoms. Conclusions: In elderly and frail men with BOO deemed unsuitable to undergo TURP, prostatic stent is a safe and practical alternative to long-term catheterization.

  10. Intraprostatic injection of botulinum toxin type- A relieves bladder outlet obstruction in human and induces prostate apoptosis in dogs

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    Yoshimura Naoki

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing interest with botulinum toxin – A (BTX-A application in the lower urinary tract, we investigated the BTX-A effects on the canine prostate and also in men with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Methods Transperineal injection into the prostate using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS was performed throughout the study. Saline with or without 100 U of BTX-A was injected into mongrel dogs prostate. One or 3 months later, the prostate was harvested for morphologic and apoptotic study. In addition, eight BPH patients refractory to α-blockers were treated with ultrasound guided intraprostatic injection of 200 U of BTX-A. Results In the BTX-A treated dogs, atrophy and diffuse apoptosis was observed with H&E stain and TUNEL stain at 1 and 3 months. Clinically, the mean prostate volume, symptom score, and quality of life index were significantly reduced by 18.8%, 73.1%, and 61.5% respectively. Maximal flow rate significantly increased by 72.0%. Conclusion Intraprostatic BTX-A injection induces prostate apotosis in dogs and relieves BOO in humans. It is therefore a promising alternative treatment for refractory BOO due to BPH.

  11. Effects of silodosin, a selective alpha-1A adrenoceptor antagonist, on erectile function in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

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    Bastaskın, Tugce; Kaya, Ecem; Ozakca, Isıl; Yilmaz, Didem; Bayatlı, Nur; Akdemir, Alp Ozgur; Gur, Serap

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the effects of silodosin (selective α 1A -adrenoceptor antagonist) on erectile dysfunction (ED) in a rat model of bladder outlet obstruction. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 32) were divided into four groups: (i) sham-operated control; (ii) silodosin-treated (sham) control (0.1 mg/kg/day); (iii) partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO); and (iv) silodosin-treated with PBOO. PBOO was induced by ligation of the urethra for 6 weeks. In vivo, erectile responses were monitored by evaluating ratios of intracavernosal pressure (ICP)/mean arterial pressure (MAP). Organ-bath studies were performed on corpus cavernosum (CC) strips. Penises were assessed at baseline for protein expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK2) by Western blot. Immunohistochemistry and Masson trichrome staining were performed for analysis of nNOS protein levels and tissue alterations. The ratio of ICP/MAP was significantly decreased in obstructed rats (0.26 ± 0.043, P < 0.01) compared to sham-control rats (0.64 ± 0.10), which was restored by the treatment (0.59 ± 0.14, P < 0.01) compared with obstructed rats. Relaxation responses were significantly reduced in strips from the obstructed group. Silodosin restored nitrergic relaxant responses. nNOS expression in the obstructed group decreased, which was improved by treatment. The decreased smooth muscle/collagen ratio in the bladder obstructed group was reversed by the treatment. Silodosin improves erectile function in obstructed rats. Further clinical trials are needed to explore fully the potential benefits of silodosin in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)/lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in association with ED. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:597-603, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of combined treatment of tadalafil and tamsulosin on bladder dysfunction via the inhibition of afferent nerve activities in a rat model of bladder outlet obstruction.

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    Furuta, Akira; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Igarashi, Taro; Koike, Yusuke; Egawa, Shin; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2018-03-08

    To investigate the effects of combined treatment of tadalafil (a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor) and tamsulosin (an α 1 -adrenoceptor antagonist) on bladder dysfunction in a rat model of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Cystometry was performed in conscious female BOO rats 6 weeks after partially ligation of the urethra. Either tadalafil (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg) or tamsulosin (0.001, 0.003 and 0.01 mg/kg) was cumulatively applied intravenously at 30-min intervals to examine changes in cystometric parameters and blood pressures. Changes in cystometric parameters and blood pressures were also checked when tadalafil (0.3 mg/kg), tamsulosin (0.003 mg/kg) or both were intravenously applied. In BOO rats, application of either tadalafil (0.3 mg/kg) or tamsulosin (0.003, 0.01 mg/kg) alone significantly increased threshold pressures and intercontraction intervals whereas there were no significant changes in other cystometric parameters. In addition, because a significant reduction in blood pressures was detected after the administration of tamsulosin (0.01 mg/kg), tamsulosin at a lower dose (0.003 mg/kg) was used for the combined treatment. The combination therapy of tadalafil and tamsulosin induced a significantly larger rate of increase in intercontraction intervals (1.7 times) compared with monotherapy of either drug (1.3 times each) although the combined therapy did not affect blood pressures. These results suggest that the combination therapy of tadalafil and tamsulosin can induce the additive inhibitory effects on urinary frequency compared with monotherapy, more likely via inhibition of the afferent limb of micturition reflex rather than the efferent function as evidenced by the increases in threshold pressures and intercontraction intervals without affecting bladder contractile function.

  13. Early bladder outlet obstruction in fetal lambs induces renal dysplasia and the prune-belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, R; Reinberg, Y; Burke, B; Wells, T; Vernier, R L

    1990-03-01

    A model of posterior urethral valves in fetal lambs was developed in order to evaluate the effect of intrauterine urinary obstruction on the developing kidney. Complete urethral obstruction was induced in five fetal lambs at 43 to 45 days of gestation. Two control fetal lambs underwent sham operations. At full term (140 days), two of the five experimental lambs and both control lambs were available for postmortem examination. Results of gross and histological examination of the control lambs were normal. In contrast, the kidneys of the experimental lambs were markedly asymmetrical in size. Histological examination of the kidneys in experimental lambs showed cystic dilatation of the collecting ducts and occasional cystic dilatation of Bowman's spaces, features compatible with obstruction. Also noted were peripheral cortical cysts and primitive tubules lined with cuboidal epithelium and surrounded by fibromuscular collarettes, characteristic of renal dysplasia. One of the infant lambs had many characteristics of the prune-belly syndrome, including a wrinkled, markedly distended abdomen, deficient abdominal wall musculature, flared chest wall, limb deformities, and undescended testes. These results suggest that early in utero urethral obstruction (at the beginning of the second third of gestation) causes renal dysplasia. The results also support the hypothesis that the prune-belly syndrome results from abdominal distention that occurs early in gestation.

  14. Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate Ameliorates Bladder Fibrosis in a Rat Model of Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction by Inhibiting the TGF-β/Smad Pathway Activation.

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    Xiaoxiao Jiang

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 is known to play a pivotal role in a diverse range of biological systems including modulation of fibrosis in several organs. The precise role of TGF-β/Smad signaling in the progression of bladder fibrosis secondary to partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO is yet to be conclusively. Using a rat PBOO model, we investigated TGF-β1 expression and exaimined whether sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS could inhibit TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway activation and ameliorate bladder fibrosis. Forty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham operation group (n = 16, PBOO operation without STS treatment group (n = 16 and PBOO operation with STS treatment group (n = 16. Thirty-two rats underwent the operative procedure to create PBOO and subsequently received intraperitoneal injections of STS (10 mg/kg/d; n = 16 or vehicle (n = 16 two days after the surgery. Sham surgery was conducted on 16 rats, which received intraperitoneal vehicle injection two days later. In each of the three groups, an equal number of rats were sacrificed at weeks 4 and 8 after the PBOO or sham operation. The TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway was analyzed using western blotting, immunohistochemical staining and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. One-way analysis of variance was conducted to draw statistical inferences. At 4 and 8 weeks, the expression of TGF-β1 and phosphorylated Smad2 and Smad3 in STS-treated PBOO rats was significantly lower than in the PBOO rats not treated with STS. Alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, collagen I and collagen III expression at 4 and 8 weeks post PBOO was lower in STS-treated PBOO rats when compared to that in PBOO rats not treated with STS. Our findings indicate that STS ameliorates bladder fibrosis by inhibiting TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway activation, and may prove to be a potential therapeutic measure for preventing bladder fibrosis secondary to PBOO

  15. Non-invasive clinical parameters for the prediction of urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction: analysis using causal Bayesian networks.

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    Myong Kim

    Full Text Available To identify non-invasive clinical parameters to predict urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH using causal Bayesian networks (CBN.From October 2004 to August 2013, 1,381 eligible BPH patients with complete data were selected for analysis. The following clinical variables were considered: age, total prostate volume (TPV, transition zone volume (TZV, prostate specific antigen (PSA, maximum flow rate (Qmax, and post-void residual volume (PVR on uroflowmetry, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS. Among these variables, the independent predictors of BOO were selected using the CBN model. The predictive performance of the CBN model using the selected variables was verified through a logistic regression (LR model with the same dataset.Mean age, TPV, and IPSS were 6.2 (±7.3, SD years, 48.5 (±25.9 ml, and 17.9 (±7.9, respectively. The mean BOO index was 35.1 (±25.2 and 477 patients (34.5% had urodynamic BOO (BOO index ≥40. By using the CBN model, we identified TPV, Qmax, and PVR as independent predictors of BOO. With these three variables, the BOO prediction accuracy was 73.5%. The LR model showed a similar accuracy (77.0%. However, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the CBN model was statistically smaller than that of the LR model (0.772 vs. 0.798, p = 0.020.Our study demonstrated that TPV, Qmax, and PVR are independent predictors of urodynamic BOO.

  16. The effectiveness of otis urethrotomy combined with six weeks urethral dilations until 40 Fr in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction in women: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Nikolaos; Tsimaris, Ioannis; Makatsori, Aikaterini; Hastazeris, Konstantinos; Kafarakis, Vasillios; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos E

    2014-01-04

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Otis urethrotomy combined with six weekly urethral dilations until 40 French (Fr) in the treatment of women with urodynamic diagnosis of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Women diagnosed with lower urinary tract symptoms underwent urodynamic evaluation. Severity of symptoms and quality of life were assessed with international prostate symptom score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL) questionnaires. Bladder outlet obstruction was defined as the presence of two or more of the following: maximum flow rate (Qmax) 50 cmH2O and urethral resistance factor (URF) greater than 0.2. Ten out of 25 women diagnosed with BOO met the criteria. All women underwent Otis urethrotomy to 40 F and six-week urethral dilations until 40 F. After six months all patients underwent free uroflowmetry. Moreover post voiding residual (PVR), IPSS-QoL were recorded. Six months post-operatively there was a significant improvement in all parameters: IPSS = 13.5 vs. 22.5 (P = .001), QoL = 3 vs. 5 (P = .001), voided volume = 312 mL vs. 216 mL (P = .055), Qmax = 27.5 mL/s vs. 12 mL/s (P = .001), and PVR = 27.5 mL vs. 170 mL (P = .005). Five women had close follow up during an average of 82 months. They maintained improved QoL (P women with evidence of BOO not related to detrusor sphincter dyssynergia or obvious functional and anatomical pathology.

  17. Blebbistain, a myosin II inhibitor, as a novel strategy to regulate detrusor contractility in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

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    Xinhua Zhang

    Full Text Available Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO, a common urologic pathology mostly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, can coexist in 40-45% of patients with overactive bladder (OAB and is associated with detrusor overactivity (DO. PBOO that induces DO results in alteration in bladder myosin II type and isoform composition. Blebbistatin (BLEB is a myosin II inhibitor we recently demonstrated potently relaxed normal detrusor smooth muscle (SM and reports suggest varied BLEB efficacy for different SM myosin (SMM isoforms and/or SMM vs nonmuscle myosin (NMM. We hypothesize BLEB inhibition of myosin II as a novel contraction protein targeted strategy to regulate DO. Using a surgically-induced male rat PBOO model, organ bath contractility, competitive and Real-Time-RT-PCR were performed. It was found that obstructed-bladder weight significantly increased 2.74-fold while in vitro contractility of detrusor to various stimuli was impaired ∼50% along with decreased shortening velocity. Obstruction also altered detrusor spontaneous activities with significantly increased amplitude but depressed frequency. PBOO switched bladder from a phasic-type to a more tonic-type SM. Expression of 5' myosin heavy chain (MHC alternatively spliced isoform SM-A (associated with tonic-type SM increased 3-fold while 3' MHC SM1 and essential light chain isoform MLC(17b also exhibited increased relative expression. Total SMMHC expression was decreased by 25% while the expression of NMM IIB (SMemb was greatly increased by 4.5-fold. BLEB was found to completely relax detrusor strips from both sham-operated and PBOO rats pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or electrical field stimulation although sensitivity was slightly decreased (20% only at lower doses for PBOO. Thus we provide the first thorough characterization of the response of rat bladder myosin to PBOO and demonstrate complete BLEB-induced PBOO bladder SM relaxation. Furthermore, the present study provides valuable

  18. Diagnostic value of urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction to select patients for transurethral surgery of the prostate: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Myong Kim

    Full Text Available To investigate the diagnostic value of urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO in the selection of patients for transurethral surgery of the prostate.We systematically searched online PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases from January 1989 to June 2014.A total of 19 articles met the eligibility criteria for this systematic review. The eligible studies included a total of 2321 patients with a median number of 92 patients per study (range: 12-437. Of the 19 studies, 15 conducted conventional transurethral prostatectomy (TURP, and 7 used other or multiple modalities. In urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO positive patients, the pooled mean difference (MD was significant for better improvement of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS (pooled MD, 3.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72-5.24; p < 0.01; studies, 16; participants, 1726, quality of life score (QoL (pooled MD, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.14-1.02; p = 0.010; studies, 9; participants, 1052, maximal flow rate (Qmax (pooled MD, 3.86; 95% CI, 2.17-5.54; p < 0.01; studies, 17; participants, 1852, and post-void residual volume (PVR (pooled MD, 32.46; 95% CI, 23.34-41.58; p < 0.01; studies, 10; participants, 1219 compared with that in non-BOO patients. Some comparisons showed between-study heterogeneity despite the strict selection criteria of the included studies. However, there was no clear evidence of publication bias in this meta-analysis.Our meta-analysis results showed a significant association between urodynamic BOO and better improvements in all treatment outcome parameters. Preoperative UDS may add insight into postoperative outcomes after surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  19. Activation of P2Y6 Receptors Facilitates Nonneuronal Adenosine Triphosphate and Acetylcholine Release from Urothelium with the Lamina Propria of Men with Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

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    Silva, Isabel; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Silva-Ramos, Miguel; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2015-10-01

    Deregulation of purinergic bladder signaling may contribute to persistent detrusor overactivity in patients with bladder outlet obstruction. Activation of uridine diphosphate sensitive P2Y6 receptors increases voiding frequency in rats indirectly by releasing adenosine triphosphate from the urothelium. To our knowledge this mechanism has never been tested in the human bladder. We examined the role of the uridine diphosphate sensitive P2Y6 receptor on tetrodotoxin insensitive nonneuronal adenosine triphosphate and [(3)H]acetylcholine release from the human urothelium with the lamina propria of control organ donors and patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. The adenosine triphosphate-to-[(3)H]acetylcholine ratio was fivefold higher in mucosal urothelium/lamina propria strips from benign prostatic hyperplasia patients than control men. The selective P2Y6 receptor agonist PSB0474 (100 nM) augmented by a similar amount adenosine triphosphate and [(3)H]acetylcholine release from mucosal urothelium/lamina propria strips from both groups of individuals. The facilitatory effect of PSB0474 was prevented by MRS2578 (50 nM) and by carbenoxolone (10 μM), which block P2Y6 receptor and pannexin-1 hemichannels, respectively. Blockade of P2X3 (and/or P2X2/3) receptors with A317491 (100 nM) also attenuated release facilitation by PSB0474 in control men but not in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Immunolocalization studies showed that P2Y6, P2X2 and P2X3 receptors were present in choline acetyltransferase positive urothelial cells. In contrast to P2Y6 staining, choline acetyltransferase, P2X2 and P2X3 immunoreactivity decreased in the urothelium of benign prostatic hyperplasia patients. Activation of P2Y6 receptor amplifies mucosal adenosine triphosphate release underlying bladder overactivity in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Therefore, we propose selective P2Y6 receptor blockade as a novel therapeutic strategy to control persistent storage symptoms in

  20. Urodynamic Features and Significant Predictors of Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Patients With Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Small Prostate Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minyong; Kim, Myong; Choo, Min Soo; Paick, Jae-Seung; Oh, Seung-June

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the clinical and urodynamic features of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) according to their prostate size. We analyzed 2039 LUTS/BPH patients who underwent urodynamic study between October 2004 and August 2013. We divided the patients into three groups according to their prostate size: small (≤30 mL), moderately enlarged (31-80 mL), and large prostate (≥81 mL) groups. We compared the groups regarding age, International Prostatic Symptom Score, maximal flow rate (Qmax), postvoided residual (PVR), serum prostate-specific antigen, prostate volume measured by ultrasonography, and urodynamic findings. Patients with a small prostate had better urodynamic outcomes than those with larger prostates in overall population. Although the total prostate volume significantly correlated with the bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) index (r  =  0.51), BOO patients with a small prostate had similar Qmax, higher PVR, and lower voiding efficiency, compared to those with larger prostates. Moreover, urodynamic parameters indicating bladder abnormalities, including low compliance and involuntary detrusor contraction positivity, were similar among the groups in BOO patients. A higher proportion of detrusor underactivity was also observed in the small prostate group in BOO patients. Finally, when adjusting for potential confounding variables, we identified serum prostate-specific antigen levels (odds ratio, 1.34) and Qmax (odds ratio, 0.77) as significant predictors for BOO in LUTS/BPH patients with a small prostate. BOO patients with a small prostate showed higher PVR and poor voiding efficiency, as well as similar urodynamic bladder abnormalities, compared to those with moderately enlarged and large prostates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Age and bladder outlet obstruction are independently associated with detrusor overactivity in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oelke, Matthias; Baard, Joyce; Wijkstra, Hessel; de la Rosette, Jean J.; Jonas, Udo; Hoefner, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Background: Detrusor overactivity is one known cause of lower urinary tract Symptoms and has been linked to bladder storage symptoms (urgency, frequency, or urge incontinence). Objective: To determine clinical and urodynamic parameters associated with detrusor overactivity in patients with suspected

  2. Clinical diagnosis of bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic enlargement and lower urinary tract symptoms: development and urodynamic validation of a clinical prostate score for the objective diagnosis of bladder outlet obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosier, P. F.; de Wildt, M. J.; Wijkstra, H.; Debruyne, F. F.; de la Rosette, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    We attempted to improve the method of objective clinical evaluation of patients with benign prostatic enlargement and lower urinary tract symptoms. We compared the results of free uroflowmetry and transrectal ultrasound prostate size determination with those of pressure-flow analysis of bladder

  3. Detrusor Induction of miR-132/212 following Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Association with MeCP2 Repression and Cell Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Katarzyna; Svensson, Daniel; Göransson, Olga; Dahan, Diana; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof; Albinsson, Sebastian; Uvelius, Bengt; Swärd, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The microRNAs (miRNAs) miR-132 and miR-212 have been found to regulate synaptic plasticity and cholinergic signaling and recent work has demonstrated roles outside of the CNS, including in smooth muscle. Here, we examined if miR-132 and miR-212 are induced in the urinary bladder following outlet obstruction and whether this correlates with effects on gene expression and cell growth. Three to seven-fold induction of miR-132/212 was found at 10 days of obstruction and this was selective for the detrusor layer. We cross-referenced putative binding sites in the miR-132/212 promoter with transcription factors that were predicted to be active in the obstruction model. This suggested involvement of Creb and Ahr in miR-132/212 induction. Creb phosphorylation (S-133) was not increased, but the number of Ahr positive nuclei increased. Moreover, we found that serum stimulation and protein kinase C activation induced miR-132/212 in human detrusor cells. To identify miR-132/212 targets, we correlated the mRNA levels of validated targets with the miRNA levels. Significant correlations between miR-132/212 and MeCP2, Ep300, Pnkd and Jarid1a were observed, and the protein levels of MeCP2, Pnkd and Ache were reduced after obstruction. Reduction of Ache however closely matched a 90% reduction of synapse density arguing that its repression was unrelated to miR-132/212 induction. Importantly, transfection of antimirs and mimics in cultured detrusor cells increased and decreased, respectively, the number of cells and led to changes in MeCP2 expression. In all, these findings show that obstruction of the urethra increases miR-132 and miR-212 in the detrusor and suggests that this influences gene expression and limits cell growth. PMID:25617893

  4. Outlet Obstruction of Temporary Loop Diverting Ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takaaki; Morita, Hiroki; Sutoh, Toshinaga; Yajima, Reina; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    Stoma formation is commonly performed in operations to treat carcinoma, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). In this study, we report several cases of stomal outlet obstruction and investigate the clinical features of cases of outlet obstruction in patients who underwent diverting loop ileostomy. Sixty-one patients with IBD, FAP or rectal cancer who required diverting loop ileostomy were identified for inclusion in this study. We defined outlet obstruction as a small bowel obstruction at the opening of the ileostomy following surgery. All cases of outlet obstruction were diagnosed by computed tomography. In the univariate analysis the type of diagnosis, type of operation, age, and white blood cell count were the factors significantly associated with outlet obstruction following ileostomy, and outlet obstruction was considered to have a connection with restorative proctocolectomy. In conclusion, we found that adhesion and twisting of the ileostomy were the causes of outlet obstruction. For temporary diversion, simple rotation of the ileostomy should be recommended, especially in restorative proctocolectomy. Additional study is required to explore other risk factors of outlet obstruction.

  5. Effects of chronic administration of tamsulosin and tadalafil, alone or in combination, in rats with bladder outlet obstruction induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regadas, Rommel Prata; Reges, Ricardo; Cerqueira, João Batista Gadelha; Sucupira, Daniel Gabrielle; Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo F; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de; Gonzaga-Silva, Lúcio Flávio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define if tadalafil causes detrusor muscle impairment and to observe the effect of combination of tadalafil with tamsulosin on the lower urinary tract of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency. Thirty-one male rats were randomized to following groups: 1 - control; 2 - L-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME); 3 - Tamsulosin + L-NAME, 4 Tadalafil+L-NAME; and 5 - Tamsulosin + Tadalafil + L-NAME. At the end of the treatment period (30 days), all animals were submitted to urodynamic study. The administration of L-NAME increased the number of non-voiding contractions (NVC) (1.04 ± 0.22), volume threshold (VT) (1.86 ± 0.35), and micturition cycle (MC) (1.34 ± 0.11) compared with control (0.52 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.06, and 0.67 ± 0.30), respectively. The administration of tamsulosin reduced the number of NVC (0.57 ± 0.42) and VT (0.76 ± 0.24 ) compared with L-NAME group. Co-treatment with tadalafil decreased the number of VT (0.85 ± 0.53) and MC (0.76 ± 0.22) compared with L-NAME group. The combination of tamsulosin with tadalafil improved the number of NVC (0.56 ± 0.18), VT (0.97 ± 0.52) and MC (0.68 ± 0.30) compared with L-NAME group. In rats with BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency, tadalafil did not cause impairment in detrusor muscle and seems to have an addictive effect to tamsulosin because the combination decreased non voiding contractions as well the number of micturition cycles.

  6. Effects of chronic administration of tamsulosin and tadalafil, alone or in combination, in rats with bladder outlet obstruction induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Prata Regadas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study was to define if tadalafil causes detrusor muscle impairment and to observe the effect of combination of tadalafil with tamsulosin on the lower urinary tract of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency. Materials and Methods Thirty-one male rats were randomized to following groups: 1 - control; 2 - L-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 3 - Tamsulosin + L-NAME, 4 Tadalafil+L-NAME; and 5 - Tamsulosin + Tadalafil + L-NAME. At the end of the treatment period (30 days, all animals were submitted to urodynamic study. Results The administration of L-NAME increased the number of non-voiding contractions (NVC (1.04 ± 0.22, volume threshold (VT (1.86 ± 0.35, and micturition cycle (MC (1.34 ± 0.11 compared with control (0.52 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.06, and 0.67 ± 0.30, respectively. The administration of tamsulosin reduced the number of NVC (0.57 ± 0.42 and VT (0.76 ± 0.24 compared with L-NAME group. Co-treatment with tadalafil decreased the number of VT (0.85 ± 0.53 and MC (0.76 ± 0.22 compared with L-NAME group. The combination of tamsulosin with tadalafil improved the number of NVC (0.56 ± 0.18, VT (0.97 ± 0.52 and MC (0.68 ± 0.30 compared with L-NAME group. Conclusion In rats with BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency, tadalafil did not cause impairment in detrusor muscle and seems to have an addictive effect to tamsulosin because the combination decreased non voiding contractions as well the number of micturition cycles.

  7. Gastric outlet obstruction in Northwestern Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    progressive weight loss was considered the clinical indicator of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The clinical diagnosis ... aggravated by meals and relieved by vomiting. The duration of the epigastric pain ranged from one .... and increased daily bowel frequency in 71% of pa- tients. Since our follow up is an incomplete one,.

  8. Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction from Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Clare; Tsang, Adrian; Nithianandan, Harrish; Nguyen, Eric; Bauer, Patrick; Dennis, Kristopher

    2017-01-01

    Patients with advanced-stage pancreatic cancer are typically burdened by many symptoms that impair functioning and worsen quality of life. We report an exceptional case of a 73-year-old woman with T4N1M0 adenocarcinoma of the uncinate process of the pancreas who developed significant gastric outlet obstruction - an uncommon yet potentially life-threatening complication of disease progression. She developed progressive abdominal pain and emesis, and profound dilatation of her stomach was detected on a radiation therapy simulation CT scan that required urgent decompression. Malignant gastric outlet obstruction must be included in the differential diagnosis when patients with known advanced disease of the pancreas present with obstructive upper gastrointestinal symptoms.

  9. Gastric Outlet Obstruction due to Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jared A; An, Jong; Brown, Alexander W; Spearman, Darren; Paredes, Angelo

    2017-03-01

    A 64- year-old man with smoldering myeloma presented to the hospital for nausea, vomiting, and PO intolerance. Abdominal CT demonstrated massive gastric distention and collapsed proximal duodenum consistent with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated pyloric edema. Duodenal biopsies were consistent with AL amyloidosis. Given the concerns for bleeding risk and immediate need to start chemotherapy, surgery was deferred. Chemotherapy was initiated with a good clinical response. Our non-operative approach is novel, eliminates perioperative adverse events, allows for early initiation of chemotherapy, and can serve as a model for patients with GOO resulting from AL amyloidosis who are not surgical candidates.

  10. Recurrent gastric outlet obstruction due to an inguinal hernia.

    OpenAIRE

    Naraynsingh, V.; Sieunarine, K.; Raju, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Although gastric strangulation in an inguinal hernia has been reported on three previous occasions, recurrent gastric outlet obstruction due to this hernia has not been previously documented. Prolonged traction on the distal stomach by omentum and transverse colon can draw the antrum and pylorus into the hernia and produce gastric outlet obstruction.

  11. Steroid responsive eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric outlet obstruction is a rare complication of eosinophilic gastroenteritis, most commonly treated surgically. We report a case of eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child that responded to conservative medical management. A brief review of this clinical entity is also provided....

  12. Steroid responsive eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Kellermayer, Richard; Tatevian, Nina; Klish, William; Shulman, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction is a rare complication of eosinophilic gastroenteritis, most commonly treated surgically. We report a case of eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child that responded to conservative medical management. A brief review of this clinical entity is also provided.

  13. Gastric Outlet Obstruction from Duodenal Lipoma in an Adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastric Outlet Obstruction from Duodenal Lipoma in an Adult. ... Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Although, peptic ulcer disease remains the most common benign cause of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO), duodenal lipomas remain a rare, but possible cause of GOO and could pose a diagnostic challenge, especially in ...

  14. Ectopic pancreas causing partial gastric outlet obstruction: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ectopic pancreas causing partial gastric outlet obstruction: a case report and review of literature. ... Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Gastric outlet obstruction resulting from ectopic pancreas in an adult is the first of its kind in our center; we, therefore, present this case to describe the challenges faced with diagnosis, treatment, ...

  15. A CLINICAL STUDY ON GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latchu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO is obstruction in the first part of duodenum secondary to cicatrised duodenal ulcer or proximally where the diagnosis of carcinoma is most probable. GOO can be a diagnostic and treatment dilemma. Once a mechanical obstruction is confirmed, differentiate between benign and malignant processes. Cicatrized duodenal ulcer was the most common cause of GOO. But with increased awareness, change in the dietary habits and availability of H2 receptor blockers and Proton Pump Inhibitors and H pylori kits all have resulted in decreased incidence of patients requiring surgery and also the complications like pyloric stenosis have reduced. At the same time the incidence of antral carcinoma of stomach producing GOO has comparatively increased, which may be due to increased early diagnosis of the condition with the help of flexible fibro optic endoscope. AIMS & OBJECTIVES To study and identify the cause of cases of GOO with respect to benign peptic ulcer and malignancy of stomach. MATERIALS AND METHODS An observational study comparing of 30 cases of GOO. An elaborate study of the cases with regard to history, clinical features, routine and special investigation, pre operative treatment, operative findings, post operative management and complications in the post operative period is done. Apart from routine surgical profile special investigations like serum electrolytes, barium meal study, Upper GI Endoscopy and ultrasound abdomen and pelvis will be carried. For peptic ulcer disease truncal vagotomy with posterior gastrojejunostomy was done and for carcinoma partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction or anterior GJ or palliative resection with anterior GJ were done. INCLUSION CRITERIA 1. Peptic ulcer disease 2. Carcinoma pyloric antrum, 3. Benign neoplasm of stomach. EXCLUSION CRITERIA 1. Carcinoma stomach with liver metastasis, ascites, peritoneal implantation, 2. Gastro duodenal tuberculosis. ETHICAL ISSUES

  16. The efficacy and safety of oral Tamsulosin controlled absorption system (OCAS for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms due to bladder outlet obstruction associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia: an open-label preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannakij Lojanapiwat

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Tamsulosin, a superselective subtype alpha 1a and 1d blocker, is used for the treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS commonly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. This prospective study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new formulation, Tamsulosin OCAS® (Oral Controlled Absorption System, for LUTS associated with BPH in Thai patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty one patients over 40 years old with complaints of LUTS associated with BPH were recruited. Patients received an 8 week course of once daily 0.4 mg tamsulosin OCAS®, and were followed up at 2 (visit 3, 4 (visit 4 and 8 (visit 5 weeks post-treatment. At each visit, patients were assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, Nocturia Quality of Life (N-QoL Questionnaire, QoL Assessment Index (IPSS-QoL, and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF. The primary outcome was efficacy of Tamsulosin. The secondary outcomes included change in the mean number of nocturia episodes, hours of undisturbed sleep (HUS and uroflowmetry measurements. RESULTS: Total IPSS significantly decreased at week 8 from baseline (from 19.52 to 6.08; p < 0.001. Similarly, the voiding and storage subscores of IPSS also continued to improve significantly starting from the second and third visits, respectively (p < 0.001 versus baseline. The IPSS-QoL and N-QoL scores significantly improved at visit 3 through end of study. In addition, we observed significant nocturia and HUS improvement in their last clinic visit. Uroflowmetry parameters, Qmax and Qave, improved significantly at 3rd clinic visit . Three patients experienced mild dizziness. CONCLUSION: Tamsulosin OCAS® treatment led to significant improvements in LUTS, HUS and QoL in Thai patients with bladder outlet obstruction from BPH with few side effects.

  17. Usual and unusual causes of pediatric gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otjen, Jeffrey P; Iyer, Ramesh S; Phillips, Grace S; Parisi, Marguerite T

    2012-06-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction in children encompasses a spectrum of disorders that extends beyond hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Each condition can result in the clinical syndrome of persistent nonbilious vomiting, which can progress to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances. This paper reviews the spectrum of both the common and uncommon entities that cause partial or complete gastric outlet obstruction and their imaging appearances. The correct diagnosis of those with gastric outlet obstruction can be achieved by combining clinical presentation with appropriate imaging, leading to optimal and timely patient management.

  18. Temporary metal stents in bladder outflow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachia, D

    1997-12-01

    The use of stents in the management of prostatic obstruction started in 1980 with the development of the "partial catheter" by Fabian in Germany. Since then, a variety of metals and biostable and biodegradable polymers have been made into temporary or permanent stents for the management of infravesical obstructions such as benign or malignant prostatic enlargement, bladder neck stenoses, or urethral strictures. This paper is an overview of two generations of temporary metal stents used in the patients with infravesical obstruction.

  19. Double endoscopic bypass for gastric outlet obstruction and biliary obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer Gutierrez, Olaya I.; Nieto, Jose; Irani, Shayan; James, Theodore; Pieratti Bueno, Renata; Chen, Yen-I; Bukhari, Majidah; Sanaei, Omid; Kumbhari, Vivek; Singh, Vikesh K.; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Baron, Todd H.; Khashab, Mouen A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims  Double endoscopic bypass entails EUS-guided gastroenterostomy (EUS-GE) and EUS-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) in patients who present with gastric outlet and biliary obstruction. We report a multicenter experience with double endoscopic bypass. Patients and methods  Retrospective, multicenter series involving 3 US centers. Patients who underwent double endoscopic bypass for malignant gastric and biliary obstruction from 1/2015 to 12/2016 were included. Primary outcome was clinical success defined as tolerance of oral intake and resolution of cholestasis. Secondary outcomes included technical success, re-interventions and adverse events (AE). Results  Seven patients with pancreatic head cancer (57.1 % females; mean age 64.6 ± 12.5 years) underwent double endoscopic bypass. Four patients had EUS-GE and EUS-BD performed during the same session with a mean procedure time of 70 ± 20.4 minutes. EUS-GE and EUS-BD were technically successful in all patients, all of whom were able to tolerate oral intake with resolution of cholestasis in 6 (87.5 %). One patient had a repeat EUS-BD with normalization of bilirubin. There were no adverse events. Conclusions  Double endoscopic bypass is feasible and effective when performed by experienced operators. Studies comparing this novel concept to existing techniques are warranted. PMID:28924596

  20. [Surgical treatment of gastric outlet obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitchev, G; Hristova, P; Ivanov, I

    2009-01-01

    Today surgery for peptic ulcer disease is largely restricted to the treatment of complications. About two-thirds of operations for complicated peptic ulcer disease are due to perforations, about one-third of operations are necessary to stop peptic ulcer bleeding, despite endoscopic treatment. In rare cases, peptic ulcer penetration requires surgery. Approximately 1-2% of patients with peptic ulcer disease develop gastric outlet obstructions (GOO), and about 80% of GOO due to peptic ulcer disease are caused by duodenal ulcers. Through retrospective analysis authors make it one's aim to investigate indications, methods of treatment and outcome of treated patients, based on contemporary principles. Over a 12 year period (1993-2004) in the third surgical clinic of the Emergency Medicine Institute "Pirogov" a total of 126 patients presenting GOO are operated. There is a 4:1 male to female ratio. The middle age group is the most frequently affected (58.7%). The following operations have been done: Resection of the stomach--122 (Bilroth I--109: Billroth II--13). Gastro-entero anastomosis--2; Gastro-entero anastomosis with Vagotomia truncularis --2. The main factors to influence mortality are the presence of serious concurrent medical illnes and age above 70 years (average age of dead patients--76.3 year). Follow-up between 1 to 5 years is done according to Vizic on 40 resected patients. Authors accept resection of the stomach as a method of choice for treatment of GOO. The highly per cent of reconstruction according to Billroth 1 (86.5%) is realized by modification Haberer-Andreoiu (60 patients). Preserving the normal passage through the duodenum decreases frequency of postresection syndromes (97.5% excellent results according to Vizic).

  1. Benign intermittent gastric outlet obstruction in an elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    duration without any alarming symptoms. On upper GI endoscopy she was found to have gastric polyp with a long stalk which was partially obstructing her pyloric ring giving rise to features of intermittent gastric outlet obstruction Polypectomy was done with complete relief of symptoms .She is following our clinic for last 6 ...

  2. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement in the Palliative Treatment of Malignant Obstruction of Gastric Outlet and Duodenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrucali, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims To asses the usefulness of flexible metallic stents in the palliation of malignant obstruction of gastric outlet and duodenum. Methods Retrospective review was performed between January 2006 and December 2011 in 30 patients. Thirty consecutive patients with obstruction of the gastric outlet underwent palliative treatment with self-expandable flexible metallic stents. Complications and clinical outcomes were assessed. Results Twenty-four patients had advanced gastric carcinoma at the antrum and/or pylorus, four patients had obstruction at the pylorus due to pancreas tumours and one patient had duodedum and one patient had gall bladder tumour. Symptoms improved in 82.7% of the patients after the procedure. The improvement in ability to eat using the score system was statistically significant (pgastric outlet obstruction caused by stomach or pancreas cancer. PMID:23423384

  3. Endoscopic stenting versus operative gastrojejunostomy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasegaram, Manju D; Eslick, Guy D; Mansfield, Clare O; Liem, Han; Richardson, Mark; Ahmed, Sulman; Cox, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction represents a terminal stage in pancreatic cancer. Between 5% and 25% of patients with pancreatic cancer ultimately experience malignant gastric outlet obstruction. The aim in palliating patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction is to reestablish an oral intake by restoring gastrointestinal continuity. This ultimately improves their quality of life in the advanced stages of cancer. The main drawback to operative bypass is the high incidence of delayed gastric emptying, particularly in this group of patients with symptomatic obstruction. This study aimed to compare surgical gastrojejunostomy and endoscopic stenting in palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction, acknowledging the diversity and heterogeneity of patients with this presentation. This retrospective study investigated patients treated for malignant gastric outlet obstruction from December 1998 to November 2008 at Nepean Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Endoscopic duodenal stenting was performed under fluoroscopic guidance for placement of the stent. The operative patients underwent open surgical gastrojejunostomy. The outcomes assessed included time to diet, hospital length of stay (LOS), biliary drainage procedures, morbidity, and mortality. Of the 45 participants in this study, 26 underwent duodenal stenting and 19 had operative bypass. Comparing the stenting and operative patients, the median time to fluid intake was respectively 0 vs. 7 days (P < 0.001), and the time to intake of solids was 2 vs. 9 days (P = 0.004). The median total LOS was shorter in the stenting group (11 vs. 25 days; P < 0.001), as was the median postprocedure LOS (5 vs. 10 days; P = 0.07). Endoscopic stenting is preferable to operative gastrojejunostomy in terms of shorter LOS, faster return to fluids and solids, and reduced morbidity and in-hospital mortality for patients with a limited life span.

  4. Ampullary neuroendocrine tumor presenting with biliary obstruction and gastric outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveer Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine tumors of the ampulla of Vater are extremely rare cause of extrahepatic biliary obstruction and further rarer cause of duodenal obstruction, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein we report a case of ampullary neuroendocrine tumor in a 75-year-old woman who presented with biliary obstruction and gastric outlet obstruction palliated with metal biliary and duodenal stenting with relief of jaundice and vomiting at 1 month of follow-up.

  5. Update on endoscopic management of gastric outlet obstruction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Hsun-Chin

    2016-10-16

    Endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) and surgical intervention are two most common and effective treatments for gastric outlet obstruction. Correction of gastric outlet obstruction without the need for surgery is an issue that has been tried to be resolved in these decades; this management has developed with EBD, advanced treatments like local steroid injection, electrocauterization, and stent have been added recently. The most common causes of pediatric gastric outlet obstruction are idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, peptic ulcer disease followed by the ingestion of caustic substances, stenosis secondary to surgical anastomosis; antral web, duplication cyst, ectopic pancreas, and other rare conditions. A complete clinical, radiological and endoscopic evaluation of the patient is required to make the diagnosis, with complimentary histopathologic studies. EBD are used in exceptional cases, some with advantages over surgical intervention depending on each patient in particular and on the characteristics and etiology of the gastric outlet obstruction. Local steroid injection and electrocauterization can augment the effect of EBD. The future of endoscopic treatment seems to be aimed at the use of endoscopic electrocauterization and balloon dilatations.

  6. Gastric Outlet Obstruction from Duodenal Lipoma in an Adult

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with resultant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The duodenum was not demonstrated. An abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large and prominent stomach, with the gastric lumen harboring large food debris with near absence of gastric emptying. An area of fusiform bowel thickening was noted near the duodenal bulb.

  7. Ectopic Pancreas Causing Partial Gastric Outlet Obstruction: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Departments of Surgery and 1Pathology,. Bayero University/Aminu. Kano Teaching Hospital,. Kano, Nigeria. A. BSTRACT. Case Report. How to cite this article: Sheshe AA, Yusuf I. Ectopic pancreas causing partial gastric outlet obstruction: A case report and review of literature. Niger J Surg 2018;24:56-9. This is an open ...

  8. Gastrojejunostomy for gastric outlet obstruction in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty patients were discharged from hospital having resumed normal eating. Their median survival after surgery was 9 months. Conclusion. Gastrojejunostomy offers worthwhile palliation and may prolong survival in a significant group of patients with irresectable gastric carcinoma and gastric outlet obstruction. South African ...

  9. Update on endoscopic management of gastric outlet obstruction in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Hsun-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) and surgical intervention are two most common and effective treatments for gastric outlet obstruction. Correction of gastric outlet obstruction without the need for surgery is an issue that has been tried to be resolved in these decades; this management has developed with EBD, advanced treatments like local steroid injection, electrocauterization, and stent have been added recently. The most common causes of pediatric gastric outlet obstruction are idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, peptic ulcer disease followed by the ingestion of caustic substances, stenosis secondary to surgical anastomosis; antral web, duplication cyst, ectopic pancreas, and other rare conditions. A complete clinical, radiological and endoscopic evaluation of the patient is required to make the diagnosis, with complimentary histopathologic studies. EBD are used in exceptional cases, some with advantages over surgical intervention depending on each patient in particular and on the characteristics and etiology of the gastric outlet obstruction. Local steroid injection and electrocauterization can augment the effect of EBD. The future of endoscopic treatment seems to be aimed at the use of endoscopic electrocauterization and balloon dilatations. PMID:27803770

  10. An uncommon cause of gastric outlet obstruction: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandireddy, Manjusha; Baffy, Noemi

    2017-06-01

    Metastatic involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is an uncommon scenario encountered in the clinical practice. Our case represents a gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) as a consequence of distant Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) metastasis without any lymph node involvement in association with inflammatory stranding leading to extrinsic duodenal obstruction. We report an unusual case of a 73-year-old male presented with a five-week history of nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain due to the metastatic extension from TCC that had been considered in remission. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis revealed new circumferential thickening and inflammatory stranding involving the ascending colon extending to the hepatic flexure. Based on the imaging findings, colonoscopy was pursued which demonstrated a mass at the hepatic flexure and biopsies obtained confirmed invasive transitional cell cancer. Patient underwent a Wall Flex (22 mm × 120 mm) metal stent to help alleviate the gastric outlet obstruction. Chemotherapy was planned by oncology. Our case highlights the importance of ruling out distant metastases in the evaluation of new gastrointestinal tract pathology, for instance, Gastric Outlet Obstruction in our patient; with a prior history of TCC without any lymph node involvement under remission.

  11. 63-Year-Old Male with Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavraj Khalsa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 63-year-old male with complicated Bouveret’s syndrome, both in its presentation and in its management. Bouveret’s syndrome is a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction resulting from mechanical obstruction from gallstones at the pyloroduodenal segment. As Bouveret’s syndrome can be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians, we aim to identify clinical and radiologic pearls that can lower the threshold for the diagnosis of Bouveret’s syndrome.

  12. Gastric outlet obstruction: an unusual case of primary duodenal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpande, Sanket; Pandya, Jayashri Sanjay; Tiwari, Ajeet; Adhikari, Devbrata

    2017-03-24

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem worldwide. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis presenting as isolated involvement of the duodenum is a rare case. A 13 year male, presented with features of gastric outlet obstruction. CT enterography scan showed circumferential mural thickening in first and second part of duodenal junction causing luminal narrowing. Upper GI endoscopy confirmed the narrowing of D1-D2 junction. Duodenal biopsy showed duodenitis with negative result for AFB stain, Helicobacter Pylori . Patient underwent roux-en-y gastro-jejunostomy. Histo-pathological findings were consistent with tuberculosis. Patient was started on AKT and discharged. At 3 months follow up; patient asymptomatic. The unusual location of gastrointestinal tuberculosis, lack of specific signs and symptoms, radiological studies and endoscopy findings makes diagnosis a challenge. The treatment of duodenal tuberculosis is still medical and surgery should be reserved for emergency like gastric outlet obstruction causing nutritional compromise. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Gastric Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Al-Hussaini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric carcinoma is extremely rare in children representing only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we report the first pediatric case of gastric cancer presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. Upper endoscopy revealed a markedly thickened antral mucosa occluding the pylorus and a clean base ulcer 1.5 cm × 2 cm at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The narrowed antrum and pylorus underwent balloon dilation, and biopsy from the antrum showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. The biopsy taken from the edge of the gastric ulcer demonstrated signet-ring-cell type infiltrate consistent with gastric adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, there were metastases to the liver, head of pancreas, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, the gastric carcinoma was deemed unresectable. The patient died few months after initiation of chemotherapy due to advanced malignancy. In conclusion, this case report underscores the possibility of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in children and presenting with gastric outlet obstruction.

  14. Infantile myofibromatosis: a most unusual cause of gastric outlet obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, Kellie; Murphy, Robyn; Thresher, Caroline; Jacir, Nabil; Bergman, Kerry

    2005-01-01

    Non-bilious vomiting in the newborn is common. Etiologies include both surgical and medical conditions. Gastroesophageal reflux, soy or milk protein allergy, and prostaglandin-induced foveolar hyperplasia are among the medical causes. Surgical entities include gastric antral webs, pre-ampullary duodenal and pyloric atresia, and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. We report the unique case of an 8-day-old girl who presented with gastric outlet obstruction secondary to infantile myofibromatosis. (orig.)

  15. Infantile myofibromatosis: a most unusual cause of gastric outlet obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Kellie; Murphy, Robyn; Thresher, Caroline; Jacir, Nabil; Bergman, Kerry [Morristown Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Morristown, NJ (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Non-bilious vomiting in the newborn is common. Etiologies include both surgical and medical conditions. Gastroesophageal reflux, soy or milk protein allergy, and prostaglandin-induced foveolar hyperplasia are among the medical causes. Surgical entities include gastric antral webs, pre-ampullary duodenal and pyloric atresia, and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. We report the unique case of an 8-day-old girl who presented with gastric outlet obstruction secondary to infantile myofibromatosis. (orig.)

  16. Crohn's disease presenting as gastric outlet obstruction: a therapeutic challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayat, Faisal; Ullah, Waqas; Hussain, Qulsoom; Shafique, Khurram

    2017-04-28

    Isolated gastric Crohn's disease with initial presentation related to gastric outlet obstruction is an unusual clinicopathological entity. We undertake here a literature review of this rare initial presentation of isolated gastric Crohn's disease and discuss the formidable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges encountered in such patients. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Gastric outlet obstruction due to neurofibromatosis: An unusual case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, Rajul

    2009-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF-1), also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is an autosomal dominant condition with an approximate incidence of one in 3000 births. NF-1 is known to involve multiple systems in the body. Abdominal involvement include neurofibroma and tumor growth in the liver, mesentery, and retroperitoneum in addition to gastric and bowel tumors. Gastrointestinal neoplasms occur in up to one quarter of patients. The author reports a rare case of diffuse submucosal neurofibromatosis resulting in gastric outlet obstruction. (author)

  18. Surgical management of benign gastric outlet obstruction in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Hsin; Liou, Gong-Jyh; Liu, Chien-Liang; Pan, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Jie-Jen; Cheng, Shih-Ping; Liu, Tsang-Pai

    2012-01-01

    Surgical management of gastric outlet obstruction may associate with significant morbidity and mortality. Few studies have documented surgical outcomes in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to review recent operative results of benign gastric outlet obstruction in elderly patients compared with younger patients. Forty- seven consecutive patients from January 2000 through September 2008 were included. Preoperative, intraoperative data and early postoperative complications were analyzed. Fifteen operations were performed in elderly patients and 32 in younger patients. More patients in the elderly group were assigned as ASA class 3 (p=0.037), but Charlson comorbidity index was similar. Procedure types included Finney or Jaboulay pyloroplasty (n=26), antrectomy (n=13) and gastrojejunostomy (n=8). The mean postoperative hospital stay was 14.9 days. A modest correlation between the length of stay and the patient's age (p=0.044; r=0.294) was observed. There were two in hospital mortalities and four patients had complications. Surgery for benign gastric outlet obstruction is safe in the elderly population and is not associated with any increase in morbidity or mortality.

  19. Antral hyperplastic polyp: A rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ibrahim; Ozer, Ender; Rakici, Halil; Sehitoglu, Ibrahim; Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Pergel, Ahmet; Sahin, Dursun Ali

    2014-01-01

    Gastric polyps are usually found incidentally during upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations. These polyps are generally benign, with hyperplasia being the most common. While gastric polyps are often asymptomatic, they can cause gastric outlet obstruction. A 64 years-old female patient presented to our polyclinic with a history of approximately 2 months of weakness, occasional early nausea, vomiting after meals and epigastric pain. A polypoid lesion of approximately 25mm in diameter was detected in the antral area of the stomach, which prolapsed through the pylorus into the duodenal bulbus, and subsequently caused gastric outlet obstruction, as revealed by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy of the patient. The polyp was retrieved from the pyloric canal into the stomach with the aid of a tripod, and snare polypectomy was performed. Currently, widespread use of endoscopy has led to an increase in the frequency of detecting hyperplastic polyps. While most gastric polyps are asymptomatic, they can cause iron deficiency anemia, acute pancreatitis and more commonly, gastric outlet obstruction because of their antral location. Although there are no precise principles in the treatment of asymptomatic polyps, polyps >5mm should be removed due to the possibility of malignant transformation. According to the medical evidence, polypectomy is required for gastric hyperplastic polyps because of the risks of complication and malignancy. These cases can be successfully treated endoscopically. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Female outlet obstruction constipation: assessment with MR defecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Min; Jiang Tao; Yang Xinqing; Peng Peng; Wang Wenchuan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Using MR defecography to assess the morphological and functional anorectal anomalies related to female outlet obstruction constipation, and evaluate the joint disease of' anterior and mid pelvic. Methods: One hundred and seven female patients, aged 20 to 84 years (average, 55 years), were diagnosed as outlet obstruction constipation based on clinical symptoms and signs. They all received MR defecography in our institution. The high compliance homemade balloon was inserted into rectum to simulate stool. Then relevant measurements were obtained during rest, squeezing and straining, respectively. Results: In all the 107 cases, 70 (65.4%) presented rectocele on dynamic MRI; 28 (26.2%) presented anismus; 60 (56.1%) presented cystocele; 59 presented vaginal or cervical prolapse(55.1%); and, 54 (50.5%) presented descending perineum. In 85 females (79.4%) multiple disorders were detected, involving more than one pelvic compartment. Conclusion: MR defecography allowed to accurately evaluate the morphological and functional anorectal anomalies related to female outlet obstruction constipation, and the joint disease of anterior and mid pelvic. (authors)

  1. Gastric outlet obstruction in a 12 year old male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Bartlett

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyloric stenosis presenting beyond infancy is uncommon and poorly understood. Here, we present a case of primary acquired gastric outlet obstruction due to pyloric stenosis in a 12-year-old male child. The patient presented after a four-year history of persistent non-bilious, post-prandial emesis and failure to thrive. A Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty was performed. Pyloric biopsy was without diagnostic abnormality. A gastrostomy tube was also placed at the time of pyloroplasty. The patient was asymptomatic after surgery and had gained 25 pounds after three and a half months. The gastrostomy tube was removed 4 months after the pyloroplasty. Literature review yielded 42 cases, including the current report, of patients ages 4 months to 17 years with a diagnosis of primary acquired gastric outlet obstruction. Useful studies for diagnosis of these cases include abdominal ultrasound, upper GI contrast study and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The most common curative procedure reported in the literature was a pyloroplasty (31 cases. The remaining patients underwent Bilroth I gastrectomy (7 cases, balloon dilatation (3 cases and pyloromyotomy (1 case. Keywords: Gastric outlet obstruction, Pyloric stenosis, Pyloroplasty, Failure to thrive, Adolescence, Eosinophilic esophagitis

  2. Gastric outlet obstruction: Report of an exceptional case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutoshi Saha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although gastric outlet obstruction is a common condition, etiology could not be determined in a few cases by means of clinical features, radiological, and endoscopic examination, resulting in substantial diagnostic dilemma. A case is being described where a 30-year-old male presented with anorexia, dyspepsia, vomiting, low-grade fever, and weight loss for 2 months. Results of routine laboratory tests were within normal limit except elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Abdominal computed tomography scan demonstrated a gastric outlet obstruction by an antral mass with mild enhancement of the area. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy depicted an ulcerated and friable mass with an irregular shape and surface at pylorus resulting in pyloric obstruction. Endoscopic biopsy revealed only chronic gastritis with regenerative changes of epithelium. As the patient was not relieved of obstruction by conservative management, Billroth Type II gastrectomy was done. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed caseating granulomas with acid-fast bacilli. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as primary gastric tuberculosis after exclusion affection of other organs and antituberculous medications was initiated. A good response to antitubercular treatment was noted after 5 months. Stomach being an uncommon site of tuberculosis and as it can occur in patients with no risk factors or characteristic symptoms, diagnosis of such rare condition remains a diagnostic enigma.

  3. Unravelling detrusor underactivity: Development of a bladder outlet resistance-Bladder contractility nomogram for adult male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelke, Matthias; Rademakers, Kevin L J; van Koeveringe, Gommert A

    2016-11-01

    Voiding dysfunction in adult men may be caused by bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and/or detrusor underactivity (DU). Until now, it is only possible to classify BOO and DU by pressure-flow analysis. Low values of the maximum Watts factor (W max ) indicate DU but thresholds for the diagnosis have not been established. Purpose of this study was to construct a nomogram using bladder outlet resistance and detrusor contractility in order to classify BOO and DU simultaneously. Treatment naïve men aged ≥40 years with uncomplicated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were prospectively evaluated. Patients were assessed with IPSS, prostate volume, uroflowmetry, post-void residual, and pressure-flow measurement. The bladder outlet obstruction index (BOOI) was used to determine BOO-grade and W max to calculate detrusor contractility. Individual BOOI-W max values were plotted in a graph. Linear interpolation was applied to determine the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles. Retrospective analysis of 822 male patients with means of 64 years, IPSS 16, and prostate volume of 40 cc. Patient and clinical parameters of the <25th percentile groups were significantly different compared to the 25th-50th percentiles: age (66 vs. 63 years, P = 0.006), bladder capacity (503 vs. 442 ml, P = 0.009), post-void residual urine (167 vs. 116 ml, P = 0.001), and voiding efficiency (67% vs. 73%, P = 0.015). The nomogram quantifies the relationship between detrusor contractility and BOO in men with LUTS. A measurement value <25th percentile correlates with clinical indicators of DU and is proposed as a cut-off value for DU-diagnosis. Higher age, bladder capacity, and PVR as well as lower voiding efficiency indicate DU. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:980-986, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Postoperative Urinary Retention is an Independent Predictor of Short-Term and Long-Term Future Bladder Outlet Procedure in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Robert H; Vedachalam, Srikanth; Shah, Arpeet S; Kothari, Anai N; Kuo, Paul C; Gupta, Gopal N; Turk, Thomas M T

    2017-11-01

    Postoperative urinary retention is a common complication across surgical specialties. To our knowledge no literature to date has examined postoperative urinary retention as a predictor of long-term receipt of surgery for bladder outlet obstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the records of inpatients who underwent nonurological surgery in California between 2008 and 2010. Postoperative urinary retention during the index admission was identified, as was receipt of a bladder outlet procedure (transurethral prostate resection, prostate photoselective vaporization or suprapubic prostatectomy) at a subsequent encounter. Patients were matched using propensity scoring of demographics, comorbidities and surgery type. Adjusted Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to determine the cumulative incidence of subsequent bladder outlet procedures by patient group, including group 1-age 60 years or greater and postoperative urinary retention, group 2-age 60 years or greater and no postoperative urinary retention, group 3-age less than 60 years and postoperative urinary retention, and group 4-age less than 60 years and no postoperative urinary retention. Of 769,141 eligible male patients postoperative urinary retention developed in 8,051 (1.1%). Following hospital discharge 1,855 patients (0.24%) underwent a bladder outlet procedure. Those treated with a bladder outlet procedure were significantly more likely to have experienced postoperative urinary retention during the index admission (6.3% vs 1.0%, p outlet procedure rate at 3 years was 7.1%, 2.2%, 0.8% and 0.0% in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. In men 60 years old or older postoperative urinary retention identified those with an increased incidence of bladder outlet procedures within 3 years. Men younger than 60 years had a low rate of subsequent bladder outlet procedures regardless of a postoperative urinary retention diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  5. TRICHOBEZOAR WITH GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Prasad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Trichobezoar is collection of hairs forming a conglomerated mass. It is a very rare entity mimicking other common causes of gastric outlet obstruction. It is classically seen in adolescent females usually with psychiatric disturbances. Stomach is the most common site of occurrence. Occasionally, it may extend into small intestine (Rapunzel syndrome. Patients present with nonspecific symptoms such as loss of appetite, early satiety and vomiting. It may present as failure to thrive in small children. Diagnosis is frequently delayed due to paucity of symptoms. It is noticed as a slowly growing lump but occasionally may present with complications such as perforation, intestinal obstruction and pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasonography is inconclusive and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy confirms the diagnosis. Laparotomy and extraction is the standard of treatment in spite of many new minimally invasive techniques. This is a case of gastric trichobezoar in a 16-year-old girl who presented with gastric outlet obstruction, which was successfully removed surgically. Recurrences are frequent due to associated psychiatric disturbances, hence psychiatric counselling must form an integral part of treatment.

  6. A CLINICAL STUDY OF GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION IN ADULT POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO also known as pyloric obstruction is not a single entity. It is the clinical & pathophysiological consequence of any disease process that produces a mechanical impediment to gastric emptying. MATERIALS AND METHODS 37 patients attending surgical out-patient department of Pt. J. N. M. Medical College, Raipur during the period of March 2015 to September 2016 of GOO with chief complaints of projectile vomiting, visible gastric peristalsis or palpable distended stomach were included in this study. Cases of functional non-mechanical cause of GOO were excluded. Only patients of 20 years & above were included in this study. Saline load test, upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy and routine laboratory investigations done in all cases. RESULTS Age group of 40-59 was maximum sufferer 27%, followed by age group 60-69 years (21.9%. Male-Female ratio was 1.2:1. Antral carcinoma (75.7% cases topped the list followed by cicatrised duodenal ulcer which was seen in 18.9% cases; only two case was due to duodenal adenoma. CONCLUSION This study is a clinical observational study of gastric outlet obstruction, but in vast majority of cases diagnosis can be established clinically. Males are more sufferers and antral carcinoma seems to be main causes of GOO, Proliferative lesion is common finding in UGI.

  7. Ectopic Pancreas Causing Partial Gastric Outlet Obstruction: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshe, Abdurrahaman Abba; Yusuf, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction, perhaps rarer still among Africans. Although the entity is known, the diagnostic challenges are enormous, especially in the poor-resource environment. Gastric outlet obstruction resulting from ectopic pancreas in an adult is the first of its kind in our center; we, therefore, present this case to describe the challenges faced with diagnosis, treatment, and the lesson learned. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric outlet obstruction.

  8. Prolapsing Gastric Polyp Causing Intermittent Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosai, Nik Ritza; Gendeh, Hardip Singh; Norfaezan, Abdul Rashid; Razman, Jamin; Sutton, Paul Anthony; Das, Srijit

    2015-06-01

    Gastric polyps are often an incidental finding on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, with an incidence up to 5%. The majority of gastric polyps are asymptomatic, occurring secondary to inflammation. Prior reviews discussed Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-associated singular gastric polyposis; however, we present a rare and unusual case of recurrent multiple benign gastric polyposis post H pylori eradication resulting in intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. A 70-year-old independent male, Chinese in ethnicity, with a background of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and a simple renal cyst presented with a combination of melena, anemia, and intermittent vomiting of partially digested food after meals. Initial gastroscopy was positive for H pylori; thus he was treated with H pylori eradication and proton pump inhibitors. Serial gastroscopy demonstrated multiple sessile gastric antral polyps, the largest measuring 4 cm. Histopathologic examination confirmed a benign hyperplastic lesion. Computed tomography identified a pyloric mass with absent surrounding infiltration or metastasis. A distal gastrectomy was performed, whereby multiple small pyloric polyps were found, the largest prolapsing into the pyloric opening, thus explaining the intermittent nature of gastric outlet obstruction. Such polyps often develop from gastric ulcers and, if left untreated, may undergo neoplasia to form malignant cells. A distal gastrectomy was an effective choice of treatment, taking into account the polyp size, quantity, and potential for malignancy as opposed to an endoscopic approach, which may not guarantee a complete removal of safer margins and depth. Therefore, surgical excision is favorable for multiple large gastric polyps with risk of malignancy.

  9. Antral hyperplastic polyp causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtkaya-Yapicier Ozlem

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperplastic polyps are the most common polypoid lesions of the stomach. Rarely, they cause gastric outlet obstruction by prolapsing through the pyloric channel, when they arise in the prepyloric antrum. Case presentation A 62-year-old woman presented with intermittent nausea and vomiting of 4 months duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a 30 mm prepyloric sessile polyp causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. Following submucosal injection of diluted adrenaline solution, the polyp was removed with a snare. Multiple biopsies were taken from the greater curvature of the antrum and the corpus. Rapid urease test for Helicobacter pylori yielded a negative result. Histopathologic examination showed a hyperplastic polyp without any evidence of malignancy. Biopsies of the antrum and the corpus revealed gastritis with neither atrophic changes nor Helicobacter pylori infection. Follow-up endoscopy after a 12-week course of proton pomp inhibitor therapy showed a complete healing without any remnant tissue at the polypectomy site. The patient has been symptom-free during 8 months of follow-up. Conclusions Symptomatic gastric polyps should be removed preferentially when they are detected at the initial diagnostic endoscopy. Polypectomy not only provides tissue to determine the exact histopathologic type of the polyp, but also achieves radical treatment.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Gastric Polyp with Outlet Obstruction without Polypectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheuk-Kay Sun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although gastric polyp is usually an incidental endoscopic finding, large-sized polyps can cause symptoms ranging from epigastralgia to bleeding from ulcerated polyps and gastric outlet obstruction. Although the gold standard of treatment is removal of the polyp either through endoscopic polypectomy or surgical excision, complications associated with these procedures cannot be ignored. The risk becomes a major concern for patients at high risk for surgery when complications arise. We describe a debilitated 74-year-old woman who presented with early satiety, intermittent postprandial nausea and vomiting for three months. Upper endoscopy revealed a 2.5 cm pedunculated polyp over the gastric antrum causing intermittent obstruction. Considering her high risk for polypectomy, detachable snaring was performed without polypectomy in an outpatient setting. The patient was complication-free with complete relief of obstructive symptoms one week after the procedure. Subsequent follow-ups showed satisfactory healing without signs of mucosal disruption or recurrence. The results suggest that detachable snaring without polypectomy may be a therapeutic option for high-risk patients with benign symptomatic gastric polyps.

  11. Combined common bile duct and gastric outlet obstruction demonstrated during hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, A.J.; Rodriguez, A.A.; Sorensen, K.A.; Turnbull, G.L.; Parker, A.L.

    1985-06-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with jaundice. Hepatobiliary imaging using /sup 99m/Tc-DISIDA revealed complete hepatobiliary tract obstruction with a photopenic area corresponding to a dilated gallbladder and a large photopenic region corresponding to a distended stomach as a result of gastric outlet obstruction. At surgery, carcinoma of the head of the pancreas was found to be the cause of the combined common bile duct and gastric outlet obstruction.

  12. Combined common bile duct and gastric outlet obstruction demonstrated during hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, A.J.; Rodriguez, A.A.; Sorensen, K.A.; Turnbull, G.L.; Parker, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with jaundice. Hepatobiliary imaging using sup(99m)Tc-DISIDA revealed complete hepatobiliary tract obstruction with a photopenic area corresponding to a dilated gallbladder and a large photopenic region corresponding to a distended stomach as a result of gastric outlet obstruction. At surgery, carcinoma of the head of the pancreas was found to be the cause of the combined common bile duct and gastric outlet obstruction. (orig.)

  13. Ectopic Pancreas Causing Partial Gastric Outlet Obstruction: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahaman Abba Sheshe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pancreas is a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction, perhaps rarer still among Africans. Although the entity is known, the diagnostic challenges are enormous, especially in the poor-resource environment. Gastric outlet obstruction resulting from ectopic pancreas in an adult is the first of its kind in our center; we, therefore, present this case to describe the challenges faced with diagnosis, treatment, and the lesson learned. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric outlet obstruction.

  14. Results of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens De Lichtenberg, Mette; Miskowiak, J; Rolff, H

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer.......To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer....

  15. Surgical palliation of gastric outlet obstruction in advanced malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potz, Brittany A; Miner, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a common problem associated with advanced malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Palliative treatment of patients’ symptoms who present with GOO is an important aspect of their care. Surgical palliation of malignancy is defined as a procedure performed with the intention of relieving symptoms caused by an advanced malignancy or improving quality of life. Palliative treatment for GOO includes operative (open and laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy) and non-operative (endoscopic stenting) options. The performance status and medical condition of the patient, the extent of the cancer, the patients prognosis, the availability of a curative procedure, the natural history of symptoms of the disease (primary and secondary), the durability of the procedure, and the quality of life and life expectancy of the patient should always be considered when choosing treatment for any patient with advanced malignancy. Gastrojejunostomy appears to be associated with better long term symptom relief while stenting appears to be associated with lower immediate procedure related morbidity. PMID:27648158

  16. Is transition zone index useful in assessing bladder outflow obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia?: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S L Sailo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Benign prostatic enlargement (BPE is the commonest cause of bladder outlet obstruction in men above 50 years of age. Though pressure-flow study is the gold standard in establishing outlet obstruction, it is associated with definite morbidity. Several noninvasive parameters are described to diagnose outlet obstruction due to BPE and evaluate treatment efficacy. AIM: We studied the role of transitional zone index (TZI in assessing bladder outlet obstruction (BOO due to BPE. SETTING AND DESIGN: Prospective hospital-based cross-sectional diagnostic study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-five men aged between 50 and 77 years with untreated lower urinary tract symptoms due to BPE were studied. Patients with prostate cancer, prostatitis, active UTI urethral stricture, neurovesical dysfunction and diabetes mellitus were excluded. All patients underwent a standard assessment using the American Urological Association (AUA symptom score, uroflow, pressure-flow (PF study and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS estimation of TZI. Investigators undertaking PF studies and TRUS were blinded to the investigation of others. From the PF studies, Abrams Griffith (AG number was calculated. Based on this, patients were grouped into obstructed (AG>40 and unobstructed (AG< 40 groups. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: TZI was calculated and compared with PF studies using Mann-Whitney U test, logistic regression analysis and receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC. RESULTS: The mean age was 63.2 years (SD. The mean AUA scores and peak flow rate were 16.7 and 7.5 ml/sec, respectively. Of the 35 men, 21 were obstructed and 14 were unobstructed. TZI was not significantly different between the two groups, while the differences in age, AUA symptom score, prostate volume and TZ volume were statistically significant. Logistic regression model did not show any independent effect of TZI in predicting obstruction. ROC curve showed a poor overall accuracy in diagnosing obstruction due

  17. Stent versus gastrojejunostomy for the palliation of gastric outlet obstruction: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Jeurnink (Suzanne); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); P.D. Siersema (Peter)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Gastrojejunostomy (GJJ) is the most commonly used palliative treatment modality for malignant gastric outlet obstruction. Recently, stent placement has been introduced as an alternative treatment. We reviewed the available literature on stent placement and GJJ for gastric

  18. Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Outlet Obstruction Secondary to Accidental Acid Ingestion in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Mateus; Sawamura, Regina; Cupo, Palmira; Del Ciampo, Ieda R Lopes; Fernandes, Maria I M

    2016-01-01

    Accidental corrosive ingestion is not rare in pediatric patients in developing countries. We report a case of gastric outlet obstruction after the accidental ingestion of an acidic substance by a child who was successfully treated with endoscopic balloon dilatation.

  19. Case report of gastric outlet obstruction from metastatic lobular breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alexander H; Shellenberger, M Joshua; Chen, Zong Ming; Li, Jinhong

    2015-09-25

    The most common malignancy to cause gastric outlet obstruction is primary gastric adenocarcinoma and it is followed by carcinoma of the pancreas and gallbladder. Herein, we report a case of gastric outlet obstruction secondary to metastatic lobular breast carcinoma. Fifty-seven year old Caucasian female with recently diagnosed metastatic lobular breast carcinoma to skin was referred to gastroenterology for evaluation of dyspepsia and dysphagia. She has past medical history significant for acid reflux and Clostridium difficile colitis. Computed tomography of her abdomen showed diffused bowel wall thickening without evidence of bowel obstruction. Due to persistent abdominal pain, an upper endoscopy was performed. The upper endoscopy showed gastritis and gastric stenosis in the gastric antrum. These lesions were biopsied and dilated with a balloon dilator. The biopsy of the gastric antrum later showed a metastatic carcinoma of breast origin with typical tumor morphology and immune-phenotype. Differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma from primary gastric adenocarcinoma cannot be done using histological examination alone. Immunohistochemistry is needed to differentiate the two based on staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors. The presence of gross cystic disease fluid protein 15 is also suggestive of metastatic breast carcinoma. The stomach has a significant capacity to distend (up to 2-4 L of food) and malignant gastric outlet obstruction is often undetected clinically until a high-grade obstruction develops. Our case demonstrates valuable teaching point in terms of broadening our differentials for gastric outlet obstruction. When patients present with gastric outlet obstruction, both non-malignant and malignant causes of gastric outlet obstruction should be considered. Once adenocarcinoma has been determined to be the cause of gastric outlet obstruction, further immunohistochemistry is needed to differentiate breast carcinoma from other carcinomas.

  20. Enteral stents are safe and effective to relieve malignant gastric outlet obstruction in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Hala; Zeb, Faisal

    2015-03-01

    Nausea, vomiting and intolerance to oral intake are usually the first presenting symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction, which not only cause malnutrition and increases chances of aspiration pneumonia but also greatly impair the quality of life. Self expandable metallic stents (SEMS) are both effective and safe to relieve the distressing symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of endoscopic enteral stent insertion in malignant gastric outlet obstruction in older versus younger patients. Eighty two patients were identified to have undergone SEMs insertion for malignant gastric outlet obstruction. Of these, 26 were ≥65 years (older patient group) and 56 were ≤65 years (younger patient group). These were retrospectively reviewed to assess the success rate and the complications of the procedure. Both groups were comparable in terms of technical success (100 % in older patient group versus 97 % in younger patient group). Clinical success rate, as determined by gastric outlet obstruction scoring system score (GOOSS) was also similar in both groups. Additionally, the rate of complications in both groups was also comparable, 27 % in older patient versus 23 % in younger patients (p = 0.085). Enteral stenting for malignant gastric outlet obstruction is effective in the older patient groups with its success rate and complications comparable to younger patient population.

  1. Gastric Outlet Obstruction Palliation: A Novel Stent-Based Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha M. Rueth

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO after esophagectomy is a morbid outcome and significantly hinders quality of life for end-stage esophageal cancer patients. In the pre-stent era, palliation consisted of chemotherapy, radiation, tumor ablation, or stricture dilation. In the current era, palliative stenting has emerged as an additional tool; however, migration and tumor ingrowth are ongoing challenges. To mitigate these challenges, we developed a novel, hybrid, stent-based approach for the palliative management of GOO. We present a patient with esophageal cancer diagnosed with recurrent, metastatic disease 1 year after esophagectomy. She developed dehydration and intractable emesis, which significantly interfered with her quality of life. For palliation, we dilated the stenosis and proceeded with our stent-based solution. Using a combined endoscopic and fluoroscopic approach, we placed a 12-mm silicone salivary bypass tube across the pylorus, where it kinked slightly because of local tumor biology. To bridge this defect and ensure luminal patency, we placed a nitinol tracheobronchial stent through the silicone stent. Clinically, the patient had immediate relief from her pre-operative symptoms and was discharged home on a liquid diet. In conclusion, GOO and malignant dysphagia after esophagectomy are significant challenges for patients with end-stage disease. Palliative stenting is a viable option, but migration and tumor ingrowth are common complications. The hybrid approach presented here provides a unique solution to these potential pitfalls. The flared silicone tube minimized the chance of migration and impaired tumor ingrowth. The nitinol stent aided with patency and overcame the challenges of the soft tube. This novel strategy achieved palliation, describing another endoscopic option in the treatment of malignant GOO.

  2. Surgical selection for late pancreatic head carcinoma without gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-hua; Wang, Juan; Yang, Chong; Wang, Bo; Wu, He-shui; Wang, Chun-you

    2013-12-01

    The effects of different surgical procedures for late pancreatic head carcinoma without gastric outlet obstruction were explored in order to provide theoretical basis to select a suitable operation for these patients. The clinical data of 441 cases of late pancreatic head carcinoma without gastric outlet obstruction were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were divided into 4 groups based on different surgical procedures: group A (101 cases) subjected to Roux-en-Y cholecystojejunostomy; group B (133 cases) undergoing Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy; group C (83 cases) given Roux-en-Y cholecystojejunostomy combined with gastrojejunostomy; group D (124 cases) receiving Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy combined with gastrojejunostomy. Therapeutic efficacy in each group was evaluated comparatively. Both groups B and D had a lower rate of postoperative obstructive jaundice than groups A and C separately (Pgastric outlet obstruction in groups A and B was higher than that in groups C and D separately (P0.05). For the late pancreatic head carcinoma without gastric outlet obstruction, Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy is effective for the reduction of icteric index and the incidence of recurrent jaundice, also offers an opportunity for prolonged survival. Combined use of prophylactic Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy during surgical biliary drainage is safe for advanced pancreatic carcinoma with obstructive jaundice, which can decrease the incidence of postoperative gastric outlet obstruction, and has important implications for improving outcomes.

  3. Is diabetes mellitus associated with clinical outcomes in aging males treated with transurethral resection of prostate for bladder outlet obstruction: implications from Taiwan Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin YH

    2017-03-01

    requiring catheterization (OR, 1.35; P=0.01 within 1 month after TUR-P. A higher proportion of patients with DM took anti-muscarinics (OR, 1.23; P=0.032 within the first 3 months and α-blockers (OR, 1.18; P=0.049 during 3–12 months after receiving TUR-P. Overall, the DM group patients had a worse postoperative medication-free survival compared to that of non-DM group patients (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.14; P=0.005. Conclusion: DM patients require higher rates of continuing medication after TUR-P, especially anti-muscarinics in 3 months postoperatively and alpha-blocker after 3 months postoperatively. DM patients also had higher incidence of urine retention after surgery. DM patients had relatively poor treatment outcomes compared to DM-free patients. Keywords: benign prostate hyperplasia, infection, overactive bladder, prostatectomy, urinary tract infection, lower urinary tract symptoms

  4. The location of obstruction predicts stent occlusion in malignant gastric outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Douglas; Cohen, Jonah; Bartley, Anthony; Sheridan, Jennifer; Chuttani, Ram; Sawhney, Mandeep S.; Pleskow, Douglas K.; Berzin, Tyler M.; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) can occur with locally invasive or metastatic cancer involving the upper gastrointestinal tract at the pylorus or the duodenum. Endoscopic management with self-expanding metal stents (SEMSs) is often the preferred palliative approach. Stent occlusion is a common reason for failure and reintervention. We set out to determine whether the location of the malignant obstruction is associated with the angulation of the stent and can predict stent occlusion. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients who underwent successful duodenal stenting with SEMS for malignant GOO between 2006 and 2015 at a large advanced endoscopy referral center. We determined the location of obstruction, the stent angle, and the rate of technical and clinical success of stent placement. We then identified cases of subsequent stent occlusion confirmed by endoscopic evaluation. Results: A total of 100 consecutive patients were included in the study; 91 of these patients had enough data to evaluate SEMS occlusion. A total of 21 patients (23%) developed stent occlusion with a median time of 39 days. The risk of occlusion sequentially increased as the obstruction occurred more distally from the antrum to the third or fourth portion of the duodenum (p = 0.006). This relationship was maintained after controlling for stent angle (p = 0.05). Conclusions: A distal location of malignant GOO was strongly predictive of stent occlusion, independent of stent angle. This may be due to longer and more complex distal obstructions, along with foreshortening of the stent during placement and tumor infiltration. If replicated, these results will have implications for endoscopic practice and future device development. PMID:27803736

  5. Pancreatitis of ectopic pancreatic tissue: a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwir, Saleh; Glessing, Brooke; Amin, Khalid; Jensen, Eric; Mallery, Shawn

    2017-08-01

    Inflammation in ectopic pancreatic tissue can clinically present with pain or obstructive symptoms, depending on the location of the ectopic tissue. We present a rare case of gastric outlet obstruction secondary to pancreatitis of ectopic pancreatic tissue in the pylorus. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  6. Gastric outlet obstruction secondary to caecal herniation into the lesser sac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Lawrence; Newton, Charlotte

    2017-04-01

    Internal hernias comprise 1% of hernias, 8% of which are through the foramen of Winslow into the lesser sac. These hernias can mimic gastric outlet obstruction and cause associated morbidity. In this case, we describe a caecal herniation into the lesser sac presenting as true gastric outlet obstruction in a 69-year-old female. Initial computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated a distended stomach with collapsed small bowel representing likely gastric outlet obstruction. Nasogastric tube insertion decompressed the stomach but the clinical picture progressed to that of small bowel obstruction with generalized abdominal distension and hypoactive bowel sounds. Repeat CT demonstrated caecal herniation into the lesser sac. This was confirmed at exploratory laparotomy with the caecum found in the lesser sac via the foramen of Winslow. The caecum was grossly ischaemic with patchy necrosis. A limited right hemicolectomy was performed. The patient made an uncomplicated recovery and was discharged on the eighth post-operative day.

  7. Polyarteritis nodosa presenting as a bladder outlet obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histological examination of this demonstrated a medium-sized necrotising vasculitis with small-vessel fibrinoid necrosis suggestive of PAN. At least six of the American College of Rheumatology criteria for PAN were met. The patient was treated with pulses of intravenous cyclophosphamide and oral corticosteroids with a ...

  8. Predictive factors of bladder outlet obstruction following the tension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. Elghamrawi

    procedure for treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Preoperatively, a detailed medical history was taken from all patients, and all were subjected to physical examination, routine labs, abdominal and pelvic ultrasound and urodynamic studies (cystometry and assessment of the detrusor leak point pressure (DLPP),.

  9. Predictive factors of bladder outlet obstruction following the tension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and methods: This prospective study was carried out on 85 women who underwent the TVTO procedure for treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Preoperatively, a detailed medical history was taken from all patients, and all were subjected to physical examination, routine labs, abdominal and pelvic ...

  10. Prostatic cyst with bladder outlet obstruction symptoms. case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prostatic cysts are uncommon lesions usually detected incidentally. The incidence is reported as less than 1% most often occurs as small & asymptomatic lesions located medially in the gland, when they get a big size causes different lower urinary tract symptoms. Only 5% are symptomatic. The symptoms depend on the ...

  11. Pretreatment of gastric outlet obstruction with pancrelipase: Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Takashi; Shibusawa, Hiroyuki; Tsukui, Hidenori; Sakuma, Kazuya; Takahashi, Shuhei; Lefor, Alan K; Hosoya, Yoshinori; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction is characterized by the retention of gastric contents. Removal of gastric contents is an important part of the treatment strategy. The use of a nasogastric tube alone can result in inadequate removal of gastric contents. We treated a patient with advanced gastric cancer and gastric outlet obstruction with pancrelipase to aid in the removal of gastric contents. The patient is an 81-year-old man with a Type 3 gastric cancer nearly circumferentially involving the antrum, resulting in gastric outlet obstruction. A nasogastric tube was placed for four days, but drainage of gastric contents was inadequate. Pancrelipase was then given orally for four days, and gastric contents were evacuated. The patient underwent distal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction and was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 14. This report suggests that pancrelipase may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with gastric outlet obstruction. Pancrelipase allowed gastric contents to be evacuated in a short period of time in a patient with gastric outlet obstruction. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical gastrojejunostomy or endoscopic stent placement for the palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (SUSTENT study): a multicenter randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, Suzanne M.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; van Eijck, Casper H. J.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.; Jeurnink, S. M.; Kuipers, E. J.; Siersema, P. D.; Steyerberg, E. W.; Polinder, S.; Borsboom, G.; van Eijck, C. H. J.; Fockens, P.; Gouma, D. J.; Schwartz, M. P.; Vermeijden, J. R.; van Ooijen, B.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Borel Rinkes, I. H. M.; Grubben, M.; van Laarhoven, C. H. J. M.; Peters, F. T. M.; Porte, R. J.; Plukker, J. Th M.; van Spreeuwel, J. P.; Jakimowicz, J. J.; Boot, H.; Cats, A.; van Coevorden, F. V.; Klaase, J. M.; van der Waaij, L. A.; Baas, P.; van der Schaar, P.; Sosef, M. N.; Timmer, R.; van Ramshorts, B.; Nicolai, J. J.; Houben, M. H. M. G.; Steup, W. H.; Pahlplatz, P. V. M.; Brouwers, M. A. M.; Meijssen, M. A. C.; Marinelli, A.; van der Linde, K.; Manusama, E.; ter Borg, F.; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, M.; Witteman, B.; Kruyt, F.; ten Hove, R.; Schmitz, R. F.; Lesterhuis, W.; Oostenbroek, R.; Veenendaal, R.; Hartgrink, H. H.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Wahab, P.; Spillenaar Bilgen, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both gastrojejunostomy (GJJ) and stent placement are commonly used palliative treatments of obstructive symptoms caused by malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). OBJECTIVE: Compare GJJ and stent placement. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized trial. SETTING: Twenty-one centers in The

  13. Malignant gastric outlet obstruction managed by endoscopic stenting: a prospective single-centre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havemann, Maria Cecilie; Adamsen, Sven; Wøjdemann, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Endoscopic stenting for malignant gastric outlet obstruction was chosen as the primary strategy by which to palliate this complication, which is dominated by weight loss and anorexia. Advanced upper gastrointestinal tract cancers present late and life expectancy is limited. Only smaller...... multicentre studies point to endoscopic stenting as superior to surgery in terms of clinical outcome and cost. Material and methods. Forty-five consecutive patients with gastric outlet obstruction as a result of advanced upper GI-tract malignancy were enrolled in accordance with the intention......-to-treat principle. All patients were offered endoscopic stenting. Oral intake before and after stenting was assessed using the gastric outlet obstruction score system (GOOSS). Various lengths of duodenal Hanaro(R) self-expanding nitinol stents were delivered through a therapeutic endoscope. Outcome criteria were...

  14. Videourodynamic characteristics of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome-The role of bladder outlet dysfunction in the pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuh-Chen; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2018-03-05

    To investigate the characteristics of videourodynamic study (VUDS) in females with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) focusing on the etiologies of bladder outlet dysfunction (BOD) and their associations with clinical and urodynamic parameters. IC/BPS females with complete data on symptom assessment, VUDS, the potassium sensitivity test, and cystoscopic hydrodistention were reviewed retrospectively. Diagnoses of bladder dysfunction (hypersensitive bladder, HSB) and BOD including dysfunctional voiding (DV), poor relaxation of the external urethral sphincter (PRES), and bladder neck dysfunction (BND) were made by VUDS. The clinical and urodynamic parameters between patients with normal and abnormal VUDS diagnoses were analyzed. A total of 348 IC/BPS female patients (mean age 48.8 ± 13.5) were enrolled. HSB was found in 307 (88.2%) patients and BOD in 209 (60.1%). The causes of BOD included DV in 40 (11.5%), PRES in 168 (48.3%), and BND in 1 (0.3%). Patients with DV and BND had higher, and those with PRES had lower detrusor pressures at maximum flow rate (Q max ) than those with normal tracings. For all BOD patients, univariate logistic regression revealed a significant positive correlation of disease duration and negative correlations of urodynamic volume parameters with BOD in IC/BPS patients. Multivariate logistic regression found a cut-off value of Q max  ≦ 11 mL/s predicted BOD in IC/BPS with a receiver operating characteristic area of 0.81 (sensitivity = 82.0%, specificity = 68.5%). HSB and BOD are common findings on VUDS in IC/BPS females. BOD is associated with duration and hypersensitive bladder. A Q max  ≦ 11 mL/s predicts BOD in IC/BPS. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Urethral obstruction from dislodged bladder Diverticulum stones: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeke Linus I

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary urethral stone although rare, commonly arises from the kidneys, bladder or are seen in patients with urethral stricture. These stones are either found in the posterior or anterior urethra and do result in acute urinary retention. We report urethral obstruction from dislodged bladder diverticulum stones. This to our knowledge is the first report from Nigeria and in English literature. Case presentation A 69 year old, male, Nigerian with clinical and radiological features of acute urinary retention, benign prostate enlargement and bladder diverticulum. He had a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP and was lost to follow up. He re-presented with retained urethral catheter of 4months duration. The catheter was removed but attempt at re-passing the catheter failed and a suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Clinical examination and plain radiograph of the penis confirmed anterior and posterior urethral stones. He had meatotomy and antegrade manual stone extraction with no urethra injury. Conclusions Urethral obstruction can result from inadequate treatment of patient with benign prostate enlargement and bladder diverticulum stones. Surgeons in resource limited environment should be conversant with transurethral resection of the prostate and cystolithotripsy or open prostatectomy and diverticulectomy.

  16. Gastric outlet obstruction at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania: a prospective review of 184 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaka, Hyasinta; Mchembe, Mabula D; Rambau, Peter F; Chalya, Phillipo L

    2013-09-25

    Gastric outlet obstruction poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to general surgeons practicing in resource-limited countries. There is a paucity of published data on this subject in our setting. This study was undertaken to highlight the etiological spectrum and treatment outcome of gastric outlet obstruction in our setting and to identify prognostic factors for morbidity and mortality. This was a descriptive prospective study which was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between March 2009 and February 2013. All patients with a clinical diagnosis of gastric outlet obstruction were, after informed consent for the study, consecutively enrolled into the study. Statistical data analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 17.0. A total of 184 patients were studied. More than two-third of patients were males. Patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction were older than those of benign type. This difference was statistically significant (p Gastric cancer was the commonest malignant cause of gastric outlet obstruction where as peptic ulcer disease was the commonest benign cause. In children, the commonest cause of gastric outlet obstruction was congenital pyloric stenosis (13.0%). Non-bilious vomiting (100%) and weight loss (93.5%) were the most frequent symptoms. Eighteen (9.8%) patients were HIV positive with the median CD 4+ count of 282 cells/μl. A total of 168 (91.3%) patients underwent surgery. Of these, gastro-jejunostomy (61.9%) was the most common surgical procedure performed. The complication rate was 32.1 % mainly surgical site infections (38.2%). The median hospital stay and mortality rate were 14 days and 18.5% respectively. The presence of postoperative complication was the main predictor of hospital stay (p = 0.002), whereas the age > 60 years, co-existing medical illness, malignant cause, HIV positivity, low CD 4 count (Gastric outlet obstruction in our setting is more prevalent in males and the cause is mostly malignant. The

  17. Gastric outlet obstruction from a caecal volvulus, herniated through epiploic foramen: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kausik; Snowden, Claire; Khatri, Kamran; Mcfall, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with sudden onset upper abdominal pain and vomiting. On examination she had tender epigastric mass with “succusion splash” on auscultation. Straight abdominal x ray showed a distended and displaced stomach with another gas filled viscus around it. Subsequent computed tomography suggested caecal volvulus herniated through the epiploic foramen obstructing the gastric outlet. The patient underwent reduction of the internal hernia and right hemicolectomy. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. Herniation of caecal volvulus through the epiploic foramen is a very rare condition and its presentation as a gastric outlet obstruction has not been reported before. PMID:21747900

  18. Gastric outlet obstruction at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania: a prospective review of 184 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastric outlet obstruction poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to general surgeons practicing in resource-limited countries. There is a paucity of published data on this subject in our setting. This study was undertaken to highlight the etiological spectrum and treatment outcome of gastric outlet obstruction in our setting and to identify prognostic factors for morbidity and mortality. Methods This was a descriptive prospective study which was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between March 2009 and February 2013. All patients with a clinical diagnosis of gastric outlet obstruction were, after informed consent for the study, consecutively enrolled into the study. Statistical data analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 17.0. Results A total of 184 patients were studied. More than two-third of patients were males. Patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction were older than those of benign type. This difference was statistically significant (p outlet obstruction where as peptic ulcer disease was the commonest benign cause. In children, the commonest cause of gastric outlet obstruction was congenital pyloric stenosis (13.0%). Non-bilious vomiting (100%) and weight loss (93.5%) were the most frequent symptoms. Eighteen (9.8%) patients were HIV positive with the median CD 4+ count of 282 cells/μl. A total of 168 (91.3%) patients underwent surgery. Of these, gastro-jejunostomy (61.9%) was the most common surgical procedure performed. The complication rate was 32.1 % mainly surgical site infections (38.2%). The median hospital stay and mortality rate were 14 days and 18.5% respectively. The presence of postoperative complication was the main predictor of hospital stay (p = 0.002), whereas the age > 60 years, co-existing medical illness, malignant cause, HIV positivity, low CD 4 count (outlet obstruction in our setting is more prevalent in males and the cause is mostly malignant. The majority of patients present late with poor

  19. Gastric outlet obstruction possibly secondary to ulceration in a 2-year-old girl: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Okawada, Manabu; Okazaki, Tadaharu; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Lane, Geoffrey J; Yamataka, Atsuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction due to ulceration is extremely rare in childhood. We report a case of gastric outlet obstruction possibly secondary to peptic ulceration and our surgical management. Our approach, without vagotomy or antrectomy, would appear to be a safe and effective.

  20. Endoscopic magnetic gastroenteric anastomosis for palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction: a prospective multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Moine, Olivier Le; Bizzotto, Alessandra; Voermans, Rogier P.; Costamagna, Guido; Devière, Jacques; Siersema, Peter D.; Fockens, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background: Palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction remains challenging. Although there are 2 established treatment options, ie, surgical gastrojejunostomy and endoscopic duodenal stent insertion, there is an ongoing search for a technique that would combine the safety and rapid effect of

  1. Association of preoperative symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction with delayed gastric emptying after pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atema, Jasper J.; Eshuis, Wietse J.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Gouma, Dirk J.

    2013-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) is among the most common complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) and might demand postoperative nutritional support. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between preoperative symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction and DGE after PD in an

  2. Endoscopic balloon dilatation as treatment of gastric outlet obstruction in infancy and childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heymans, H. S.; Bartelsman, J. W.; Herweijer, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    The application of balloon dilatation as treatment of gastric outlet obstruction is described. In two infants after inadequate pyloromyotomy and in an 11-year-old boy with surgical damage to the vagus, balloon dilatation was successful and considered a good alternative to surgery in these conditions

  3. Self-expandable metal stents for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: A pooled analysis of prospective literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halsema, Emo E.; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E.

    2015-01-01

    To provide an overview of the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO). A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed of the literature published between January 2009 and March 2015. Only prospective studies that

  4. Highly selective vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy in the treatment of peptic ulcer induced gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, Nebojša; Simić, Aleksandar; Skrobić, Ognjan; Kotarac, Milutin; Ivanović, Nenad

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of peptic ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction is constantly declining. The aim of this study was to present our results in the treatment of gastric outlet obstruction with highly selective vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy. This retrospective clinical study included 13 patients with peptic ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction operated with higly selective vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy. A 3-year follow-up was conducted including clinical interview and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy on 1 and 3 years after the surgery. The most common preoperative symptom was vomiting (in 92.3% of patients). The mean preoperative body mass index was 16.3 +/- 3.1 kg/m2, with 9 patients classified preoperatively as underweight. There were no intraoperative complications, nor mortality. At a 3-year follow-up there was no ulcer recurrence. Delayed gastric emptying was present in 1, bile reflux in 2, and erosive gastritis in 1 patient. Two patients suffered from mild "dumping" syndrome. Higly selective vagotomy combined with gastrojejunostomy is a safe and easily feasible surgical solution of gastric outlet obstruction induced by peptic ulcer. Good functional results and low rate of complications can be expected at a long-term follow-up.

  5. A 65-year-old female patient with gastric outlet obstruction of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, N.A.; Gaa, J.; Hamacher, R.; Schulz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstructions can be of benign or malignant origin. In the case of the female patient described in this article, the extended diagnostic procedure with computed tomography and bone marrow biopsy was the key to a definite diagnosis and treatment planning. (orig.) [de

  6. Highly selective vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy in the treatment of peptic ulcer induced gastric outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Nebojša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The incidence of peptic ulcer-induced gastric outlet obstruction is constantly declining. The aim of this study was to present our results in the treatment of gastric outlet obstruction with highly selective vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy. Methods. This retrospective clinical study included 13 patients with peptic ulcer - induced gastric outlet obstruction operated with higly selective vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy. A 3-year follow-up was conducted including clinical interview and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy on 1 and 3 years after the surgery. Results. The most common preoperative symptom was vomiting (in 92.3% of patients. The mean preoperative body mass index was 16.3 ± 3.1 kg/m2, with 9 patients classified preoperatively as underweight. There were no intraoperative complications, nor mortality. At a 3-year follow-up there was no ulcer recurrence. Delayed gastric emptying was present in 1, bile reflux in 2, and erosive gastritis in 1 patient. Two patients suffered from mild “dumping” syndrome. Conclusion. Higly selective vagotomy combined with gastrojejunostomy is a safe and easily feasible surgical solution of gastric outlet obstruction induced by peptic ulcer. Good functional results and low rate of complications can be expected at a long-term follow-up.

  7. A case series of gastric outlet obstruction secondary to tuberculosis: New diagnostic and treatment paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinkesh Kumar Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis can involve any part of gastrointestinal tract. Gastro-duodenal involvement in tuberculosis is rare. We report four cases of gastric outlet obstruction due to tuberculosis. In all of these patients obstruction was due to extra-luminal compression from lymph-nodes. Clinical presentation was with epigastric pain and recurrent vomiting. Upper GI endoscopy revealed duodenal stricture without any active ulcer or mass. Computed tomography scan showed duodenal thickening along with abdominal lymph nodes. Diagnosis was confirmed with EUS guided FNAC. Antral dilatation using CRE can be used as first treatment option for obstruction in these patients. Patients non responsive to dilatation may require surgery.

  8. Outcomes of endoscopic pyloric stenting in malignant gastric outlet obstruction: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Hala; Yusuf, Muhammed Aasim

    2013-07-19

    Up to 30% of patients with pancreatic cancer and more than 50% of patients with gastric cancer already have incurable disease, with distressing symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction at the time of presentation which require effective palliation. We decided to test the clinical outcomes of endoscopic stent placement in malignant gastric outlet obstruction. In a retrospective single institution-based study, the charts of patients who had self-expandable metal stents placed to alleviate malignant gastric outlet obstruction were reviewed. Charts were reviewed to assess improvement in oral intake according to the Gastric Outlet Obstruction Scoring System (GOOSS), and in order to also evaluate technical success and complications of the procedure. 69 patients with successful stent placement were retrospectively evaluated. Within 7 and 28 days after stent placement respectively, 85.5% and 80% benefited from stent insertion, with an increase in the GOOSS score of > 1. Resumption of soft or low residue diet (GOOSS 2-3) was achieved in 53.6% at day 7 and in 62% of patients at day 28, respectively. Of the patients achieving a GOOSS score of 2-3, 17.3% remained on a soft or low residue diet at 24 weeks or at last follow up, while 46% died. Stent related adverse events occurred in 10 patients (14%), including stent blockade in 7 and stent migration in 3 patients. Endoscopic enteral stenting promptly increases oral intake in the majority of patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction and is a safe procedure with a low rate of serious complications.

  9. A CLINICAL STUDY ON GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION IN A SOUTH INDIAN TEACHING HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailaja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastric outlet obstruction is defined as a clinical and patho - physiological consequence of any disease process that produces a mechanical impediment to gastric emptying which may be extrinsic or intrinsic. Gastric outlet obstruction can be a diagnostic and treatment dilemma. Endoscopy of upper gastrointestinal tract has been a sensitive and specific investigation to study the status of gastric outlet - the pylorus and has enabled early detection of lesions of both stomach a nd duodenum. We undertook a prospective clinical study regarding incidence, etiology, investigation and management of cases of Gastric outlet obstruction in adults in a period of three years. In our study the m ost common cause of GOO is Carcinoma stomach a ntral region 46.6% , duodenal ulcer 33.3% , corrosive acid ingestion sequel 8.3%, peri ampullary carcinoma 6.6%, Ca pancreas 3.3%% , cholangio Carcinoma 1.6%. Males are more commonly involved in a ratio of M: F=3:1. Surgical procedures done varied from defini tive resections to palliative bypass or feeding jejunostomy for enteral feeding

  10. Gastric outlet obstruction by a lost gallstone: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koichopolos, Jennifer; Hamidi, Moska; Cecchini, Matthew; Leslie, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Spilled gallstones from a laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be a source of significant morbidity, most commonly causing abscesses and fistulae. Preventative measures for loss, careful removal during the initial surgery, and good documentation of any concern for remaining intraperitoneal stones needs to be performed with the initial surgery. An 80-year-old male with a history of complicated biliary disease resulting in a cholecystectomy presented to general surgery clinic with increasing symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction. CT imaging was concerning for a malignant process despite negative biopsies. A distal gastrectomy and Billroth II reconstruction was performed and final pathology showed dense inflammation with a single calcified stone incarcerated within the gastric wall of the inflamed pylorus and no malignancy. Stones lost during laparoscopic cholecystectomy are not innocuous and preventative measures for loss, careful removal during the initial surgery, and good documentation of any concern for remaining intraperitoneal stones. This is the first case of gastric outlet obstruction caused by an intramural obstruction of the pylorus from a spilled gallstone during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy and subsequent inflammation. This is an etiology that must be considered in new cases of gastric outlet obstruction and can mimic malignancy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastric outlet obstruction in children: an overview with report of Jodhpur disease and Sharma's classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kamlesh Kumar; Ranka, Pankaj; Goyal, Pushpa; Dabi, D R

    2008-10-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is overwhelmingly described as infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis that overshadows other causes; thereby, there is a need to develop an elaborate and comprehensive classification. We present the same and establish a new disease called primary acquired gastric outlet obstruction during infancy and childhood that was reported for the first time by us in 1997, reviewing the literature published since then, with report of our new cases. Eight patients of this disease presented at our center from 1996 to May 2008, and these were analyzed epidemiologically and clinically. Other reports published in literature were compared, and all reported patients were compiled. All 8 cases presented at age ranging from 1 month to 6 years, with mean age of 2.9 years; there was predilection for male sex (male, 7; female, 1). Presenting symptoms and signs were nonbilious vomiting, weight loss, dehydration, dyselectrolytemia, abdominal pain, and visible gastric peristalsis. Upper gastrointestinal contrast study showed large stomach and increased gastric emptying time. Endoscopy displayed normal stomach without intraluminal lesion. Exploration revealed a dilated stomach, without any pyloric muscular hypertrophy, scarring, inflammation, or obstruction externally or intraluminally. Result of histopathologic examination was normal. All patients except 1 (died of unrelated cause) were cured by Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty. These patients represent a new disease entity designated as primary acquired gastric outlet obstruction during infancy and childhood. Author's classification is complete and scientific, encompassing all rare causes of GOO. We nickname this idiopathic variety of GOO the Jodhpur disease, the place of the first cases.

  12. Delayed Diagnosis of Gastric Outlet Obstruction from Bouveret Syndrome in a Young Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith, Zachary

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bouveret syndrome is a rare presentation of gastric outlet obstruction caused by a gallstone in the proximal duodenum via a bilioenteric fistula. This is an infrequent although clinically significant cause of abdominal pain, almost exclusively in the elderly. The clinical presentation is similar to that of a small bowel obstruction with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Surgery or endoscopy is often required for definitive diagnosis and therapy. We describe the case of a young woman with this condition who had a delayed diagnosis in part because of her age and the rarity of the condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:151-153.

  13. Delayed diagnosis of gastric outlet obstruction from bouveret syndrome in a young woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary; Totten, Jodie; Hughes, Adrienne; Strote, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Bouveret syndrome is a rare presentation of gastric outlet obstruction caused by a gallstone in the proximal duodenum via a bilioenteric fistula. This is an infrequent although clinically significant cause of abdominal pain, almost exclusively in the elderly. The clinical presentation is similar to that of a small bowel obstruction with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Surgery or endoscopy is often required for definitive diagnosis and therapy. We describe the case of a young woman with this condition who had a delayed diagnosis in part because of her age and the rarity of the condition.

  14. Gastric Tuberculosis with Outlet Obstruction: A Case Report Presenting with a Mass Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Shifa Ecka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a major health problem worldwide. In India, it is highly endemic. The most common manifestation is a pulmonary disease, but involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon with the ileocecal region being the commonest site. Gastric tuberculosis is rare and usually associated with pulmonary tuberculosis or an immunodeficient state. Here, we report a case of gastric tuberculosis presenting as gastric outlet obstruction in an immunocompetent patient without evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis. Biopsy and PCR confirmed the diagnosis, and the patient responded well to standard antitubercular treatment. Though, gastric tuberculosis is rare, it should be considered as a possibility when patients present with gastric outlet obstruction, particularly in endemic areas with tuberculosis.

  15. Intermittent gastric outlet obstruction caused by a prolapsing antral gastric polyp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Mehul; Kelley, Brian; Rendon, Gabriel; Abraham, Bincy

    2010-01-01

    Most gastric polyps have an asymptomatic presentation and are an incidental finding on upper endoscopy. Symptomatic presentations can range from an ulcerated polyp leading to anemia and occult bleed to complete gastric outlet obstruction. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman who presented with postprandial nausea and early satiety. Her upper endoscopy revealed a 2 cm pedunculated hyperplastic polyp arising from the antrum of the stomach which was seen prolapsing into the pylorus causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. In the present report, we statistically analyzed 39 prolapsing gastric polyps previously reported in the English literature and demonstrate the current utility of monopolar snare polypectomy in establishing a histological diagnosis while offering simultaneous treatment. Additionally, we review the literature for the management of all hyperplastic gastric polyps in relation to advancements in digestive endoscopy. PMID:21160624

  16. Aetiological spectrum of benign gastric outlet obstruction in India: new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharshi, Sudhir; Puri, Amarender Singh; Sachdeva, Sanjeev; Kumar, Ajay; Dalal, Ashok; Gupta, Manish

    2016-10-01

    There is a paucity of data on the spectrum of benign gastric outlet obstruction in India. Our aim was to evaluate its spectrum and to identify the subgroup which would be most amenable to endoscopic therapy. We studied 64 patients whose aetiology revealed in approximately equal proportions: corrosive injury; gastroduodenal tuberculosis (TB); and peptic ulcer disease. The median number of endoscopic dilations required was two for TB, four for peptic ulcer disease and five for corrosive injury. Gastroduodenal TB and corrosive injury appear now to be more, or at least as, common as peptic ulcer disease as causes of benign gastric outlet obstruction in India. Gastroduodenal TB responds best to endoscopic therapy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Acute gastric outlet obstruction secondary to exclusive paraoesophageal small bowel herniation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Schoutheete, Jean-Charles; Reece-Smith, Alex M; Wajed, Saj A

    2018-04-01

    Herniation of abdominal viscera into the thorax may occur as a consequence of abnormal defects in the diaphragm. In adults, the most common condition relates to herniations through a weakened crural orifice via which the oesophagus normally traverses. These hiatus hernias are classified as types I-IV depending on the extent of visceral involvement. We present here a case of type IV hiatus hernia with massive mediastinal herniation of the small bowel, yet remarkable in that the stomach itself remained completely intra-abdominal. Gastric outlet obstruction occurred as a consequence of extrinsic proximal small bowel compression. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of paraoesophageal hernia exclusively involving small bowel, without involving any part of the stomach, and yet causing gastric outlet obstruction.

  18. Duodenal stenting followed by systemic chemotherapy for patients with pancreatic cancer and gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ueno, Makoto; Kameda, Ryo; Moriya, Satoshi; Irie, Kuniyasu; Goda, Yoshihiro; Tezuka, Shun; Yanagida, Naoki; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Aoyama, Toru; Morinaga, Soichiro; Morimoto, Manabu

    Endoscopic duodenal stenting has recently been proposed as a substitute for surgical gastrojejunostomy for the treatment of gastric outlet obstruction. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of duodenal stenting followed by systemic chemotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with gastric outlet obstruction. This was a single-center, retrospective cohort study, conducted at an academic medical center, of 71 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and gastric outlet obstruction (mean age: 67.6 years; range: 31-92 years) who underwent duodenal stenting with or without subsequent chemotherapy. Overall survival, duration of oral intake of foods, the rate of introduction of chemotherapy, progression-free survival, and adverse events were evaluated. Stent placement was technically successful in 69 (97%) patients. Thirty-six (51%) patients were treated with chemotherapy: 17 with gemcitabine alone, 15 with S-1 alone, 3 with FOLFIRINOX, and 1 with paclitaxel. Median progression-free survival and overall survival after chemotherapy were 2.6 months (95% confidence interval: 1.3-3.9 months) and 4.7 months (95% confidence interval: 2.6-6.8 months), respectively. Cases of grade 3 anemia were frequently observed during chemotherapies following duodenal stenting (32%). Tumor stage, performance status, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, and introduction of chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for survival (hazard ratios of 3.73, 2.21, 2.69, and 1.85 with p-values of gastric outlet obstruction regarding its safety and smooth conduction of subsequent chemotherapies. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Partial stomach partitioning gastrojejunostomy in the treatment of the malignant gastric outlet obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-lah-Fernández, Omar; Parreño-Manchado, Felipe Carlos; García-Plaza, Asunción; Álvarez-Delgado, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In patients with unresectable gastric cancer and outlet obstruction syndrome, gastric partitioning gastrojejunostomy is an alternative, which could avoid the drawbacks of the standard techniques. Comparison of antroduodenal stent, conventional gastrojejunostomy and gastric partitioning gastrojejunostomy. A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with unresectable distal gastric cancer and gastric outlet obstruction, treated with the three different techniques over the last 12 years, comparing results based on oral tolerance and complications. An analysis was performed on the results using the Student-t test for independent variables. The 22 patients were divided in 3 groups: group I (6 cases) stent, group II (9 cases) conventional gastrojejunostomy, and group III (7 cases) gastric partitioning gastrojejunostomy, respectively. The stent allows a shorter "postoperative" stay and early onset of oral tolerance (Pgastric partitioning gastrojejunostomy achieve normal diet at 15th day (Pgastric partitioning gastrojejunostomy, achieving an overall survival of 6.5 months. The gastric partitioning gastrojejunostomy for treatment of gastric outlet obstruction in unresectable advanced gastric cancer is a safe technique, allowing a more complete diet with lower morbidity and improved survival. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. [Eleven Patients with Gastric Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy after Stent Placement for Gastric Outlet Obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Shunji; Nakagawa, Tomo; Konishi, Ken; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Ohta, Katsuya; Nakashima, Shinsuke; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Takeshi; Yamada, Terumasa

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents is reportedly effective for gastric outlet obstructions due to advanced gastric cancer, and is less invasive than gastrojejunostomy. For patients who have good performance status, we administer chemotherapy after stent placement, although the safety and feasibility of this chemotherapy have not yet been discussed in full. Between 2011 and 2015, 15 patients at our institution underwent endoscopic gastroduodenal stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer. Eleven of these patients were administered chemotherapy after stent placement. In our case series, we did not observe any specific adverse event caused by stent placement plus chemotherapy. Adverse events after chemotherapy included anemia of CTCAE Grade 3 in 7 patients. Stent-in-stent placement was needed in 2 patients. Neither stent migration nor perforation was observed. Therefore, chemotherapy after stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer was considered safe and feasible. Stent placement is useful not only as palliative care for patients with terminal-stage disease, but also as one of the multimodal therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.

  1. A rare presentation of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) - The Bouveret's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwaniya, Dheer Singh; Arya, S V; Guha, Soumya; Kuppuswamy, Manigandan; Chaggar, Jasneet G; Ralte, Lalmalsamwe; Chejera, Rajkumar; Sharma, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    Bouveret's Syndrome is a rare cause of Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) caused by a gall stone which has migrated into the duodenal bulb from a bilioduodenal fistula. It is an uncommon condition and only a few cases have been reported in the medical literature till to date. We report a case of a 45 year old woman who presented to us with recurrent pain in the upper abdomen for the last 8 years, and that progressed to develop symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed duodenal ulceration with a stony hard lesion in the first part of duodenum. An contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) scan of the abdomen performed later confirmed the presence of cholecystoduodenal fistula and a gall-stone in proximal jejunum. Bouveret's syndrome is a case of gastric outlet obstruction caused by the impaction of a large gall stone in the duodenum as a result of a cholecystoduodenal fistula. It constitutes 1-3% of cases of gall stone ileus which in turn complicates only 0.3-4% cases of cholelithisasis. Bouveret's syndrome is managed surgically. Bouveret's syndrome being an uncommon condition may pose a difficulty in diagnosis and dilemma in managing such patients. An awareness is hence essential.

  2. [A case of gastric outlet obstruction and rectal obstruction due to metastases from breast cancer treated by gastroduodenal and colon stenting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yoshihiro; Egawa, Chiyomi; Ishida, Tomo; Sato, Yasufumi; Kusama, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Tadayoshi; Matsushita, Katsunori; Kimura, Kei; Katsura, Yoshiteru; Nitta, Kanae; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Takeno, Atsushi; Nakahira, Shin; Sakisaka, Hideki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Takatsuka, Yuichi

    2014-11-01

    Malignant bowel obstruction often causes oral intake difficulties and decreases quality of life. In Japan, gastroduodenal stenting for malignant gastric outlet obstruction has been covered by health insurance since 2010, while colon stenting has been covered since 2012. Both approaches are useful treatments for malignant bowel obstruction. Here we report the case of a woman with gastric outlet obstruction and rectal obstruction due to breast cancer metastases who was able to eat solid food after duodenal and colon stenting. When choosing whether to perform endoscopic stenting or surgical intervention such as gastrojejunostomy, ileostomy, and colostomy for treating malignant bowel obstruction, it is important to assess the patient's general condition and prognosis as well as the obstruction position.

  3. Rectal hyposensitivity and functional anorectal outlet obstruction are common entities in patients with functional constipation but are not significantly associated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Joon Seong; Hong, Su Jin; Jeon, Seong Ran; Kwon, Soon Ha; Kim, Wan Jung; Kim, Hyun Gun; Cho, Won Young; Cho, Joo Young; Kim, Jin-Oh; Lee, Ji Sung

    2013-01-01

    The causes of functional anorectal outlet obstruction (outlet obstruction) include functional defecation disorder (FDD), rectocele, and rectal intussusception (RI). It is unclear whether outlet obstruction is associated with rectal hyposensitivity (RH) in patients with functional constipation (FC). The aim of this study was to determine the association between RH and outlet obstruction in patients with FC. This was a retrospective study using a prospectively collected constipation database, and the population comprised 107 patients with FC (100 females; median age, 49 years). We performed anorectal manometry, defecography, rectal barostat, and at least two tests (balloon expulsion test, electromyography, or colon transit time study). RH was defined as one or more sensory threshold pressures raised beyond the normal range on rectal barostat. We investigated the association between the presence of RH and an outlet obstruction such as large rectocele (> 2 cm in size), RI, or FDD. Forty patients (37.4%) had RH. No significant difference was observed in RH between patients with small and large rectoceles (22 [44.9%] vs. 18 [31%], respectively; p = 0.140). No significant difference was observed in RH between the non-RI and RI groups (36 [36.7%] vs. 4 [30.8%], respectively; p = 0.599). Furthermore, no significant difference in RH was observed between the non-FDD and FDD groups (19 [35.8%] vs. 21 [38.9%], respectively; p = 0.745). RH and outlet obstruction are common entities but appear not to be significantly associated.

  4. The functional status of neoaortic valve and left ventricular outlet tract after arterial switch operation for transposition of great arteries with left ventricular outlet tract obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi; Li, Shoujun; Zhang, Hao; Hua, Zhongdong; Yang, Keming; Gao, Huawei

    2016-07-01

    To assess the function of the left ventricular outlet tract and neoaortic valve after arterial switch operation for patients with transposition of the great arteries and left ventricular outlet tract obstruction. The data of 40 patients, who underwent arterial switch surgery with transposition of the great arteries with left ventricular outlet tract obstruction and a concomitant left ventricular outlet tract obstruction relieving procedure, were retrospectively analysed. Ultrasonic cardiogram and intraoperative findings, surgical methods and early and follow-up results were also summarized. Early death occurred in one case. One patient died in follow-up stage and 3 patients were lost during follow-up. In all the 35 patients accepting follow-up, 1 patient had a reoccurring left ventricular outlet tract obstruction, 1 patient had mild neoaortic stenosis, whereas mild and moderate neoaortic regurgitation occurred in 11 and 2 patients, respectively. The median pressure gradient across the left ventricular outlet tract was 6.8 mmHg (range: 2-49 mmHg) during follow-up which was statistically significant compared with that before surgery. We defined death, reintervention and rehospitalization for cardiac reasons as a cardiac event; the survival rate of being free from cardiac event for 1 year and 5 years was 92.8 ± 0.04%, respectively. Anatomical features and pressure gradient should be used together to evaluate the severity of obstruction, whereas the mid-term outcomes can be satisfied after arterial switch operation for the appropriate candidates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Results of radiotherapy for ureteric obstruction in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, M.; Miskowiak, J.; Rolff, H.

    1996-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of the records of 574 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer revealed 90 patients (16%) with ureteric obstruction; the obstruction was bilateral in 24%. The effect of radiotherapy was assessed in 55 patients with 68 obstructed kidneys. Six patients with eight obstructed kidneys required percutaneous nephrostomy or ureteric catheters in addition to radiotherapy. Drainage improved in only 20% of kidneys and the diverting catheter could be withdrawn permanently in only one (17%) of the diverted patients. The median survival was 11 months. Irradiation was followed by significant complications in 37 patients (67%). This raises doubts about the assumed beneficial effect of irradiation on ureteric obstruction due to muscle invasive bladder cancer. The short median survival of 11 months confirms that ureteric obstruction is a poor prognostic factor in muscle invasive bladder cancer. (au) 10 refs

  6. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement in Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bing-Wei; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Malignant gastric outlet obstruction is a late complication of intraabdominal malignancy. Self-expandable metallic stent placement has been a safe palliative treatment to relieve obstructive symptoms. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of metallic stents in our patients and analyzed the clinical outcome of different brands. Seventy-one patients with inoperable gastric outlet obstruction receiving WallFlex enteral stents (WallFlex group) or Bonastents (Bonastent group) since April 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. The overall technical and clinical success rates of stent placement were 100% and 93%, respectively. The baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes including procedure-related complications, restenosis, and reintervention rates were comparable between the 2 groups. However, the Bonastent group had a higher rate of stent fracture than the WallFlex group (13.3% vs 0%, P = 0.03). The mean duration of overall stent patency was 132.7 days. The mean duration of survival was 181.9 days. Resumption of regular diet or low residual diet at day 7 after stent insertion predicted stent patency (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.28, P = 0.01). Cancer with gastric origin (HR: 0.25, P = 0.045) and poststent chemotherapy (HR: 0.38, P = 0.006) predicted lower mortality; however, peritoneal carcinomatosis (HR: 3.09, P = 0.04) correlated with higher mortality. Metallic stent placement is a safe and effective method for relieving gastric outlet obstruction. Except higher rate of stent fracture in the Bonastent group, there is no significant difference in clinical outcomes between the Bonastent group and the WallFlex group. PMID:26200641

  7. Overactive bladder syndrome and bladder wall thickness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Zahide; Voyvoda, Bekir; Şirinocak, Pinar Bekdik

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome, nocturia, urgency, and urge incontinence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and measure bladder wall thickness (BWT) in these patients. The patient group was composed of 38 patients with OSAS. The control group was composed of 15 healthy individuals. All patients were evaluated using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). The bladder wall thickness was measured by transabdominal ultrasound (US). The presence of nocturia, urinary urgency, and urge incontinence were also evaluated. The mean OABSS was significantly higher in the patient group compared with the control group (p=0.048). The minimum oxygen saturation (Min.SO2) of patients with urgency was found to be significantly lower (p=0.014). The time spent below 90% of oxygen saturation (SO2) was significantly longer in patients with urinary urgency (p=0.009). There was no difference in BWT measurements between the patient group and the control group. There was a significant relationship between BWT values and OABSS in patients with OSAS (p=0.002). The results of the present study suggest that OSAS is associated with OAB syndrome. As a key symptom of OAB, urgency correlates with hypoxia in cases with OSAS. Although the present study did not observe any difference in BWT measurements between the patients and the control group, there was a correlation between BWT measurements and OABSS in patients with OSAS. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  8. Independent predictors of survival in patients with incurable malignant gastric outlet obstruction: a multicenter prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Timmer, Robin; Siersema, Peter D.; Fockens, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Objective. Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is one of the late complications of a variety of malignancies. Palliation of symptoms of obstruction rather than cure is the primary aim of treatment in affected patients. Thus far prognostic information on life expectancy is lacking in these patients

  9. Stents and surgical interventions in the palliation of gastric outlet obstruction: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minata, Mauricio Kazuyoshi; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Rocha, Rodrigo Silva de Paula; Morita, Flavio Hiroshi Ananias; Aquino, Julio Cesar Martins; Cheng, Spencer; Zilberstein, Bruno; Sakai, Paulo; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Palliative treatment of gastric outlet obstruction can be done with surgical or endoscopic techniques. This systematic review aims to compare surgery and covered and uncovered stent treatments for gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Patients and methods: Randomized clinical trials were identified in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, LILACs, BVS, SCOPUS and CINAHL databases. Comparison of covered and uncovered stents included: technical success, clinical success, complications, obstruction, migration, bleeding, perforation, stent fracture and reintervention. The outcomes used to compare surgery and stents were technical success, complications, and reintervention. Patency rate could not be included because of lack of uniformity of the extracted data. Results: Eight studies were selected, 3 comparing surgery and stents and 5 comparing covered and uncovered stents.The meta-analysis of surgical and endoscopic stent treatment showed no difference in the technical success and overall number of complications. Stents had higher reintervention rates than surgery (RD: 0.26, 95 % CI [0.05, 0.47], NNH: 4). There is no significant difference in technical success, clinical success, complications, stent fractures, perforation, bleeding and the need for reintervention in the analyses of covered and uncovered stents. There is a higher migration rate in the covered stent therapy compared to uncovered self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) in the palliation of malignant GOO (RD: 0.09, 95 % CI [0.04, 0.14], NNH: 11). Nevertheless, covered stents had lower obstruction rates (RD: – 0.21, 95 % CI [-0.27, – 0.15], NNT: 5). Conclusions: In the palliation of malignant GOO, covered SEMS had higher migration and lower obstruction rates when compared with uncovered stents. Surgery is associated with lower reintervention rates than stents. PMID:27857965

  10. Intragastric balloon in the emergency department: an unusual cause of gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Natalia I; Rawat, Anish; Buehler, Greg

    2014-04-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Many strategies to promote weight loss, including medications and surgical techniques, have been developed; however, few have proven effective. As the rates of obesity and associated complications continue to climb, there is growing pressure on the medical community to develop less invasive procedures that can provide lasting weight loss results. One surgical treatment for obesity, available in several countries but not yet approved for use in the United States, is the intragastric balloon (IGB). The IGB is a temporary, space-occupying device placed endoscopically into the stomach to decrease gastric volume and provide a sense of early satiety. Our objective is to highlight potential complications of this device that emergency physicians should be familiar with, in particular, gastric outlet obstruction. We report the case of a morbidly obese 63-year-old Middle Eastern man who presented to an emergency department in Texas with mechanical gastric outlet obstruction 2 months after IGB placement. After three endoscopic attempts, the balloon was successfully removed and the obstruction relieved. With an increasingly mobile and obese global population, emergency physicians should be aware of weight loss procedures such as the IGB and appropriate time-sensitive management of high-risk complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastric outlet obstruction caused by focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eris, Cengiz; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Odabasi, Mehmet; Akbulut, Sami; Abuoglu, Hasan; Ozkan, Erkan

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a case of gastric outlet obstruction due to focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver. A 23-year-old female presented to our emergency clinic with nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Endoscopy showed that the prepyloric region of the stomach was externally compressed by a lesion. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 70mm solid mass originating from the liver, extending caudally in an exophytic manner, and compressing the stomach. Laparotomy revealed an irregular and exophytic mass originating from the liver, which caused gastric outlet obstruction. The mass was resected with a 10mm safety margin. The histopathology report of the mass returned as focal nodular hyperplasia. Gastric outlet obstruction is a clinical syndrome characterized by abdominal pain, nausea, and postprandial vomiting. This clinical condition frequently develops as a result of peptic ulcer disease, pyloric stenosis, and obstruction of pylorus by foreign bodies including phytobezoars, congenital duodenal webs, malignant disorders, and various lesions externally compressing the stomach. Gastric outlet obstruction due to hepatic lesions is extremely rare; few cases have been reported. This is the first reported case of gastric outlet obstruction that developed due to focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Foley Catheter: A Complication when Substituting for Commercial Gastrostomy Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda B. Lewis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of using percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG for long-term enteral feeding is well established and commonly used. While the technique is relatively safe and simple, the gastrostomy tube itself may deteriorate or malfunction, requiring a replacement tube. We present a case of a 58-year-old woman who was found to have gastric outlet obstruction from the inflated balloon of a Foley catheter being used as a replacement for her PEG tube. This case illustrates a potential complication of using a Foley catheter in place of commercially available gastrostomy tubes.

  13. Gastric outlet obstruction secondary to paraesophageal herniation of gastric antrum after laparoscopic fundoplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Selcuk; Soylu, Lutfi; Sahin, Mahir; Demiray, Taylan

    2015-04-01

    The most common causes of acute gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) are duodenal and type 3 gastric ulcers. However, mechanical or functional causes may also lead to this pathology. Acute GOO is characterized by delayed gastric emptying, anorexia, or nausea accompanied by vomiting. Herein we report a 56-year-old man diagnosed with GOO secondary to paraesophageal hiatal herniation of gastric antrum after laparoscopic fundoplication. Because of the rarity of this disease, common gastrointestinal complaints may mislead the emergency physician to diagnose a nonsurgical gastrointestinal disease if a detailed history and physical examinations are not obtained. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Gastric outlet obstruction secondary to paraesophageal herniation of gastric antrum after laparoscopic fundoplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcuk Coskun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The most common causes of acute gastric outlet obstruction (GOO are duodenal and type 3 gastric ulcers. However, mechanical or functional causes may also lead to this pathology. Acute GOO is characterized by delayed gastric emptying, anorexia, or nausea accompanied by vomiting. Herein we report a 56-year-old man diagnosed with GOO secondary to paraesophageal hiatal herniation of gastric antrum after laparoscopic fundoplication. Because of the rarity of this disease, common gastrointestinal complaints may mislead the emergency physician to diagnose a nonsurgical gastrointestinal disease if a detailed history and physical examinations are not obtained.

  15. Duplication cyst of the pylorus--a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction in the newborn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplication cysts of the pylorus are the rarest of alimentary tract duplications with very few reported cases. We present such a cyst in a neonate presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. We have also reviewed the literature and outlined the theories of origin, modes of presentation, diagnosis and the surgical procedures. Even though several modes of surgery have been described, it is best to individualize the surgical option in each case. The results depend on the nature and site of duplication, complications and the associated anomalies.

  16. An unusual cause of gastric outlet obstruction: A pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhasan, Abdulaziz; Khan, Patan M

    2009-01-01

    We present a rare case of gastric outlet obstruction due to compression of the duodenum by a pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDA) aneurysm 2.5 cm in diameter, in a 43-year-old man from Saudi Arabia who presented with persistent vomiting and epigastric pain. The initial investigations and blood works were negative, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was unremarkable. A CT abdomen demonstrated a mass around the duodenum and dilatation of the stomach, and CT angiography showed the PDA aneurysm. The patient was stabilized and then referred to a tertiary center for embolization. Our case demonstrates a diagnostic challenge that physicians may encounter in patients who present with vomiting and epigastric pain. (author)

  17. Gastric outlet obstruction without esophageal involvement: A late sequelae of acid ingestion in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Shyam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental corrosive ingestion is not a rare occurrence in children because of easy access to strong household cleansers. Gastric injury as a predominant finding following acid ingestion in pediatric age group is less widely known with a few cases being reported in Indian literature. We report two such cases of gastric outlet obstruction following accidental ingestion of dilute acid. Both children have typical clinical presentation just 4-6 weeks after the ingestion. Upper GI endoscopy and barium meal studies confirmed the diagnosis. Early surgical intervention resulted in a satisfactory recovery. Both patients are doing well on follow up.

  18. Gastric outlet obstruction caused by heterotopic pancreas: A case report and a quick review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Xin; Xu, Jie; Wang, Xue-Wen; Zhou, Fu-Run; Gao, Wei; Yu, Guo-Hua; Lv, Zhong-Chuan; Zheng, Hai-Tao

    2008-01-01

    A 46-year-old Chinese woman presented with nausea, recurrent vomiting, and abdominal pain. Gastroduodenal endoscopic examination revealed an oval-shaped submucosal tumor at the prepyloric area on the posterior wall of the stomach. A degenerated gastrointestinal stromal tumor was suspected. Distal gastrectomy was performed and a histological diagnosis of heterotopic pancreas (HPs) was confirmed. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged 7 d after operation. The patient remains healthy and symptom-free in the follow-up of 6 mo. This is a report of a case of gastric outlet obstruction resulting from pancreatic heterotopia in the gastric antrum in an adult woman. PMID:19034986

  19. "DUPLICATION CYST OF THE STOMACH: A RARE CAUSE OF GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION IN THE CHILDREN"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kargar F. Moghaddasi

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of gastrointestinal tract are congenital anomalies found in about 0.2% of all children. These include the rare gastric duplication. We present such a cyst in a 14 years old girl with gastric outlet obstruction. She was found to have a noncommunicating antral duplication cyst .The cyst was managed by cystectomy and marsupialization. Microscopically the duplication cyst contained a mucosal, submucosal and muscularis layers. There was no evidence of ulceration or malignant cells. Her recovery was smooth. Etiology, presentation and management of duplication cyst of the stomach is discussed together with a review of literature.

  20. Ultrasound Demonstration of a Benign Gastric Ulcer with Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PL Pattee

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A benign antral gastric ulcer in an adult causing gastric outlet obstruction was demonstrated by ultrasonography. The extent and benign nature of the ulcer was suggested by ultrasound before gastric surgery was performed. Features implying a benign gastric ulcer were: observation of peristaltic waves through the underlying muscular layer, homogenicity of the ulcer crater and characteristic mound or volcano-like appearance of the heaped-up folds of mucosa. The differential diagnosis and the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis of gastric ulcers are discussed.

  1. Gastric outlet obstruction with an elevated serum pancreatic lipase secondary to an infraumbilical hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with symptoms and signs of gastric outlet obstruction with a history of a ventral hernia. Clinical examination revealed a large ventral hernia with visible peristalsis of the herniated viscera.Initial serum biochemistry revealed a markedly elevated lipase level and deranged renal function.Computed tomography demonstrated an infraumbilical hernia with herniation of the stomach through the ventral defect and distortion of the pancreatic anatomy. The hernia was reduced operatively and repaired, leading to an uneventful recovery. PMID:24112485

  2. Successful Multimodality Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by an Impacted Gallstone (Bouveret's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason N. Rogart

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bouveret's syndrome is a rare condition of gastric outlet obstruction resulting from the migration of a gallstone through a choledochoduodenal fistula. Due to the large size of these stones and the difficult location in which they become impacted, endoscopic treatment is unsuccessful and most patients require surgery. We report the case of an elderly male who presented with nausea and hematemesis, and was found on CT scan and endoscopy to have an obstructing gallstone in his duodenal bulb. After several endoscopic sessions and the use of multiple instruments including a Holmium: YAG laser and electrohydraulic lithotripter, fragmentation and endoscopic removal of the stone were successful. We believe this to be the first case of Bouveret's syndrome successfully treated by endoscopy alone in the United States. We describe the difficulties encountered which necessitated varied and innovative therapeutic techniques.

  3. Laparoscopic-assisted stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy for the palliation of gastric outlet obstruction from antral gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kano, Hisao; Kuboi, Youichi; Aramaki, Osamu; Amano, Sadao

    2009-06-01

    Conventional gastrojejunostomy is performed for gastric outlet obstruction; however, we have experience of some patients for whom oral intake was not adequately restored. Open stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy is a useful technique for the relief of unresectable and obstructing antral gastric cancers. We herein report the successful laparoscopic application of this technique in 2 patients: a 62-year-old male and a 65-year-old female with obstructing antral gastric cancer. There were no operative complications, and blood loss was minimal. Oral fluid intake was resumed 3 and 4 days postoperatively. Chemotherapy by oral administration was possible for each patient. There was no recurrence of the gastric outlet obstruction in either patient up until they died 6 and 10 months after surgery. Laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy is a safe and useful technique for treating unresectable and obstructing antral gastric cancer, allowing the possibility of adequate oral intake and permitting the administration of anticancer drugs.

  4. What is the ideal stent as initial intervention for malignant gastric outlet obstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Ik; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Lee, Yong Chan; Jahng, Jaehoon; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin; Lee, Sang In

    2013-01-01

    Self-expandable metal stents are effective palliation for malignant gastric outlet obstruction. The aims of study were to evaluate efficacy and safety of double-layered Comvi, uncovered and covered stent to find out protocols which enhance stent patency. We retrospectively analysed data from 224 patients who underwent endoscopic stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction caused by stomach cancer from 2006 to 2011. Technical and clinical success rates were evaluated and clinical outcomes were compared according to stent types and chemotherapy. The overall technical and clinical success rates were achieved in 99.6% and 80.4%, respectively without immediate complications. The clinical success rate was not significantly different between three groups. The median stent patency time was 156 days [interquartile range 66-279] without differences between groups. The 4-, 8-, and 12-week patency rates were 89.4%, 77.3%, and 61.2%, respectively with no differences between groups. The re-stenosis of stent frequently occurred in the case of the uncovered stents, while migration was more likely to be observed for the covered and Comvi stent. Chemotherapy significantly lowered re-intervention rates, especially in uncovered stents. Patency rates are significantly improved by combining the use of uncovered stent with follow-up chemotherapy treatment, which retains the advantages of the mechanical and chemical aspects of stent and chemotherapy, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Surgical therapy for benign prostatic hypertrophy/bladder outflow obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikesh Thiruchelvam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP with endoscopic electrocautery remains the gold standard surgical technique for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH by which all new procedures are compared. We reviewed the current literature, and international urological guidelines and consensus opinion on various surgical options for BPH and present a brief overview of alternative techniques including bipolar TURP, transurethral incision of the prostate, transurethral vaporization of the prostate, laser prostatectomy (with holmium, thulium and potassium titanyl phosphate greenlight lasers and open prostatectomy (with mention of new techniques including laparoscopic and robotic prostatectomy. Emerging, experimental and less established techniques are also described including endoscopic heat generation (transurethral microwave thermotherapy, radiofrequency transurethral needle ablation of the prostate, high intensity focused ultrasound, hot water induced thermotherapy, pulsed electromagnetic radiofrequency, injection therapy (transurethral ethanol ablation and botulinum toxin and mechanical devices (intraprostatic stents and urethral lift devices. Despite a plethora of surgical options, none have realistically improved outcomes in the long-term compared with TURP. Improvements have been made on improving surgical morbidity and time in hospital. Questions remain in this area, including what specific elements of bladder outflow obstruction (BOO result in damage to the urinary tract, how does BPH contribute to BOO and how much prostate volume reduction is necessary to relieve BOO or lower urinary tract symptoms. Given these unanswered questions and the multitude of procedures available, it is clear that appropriate counselling is necessary in all men who undergo BPH surgery.

  6. Surgical therapy for benign prostatic hypertrophy/bladder outflow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruchelvam, Nikesh

    2014-04-01

    Monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with endoscopic electrocautery remains the gold standard surgical technique for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) by which all new procedures are compared. We reviewed the current literature, and international urological guidelines and consensus opinion on various surgical options for BPH and present a brief overview of alternative techniques including bipolar TURP, transurethral incision of the prostate, transurethral vaporization of the prostate, laser prostatectomy (with holmium, thulium and potassium titanyl phosphate greenlight lasers) and open prostatectomy (with mention of new techniques including laparoscopic and robotic prostatectomy). Emerging, experimental and less established techniques are also described including endoscopic heat generation (transurethral microwave thermotherapy, radiofrequency transurethral needle ablation of the prostate, high intensity focused ultrasound, hot water induced thermotherapy, pulsed electromagnetic radiofrequency), injection therapy (transurethral ethanol ablation and botulinum toxin) and mechanical devices (intraprostatic stents and urethral lift devices). Despite a plethora of surgical options, none have realistically improved outcomes in the long-term compared with TURP. Improvements have been made on improving surgical morbidity and time in hospital. Questions remain in this area, including what specific elements of bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) result in damage to the urinary tract, how does BPH contribute to BOO and how much prostate volume reduction is necessary to relieve BOO or lower urinary tract symptoms. Given these unanswered questions and the multitude of procedures available, it is clear that appropriate counselling is necessary in all men who undergo BPH surgery.

  7. Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid bladder neck injection for persistent outlet incompetency after sling procedures in children with neurogenic urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaJusta, Daniel; Gargollo, Patricio; Snodgrass, Warren

    2013-06-01

    We report outcomes after dextranomer/hyaluronic acid (Dx/HA) bladder neck injection for persistent outlet incompetency despite prior sling or Leadbetter/Mitchell bladder neck revision plus sling (LMS) in children with neurogenic urinary incontinence. Consecutive patients with outlet incompetency after sling (n = 17) or LMS (n = 9) underwent a maximum of 2 Dx/HA injections. Antegrade and/or retrograde endoscopy was used to access the bladder outlet, and injection done in quadrants to achieve visual mucosal coaptation. Outcomes were described as either "dry", not requiring pads, or "wet". There were 24 children with follow-up after injection, of which 9 (38%) were initially dry and 15 (62%) remained wet. Of the 9 dry patients, 4 had recurrent incontinence at a mean of 16 months while 5 remained dry at a mean of 27 months. Second injections were done in a total of 14 children, with 1 dry at 39 months. Of all 24 children, up to 2 injections resulted in 6 (25%) dry patients, while the remainder was wet at last follow-up. Gender, initial outlet surgery, pre-injection pad use, injection technique, and volume injected did not predict outcomes. Dx/HA bladder neck injection resulted in dryness in 25% of patients in this series after failed sling or LMS. Second injections after either initial failure or success achieved dryness in only 7%, and are no longer recommended. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Evaluation of Endoscopic Balloon Dilation Treatment for Benign Gastric Outlet Obstruction

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    J Sokri Shirvani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objective

    Balloon dilatation of stricture is one of the new treatment methods for patients with Gastric Outlet Obstruction (GOO. Prevalence and underlying etiologies of GOO in various populations are different. The goal of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic balloon dilatation and factors that could affect method advantage among patients with benign etiology for GOO.

     

    Methods

     Forty-five patients with symptoms of benign GOO were randomly selected. The mean age of patients was 43.7±18.1 years and 86.7% of them were men. Gastric outlet was delineated using double channel videoendoscopy. The severity of gastric pain was measured by VAS test immediately before and one month after balloon dilatation. Patients were followed after procedure weekly (for the first month and then monthly. Balloon dilatation was repeated for 27% patients during the follow up period.

     

    Results

    Patients were followed for 9.9±5.8 months. Furthermore, 71.1% were H. pylori positive. Positive response percent to endoscopic balloon dilatation was 80% and eight patients were took under surgical resection. Weight loss was seen frequently in the non-respondent group. The pain severity was significantly reduced in respondent subjects. No meaningful correlations were found between the response to balloon dilatation and positive H. pylori and cigarette smoking.

     

    Conclusion

    Endoscopic balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treating most of patients with benign gastric outlet obstruction and has favorable long-term outcome. 

  9. Stent versus gastrojejunostomy for the palliation of gastric outlet obstruction: a systematic review

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    Kuipers Ernst J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrojejunostomy (GJJ is the most commonly used palliative treatment modality for malignant gastric outlet obstruction. Recently, stent placement has been introduced as an alternative treatment. We reviewed the available literature on stent placement and GJJ for gastric outlet obstruction, with regard to medical effects and costs. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed by searching PubMed for the period January 1996 and January 2006. A total of 44 publications on GJJ and stents was identified and reported results on medical effects and costs were pooled and evaluated. Results from randomized and comparative studies were used for calculating odds ratios (OR to compare differences between the two treatment modalities. Results In 2 randomized trials, stent placement was compared with GJJ (with 27 and 18 patients in each trial. In 6 comparative studies, stent placement was compared with GJJ. Thirty-six series evaluated either stent placement or GJJ. A total of 1046 patients received a duodenal stent and 297 patients underwent GJJ. No differences between stent placement and gastrojejunostomy were found in technical success (96% vs. 100%, early and late major complications 7% vs. 6% and 18% vs. 17%, respectively and persisting symptoms (8% vs. 9%. Initial clinical success was higher after stent placement (89% vs. 72%. Minor complications were less frequently seen after stent placement in the patient series (9% vs. 33%, however the pooled analysis showed no differences (OR: 0.75, p = 0.8. Recurrent obstructive symptoms were more common after stent placement (18% vs. 1%. Hospital stay was prolonged after GJJ compared to stent placement (13 days vs. 7 days. The mean survival was 105 days after stent placement and 164 days after GJJ. Conclusion These results suggest that stent placement may be associated with more favorable results in patients with a relatively short life expectancy, while GJJ is preferable in

  10. Adhesions due to peritoneal carcinomatosis caused by a renal carcinoma leading to mechanical gastric outlet obstruction: a case report

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    Gruttadauria Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Gastric outlet obstruction is a clinical syndrome caused by a variety of mechanical obstructions. Peptic ulcer disease used to be responsible for most gastric outlet obstruction, but in the last 40 years the prevalence of malignant tumors has risen significantly. Adhesive disease is an infrequent and insidious cause of mechanical gastric outlet obstruction. Case presentation We report the case of a 78-year-old Caucasian man who had a clinical history of a right nephrectomy for malignancy three years earlier and who was admitted for a severe gastric outlet obstruction (score of 1 confirmed both by an upper endoscopy and by a fluoroscopic view after contrast injection. A computed tomography scan and a laparotomy, with omental biopsies, showed a peritoneal carcinomatosis with the development of abdominal adhesions that prompted an abnormal gastric rotation around the perpendicular axis of his antrum with a dislocation in the empty space of his right kidney. Symptoms disappeared after surgical bypass through a gastrojejunostomy. Conclusions Our patient experienced a very rare complication characterized by the development of adhesions due to peritoneal carcinomatosis caused by a renal carcinoma treated with nephrectomy. These adhesions prompted an abnormal dislocation of his antrum, as an internal hernia, in the empty space of his right kidney.

  11. Clinical implications of underactive bladder

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    Kwang Jin Ko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB is a common urologic condition but a complex disease that causes troublesome lower urinary tract symptoms. Currently, management of UAB remains unsatisfactory. Also, many urological diseases can be combined with UAB. In these combined cases, the treatment results may be affected by UAB component. This review focuses on the clinical implications of UAB in patients with common urologic conditions, including bladder outlet obstruction, overactive bladder syndrome and stress urinary incontinence.

  12. Gastric Outlet and Duodenal Obstruction as a Complication of Migrated Gastrostomy Tube: Report of Two Cases and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jamil; Sunkara, Tagore; Yarlagadda, Krishna Sowjanya; Rawla, Prashanth; Gaduputi, Vinaya

    2018-02-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a well-recognized procedure for providing enteral feeding and long-term enteral nutritional support. Although it is mostly well tolerated, complications, sometimes mechanical in nature, do occur. Rare, and often initially unrecognized, late complications of PEG tube placement are gastric outlet obstruction and duodenal obstruction. Simple adjustment of the gastrostomy tube will lead to the improvement of the patient's clinical condition and prevent further complications. Physicians should be aware of and suspect gastric outlet and duodenal obstruction as rare late complications of PEG tube placement. Simple adjustment of the gastrostomy tube can resolve the problem without unnecessary medical tests and overly aggressive care. Here, we present two interesting cases of elderly women who developed mechanical obstruction after inadvertent migration of the gastrostomy tube.

  13. Influence of bladder fullness on the detection of urinary tract obstruction by dynamic renal scintigraphy

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    Cosenza, Nathalia Novaes; Lau, Fabio; Lima, Mariana Cunha Lopes; Amorim, Barbara Juarez; Mosci, Camila; Lima, Marcelo Lopes; Ramos, Celso Dario, E-mail: nathalia_cosenza@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2017-07-15

    Objective: To investigate the influence of bladder fullness on the diagnosis of urinary tract obstruction during dynamic renal scintigraphy with a diuretic stimulator. Materials and Methods: We studied 82 kidneys in 82 patients submitted to dynamic renal scintigraphy with a diuretic stimulator. We compared the proportional elimination of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA from the kidneys before and after bladder emptying in post-diuretic images, classifying each image as representing an obstructed, indeterminate, or unobstructed kidney. Results: The overall elimination of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA from the kidneys was 10.4% greater after bladder emptying than before. When the analysis was performed with a full bladder, we classified 40 kidneys as obstructed, 16 as indeterminate, and 26 as unobstructed. When the 40 kidneys classified as obstructed were analyzed after voiding, 11 were reclassified as indeterminate and 3 were reclassified as unobstructed. Of the 16 kidneys classified as indeterminate on the full-bladder images, 13 were reclassified as unobstructed after voiding. Conclusion: In dynamic renal scintigraphy with a diuretic stimulator, it is important to obtain images after voiding, in order to perform a reliable analysis of the proportional excretion of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA from the kidneys, avoiding possible false-positive results for urinary tract obstruction. (author)

  14. Acute Gastric Necrosis Due to Gastric Outlet Obstruction Accompanied with Gastric Cancer and Trichophytobezoar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Gastric necrosis due to gastric outlet obstruction is a very rare condition, but it might be fatal if missed or if diagnosis is delayed. Our patient was a 73-year-old male complaining of abdominal pain, distension and dyspnea for 1 day. In plain radiography and computed tomography, a markedly distended stomach and decreased enhancement at the gastric wall were noted. He underwent explo-laparotomy, and near-total gastric mucosal necrosis accompanied by sludge from the soaked laver was noted. A total gastrectomy with esophagojejunostomy was performed, and he recovered without sequelae. Final pathologic examination revealed advanced gastric cancer at the antrum with near-total gastric mucosal necrosis. PMID:22076225

  15. An unusual case of gastric outlet obstruction caused by tuberculosis: challenges in diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Hari; Rothnie, Alexander; Singh, Pradip

    2013-05-22

    Gastroduodenal tuberculosis (GDTB) is rare in the West. Its presentation can be non-specific and often mimics other more common conditions such as peptic ulcer disease, malignancy and Crohn's disease. Our case describes a 33-year-old Indian immigrant who presented with a 3-year history of dyspepsia and underwent balloon dilation for gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). While biopsies from the duodenum revealed only non-caseating granuloma, a high index of suspicion was maintained and colonoscopy, performed despite the absence of lower gastrointestinal symptoms, revealed a single discrete nodular and ulcerated area in the proximal transverse colon; this eventually grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient avoided undergoing major surgery and was successfully treated with balloon dilation and antitubercular medication. We highlight the importance of having a concerted, proactive approach to diagnosis. We discuss the therapeutic challenges involving this rare condition and explain the rationale for high-dose antisecretory therapy.

  16. Gastric leiomyosarcoma as a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction and perforation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weledji, Elroy P; Enoworock, George; Ngowe, Marcelin Ngowe

    2014-07-29

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours are the most common mesenchymal malignancies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and gastric leiomyosarcoma represent 1-3% of gastric malignancies. We report a case of a 69-year-old black African man who presented with a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction and duodenal perforation. A Billroth-II gastrectomy was performed and histology confirmed a gastric leiomyosarcoma. It is important to identify the gastric leiomyosarcoma which is a variant of the more common malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumours as the pathogenesis and management are currently well established. As the facilities for differentiating these are not easily available in resource-limited areas gastrointestinal stromal tumours may remain underdiagnosed and undertreated.

  17. Percutaneous endoscopy to diagnose malignancy in gastric outlet obstruction of excluded stomach after gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Rubin, Joshua; Kwong, Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer in the excluded stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a rare finding and most reported diagnoses are made via surgery. Endoscopic access to the excluded stomach is difficult, even with balloon-assisted enteroscopy. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman with malignant gastric outlet obstruction of the excluded stomach, 41 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Minimally invasive access to the excluded stomach was obtained by placement of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube, followed by insertion of a pediatric gastroscope through the gastrostomy tube tract. This novel approach provides minimally invasive access to the excluded stomach in patients with high suspicion of pathology in the excluded stomach, when balloon-assisted enteroscopy is not technically feasible or available.

  18. Two Cases of Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastric Outlet Obstruction in Children

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    Raza A. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO in children is most commonly caused by idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Prior to proton pump inhibitors and H2 blockers, peptic ulcer disease (PUD secondary to H. pylori was a cause of GOO. Both patients presented with a history of weight loss, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Their diagnosis of PUD and GOO was made by EGD and UGI. H. pylori testing was negative for both on multiple occasions but still received H. pylori eradication therapy. Patient 1 after failing pharmaceutical management underwent surgery for definitive treatment. Patient 2 underwent six therapeutic pyloric dilations before undergoing surgery as definitive treatment. These cases suggest that GOO secondary to PUD occurs in the absence of H. pylori infection and surgical management can provide definitive therapy.

  19. Laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy versus duodenal stenting in unresectable gastric cancer with gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sa-Hong; Son, Sang-Yong; Jung, Do-Hyun; Lee, Chang-Min; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2017-09-01

    To compare the outcome between laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy (LapGJ) and duodenal stenting (DS) in terms of oral intake, nutritional status, patency duration, effect on chemotherapy and survival. Medical records of 115 patients, who had LapGJ or duodenal stent placement between July 2005 and September 2015 in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, have been reviewed retrospectively. Oral intake was measured with Gastric Outlet Obstruction Scoring System. Serum albumin and body weight was measured as indicators of nutritional status. The duration of patency was measured until the date of reintervention. Chemotherapy effect was calculated after the procedures. Survival period and oral intake was analyzed by propensity score matching age, sex, T-stage, comorbidities, and chemotherapy status. Forty-three LapGJ patients and 58 DS patients were enrolled. Improvement in oral intake was shown in LapGJ group versus DS group (88% vs. 59%, P = 0.011). Serum albumin showed slight but significant increase after LapGJ (+0.75 mg/dL vs. -0.15 mg/dL, P = 0.002); however, there was no difference in their body weight (+5.1 kg vs. -1.0 kg, P = 0.670). Patients tolerated chemotherapy longer without dosage reduction after LapGJ (243 days vs . 74 days, P = 0.006) and maintained the entire chemotherapy regimen after the procedure longer in LapGJ group (247 days vs. 137 days, P = 0.042). LapGJ showed significantly longer survival than DS (220 vs. 114 days, P = 0.004). DS can provide faster symptom relief but LapGJ can provide improved oral intake, better compliance to chemotherapy, and longer survival. Therefore, LapGJ should be the first choice in gastric outlet obstruction patients for long-term and better quality of life.

  20. Factors associated with delayed gastric emptying in patients with stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Kenji; Maetani, Iruru; Shigoka, Hiroaki; Omuta, Shigefumi; Sato, Koichiro; Ito, Sayo; Saigusa, Yoshinori; Gomi, Tatsuya; Kohda, Ehiichi

    2013-01-01

    Background and study aims: Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) is an important factor in determining the clinical outcome in patients with stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction but the factors associated with DGE remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether clinicopathologic data could be used to identify the factors for DGE in such patients. Patients and methods: A prospective, single-arm, observational clinical study was performed in a referral hospital in Japan. A total of 54 patients with stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction were enrolled. A gastric emptying scintigraphy test was performed 1 week after stent placement. The relationship between DGE and clinicopathologic factors was investigated, and also the relationship between DGE and stent patency time, eating period (when the patient was able to maintain oral intake), and survival time. Results: A total of 38.9 % (21 /54) of patients had DGE. The following were identified as independent predictive factors of DGE: opioid use (odds ratio, 5.32; 95 % confidence interval [95 %CI], 1.07 – 26.41; p = 0.04), chemotherapy before stent placement (odds ratio, 8.03; 95 %CI, 1.85 – 34.95; p = 0.006), and smaller stent diameter (odds ratio, 13.59; 95 %CI, 1.72 – 107.41; p = 0.01). No relationship was found between DGE and the level of oral intake, stent patency time, eating period, and survival time. Conclusions: The factors associated with DGE after stent placement include those associated with the patient’s tumor as well as factors relating to their treatment, including stenting. The clinical and functional results after stent placement appear to be unrelated to the gastric emptying findings. PMID:26135508

  1. Gastric outlet obstruction: An unusual adverse event of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barosa, Rita; Santos, Carla; Fonseca, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Dear Editor, A 75-year-old woman living in a nursing home presented with a 24-hour history of abdominal cramping and vomiting. Medical history was remarkable for dementia and a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) was performed 3 years earlier. The day before the admission the feeding tube was accidentally pulled out and a Foley catheter was placed in order to avoid stoma closure. On physical examination, there was extravasation of the gastric content through the stoma. The base of the "Y" of the Foley catheter was introduced in the gastric stoma and a pulling sensation was felt when it was mobilized. The remainder abdominal examination was unremarkable. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy the Foley catheter was identified passing the pylorus and pulling duodenal bulb towards the antrum (Figure 1). Advancing the scope through the duodenum, the Foley balloon impacted in the duodenal apex was identified. There was no mucosal injury so the balloon was deflated and the catheter removed. A 14 Fr. Bard PEG tube was latter placed to allow a reduction in the calibre of the stoma. Gastric outlet obstruction is an unusual adverse event of PEG tubes. In adults it is usually related to Foley catheters use as peristalsis can pull the balloon into the duodenum in the absence of an external bumper. A clinical picture of abdominal cramping, vomiting and resistance to the attempt of percutaneous reposition should raise the suspicion of gastrostomy tube migration through the pylorus. Foley catheters are easily available and some may use it to prevent gastrostomy closure after accidentally PEG tube extraction. We have performed more than 800 PEG and assisted several cases of gastric outlet obstruction and even stoma damage in this setting. This case emphasises the importance of receiving an early PEG tube with external bumper replacement to prevent this adverse event.

  2. Laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy versus duodenal stenting in unresectable gastric cancer with gastric outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sa-Hong; Son, Sang-Yong; Jung, Do-Hyun; Lee, Chang-Min; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcome between laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy (LapGJ) and duodenal stenting (DS) in terms of oral intake, nutritional status, patency duration, effect on chemotherapy and survival. Methods Medical records of 115 patients, who had LapGJ or duodenal stent placement between July 2005 and September 2015 in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, have been reviewed retrospectively. Oral intake was measured with Gastric Outlet Obstruction Scoring System. Serum albumin and body weight was measured as indicators of nutritional status. The duration of patency was measured until the date of reintervention. Chemotherapy effect was calculated after the procedures. Survival period and oral intake was analyzed by propensity score matching age, sex, T-stage, comorbidities, and chemotherapy status. Results Forty-three LapGJ patients and 58 DS patients were enrolled. Improvement in oral intake was shown in LapGJ group versus DS group (88% vs. 59%, P = 0.011). Serum albumin showed slight but significant increase after LapGJ (+0.75 mg/dL vs. −0.15 mg/dL, P = 0.002); however, there was no difference in their body weight (+5.1 kg vs. −1.0 kg, P = 0.670). Patients tolerated chemotherapy longer without dosage reduction after LapGJ (243 days vs. 74 days, P = 0.006) and maintained the entire chemotherapy regimen after the procedure longer in LapGJ group (247 days vs. 137 days, P = 0.042). LapGJ showed significantly longer survival than DS (220 vs. 114 days, P = 0.004). Conclusion DS can provide faster symptom relief but LapGJ can provide improved oral intake, better compliance to chemotherapy, and longer survival. Therefore, LapGJ should be the first choice in gastric outlet obstruction patients for long-term and better quality of life. PMID:28932728

  3. Feeding patients with preoperative symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction after pancreatoduodenectomy: Early oral or routine nasojejunal tube feeding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Arja; Wennink, Roos A. W.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Kazemier, Geert; Gouma, Dirk J.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Besselink, Marc G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Early oral feeding is currently considered the optimal routine feeding strategy after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD). Some have suggested that patients with preoperative symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) who undergo PD have such a high risk of developing delayed gastric emptying that these

  4. First data on the Evolution duodenal stent for palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (DUOLUTION study): a prospective multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M. W.; Haijtink, S.; Fockens, P.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Siersema, P. D.; van Hooft, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    Enteral stent placement has emerged as a safe and effective palliative treatment option for patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). In an attempt to further optimize this treatment new enteral stents have been designed. This study is the first to describe the results regarding

  5. Predictors of survival in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction: a patient-oriented decision approach for palliative treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, Suzanne M.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; van Eijck, Casper H. J.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrojejunostomy and stentplacement are the most commonly used treatments for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The preference for either treatment largely depends on the expected survival. Our objective was to investigate predictors of survival in patients with malignant GOO and to

  6. High proximal migration rate of a partially covered "big cup" duodenal stent in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Maarten W.; Walter, Daisy; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Siersema, Peter D.; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has emerged as a palliative treatment for patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Recently, a new partially covered "big cup" SEMS has been developed to prevent both stent migration and tissue ingrowth. The aim of the

  7. Use of stents in the palliative treatment of malignant gastric outlet and duodenal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviv, R.I.; Shyamalan, G.; Khan, F.H.; Watkinson, A.F.; Tibballs, J.; Caplin, M.; Winslett, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of stenting in the palliation of malignant duodenal and gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our series of patients who underwent stenting for malignant upper gastrointestinal obstruction between March 1998 and December 1999. From January 2000 data have been acquired prospectively. Our series comprises 21 stents successfully deployed in 15 patients. RESULTS: The technical and clinical success was 93% (14/15 patients). One patient required endoscopic negotiation of recurrent gastric carcinoma at the gastrojejunostomy site after failure to cross the lesion fluroscopically. Two patients required re-intervention 2 and 5 weeks after initial stent placement, for migration and ingrowth respectively. Eighteen stents were placed transorally, two stents transhepatically and one via a transgastric approach. Early complications (pain < 3 days) occurred in two patients (13%) and late complications (ingrowth, overgrowth and migration) occurred in three patients (20%). The median survival was 2.4 months (range 2-4 months). CONCLUSION: Stenting provides a less invasive palliative option than surgery with the advantage of lower morbidity and complication rates. It has the advantage of high technical and clinical success rates facilitated by alternative routes of access into the upper gastrointestinal tract via transgastric and transhepatic routes in addition to the traditional peroral route. Aviv, R.I. et al. (2002)

  8. Use of stents in the palliative treatment of malignant gastric outlet and duodenal obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviv, R.I.; Shyamalan, G.; Khan, F.H.; Watkinson, A.F.; Tibballs, J.; Caplin, M.; Winslett, M

    2002-07-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of stenting in the palliation of malignant duodenal and gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our series of patients who underwent stenting for malignant upper gastrointestinal obstruction between March 1998 and December 1999. From January 2000 data have been acquired prospectively. Our series comprises 21 stents successfully deployed in 15 patients. RESULTS: The technical and clinical success was 93% (14/15 patients). One patient required endoscopic negotiation of recurrent gastric carcinoma at the gastrojejunostomy site after failure to cross the lesion fluroscopically. Two patients required re-intervention 2 and 5 weeks after initial stent placement, for migration and ingrowth respectively. Eighteen stents were placed transorally, two stents transhepatically and one via a transgastric approach. Early complications (pain < 3 days) occurred in two patients (13%) and late complications (ingrowth, overgrowth and migration) occurred in three patients (20%). The median survival was 2.4 months (range 2-4 months). CONCLUSION: Stenting provides a less invasive palliative option than surgery with the advantage of lower morbidity and complication rates. It has the advantage of high technical and clinical success rates facilitated by alternative routes of access into the upper gastrointestinal tract via transgastric and transhepatic routes in addition to the traditional peroral route. Aviv, R.I. et al. (2002)

  9. Clinical outcomes of re-stenting in patients with stent malfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Eun Hyo; Kim, Sang Gyun; Seo, Ji Yeon; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-04-01

    Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have been used for the palliative treatment of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of salvage SEMS for stent malfunction and to identify the prognostic factors for a longer patency. A total of 108 patients who underwent a secondary salvage SEMS placement for a primary stent malfunction were retrospectively reviewed at the Seoul National University Hospital between August 2004 and May 2013. The duration of patency for salvage SEMS was defined as the time between salvage SEMS placement and the recurrence of obstructive symptoms that were confirmed either endoscopically or radiologically. The technical and clinical success rates for salvage SEMS were 100 and 82.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 74.0-89.0), respectively. A salvage SEMS malfunction occurred in 29 (26.9%) of the 108 patients. The median duration of patency for salvage SEMS was 59.5 days (range 3-928, 95% CI 73.7-118.3). Longer SEMS patencies of more than 60 days were significantly associated with palliative chemotherapy (odds ratio = 2.539, 95% CI 1.031-6.252, p = .043). For salvage SEMS, covered-uncovered stents had a longer patency duration, as compared with other combinations of primary and salvage stent types. Longer patency durations for salvage SEMS were associated with palliative chemotherapy after salvage SEMS insertion. Salvage SEMS could be a feasible and effective treatment for primary stent malfunction in malignant GOO.

  10. Gastric outlet obstruction in gastric cancer: a comparison of three palliative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keränen, Ilona; Kylänpää, Leena; Udd, Marianne; Louhimo, Johanna; Lepistö, Anna; Halttunen, Jorma; Kokkola, Arto

    2013-12-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) commonly occurs in advanced gastric cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the results of endoscopic stenting (ES), palliative resection (PR), and gastrojejunostomy (GJ) as palliation of GOO. A total of 97 patients (50 ES, 26 PR, 21 GJ) were included in this retrospective study. All the patients had primary gastric cancer and symptoms of GOO. Compared to surgery, ES resulted in a faster improvement on oral intake and symptom relief (P obstruction, and the number of patients receiving chemotherapy were similar. The median symptom-free and overall survival were longest in the PR group (P gastric cancer and GOO, the clinical condition of the patient before treatment affects survival and should be taken into account in determining the treatment. PR seems to provide a survival benefit and should be considered as treatment option for patients suitable for surgery. For patients unfit for surgery, ES provides rapid and efficient palliation. Chemotherapy also seems to improve survival in gastric cancer and GOO. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Demographic and Etiological Patterns of Gastric Outlet Obstruction in Kerala, South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, Vivek; Ravindran, Chirukandath; Prasad, Ramachandra Venkateshwara

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the modern era, the major cause of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is known to be a malignancy, especially in the developed world. Many books and articles do suggest that the benign causes continue to be the major cause of GOO in the developing world however, there is growing evidence proving the contrary. Males were (more commonly) affected females and individuals in their fifth and sixth decade have been the predominant age group in the majority of studies. There is a minimal data of GOO from South India. Aims: A retrospective analysis of the endoscopic findings of patients presenting with features of GOO to determine the demographic and etiological patterns. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of the endoscopic findings of patients with GOO from January 2005 to January 2014 was done. The diagnosis of GOO was based on clinical presentation, and an inability during the upper endoscopy to enter the second portion of the duodenum as documented in the endoscopy registers. Patients who have already been diagnosed with malignancy prior to the endoscopy were excluded from the study; so were the patients with gastroparesis. Results: A total of 342 patients with GOO underwent the endoscopy during the study period. The causes for benign obstruction were predominantly peptic ulcer disease. The major cause for malignant obstruction was carcinoma of stomach involving the distal stomach. The male to female ratio was 3.2:1. The patients with malignancy were older than patients with benign disorders. Most of the patients were in the sixth and seventh decade. The risk of malignancy was higher with increasing age, especially in women. A fourth of all carcinoma stomach presented with GOO. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that the cause for GOO in Kerala, South India is predominantly malignancy. The etiological and demographic patterns were similar to the studies conducted in the developed nations. PMID:26605204

  12. Self-expandable metal stents for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: A pooled analysis of prospective literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; Rauws, Erik A J; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-11-21

    To provide an overview of the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO). A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed of the literature published between January 2009 and March 2015. Only prospective studies that reported on the clinical success of stent placement for MGOO were included. The primary endpoint was clinical success, defined according to the definition used in the original article. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroup analyses were performed for partially covered SEMSs (PCSEMSs) and uncovered SEMSs (UCSEMSs) using Fisher's exact test. A total of 19 studies, including 1281 patients, were included in the final analysis. Gastric (42%) and pancreatic (37%) cancer were the main causes of MGOO. UCSEMSs were used in 76% of patients and PCSEMSs in 24%. The overall pooled technical success rate was 97.3% and the clinical success rate was 85.7%. Stent dysfunction occurred in 19.6% of patients, mainly caused by re-obstruction (12.6%) and stent migration (4.3%), and was comparable between PCSEMSs and UCSEMSs (21.2% vs 19.1%, respectively, P = 0.412). Re-obstruction was more common with UCSEMSs (14.9% vs 5.1%, P < 0.001) and stent migration was more frequent after PCSEMS placement (10.9% vs 2.2%, P < 0.001). The overall perforation rate was 1.2%. Bleeding was reported in 4.1% of patients, including major bleeding in 0.8%. The median stent patency ranged from 68 to 307 d in five studies. The median overall survival ranged from 49 to 183 d in 13 studies. The clinical outcomes in this large population showed that enteral stent placement was feasible, effective and safe. Therefore, stent placement is a valid treatment option for the palliation of MGOO.

  13. Metallic Stent Expansion Rate at Day One Predicts Stent Patency in Patients with Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bing-Wei; Chou, Chung-Kai; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Kuei-Chuan

    2017-05-01

    Self-expandable metallic stent insertion has been a mainstream treatment for relieving the obstructive symptoms of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO), a late-stage complication of gastrointestinal malignancies. This study aims to investigate the predictive value of stent expansion rates in clinical outcomes in patients with MGOO. Eighty-seven patients with inoperable MGOO receiving metallic stents were reviewed retrospectively from April 2010 to December 2014. Clinical outcomes, predictors of stent patency, and survival were analyzed. The technical and clinical success rates were 100 and 94.3%, respectively. The median stent patency time was 114 days (range 13-570 days). The median survival time was 133 days (range 13-1145 days). Stent dysfunctions occurred in 28 patients (32.2%), with restenosis accounting for the majority (82%). The stent expansion rate ≥75% at Day 1 predicted the stent patency [hazard ratio (HR) 0.12, P = 0.04]. However, it did not correlate with survival. Non-gastric cancer origins (HR 2.41, P = 0.002) and peritoneal carcinomatosis (HR 2.54, P = 0.001) correlated with poor survival. However, post-stent chemotherapy (HR 0.55, P = 0.03) was related to better outcome. The comparison of clinical outcomes of first and second stent insertions showed no significant difference in the stent expansion rate either at Day 0 and Day 1 (P = 0.97 and P = 0.57). Self-expandable metallic stent insertion is a safe and effective treatment for relieving the obstructive symptoms. The stent expansion rate ≥75% at Day 1 is a novel stent-related predictor of stent patency.

  14. Self-expandable metal stents for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: A pooled analysis of prospective literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; Rauws, Erik AJ; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide an overview of the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO). METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed of the literature published between January 2009 and March 2015. Only prospective studies that reported on the clinical success of stent placement for MGOO were included. The primary endpoint was clinical success, defined according to the definition used in the original article. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroup analyses were performed for partially covered SEMSs (PCSEMSs) and uncovered SEMSs (UCSEMSs) using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: A total of 19 studies, including 1281 patients, were included in the final analysis. Gastric (42%) and pancreatic (37%) cancer were the main causes of MGOO. UCSEMSs were used in 76% of patients and PCSEMSs in 24%. The overall pooled technical success rate was 97.3% and the clinical success rate was 85.7%. Stent dysfunction occurred in 19.6% of patients, mainly caused by re-obstruction (12.6%) and stent migration (4.3%), and was comparable between PCSEMSs and UCSEMSs (21.2% vs 19.1%, respectively, P = 0.412). Re-obstruction was more common with UCSEMSs (14.9% vs 5.1%, P < 0.001) and stent migration was more frequent after PCSEMS placement (10.9% vs 2.2%, P < 0.001). The overall perforation rate was 1.2%. Bleeding was reported in 4.1% of patients, including major bleeding in 0.8%. The median stent patency ranged from 68 to 307 d in five studies. The median overall survival ranged from 49 to 183 d in 13 studies. CONCLUSION: The clinical outcomes in this large population showed that enteral stent placement was feasible, effective and safe. Therefore, stent placement is a valid treatment option for the palliation of MGOO. PMID:26604654

  15. Self-expandable metallic stents for palliation of patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction caused by stomach cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Oh; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Gwang Ha; Heo, Jeong; Song, Geun Am; Cho, Mong; Kim, Dong Heon; Sim, Mun Sup

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain clinical outcome and complications of self-expandable metal stents for endoscopic palliation of patients with malignant obstruction of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed throughout August 2000 to June 2005 of 53 patients with gastric outlet obstruction caused by stomach cancer. All patients had symptomatic obstruction including nausea, vomiting, and decreased oral intake. All received self-expandable metallic stents. RESULTS: Stent implantation was successful in all 53 (100%) patients. Relief of obstructive symptoms was achieved in 43 (81.1%) patients. No immediate stent-related complications were noted. Seventeen patients had recurrent obstruction (tumor ingrowth in 14 patients, tumor overgrowth in 1 patient, and partial distal stent migration in 2 patients). The mean survival was 145 d. Median stent patency time was 187 d. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents is a safe and effective treatment for the palliation of patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction caused by stomach cancer. PMID:17352023

  16. An Unusual Lesser Sac Collection Causing Gastric Outlet Obstruction with Coincidental Occurrence of Leriche’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Darshanjeet Singh; Kaur, Rishabhpreet

    2016-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction in adults is usually caused by pyloric stenosis secondary to peptic ulcer disease or malignancy. However, there are few other causes such as a foreign body and external compression due to pseudocyst pancreas. We present a rare aetiology of a large collection of pus in the lesser sac in our patient causing gastric outlet obstruction. A perforated peptic ulcer was suspected in our patient who had symptoms of sudden onset pain in epigastric region which was referred to back. This was followed by pain in upper abdomen, vomiting, constipation and fever for which patient was being managed conservatively before being referred to us. The CECT didn’t show any leakage of contrast to the lesser sac making the possibility of healed perforation likely as all other causes were ruled out at the time of presentation to our hospital. The CECT scan ruled out other causes of gastric outlet obstruction with normal wall thickness of the stomach and duodenum along with normal looking liver, pancreas and no lymphadenopathy. The liver function tests and serum amylase were within normal limits. Along with this, there was another unrelated rare coincidental finding of aortoiliac occlusive disease termed as Leriche’s syndrome. Ultrasound guided percutaneous drainage was done following which the patient’s obstruction was relieved and patient was referred to the department of vascular surgery for the mangement of aortoiliac occlusive disease. PMID:27190892

  17. Fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction and post-operative gastroenterostomy anastomotic stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Young; Lee, Soo Teik; Yang, Doo Hyun

    2001-07-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placements in providing palliative care for patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of self-expandable, covered stents was attempted in 20 patients with inoperable or recurrent gastric cancer (age range 36-79 years). All patients had inoperable gastric outlet obstruction, 13 with native anatomy and seven with post-operative anatomy (gastrointestinal anastomotic sites). All patients had intolerance to oral alimentation and/or vomiting after ingestion. Success was defined both technically and clinically. RESULTS: The placement of the stent was technically successful in 18 patients and failed in two patients (technical success: 90%). The cause of the technical failures was an inability to negotiate the guide wire through the obstruction sites in spite of the use of both fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. After stent placement, 15 patients were able to ingest at least liquids and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting (clinical success: 75%). During the mean follow-up of 6 weeks, there have been no stent reocclusion and no life-threatening complications except migration of two stents in one patient. CONCLUSION: Fluoroscopically guided covered metallic stent placement appears to be valuable for the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of gastric outlet and post-operative gastrointestinal anastomoses. Lee, J.M. et al. (2001)

  18. Successful Resolution of Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Pancreatic Pseudocyst or Walled-Off Necrosis After Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Shao-Yang; Gao, Shun-Liang; Liang, Zhong-Yan; Yu, Wen-Qiao; Liang, Ting-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) can be caused by gastroparesis or gastric outlet obstruction, which may occur when pancreatic pseudocyst (PP) or walled-off necrosis (WON) compresses the stomach. The aim of the study was to explore a proper surgical treatment. Methods From June 2010 to June 2013, 25 of 148 patients with AP suffered DGE. Among them, 12 were caused by gastroparesis, 1 was a result of obstruction from a Candida albicans plug, and 12 were gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) compressed by PP (n = 8) or WON (n = 4), which were treated by percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD). Results All 12 cases of compressing GOO achieved resolution by PCD after 6 [1.86] and 37.25 [12.02] days for PP and WON, respectively. Five cases developed intracystic infection, 3 cases had pancreatic fistulae whereas 2 achieved resolution and 1 underwent a pseudocyst jejunostomy. Conclusions Gastric outlet obstruction caused by a PP or WON is a major cause of DGE in patients with AP. Percutaneous catheter drainage with multiple sites, large-bore tubing, and lavage may be a good therapy due to high safety and minimal invasiveness. PMID:26465954

  19. Fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction and post-operative gastroenterostomy anastomotic stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Young; Lee, Soo Teik; Yang, Doo Hyun

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placements in providing palliative care for patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of self-expandable, covered stents was attempted in 20 patients with inoperable or recurrent gastric cancer (age range 36-79 years). All patients had inoperable gastric outlet obstruction, 13 with native anatomy and seven with post-operative anatomy (gastrointestinal anastomotic sites). All patients had intolerance to oral alimentation and/or vomiting after ingestion. Success was defined both technically and clinically. RESULTS: The placement of the stent was technically successful in 18 patients and failed in two patients (technical success: 90%). The cause of the technical failures was an inability to negotiate the guide wire through the obstruction sites in spite of the use of both fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. After stent placement, 15 patients were able to ingest at least liquids and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting (clinical success: 75%). During the mean follow-up of 6 weeks, there have been no stent reocclusion and no life-threatening complications except migration of two stents in one patient. CONCLUSION: Fluoroscopically guided covered metallic stent placement appears to be valuable for the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of gastric outlet and post-operative gastrointestinal anastomoses. Lee, J.M. et al. (2001)

  20. Bezoar in gastro-jejunostomy presenting with symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Edmund

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Gastric outlet obstruction usually presents with non-bilious vomiting, colicky epigastric pain, loss of appetite and occasionally, upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Causes can be classified as benign or malignant, or as extra- or intraluminal. Gastrojejunostomy is a well-recognised surgical procedure performed to bypass gastric outlet obstruction. A bezoar occurs most commonly in patients with impaired gastrointestinal motility or with a history of gastric surgery. It is an intestinal concretion, which fails to pass along the alimentary canal. Case presentation A 62-year-old Asian woman with a history of gastrojejunostomy for peptic ulcer disease was admitted to hospital with epigastric pain, vomiting and dehydration. All investigations concluded gastric outlet obstruction secondary to a "stricture" at the site of gastrojejunostomy. Subsequent laparotomy revealed that the cause of the obstruction was a bezoar. Conclusion Many bezoars can be removed endoscopically, but some will require operative intervention. Once removed, emphasis must be placed upon prevention of recurrence. Surgeons must learn to recognise and classify bezoars in order to provide the most effective therapy.

  1. A Systematic Review on Renal and Bladder Dysfunction after Endoscopic Treatment of Infravesical Obstruction in Boys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennus, Pauline M. L.; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.; Bosch, J. L. H. Ruud; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; de Kort, Laetitia M. O.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Posterior urethral valves (PUV) may cause subtle to severe obstruction of the urethra, resulting in a broad clinical spectrum. PUV are the most common cause of chronic renal disease in boys. Our purpose was to report the incidences of kidney and bladder dysfunction in boys treated with

  2. Primary gastric tuberculosis presenting as gastric outlet obstruction: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Nassir Alhaboob; Musaad, Abdulmagid M; Ahmed, Elsaggad Eltayeb; Ibnouf, Mohammed M A M; Abdelaziz, Muataz Salah Eldin

    2015-11-18

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem worldwide. Sudan has high burden of tuberculosis (TB) with a prevalence of 209 cases per 100,000 of the population and it is commonly presented with pulmonary disease but involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Abdominal tuberculosis comprises about 1-3 % of all cases of tuberculosis and about 12% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It involves the ileocecal region, but involvement of stomach and duodenum are rare sites. Here we present an unusual case of gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric tuberculosis. A 54-year-old Sudanese man presented with a non-bile stain persistent projectile vomiting, and epigastric pain for two years associated with marked loss of weight. There is no fever or cough. He was on antacid, physical examination showed BMI 18 and stable vital signs. He was not pale or jaundiced, there was no cervical lymphadenopathy and chest was clear. Abdominal examination was normal apart of positive succussion splash. The results of haematological tests were normal, ESR was 30 mm/hr, hepatitis B, C and HIV were negative. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed that the stomach was full of fluid and food particles and ulcerated mass in the pylorus extended to the proximal part of the duodenum with severe narrowing of the pylorus. The lesion biopsied and the result revealed active inflammatory cells, cryptitis and multiple lymphoid follicles, no malignancy seen. Sonographic test showed hypodense pyloric mass, enlarged para-aortic and mesenteric lymph nodes and mild pelvic ascites. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed antral hypodense lesions multiple mesenteric lymphadenopathies peritoneal thickening and ascites. Chest X-ray was normal. Intra-operative findings were dilated stomach and pylorus mass with multiple mesenteric lymph nodes, peritoneal and omental seedlings all over with small nodules on the surface of the liver, gastro-jejunostomy was done. Histopathology confirmed

  3. Impact of Carcinomatosis on Clinical Outcomes after Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Keol; Hong, Yun Soo; Kim, Eun Ran; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It is still unclear whether the peritoneal carcinomatosis had a negative effect on the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Although carcinomatosis may be associated with the development of multifocal gastrointestinal (GI) tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement, previous studies investigated the occurrence of stent failure only and thus had limitation in evaluating clinical outcomes of patients with carcinomatosis. Between 2009 and 2013, 155 patients (88 patients without carcinomatosis and 67 patients with carcinomatosis) underwent endoscopic SEMS placement for malignant GOO. Factors affecting clinical success and obstructive symptom-free survival (time period between SEMS placement and the recurrence of obstructive symptoms due to multifocal GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement as well as stent failure) were assessed. Patients with carcinomatosis showed higher Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) scale than those without carcinomatosis. Clinical success rates were 88.1% in patients with carcinomatosis and 97.7% in patients without carcinomatosis. In multivariate analysis, only ECOG scale was identified as an independent predictor of clinical success. During follow-up period, patients with carcinomatosis showed significantly shorter obstructive symptom-free survival than those without carcinomatosis. In multivariate analysis, the presence of carcinomatosis, chemotherapy or radiation therapy after SEMS placement, and obstruction site were identified as independent predictors of obstructive symptom-free survival. For patient without carcinomatosis, stent failure accounted for the recurrence of obstructive symptoms in 84.6% of cases. For patients with carcinomatosis, multifocal GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement accounted for 37.9% of cases with obstructive symptom recurrence and stent failure accounted for 44.8% of cases

  4. Impact of Carcinomatosis on Clinical Outcomes after Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Lee

    Full Text Available It is still unclear whether the peritoneal carcinomatosis had a negative effect on the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO. Although carcinomatosis may be associated with the development of multifocal gastrointestinal (GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement, previous studies investigated the occurrence of stent failure only and thus had limitation in evaluating clinical outcomes of patients with carcinomatosis.Between 2009 and 2013, 155 patients (88 patients without carcinomatosis and 67 patients with carcinomatosis underwent endoscopic SEMS placement for malignant GOO. Factors affecting clinical success and obstructive symptom-free survival (time period between SEMS placement and the recurrence of obstructive symptoms due to multifocal GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement as well as stent failure were assessed.Patients with carcinomatosis showed higher Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG scale than those without carcinomatosis. Clinical success rates were 88.1% in patients with carcinomatosis and 97.7% in patients without carcinomatosis. In multivariate analysis, only ECOG scale was identified as an independent predictor of clinical success. During follow-up period, patients with carcinomatosis showed significantly shorter obstructive symptom-free survival than those without carcinomatosis. In multivariate analysis, the presence of carcinomatosis, chemotherapy or radiation therapy after SEMS placement, and obstruction site were identified as independent predictors of obstructive symptom-free survival. For patient without carcinomatosis, stent failure accounted for the recurrence of obstructive symptoms in 84.6% of cases. For patients with carcinomatosis, multifocal GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement accounted for 37.9% of cases with obstructive symptom recurrence and stent failure accounted for 44.8% of

  5. Balloon dilatation in patients with gastric outlet obstruction related to peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Bouassida, Mahdi; Ben Mansour, Imed; Medhioub, Mouna; Ezzine, Heykal; Touinsi, Hassen; Azouz, Mohamed M

    2015-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a rare complication of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). The endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) associated with medical treatment of Helicobacter pylori is a successful method in the management of pyloric stenosis. The aim of this study was to describe epidemiological, clinical, and endoscopic characteristics of GOO related to PUD and to evaluate the effectiveness, safety, and outcome of EBD. In a retrospective study of patients seen between 1999 and 2009 with symptoms of GOO secondary to PUD, pyloro-bulbar stenosis was confirmed by endoscopic examination. Balloon dilatation was performed when obstruction persisted after treatment with double-dose proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) intravenously for 7-10days. The H. pylori status was assessed with histology, and eradication therapy was prescribed for infection. A total of 45 consecutive patients (38 males, 7 females median age, 51.9years; range, 20-58years) with symptoms of GOO secondary to PUD underwent EBD. Median follow-up time of the 45 patients was 32months (range, 4-126months). The immediate success rate of the procedure was 95.5%. Clinical remission was noted in 84.4% of the patients. Remission without relapse was observed in 55.8%, 30months after the dilatation. Pyloric stenosis relapsed in 15 patients (39.5%) after a median period of 22.9months. The dilatation was complicated in three patients (6.7%, two perforations and one bleeding). A total of 13 patients (29%) underwent surgery. H. pylori was found to be positive in 97.7% of the patients, and was eradicated in 78.4% of them. Smoking and failure of H. pylori eradication were associated with the relapse of the stenosis. EBD is a simple, effective, and safe therapy for the GOO related to PUD, producing short- and long-term remission. Copyright © 2015 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An Assessment of Radiologically Inserted Transoral and Transgastric Gastroduodenal Stents to Treat Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bethany H. T., E-mail: bmiller@doctors.org.uk [Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Preston Hospital, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Ewen A., E-mail: Eagriffiths@doctors.org.uk [The New Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery (United Kingdom); Pursnani, Kishore G., E-mail: Kish.Pursnani@lthtr.nhs.uk; Ward, Jeremy B., E-mail: Jeremy.Ward@lthtr.nhs.uk [Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Preston Hospital, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery (United Kingdom); Stockwell, Robert C., E-mail: Robert.Stockwell@lthtr.nhs.uk [Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Chorley and South Ribble Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    IntroductionSelf-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are used to palliate malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) and are useful in patients with limited life expectancy or severe medical comorbidity, which would preclude surgery. Stenting can be performed transorally or by a percutaneous transgastric technique. Our goal was to review the outcome of patients who underwent radiological SEMS insertion performed by a single consultant interventional radiologist. Methods: Patients were identified from a prospectively collected database held by one consultant radiologist. Data were retrieved from radiological reports, multidisciplinary team meetings, and the patients' case notes. Univariate survival analysis was performed. Results: Between December 2000 and January 2011, 100 patients (63 males, 37 females) had 110 gastroduodenal stenting procedures. Median age was 73 (range 39-89) years. SEMS were inserted transorally (n = 66) or transgastrically (n = 44). Site of obstruction was the stomach (n = 37), duodenum (n = 50), gastric pull-up (n = 10), or gastroenterostomy (n = 13). Seven patients required biliary stents. Technical success was 86.4 %: 83.3 % for transoral insertion, 90.9 % for transgastric insertion. Eleven patients developed complications. Median GOO severity score: 1 pre-stenting, 2 post-stenting (p = 0.0001). Median survival was 54 (range 1-624) days. Post-stenting GOO severity score was predictive of survival (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: The technical success rate for insertion of palliative SEMS is high. Insertional technique can be tailored to the individual depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is possible to access the stomach percutaneously. Patients who have successful stenting and return to eating a soft/normal diet have a statistically significant increase in survival.

  7. An assessment of radiologically inserted transoral and transgastric gastroduodenal stents to treat malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bethany H T; Griffiths, Ewen A; Pursnani, Kishore G; Ward, Jeremy B; Stockwell, Robert C

    2013-12-01

    Self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are used to palliate malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) and are useful in patients with limited life expectancy or severe medical comorbidity, which would preclude surgery. Stenting can be performed transorally or by a percutaneous transgastric technique. Our goal was to review the outcome of patients who underwent radiological SEMS insertion performed by a single consultant interventional radiologist. Patients were identified from a prospectively collected database held by one consultant radiologist. Data were retrieved from radiological reports, multidisciplinary team meetings, and the patients' case notes. Univariate survival analysis was performed. Between December 2000 and January 2011, 100 patients (63 males, 37 females) had 110 gastroduodenal stenting procedures. Median age was 73 (range 39-89) years. SEMS were inserted transorally (n = 66) or transgastrically (n = 44). Site of obstruction was the stomach (n = 37), duodenum (n = 50), gastric pull-up (n = 10), or gastroenterostomy (n = 13). Seven patients required biliary stents. Technical success was 86.4 %: 83.3 % for transoral insertion, 90.9 % for transgastric insertion. Eleven patients developed complications. Median GOO severity score: 1 pre-stenting, 2 post-stenting (p = 0.0001). Median survival was 54 (range 1-624) days. Post-stenting GOO severity score was predictive of survival (p = 0.0001). The technical success rate for insertion of palliative SEMS is high. Insertional technique can be tailored to the individual depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is possible to access the stomach percutaneously. Patients who have successful stenting and return to eating a soft/normal diet have a statistically significant increase in survival.

  8. Primary duodenal tuberculosis presenting as gastric-outlet obstruction: Its diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijai Datta Upadhyaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastrointestinal tuberculosis often involves the ileocecal region. Duodenal and gastric tuberculosis found in only 1% of patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis with associated HIV infection in non-endemic areas. Duodenal obstruction due to tuberculosis is very rare and needs high index of suspicions for diagnosis. Mostly this entity is suspected on intraoperative findings. In this manuscript we emphasized on ways and means for establishing histopathological diagnosis before starting anti-tubercular treatment in such cases. Method and Material: All patients of suspected gastroduodenal tuberculosis presented with feature of gastric-outlet obstruction managed during Jan 2009 to June 2011 were included in the study. After proper evaluation (routine hematological and biochemical examination, microbiological examination, serological and endoscopic evaluation exploratory laparotomy was done and if there is no mesenteric lymphadenopathy or it is not safe to take biopsy form the diseased duodenum, multiple FNAC were taken from the diseased portion for histopathological and microbiological diagnosis. Result: A total of five patients were treated during this period. The most common presentation was vomiting followed by failure to thrive and weight loss; two patients had abdominal pain. Biopsy of mesenteric lymph node was possible in two cases. FNAC from diseases portion was taken in all cases. FNAC showed granulomas in four cases. Cases where even FNAC finding was non-conclusive on HPE/Microbiology was not subjected to antitubercular drug. Conclusion: Multiple intra-operative FNAC may be taken from the diseased portion of the duodenum to establish the histopathological diagnosis if diagnosis is not established by any other mean.

  9. An Assessment of Radiologically Inserted Transoral and Transgastric Gastroduodenal Stents to Treat Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Bethany H. T.; Griffiths, Ewen A.; Pursnani, Kishore G.; Ward, Jeremy B.; Stockwell, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionSelf-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are used to palliate malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) and are useful in patients with limited life expectancy or severe medical comorbidity, which would preclude surgery. Stenting can be performed transorally or by a percutaneous transgastric technique. Our goal was to review the outcome of patients who underwent radiological SEMS insertion performed by a single consultant interventional radiologist. Methods: Patients were identified from a prospectively collected database held by one consultant radiologist. Data were retrieved from radiological reports, multidisciplinary team meetings, and the patients’ case notes. Univariate survival analysis was performed. Results: Between December 2000 and January 2011, 100 patients (63 males, 37 females) had 110 gastroduodenal stenting procedures. Median age was 73 (range 39–89) years. SEMS were inserted transorally (n = 66) or transgastrically (n = 44). Site of obstruction was the stomach (n = 37), duodenum (n = 50), gastric pull-up (n = 10), or gastroenterostomy (n = 13). Seven patients required biliary stents. Technical success was 86.4 %: 83.3 % for transoral insertion, 90.9 % for transgastric insertion. Eleven patients developed complications. Median GOO severity score: 1 pre-stenting, 2 post-stenting (p = 0.0001). Median survival was 54 (range 1–624) days. Post-stenting GOO severity score was predictive of survival (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: The technical success rate for insertion of palliative SEMS is high. Insertional technique can be tailored to the individual depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is possible to access the stomach percutaneously. Patients who have successful stenting and return to eating a soft/normal diet have a statistically significant increase in survival

  10. Neonatal gastric outlet obstruction by isolated pyloric atresia, an often forgotten diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboyo, Antoine; Clermidi, Pauline; Podevin, Guillaume; Patkowski, Dariusz; Baglaj, Maciej; Gerus, Sylwester; Lalioui, Abdelfetah; Napoli-Cocci, Stéphan de; Robert, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Pyloric atresia (PA) is a rare condition, and may be misdiagnosed and especially confused for duodenal atresia pre-operatively. We looked for clues to avoiding pre-operative misdiagnosis and hence allow the best neonatal medical and surgical management. A retrospective case-note review was carried out of the five patients managed in four centres with the diagnosis of isolated PA. We focused on antenatal ultrasound findings, postnatal clinical and radiological features, operative findings, surgical procedures and outcomes. Four patients had polyhydramnios and one double bubble sign on antenatal ultrasound. After birth, non-bilious vomiting and upper abdominal distension were the main symptoms. Gastric decompression showed non-bilious gastric fluid. Radiological findings were a large gastric air bubble with no gas beyond in all cases. The diagnosis of duodenal atresia was postulated at first in all cases. The diagnosis of PA was established peroperatively. One patient referred late, died 13-day post-operatively of cardiopulmonary failure secondary to a severe pneumonia that may be related to aspiration syndrome. Outcomes were otherwise satisfactory. Even though it is a rare diagnosis, PA has a specific clinical and radiological presentation underlined here that should be kept in mind when managing a neonate with a gastric outlet obstruction.

  11. Investigation of the potential role of preoperative chemotherapy in treatment for gastric cancer with outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xuelong; Zhou, Yanbing

    2015-09-01

    Preoperative chemotherapy is currently recognized as the recommended treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Whether there is a role of preoperative chemotherapy in the treatment for advanced gastric cancer with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is unknown. In order to explore the potential feasibility of preoperative chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer with GOO, and to encourage the probe into optimal treatment strategies for advanced gastric cancer with GOO in the current era of preoperative chemotherapy prevailing, a systematic literature search was conducted with a multistage process. The characteristics of the retrieved publications were summarized and the essential information was extracted. Only 11 studies associated with preoperative chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer with GOO were identified. Among them, 9 were case reports, while the other 2 were research reports of retrospective studies. None were of prospective studies. The paucity of the literature in this field is a marked finding of the present study, which reports the emerging attempts at preoperative chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer patients with GOO, as no high-quality data are available. The definite role of chemotherapy as an initial treatment for advanced gastric cancer patients with GOO remains unclear. Clinical trials are expected to be conducted in order to explore the feasibility, safety and efficacy of preoperative chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer patients with GOO.

  12. Laparoscopic Gastrojejunostomy for Patients with Unresectable Gastric Cancer with Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Toshiyasu; Nakamori, Mikihito; Nakamura, Masaki; Katsuda, Masahiro; Hayata, Keiji; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2017-08-01

    There have been no comparative studies of open gastrojejunostomy (OGJ) and laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy (LGJ) in gastric cancer (GC) patients with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) to explore both short- and long-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and feasibility of short-term oral intake as well as the long-term oncological outcome of OGJ and LGJ. This was a retrospective study of 53 consecutive unresectable GC patients who underwent GJ for GOO in our institute. OGJ (n = 23) was performed between 2010 and 2012 and LGJ (n = 30) was performed between 2013 and 2015. We found a higher rate of postoperative delayed gastric emptying in the OGJ group than in the LGJ group (26.1 vs 0%; P = 0.004). OGJ had more unfavorable results regarding the median time to resumption of oral feeding (4 vs 2 days; P < 0.001). Palliative LGJ did not offer survival benefit over OGJ in patients with unresectable GC with GOO. LGJ is a useful and feasible alternative to OGJ regarding short-term outcomes.

  13. Enhanced gastric ghrelin production and secretion in rats with gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Eisuke; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Masaoka, Tatsuhiro; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2012-04-01

    Ghrelin has distinct effects on gastrointestinal motility through the vagus nerve and gastric excitatory neural plexus. The objectives of this study were to investigate the dynamics of ghrelin and expression of neuromuscular markers in a newly established surgically manipulated rat model of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO), akin to the pyloric stricture associated with duodenal ulcer, advanced gastric cancer, and other conditions, in the clinical setting. The rats were divided into two groups, a control group (sham operation) and the GOO group (proximal duodenal stricture). The animals were sacrificed 2 weeks after the operation. Plasma and gastric ghrelin were measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA expression in the stomach of neural choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), c-kit, and membrane-bound stem cell factor (SCF) were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. In addition, gastric mRNA expression of the aforementioned were also evaluated 60 min after intraperitoneal administration of a synthetic GHS-R1a antagonist ([D: -Lys3] GHRP-6 6.0 mg/kg). Mechanical GOO induced increases of fasting plasma ghrelin levels and hyperplasia of the gastric muscle layers, with enhanced expression of the gastric neuromuscular markers. Administration of [D: -Lys3] GHRP-6 normalized the enhanced expression of c-kit and SCF. GOO stimulates ghrelin dynamics and then enhances the mechanistic expression of gastric cellular communication network molecules between nerves and smooth muscle cells.

  14. Treatment of gastric outlet obstruction that results from unresectable gastric cancer: Current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Takiguchi, Shuji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Makino, Tomoki; Yamasaki, Makoto; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a common condition that results from locally advanced malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal tract, such as pancreatic, gastric, and other carcinomas. Two types of procedures for malignant GOO, namely, gastrojejunostomy (GJ) with laparotomy or a laparoscopic approach and endoscopic stenting (ES), are currently available. Although numerous previous reports have clarified the benefits and drawbacks of each procedure, whether GJ or ES should be used in patients with GOO that results from gastric cancer who may have a longer life expectancy than patients with other malignancies has not been determined. In this review, which focuses on gastric cancer-induced GOO, we analyzed the two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis that compared GJ and ES and outlined the current status of GOO treatment. We also provide an updated review that includes laparoscopic GJ. Various data from 13 studies in one review and 6 studies in another review were analyzed. Although the main results of the present review indicated that both GJ and ES were efficacious treatments in patients with GOO that resulted from gastric cancer, current evidence suggests that GJ may be the preferable procedure given its good performance status and improved prognosis in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26862366

  15. Successful Emergency Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Outlet Obstruction due to Gastric Bezoar with Gastric Pneumatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Honda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastric bezoars are rare and are usually found incidentally. They can sometimes cause severe complications, including gastric outlet obstruction (GOO or gastric pneumatosis (GP. In cases of bezoars with GP, the optimal treatment strategy has not yet been defined. We report the case of an 89-year-old man with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension who presented to our emergency room with a 2-day history of upper abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Physical examination revealed no rebound tenderness or guarding, and laboratory values revealed no elevation of the serum lactate level. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed a dilated stomach with significant fluid collection, GOO, and GP due to a 42 × 40 mm mass composed of fat and air densities. Emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed two gastric bezoars, one of which was incarcerated in the pyloric region. We used various endoscopic devices to successfully break and remove the bezoars. We used endoscopic forceps and a water jet followed by an endoscopic snare to cut the bezoars into several pieces and remove them with an endoscopic net. Follow-up endoscopy confirmed that the gastric bezoar had been completely removed. As seen in this case, endoscopic treatment may be a safe and viable option for the extraction of gastric bezoars presenting with GOO and GP.

  16. Successful Emergency Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Outlet Obstruction due to Gastric Bezoar with Gastric Pneumatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hirokazu; Ikeya, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Erika; Okada, Shuichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Gastric bezoars are rare and are usually found incidentally. They can sometimes cause severe complications, including gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) or gastric pneumatosis (GP). In cases of bezoars with GP, the optimal treatment strategy has not yet been defined. We report the case of an 89-year-old man with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension who presented to our emergency room with a 2-day history of upper abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Physical examination revealed no rebound tenderness or guarding, and laboratory values revealed no elevation of the serum lactate level. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed a dilated stomach with significant fluid collection, GOO, and GP due to a 42 × 40 mm mass composed of fat and air densities. Emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed two gastric bezoars, one of which was incarcerated in the pyloric region. We used various endoscopic devices to successfully break and remove the bezoars. We used endoscopic forceps and a water jet followed by an endoscopic snare to cut the bezoars into several pieces and remove them with an endoscopic net. Follow-up endoscopy confirmed that the gastric bezoar had been completely removed. As seen in this case, endoscopic treatment may be a safe and viable option for the extraction of gastric bezoars presenting with GOO and GP.

  17. Late-onset hypertrophic pyloric stenosis with gastric outlet obstruction: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lindsey L; Nijagal, Amar; Flores, Alejandro; Buchmiller, Terry L

    2016-10-01

    We report late-onset hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a 17-year-old female. She presented with abdominal pain and an episode of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and subsequently developed gastric outlet obstruction. Work-up revealed circumferential pyloric thickening, delayed gastric emptying, and a stenotic, elongated pyloric channel. Biopsies showed benign gastropathy, negative for Helicobacter pylori, without eosinophilic infiltrates. Botulinum toxin injection provided limited relief. Diagnostic laparoscopy confirmed the hypertrophic pylorus and we performed laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. The patient tolerated the procedure well and had complete symptom resolution at 1-year follow-up. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction in adolescents and may be managed successfully with laparoscopic pyloromyotomy.

  18. Lateral sphincteromyotomy in patients with outlet obstruction after surgery for Hirschsprung's disease and short-segment disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorm, Hanne N; Jensen, Susanne I; Qvist, Niels

    2002-01-01

    The results of lateral sphincteromyotomy (LSM) including the external sphincter in patients with severe outlet obstruction (OO) and constipation refractory to medical treatment after surgery for Hirschsprung's disease (HD) or with short-segment disease were evaluated. The parents filled out a det...... gave significant symptomatic relief in two-thirds of the patients. However, the long-term results are still pending.......The results of lateral sphincteromyotomy (LSM) including the external sphincter in patients with severe outlet obstruction (OO) and constipation refractory to medical treatment after surgery for Hirschsprung's disease (HD) or with short-segment disease were evaluated. The parents filled out...... a detailed questionnaire on the child's bowel habits prior to surgery and at follow-up 2-26 months after surgery. The postoperative questionnaire included a 10-grade visual analog scale (VAS) indicating the general effect of LSM on the child's bowel habits: grade 1 represented no change at all and 10...

  19. Normal bladder wall thickness measurement in healthy Iranian children, a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Adibi, Atoosa; Kazemian, Afarin; Toghiani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Normal bladder function is necessary for micturition. Many causes such as urinary tract infection, bladder outlet obstruction, and neuropathic bladder can influence bladder wall thickness (BWT).This study was designed to determine normal BWT in Iranian children. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study done in Isfahan in 2012 comprising 82 children aged 2-14 years without any urinary complaint. We measured thickness of posterior and lateral walls of the bladder ...

  20. A 65-year-old female patient with gastric outlet obstruction of unknown origin; 65-jaehrige Patientin mit unklarer Magenausgangsstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, N.A.; Gaa, J. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany); Hamacher, R. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, II. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Muenchen (Germany); Schulz, S. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Allgemeine Pathologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Gastric outlet obstructions can be of benign or malignant origin. In the case of the female patient described in this article, the extended diagnostic procedure with computed tomography and bone marrow biopsy was the key to a definite diagnosis and treatment planning. (orig.) [German] Die Ursache fuer eine Magenausgangsstenose kann benigner und maligner Genese sein. Bei der hier vorgestellten Patientin war nach der weiterfuehrenden Diagnostik mittels CT und Knochenmarkbiopsie die CT wegweisend fuer die definitive Diagnosestellung und Therapieplanung. (orig.)

  1. Association of compartment defects in anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction with female outlet obstruction constipation (OOC) by dynamic MR defecography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Jiang, T; Peng, P; Yang, X-Q; Wang, W-C

    2015-04-01

    Chronic constipation affects more than 17% of the global population worldwide, and up to 50% of patients were outlet obstruction constipation (OOC). Women and the elderly are most likely to be affected, due to female-specific risk factors, such as menopause, parity and multiparity. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of compartment defects in anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction with female outlet obstruction constipation (OOC) by MR defecography. Fifty-six consecutive women diagnosed with outlet obstruction constipation from October 2009 to July 2011 were included. They were categorized into the following groups: anorectal disorder only group (27 patients) and anorectal disorder plus multi-compartment pelvic disorder group (29 patients). Relevant measurements were taken at rest, during squeezing and straining. Anismus was significantly more common in the anorectal disorder group compared to the multi-compartment pelvic disorder group. Conversely, rectocele, rectal prolapse, and descending perineum were significantly more common in the multi-compartment pelvic disorder group compared to the anorectal disorder group. Of the total 56 OOC patients, 34 (60.7%) exhibited anismus and 38 (67.9%) rectocele. Among the anismus patients, there were 8 patients (23.5%) with combined cystocele, and 6 patients (17.6%) with combined vaginal/cervical prolapse. Among the rectocele patients, there were 23 patients (60.5%) with combined cystocele and 18 patients (47.4%) with combined vaginal/cervical prolapse. With respect to anorectal defects, 13 anismus patients (38.2%) were with signal posterior pelvic defects, 4 rectocele patients (10.5%) presented with signal posterior pelvic defects. Inadequate defecatory propulsion due to outlet obstruction constipation is often associated with multi-compartment pelvic floor disorders, whereas not about dyssynergic defecation.

  2. Unusual bladder outflow obstruction: case report | Ndaguatha | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydatid disease, the parasitic infestation caused by the cestode, echinococcus granulosus involves mainly the liver and the lungs though no organ is immune. Genito urinary involvement has been found mainly in the kidneys and rarely in other structures such as, bladder and epididymis. Isolated retrovesical location of the ...

  3. Efficacy of endoscopic gastroduodenal stenting for gastric outlet obstruction due to unresectable advanced gastric cancer: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Shunji; Takiguchi, Shuji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Imamura, Hiroshi; Takachi, Ko; Kimura, Yutaka; Takeno, Atsushi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2014-03-01

    Gastroduodenal stents for gastric outlet obstruction due to unresectable advanced gastric cancer are increasingly used; however, their effects have not been fully evaluated. A multicenter prospective observational study was performed. Patients were eligible if they had stage IV gastric cancer with a gastric outlet obstruction scoring system (GOOSS) score of 0 (no oral intake) or 1 (liquids only). Self-expandable metallic stents were delivered endoscopically. The effects of stents were evaluated. Twenty patients were enrolled and 18 were eligible (15 men, three women; median age, 70 years). Stent placement was successfully performed in all patients, with no complications. After stenting, a GOOSS score of 2 (soft solids only) or 3 (low-residue or full diet) was achieved in 13 (72%) patients. An improvement in the GOOSS score by one or more points was obtained in 16 (94%) patients. The median duration of fasting and hospital stay was 3 (range, 0-9) days and 18 (6-168) days, respectively. Chemotherapy was performed after stenting in 13 (72%) patients. Gastroduodenal stents are thought to be feasible, safe, and effective for gastric outlet obstruction due to unresectable advanced gastric cancer, with rapid clinical relief and a short hospital stay. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Resting anal pressure, not outlet obstruction or transit, predicts healthcare utilization in chronic constipation: a retrospective cohort analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Kyle; Barshop, Kenneth; Kuo, Braden; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic constipation is common and exerts a considerable burden on health-related quality of life and healthcare resource utilization. Anorectal manometry (ARM) and colonic transit testing have allowed classification of subtypes of constipation, raising promise of targeted treatments. There has been limited study of the correlation between physiological parameters and healthcare utilization. Methods All patients undergoing ARM and colonic transit testing for chronic constipation at two tertiary care centers from 2000 to 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Our primary outcomes included number of constipation-related and gastroenterology visits per year. Multivariate linear regression adjusting for confounders defined independent effect of measures of colonic and anorectal function on healthcare utilization. Key Results Our study included 612 patients with chronic constipation. More than 50% (n=333) of patients had outlet obstruction by means of balloon expulsion testing and 43.5% (n=266) had slow colonic transit. On unadjusted analysis, outlet obstruction (1.98 vs. 1.68), slow transit (2.40 vs 2.07) and high resting anal pressure (2.16 vs. 1.76) were all associated with greater constipation-related visits/year compared to patients without each of those parameters (Pconstipation-related visits/year (P=0.02) and gastroenterology visits/year (P=0.04). Conclusions and Inferences Among patients with chronic constipation, high resting anal pressure, rather than outlet obstruction or slow transit, predicts healthcare resource utilization. PMID:26172284

  5. Combined uterine and urinary bladder rupture: an unusual complication of obstructed labor in a primigravida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takai IU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Idris Usman Takai,1 Abdulkadir Abubakar2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 2Department of Surgery, Bayero University/Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Kano State, Nigeria Background: Combined uterine and urinary bladder rupture following prolonged obstructed labor is indeed a momentous uro-obstetric emergency. The urinary bladder involvement is distinctly rare in the absence of factors that predispose the bladder to be adherent to the lower uterine segment and is quite unusual in a primigravida. Objective: To report a rare case of uterine rupture involving urinary bladder secondary to a prolonged obstructed labor in a primigravida from a low resource setting. Case: A 17-year-old married unbooked primigravida who presented with a 3-day history of spontaneous onset of labor at term that was initially managed at home and later in a primary health care center where she had fundal pressure and oxytocin augmentation, respectively. The labor was complicated by combined uterine and urinary bladder rupture with sepsis. She was resuscitated and had exploratory laparotomy with uterine and urinary bladder repair. The postoperative period was uneventful and she was followed-up at the gynecology and family planning clinics. Conclusion: There is a need for community reawakening on the inherent risks of teenage pregnancy, bad obstetric practices, and unsupervised pregnancy, labor, and delivery, particularly in the rural settings as in the index patient. A high index of suspicion and prompt appropriate intervention will reduce the sequel of morbidity and occasional mortality from this predicament. Keywords: uterine rupture, bladder rupture, primigravida, labor

  6. Safety and benefits of self-expandable metallic stents with chemotherapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Sano, Hitoshi; Yamada, Tomonori; Takada, Hiroki; Naitoh, Itaru; Shimizu, Shuya; Kondo, Hiromu; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshida, Michihiro; Umemura, Shuichiro; Hori, Yasuki; Kato, Akihisa; Ohara, Hirotaka; Joh, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chemotherapy on placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO) has not been evaluated extensively. We investigated the influence of chemotherapy on the clinical outcomes of SEMS placement for MGOO. A total of 152 cancer patients with MGOO from a university hospital and affiliate hospitals were included. The patients were classified according to chemotherapy status and evaluated for palliative efficacy and safety of SEMS placement. Technical success rate, time to oral intake, and parameters indicating improvement of physical condition did not differ between the with- and without-chemotherapy groups after stent placement. Re-intervention and stent migration were significantly more frequent in the with-chemotherapy group than in the without-chemotherapy group after stent placement (re-intervention, 32.4% vs 7.8%, P = 0.0005; stent migration, 13.5% vs 1.7%, P = 0.0097). The frequency of adverse events did not differ between the with- and without-chemotherapy groups. Although chemotherapy after stent placement was an independent predictive factor for shortening the stent patency period (hazard ratio [HR], 3.10; P = 0.0264), the use of additional stents facilitated uneventful recovery and further prolonged survival time (HR, 0.60; P = 0.0132). Various cancer patients with MGOO can undergo SEMS placement safely regardless of chemotherapy, and concurrent chemotherapy after stent placement can prolong survival time, although re-intervention and stent migration may be increased. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  7. Endoscopic self-expandable metallic stenting for palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lye, Tiffany Jian Ying; Goh, Yaw Chong; Eng, Alvin Kim Hock; Ong, Hock Soo; Wong, Wai Keong; Chan, Weng Hoong

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a pre-terminal event in the natural history of gastric and pancreaticobiliary cancers. The use of endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) is a less invasive alternative palliative option for these patients. This is the first study in Southeast Asia to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of endoscopic SEMS placement in patients with malignant GOO. A retrospective review of our department's database in endoscopic SEMS placement for the treatment of malignant GOO was performed. Twenty-four patients with advanced or metastatic malignancy that underwent placement of SEMS for treatment of malignant GOO between January 2003 and July 2013 were analysed. The GOO severity score was used as an objective means of assessing patients' oral intake. Technical success rate was 100%. All patients resumed oral intake of liquids within the same day of stent placement. Clinical success was achieved in 21 patients (87.5%). There was a significant improvement of GOO severity score from 0.62 ± 1.0 (mean ± standard deviation) before stent placement to 2.04 ± 0.86 after stent placement (P < 0.001). Complication rate was 12.5%. Stent-related complications observed include stent migration (two patients) and tumour ingrowth (one patient). Serious complications such as gastrointestinal haemorrhage or perforation did not occur in any patients. The median survival after stent placement was 57 days (95% confidence interval, 12.2-101.8 days). None of the patients died from stent-related complications. Endoscopic SEMS placement is a minimally invasive, safe and effective option for the palliation of malignant GOO. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. Covered versus uncovered metal stents for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Hakuta, Ryunosuke; Takahara, Naminatsu; Sasaki, Takashi; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are used for non-resectable malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Studies of covered versus uncovered SEMS have yielded inconsistent results as a result of heterogeneity in design and patient population. We carried out a meta-analysis to compare covered and uncovered gastroduodenal SEMS. Using MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane database, we identified 1624 patients from 13 prospective and retrospective studies that evaluated covered and uncovered SEMS for malignant GOO and were published until October 2016. We pooled data on SEMS dysfunction, technical and clinical success, and adverse events using the fixed-effect or random-effects model. Compared with uncovered SEMS, covered SEMS did not show any significant difference in stent dysfunction risk (risk ratio [RR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.32). A subgroup analysis of five randomized trials suggested a trend toward a lower dysfunction risk in covered SEMS (RR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.45-0.88). Covered SEMS were associated with a lower occlusion risk (RR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.28-0.68), but with a higher migration risk (RR, 4.28; 95% CI, 2.89-6.34). Technical and clinical success rates were comparable between the groups. Overall adverse events tended to be more frequent in covered SEMS (RR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.09-2.83). Outcomes of covered and uncovered gastroduodenal SEMS were comparable, although the lower dysfunction rate of covered SEMS observed in the analysis of randomized trials needs further investigation. Antimigration mechanisms for covered SEMS and identification of patients who can achieve longer patency from uncovered SEMS would help improve the outcomes of gastroduodenal SEMS. © 2016 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  9. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement in Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction: A Comparison Between 2 Brands of Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bing-Wei; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2015-07-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction is a late complication of intraabdominal malignancy. Self-expandable metallic stent placement has been a safe palliative treatment to relieve obstructive symptoms. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of metallic stents in our patients and analyzed the clinical outcome of different brands. Seventy-one patients with inoperable gastric outlet obstruction receiving WallFlex enteral stents (WallFlex group) or Bonastents (Bonastent group) since April 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. The overall technical and clinical success rates of stent placement were 100% and 93%, respectively. The baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes including procedure-related complications, restenosis, and reintervention rates were comparable between the 2 groups. However, the Bonastent group had a higher rate of stent fracture than the WallFlex group (13.3% vs 0%, P = 0.03). The mean duration of overall stent patency was 132.7 days. The mean duration of survival was 181.9 days. Resumption of regular diet or low residual diet at day 7 after stent insertion predicted stent patency (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.28, P = 0.01). Cancer with gastric origin (HR: 0.25, P = 0.045) and poststent chemotherapy (HR: 0.38, P = 0.006) predicted lower mortality; however, peritoneal carcinomatosis (HR: 3.09, P = 0.04) correlated with higher mortality. Metallic stent placement is a safe and effective method for relieving gastric outlet obstruction. Except higher rate of stent fracture in the Bonastent group, there is no significant difference in clinical outcomes between the Bonastent group and the WallFlex group.

  10. A systematic review on renal and bladder dysfunction after endoscopic treatment of infravesical obstruction in boys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline M L Hennus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Posterior urethral valves (PUV may cause subtle to severe obstruction of the urethra, resulting in a broad clinical spectrum. PUV are the most common cause of chronic renal disease in boys. Our purpose was to report the incidences of kidney and bladder dysfunction in boys treated with endoscopic valve resection for PUV. METHODOLOGY: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases until 1st of July 2011, to identify original papers that described outcome of endoscopic valve resection (EVR in boys. We extracted information on (1 patient characteristics and clinical presentation of PUV related to outcomes and (2 the post-treatment absolute risks for kidney and bladder dysfunction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty-four studies describing renal function, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, incontinence, and urodynamic bladder function after EVR in 1474 patients were retrieved. Patients treated for PUV show high percentages of chronic kidney disease (CKD or end stage renal disease (ESRD, 22% (0-32% and 11% (0-20%, respectively. Elevated nadir serum creatinine was the only independent factor associated with renal failure. Before treatment, VUR was present in 43% of boys and after EVR, VUR was present in 22%. Post treatment, 19% (0-70% was reported to suffer from urinary incontinence. Urodynamic bladder dysfunction was seen in many patients (55%, 0-72% after treatment of PUV. CONCLUSIONS: The reported cumulative incidence of renal and bladder dysfunction in patients with PUV after endoscopic PUV treatment varies widely. This may reflect a broad clinical spectrum, which relates to the lack of a standardised quantification of obstruction and its severity. Moreover, the risk of bias is rather high, and therefore we put little confidence in the reported estimates of effect. We found elevated nadir serum creatinine as a predictor for renal dysfunction. In order to be able to predict outcomes for patients with PUV, an objective classification of severity of

  11. First data on the palliative treatment of patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction using the WallFlex enteral stent: a retrospective multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooft, J.; Mutignani, M.; Repici, A.; Messmann, H.; Neuhaus, H.; Fockens, P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Gastric outlet obstruction can occur as a late complication of a variety of cancers. Palliation of the obstructive symptoms is the primary aim of treatment in these patients. Self-expandable metal stents have emerged as a promising treatment option. The purpose of this

  12. Efficacy and safety of the new WallFlex enteral stent in palliative treatment of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (DUOFLEX study): a prospective multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Uitdehaag, Madeleen J.; Bruno, Marco J.; Timmer, Robin; Siersema, Peter D.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Fockens, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background: Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is most commonly a complication of advanced distal gastric, periampullary, or duodenal malignancy. Palliation of obstruction is the primary aim of treatment in most of these patients. Self-expandable metal stents have emerged as an effective treatment

  13. Safety and efficacy of a new non-foreshortening nitinol stent in malignant gastric outlet obstruction (DUONITI study): a prospective, multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooft, J. E.; van Montfoort, M. L.; Jeurnink, S. M.; Bruno, M. J.; Dijkgraaf, M. G.; Siersema, P. D.; Fockens, P.

    2011-01-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a late complication of advanced gastric, periampullary, and duodenal malignancies. Palliation of obstruction is the primary aim of treatment in these patients. Self-expandable metal stents have emerged as a promising treatment option. Our aim was to investigate

  14. Gastric Outlet Obstruction After Esophagectomy: Retrospective Analysis of the Effectiveness and Safety of Postoperative Endoscopic Pyloric Dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Martin K H; Leers, Jessica; Herbold, Till; Bludau, Marc; Chon, Seung-Hun; Kleinert, Robert; Hescheler, Daniel A; Bollschweiler, Elfriede; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Schäfer, Hartmut; Alakus, Hakan

    2016-10-01

    Delayed gastric emptying after esophagectomy with gastric replacement can pose a significant postoperative problem, often leading to aspiration and pneumonia. The present study analyzes retrospectively the effectiveness of endoscopic pyloric dilatation for post-surgical gastric outlet obstruction. Between March 2006 and March 2010, 403 patients underwent a transthoracic en-bloc esophagectomy and reconstruction with a gastric tube and intrathoracic esophagogastrostomy. In patients with postoperative symptoms of an outlet dysfunction and the confirmation by endoscopy, pyloric dilatations were performed without preference with either 20- or 30-mm balloons. A total of 89 balloon dilatations of the pylorus after esophagectomy were performed in 60 (15.6 %) patients. In 21 (35 %) patients, a second dilatation of the pylorus was performed. 55 (61.8 %) dilatations were performed with a 30-mm balloon and 34 (38.2 %) with a 20-mm balloon. The total redilatation rate for the 30-mm balloon was 20 % (n = 11) and 52.9 % (n = 18) for the 20-mm balloon (p gastric emptying leading to postoperative complications after esophagectomy. Endoscopic pyloric dilatation after esophagectomy is a safe procedure for treatment of gastric outlet obstruction. The use of a 30-mm balloon has the same safety profile but a 2.5 lower redilatation rate compared to the 20-mm balloon. Thus, the use of 20-mm balloons has been abandoned in our clinic.

  15. Self-expanding metal stents for the palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Christoph; Bechtler, Matthias; Schneider, Steffen; Hartmann, Bettina; Striegel, Johannes; Jakobs, Ralf

    2016-11-21

    To evaluate the efficacy of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) for the palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction in patients with and without peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients who underwent SEMS placement for treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstruction at our hospital over a six-year period. Stents were deployed through the scope under combined fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. Technical success was defined as successful stent placement and expansion. Clinical success was defined as an improvement in the obstructive symptoms and discharge from hospital without additional parenteral nutrition. According to carcinomatosis status, patients were assigned into groups with or without evidence of peritoneal disease. In most cases, obstruction was caused by pancreatic (47%) or gastric cancer (23%). Technical success was achieved in 96.8% (60/62), clinical success in 79% (49/62) of all patients. Signs of carcinomatosis were identified in 27 patients (43.5%). The diagnosis was confirmed by pathology or previous operation in 7 patients (11.2%) and suspected by CT, MRI or ultrasound in 20 patients (32.2%). Presence of carcinomatosis was associated with a significantly lower clinical success rate compared to patients with no evidence of peritoneal disease (66.7% vs 88.6%, P = 0.036). There was no significant difference in overall survival between patients with or without PC (median 48 d vs 70 d, P = 0.21), but patients showed significantly longer survival after clinical success of SEMS placement compared to those experiencing clinical failure (median 14.5 d vs 75 d, P = 0.0003). Given the limited therapeutic options and a clinical success rate of at least 66.7%, we believe that SEMS are a reasonable treatment option in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction with peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  16. Metastatic lung cancer presenting as gastric outlet obstruction: diagnosis and management with laparoscopic gastric bypass: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Richard W D; Bird, Brian R Healey; O'Boyle, Colm J

    2016-10-28

    Metastatic tumours of the duodenum are relatively rare. Here we present a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian male who presented with a 3-week history of postprandial vomiting, weight-loss and epigastric discomfort. Imaging and biopsy revealed that the patient had a primary lung tumour in his right upper lung lobe as well as a duodenal metastasis leading to gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The patient was stabilised and subsequently underwent a laparoscopic gastric bypass to palliate the gastric outlet obstruction. Appropriate management of metastatic GOO involves accurate diagnosis and treatment with either enteral stenting or laparoscopic gastric bypass. It is suggested that the decision whether to stent or surgically bypass the obstruction can be based on the patient's life expectancy and performance status. Regardless of the approach, palliating metastatic GOO can improve the quality of life of carefully chosen symptomatic patients. We describe a technique of laparoscopic palliative gastric bypass which has not been reported previously in the literature. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. OPERABILITY RATE OF DISTAL GASTRIC CANCER AND THE EFFECT OF GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION IN THE OPERABILITY RATE AND POSTOPERATIVE OUTCOME- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Rajesh T. R

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stomach cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. 1 Except in countries where screening for stomach cancer is prevalent, most of the distal stomach tumours are diagnosed at advanced stage. Gastric outlet obstruction is usually believed to be a sign of locally-advanced disease. Complete surgical removal of the disease (R0 is the only potentially curative treatment for resectable gastric cancer. The aim of the study is to finda The operability rate of gastric cancer in our institution and the incidence of Gastric Outlet Obstruction (GOO in patients undergoing gastrectomy for distal gastric cancer. b To compare the postoperative outcome in patients with gastric outlet obstruction and those without gastric outlet obstruction. c To see if the histology of the tumour has any role in the development of GOO. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study. The study includes patients who were admitted with carcinoma stomach and underwent operative or nonoperative treatment in our institution during 2013 to 2015. RESULTS Overall operability rate was 45.8%. Operable patients in the GOO group were 47%. Operability in the no outlet obstruction group were 45%. Data shows a slightly increased predilection for GOO in diffuse and mixed type of tumours (statistically not significant. Intestinal tumours had significant rate of anaemia compared to diffuse tumours (p <0.005. Overall mortality was 6.7%. Mortality is higher in the GOO group (8.8%. CONCLUSION (a. Operability rate of distal gastric cancer in our institution is 45.8%. (b. Incidence of gastric outlet obstruction in patients undergoing gastrectomy is 38.2%. (c. Presence of gastric outlet obstruction does not influence operability rate (47% vs. 45%. (d. Morbidity and mortality after distal radical gastrectomy is comparable in both groups. (e. Both intestinal and diffuse histology have equal incidence of GOO. (f. Chronic blood loss and incidence of anaemia is more in

  18. EUS-guided gastroenterostomy in management of benign gastric outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-I; James, Theodore; Agarwal, Amol; Baron, Todd H.; Itoi, Takao; Kunda, Rastislav; Nieto, Jose; Bukhari, Majidah; Gutierrez, Olaya Brewer; Sanaei, Omid; Moran, Robert; Fayad, Lea; Khashab, Mouen A.

    2018-01-01

    Background and study aims  Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastroenterostomy (EUS-GE) in malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) appears to be promising; however, its role in benign GOO is unclear. The aim of this study was to ascertain the clinical efficacy and safety of EUS-GE in benign GOO. Patients and methods  This was an international retrospective series involving 5 tertiary centers. Consecutive patients who underwent EUS-GE between 1/2013 – 10/2016 for benign GOO were included. The primary endpoint was the rate of clinical success defined as ability to tolerate oral intake without vomiting. Secondary endpoints included technical success and rate of adverse events (AE). Results  Overall, 26 patients (46.2 % female; mean age 57.7 ± 13.9 years) underwent EUS-GE for benign GOO due to strictures from chronic pancreatitis (n = 11), surgical anastomosis (n = 6), peptic ulcer disease (n = 5), acute pancreatitis (n = 1), superior mesentery artery syndrome (n = 1), caustic injury (n = 1), and hematoma (n = 1). Technical success was achieved in 96.2 %. Dilation of the lumen apposing metal stent was performed in 13/25 (52 %) with a mean maximum diameter of 14.6 ± 1.0 mm. Mean procedure time was 44.6 ± 26.1 min. Clinical success was observed in 84.0 % with a mean time to oral intake of 1.4 ± 1.9 days and a median follow-up of 176.5 (IQR: 47 – 445.75) days. Rate of unplanned re-intervention was 4.8 %. 3 AE were noted including 2 misdeployed stents and 1 gastric leak needing surgical intervention following elective GE stent removal. Conclusions  EUS-GE is a promising treatment for benign GOO. Larger and prospective data are needed to further validate this novel endoscopic technique in treating benign GOO of various etiologies. PMID:29527559

  19. The Effects of Pre-Operative Enteral Nutrition from Nasal Feeding Tubes on Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Lin, Su-Yong; Dai, Qi-Bao; Hua, Jin; Chen, Shao-Qin

    2017-04-10

    We examined gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) patients who received two weeks of strengthening pre-operative enteral nutrition therapy (pre-EN) through a nasal-jejenal feeding tube placed under a gastroscope to evaluate the feasibility and potential benefit of pre-EN compared to parenteral nutrition (PN). In this study, 68 patients confirmed to have GOO with upper-gastrointestinal contrast and who accepted the operation were randomized into an EN group and a PN group. The differences in nutritional status, immune function, post-operative complications, weight of patients, first bowel sound and first flatus time, pull tube time, length of hospital stay (LOH), and cost of hospitalization between pre-operation and post-operation were all recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi square test and t -test; statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. The success rate of the placement was 91.18% (three out of 31 cases). After pre-EN, the levels of weight, albumin (ALB), prealbumin (PA), and transferrin (TNF) in the EN group were significantly increased by pre-operation day compared to admission day, but were not significantly increased in the PN group; the weights in the EN group were significantly increased compared to the PN group by pre-operation day and day of discharge; total protein (TP), ALB, PA, and TNF of the EN group were significantly increased compared to the PN group on pre-operation and post-operative days one and three. The levels of CD3+, CD4+/CD8+, IgA, and IgM in the EN group were higher than those of the PN group at pre-operation and post-operation; the EN group had a significantly lower incidence of poor wound healing, peritoneal cavity infection, pneumonia, and a shorter first bowel sound time, first flatus time, and post-operation hospital stay than the PN group. Pre-EN through a nasal-jejunum feeding tube and placed under a gastroscope in GOO patients was safe, feasible, and beneficial to the nutrition status, immune function

  20. Outcomes of second self-expandable metallic stent insertion for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan Gyoo; Choi, Il Ju; Lee, Jong Yeul; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Mi-Jung; Park, Sook Ryun; Park, Young Lee

    2014-01-01

    Self-expandable metallic stents are used widely to relieve malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, restenosis or migration of first stents is a frequent complication. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the effectiveness of second stents as an approach to manage failure of first stents in patients with malignant GOO. A total of 222 patients with gastric cancer received first stents due to inoperable GOO at National Cancer Center in Korea between January 2008 and June 2011. Monthly follow-up interviews were performed, and second stents (stent-in-stent or stent-after-migration) were inserted in 59 patients by June 2012. Technical and clinical successes and long-term complications were evaluated. The technical and immediate clinical success rates were 98.3 % (58/59) and 91.5 % (54/59), respectively. Patients who received a second stent due to late complications involving the first stent (migration, restenosis, and fracture) showed a higher clinical success rate (95.8 % [46/48]) than patients who received a second stent due to immediate clinical failure of the first stent (72.7 % [8/11], p = 0.04). The immediate clinical success rate of stent-after-migration (100 % [11/11]) was not different from that of stent-in-stent (89.6 % [43/48], p = 1.0). The stent dysfunction rate of stent-after-migration (27.3 % [3/11]) also was similar to that of stent-in-stent (29.2 % [14/48], p = 1.0). The median patencies of stent-in-stent and stent-after-migration were 27.4 and 58.4 weeks, respectively (p = 0.177). There were no significant prognostic factors for patency of second stents. Insertion of a second stent is effective for treating the first-stent failure in gastric cancer patients with GOO, especially if the immediate outcome of the first stent was successful.

  1. Treatment of malignant gastric outlet obstruction with stents: An evaluation of the reported variables for clinical outcome

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    Medhus Asle W

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO is commonly seen in patients with advanced gastric-, pancreatic-, duodenal, hepatobiliary or metastatic malignancies. Ten to 25% of patients with pancreatic cancer will develop duodenal obstruction during the course of the disease. Duodenal stenting with self-expandable metal stents is an alternative treatment to surgical bypass procedures. Our aim was to review the published literature regarding treatment of malignant GOO with stents to reveal whether the information provided is sufficient to evaluate the clinical effects of this treatment Methods A literature search from 2000 – 2007 was conducted in Pub Med, Embase, and Cochrane library, combining the following search terms: duodenal stent, malignant duodenal obstruction, gastric outlet obstruction, SEMS, and gastroenteroanastomosis. All publications presenting data with ≥ 15 patients and only articles written in English were included and a review focusing on the following parameters were conducted: 1 The use of graded scoring systems evaluating clinical success; 2 Assessment of Quality of life (QoL before and after treatment; 3 Information on stent-patency; 4 The use of objective criteria to evaluate the stent effect. Results 41 original papers in English were found; no RCT's. 16 out of 41 studies used some sort of graded scoring system. No studies had objectively evaluated QoL before or after stent treatment, using standardized QoL-questionnaires, 32/41 studies reported on stent patency and 9/41 performed an oral contrast examination after stent placement. Objective quantitative tests of gastric emptying had not been performed. Conclusion Available reports do not provide sufficient relevant information of the clinical outcome of duodenal stenting. In future studies, these relevant issues should be addressed to allow improved evaluation of the effect of stent treatment.

  2. Individualization of metal stents for management of gastric outlet obstruction caused by distal stomach cancer: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ding; Bao, Yin-Su; Liu, Yong-Pan

    2013-08-01

    The use of various kinds of metal stents has emerged as an effective palliative treatment for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, most of these metal stents were designed for use in the esophagus or intestine and have a high incidence of stent obstruction and stent migration when used elsewhere. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of individualized stents (designed according to the shape and size of the GOO) in order to determine whether such stents could reduce the incidence of stent obstruction and migration. Multicenter, prospective, clinical trial. Two tertiary-care referral centers. Thirty-seven patients who presented with symptomatic unresectable malignant GOO caused by distal gastric cancer between April 2005 and June 2009. Placement of the individualized metal stents. The primary endpoint was to optimize stent resolution of proximal obstruction as determined by a GOO scoring system. Secondary endpoints were success rates, survival rates, and adverse events. Technical and clinical success was achieved in 97.3% and 94.4% of patients, respectively. The rate of resolution of proximal obstruction by a proximal stent was 97.3%. There were no procedure-related perforations or deaths. No stent migration or obstruction by tumor growth were found. The mean survival time was 232 days (range 28-387 days). A single-arm study in tertiary-care centers. Placement of individualized stents is a safe and effective modality for the palliation of malignant GOO caused by distal stomach cancer and can help reduce tumor ingrowth and stent migration. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrasonography of the obstructive lesions of the gastric outlet: Emphasis on the differentiation between advanced gastric cancer and benign inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, Kyu Tong; Suh, Chang Hae; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Soon Gu; Park, Chan Sup; Cho, Sang Kyoon; Kim, Joon Mee [Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the value of high resolution ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of the obstructive lesions of the gastric outlet. We reviewed the ultrasonograms of 37 cases with symptoms of gastric obstruction. The ultrasonograms were obtained by using 5 or 7.5 MHz probe. The pathology of the lesion was confirmed by operation or endoscopic biopsy in all cases. We analyzed the ultrasonograms in terms of the thickness and length of the lesions, the ultrasonographic feature of the gastric lumen on transverse scan, the echogenicity of the lesion, and the changes in the 5 echo layers of the gastric wall. The average thickness of gastric cancer and inflammatory stricture was 18.4mm and 9.0mm, and that of length was 35.2mm and 11.5mm respectively. Thus, the thickness and length of the lesion in gastric cancers were significantly greater than those in inflammatory strictures. On transverse scan, we classified the feature of lesion into 3 categories : marked circumferential wall thickening with compressed slit like lumen, circumferential wall thickening with preserved round contour of lumen, and eccentrical wall thickening with peripheral deviation of lumen. Circumferential wall thickening with central slit like lumen and eccentrical wall thickening with displaced lumen were seen predominently in gastriccancers (48% and 44% respectively), while circumferential wall thickening with preserved round contour of lumen inflammatory strictures(80%). Gastric cancer showed low echogenicity in 22 cases (81%), whereas benign inflammation showed low or iso echogenicity in equal number. Some or all of the 5 echo layers of the gastric wall was disintegrated in both groups. In summery, high resolution ultrasonography was helpful in determining the nature of gastric outlet obstruction, especially in differentiation between advanced gastric cancer and inflammatory stricture

  4. Ultrasonography of the obstructive lesions of the gastric outlet: Emphasis on the differentiation between advanced gastric cancer and benign inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoh, Kyu Tong; Suh, Chang Hae; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Soon Gu; Park, Chan Sup; Cho, Sang Kyoon; Kim, Joon Mee

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the value of high resolution ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of the obstructive lesions of the gastric outlet. We reviewed the ultrasonograms of 37 cases with symptoms of gastric obstruction. The ultrasonograms were obtained by using 5 or 7.5 MHz probe. The pathology of the lesion was confirmed by operation or endoscopic biopsy in all cases. We analyzed the ultrasonograms in terms of the thickness and length of the lesions, the ultrasonographic feature of the gastric lumen on transverse scan, the echogenicity of the lesion, and the changes in the 5 echo layers of the gastric wall. The average thickness of gastric cancer and inflammatory stricture was 18.4mm and 9.0mm, and that of length was 35.2mm and 11.5mm respectively. Thus, the thickness and length of the lesion in gastric cancers were significantly greater than those in inflammatory strictures. On transverse scan, we classified the feature of lesion into 3 categories : marked circumferential wall thickening with compressed slit like lumen, circumferential wall thickening with preserved round contour of lumen, and eccentrical wall thickening with peripheral deviation of lumen. Circumferential wall thickening with central slit like lumen and eccentrical wall thickening with displaced lumen were seen predominently in gastriccancers (48% and 44% respectively), while circumferential wall thickening with preserved round contour of lumen inflammatory strictures(80%). Gastric cancer showed low echogenicity in 22 cases (81%), whereas benign inflammation showed low or iso echogenicity in equal number. Some or all of the 5 echo layers of the gastric wall was disintegrated in both groups. In summery, high resolution ultrasonography was helpful in determining the nature of gastric outlet obstruction, especially in differentiation between advanced gastric cancer and inflammatory stricture

  5. International Prostatic Symptom Score-voiding/storage subscore ratio in association with total prostatic volume and maximum flow rate is diagnostic of bladder outlet-related lower urinary tract dysfunction in men with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hong Jiang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive values of the total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS-T and voiding to storage subscore ratio (IPSS-V/S in association with total prostate volume (TPV and maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax in the diagnosis of bladder outlet-related lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. METHODS: A total of 298 men with LUTS were enrolled. Video-urodynamic studies were used to determine the causes of LUTS. Differences in IPSS-T, IPSS-V/S ratio, TPV and Qmax between patients with bladder outlet-related LUTD and bladder-related LUTD were analyzed. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV for bladder outlet-related LUTD were calculated using these parameters. RESULTS: Of the 298 men, bladder outlet-related LUTD was diagnosed in 167 (56%. We found that IPSS-V/S ratio was significantly higher among those patients with bladder outlet-related LUTD than patients with bladder-related LUTD (2.28±2.25 vs. 0.90±0.88, p1 or >2 was factored into the equation instead of IPSS-T, PPV were 91.4% and 97.3%, respectively, and NPV were 54.8% and 49.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Combination of IPSS-T with TPV and Qmax increases the PPV of bladder outlet-related LUTD. Furthermore, including IPSS-V/S>1 or >2 into the equation results in a higher PPV than IPSS-T. IPSS-V/S>1 is a stronger predictor of bladder outlet-related LUTD than IPSS-T.

  6. Congenital posterior urethral diverticula causing bladder outlet obstruction in a young male

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    Saurabh Agrawal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 26-year-old male presenting with mild renal failure. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of posterior urethral valve, but micturating cystourethrogram and endoscopic evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of posterior urethral diverticulae. Transurethral resection of diverticulae was performed. Patient is voiding well and his renal function has stabilized.

  7. Wegener′s granulomatosis of urinary tract presenting as bladder outlet obstruction

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    V Suryaprakash

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of Wegener′s granulomatosis involving the prostate gland in a 45-year-old male who presented with acute urinary retention. Treatment was initiated with oral cyclophosphamide and steroids. The prostate size regressed in four weeks and patient voided well after removal of catheter.

  8. Three-dimensional stereology as a tool for evaluating bladder outlet obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Der Wijk, Jasper; Van Der Wijk, Jan; Horn, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    -cup biopsy, taken during cystoscopy, was stereologically evaluated to determine the smooth muscle cell volume and the fractions of collagen and smooth muscle using light and electron microscopy. Results. The collagen fraction was higher in patients than in controls (probably because the patients were older...... tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of BOO and five controls (mean age 48.6 years; range 43-53 years) without LUTS were studied. All participants underwent a full examination, including determination of the International Prostate Symptom Score, laboratory analysis and a urodynamic evaluation. A cold...

  9. Three-dimensional stereology as a tool for evaluating bladder outlet obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijk, J. Van der; Wijk, J. Van der; Horn, T.

    2008-01-01

    tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of BOO and five controls (mean age 48.6 years; range 43-53 years) without LUTS were studied. All participants underwent a full examination, including determination of the International Prostate Symptom Score, laboratory analysis and a urodynamic evaluation. A cold...

  10. Radionuclide measurement of urinary flow rates and residual urine in the evaluation of bladder outflow obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groshar, D.; Embon, O.M.; Sazbon, A.; Koritny, E.; Frankel, A.

    1986-01-01

    A radionuclide method was developed to evaluate bladder outflow obstruction. Forty-seven patients with prostatic hypertrophy and 29 controls were studied. Urinary mean (MRF) and peak (PFR) flow rates were determined from the time-activity curves of bladder emptying. Residual urine (RU) was calculated by the volume voided and the bladder ejection fraction. A corrected PFR was calculated [CPFR = PFR/(vol. voided + RU)/sup 1/2/]. There was significant difference between patients and controls (MFR = 4 +- 2 vs. 9 +- 4 ml/sec, P <.001; PFR = 10 +- 6 vs. 20 +- 7, P <.001; CPFR = 0.57 +- 0.21 vs. 1.22 +- 0.32, P <.0001). RU was 13 +- 13 ml in controls and 155 +- 285 ml in patients (P <.01). CPFR was less than 0.89 in 94% of patients and 10% of controls, PFR was less than 14 ml/sec in 79% of patients and 17% of controls, and MFR was less than 7 ml/sec in 91% of patients and 21% of controls. The method enables good separation between patients and controls in a single examination that measures both flow and volume

  11. Development and application of the condom catheter method for non-invasive measurement of bladder pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Mastrigt (Ron); J.J.M. Pel (Johan); J.W.N.C. Huang Foen Chung (John); P.A. de Zeeuw (Sandra)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: A non-invasive method to measure the bladder pressure in males using a condom catheter has been developed. The measurement technique, its validation and limitations, a diagnostic nomogram to non-invasively diagnose bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), and results of large-scale

  12. Closed-perforation of gastric fundus and gastric outlet obstruction caused by a giant gastric trichobezoar: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbulak, Bünyamin; Seğmen, Özgür; Rakıcı, Taşkın; Büyükaşık, Kenan; Yavaş, Mazlum

    2017-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass formed because of the accumulation of indigestible material in the stomach and/or small intestine. Bezoars are rare but occasionally occur with acute abdomen findings. Bezoars form as a result of changes in the gastrointestinal system anatomy and physiology and repetitive exposure to the ingested material. These materials can include vegetables with high fiber content (phytobezoars), non-animal origin fats, hair (trichobezoars), or drugs such as anti-acids (pharmobezoars). Gastric bezoars frequently occur after gastric surgery. Psychiatric disorders such as trichotillomania (an irresistible urge to remove and swallow one's own hair) are frequently the underlying reason in patients without a history of gastric surgery. In this article, we presented a giant gastric trichobezoar obstructing outlet and causing closed-perforation and abscess formation of gastric fundus in a 30-year-old woman.

  13. Palliative distal gastrectomy offers no survival benefit over gastrojejunostomy for gastric cancer with outlet obstruction: retrospective analysis of an 11-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Aikou, Susumu; Yagi, Koichi; Yamagata, Yukinori; Nishida, Masato; Mori, Kazuhiko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-29

    Either palliative distal gastrectomy or gastrojejunostomy are the initial treatment options for locally advanced gastric cancer with outlet obstruction when curative-intent resection is not feasible. Since chemotherapy is the mainstay for unresectable gastric cancer, the clinical value of palliative distal gastrectomy is controversial. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of patients with gastric cancer with outlet obstruction treated at our institution between January 2002 and December 2012. We compared the clinical outcomes of palliative distal gastrectomy with those of gastrojejunostomy patients and the factors affecting overall survival were evaluated. Elective palliative distal gastrectomy and gastrojejunostomy were performed in 18 and 25 patients, respectively. The median overall survival times in the gastrojejunostomy and palliative distal gastrectomy groups were statistically equivalent at 8.8 and 8.3 months, respectively (P = 0.73), despite the more locally advanced tumors in the gastrojejunostomy as compared with the palliative distal gastrectomy group. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed absence of postoperative chemotherapy and higher postoperative complication grade to be associated with worse clinical outcomes. Palliative distal gastrectomy offers neither survival nor palliative benefit as compared to gastrojejunostomy. Minimizing the morbidity of intervention for outlet obstruction, followed by chemotherapy, appears to be the optimal initial strategy for incurable gastric cancer with outlet obstruction.

  14. A challenging case of gastric outlet obstruction (Bouveret's syndrome: a case report

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    Gelrud Andres

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bouveret's syndrome is a clinically distinct form of gallstone ileus caused by the formation of a fistula between the biliary tract and duodenum. This case reinforces the need for early recognition and treatment of Bouveret's syndrome, as it is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Case presentation An 82-year-old Caucasian woman presented with signs and symptoms of small bowel obstruction. Her laboratory workup showed elevated alkaline phosphatase and amylase levels. Computed tomography of her abdomen revealed pneumobilia, a choledochoduodenal fistula and a gallstone obstructing her distal duodenum. The impacted gallstone could not be extracted endoscopically, so our patient underwent open enterolithotomy successfully. However, the postoperative course was complicated by myocardial infarction, respiratory failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She died 22 days after surgery, secondary to cardiopulmonary arrest. Conclusion This case clearly highlights the considerable morbidity and mortality associated with Bouveret's syndrome.

  15. Treatment of urethral obstruction secondary to caudal bladder displacement, trigonal invagination, and urethral kinking in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakubo, Kayo; Palm, Carrie A; Korner, Amber L; Culp, William T N

    2017-10-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 15-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog was evaluated for a 7-week history of stranguria, pollakiuria, and intermittent urethral obstruction. CLINICAL FINDINGS On initial evaluation, the patient had persistent stranguria with lack of urine production; after multiple unsuccessful attempts to urinate, a large volume of urine was produced. Prior to voiding the large volume, the urinary bladder was not palpable during examination. Abdominal ultrasonography confirmed caudal displacement of the urinary bladder, and the urethra and trigone could not be located ultrasonographically. Positive-contrast cystourethrography and CT confirmed caudal displacement of the urinary bladder and also revealed trigonal invagination and urethral kinking; dysuria was attributed to these findings. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Surgical repositioning of the lower urinary tract was performed. The urinary bladder was moved cranially and was fixed in place along the left lateral aspect of the body wall by cystopexy. After surgery, positive-contrast cystourethrography revealed a more cranial positioning of the urinary bladder and straightening of the urethra with no urethral kinking or trigonal invagination. Immediately after surgery, stranguria had resolved and the patient was able to void normally. Two years after surgery, the dog was reported to be urinating normally. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Surgical correction of caudal urinary bladder displacement with cystopexy led to resolution of trigonal invagination, urethral kinking, and urethral obstruction in the dog of the present report. Trigonal invagination and urethral kinking, although uncommon findings, should be considered as possible causes of dysuria in dogs.

  16. The Long-term Effect of Superficial Bladder Neck Incision on Ejaculation and Incontinence in Boys with Primary and Secondary Bladder Neck Obstruction

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    Pauline M. L. Hennus

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveSuperficial bladder neck incision (SBNI is controversial at young age, with retrograde ejaculation after puberty as main concern. The aim of the study is to investigate the long-term effect of SBNI on ejaculation and incontinence in boys with primary and secondary bladder neck obstruction (BNO.Materials and methodsIn boys with infravesical obstruction, SBNI was performed in case of a persistent BNO after earlier desobstruction or in case of primary severely obstructive bladder neck. SBNI was performed with a diathermy hook, always superficially (2–3 mm and unilaterally at 7 O’clock. Males that had SBNI during childhood after posterior urethral valve incision or relief of other obstruction between 1986 and 2003 were included. Evaluation was done by International Continence Society male sex questionnaire, International Prostate Symptom Score, developmental International Consultation Modular Questionnaire on Urinary Incontinence, frequency volume chart, and uroflowmetry.ResultsOf 79 traceable patients, 40 (50.6% participated. Of these, 37 (92.5% completed all questionnaires and 28 (70% performed uroflowmetry. Median age at SBNI was 4.7 years [interquartile range (IQR 0.6–8.5] and was 19.6 years (IQR 17.3–20.9 at follow-up. All men had antegrade ejaculation, 4/37 (10.8% reported possibly reduced ejaculatory volume. Eight (22% had moderate lower urinary tract symptoms and two (5.4% had moderate incontinence. Median maximum flow rate was 30.1 mL/s (IQR 24.4–42.6.ConclusionSBNI in boys with severe infravesical obstruction can be done safely with preservation of antegrade ejaculation and no additional lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  17. Successful Resolution of Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Pancreatic Pseudocyst or Walled-Off Necrosis After Acute Pancreatitis: The Role of Percutaneous Catheter Drainage.

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    Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Shao-Yang; Gao, Shun-Liang; Liang, Zhong-Yan; Yu, Wen-Qiao; Liang, Ting-Bo

    2015-11-01

    Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) can be caused by gastroparesis or gastric outlet obstruction, which may occur when pancreatic pseudocyst (PP) or walled-off necrosis (WON) compresses the stomach. The aim of the study was to explore a proper surgical treatment. From June 2010 to June 2013, 25 of 148 patients with AP suffered DGE. Among them, 12 were caused by gastroparesis, 1 was a result of obstruction from a Candida albicans plug, and 12 were gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) compressed by PP (n = 8) or WON (n = 4), which were treated by percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD). All 12 cases of compressing GOO achieved resolution by PCD after 6 [1.86] and 37.25 [12.02] days for PP and WON, respectively. Five cases developed intracystic infection, 3 cases had pancreatic fistulae whereas 2 achieved resolution and 1 underwent a pseudocyst jejunostomy. Gastric outlet obstruction caused by a PP or WON is a major cause of DGE in patients with AP. Percutaneous catheter drainage with multiple sites, large-bore tubing, and lavage may be a good therapy due to high safety and minimal invasiveness.

  18. The Added Value of Partial Stomach-partitioning to a Conventional Gastrojejunostomy in the Treatment of Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

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    Ernberg, Annika; Kumagai, Koshi; Analatos, Apostolos; Rouvelas, Ioannis; Swahn, Fredrik; Lindblad, Mats; Lundell, Lars; Nilsson, Magnus; Tsai, Jon A

    2015-06-01

    Poor results have been reported after conventional gastrojejunostomy (CGJ) as palliative surgical bypass treatment of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy (PSPGJ) has been introduced as an alternative surgical treatment of GOO to reduce the risk of postoperative delayed gastric emptying (DGE). The aim was to study PSPGJ as an alternative to CGJ in the treatment of GOO, with respect to DGE. A retrospective cohort study was completed in all patients who underwent a bypass of the duodenum via PSPGJ or CGJ due to GOO. Cases where concomitant biliary or bariatric procedures were performed were excluded. Twenty-four patients met the inclusion criteria for the study; ten cases underwent PSPGJ and 14 CGJ. The incidence of DGE grade B-C was significantly lower in the PSPGJ group (0 %) compared with the CGJ group (42.9 %, p = 0.024). Oral nutrition only was recorded more often at follow-up in the PSPGJ group (9/9, 100 %) than in the CGJ group (4/13, 30.8 %) (p = 0.002). PSPGJ seems to be followed by a lower rate of DGE compared to CGJ.

  19. A Novel Partially Covered Self-Expandable Metallic Stent with Proximal Flare in Patients with Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

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    Takahara, Naminatsu; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Saito, Tomotaka; Mizuno, Suguru; Yagioka, Hiroshi; Kogure, Hirofumi; Togawa, Osamu; Matsubara, Saburo; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-07-15

    Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) has emerged as a palliative treatment for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Although covered SEMSs can prevent tumor ingrowth, frequent migration of covered SEMSs may offset their advantages in preventing tumor ingrowth. We conducted this multicenter, single-arm, retrospective study at six tertiary referral centers to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a partially covered SEMS with an uncovered large-bore flare at the proximal end as an antimigration system in 41 patients with symptomatic malignant GOO. The primary outcome was clinical success, and the secondary outcomes were technical success, stent dysfunction, adverse events, and survival after stent placement. The technical and clinical success rates were 100% and 95%, respectively. Stent dysfunctions occurred in 17 patients (41%), including stent migration in nine (23%), tumor ingrowth in one (2%), and tumor overgrowth in four (10%). Two patients (5%) developed adverse events: one pancreatitis and one perforation. No procedure-related death was observed. A novel partially covered SEMS with a large-bore flare proximal end was safe and effective for malignant GOO but failed to prevent stent migration. Further research is warranted to develop a covered SEMS with an optimal antimigration system.

  20. Prevalence of Fecal Outlet Obstruction and Its Predisposing Factors in Women Aged 40 years and Older: An Epidemiological Study

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    Batool Ahmadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalent of Fecal Outlet Abstract  Obstruction (FOO and associated risk factors in women aged 40 and older. Methods & Materials: In this cross sectional study, a total of 800 women were  randomly selected via cluster sampling among residents of area zone 17 of Tehran Health Management and were interviewed at home. Data was analyzed using Chi-square and Fisher exact Economics tests. Results: Prevalence for FOO cases was mild 36.5% (95% CI, 33–39%, medium 8%(95% CI, 6–10% and acute 0.5% (95% CI, 0.01–0.9% which was only associated with age increase (P=0.006. There is a significant relationship between Physical activity and morbidity of FOO (P=0.004. FOO was associated with depressive and anxiety disorders, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes, chronic, cough, and chronic inflammatory bowel disease (P<0.005. Conclusion: This study underscores the prevalence rate of FOO symptoms and its underlying factors. It also considers lack of knowledge about this hidden  problem and its protective factors among women in  recommends further research to determine effective strategies for prevention education, screening and early treatment to promote women's health and quality of life.

  1. Modified Devine exclusion with vertical stomach reconstruction for gastric outlet obstruction: a novel technique.

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    Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kano, Hisao; Kuboi, Youichi; Amano, Sadao

    2009-07-01

    A gastroenterostomy is the most commonly performed palliative procedure in patients with gastroduodenal outflow obstruction (GOO) caused by unresectable advanced gastric and pancreatic cancer. We developed a new technique--modified Devine exclusion with vertical stomach reconstruction--and evaluated the efficacy of this procedure. We retrospectively studied 60 patients who underwent gastrojejunostomy for GOO caused by unresectable advanced gastric and pancreatic cancer. These patients were divided into two groups, the conventional gastrojejunostomy group (CGJ group) and the modified Devine exclusion with vertical stomach reconstruction group (MDVSR group). The mean duration of the required nasogastric suction, the number of days after which diet could be initiated and after which oral ingestion of solid food could by safely resumed, and the duration of hospitalization after the surgery were significantly shorter in the MDVSR group. The patients in the MDVSR group had a significantly longer duration of stay at home and survival after the surgery. Moreover, in the MDVSR group, GOO did not recur in any of the patients until the time of death. We consider that our procedure of modified Devine exclusion with vertical stomach reconstruction is an easy and feasible technique for GOO.

  2. [Metal self-expanding stents for malignant obstruction of stomach outlet and duodenum].

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    Shabunin, A V; Lebedev, S S; Chechenin, G M; Barinov, Yu V; Sidorova, Yu V; Bagateliya, Z A; Vardanyan, A V; Dolidze, D D

    To compare different types of self-expanding stents (partially coated or uncovered) for malignant pyloroduodenal obstruction (MPDO). 89 MPDO patients underwent stenting at the Botkin City Hospital (Moscow) for the period 2008-2016. The causes of malignant obstruction were: stomach cancer - 53 (59.5%), pancreatic cancer - 31 (34.8%), compression by retroperitoneal lymph nodes - 3 (3.4%), duodenal cancer - 2 (2.2%). Patients were divided into two homogeneous groups. In group 1 (32 patients) partially coated stents were used, in group 2 (57 patients) - uncovered stents. Mean age was 68.3±6.2 and 64.3±5.7 years in both groups respectively; male/female ratio 18/14 in group 1, 32/25 in group 2. Length of stricture was 51±5.1 mm in group 1, 48±4.8 mm in group 2. GOOSS score in group 1: 0-8, 1-13, 2-11, 3-0, in group 2 0-14, 1-25, 2-18, 3-0 (p=0.03). Technical success was achieved in 32 patients of group 1 (100%) and in 57 patients of group 2 (100%). There were no procedure-associated complications and mortality. Clinical success was observed in 29 (90.6%) patients of group 1 and in 50 (87.7%) patients of group 2. GOOSS score of group 1: 0-8, 1-8, 2-10, 3-12, group 2: 0-3, 1-15, 2-19, 3-20. There were 3 distal dislocations of the stent within 1 - days in group 1, in group 2 dislocations were absent. Postoperative chemotherapy was prescribed in 20 (62.5%) patients of group 1 and 38 (66.7%) patients of group 2 (p=0.08). 27 patients of group 1 and 49 patients of group 2 died due to progression of the disease, others are under observation. Mean life expectancy: group 1 (18 patients - 50 days, 9 patients - 100 days, 5 patients were alive by the moment of study); group 2 (32 patients - 50 days, 100 days - 17 patients, 8 patients were alive by the moment of study). 3 patients (9.4%) in group 1 and 7 (12.3%) patients in group 2 had stent dysfunction (p=0.02). Mean period of partially covered stent function was 138±3.9 days, uncovered stent - 96±4.8 days (р=0.003). Our study

  3. What is the value of proctography for diagnostic of outlet obstruction?

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    Maria Auxiliadora Prolungatti Cesar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of constipation is complicated due to the multiplicity and complexity of the causes. Regarding diagnostic tests, proctography is the best choice because it provides information on functions and visualization of abnormalities. Objective: To measure the isolated value of proctography in patients with obstructed defecation. Method: We evaluated 40 constipated patients at the Coloproctology Clinic of Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. The test was performed by introducing 120 mL of barium contrast in the rectum and by analyzing the different stages of evacuation. Three x-rays were performed in the lateral position: rest, anal contraction and evacuation. Results: The diagnoses were: rectocele: 2 (5.0%; anismus: 8 (20.0%; perineal descent: 13 (32.5%; sigmoidocele: 6 (15.0%; internal invagination: 10 (25.0%; rectocele + sigmoidocele 9 (22.5%; rectocele + internal invagination 11 (27.5%; rectocele + anismus: 18 (45.0%. Several patients presented multiple disorders. Conclusion: Constipation by obstructed defecation depends on multiple factors and it is important to have an accurate diagnosis. Proctography is essential, but insufficient as a single procedure. The other tests contribute with the diagnosis, therefore, they should be included in the investigation.O diagnóstico da constipação é difícil pela multiplicidade e complexidade das causas. Dos exames diagnósticos, a proctografia é preferida, fornecendo informações da função e visualização de anormalidades. Objetivo: Medir o valor isolado da proctografia, em pacientes com diagnóstico de defecação obstruída. Método: Avaliamos 40 pacientes com constipação intestinal do Ambulatório de Coloproctologia da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. O exame foi feito introduzindo-se 120 mL de contraste no reto e analisando-se as diferentes fases da evacuação. Foram realizadas três radiografias na posição lateral: repouso, contração anal e evacua

  4. Clinical outcomes of secondary stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent placement for primary stent malfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

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    Park, Jun Chul; Park, Jae Jun; Cheoi, Kungseok; Chung, Hyunsoo; Lee, Hyuk; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan

    2012-12-01

    Although a substantial number of patients require secondary stents insertion due to primary stent malfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction, data on the outcomes of secondary self-expanding metal stents are sparse. To investigate clinical outcomes and factors related with secondary stent malfunction in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction given secondary stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent insertion. For this retrospective study, a total 77 patients who underwent secondary stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent placement for primary stent malfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction were enrolled. We compared the effectiveness and complications of secondary covered and uncovered stents and explored the predictive factors for stent malfunction. Stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent placements were technically successful in all patients. Both groups also had comparable clinical success rates (covered stent, 87.2% and uncovered stent, 90.0%, P = 1.000). Stent malfunction rates (31.9% and 36.7% respectively, P = 0.805) and median patency time of stent (165 [95% confidence interval: 112-218] and 165 [95% confidence interval: 126-204] days, respectively, P = 0.358) were similar between secondary covered and uncovered stents. Longer patients' survival time (≥ 100 days) was associated with increased risk of stent malfunction (odds ratio: 4.598; 95% confidence interval: 1.473-14.355; P = 0.009). Secondary stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent placement is feasible and effective treatment for primary stent malfunctions in malignant gastric outlet obstruction. Covered and uncovered stent are equally acceptable in terms of stent-related complications and stent patency, regardless of primary stent type. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. PERCUTANEOUS ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY WITH JEJUNAL EXTENSION PLUS PERCUTANEOUS ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY (PEG-J PLUS PEG IN PATIENTS WITH GASTRIC/DUODENAL CANCER OUTLET OBSTRUCTION

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    Jorge FONSECA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Stent palliation is the gold standard for gastric/duodenal cancer outlet obstruction. When stenting is impossible, feeding may be achieved through a gastrojejunostomy (PEG-J, but displacement of jejunal tube is frequent due to manipulation for feeding and drainage. Gastric outlet obstruction results on increased gastroesophageal reflux or extra-tube leakage. In order to reduce the jejunostomy tube manipulation and the gastric residuum, we created a second gastrostomy (PEG dedicated to gastric drainage, reducing the PEG-J handling. Objective Our aim was evaluating of the usefulness of an added second gastrostomy in a PEG-J patient, for: 1. controlling symptomatic reflux and extra-tube leakage; 2. preventing jejunal tube dislocation. Methods We retrospectively evaluated patients were stent palliation of gastric/duodenal cancer outlet obstruction was not achieved, who were referred and underwent PEG-J. We selected four of these patients who needed a second PEG dedicated to gastric drainage, which was performed a few centimetres apart from the gastrojejunostomy. In order to achieve an efficient gastric drainage and provide the maximum comfort to the patient, the drainage PEG tube could be linked to an ileostomy bag. Results The four PEG-J cancer patients with longer survival developed symptoms associated with an important gastric residuum. After the drainage gastrostomy, symptoms subsided or vanished and there were no jejunal tube dislocations. Conclusions When stenting is not possible in patients with gastric/duodenal outlet obstruction due to cancer growing, feeding PEG-J plus drainage PEG may be an alternative, allowing duodenal/jejunal feeding and gastric drainage with minimal manipulation of the jejunal tube.

  6. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal extension plus percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG-j plus PEG) in patients with gastric/duodenal cancer outlet obstruction.

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    Fonseca, Jorge; Santos, Carla Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Stent palliation is the gold standard for gastric/duodenal cancer outlet obstruction. When stenting is impossible, feeding may be achieved through a gastrojejunostomy (PEG-J), but displacement of jejunal tube is frequent due to manipulation for feeding and drainage. Gastric outlet obstruction results on increased gastroesophageal reflux or extra-tube leakage. In order to reduce the jejunostomy tube manipulation and the gastric residuum, we created a second gastrostomy (PEG) dedicated to gastric drainage, reducing the PEG-J handling. Our aim was evaluating of the usefulness of an added second gastrostomy in a PEG-J patient, for: 1. controlling symptomatic reflux and extra-tube leakage; 2. preventing jejunal tube dislocation. Methods We retrospectively evaluated patients were stent palliation of gastric/duodenal cancer outlet obstruction was not achieved, who were referred and underwent PEG-J. We selected four of these patients who needed a second PEG dedicated to gastric drainage, which was performed a few centimetres apart from the gastrojejunostomy. In order to achieve an efficient gastric drainage and provide the maximum comfort to the patient, the drainage PEG tube could be linked to an ileostomy bag. The four PEG-J cancer patients with longer survival developed symptoms associated with an important gastric residuum. After the drainage gastrostomy, symptoms subsided or vanished and there were no jejunal tube dislocations. When stenting is not possible in patients with gastric/duodenal outlet obstruction due to cancer growing, feeding PEG-J plus drainage PEG may be an alternative, allowing duodenal/jejunal feeding and gastric drainage with minimal manipulation of the jejunal tube.

  7. A rare case of gastric outlet obstruction due to large intramural duodenal hematoma following endotherapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in a patient with end-stage renal disease

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    Vineet Kumar Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a very rare case and probably the first from India of gastric outlet obstruction due to a large intramural duodenal hematoma following combination endotherapy with hemoclipping and injection adrenaline 1:10,000 for actively bleeding duodenal ulcer in an elderly male patient with diabetes, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis. The patient improved to approximately 6 weeks of conservative treatment with nasojejunal feeding.

  8. Self-expanding metallic stents for gastric outlet obstruction resulting from stomach cancer: a preliminary study with a newly designed double-layered pyloric stent.

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    Lee, Sun Mi; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Won Il; Kim, Hyong Wook; Park, Jin Hong

    2007-12-01

    Although endoscopic stent placement is now generally accepted as a palliative treatment for gastric outlet obstruction resulting from gastric cancer, it carries potential limitations such as tumor ingrowth or migration. Our purpose was to evaluate the technical and clinical efficacy of endoscopic placement of a newly designed double-layered combination pyloric stent. Prospective, uncontrolled, single-center. Tertiary referral university hospital. Eleven patients with gastric outlet obstruction by unresectable stomach cancer. Eleven patients received a double-layered combination pyloric stent (an outer uncovered stent to reduce migration and an inner polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent to prevent tumor ingrowth). To evaluate technical success, clinical success, and complications, especially tumor ingrowth and migration. Technical success was achieved in 11 of 11 (100%) patients. Among 11 patients in whom endoscopic stenting was placed successfully, clinical success was 90.9%, tumor ingrowth 0%, migration 9.1%, and tumor overgrowth 9.1%. Median stent patency period was 121 days. Small number of patients, uncontrolled study, short-term follow-up period. We have described a technique for endoscopic metal stent placement by using the newly designed double-layered combination stent for gastric outlet obstruction by stomach cancer. This stent seems to be effective and looks promising for technical efficacy, clinical outcome, and preventing tumor ingrowth and migration.

  9. Large-diameter (30-35 mm) pneumatic balloon dilatation of the pylorus in patients with gastric outlet obstruction symptoms after esophagectomy.

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    Ericson, J; Sunde, B; Lindblad, M; Nilsson, M; Lundell, L; Tsai, J A

    2013-01-01

    Functional gastric outlet obstruction is a common problem after esophagectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treating this group of patients with pneumatic dilatation of the pyloric sphincter region using a large-diameter (30-35 mm) balloon. A review of all patients who had undergone pneumatic dilatation of the pylorus sphincter because of gastric outlet obstruction symptoms after esophagectomy at the Karolinska University Hospital from 2006-2011 was completed. Main outcomes were recordings of nausea, regurgitation and bloating. A total of 13 patients received pneumatic dilatation after an esophagectomy. The median time between esophagectomy and the first dilatation was 100 days, and the patients underwent a total of 21 dilatations (1-3 per patient) to a final median diameter of 30 mm. No procedure-related complications occurred. The median follow-up time was 205 days, and nausea and regurgitation improved significantly (p gastric outlet obstruction after esophagectomy. To document its true effectiveness, a randomized and sham-controlled study is needed.

  10. Clinical outcomes of secondary gastroduodenal self-expandable metallic stent placement by stent-in-stent technique for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

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    Sasaki, Takashi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Takahara, Naminatsu; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Suguru; Mohri, Dai; Yagioka, Hiroshi; Kogure, Hirofumi; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Togawa, Osamu; Matsubara, Saburo; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Sasahira, Naoki; Hirano, Kenji; Toda, Nobuo; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of secondary gastroduodenal stent placement after first stent dysfunction for malignant gastric outlet obstruction. We conducted a retrospective analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of secondary stent-in-stent gastroduodenal stent placement. Among 260 patients who had been treated with first gastroduodenal stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction, 29 patients (11.2%) were treated with secondary gastroduodenal stent placement because of first stent dysfunction. Pancreatic cancer was the major primary cancer (55.2%). A WallFlex duodenal stent was the most frequently inserted stent both as a first stent (75.9%) and as a secondary stent (62.1%). There were 22 patients (75.9%) that received gastroduodenal stents at the bending site (supraduodenal angle or infraduodenal angle). Technical and clinical success rates were 100% and 86.2%, respectively. Median eating period was 3.0 months, and median survival time was 3.5 months. As for related complications, gastrointestinal perforation, insufficient stent expansion, tumor ingrowth, tumor overgrowth, and cholangitis were experienced in 13.8% (four cases), 6.9% (two cases), 6.9% (two cases), 3.4% (one case), and 3.4% (one case), respectively. Secondary gastroduodenal stent placement might be effective for managing first stent dysfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction. However, gastrointestinal perforation was the major complication. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  11. [A Case of Inoperable Advanced Gastric Cancer with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in Which Oral Intake Could Be Prolonged by Duodenal Stenting].

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    Takeno, Atsushi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Murakami, Kouhei; Naito, Atsushi; Katsura, Yoshiteru; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Sakisaka, Hideki; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    The indications for duodenal stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction caused by gastric cancers remain controversial. We report the case of a patient with inoperable advanced gastric cancer with gastric outlet obstruction in whom oral intake could be prolonged for more than 2 years by duodenal stenting. A 60-year-old man diagnosed as having cStage Ⅳ gastric cancer with liver, peritoneum, and lymph node metastases underwent duodenal stent placement before first-line chemotherapy. After 8 months, the duodenal stent was found to be dislocated in the horizontal part of the duodenum due to tumor shrinkage. It was removed immediately by endoscopy. The patient was able to take a solid diet orally for the next 19 months, while receiving systemic chemotherapy. Duodenal stent placement proved useful in a patient who showed response to chemotherapy, despite the need for management of late complications. This approach is expected to be a first-line treatment option for gastric outlet obstruction caused by inoperable gastric cancer.

  12. EUS-guided gastroenterostomy is comparable to enteral stenting with fewer re-interventions in malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

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    Chen, Yen-I; Itoi, Takao; Baron, Todd H; Nieto, Jose; Haito-Chavez, Yamile; Grimm, Ian S; Ismail, Amr; Ngamruenphong, Saowanee; Bukhari, Majidah; Hajiyeva, Gulara; Alawad, Ahmad S; Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2017-07-01

    Endoscopic enteral stenting (ES) in malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is limited by high rates of stent obstruction. EUS-guided gastroenterostomy (EUS-GE) is a novel procedure that potentially offers sustained patency without tumor ingrowth/overgrowth. The aim of this study is to compare EUS-GE with ES in terms of (1) symptom recurrence and need for re-intervention, (2) technical success (proper stent positioning as determined via endoscopy and fluoroscopy), (3) clinical success (ability to tolerate oral intake without vomiting), and (4) procedure-related adverse events (AEs). Multicenter retrospective study of all consecutive patients who underwent either EUS-GE at four centers between 2013 and 2015 or ES at one center between 2008 and 2010. A total of 82 patients (mean age 66-years ± 13.5 and 40.2% female) were identified: 30 in EUS-GE and 52 in ES. Technical and clinical success was not significantly different: 86.7% EUS-GE versus 94.2% ES (p = 0.2) and 83.3% EUS-GE versus 67.3% ES (p = 0.12), respectively. Symptom recurrence and need for re-intervention, however, was significantly lower in the EUS-GE group (4.0 vs. 28.6%, (p = 0.015). Post-procedure mean length of hospitalization was comparable at 11.3 days ± 6.6 for EUS-GE versus 9.5 days ± 8.3 for ES (p = 0.3). Rates and severity of AEs (as per the ASGE lexicon) were also similar (16.7 vs. 11.5%, p = 0.5). On multivariable analysis, ES was independently associated with need for re-intervention (OR 12.8, p = 0.027). EUS-GE may be ideal for malignant GOO with comparable effectiveness and safety to ES while being associated with fewer symptom recurrence and requirements for re-intervention.

  13. The Surgical Outcomes of Totally Laparoscopic Stomach-partitioning Gastrojejunostomy for Gastric Outlet Obstruction: A Retrospective, Cohort Study.

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    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Ebihara, Yuma; Hontani, Koji; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Nakanishi, Yoshitsugu; Asano, Toshimichi; Noji, Takehiro; Kurashima, Yo; Murakami, Soichi; Nakamura, Toru; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Okamura, Keisuke; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2018-04-01

    We have reported the effectiveness of laparoscopy-assisted stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy Roux-en-Y reconstruction (LASPGJ-RY) for gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of totally laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy Roux-en-Y reconstruction (TLSPGJ-RY) for GOO. This retrospective study enrolled 19 consecutive patients with GOO. Surgical outcomes of LASPGJ-RY (LA group; n=8) and TLSPGJ-RY (TL group; n=11) between January 2004 and 2015 were compared. The patients' background characteristics, operative findings, postoperative complications, and period to starting postoperative chemotherapy were examined. Eligible cases included 6 patients with gastric cancer, 4 with pancreatic cancer, 4 with duodenal cancer, 4 with urologic malignancies, and 1 with benign duodenal stenosis. The patients' background characteristics were not significantly different. In surgical outcomes, there were no significant differences in operating time, bleeding, complications (≥Clavien-Dindo grade IIIA), and postoperative hospital stay between the groups. The time to resume diet was significantly shorter in the TL group (median, 3 d; range, 3 to 6 d) than in the LA group (median, 5 d; range, 3 to 7 d; P=0.0093), and the number of patients who could receive chemotherapy after surgery was significantly higher in the TL group (P=0.039). TLSPGJ-RY was a safe and feasible gastrojejunostomy procedure for GOO. TLSPGJ-RY might be useful for early resumption of oral intake after surgery.

  14. Feeding patients with preoperative symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction after pancreatoduodenectomy: Early oral or routine nasojejunal tube feeding?

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    Gerritsen, Arja; Wennink, Roos A W; Busch, Olivier R C; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Kazemier, Geert; Gouma, Dirk J; Molenaar, I Quintus; Besselink, Marc G H

    2015-01-01

    Early oral feeding is currently considered the optimal routine feeding strategy after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD). Some have suggested that patients with preoperative symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) who undergo PD have such a high risk of developing delayed gastric emptying that these patients should rather receive routine postoperative tube feeding. The aim of this study was to determine whether clinical outcomes after PD in these patients differ between postoperative early oral feeding and routine tube feeding. We analyzed a consecutive multicenter cohort of patients with preoperative symptoms of GOO undergoing PD (2010-2013). Patients were categorized into two groups based on the applied postoperative feeding strategy (dependent on their center's routine strategy): early oral feeding or routine nasojejunal tube feeding. Of 497 patients undergoing PD, 83 (17%) suffered from preoperative symptoms of GOO. 49 patients received early oral feeding and 29 patients received routine tube feeding. Time to resumption of adequate oral intake (primary outcome; 14 vs. 12 days, p = 0.61) did not differ between these two feeding strategies. Furthermore, overall complications and length of stay were similar in both groups. Of the patients receiving early oral feeding, 24 (49%) ultimately required postoperative tube feeding. In patients with an uncomplicated postoperative course, early oral feeding was associated with shorter time to adequate oral intake (8 vs. 12 days, p = 0.008) and shorter hospital stay (9 vs. 13 days, p < 0.001). Also in patients with preoperative symptoms of GOO, early oral feeding can be considered the routine feeding strategy after PD. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional and molecular evidence for Kv7 channel subtypes in human detrusor from patients with and without bladder outflow obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Svalø

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate whether Kv7 channels and their ancillary β-subunits, KCNE, are functionally expressed in the human urinary bladder. Kv7 channels were examined at the molecular level and by functional studies using RT-qPCR and myography, respectively. We found mRNA expression of KCNQ1, KCNQ3-KCNQ5 and KCNE1-5 in the human urinary bladder from patients with normal bladder function (n = 7 and in patients with bladder outflow obstruction (n = 3. Interestingly, a 3.4-fold up-regulation of KCNQ1 was observed in the latter. The Kv7 channel subtype selective modulators, ML277 (activator of Kv7.1 channels, 10 μM and ML213 (activator of Kv7.2, Kv7.4, Kv7.4/7.5 and Kv7.5 channels, 10 μM, reduced the tone of 1 μM carbachol pre-constricted bladder strips. XE991 (blocker of Kv7.1-7.5 channels, 10 μM had opposing effects as it increased contractions achieved with 20 mM KPSS. Furthermore, we investigated if there is interplay between Kv7 channels and β-adrenoceptors. Using cumulative additions of isoprenaline (β-adrenoceptor agonist and forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator in combination with the Kv7 channel activator and blocker, retigabine and XE991, we did not find interplay between Kv7 channels and β-adrenoceptors in the human urinary bladder. The performed gene expression analysis combined with the organ bath studies imply that compounds that activate Kv7 channels could be useful for treatment of overactive bladder syndrome.

  16. [Etiology and pathogenesis of overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bschleipfer, T; Wagenlehner, F; Weidner, W

    2011-04-01

    The symptom complex"overactive bladder" (OAB) affects more than 10% of adult individuals. The etiopathology is complex and multifactorial. Foremost, urinary tract infection, bladder cancer, foreign bodies, and history of radiation or intravesical instillation of chemotherapeutics must be excluded. In many cases, OAB is caused by neurogenic disorders that activate involuntary detrusor contractions (detrusor overactivity, DO). Also, non-neurogenic disorders such as bladder outlet obstruction or dysfunctions of the female pelvic floor/slack ligaments that affect the urothelium, suburothelium, detrusor and bladder afferents are substantially involved in the pathogenesis of OAB. Until now, circulatory disorders have not been adequately taken into consideration but seem to be another etiological factor that causes OAB. Henceforth, molecular changes of bladder afferents and circulatory disorders in patients suffering from OAB have to be investigated in more detail.

  17. Gastroduodenal stent placement versus surgical gastrojejunostomy for the palliation of gastric outlet obstructions in patients with unresectable gastric cancer: a propensity score-matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Yoo, Moon-Won; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Zhou, Wei-Zhong; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

    2016-08-01

    To compare the outcomes between stent placement and surgical gastrojejunostomy (GJ) for the palliation of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) in patients with unresectable gastric cancer. A retrospective study was performed in a single university hospital in 224 patients with GOO, and who were treated either by stent placement (n = 124) or surgical GJ (n = 100). The outcomes were assessed with reference to the following variables with the use of propensity-score matching: success rates; complications; dysphagia scores, albumin, and body mass index; survival; symptom-free duration; and hospitalization. We identified a well-balanced cohort of 74 pairs of patients, matched on the basis of propensity score. The dysphagia score 7 days after treatment was significantly better in the stent group (P obstruction symptoms and better nutritional status. • The two methods are equally effective in palliating gastric outlet obstruction symptoms • The stent group showed rapid and efficient palliation of symptoms • Recurrent symptoms were more frequent in the stent group • Surgical gastrojejunostomy provides a longer symptom-free duration and better nutritional status.

  18. A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial of Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction: Tailored Partially Covered Stents (Placed Fluoroscopically versus Standard Uncovered Stents (Placed Endoscopically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study is to compare the efficacy and safety of “outlet-shape” tailored stents with standard stents for the management of distal gastric cancer causing gastric outlet obstructions (GOOs with varying gastric cavity shapes and sizes. To determine the shape and size of the GOOs, stomach opacifications were performed using contrast media before stenting. Two basic shapes of the residual cavity of the proximal GOO were observed: cup shaped or approximately cup shaped and funnel shaped or approximately funnel shaped. Other shapes were not found. In the GOO tailored group, the size and shape of the proximal ends of the tailored stent were suited for the residual cavity of the proximal GOO. The tailored stents included large cup-shaped stents and large funnel-shaped stents. GOO tailored covered stents led to less restenosis and reintervention rates compared to standard uncovered stents but with the same survival.

  19. Effectiveness of laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy for patients with gastric outlet obstruction caused by advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Suda, Koichi; Satoh, Seiji; Kawamura, Yuichiro; Inaba, Kazuki; Ishida, Yoshinori; Uyama, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Distal advanced gastric cancer (AGC) occasionally causes gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). We developed a laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy (LSPGJ) to restore the ability of food intake. This was a retrospective study performed at a single institution. Of consecutive 78 patients with GOO caused by AGC between 2006 and 2012, 43 patients who underwent LSPGJ were enrolled. The procedure was performed in an antiperistaltic Billroth II fashion, and the afferent loop was elevated and fixed along the staple line of the proximal partitioned stomach. Then, patients for whom R0 resection was planned received chemotherapy prior to laparoscopic gastrectomy. The primary end point was food intake at the time of discharge, which was evaluated using the GOO scoring system (GOOSS). Short- and long-term outcomes were assessed as secondary end points. Overall survival was estimated and compared between the groups who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery (NAC group), definitive chemotherapy followed by curative resection (Conversion group), and best supportive care (BSC group). The median operative time was 92 min, blood loss did not exceed 30 g in any patient, and postoperative complications (Clavien-Dindo grade ≥2) were only seen in four patients (9.3 %). The median time to food intake was 3 days, and GOOSS scores were significantly improved in 41 patients (95.3 %). Chemotherapy was administered to 38 patients (88.4 %), of whom 11 later underwent radical resection, and 4 of 11 patients underwent conversion surgery following definitive chemotherapy. Median survival times were significantly superior in the NAC (n = 7; 46.8 months) and Conversion (n = 4; 35.9 months) groups than in the BSC group (n = 26; 12.2 months); however, the difference was not significant between the Conversion and NAC groups. LSPGJ is a feasible and safe minimally invasive induction surgery for patients with GOO from surgical and oncological perspectives.

  20. Gastric Outlet Obstruction--An Unexpected Complication during Coca-Cola Therapy for a Gastric Bezoar: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Gastric bezoars are concretions of undigested material, and Coca-Cola therapy is an easy, efficacious and safe approach for bezoar treatment. Gastric outlet obstruction due to a migratory gastric bezoar during Coca-Cola therapy is an uncommon presentation and, to the best of our knowledge, no cases have been previously reported. We herein describe one such case with no known predisposing factors that recovered via the endoscopic technique. A thorough literature search was performed, which yielded eight relevant patients from seven publications, all of who developed gastrointestinal obstruction during dissolution treatment and recovered uneventfully after surgical intervention. In conclusion, this potential complication should be kept in mind in the event that alternative treatment is necessary.

  1. Factors predicting through-the-scope gastroduodenal stenting outcomes in patients with gastric outlet obstruction: a large multicenter retrospective study in West Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamao, Kentaro; Kitano, Masayuki; Kayahara, Takahisa; Ishida, Etsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Minaga, Kosuke; Yamashita, Yukitaka; Nakajima, Jun; Asada, Masanori; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Osaki, Yukio; Chiba, Yasutaka; Imai, Hajime; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-11-01

    Endoscopic gastroduodenal stenting for malignant gastric outlet obstruction recently has become more effective, but the factors that predict gastroduodenal stenting outcomes are poorly defined. This multicenter retrospective cohort study evaluated the clinical outcomes of gastroduodenal stenting in malignant gastroduodenal obstruction and identified factors predicting clinical ineffectiveness, stent dysfunction, and adverse events. All consecutive patients with malignant gastroduodenal obstruction who underwent through-the-scope gastroduodenal stenting from 2009 to 2014 at 4 tertiary-care medical centers were identified. Clinically ineffective stenting was defined as symptom recurrence and a gastric outlet obstruction scoring system (GOOSS) score gastric cancer, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 277 patients (99.6%). GOOSS scores rose from 0.5 ± 0.6 to 2.6 ± 0.8. Stenting was ineffective in 32 patients (12.6%). Stent dysfunction that caused symptom recurrence during follow-up developed in 46 patients (16.6%). Adverse events occurred in 49 patients (17.7%). Three or more stenosis sites (odds ratio [OR] = 6.11; P < .01) and Karnofsky performance scores ≤50 (OR = 6.63; P < .01) predicted clinical ineffectiveness. Karnofsky performance scores ≤50 predicted stent dysfunction (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.63; P < .01). Bile duct stenosis (HR = 9.55; P = .02) and liver metastasis (HR = 9.42; P < .01) predicted stent overgrowth. Covered stent predicted stent migration (HR = 12.63; P < .01). Deployment of 2 stents predicted perforation (HR = 854.88; P < .01). Through-the-scope gastroduodenal stenting tended to be ineffective in patients with poor performance status and long stenosis sites. Stent dysfunction occurred more frequently in patients with poorer performance status. Deployment of 2 stents was a risk factor for perforation. Identification of these risk variables may help yield better gastroduodenal stenting outcomes. Copyright © 2016

  2. Palliative Therapy for Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Unresectable Gastric Cancer: A Meta-analysis Comparison of Gastrojejunostomy with Endoscopic Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shi-Bo; Shen, Wei-Song; Xi, Hong-Qing; Wei, Bo; Chen, Lin

    2016-05-05

    Gastrojejunostomy (GJJ) and endoscopic stenting (ES) are palliative treatments for gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) caused by gastric cancer. We compared the outcomes of GJJ with ES by performing a meta-analysis. Clinical trials that compared GJJ with ES for the treatment of GOO in gastric cancer were included in the meta-analysis. Procedure time, time to resumption of oral intake, duration of hospital stay, patency duration, and overall survival days were compared using weighted mean differences (WMDs). Technical success, clinical success, procedure-related mortality, complications, the rate of re-obstruction, postoperative chemotherapy, and reintervention were compared using odds ratios (OR s). Nine studies were included in the analysis. Technical success and clinical success were not significantly different between the ES and GJJ groups. The ES group had a shorter procedure time (WMD = -80.89 min, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -93.99 to -67.78,P obstruction (OR= 7.75, 95% CI = 4.06-14.78,P gastric cancer. ES is associated with better short-term outcomes. GJJ is preferable to ES in terms of its lower rate of stent-related complications, re-obstruction, and reintervention. GJJ should be considered a treatment option for patients with a long life expectancy and good performance status.

  3. Pathophysiology of the underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Aizawa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB, which has been described as a symptom complex suggestive of detrusor underactivity, is usually characterized by prolonged urination time with or without a sensation of incomplete bladder emptying, usually with hesitancy, reduced sensation on filling, and slow stream often with storage symptoms. Several causes such as aging, bladder outlet obstruction, diabetes mellitus, neurologic disorders, and nervous injury to the spinal cord, cauda equine, and peripheral pelvic nerve have been assumed to be responsible for the development of UAB. Several contributing factors have been suggested in the pathophysiology of UAB, including myogenic failure, efferent and/or afferent dysfunctions, and central nervous system dysfunction. In this review article, we have described relationships between individual contributing factors and the pathophysiology of UAB based on previous reports. However, many pathophysiological uncertainties still remain, which require more investigations using appropriate animal models.

  4. A Rare Complication of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate: Explosion of the Bladder

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    İbrahim Buldu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Monopolar and bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate is currently the gold standard modality in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement. A rare complication of transurethral resection is the explosion of the bladder as may occur during resection of the prostate. The etiology of explosion is thought to be a result of ignition due to mixture of oxygen and hydrogen gas occurring during the resection under increased pressure of the bladder. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the first report of bladder explosion during transurethral resection with bipolar energy using saline solution.

  5. Successful treatment with a combination of endoscopic injection and irrigation with coca cola for gastric bezoar-induced gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Sheng; Tung, Chun-Fang; Peng, Yen-Chun; Chow, Wei-Keung; Chang, Chi-Sen; Hu, Wei-Hsiung

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of gastric bezoar-induced gastric outlet obstruction that was successfully treated with a combination of endoscopic injection and irrigation with Coca Cola. A 73-year-old diabetic woman had a history of perforated peptic ulcer and had received pyloroplasty more than 20 years previously. She had been ingesting Pho Pu Zi (Cordia dichotoma Forst. f.) as an appetizer for 1 month. She presented with epigastric pain, nausea, and vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, performed at a local hospital, showed 2 gastric bezoars in the stomach, and 1 of them impacted at the pylorus. She was referred to our emergency department for removal of the gastric bezoars that were suspected to be causing gastric outlet obstruction. All attempts at endoscopic removal using a polypectomy snare, biopsy forceps and Dormia basket failed. We then injected Coca Cola directly into the bezoar mass, followed by irrigation with Coca Cola. Follow-up endoscopy was performed the next day, which revealed that the gastric bezoars had dissolved spontaneously.

  6. Successful Treatment with a Combination of Endoscopic Injection and Irrigation with Coca Cola for Gastric Bezoar-induced Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Sheng Lin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of gastric bezoar-induced gastric outlet obstruction that was successfully treated with a combination of endoscopic injection and irrigation with Coca Cola. A 73-year-old diabetic woman had a history of perforated peptic ulcer and had received pyloroplasty more than 20 years previously. She had been ingesting Pho Pu Zi (Cordia dichotoma Forst. f. as an appetizer for 1 month. She presented with epigastric pain, nausea, and vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, performed at a local hospital, showed 2 gastric bezoars in the stomach, and 1 of them impacted at the pylorus. She was referred to our emergency department for removal of the gastric bezoars that were suspected to be causing gastric outlet obstruction. All attempts at endoscopic removal using a polypectomy snare, biopsy forceps and Dormia basket failed. We then injected Coca Cola directly into the bezoar mass, followed by irrigation with Coca Cola. Follow-up endoscopy was performed the next day, which revealed that the gastric bezoars had dissolved spontaneously.

  7. A Rare Complication of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate: Explosion of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    İbrahim Buldu; Tuna Karatağ; Mehmet Kaynar; M. Okan İstanbulluoğlu

    2015-01-01

    Monopolar and bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate is currently the gold standard modality in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement. A rare complication of transurethral resection is the explosion of the bladder as may occur during resection of the prostate. The etiology of explosion is thought to be a result of ignition due to mixture of oxygen and hydrogen gas occurring during the resection under increased pressure of the bladd...

  8. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Bladder: New Parameters for Evaluating Voiding Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnab, A.; Shadgan, B.; Stothers, L.; Macnab, A.; Afshar, K.

    2011-01-01

    We describe innovative methodology for monitoring alterations in bladder oxygenation and haemodynamics in humans using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Concentrations of the chromophores oxygenated (O 2 Hb) and deoxygenated (HHb) haemoglobin and their sum (total haemoglobin) differ during bladder contraction in health and disease. A wireless device that incorporates three paired light emitting diodes (wavelengths 760 and 850 nanometers) and silicon photodiode detector collects data trans cutaneously (10 Hz) with the emitter/detector over the bladder during spontaneous bladder emptying. Data analysis indicates comparable patterns of change in chromophore concentration in healthy children and adults (positive trend during voiding, predominantly due to elevated O 2 Hb), but different changes in symptomatic subjects with characteristic chromophore patterns identified for voiding dysfunction due to specific pathophysiology: bladder outlet obstruction (males), overactive bladder (females), and non neurogenic dysfunction (children). Comparison with NIRS muscle data suggests altered bladder haemodynamics and/or oxygenation may underlie voiding dysfunction offering new insight into the causal physiology.

  9. Immunohistochemical Detection and Localization of Somatostatin Receptor Subtypes in Prostate Tissue from Patients with Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Montironi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim of the Study: Scant information on the cellular distribution of the five somatostatin receptor (SSTR subtypes in the normal prostate and in neoplasms of the prostate has been reported in very few studies in which techniques, such as in situ hybridization histochemistry, autoradiography, and more recently immunohistochemistry, have been applied. The aim of the study was to examine immunohistochemically the distribution and localization of these 5 subtypes in the various tissue components in normal prostate.

  10. Long-term outcome of palliative therapy for gastric outlet obstruction caused by unresectable gastric cancer in patients with good performance status: endoscopic stenting versus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    No, Jin Hee; Kim, Sang Woo; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2013-07-01

    In patients with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) caused by gastric cancer, choosing between self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement and gastrojejunostomy (GJJ) is of concern, especially in those with good performance status. To compare SEMS placement and GJJ. Retrospective study. Single tertiary referral center. Patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-2 who had GOO caused by unresectable gastric cancer. SEMS placement and GJJ. Success rate, adverse events, patency, and survival duration. Of the 113 patients in this study, 72 underwent SEMS placement and 41 underwent GJJ. The 2 groups did not differ in the technical and clinical success and incidence of early adverse events. However, the rate of late adverse events was significantly higher in the SEMS group (44.4% vs 12.2%; P gastric cancer in patients with a good performance status, especially ECOG 0-1. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastric outlet obstruction due to adenocarcinoma in a patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

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    Hammond Sue

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome is characterized by progressive cerebellar dysfunction, conjuctival and cutaneous telangiectasias, severe immune deficiencies, premature aging and predisposition to cancer. Clinical and radiographic evaluation for malignancy in ataxia-telangiectasia patients is usually atypical, leading to delays in diagnosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 20 year old ataxia-telangiectasia patient with gastric adenocarcinoma that presented as complete gastric outlet obstruction. Conclusion A literature search of adenocarcinoma associated with ataxia-telangiectasia revealed 6 cases. All patients presented with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints suggestive of ulcer disease. Although there was no correlation between immunoglobulin levels and development of gastric adenocarcinoma, the presence of chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia seem to lead to the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. One should consider adenocarcinoma in any patient with ataxia-telangiectasia who presents with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints, since this can lead to earlier diagnosis.

  12. Clinical Impact of Stomach-partitioning Gastrojejunostomy with Braun Enteroenterostomy for Patients with Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Unresectable Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigami, Takaaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Ishigami, Sumiya; Yanagita, Shigehiro; Okubo, Keishi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Kita, Yoshiaki; Mori, Shinichiro; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2016-10-01

    To compare adverse events and post-therapeutic clinical courses between stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy with Braun enteroenterostomy (SPGJ-BEE) and endoscopic metallic stent placement (EMSP) in patients with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) caused by unresectable gastric cancer and assess the clinical utility of SPGJ-BEE. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 16 and 9 patients with GOO undergoing SPGJ-BEE and EMSP, respectively. Re-obstruction caused by tumor overgrowth was identified in 3 (33.3%) out of 9 patients in the EMSP group. The GOO scoring system (GOOSS) revealed that its score after treatments was significantly higher in the SPGJ-BEE group than in the EMSP group (p<0.001). All patients in both groups received chemotherapy after treatments. The median survival times in the SPGJ-BEE and EMSP groups were 414 and 303 days, respectively. Our preliminary results suggest that SPGJ-BEE provides an improved long-term quality of life and the early induction of subsequent chemotherapy related with a better prognosis in patients with GOO. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Entirely Laparoscopic Gastrectomy and Colectomy for Remnant Gastric Cancer with Gastric Outlet Obstruction and Transverse Colon Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyun Il; Kim, Min Gyu

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that gastrectomy with curative intent is the best way to improve outcomes of patients with remnant gastric cancer. Recently,several investigators reported their experiences with laparoscopic gastrectomy of remnant gastric cancer. We report the case of an 83-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with remnant gastric cancer with obstruction. She underwent an entirely laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with colectomy because of direct invasion of the transverse colon. The opera...

  14. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome causing pouch outlet obstruction 5 years after roux-en-y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gys, Ben; Mertens, Joren; Ruppert, Martin; Hubens, Guy

    2017-12-05

    We present the case of a 57-year-old man with a history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and colonic polyps who presented with an upper gastrointestinal obstruction based on massive stomach polyposis in the pouch. Two months prior to this acute admission, he had undergone resection of the gastric remnant due to massive refractory intraluminal bleeding from a polypoid mass. Ten years earlier, right colectomy was performed due to hypertrophic polyposis unsuitable for endoscopic polypectomy. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a polypoid mass in the pouch causing obstruction. Benign biopsies were obtained. A resection of the stomach pouch with esophagojejunostomy was performed. Macroscopic evaluation of the pouch lumen showed massive polyposis with a sharp demarcation near the Z-line and at the gastrojejunostomy. On clinical examination, the presence of atrophic nail changes, alopecia, and palmar hyperpigmentation was noticed. Postoperative course was uneventful and feeding was restarted successfully. Histological analysis revealed hyperplastic polypoid tissue, which resembled the polyps in the stomach remnant and colon. Together with the ectodermal changes, the diagnose of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome was established. Diffuse polyposis in Cronkhite-Canada syndrome is a rare cause for pouch obstruction after RYGB. Clinical examination should focus on dermatologic findings.

  15. Predictors of outcomes in patients undergoing covered and uncovered self-expandable metal stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yasuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Ban, Tesshin; Natsume, Makoto; Okumura, Fumihiro; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Takada, Hiroki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Jinno, Naruomi; Togawa, Shozo; Ando, Tomoaki; Kataoka, Hiromi; Joh, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Uncovered self-expandable metal stents (U-SEMSs) and covered self-expandable metal stents (C-SEMSs) are available for palliative therapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, clinical differences and indications between the 2 types of SEMSs have not been elucidated. We retrospectively compared 126 patients with U-SEMS and 126 patients with C-SEMSs with regard to clinical outcome and factors predictive of clinical improvement after SEMSs placement. No significant difference was observed between the U-SEMS and C-SEMS groups with respect to technical success, clinical success, GOO score, or time to stent dysfunction. Stent migration was significantly more frequent in patients with C-SEMSs (U-SEMSs, .79%; C-SEMSs, 8.73%; P = .005). Karnofsky performance status, chemotherapy, peritoneal dissemination, and stent expansion ≤ 30% were associated significantly with poor GOO score improvement in multivariable analyses, but stent type was not (P = .213). In subgroup analyses, insufficient (≤30%) stent expansion was an independent factor in patients with U-SEMSs (P = .041) but not C-SEMSs. In the insufficient stent expansion subgroup, C-SEMSs was associated significantly with superior clinical improvement compared with U-SEMSs (P = .01). Insufficient stent expansion was observed more frequently in patients with GI obstruction because of anastomotic sites or metastatic cancer (44.8% [13/29], P = .001). No clinical difference, apart from stent migration, was observed between patients with U-SEMSs and C-SEMSs. GI obstruction because of an anastomotic site or metastatic cancer may be an indication for C-SEMS use to improve oral intake after SEMSs placement. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Placement of a triple-layered covered versus uncovered metallic stent for palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction: a multicenter randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetani, Iruru; Mizumoto, Yoshinori; Shigoka, Hiroaki; Omuta, Shigefumi; Saito, Michihiro; Tokuhisa, Junya; Morizane, Toshio

    2014-03-01

    Usually, uncovered self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) are used for palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). A triple-layered covered SEMS is reported to be efficacious, but its performance has not been compared with uncovered SEMS. The present study is the first to compare the efficacy and safety of a triple-layered covered versus uncovered SEMS. A multicenter randomized study was conducted in two tertiary referral centers, with 62 eligible patients with symptomatic GOO to receive covered (n = 31) or uncovered SEMS (n = 31). The primary endpoint was SEMS patency, and secondary endpoints were success rate and adverse events after complete follow up. Both groups had a technical success rate of 100% and comparable clinical success rates (P = 0.67). There was nostatistically significant difference in stent patency and adverse events between the two groups (P = 0.52 and P = 0.38, respectively). Although the occurrence rate of persistent obstructive symptoms was comparable (P = 0.42), that of recurrent obstructive symptoms was higher in the uncovered group (29% vs 3.6%, P = 0.0125). Patient survival did not differ between groups (P = 0.34). There was no statistically significant difference in stent patency, but use of a triple-layered covered SEMS was associated with less frequent stent dysfunction more than 4 weeks after stenting, despite similar short-term outcomes. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  17. The novel β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron reduces carbachol-induced contractile activity in detrusor tissue from patients with bladder outflow obstruction with or without detrusor overactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalø, Julie; Nordling, Jørgen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    prostatic hyperplasia undergoing cystoscopy and from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy/cystectomy (in total 33 donors). Detrusor contractility was evaluated by organ bath studies and strips were incubated with carbachol (1μM) to induce and enhance tension. Both mirabegron and isoprenaline reduced...... preparations from patients with bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) with and without detrusor overactivity (DO), and from patients with normal bladder function. We compared the effects to those of isoprenaline, a non-selective β-adrenoceptor agonist. Detrusor specimens were obtained from patients with benign...

  18. Stereological comparison of the effects of pentoxifylline, captopril, simvastatin, and tamoxifen on kidney and bladder structure after partial urethral obstruction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mehdi; Soltani, Mohammad-Reza; Jahanabadi, Zahra; Abdollahifar, Mohammad-Amin; Tanideh, Nader; Noorafshan, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Limited studies have shown antifibrotic effects of pentoxifylline, captopril, simvastatin, and tamoxifen. No comparisons are available of the effects of these drugs on prevention of renal and bladder changes in partial urethral obstruction (PUO). The rats were divided into six groups (n=7). The sham-operated rats (group I) only underwent laparotomy and did not receive any treatments. The PUO groups (group II-VI) received normal saline (PUO+NS), pentoxifylline (100 mg/kg/d; PUO+PEN), captopril (35 mg/kg/d; PUO+CAP), simvastatin (15 mg/kg/d; PUO+SIM), or tamoxifen (10 mg/kg/d; PUO+TAM) by gavage for 28 days. Then, the volume and/or length of the kidney components (tubules, vessels, and fibrous tissue) and the bladder components (epithelial and muscular layers, fibrous tissue, fibroblast and fibrocyte number) were quantitatively evaluated on the microscopic sections by use of stereological techniques. The volume of renal and bladder fibrosis was significantly ameliorated in the PUO+PEN group, followed by the PUO+CAP, PUO+SIM, and PUO+TAM groups. Also, the volume and length of the renal tubules and vessels and bladder layers were more significantly protected in the PUO+PEN group, followed by the PUO+CAP, PUO+SIM, and PUO+TAM groups. Treatment of PUO with PEN was more effective in the prevention of renal and bladder fibrosis and in the preservation of renal and bladder structures.

  19. Palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction with simultaneous endoscopic insertion of afferent and efferent jejunal limb enteral stents in patients with recurrent malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Isaac; Gerdes, Hans; Markowitz, Arnold J; Mendelsohn, Robin B; Ludwig, Emmy; Shah, Pari; Schattner, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    Patients with prior pancreaticobiliary or distal gastric cancer treated surgically may have local anastomotic recurrence with obstruction of the afferent and efferent jejunal limbs. This report describes the efficacy and safety of simultaneous endoscopic insertion of self-expanding metal stents into the afferent and efferent jejunal limbs in patients with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) of post-surgical anatomy for palliation of recurrent malignancy. Patients were identified from an endoscopic database at a specialized cancer center between September 2007 and March 2014. Technical success was defined as single-session insertion of afferent and efferent jejunal limb enteral stents. Clinical success was defined as immediate symptom relief and ability to advance diet. A durable response was defined as symptom relief of at least 60 days or until hospice placement or death. Twenty-three patients were identified who underwent insertion of two 22-mm-diameter uncovered duodenal stents. Stent length varied from 60 to 120 mm. Stents were placed under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. Three patients required balloon dilation to facilitate stent insertion. Average procedure time was 58.8 min (range 28-120). Technical success was achieved in 23/24 (96%) patients. Clinical success was achieved in 19/23 (83%) patients. Following initial stent insertion and prior to subsequent re-intervention, 11/19 (58%) patients had a durable response with a median duration of 70 days (range 4-315). Eight (42%) patients underwent subsequent re-intervention at a median of 22 days (range 11-315). Five patients had stent revision and were able to tolerate oral intake. Two patients had percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy insertion. One patient required surgical diversion for persistent obstruction. Complications included stent migration and post-stent insertion bacteremia due to food bolus obstruction. Recurrent malignant GOO in patients with post-surgical anatomy treated with

  20. Clinical guidelines for male lower urinary tract symptoms associated with non-neurogenic overactive bladder

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    Chung-Cheng Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this guideline is to direct urologists and patients regarding how to identify overactive bladder (OAB in male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and to make an accurate diagnosis and establish treatment goals to improve the patients' quality of life (QoL. LUTS are commonly divided into storage, voiding, and postmicturition symptoms, and are highly prevalent in elderly men. LUTS can result from a complex interplay of pathophysiologic features that can include bladder dysfunction and bladder outlet dysfunction such as benign prostatic obstruction (BPO or poor relaxation of the urethral sphincter. Diagnosis of OAB in male LUTS leads to accurate diagnosis of pure OAB and bladder outlet-related OAB, and appropriate treatment in men with residual storage symptoms after treatment for LUTS.

  1. Huge Obstructive Bladder Diverticula and Cystic Dysplastic Kidneys in a Newborn: A Challenging Dilemma

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    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated a 63-day boy with end stage renal disease and abdominalcysts.The antenatal sonography detected anhydraminos, posterior urethral valve,and cystic dysplastic kidneys. Voiding cystourethrogram revealed two obstructivegiant diverticula which at firstlooked like enlarged renal pelvis.The patient had persistenturinary tract infection and perforation of diverticula. The dialysis was ineffectivebecause of leakage,immeasurable inflow and dwell volume, peritonitis and tunnelinfection.As a result, the availability of automated peritoneal dialysis for infantsis recommended to reduce morbidity and increasing the survival rate. Nonethelessthe giant bladder diverticules might be better managed by diverticulectomy procedure.

  2. Unresectable gastric cancer with gastric outlet obstruction and distant metastasis responding to intraperitoneal and folfox chemotherapy after palliative laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy: report of a case

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) caused by unresectable gastric cancer is a challenging aspect of patient care. There have been no reports involving patients with obstructing gastric cancer and several incurable factors curatively treated by multimodal treatments. Case presentation We report a case of 55-year-old man who was diagnosed with a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in the pre-pyloric antrum with GOO by gastroscopy. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed thickening of the gastric wall and adjacent fat infiltration, and a large amount of food in the stomach suggesting a passage disturbance, enlarged lymph nodes along the common hepatic and left gastric arteries, and multiple hepatic metastases. The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level was 343 ng/ml and the carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level was within normal limits. The patient underwent a laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy for palliation of the GOO. On the 3rd and 12th days after surgery, he received intraperitoneal chemotherapy with 40 mg of docetaxel and 150 mg of carboplatin. Simultaneously, combined chemotherapy with 85 mg/m2 of oxaliplatin for the 1st day and 600 mg/m2 of 5-FU for 2 days (FOLFOX regimen) was administered from the 8th post-operative day. After completion of nine courses of FOLFOX, the patient achieved a complete response (CR) with complete disappearance of the primary tumor and the metastatic foci. He underwent a radical subtotal gastrectomy with D3 lymph node dissection 4 months after the initial palliative surgery. The pathologic results revealed no residual primary tumor and no lymph node metastasis in 43 dissected lymph nodes. He has maintained a CR for 18 months since the last operation. Conclusion Combination chemotherapy with systemic and intraperitoneal chemotherapy following laparoscopic bypass surgery showed marked efficacy in the treatment for unresectable advanced gastric cancer with GOO. PMID:21167074

  3. Predicting the Progress of Caustic Injury to Complicated Gastric Outlet Obstruction and Esophageal Stricture, Using Modified Endoscopic Mucosal Injury Grading Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lung-Sheng; Tai, Wei-Chen; Hu, Ming-Luen; Wu, Keng-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Severe caustic injury to the gastrointestinal tract carries a high risk of luminal strictures. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify predicting factors for progress of caustic injury to gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) and esophageal strictures (ES), using modified endoscopic mucosal injury grading scale. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients with caustic injuries to the gastrointestinal tract in our hospital in the past 7 years. We enrolled 108 patients (49 male, 59 female, mean age 50.1 years, range 18–86) after applying strict exclusion criteria. All patients received early upper gastrointestinal endoscopy within 24 hours of ingestion. Grade III stomach injuries were found in 58 patients (53.7%); 43 (39.8%) esophageal, and 13 (12%) duodenal. Of the 108 patients, 10 (9.3%) died during the acute stage. Age over 60 years (OR 4.725, P = 0.029) was an independent risk factor of mortality for patients after corrosive injury. Among the 98 survivors, 36 developed luminal strictures (37.1%): ES in 18 patients (18.6%), GOO in 7 (7.2%), and both ES and GOO in 11 (11.3%). Grade III esophageal (OR 3.079, P = 0.039) or stomach (OR 18.972, P = 0.007) injuries were independent risk factors for obstructions. Age ≥60 years was the independent risk factor for mortality after corrosive injury of GI tract. Grade III injury of esophagus was the independent risk factor for development of ES. Grade III injury of stomach was the independent risk factor for development of GOO. PMID:25162035

  4. Covered metallic stents with an anti-migration design vs. uncovered stents for the palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction: a multicenter, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Younjoo; Chung, Hyunsoo; Lee, Sang Hyub

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies reported comparable stent patency between covered self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) and uncovered SEMS (UCS) for palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the newly developed WAVE-covered SEMS (WCS), which has an anti-migration design, compared with UCS in gastric cancer patients with symptomatic GOO. A total of 102 inoperable gastric cancer patients with symptomatic GOO were prospectively enrolled from five referral centers and randomized to undergo UCS or WCS placement. Stent patency and recurrence of obstructive symptoms were assessed at 8 weeks and 16 weeks after stent placement. At the 8-week follow-up, both stent patency rates (72.5% vs. 62.7%) and re-intervention rates (19.6% vs. 19.6%) were comparable between the WCS and the UCS groups. Both stent stenosis (2.4% vs. 8.1%) and migration rates (9.5% vs. 5.4%) were comparable between WCS and UCS groups. At the 16-week follow-up, however, the WCS group had a significantly higher stent patency rate than the UCS group (68.6% vs. 41.2%). Re-intervention rates in the WCS and UCS groups were 23.5% and 39.2%, respectively. Compared with the UCS group, the WCS group had a significantly lower stent restenosis rate (7.1% vs. 37.8%) and a comparable migration rate (9.5% vs. 5.4%). Overall stent patency was significantly longer in the WCS group than in the UCS group. No stent-associated significant adverse events occurred in either the WCS or UCS groups. In the multivariate analysis, WCS placement and chemotherapy were identified as independent predictors of 16-week stent patency. WCS group showed comparable migration rate and significantly more durable long-term stent patency compared with UCS group for the palliation of GOO in patients with inoperable gastric cancer.

  5. Unresectable gastric cancer with gastric outlet obstruction and distant metastasis responding to intraperitoneal and folfox chemotherapy after palliative laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy: report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Joong-Min

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO caused by unresectable gastric cancer is a challenging aspect of patient care. There have been no reports involving patients with obstructing gastric cancer and several incurable factors curatively treated by multimodal treatments. Case presentation We report a case of 55-year-old man who was diagnosed with a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in the pre-pyloric antrum with GOO by gastroscopy. An abdominal computed tomography (CT scan revealed thickening of the gastric wall and adjacent fat infiltration, and a large amount of food in the stomach suggesting a passage disturbance, enlarged lymph nodes along the common hepatic and left gastric arteries, and multiple hepatic metastases. The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level was 343 ng/ml and the carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9 level was within normal limits. The patient underwent a laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy for palliation of the GOO. On the 3rd and 12th days after surgery, he received intraperitoneal chemotherapy with 40 mg of docetaxel and 150 mg of carboplatin. Simultaneously, combined chemotherapy with 85 mg/m2 of oxaliplatin for the 1st day and 600 mg/m2 of 5-FU for 2 days (FOLFOX regimen was administered from the 8th post-operative day. After completion of nine courses of FOLFOX, the patient achieved a complete response (CR with complete disappearance of the primary tumor and the metastatic foci. He underwent a radical subtotal gastrectomy with D3 lymph node dissection 4 months after the initial palliative surgery. The pathologic results revealed no residual primary tumor and no lymph node metastasis in 43 dissected lymph nodes. He has maintained a CR for 18 months since the last operation. Conclusion Combination chemotherapy with systemic and intraperitoneal chemotherapy following laparoscopic bypass surgery showed marked efficacy in the treatment for unresectable advanced gastric cancer with GOO.

  6. Stent under-expansion on the procedure day, a predictive factor for poor oral intake after metallic stenting for gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yasuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Ban, Tesshin; Narita, Kei; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Hayashi, Kazuki; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Shimizu, Shuya; Kondo, Hiromu; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshida, Michihiro; Umemura, Shuichiro; Kato, Akihisa; Yamada, Tomonori; Ando, Tomoaki; Joh, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) have been widely accepted as palliation therapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, the factors predictive of poor oral intake after SEMS placement have not been elucidated sufficiently. We aimed to clarify both the patient and stent-related predictive factors. We retrospectively reviewed 126 consecutive patients who underwent uncovered SEMS placement for malignant GOO between April 2010 and March 2013 at a university hospital and two tertiary care referral centers. Technical success of SEMS placement was achieved in all 126 (100%) patients. Improved oral intake was observed in 111 (88.1%) patients. A Karnofsky performance status ≤ 40 (odds ratio [OR], 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.28; P = 0.041), peritoneal dissemination (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.26; P = 0.038), and under-expansion of the SEMS on the procedure day (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.26-1.62; P < 0.001) were independent predictive factors for poor improvement on the GOO scoring system, according to multivariate analysis. SEMS under-expansion was a stent related, while poor performance status and peritoneal dissemination were patient related, predictive factors for poor oral intake after SEMS placement for malignant GOO. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Impact of carcinomatosis and ascites status on long-term outcomes of palliative treatment for patients with gastric outlet obstruction caused by unresectable gastric cancer: stent placement versus palliative gastrojejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Park, Jun Chul; Kim, Eun Hye; Chung, Hyunsoo; An, Ji Yeong; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Lee, Yong Chan; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong Bae

    2015-02-01

    Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement and palliative gastrojejunostomy (GJJ) are palliative treatment options for malignant gastric outlet obstruction. To compare clinical outcomes of palliative treatments for gastric outlet obstruction caused by unresectable gastric cancer. Retrospective study. University-affiliated tertiary-care hospital in the Republic of Korea. Two hundred fifty-six patients with gastric outlet obstruction caused by unresectable gastric cancer. SEMS placement and palliative GJJ. Patency duration and overall survival duration. In total, 217 and 39 patients underwent SEMS placement and palliative GJJ, respectively, as an initial palliative treatment. Treatment modality affected reobstruction after clinical success (hazard ratio [HR] [95% confidence interval {CI}], 0.5 [0.3-0.8] of palliative GJJ). In addition, carcinomatosis with ascites was an independent associated factor of clinical success and reobstruction (HR [95% CI], 0.3 [0.1-0.7] and 1.4 [1.0-2.0], respectively). In a subgroup of patients with good performance who had neither carcinomatosis nor ascites, patency duration and overall survival duration did not differ between the 2 groups (P = .079 and P = .290, respectively). In patients with good performance who had carcinomatosis without ascites, patency duration was longer in the palliative GJJ group than in the SEMS placement group (P = .016). Overall survival, however, did not differ between the 2 groups (P = .062). In a subgroup of patients with good performance who had carcinomatosis with ascites, both patency duration and overall survival were longer in the palliative GJJ group than in the SEMS placement group (P = .007 and P = .012, respectively). Nonrandomized, retrospective study. Long-term clinical outcomes of the palliative treatment modality for gastric outlet obstruction caused by unresectable gastric cancer were affected by carcinomatosis and ascites status. Copyright © 2015 American Society for

  8. Over-the-wire versus through-the-scope stents for the palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction: A retrospective comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Choi, Kee Don; Ryu, Min-Hee; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Do Hoon; Yoo, Moon-Won; Hwang, Dae Wook; Tsauo, Jiaywei

    2016-12-01

    To compare the outcomes of over-the-wire (OTW) and through-the-scope (TTS) partially covered stents in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). A retrospective study was performed in 306 patients who had either OTW (n = 125) or TTS (n = 181) stents placed. Outcomes analysed included technical and clinical success, procedure time, complications, re-intervention, stent patency and survival. One hundred and ninety-three patients met our inclusion criteria, including 125 patients in the OTW group and 68 patients in the TTS group. Technical and clinical outcomes were similar in the two groups. Stent migration rate was higher in the TTS than in the OTW group (P = 0.002) and was associated with straight stent and subsequent chemotherapy in the TTS group. Stent collapse was lower in the TTS than in the OTW group (P = 0.021). Six-month stent patency rate was higher in the OTW than in the TTS group (P = 0.044). TTS and OTW stents for the palliation of malignant GOO resulted in similar technical and clinical outcomes, stent patency and survival. TTS stents were associated with a higher migration rate, especially use of straight stents and subsequent chemotherapy, but a lower stent collapse rate than OTW stents. • OTW and TTS stents are equally effective in palliating GOO symptoms. • Six-month stent patency was higher for OTW than for TTS. • The straight stent and subsequent chemotherapy could increase stent migration. • Complication rates were lower for flared than for straight stents. • It is necessary to develop a multidisciplinary approach to integrate clinical experience.

  9. Palliative gastrojejunostomy versus endoscopic stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction in patients with unresectable gastric cancer: a propensity score-matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Su Mi; Kim, Hye Seung; Carriere, Keumhee C; Min, Yang Won; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Jae J

    2017-10-01

    It remains unclear whether selection of treatment modality affects the survival of patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). We compared the effect of gastrojejunostomy (GJ) and endoscopic self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement on the long-term outcomes of patients with malignant GOO caused by unresectable gastric cancer. We conducted a retrospective study of gastric cancer patients undergoing GJ or endoscopic SEMS placement for the palliation of malignant GOO. To reduce the effect of selection bias, we performed a propensity score-matching analysis between two groups. In a propensity-matched analysis (45 and 99 in GJ and SEMS groups, respectively), clinical success rates were comparable between the GJ and SEMS groups (95.6 and 96.0%), while the SEMS group showed significantly shorter hospital stays than the GJ group. The GJ group showed a significantly longer reintervention period and overall survival (393 and 129 days) compared to the SEMS group. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, GJ, low ECOG scale (good performance status), and additional chemo- or radiation therapy were identified as independent favorable predictors of overall survival. GJ was also identified as an independent protective predictor against reintervention. We found that palliative GJ was significantly associated with longer overall survival and lower risk of reintervention than SEMS placement in patients with malignant GOO caused by unresectable gastric cancer. Given very limited expected survival in selected patients with unresectable gastric cancer and more favorable short-term outcomes in cases of SEMS placement, individualized approach might be required in treatment decision between palliative GJ and SEMS placement.

  10. A case-control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Chun; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2013-03-15

    Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. This case-control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening.

  11. Management of obstructive urolithiasis in dairy calves with intact bladder and urethra by Fazili’s minimally invasive tube cystotomy technique

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    Mujeeb ur Rehman Fazili

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was planned to evaluate minimally invasive tube cystotomy technique in calves suffering from obstructive urolithiasis having intact urinary bladder and urethra. Fifteen male non-castrated calves with age ranging from 1-10 months (mean 4.05 months, presented for treatment within one to three days (mean 2.2 days of complete urinary tract obstruction due to urethral calculi with intact bladder and urethra, were included in this study. Under light sedation and local infiltration anaesthesia, all the animals were subjected through left paralumbar fossa, to a minimally invasive surgical tube cystotomy in which catheter was placed in the bladder lumen through a metallic cannula and fixed to the skin with a stay suture (Fazili’s technique. All the animals were discharged the same day. Time taken for the procedure varied from 8 to 17 minutes (mean 11.0 minutes. Normal urination resumed in twelve (80.0% calves. Mean time taken for normal urination was 10.50 days. In two of the remaining calves, urine flow stopped through the catheter prematurely and they were then subjected to standard surgical tube cystotomy. One more calf did not urinate normally for 30 postoperative days and was lost to the follow up thereafter. Recurrence of the obstruction was not detected in ten and nine animals observed up to six and 12 months respectively. In conclusion, the outcome of this minimally invasive technique is similar to the standard tube cystectomy. Additionally, the procedure is cost effective, quick, simple and field applicable. It also minimizes exposure of abdominal cavity of metabolically compromised animals. However, the technique needs to be tried in larger number of such calves wherein better quality catheter of larger diameter be used before recommending its extensive use.

  12. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; Aşkar, Niyazi; Itil, Ismail Mete

    2012-01-01

    To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms.

  13. Gastric Outlet Obstruction Annular pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meijer, Vincent E.; van Eijck, Casper H. J.; Koerkamp, Bas Groot

    A 72-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of a dull, epigastric pain, 10-kg weight loss (from 52 kg to 42 kg), and a 6- to 8-week history of nausea and vomiting. Physical examination showed no notable abnormalities. Blood test results revealed anemia (hemoglobin 9.8 g/dL [to convert to

  14. International multicenter comparative trial of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided gastroenterostomy versus surgical gastrojejunostomy for the treatment of malignant gastric outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Bukhari, Majidah; Baron, Todd H.; Nieto, Jose; El Zein, Mohamad; Chen, Yen-I; Chavez, Yamile Haito; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Alawad, Ahmad S.; Kumbhari, Vivek; Itoi, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims EUS-guided gastroenterostomy (EUS-GE) is a novel procedure that potentially offers long-lasting luminal patency without the risk of tumor ingrowth/overgrowth. This study compared the clinical success, technical success, adverse events (AEs), length of hospital stay (LOHS) and symptom recurrence in EUS-GE versus SGJ. Methods This was a multicenter international retrospective comparative study of EUS-GE and SGJ in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) who underwent either EUS-GE or SGJ. EUS-GE was performed using lumen apposing metal stents. Results A total of 93 patients with malignant GOO treated with either EUS-GE (n = 30) or SGJ (n = 63) were identified. Peritoneal carcinomatosis was present in 13 (43 %) patients in the EUS-GE group and 7 (11 %) patients in the SGJ group (P < 0.001). Although the technical success rate was significantly higher in the SGJ group as compared to the EUS-GE group (100 % vs. 87 %, P = 0.009), the clinical success rate was not different (90 % vs. 87 %, P = 0.18, OR 0.8, 95 %CI 0.44 – 7.07). The rate of AEs was lower in the EUS-GE group, but the difference was not statistically significant (16 % vs 25 %, P = 0.3). The mean LOHS was similar in the EUS-GE group compared to SGJ (P = 0.35). The rate of recurrent GOO was not different between the two groups (3 % vs. 14 %, P = 0.08). Similarly, the mean time to reintervention was similar (88 days vs. 121 days, P = 0.83). Conclusions EUS-GE is associated with equivalent efficacy and safety as compared to surgical GJ. This is the first comparative trial between both techniques and suggests EUS-GE as a non-inferior but less invasive alter to surgery. PMID:28382326

  15. Normal bladder wall thickness measurement in healthy Iranian children, a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Atoosa; Kazemian, Afarin; Toghiani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Normal bladder function is necessary for micturition. Many causes such as urinary tract infection, bladder outlet obstruction, and neuropathic bladder can influence bladder wall thickness (BWT). This study was designed to determine normal BWT in Iranian children. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study done in Isfahan in 2012 comprising 82 children aged 2-14 years without any urinary complaint. We measured thickness of posterior and lateral walls of the bladder in all children. Mean bladder wall thickness (MBWT) and mean bladder volume (BV) were also calculated. Results: In this study, we included 82 children (40 boys and 42 girls). Patients’ mean age was 6.43 ± 2.89 years, mean weight was 21.32 ± 8.40 kg, mean height was 111.57 ± 20.51 cm, and mean Body Mass Index was 17.12 ± 4.93. Mean lateral bladder wall thickness (LBWT) was 1.75 ± 0.32 mm and mean posterior bladder wall thickness (PBWT) was 1.59 ± 0.34 mm. Mean BV was 111.65 ± 72.11 ml and MBWT was 1.67 ± 0.28 mm. BVW all Index (BVWI) was 1249.05 ± 701.67. Conclusions: LBWT was1.75 ± 0.32 mm and PBWT was 1.59 ± 0.34 mm. PMID:25250302

  16. Normal bladder wall thickness measurement in healthy Iranian children, a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Adibi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Normal bladder function is necessary for micturition. Many causes such as urinary tract infection, bladder outlet obstruction, and neuropathic bladder can influence bladder wall thickness (BWT.This study was designed to determine normal BWT in Iranian children. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study done in Isfahan in 2012 comprising 82 children aged 2-14 years without any urinary complaint. We measured thickness of posterior and lateral walls of the bladder in all children. Mean bladder wall thickness (MBWT and mean bladder volume (BV were also calculated. Results: In this study, we included 82 children (40 boys and 42 girls. Patients′ mean age was 6.43 ± 2.89 years, mean weight was 21.32 ± 8.40 kg, mean height was 111.57 ± 20.51 cm, and mean Body Mass Index was 17.12 ± 4.93. Mean lateral bladder wall thickness (LBWT was 1.75 ± 0.32 mm and mean posterior bladder wall thickness (PBWT was 1.59 ± 0.34 mm. Mean BV was 111.65 ± 72.11 ml and MBWT was 1.67 ± 0.28 mm. BVW all Index (BVWI was 1249.05 ± 701.67. Conclusions: LBWT was1.75 ± 0.32 mm and PBWT was 1.59 ± 0.34 mm.

  17. A randomized controlled study of the efficacy of tamsulosin monotherapy and its combination with mirabegron for overactive bladder induced by benign prostatic obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Koji; Masumori, Naoya; Fukuta, Fumimasa; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Iwasawa, Akihiko; Tanaka, Yoshinori

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of add-on treatment with a β3-adrenoceptor agonist (mirabegron) for overactive bladder symptoms remaining after α1-blocker (tamsulosin) treatment in men with benign prostatic obstruction. Patients with benign prostatic obstruction with urinary urgency at least once per week and a total OABSS of 3 or more points after 8 or more weeks of treatment with tamsulosin were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to receive 0.2 mg tamsulosin daily or 0.2 mg tamsulosin and 50 mg mirabegron daily for 8 weeks. The primary end point was change in total OABSS. Safety assessments included change in post-void residual urine volume and adverse events. From January 2012 through September 2013 a total of 94 patients were randomized. Of these patients 76 completed the protocol treatment. In the full analysis set the change in total OABSS during the treatment period was significantly greater in the combination group than in the monotherapy group (-2.21 vs -0.87, p=0.012). The changes in scores for urinary urgency, daytime frequency, International Prostate Symptom Score storage symptom subscore and quality of life index at 8 weeks were significantly greater in the combination group. The change in post-void residual urine volume was significantly greater in the combination group. Although 6 patients experienced adverse events in the combination group, urinary retention was observed in only 1 patient. Combined tamsulosin and mirabegron treatment is effective and safe for patients with benign prostatic obstruction who have overactive bladder symptoms after tamsulosin monotherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Ultrasound indicators of the prostate, urinary bladder and uroflowmetry parameters in the diagnosis of infravesical obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoborodov, G G; Efremov, N S; Bolotov, A D

    2017-10-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common urologic diseases of males. In patients who failed drug therapy of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) caused by BPH, the most important indication for surgery is the presence of infravesical obstruction (IVO). IVO is detected by pressure-flow studies and is characterized by high detrusor pressure with decreased urinary flow rate. The invasiveness and high cost of this investigation has stimulated a search for non-invasive techniques that could reliably characterize the presence of IVO secondary to BPH. To determine the value of ultrasound indicators of the prostate, urinary bladder and uroflowmetry parameters in the diagnosis of IVO in men with BPH. Seventy-six men with moderate and severe LUTS secondary to BPH underwent a comprehensive urological examination, including a clinical history, digital rectal examination, International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS), serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), various ultrasound indicators of the prostate and urinary bladder, uroflowmetry and a pressure/flow study. Infravesical obstruction (IVO) was detected in 73.1% of men with BPH. IVO was found to have the strongest correlation with ultrasound signs of the intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP, r = 0,667, p prostate volume, prostate transition zone volume, prostate transition zone index, prostatic urethral angle, urethral length of the transition zone, estimated prostate circumference, prostate peripheral zone thickness, residual urine volume, weight of urinary bladder, the thickness of the detrusor, maximum and average urine flow rates and I-PSS score. The incidence of IVO increased in parallel with the increase of IPP. We established a cut-off value for IPP of 10 mm for the diagnosis of IVO with a sensitivity of 68.2%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 53.3%. The ultrasound findings of IPP measuring more than 10 mm strongly correlates with the IVO

  19. Functional and Molecular Evidence for Kv7 Channel Subtypes in Human Detrusor from Patients with and without Bladder Outflow Obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalø, Julie; Sheykhzade, Majid; Nordling, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether Kv7 channels and their ancillary β-subunits, KCNE, are functionally expressed in the human urinary bladder. Kv7 channels were examined at the molecular level and by functional studies using RT-qPCR and myography, respectively. We found mRNA expressi...... between Kv7 channels and β-adrenoceptors in the human urinary bladder. The performed gene expression analysis combined with the organ bath studies imply that compounds that activate Kv7 channels could be useful for treatment of overactive bladder syndrome.......The aim of the study was to investigate whether Kv7 channels and their ancillary β-subunits, KCNE, are functionally expressed in the human urinary bladder. Kv7 channels were examined at the molecular level and by functional studies using RT-qPCR and myography, respectively. We found mRNA expression...... (activator of Kv7.1 channels, 10 μM) and ML213 (activator of Kv7.2, Kv7.4, Kv7.4/7.5 and Kv7.5 channels, 10 μM), reduced the tone of 1 μM carbachol pre-constricted bladder strips. XE991 (blocker of Kv7.1-7.5 channels, 10 μM) had opposing effects as it increased contractions achieved with 20 mM KPSS...

  20. Definition and symptoms of underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D. Uren

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB is a symptom syndrome reflecting the urodynamic observation of detrusor underactivity (DU, a voiding contraction of reduced strength and/or duration, leading to prolonged or incomplete bladder emptying. An International Continence Society Working Group has described UAB as characterised by a slow urinary stream, hesitancy and straining to void, with or without a feeling of incomplete bladder emptying and dribbling, often with storage symptoms. Since DU often coexists with bladder outlet obstruction, or storage dysfunction (detrusor overactivity or incontinence, the exact contribution of the DU to the presenting complaints can be difficult to establish. The presence of voiding and post voiding lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS is implicitly expected in UAB, but a reduced sensation of fullness is reported by some patients, and storage LUTS are also an important factor in many affected patients. These may result from a postvoid residual, but often they do not. The storage LUTS are often the key driver in leading the patient to seek healthcare input. Nocturia is particularly common and bothersome, but what the role of DU is in all the range of influences on nocturia has not been established. Qualitative research has established a broad impact on everyday life as a result of these symptoms. In general, people appear to manage the voiding LUTS relatively well, but the storage LUTS may be problematic.

  1. Giant bladder diverticulum in a boy

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    Esra Ozcakir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the bladder diverticula in children are seen commonly which is association with infravesical obstruction or neurogenic bladder function, the case of giant congenital bladder diverticula are rare. In this paper, an 11 years old boy with giant bladder diverticula presenting urinary infections is evaluated in terms of diagnosis and management by current literature.

  2. Development and application of the condom catheter method for non-invasive measurement of bladder pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R van Mastrigt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A non-invasive method to measure the bladder pressure in males using a condom catheter has been developed. The measurement technique, its validation and limitations, a diagnostic nomogram to non-invasively diagnose bladder outlet obstruction (BOO, and results of large-scale application are discussed. Methods: Modified incontinence condoms are attached to the penis. During voiding the flow of urine is mechanically interrupted. The subsequent maximum pressure in the condom reflects the isovolumetric bladder pressure. The method was validated in a group of 46 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms who were simultaneously studied invasively and non-invasively. Subsequently it was applied in a non-invasive epidemiological study in 1020 healthy males. Results: The reproducibility of the measured isovolumetric bladder pressure is comparable to that of conventional pressure-flow parameters. The measured pressure can be used to diagnose bladder outlet obstruction with a diagnostic accuracy (Area Under receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.98, which compares most favorably with the area under the curve of 0.79 of Q max in the same population. During condom catheter measurements, both the involuntary interruption of voiding and the forced diuresis increase post-void residual volume. This increase does not affect the accuracy of the pressure measurements. Conclusions: We conclude that in males bladder pressure can successfully be measured non-invasively using the condom catheter method. By combining the measured volumetric bladder pressure with a separately measured free flow rate, BOO can non-invasively and accurately be diagnosed.

  3. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor M3 Mutation Causes Urinary Bladder Disease and a Prune-Belly-like Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefanie; Thiele, Holger; Mir, Sevgi; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Sozeri, Betül; Reutter, Heiko; Draaken, Markus; Ludwig, Michael; Altmüller, Janine; Frommolt, Peter; Stuart, Helen M; Ranjzad, Parisa; Hanley, Neil A; Jennings, Rachel; Newman, William G; Wilcox, Duncan T; Thiel, Uwe; Schlingmann, Karl Peter; Beetz, Rolf; Hoyer, Peter F; Konrad, Martin; Schaefer, Franz; Nürnberg, Peter; Woolf, Adrian S

    2011-11-11

    Urinary bladder malformations associated with bladder outlet obstruction are a frequent cause of progressive renal failure in children. We here describe a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 (CHRM3) (1q41-q44) homozygous frameshift mutation in familial congenital bladder malformation associated with a prune-belly-like syndrome, defining an isolated gene defect underlying this sometimes devastating disease. CHRM3 encodes the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which we show is present in developing renal epithelia and bladder muscle. These observations may imply that M3 has a role beyond its known contribution to detrusor contractions. This Mendelian disease caused by a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mutation strikingly phenocopies Chrm3 null mutant mice. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Palliative Therapy for Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Unresectable Gastric Cancer: A Meta-analysis Comparison of Gastrojejunostomy with Endoscopic Stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bo Bian

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Both GJJ and ES are effective procedures for the treatment of GOO caused by gastric cancer. ES is associated with better short-term outcomes. GJJ is preferable to ES in terms of its lower rate of stent-related complications, re-obstruction, and reintervention. GJJ should be considered a treatment option for patients with a long life expectancy and good performance status.

  5. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Bladder: New Parameters for Evaluating Voiding Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Macnab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe innovative methodology for monitoring alterations in bladder oxygenation and haemodynamics in humans using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. Concentrations of the chromophores oxygenated (O2Hb and deoxygenated (HHb haemoglobin and their sum (total haemoglobin differ during bladder contraction in health and disease. A wireless device that incorporates three paired light emitting diodes (wavelengths 760 and 850 nanometers and silicon photodiode detector collects data transcutaneously (10 Hz with the emitter/detector over the bladder during spontaneous bladder emptying. Data analysis indicates comparable patterns of change in chromophore concentration in healthy children and adults (positive trend during voiding, predominantly due to elevated O2Hb, but different changes in symptomatic subjects with characteristic chromophore patterns identified for voiding dysfunction due to specific pathophysiologies: bladder outlet obstruction (males, overactive bladder (females, and nonneurogenic dysfunction (children. Comparison with NIRS muscle data suggests altered bladder haemodynamics and/or oxygenation may underlie voiding dysfunction offering new insight into the causal physiology.

  6. Critical evaluation of the overactive bladder and urgency urinary incontinence association with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a relatively young adult male population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Murat; Yazici, Ozgur; Kafkasli, Alper; Sabuncu, Kubilay; Salepci, Banu; Narter, Fehmi; Gungor, Gulten A; Yucetas, Ugur

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of Overactive Bladder (OAB) and Urgency Urinary Incontinence (UUI) in males with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) using the OSAS grading system. A total of 194 patients who underwent Polysomnography (PSG) were included in our prospective cross sectional study. Patients were divided into four groups according to Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI). Group 1, 35 patients with normal AHI (Bladder (OAB-V8), ICIQ-SF, and IPSS questionnaires were filled out for all patients. Prevalence of OAB, UUI, nocturia, and scores of OAB-V8, ICIQ-SF, IPSS were compared between the study groups. The statistical analysis was adjusted by the demographics of age and BMI. The mean age was 44.6 ± 11.2 years, and the mean BMI was 29.9 ± 4.9 within the whole study group, and both were statistically different between the groups. The scores of OAB-V8 (P = 0.298), ICIQ-SF (P = 0.392), IPSS total, IPSS storage, and IPSS voiding (P = 0.268, P = 0.380, P = 0.167, respectively), the prevalence of OAB (P = 0.078), UUI (P = 0.423), and nocturia (P = 0.096) were not statistically different between the study groups. Our findings demonstrated that there is no increase in prevalence of OAB and UUI in relatively young adult male with OSAS. Furthermore, analysis revealed that the higher OSAS grade does not mean the higher prevalence of OAB. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Severe lower urinary tract symptoms due to anteriorly located midline prostatic cyst arising from the bladder neck in a young male: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guragac, Ali; Demirer, Zafer; Alp, Bilal Firat; Aydur, Emin, E-mail: zaferdemirer@mynet.com, E-mail: zaferdemirer1903@gmail.com [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-09-15

    Context: Prostatic cysts are uncommon. These cysts are usually asymptomatic and are diagnosed incidentally during ultrasonographic examination. On rare occasions, they may cause drastic symptoms. Case Report: We report on a case of severely symptomatic anteriorly located prostatic cyst arising from the bladder neck in a 30-year-old man presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms, without clinical evidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), computed tomography (CT) and cystourethroscopy demonstrated a projecting prostatic cyst that occupied the bladder neck at the precise twelve o’clock position. It was acting as a ball-valve, such that it obstructed the bladder outlet. Transurethral unroofing of the cyst was performed and the patient’s obstructive symptoms were successfully resolved. Histopathological examination indicated a retention cyst. Conclusions: It should be borne in mind that midline prostate cysts can be a reason for bladder outlet obstruction in a young male. Such patients may have tremendous improvement in symptoms through transurethral unroofing of the cyst wall. (author)

  8. The Add-On Effect of Solifenacin for Patients with Remaining Overactive Bladder after Treatment with Tamsulosin for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Suggestive of Benign Prostatic Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Masumori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the add-on effect of solifenacin for Japanese men with remaining overactive bladder (OAB symptoms after tamsulosin monotherapy for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO in real-life clinical practice. Methods. Patients aged ≥ 50 having remaining OAB symptoms (≥ 3 of OAB symptom score (OABSS with ≥2 of urgency score after at least 4 weeks treatment by 0.2 mg of tamsulosin for BPO/LUTS received 2.5 or 5.0 mg of solifenacin for 12 weeks. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, QOL index and OABSS, maximum flow rate (Qmax and postvoid residual urine volume (PVR were determined. Results. A total of 48 patients (mean age 72.5 years completed the study. There were significant improvement in IPSS (15.1 to 11.2 and QOL index (4.2 to 3.0 by add-on of solifenacin. Although the IPSS storage symptom score was significantly improved, there were no changes observed in the IPSS voiding symptom score. The OABSS showed significant improvement (8.0 to 4.8. No changes were observed in Qmax and PVR. Conclusions. Under the supervision of an experienced urologist, the additional administration of solifenacin to patients with BPO/LUTS treated with tamsulosin, is effective in controlling remaining OAB symptoms.

  9. Botulinum Toxin A Injection to the Bladder Neck and Urethra for Medically Refractory Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men Without Prostatic Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Liang Chen

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: Bladder neck and urethral BoNT-A injections improved LUTS and increased Qmax in men with a small prostate. Our findings suggest that bladder neck and urethral dysfunction may play a role in LUTS in men without BPH.

  10. Usefulness of bladder-prostate ultrasound in the diagnosis of obstruction/hyperactivity in males with BPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Eduardo Moran; Polo, Alba; Morales, Gonzalo; Soto, Ana; Rogel, Ramón; García, Gonzalo; Arlandis, Salvador; Broseta, Enrique; Jiménez-Cruz, Juan Fernando

    2011-11-01

    To determine the utility of prostate ultrasound in the diagnosis of infravesical obstruction (IVO) and detrusor hyperactivity(DH). Prospective study with 39 patients consulting for LUTS. Clinical history was compiled, IPSS was determined, a digital rectal exam was performed, abdominal ultrasound was used to calculate detrusor thickness/weight, prostate volume, and middle lobe length (MLL). Urodynamic study (UD) was performed with determination of the Abrams-Griffiths number and ICS nomogram. Mean values were compared with Mann-Whitney U-test, and ROC curves were plotted determining the cutoff points for optimum sensitivity/specificity. Mean age was 63.1 years (SD: 7.8), with a mean IPSS score of 14 (SD: 6). 53.8% of the patients presented IVO at UD evaluation, and 43.6% DH. The differences between free flowmetry Qmax(p=0.015) and MLL (p=0.003) between patients with and without IVO proved significant. The ROC curves yielded an AUC for middle lobe length of 0.772, with a maximum sensitivity and specificity cutoff point at 10.5 mm (sensitivity 90%, specificity 73%, PPV 76%, NPV 85%). There were no significant differences in any parameter between patients with and without DH. Ultrasound MLL measurement in patients with LUTS offers high sensitivity/specificity in diagnosing IVO, with a cutoff point of 10.5 mm. In our study it wasn't effective in the noninvasive diagnosis of DH.

  11. Thoracic outlet anatomy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a rare condition that occurs when there is compression of vessels and nerves in the ... the last 3 fingers and inner forearm. Thoracic outlet syndrome is usually treated with physical therapy which ...

  12. Bladder Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  13. Neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your bladder at all Have signs of a bladder infection (fever, burning when you urinate, frequent urination) Urinate small amounts, frequently Alternative Names Neurogenic detrusor overactivity; NDO; Neurogenic bladder sphincter dysfunction; NBSD ...

  14. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  15. Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Ventricle Menu Topics Topics FAQs Double Outlet Right Ventricle Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital heart disease. Article Info En español Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital ...

  16. Bladder Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  17. Correlation of bladder base elevation with pelvic floor hypertonicity in women with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Fei-Chi; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether the bladder base elevation as revealed by cystogram under fluoroscopy is associated with pelvic floor hypertonicity or bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in women. Sixty-two women who were referred to our videourodynamic laboratory for assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were included in this retrospective analysis. Thirty-one of these women with bladder base elevation-revealed by cystogram under fluoroscopy during videourodynamic study-served as the experimental group, and another group of 31 women without bladder base elevation served as control. None of the patients had neuropathy, previous pelvic surgery or chronic urinary retention. The clinical symptoms, urodynamic diagnosis, and parameters were compared between the two groups. The mean voiding pressure (Pdet.Qmax) and postvoid residual (PVR) were significantly greater, and maximum flow rate (Qmax) and voided volume were significantly lower in the bladder base elevation group. When a Pdet.Qmax of >or=35 cmH2O combined with a Qmax of elevation group had BOO than controls (51.6% vs. 9.7%, P=0.0003). Pelvic floor muscle electromyogram (EMG) was dyscoordinated during the voiding phase in 18 (58.1%) and 9 (29%) of the patients with and without bladder base elevation, respectively (P=0.0212). Women with LUTS and bladder base elevation revealed in the filling phase of videourodynamic study had significantly higher voiding pressure and incidence of dyscoordinated pelvic floor EMG activities during voiding, suggesting a higher incidence of BOO and pelvic floor hypertonicity. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Voiding disorders as etiologic cofeature of overactive bladder syndrome. An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Fabrizio; Spelzini, Federico; Cesana, Maria C; Blanco, Salvatore; Milani, Rodolfo; Grasso, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is very common in the urological and gynecological practice. It is well known that the correlation between clinical features and urodynamics findings is often poor. In this observational study urodynamic findings of an OAB population have been retrospectively analyzed with the aim to identify a possible role of voiding disorders in the pathophysiology of OAB syndrome. Urodynamics executed between January 2005 and December 2010 have been analyzed. Female patients presenting characteristics of OAB syndrome according to International Continence Society definition were identified. Urodynamic investigations have been carried out according to the good practice guidelines for urodynamics. The Blaivas-Groutz cut off for female urinary obstruction was to detect voiding disorders. According to the selection criteria 258 patients presenting OAB syndrome have been considered eligible to join the study. Eighty-one patients (30%) showed voiding difficulties: in 21 of them pressure-flow study was diagnostic for frank outlet obstruction, in 47 a mild form and 13 bladder sphincter pseudo-dyssynergia. OAB syndrome can be related to voiding disorders mostly represented by a mild degree of obstruction. Such condition could trigger irritative symptoms. These clinical findings require an instrumental assessment represented by a pressure-flow analysis. This approach seems to be mandatory in patients refractory to drug therapy.

  19. Neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention associated with MDMA abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, John R; Barrueto, Fermin

    2008-06-01

    The use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, known as "ecstasy"), a synthetic amphetamine and "club drug," has been associated with acute, transient urinary retention. We report a case of neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention associated with MDMA abuse. A 21-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED) because he had abdominal pain and difficulty urinating. He had experienced difficulty in initiating urination over the past 1.5 months, with periods of 24 to 36 hours between voids and large volumes of urine. The patient had a chronic pattern of MDMA use, taking 4 tablets/day for 3 months. Two weeks before coming to the ED, he had been admitted to an inpatient drug rehabilitation center. During the time since that admission, the patient had visited EDs repeatedly for insertion and removal of Foley catheters to relieve the urinary retention until he could be admitted to a urologic service. Cystometrogram was abnormal, finding no sensation of bladder fullness after instillation of 350 mL of saline and inability to generate a voluntary voiding pressure. Cystoscopy revealed no outlet obstruction. The findings were consistent with neurogenic bladder. The patient was given prescriptions for bethanecol and phenazopyridine, and told to continue a 10-day course of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim for urinary tract infection. He was discharged with a Foley catheter in place. Symptoms of urinary retention persisted at 1-year follow-up, despite self-catheterization and complete cessation of MDMA use. Chronic MDMA use may lead to neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention.

  20. Voiding by Mandatory Position Changing: Giant Bladder Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Cicek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Voiding by Mandatory Position Changing: Giant Bladder Stone Bladder Stones frequently develops on the base of neurogenic micturation disorders, infection, bladder outlet disorders, spinal cord injury and foreign bodies. BPH for men and previous incontinans surgery in women are risk factors for bladder Stone development according to gender. In this case report a 49 years old man, who can void by mandatory position changing owing to a giant bladder stone is presented . [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 120-122

  1. Understanding Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Freischlag, Julie; Orion, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was once debated in the world of vascular surgery. Today, it is more understood and surprisingly less infrequent than once thought. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is composed of three types: neurogenic, venous, and arterial. Each type is in distinction to the others when considering patient presentation and diagnosis. Remarkable advances have been made in surgical approach, physical therapy, and rehabilitation of these patients. Dedicated centers of e...

  2. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  3. Management of vesicoureteral reflux in neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Q. Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is a significant risk factor for pyelonephritis and renal scarring. VUR can occur through a defective ureterovesical junction (UVJ or an overwhelmed normal UVJ mechanism such as in bladder dysfunction of congenital, acquired, or behavioral etiology. There are numerous causes for the development of a neurogenic bladder from spinal dysraphisms to spinal cord trauma and even centrally based abnormalities in children with apparently normal motor function (inappropriately termed nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder. The foundation of managing reflux in these neurogenic bladders is to maintain low bladder pressures which will commonly mean that compliance will be normal as well. There have been several publications that have shown that if bladder pressures are lowered simply with clean intermittent catheterization and medications that the reflux can resolve spontaneously. Alternatively, the patients that are in need of bladder augmentation can have spontaneous resolution of their reflux with the resulting increase in capacity. Surgical intervention is called for when bladder capacity is adequate and the reflux persists or if it is part of a larger operation to increase capacity and to manage outlet resistance. In some instances, reimplantation is necessary because the ureters interfere with the bladder neck procedure. Aside from open and robotic surgical intervention the use of endoscopic injectable agents is beginning to become more popular especially when combined with intravesical botulinum toxin A injections. Great strides are being made in the management of patients with neurogenic bladders and we are seeing more choices for the urologist to be able to manage these patients.

  4. Current pharmacological and surgical treatment of underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Kyung Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally accepted guidelines are not yet available on the management of underactive bladder (UAB. Although the natural history of UAB is still not fully understood, observation may be an acceptable management option in patients with tolerable lower urinary tract symptoms and little risk of upper urinary tract damage. If needed, scheduled and double voiding may be recommended as an effective and safe add-on therapy. Parasympathomimetics have been widely used for the management of UAB, but the evidence does not support clinical benefit. The efficacy of alpha-blockers has also not yet been clearly demonstrated. However, selective alpha-blockers may help to enhance voiding efficiency and to decrease possible upper tract damage. Sacral neuromodulation is a surgical option for nonobstructive UAB approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, the response rate of test stimulation is not high and the efficacy of permanent implants does not always coincide with that of test stimulation. Although surgery to reduce outlet resistance may be a viable option in UAB with presumed obstruction, surgery seems to have little role in those without obstruction. Latissimus dorsi detrusor myoplasty has shown promising results in restoring voluntary voiding in selected patients. The procedure requires a multidisciplinary team approach of urologists and plastic reconstructive experts. In summary, current treatments of UAB remain unsatisfactory. The multifactorial nature of UAB pathogenesis complicates the appropriate management for each patient. Future research to establish a more clinically relevant definition of UAB will be required to open new era of UAB management.

  5. Neurogenic Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Dorsher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented.

  6. Tratamiento paliativo de la obstrucción tumoral del vaciamiento gástrico con prótesis metálicas autoexpandibles insertadas endoscópicamente Palliative management of malignant gastric outlet obstruction with endoscopically inserted self-expanding metal stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Cano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes y objetivo: la inserción de prótesis metálicas autoexpandibles para paliar la obstrucción tumoral del vaciamiento gástrico es un procedimiento mínimamente invasivo, que cada vez se utiliza con más frecuencia. Presentamos la experiencia de esta técnica en un hospital de nivel II del Sistema Nacional de Salud. Pacientes y métodos: estudio retrospectivo de un periodo de cinco años (2003-2007, en los que se trató de resolver la obstrucción tumoral del vaciamiento gástrico en 27 ocasiones a 23 pacientes (media de 0,45 procedimientos por mes, mediante la inserción endoscópica de prótesis no recubiertas (Wallstent® y Wallflex®. Resultados: la inserción fue técnicamente posible en el 100% de los 27 intentos. Se obtuvo un buen resultado clínico en 25 ocasiones (92,5%. Se utilizó sólo endoscopia 10 (37% veces y en las otras 17 (63% también fluoroscopia. Tras la inserción de la prótesis se intervino a un paciente con intención curativa y a otro, en el que la prótesis no funcionó, para realizar una derivación paliativa. Cuatro prótesis se obstruyeron por crecimiento tumoral, recanalizándose mediante la inserción de nuevas prótesis. En tres ocasiones se produjo ictericia obstructiva en prótesis que cubrían la papila de Vater. No hubo otras complicaciones. Tampoco mortalidad derivada del procedimiento. La media de supervivencia fue de 104 días (rango 28-400, DE ± 94. Conclusiones: en nuestra experiencia, la inserción endoscópica de prótesis metálicas autoexpandibles parece un método seguro y eficaz en el tratamiento paliativo de la obstrucción tumoral del vaciamiento gástrico y puede llevarse a cabo con éxito en un centro de nuestras características.Aim and background: the insertion of self-expanding metal stents to palliate malignant gastric outlet obstruction is a minimally invasive procedure that is being increasingly used. We discuss experience with this technique in a level-II hospital in the

  7. Intra-uterine cystography for evaluation of prenatal obstructive uropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoutenbeek, P.; de Jong, T. P.; van Gool, J. D.; Drogtrop, A. P.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate the risk for kidney damage in a male fetus with obstructive uropathy, a percutaneous bladder puncture was performed at 26 weeks gestational age and contrast was injected into the fetal bladder. A clear picture was obtained of the bladder with marked widening of the prostatic urethra and

  8. Urinary Nerve Growth Factor Levels in Overactive Bladder Syndrome and Lower Urinary Tract Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Tzu Liu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a syndrome based on self-reported symptoms of urgency and frequency with or without urge incontinence. Although urgency is the core symptom of OAB, patients might have difficulty to distinguish urgency from the urge to void. Urodynamic study is a useful diagnostic tool to discover detrusor overactivity (DO in patients with OAB; however, not all OAB patients have DO. Therefore, a more objective and non-invasive way to diagnose and assess OAB including DO is needed. Recent research has focused on urinary biomarkers in assessment of OAB. Urinary nerve growth factor (NGF level increases in patients with OAB-wet, bladder outlet obstruction, mixed urinary incontinence and urodynamic DO. Urinary NGF levels are correlated with severity of OAB symptoms. In patients with OAB and DO who have been well treated with antimuscarinics or botulinum toxin injection, urinary NGF levels have been shown to decrease significantly in association with reduction of urgency severity. However, not all patients with OAB have an elevated urinary NGF level. It might also be increased in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, cerebrovascular accident and lower urinary tract diseases such as urinary tract stone, bacterial infection and urothelial tumor. It is possible to use urinary NGF levels as a bio-marker for diagnosis of OAB as well as for the assessment of therapeutic outcome in patients with OAB or DO. Here, we review the latest medical advances in this field.

  9. Bladder injury and success rates following retropubic mid-urethral sling: TVT EXACT™ vs. TVT™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thubert, Thibault; Canel, Virginie; Vinchant, Marie; Wigniolle, Ingrid; Fernandez, Hervé; Deffieux, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Although placement of a retropubic mid-urethral slings (MUS) is one of the gold standard surgical treatments for stress urinary incontinence, new devices are poorly evaluated before marketing. We compared TVT-EXACT™ (TVT-E), a new device expected to reduce bladder injuries, with the historically described bottom-to-top TVT™ (TVT). This retrospective study compared TVT-E (n=49) and TVT (n=49). The main outcomes were the prevalence of complications (bladder injuries, immediate postoperative pain, perioperative complications, etc.) and the short-term success rate (no reported urinary leakage and negative cough test) of both MUSs. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. The characteristics of the two groups were comparable. The prevalence of bladder injury for TVT-E and TVT was 8% and 6%, respectively (p=1). The intensity of immediate postoperative pain (VAS/100) was lower following TVT-E than after TVT (8.0 vs. 15.9, p=0.01). The first post-void residual was increased in the TVT-E group (153.9 vs. 78.9mL, p=0.045), and there were more postoperative bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) symptoms in the TVT-E group (24% vs. 6%, p=0.02). However, there was no difference when considering only de novo BOO (14% vs. 4%, p=0.16). The prevalence of peri- and post-operative complications was equal in the two groups. The success rate was similar at 12 months of follow-up (80 vs. 82%, p=1). The prevalence of bladder injury was unchanged with TVT-EXACT™ compared with TVT™, but post-operative pain was decreased. The success rate of both retropubic MUSs was similar at 12 months of follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bladder cancer care at Mayo Clinic Symptoms Bladder cancer signs and symptoms may include: Blood in urine (hematuria) Painful urination Pelvic pain If you have hematuria, your urine may appear bright red or cola colored. Sometimes, urine may not look any different, ...

  11. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R F Sholan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 000 women are diagnosed with interstitial cystitis. Diagnosis of the disease is difficult and is substantially based on clinical symptoms. Pelvic pain, urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia are the basic complaints in this pathology. The diagnosis requires exclusion of diseases with similar manifestations. So interstitial cystitis is frequently misdiagnosed as urinary tract infection, overactive bladder, urethral obstruction or diverticulosis, chronic prostatitis, bladder cancer, vulvodynia, endometriosis, and chronic pelvic pain. Etiopathogenesis of the disease is uncertain, which makes etiologic treatment impossible. Currently scientific discussions on the causes of disease continue as well as different treatment regimens are offered, but are often ineffective, palliative and temporary. The treatment for intersticial cystitis should focus on restoring normal bladder function, prevention of relapse of symptoms and improvement of patients’ quality of life. The literature review presents current view on the terminology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  12. AGU hydrology publication outlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeze, R. Allan

    In recent months I have been approached on several occasions by members of the hydrology community who asked me which of the various AGU journals and publishing outlets would be most suitable for a particular paper or article that they have prepared.Water Resources Research (WRR) is the primary AGU outlet for research papers in hydrology. It is an interdisciplinary journal that integrates research in the social and natural sciences of water. The editors of WRR invite original contributions in the physical, chemical and biological sciences and also in the social and policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law. The editor for the physical sciences side of the journal is Donald R. Nielson, LAWR Veihmeyer Hall, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616. The editor for the policy sciences side of the journal is Ronald G. Cummings, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131

  13. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  14. Morphometry of the outlet of the foramen magnum in crania with atlantooccipital fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Lancaster, Jeffrey R; Mortazavi, Martin M; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Chern, Joshua J; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2011-07-01

    Assimilation of the atlas to the occiput may result in symptoms that are often compressive in nature around the outlet of the foramen magnum. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the morphological features of the bone through this foramen. Thirteen adult skulls with atlantooccipital fusion underwent morphometrical analysis of the outlet of the foramen magnum. All specimens but one were found to have a decreased area of the outlet of the foramen magnum. In those 12 specimens, a decrease of 15%-35% was seen. Fusions of the atlas that were based primarily along the anterior rim of the foramen magnum resulted in more obstruction of its outlet. In general, the horizontal diameters of the outlet of these foramina were more decreased from the normal range. These findings demonstrate that in the majority of cases, assimilation of the atlas to the occiput results in a compromised outlet of the foramen magnum.

  15. Medical management of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvpreet S Ubee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB, as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat.

  16. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.

  17. Percutaneous intervention in obstructive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souftas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous intervention procedures in obstructive uropathy include percutaneous nephrostomy tube placements, nephroureteral stents, percutaneous nephrostomy combined with ureteral embolization, percutaneous management of stone disease, suprapubic tube placements into the bladder, and perinephric/retroperitoneal urinomas/abscesses drainages. Percutaneous nephrostomy is performed to relieve urinary obstruction or divert the urinary stream away from the ureter or bladder. Patients are given preprocedure antibiotics. Percutaneous nephrostomies can be emergent cases because of risk of pyuria and sepsis from a stagnant urine collection. The procedure is performed using both ultrasound and fluoroscopy (or fluoroscopy alone using anatomic landmarks, or an internal radiopaque calculus, or delayed phase excretion of the contrast into the renal collecting system) under local anesthesia or conscious sedation. Ureteral stents are placed to bypass an obstructing stone or to stent across of an area of stricture or ureteral laceration. Stents may be placed by the urologist via a transurethral approach or by the interventional radiologist via a percutaneous approach. The decision as to method of stent placement is based upon the location and accessibility of the ureteral pathology. Ureteral embolization is performed in patients with unresectable tumors of the pelvis with long-standing nephrostomy tubes and distal urine leaks refractory to other treatments. Coils, gelfoam and liquid embolic materials can be used. Ureteral embolization for ureteral fistulas and incontinence is technically successful in 100% of the patients. Complications include bleeding, infection, ureteral or renal injury, and deployment (or movement) of the coils within the renal pelvis. Percutaneous management of stone disease, including renal, ureteral, and bladder stones requires close cooperation between the urologist and interventional radiologist, because of availability of sonographic lithotripsy

  18. Primary Lymphoma of the Gall Bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-29

    Jun 29, 1974 ... A patient with primary lymphocytic lymphoma of the gall bladder is presented, and cases of primary lymphoma of this organ reported in the English literature are reviewed. Primary lymphoma of the extrahepatic biliary drainage system is a rare cause of obstructive jaundice and has a poor prognosis. S. Air.

  19. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Sven; Sebesta, Pavel; Klenske, Marian; Esche, Mirko

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is one of the most extensively discussed diagnoses. There is neither a clear and homogenous clinical presentation nor an accepted definition. The term describes a complex of symptoms and complaints caused by the compression of nerves and vascular structures at one of the three defined constrictions of the upper thoracic aperture. Methods Based on a comprehensive literature review, this article presents the etiology, epidemiology and clinical diagnostics as well as the possibilities and outcomes of surgical treatment. Results The thoracic outlet syndrome is currently subdivided into three main forms: vascular TOS (vasTOS) including arterial TOS (aTOS) and venous TOS (vTOS), neurogenic TOS (nTOS), which is further subdivided into typical (nTOS) and atypical TOS (disTOS), and a mixed form of nTOS and vasTOS (nvasTOS). The diagnosis is complex and difficult since the disTOS group comprises over 90 % of all patients. In addition to conservative treatment attempts, nTOS may be treated by surgical procedures focusing on the decompression of neurovascular structures. A significant improvement after surgery was found in up to 92 % of cases. The most common access sites are supraclavicular and transaxillary. 50 to 80 % of patients benefit from surgery in the long run. The rates of vascular or neurological complications reported by specialised centres are 0 to 2 %; minor complications such as pneumothorax, bleeding and lymphatic fistula are reported in up to 25 % of cases. Summary Most patients suffering from any form of TOS benefit from surgical treatment. Duration of symptoms, socioeconomic factors and, most notably, stringent diagnostic workup and an adequate operative procedure performed by an experienced centre are crucial to success. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. [Bladder lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, C; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A; Diao, B; Diallo, A B; Gueye, S M; Ba, M; Diagne, B A

    2001-01-01

    to study the particularities of the bladder lithiasis in our countries. This was a retrospective study of 94 cases (62 men and 32 women) of bladder lithiasis over a period of 13 years. The lithogenic factors; clinic, paraclinic and therapeutic aspects have been studied. Morphoconstitutional analysis has been carded out in collaboration with Cristal Laboratory (St Cloud hospital center in France). mean age was 24.2+/-20.7 years old. The principals mains of consultation were: dysuria (n =36), mictionnal pain (n = 28), hematuria (n = 15). Facilitating factors have been found in 27% of cases. In 10 cases, there was an association bladdder lithiasis and bladdder-vaginal fistula. Radiologic test was dominated by intraveinous urographic (53.19 of cases). The metabolic test showed hypercalcemia and cristalluria in 2 cases. In 7,45 % of cases, we have founding a renal failure. An urinary tract infection have been noticed in 42 % of cases. Open surgery has been the main treatement (96 %) associating in 15 % of cases the treatement of an uropathy. In one case the bladder lithiasis weighed 1120 g. The morphologic and spectrophotometric analysis of the lithiasis have been achieved in 13 % of cases showing the predominance of struvite. the bladder lithiasis is still common in our countries; it could be good for us to access endoorporeals and extracorporeals therapeutic equipements in orderto reduce the indications of open surgery.

  2. UNUSUAL BLADDER OUTFLOW OBSTRUCTION: CASE REROPT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-07-07

    Jul 7, 2003 ... Isolated retrovesical location of the hydatid cyst is a very rare condition whose manifestations appears after a long course of the disease and are due to ... New Zealand, South Africa, Asia, Southern Europe, Middle. East and also mainly in East Africa. In Kenya, human hydatidosis is reported to be high in ...

  3. Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bladder Control Problems in Women (Urinary Incontinence) Kegel Exercises Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) What ... a vaginal pessary, or surgery. Pelvic floor, or Kegel, exercises involve strengthening pelvic floor muscles. Strong pelvic ...

  4. Association of symptoms with urodynamic findings in men with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Ali A; Gajewski, Jerzy B

    2012-12-01

    Study Type--Therapy (review) Level of Evidence 4. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? It is known that overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms correlate weakly with urodynamic findings, especially in female patients. The study shows that OAB symptoms also correlate weakly with urodynamic findings in male patients. More than third of male patients with OAB symptoms had evidence of BOO. The study finds that a pressure flow study is of benefit in the evaluation of this group of patients. • To assess the correlation between overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms with urodynamic (UD) findings in men. • We conducted a retrospective study of all UD studies involving men with OAB symptoms. • All UD studies were carried out at a single centre from 1994 to 2009 and were reported by one urology specialist. • There were 668 UD reports included in the final analysis. All patients had symptoms of urgency with or without urgency incontinence (UI). • There was a weak correlation between OAB symptoms and UD findings. • All storage symptoms, except frequency, correlated with a finding of detrusor overactivity (DO). • Severity of urgency correlated inversely with a finding of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). • Both nocturia and frequency correlated inversely with maximum cystometric capacity. • More than 75% of patients had concomitant voiding symptoms. Severity of voiding symptoms (slow stream and incomplete emptying) correlated inversely with documentation of DO. Voiding symptoms were predictors of BOO, while severe urgency was a negative predictor for BOO. • There were weak correlations between OAB symptoms and UD findings. Most men with OAB symptoms had concomitant voiding symptoms and more than a third (43%) of these had evidence of BOO. • A pressure flow study is of benefit in the evaluation of patients with OAB symptoms. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  5. Urinary nerve growth factor levels in overactive bladder syndrome and lower urinary tract disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Chen, Chia-Yen; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2010-12-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome based on self-reported symptoms of urgency and frequency with or without urge incontinence. Although urgency is the core symptom of OAB, patients might have difficulty to distinguish urgency from the urge to void. Urodynamic study is a useful diagnostic tool to discover detrusor overactivity (DO) in patients with OAB; however, not all OAB patients have DO. Therefore, a more objective and non-invasive way to diagnose and assess OAB including DO is needed. Recent research has focused on urinary biomarkers in assessment of OAB. Urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) level increases in patients with OAB-wet, bladder outlet obstruction, mixed urinary incontinence and urodynamic DO. Urinary NGF levels are correlated with severity of OAB symptoms. In patients with OAB and DO who have been well treated with antimuscarinics or botulinum toxin injection, urinary NGF levels have been shown to decrease significantly in association with reduction of urgency severity. However, not all patients with OAB have an elevated urinary NGF level. It might also be increased in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, cerebrovascular accident and lower urinary tract diseases such as urinary tract stone, bacterial infection and urothelial tumor. It is possible to use urinary NGF levels as a bio-marker for diagnosis of OAB as well as for the assessment of therapeutic outcome in patients with OAB or DO. Here, we review the latest medical advances in this field. Copyright © 2010 Formosan Medical Association & Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mameghan, Hedy; Fisher, Richard; Mameghan, Jill; Brook, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess prognostic factors for bladder relapse and distant failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of patients treated in the period 1977 to 1990 by definitive radiotherapy. The factors studied included age, sex, T stage, histological grade, tumor multiplicity, ureteric obstruction, total radiation dose, and use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The endpoints studied were bladder relapse and distant failure. Results: There were 342 patients with a mean follow-up time of 7.9 years. Bladder relapse was observed in 159 patients. The overall actuarial bladder relapse rate at 5 years was 55% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher bladder relapse rate were: tumor multiplicity (p < 0.001), presence of ureteric obstruction (p = 0.001), and higher T stage (p 0.044). Distant failure occurred in 39 patients. The overall actuarial distant failure rate at 5 years was 28% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher distant failure rate were: ureteric obstruction (p = 0.003) and higher T stage (p = 0.030). Conclusion: In our study, patients with invasive bladder TCC fell into distinct prognostic groups determined by the three independent factors, ureteric obstruction, tumor multiplicity, and T stage. These factors provided estimated risks of bladder relapse by 5 years which ranged from 34% to 91%. Knowledge of these prognostic factors can help in the selection of patients more suited for bladder preservation by definitive radiotherapy

  7. 49 CFR 178.346-4 - Outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outlets. 178.346-4 Section 178.346-4... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.346-4 Outlets. (a) All outlets on each tank... as an alternative to internal self-closing stop-valves on loading/unloading outlets. [Amdt. 178-89...

  8. Gastric outlet obstruction in Northwestern Ethiopia | Kotisso | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Truncal vagotomy with gastroenterostomy was the most frequently performed procedure with a good outcome. This study shows that peptic ulcer disease is a serious problem in the community. More effort is needed to make effective drugs against peptic ulcer disease available. Moreover, in our set up, tuberculosis should ...

  9. Gastrojejunostomy for gastric outlet obstruction in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    should not be performed for irresectable gastric cancer at all.6 Newer ... maintenance fluids were used, but parenteral nutrition was ... normal diet. There were 19 postoperative complications in 17 patients. These included intravenous line sepsis (N = 4), renal failure. (N = 3), and 1 each of stroke, myocardial infarct, renal fail-.

  10. Gastric outlet obstruction in Northwestern Ethiopia | Kotisso | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East and Central African Journal of Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Causing Gastric Outlet Obstruction In A 35 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal ultrasonography is a useful diagnostic tool with almost equal value to a computerized tomography (CT) scan. An upper gastrointestinal series with barium contrast medium is less sensitive and of secondary importance with evolution of Ct scan. Treatment includes both operative and non-operative measures.

  12. “Clavicular Duplication Causing Thoracic Outlet Obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychiatric consultation was taken to rule out psychosomatic dysfunction. Along with symptomatic medications, physical therapy was started with patient education, under the supervision of dedicated physiotherapist and occupational therapist. Patient compliance with home exercise program and modification of behavior ...

  13. Primary duodenal tuberculosis presenting as gastric-outlet obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common presentation was vomiting followed by failure to thrive and weight loss; two patients had abdominal pain. Biopsy of mesenteric lymph node was possible in two cases. FNAC from diseases portion was taken in all cases. FNAC showed granulomas in four cases. Cases where even FNAC fi nding was ...

  14. The paediatric neuropathic bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A neurogenic bladder can be defined as a dysfunctinal urinary bladder caused by disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves involved in the control of micturition (urination). In pathophysiological terms, a neurogenic bladder is caused by a spinal reflex arc that occurs when the bladder becomes autonomous.

  15. Pregnancy in a woman with untreated bladder exstrophy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhui Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the management of urinary tract obstruction and infection in a pregnant woman with unrepaired bladder exstrophy. Case Report: A 27-year-old pregnant woman with unrepaired bladder exstrophy was referred to our hospital with a complaint of bilateral flank pain in the second trimester. After two-dimensional abdominal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and a urine analysis, she was diagnosed with an upper urinary tract infection due to ureteral obstruction secondary to unrepaired congenital bladder exstrophy and an intrauterine pregnancy. J-tube insertion was performed after locating the ureteral orifices and antibiotics were administered. Symptoms rapidly resolved. She delivered a normal male infant by caesarean section at 34 weeks of gestation. Conclusion: Standard urological management of the ureteral obstruction in pregnancy was successful in this extreme case of unrepaired bladder exstrophy associated with an intrauterine pregnancy. The perinatal outcome was good. Keywords: Bladder exstrophy, Infection, Pregnancy, Urinary tract

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ...

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ...

  18. Intra-uterine cystography for evaluation of prenatal obstructive uropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoutenbeek, P.; Drogtrop, A.P.; Jong, T.P.V.M. de; Gool, J.D. van; Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Utrecht

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate the risk for kidney damage in a male fetus with obstructive uropathy, a percutaneous bladder puncture was performed at 26 weeks gestational age and contrast was injected into the fetal bladder. A clear picture was obtained of the bladder with marked widening of the prostatic urethra and posterior urethral valves, and massive bilateral vesicoureteral reflux could be demonstrated. By adding cysto-urethrography to a diagnostic puncture of the fetal bladder it could be proved that the dilatation of the upper urinary tracts was caused by high-pressure vesico-urethral reflux incurring progressive damage to the renal parenchyma. (orig.)

  19. Intra-uterine cystography for evaluation of prenatal obstructive uropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoutenbeek, P.; Drogtrop, A.P.; Jong, T.P.V.M. de; Gool, J.D. van

    1989-05-01

    To evaluate the risk for kidney damage in a male fetus with obstructive uropathy, a percutaneous bladder puncture was performed at 26 weeks gestational age and contrast was injected into the fetal bladder. A clear picture was obtained of the bladder with marked widening of the prostatic urethra and posterior urethral valves, and massive bilateral vesicoureteral reflux could be demonstrated. By adding cysto-urethrography to a diagnostic puncture of the fetal bladder it could be proved that the dilatation of the upper urinary tracts was caused by high-pressure vesico-urethral reflux incurring progressive damage to the renal parenchyma.

  20. Extreme hyperkalaemia secondary to malignant ureteric obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of a 42 year old patient who collapsed at an airport departure lounge. The patient was investigated and found to have advanced renal failure with serum potassium (K+) of 10.3 mmol/L, creatinine of 3581 µmol/L and urea of 59.9 mmol/L secondary to obstructive uropathy due to advanced bladder cancer.

  1. Muscarinic receptors of the urinary bladder: detrusor, urothelial and prejunctional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess-Williams, R

    2002-06-01

    1. The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for maintaining normal bladder function, contracting the bladder smooth muscle (detrusor) and relaxing the bladder outlet during micturition. 2. Contraction of the bladder involves direct contraction via M3 receptors and an indirect 're-contraction' via M2-receptors whereby a reduction in adenylate cyclase activity reverses the relaxation induced by beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. 3. Muscarinic receptors are also located on the epithelial lining of the bladder (urothelium) where they induce the release of a diffusible factor responsible for inhibiting contraction of the underlying detrusor smooth muscle. The factor remains unidentified but is not nitric oxide, a cyclooxygenase product or adenosine triphosphate. 4. Finally, muscarinic receptors are also located prejunctionally in the bladder on cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals, where M1-receptors facilitate transmitter release and M2 or M4-receptors inhibit transmitter release. 5. In pathological states, changes may occur in these receptor systems resulting in bladder dysfunction. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the main therapeutic agents available for treatment of the overactive bladder, but whether their therapeutic effect involves actions at all three locations (detrusor, prejunctional, urothelial) has yet to be established.

  2. Thoracic outlet syndrome: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Juan Camilo; Acosta, Mauricio Fernando; Uribe Jorge Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome in a young man, diagnosed with upper limb arteriography, leading to repeated arterio-arterial emboli originating from a post-stenotic subclavian artery aneurysm. It is of our interest due to its low incidence and the small number of cases reported that have been diagnosed by arteriography. The thoracic outlet is the path through which vascular and neural structures goes from the neck to the axilla, and it has three anatomical strictures, that when pronounced, can compress the brachial plexus or subclavian vessels, leading to different symptoms and signs.

  3. Bladder neck disease and kidney damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mudoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO was first described in men by Marion in 1933. The precise cause of PBNO has not been clearly elucidated. This paper review the theories on etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and treatments for PBNO. Also this paper focuses on management of patients with complications like acute urine retention, hydroureteronephrosis and severe renal failure. The treatment options for men and women with PBNO include careful clinical evaluation, pharmacotherapy with alpha-blockers and surgical intervention.

  4. Bladder sensation measures and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, David E; Neil, Nancy J; Govier, Fred E; Kobashi, Kathleen C

    2009-09-01

    We performed a prospective multicomponent study to determine whether subjective and objective bladder sensation instruments may provide data on sensory dysfunction in patients with overactive bladder. We evaluated 70 prospectively enrolled patients with urodynamics and questionnaires on validated urgency (Urgency Perception Score), general overactive bladder (Urogenital Distress Inventory) and quality of life (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire). We first sought a correlation between sensory specific (Urgency Perception Score) and quality of life questionnaire scores. We then assessed a correlation between sensory questionnaire scores and urodynamic variables, exploring the hypothesis that certain urodynamic parameters may be bladder sensation measures. We evaluated 2 urodynamic derivatives (first sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity) to increase sensory finding discrimination. We noted a moderate correlation between the Urgency Perception Score (0.56) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (0.74) vs the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (each p Perception Score and bladder capacity (-0.25, p sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity statistically significantly correlated with the Urgency Perception Score despite the lesser or absent correlation associated with the individual components of these derivatives. Bladder sensation questionnaires may be valuable to identify patients with sensory dysfunction and provide additional data not obtained in generalized symptom questionnaires. Urodynamic variables correlated with bladder sensation questionnaire scores and may be an objective method to assess sensory dysfunction.

  5. Hydrologic Outlets of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hydrologic Outlets of the Greenland Ice Sheet data set contains GIS point shapefiles that include 891 observed and potential hydrologic outlets of the Greenland...

  6. Outlet diffusers to increase culvert capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Aging infrastructure and changing weather patterns present the need to increase the capacity of existing highway culverts. This research approaches this challenge through the use of diffuser outlet systems to increase pipe capacity and reduce outlet ...

  7. Unusual causes of mechanical small bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatnawi, Nawaf J.; Bani-Hani, Kamal E.

    2005-01-01

    We herein report our experience regarding unusual causes of bowel obstruction to increase the awareness of surgeons regarding this disease. From 1991 to 2003, we had experience at the University affiliated hospitals, northern Jordan with 24 patients with small bowel obstruction resulting from unusual causes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these patients with regards to the mode of presentation, cause of obstruction, radiological and operative findings, management and outcome. We recorded 15 patients who underwent previous abdominal surgery. Preoperative diagnosis was correct in only one patient with an internal hernia, but the abdominal CT scan suggested the diagnosis in 5 of the 9 patients who had the scan. The final diagnosis was internal hernias in 11 patients, foreign bodies in 5, ischemic strictures in 3, carcinoid tumors in 2, endometriosis in 2, and metastatic deposit from interstitial bladder carcinoma in one patient. Nine of the 12 patients with recurrent obstruction had either short course or recurrence obstruction during the same hospital admission. W carried out bowel resections in 15 patients (5 resections were due to bowel strangulation). Post operative death occurred in 4 patients. Awareness of these rare causes of intestinal obstruction even in patients with previous abdominal operation might improve the outcome. The tentative diagnosis of adhesion obstruction in patients with unusual obstructive etiology might lead to a higher rate of gangrenous complications. Rigorous preoperative evaluation including careful history and early abdominal CT may show the obstructive cause. (author)

  8. Tracheal left mainstem bronchus and obstructive gastric mucosal intussusception associated with esophageal atresia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, C. J.; Aronson, D. C.; Ekkelkamp, S.; van de Heide-Jalving, M.; Vos, A.

    1995-01-01

    A tracheal left mainstem bronchus and gastric outlet obstruction owing to gastric mucosal intussusception occurred in a child who had esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. Bronchography and bronchoscopy, indicated because of persisting atelectasis and ventilation dependency, showed a

  9. Factory Outlet Stores - ein Trend in Deutschland?

    OpenAIRE

    Nufer, Gerd; Sieber, Dorothea

    2009-01-01

    Der Factory Outlet Store stellt einen neuen Vertriebskanal dar, der es Herstellern ermöglicht, Kunden Markenprodukte zu vergleichsweise günstige Preisen anzubieten. Der vorliegende Beitrag befasst sich mit dem Konzept Factory Outlet Store und der Frage, ob es sich hierbei um einen aktuellen Marketing-Trend handelt bzw. welche Mittel unternommen werden müssen, um Factory Outlet Stores nachhaltig zu etablieren. Hierzu werden Factory Outlet Stores aus der Marketing-Perspektive analysiert, bei de...

  10. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Acute colonic ileus; Colonic pseudo-obstruction; Idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Ogilvie syndrome; Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Paralytic ileus - pseudo-obstruction

  11. 49 CFR 192.157 - Extruded outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extruded outlets. 192.157 Section 192.157 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... outlets. Each extruded outlet must be suitable for anticipated service conditions and must be at least...

  12. Magnetic resonance in obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jena, A.; Khushu, S.; Kakar, A.K.; Mishra, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve cases of obstructive jaundice in whom ultrasound failed to demonstrate the site and/or the cause of obstruction of the biliary tract were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), correctly diagnosing the site and cause of obstruction in 10 of 12 surgically proven cases. In one case of cholangiocarcinoma, the site of obstruction was well shown on MR but a definite cause could not be ascertained. In another patient who developed intermittent jaundice following surgery for choledochal cyst, MR demonstrated a solitary stone in the common hepatic duct. Surgical confirmation could not be achieved as the patient was lost to follow up. There were 6 cases of choledocholithiasis, 3 cases of gall bladder carcinoma and one case each of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. It is believed that MRI will provide obstructive jaundice and will be able to minimize the use of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in view of its ability to perform multiplanar imaging in multiple sequences. 11 refs., figs., 1 tab

  13. Primary Lymphoma of the Gall Bladder | Botha | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A patient with primary lymphocytic lymphoma of the gall bladder is presented, and cases of primary lymphoma of this organ reported in the English literature are reviewed. Primary lymphoma of the extrahepatic biliary drainage system is a rare cause of obstructive jaundice and has a poor prognosis. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1345 ...

  14. Endoscopic Urinary Diversion As Initial Management of Symptomatic Obstructive Ectopic Ureter in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Ortiz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AimDefinitive surgery of ectopic ureter in infants is challenging. We propose an endoscopic urinary diversion (EUD as a novel surgical technique in the initial management of symptomatic obstructive ectopic ureter.Patients and methodsSixteen obstructive ectopic ureters (14 patients were initially treated by EUD between 2006 and 2015. All patients had urinary tract dilatation worsening at preoperative US scans and at least two febrile urinary tract infection (UTI or urinary sepsis despite antibiotic prophylaxis. Ectopic ureter was confirmed by cystoscopy. When ectopic meatus was not found, EUD consisted in the creation of a transurethral neo-orifice (TUNO performed by needle puncturing of the ureterovesical wall, under fluoroscopic and ultrasound control. If ectopic meatus was identified in the posterior urethra, “intravesicalization procedure” was done opening the urethral–ureteral wall to create a new ureteral outlet into the bladder.ResultsEUD was done at a median age of 3.5 months (0.5–7 with median follow-up of 48 months (24–136. TUNO was performed in six patients and “intravesicalization” in eight patients. Significant differences were observed in ureteral diameter and anteroposterior pelvis diameter before and after endoscopic treatment (p < 0.005. Initial renal function was preserved in all cases. Postoperative complications were UTI in four patients and TUNO stenosis in one patient, treated by endoscopic balloon dilation. Definitive treatment was further individualized in each patient after 1 year of life.ConclusionEUD is a feasible and safe less-invasive technique in the initial management of symptomatic obstructive ectopic ureter. It allows an adequate ureteral drainage preserving renal function until definitive repair if necessary and does not invalidate other surgical options in case of failure or future definitive treatments.

  15. Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the obstruction along the intestines. Treatment Suction via nasogastric tube Fluids given by vein Surgery for strangulation Sometimes ... nose and placed in the stomach (called a nasogastric tube) or into the intestine. Suction is applied to ...

  16. Bladder dysfunction in children science fiction or [corrected] science fact: editorial comment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bägli, Darius J

    2012-08-01

    Functional bladder problems in children are often insidious and are frequently ignored by the child, by parents, and by many caregivers. Consideration of both the urinary and bowel outlets, and more recently, of the corticospinal tracts and brain reveal great complexity in this condition. In this article, the author addresses many of these issues in depth with a familiar personal experience derived from many years of dedicated consideration of these problems. Bladder dysfunction in the child is in many ways the pediatric urologist's hypertension diagnosis. Like antihypertensive therapy, bladder retraining strategies must be adhered to for life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadhav, Praveen; Shikare, Shekhar; Tilve, Gundu

    1990-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy is a very useful investigation in cholestatic jaundice, especially when serum bilirubin is less than 20 mg %. It is particularly useful to diagnose early biliary obstruction, to quantitate biliary obstruction with measurement of hepatic and gall bladder bile excretion rate, to determine the urgency of therapeutic procedure and to evaluate the effect of therapy in all these cases. In these cases other investagations like ultrasonography are less useful as compared to scintigraphy which has a high index of sensitivity. In this study, comparative analysis of 32 cases of cholestatic jaundice is presented. (author). 12 refs ., 4 tabs

  18. Exstrophy of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollohan, J

    1999-03-01

    Exstrophy of the bladder is a rare congenital defect that occurs when the abdominal wall and underlying structures, including the ventral wall of the bladder, fail to fuse in utero. As a result, the lower urinary tract is exposed, and the everted bladder appears through the abdominal opening. Various surgical interventions have been employed with variable success in the hope of achieving complete dryness, full control over delivery of urine, freedom from catheters and external appliances, and a protected upper urinary tract. The most popular surgical approach is the primary bladder closure with secondary bladder neck reconstruction. Comprehensive nursing, medical, and surgical care are necessary to preserve renal and sexual function. The many complex problems experienced by these infants and their families call for a multidisciplinary approach. This article reviews occurrence, clinical presentation, and management of exstrophy of the bladder.

  19. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has ex...... can be challenging, and misdiagnosis as a psychological problem, overactive bladder, or chronic urinary infection has plagued patients with the problem....

  20. Intelligent electrical outlet for collective load control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Ford, Justin R.; Spires, Shannon V.; Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-10-27

    Various technologies described herein pertain to an electrical outlet that autonomously manages loads in a microgrid. The electrical outlet can provide autonomous load control in response to variations in electrical power generation supply in the microgrid. The electrical outlet includes a receptacle, a sensor operably coupled to the receptacle, and an actuator configured to selectively actuate the receptacle. The sensor measures electrical parameters at the receptacle. Further, a processor autonomously controls the actuator based at least in part on the electrical parameters measured at the receptacle, electrical parameters from one or more disparate electrical outlets in the microgrid, and a supply of generated electric power in the microgrid at a given time.

  1. Endoscopic biopsy for the diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis at the fourth ventricle outlet with hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Munetake; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Hattori, Gohsuke; Sugita, Yasuo; Morioka, Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fourth ventricle mass lesion in neurosarcoidosis is very rare and difficult to be diagnosed pathologically. We report a rare case of progressive hydrocephalus associated with neurosarcoidosis mass lesion located at the fourth ventricle outlet and suprasellar region. Case Description: A 23-year-old man had a disturbance of consciousness and neck stiffness with fever. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement, and the obstructive mass lesions at the outlet of the fourth ventricle. We performed an endoscopic biopsy of the enhanced lesion at the foramen Magendie, via foramen Monro and the aqueduct of the midbrain. Pathologically, the diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis was confirmed, and we started treatment with prednisolone. His neurological symptoms disappeared after ventriculo-peritoneal shunt and steroid therapy, and he was discharged without deficit 40 days after emergent admission. Conclusion: Endoscopic procedure is less invasive and more effective for biopsy of neurosarcoidosis with hydrocephalus, even if the lesion is located at the fourth ventricle outlet. PMID:26682088

  2. A RARE CASE OF EARLY URETHRAL OBSTRUCTION SEQUENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Garg; S. Krishna; Dhiraj Shedabale; K.C. Jain

    2009-01-01

    Early urethral obstruction is most commonly the consequence of urethral valve formation during the development of prostatic urethra. Less commonly, it is due to urethral atresia, bladder neck obstructionor distal urethral obstruction. A rare case delivered at Pravara Rural Hospital ,Loni with bilateral hydronephrosis with imperforated anus, undescended testis and unilateral Congenital Talipes EquinoVarus. Child underwent Exploratory Laparotomy with descending loop colostomy and bilateral neph...

  3. Surgical outcomes of 380 patients with double outlet right ventricle who underwent biventricular repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shoujun; Ma, Kai; Hu, Shengshou; Hua, Zhongdong; Yang, Keming; Yan, Jun; Chen, Qiuming

    2014-09-01

    The study objective was to report the outcomes of biventricular repair in patients with double outlet right ventricle. Patients with double outlet right ventricle who underwent biventricular repair at Fuwai Hospital from January 2005 to December 2012 were included. Patients were excluded if double outlet right ventricle was combined with atrioventricular septal defect, heterotaxy syndrome, atrioventricular discordance, or univentricular physiology. A total of 380 consecutive patients with a mean age of 1.9 ± 2.1 years (range, 1 month to 6 years) were included. Varied types of biventricular repair were customized individually. Follow-up was 90.4% complete, and the mean follow-up time was 3.4 ± 3.9 years. There were 17 (4.5%) early deaths and 7 (2.1%) late deaths. Preoperative pulmonary hypertension was the only risk factor for early mortality. Postoperative significant left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 9 survivors. Patients with noncommitted ventricular septal defect had a longer crossclamp time, longer cardiopulmonary bypass time, and higher incidence of postdischarge left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. There were 4 reoperations, all of which were caused by subaortic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. All of the pressure gradients were decreased to less than 20 mm Hg after the modified Konno procedure with an uneventful postoperative course. Optimal results of varied types of biventricular repair for double outlet right ventricle have been acquired. Although noncommitted ventricular septal defect is technically difficult, the outcomes of patients are favorable. Late-onset left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is the main reason for reoperation but can be successfully relieved by the modified Konno procedure. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Post appendectomy acalculus bilateral ureteric obstruction: A rare entity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral acalculus ureteric obstruction is described as rare sequelae of acute appendicitis in two paediatric patients aged 6 and 11 years presented with features of anuria. Imaging and endoscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral ureteric obstruction secondary to bladder wall oedema as an inflammatory reaction to appendix. Both cases recovered following bilateral ureteric stenting and are doing well.

  5. Bladder necrosis: 'A man without a bladder'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosschieter, Judith; Oudshoorn, Frederik H K; Meuleman, Eric J H; Nieuwenhuijzen, Jakko A

    2018-02-17

    Since the use of antibiotics, bladder necrosis has become a rare condition. We report a case of bladder necrosis in a 90-year-old man following urinary retention. After insertion of a transurethral catheter (TUC), 2 L of urine was evacuated. In the following days, the TUC became intermittently blocked. Adequate bladder drainage could not be obtained despite intensive rinsing and placement of a suprapubic catheter. On surgical exploration necrosis of almost the entire bladder wall, except for the trigone, was encountered. Surgical debridement of the non-viable bladder wall without opening the abdominal cavity was conducted, and a TUC was placed in the Retzius cavity to ensure evacuation of urine. Since the patient was haemodynamically unstable, construction of a urinary diversion was waived and urinary drainage of the Retzius cavity by the TUC was accepted, resulting in adequate urinary drainage without compromising renal function. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...

  7. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If You Have Questions Print en español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that ... Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) Urinary ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  8. Long neglected neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnani, Pooja; Gupta, Ruchi; Kedia, Nikhil; Pattewar, Sainath; Bahadur, Madan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI) post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  9. Long neglected neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Pooja Binnani; Ruchi Gupta; Nikhil Kedia; Sainath Pattewar; Madan Mohan Bahadur

    2011-01-01

    Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI) post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  10. Developments in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, L.; Niijima, T.; Prout, G.; Schroder, F.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Guidelines for Radiation Therapy in Clinical Research on Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma in Situ; Policy on Monitoring and Reporting Results; Standardization of Protocol Formnd The Role of Cytology in the Diagnosis, Detection and Follow-up of Bladder Cancer

  11. Alcohol outlets and clusters of violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pridemore William

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol related violence continues to be a major public health problem in the United States. In particular, there is substantial evidence of an association between alcohol outlets and assault. However, because the specific geographic relationships between alcohol outlets and the distribution of violence remains obscured, it is important to identify the spatial linkages that may exist, enhancing public health efforts to curb both violence and morbidity. Methods The present study utilizes police-recorded data on simple and aggravated assaults in Cincinnati, Ohio. Addresses of alcohol outlets for Cincinnati, including all bars, alcohol-serving restaurants, and off-premise liquor and convenience stores were obtained from the Ohio Division of Liquor Control and geocoded for analysis. A combination of proximity analysis, spatial cluster detection approaches and a geographic information system were used to identify clusters of alcohol outlets and the distribution of violence around them. Results A brief review of the empirical work relating to alcohol outlet density and violence is provided, noting that the majority of this literature is cross-sectional and ecological in nature, yielding a somewhat haphazard and aggregate view of how outlet type(s and neighborhood characteristics like social organization and land use are related to assaultive violence. The results of the statistical analysis for Cincinnati suggest that while alcohol outlets are not problematic per se, assaultive violence has a propensity to cluster around agglomerations of alcohol outlets. This spatial relationship varies by distance and is also related to the characteristics of the alcohol outlet agglomeration. Specifically, spatially dense distributions of outlets appear to be more prone to clusters of assaultive violence when compared to agglomerations with a lower density of outlets. Conclusion With a more thorough understanding of the spatial relationships

  12. Alcohol outlets and clusters of violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubesic, Tony H; Pridemore, William Alex

    2011-05-04

    Alcohol related violence continues to be a major public health problem in the United States. In particular, there is substantial evidence of an association between alcohol outlets and assault. However, because the specific geographic relationships between alcohol outlets and the distribution of violence remains obscured, it is important to identify the spatial linkages that may exist, enhancing public health efforts to curb both violence and morbidity. The present study utilizes police-recorded data on simple and aggravated assaults in Cincinnati, Ohio. Addresses of alcohol outlets for Cincinnati, including all bars, alcohol-serving restaurants, and off-premise liquor and convenience stores were obtained from the Ohio Division of Liquor Control and geocoded for analysis. A combination of proximity analysis, spatial cluster detection approaches and a geographic information system were used to identify clusters of alcohol outlets and the distribution of violence around them. A brief review of the empirical work relating to alcohol outlet density and violence is provided, noting that the majority of this literature is cross-sectional and ecological in nature, yielding a somewhat haphazard and aggregate view of how outlet type(s) and neighborhood characteristics like social organization and land use are related to assaultive violence. The results of the statistical analysis for Cincinnati suggest that while alcohol outlets are not problematic per se, assaultive violence has a propensity to cluster around agglomerations of alcohol outlets. This spatial relationship varies by distance and is also related to the characteristics of the alcohol outlet agglomeration. Specifically, spatially dense distributions of outlets appear to be more prone to clusters of assaultive violence when compared to agglomerations with a lower density of outlets. With a more thorough understanding of the spatial relationships between alcohol outlets and the distribution of assaults, policymakers

  13. Complex Greenland outlet glacier flow captured

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Andy; Fahnestock, Mark A.; Truffer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet is losing mass at an accelerating rate due to increased surface melt and flow acceleration in outlet glaciers. Quantifying future dynamic contributions to sea level requires accurate portrayal of outlet glaciers in ice sheet simulations, but to date poor knowledge of subglacial topography and limited model resolution have prevented reproduction of complex spatial patterns of outlet flow. Here we combine a high-resolution ice-sheet model coupled to uniformly applied models of subglacial hydrology and basal sliding, and a new subglacial topography data set to simulate the flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Flow patterns of many outlet glaciers are well captured, illustrating fundamental commonalities in outlet glacier flow and highlighting the importance of efforts to map subglacial topography. Success in reproducing present day flow patterns shows the potential for prognostic modelling of ice sheets without the need for spatially varying parameters with uncertain time evolution. PMID:26830316

  14. Intravesical TRPV4 blockade reduces repeated variate stress-induced bladder dysfunction by increasing bladder capacity and decreasing voiding frequency in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with functional lower urinary tract disorders including interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) and overactive bladder (OAB) often report symptom (e.g., urinary frequency) worsening due to stress. One member of the transient receptor potential ion channel vanilloid family, TRPV4, has recently been implicated in urinary bladder dysfunction disorders including OAB and IC/BPS. These studies address the role of TRPV4 in stress-induced bladder dysfunction using an animal model of stress in male rats. To induce stress, rats were exposed to 7 days of repeated variate stress (RVS). Quantitative PCR data demonstrated significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in TRPV4 transcript levels in urothelium but not detrusor smooth muscle. Western blot analyses of split urinary bladders (i.e., urothelium and detrusor) showed significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in TRPV4 protein expression levels in urothelial tissues but not detrusor smooth muscle. We previously showed that RVS produces bladder dysfunction characterized by decreased bladder capacity and increased voiding frequency. The functional role of TRPV4 in RVS-induced bladder dysfunction was evaluated using continuous, open outlet intravesical infusion of saline in conjunction with administration of a TRPV4 agonist, GSK1016790A (3 μM), a TRPV4 antagonist, HC067047 (1 μM), or vehicle (0.1% DMSO in saline) in control and RVS-treated rats. Bladder capacity, void volume, and intercontraction interval significantly decreased following intravesical instillation of GSK1016790A in control rats and significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased following administration of HC067047 in RVS-treated rats. These results demonstrate increased TRPV4 expression in the urothelium following RVS and that TRPV4 blockade ameliorates RVS-induced bladder dysfunction consistent with the role of TRPV4 as a promising target for bladder function disorders. PMID:24965792

  15. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    Stem cells;. Bladder tissue engineering;. Decellularization;. Bladder acellular matrix. Abstract. A wide range of injuries could affect the bladder and lead to eventual loss ... Tissue engineering relies upon three essential pillars; the scaffold, the cells seeded on scaffolds and lastly ..... Clinical trials in bladder tissue engineering.

  16. “U-Method” TVT-Secur Slings: Are they obstructive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Patrick; Gagnon, Louis-Olivier; Tu, Le Mai

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The TVT-Secur, a single incision sling, was introduced in 2006. It is implanted using either the “hammock” or the “U-method” technique. With the latter, the sling is tightened to create a “pillowing effect” on the urethra until a negative stress test is obtained. Short-term results seem promising. However, no study has ever reported on the voiding pattern 12 months after its implantation. Our objective was to assess whether the “U-method” technique creates an obstructive voiding pattern on pressure-flow study (PFS) 12 months after the surgery. Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the charts of 33 women who underwent the “U-method” TVT-Secur. Patients were evaluated before and 12 months postoperatively with regard to different urodynamic studies (UDS). The incontinence status was also assessed 12 months after surgery. Results: At 12 months after the operation, 12.5% (4/32) of the patients reported an improvement of their stress urinary incontinence, while 78.1% (25/32) reported being cured from it. The objective cure rate was 63% (19/30). One patient had a suspected bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) based on PFS. Maximal flow rate (Qmax) was significantly lower 12 months after surgery (26.0 mL/s [range: 19.0–36.5] vs. 21.5 mL/s [range: 16.0–32.3]). However, median voided volume was lower on the postoperative uroflowmetry (446 mL [range: 348–605] vs. 320 mL [range: 243–502]). Furthermore, none of the patients complained of voiding symptoms after surgery. Conclusions: Although one patient had findings compatible with BOO, none complained of voiding symptoms. TVT-Secur may result in a lower Qmax. However, this finding may be due to a lower voiding volume on the postoperative UDS. PMID:22511425

  17. Biochemical and functional correlates of an increased membrane density of caveolae in hypertrophic rat urinary bladder.

    OpenAIRE

    Shakirova, Yulia; Swärd, Karl; Uvelius, Bengt; Ekman, Mari

    2010-01-01

    Organ hypertrophy is often found to be associated with changes in the expression of caveolins and altered density of caveolae in the membrane. A plethora of signalling intermediaries are associated with caveolae and loss of caveolae has profound effects on contractility of the urinary bladder. We hypothesized that smooth muscle hypertrophy caused by bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) might lead to an altered caveola density with consequences for contractile regulation. Rat BOO for 6weeks cause...

  18. The pharmacological rationale for combining muscarinic receptor antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of airway and bladder disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dale, Philippa R.; Cernecka, Hana; Schmidt, Martina; Dowling, Mark R.; Charlton, Steven J.; Pieper, Michael P.; Michel, Martin C.

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor agonists are used in the treatment of obstructive airway disease and overactive bladder syndrome. Here we review the pharmacological rationale for their combination. Muscarinic receptors and beta-adrenoceptors are physiological antagonists for

  19. HYPERTROPHIC OBSTRUCTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Osiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP is a relatively common disease with genetic predisposition, that is widely spread irrespective of gender, race or ethnicity. The cause of this pathology are mutations of genes encoding synthesis of contracting proteins. Degree and type of mutations define clinical manifestation of the disease and its prognosis. HCMP is classified according to four main criteria: depending on morphology, presence of left ventricular outlet obstruction, pressure gradient and hemodynamic parameters. Its prevalence amounts to 1:500, and in the recent years mortality has decreased significantly to 1%. Main symptoms of HCMP include dyspnoea, dizziness, syncope, angina, and heart arrhythmias. HCMP does not manifest obligatorily with all above mentioned signs and symptoms. Presence and severity of any symptoms depend on morphological particulars of the disease. Particular attention should be paid to arrhythmias, with atrial fibrillation among them, that may cause hazardous and occasionally lethal complications. Electrocardiography and echocardiography are recognized as the “golden standard” of HCMP diagnostics, while in the recent years, magnetic resonance imaging has become a highly informative diagnostic tool. Radionuclide diagnostics is used less frequently, while physical examination and assessments have been moving backwards. At present, main strategies in HCMP include medical treatment with β-blockers, calcium antagonists, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and anti-arrhythmics. There are two techniques for surgical treatment, i.e. myectomy by Morrow and alcohol septal ablation that is becoming increasingly popular. The article reviews literature on state-of-the-art diagnostics and treatment of HCMP patients.

  20. Bladder augmentation and urinary diversion in patients with neurogenic bladder: surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Raimund; Schröder, Annette; Thüroff, Joachim W

    2012-04-01

    In patients with a neurogenic bladder, the primary goal is preservation of renal function and prevention of urinary tract infection, with urinary continence as the secondary goal. After failure of conservative treatment (clean intermittent catheterisation and pharmacotherapy) urinary diversion should be considered. In this review, the surgical options with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In patients with a hyper-reflexive, small-capacity and/or low-compliance bladder with normal upper urinary tract, bladder augmentation (bowel segments/ureter) is an option. To those who are unable to perform clean intermittent catheterisation via urethra, a continent cutaneous stoma can be offered. In patients with irreparable sphincter defects a continent cutaneous diversion is an option. For patients who are not suitable for a continent diversion (incompliant±chronic renal failure), a colonic conduit for incontinent diversion is preferred. Surgical complications specific to urinary diversion include: ureterointestinal stenosis, stomal stenosis, stone formation, bladder perforation, and shunt infection and obstruction. Surgical revision is required in around one third of patients. Careful lifelong follow-up of these patients is necessary, as some of these complications can occur late. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Presumptive migrating gall bladder mucocoele in two dogs with gall bladder rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, R K; Thornton, L; Lim, C K; Murakami, M; Nakamura, Y; Gal, A

    2017-12-13

    A 10-year-old neutered female soft-coated wheaten terrier and a 10-year-old, entire female Pomeranian were presented for vomiting and anorexia. Using ultrasound, an oval structure with a stellate, kiwifruit-like appearance typical of a gall bladder mucocoele was observed in the caudal abdomen of the soft-coated wheaten terrier and adjacent to the liver in the Pomeranian. There was also a moderate volume of abdominal effusion in both dogs. Cytology of the peritoneal fluid indicated a sterile exudative process but varied between the two dogs, with an absence of bile pigment in the soft-coated wheaten terrier and marked bile peritonitis in the Pomeranian. An entire free-floating ectopic mucocoele was confirmed via exploratory laparotomy with concomitant gall bladder rupture and common bile duct obstruction. Both dogs recovered completely after surgery. This is the first report of cases of gall bladder rupture with entire free-floating gall bladder mucocoeles in dogs. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Paraganglioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder are tumors of chromaffin tissue originating from the sympathetic innervations of the urinary bladder wall and are extremely rare. Being functional, in most of the cases they are recognized by their characteristic presentation of hypertensive crisis and postmicturition syncope. A silent presentation of a bladder paraganglioma is very unusual but quite dangerous as they are easily misdiagnosed and adequate peri-operative attention is not provided. Here, we are presenting one such silent paraganglioma in adult women who presented with only a single episode of hematuria and severe hypertensive crisis occur during its trans-urethral resection.

  3. Acutely Obstructed Airway Resulting from Complications of a Laryngopyocoele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind Mole

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngocoeles are rare cystic dilatations of the laryngeal ventricle. Obstruction of its outlet can cause entrapment of mucus and superimposed infection causes a laryngopyocoele. Such presentations, although rare, have potential to cause airway obstruction. A 67-year-old lady presented with a one-week history of hoarseness and shortness of breath. On examination, she was stridulous and had fullness of the left side of the neck. Nasendoscopy revealed large bilateral vocal cord polyps and near-complete glottis obstruction. She was taken to emergency theatre for restoration of a viable airway. Upon excision of the polyps, pus was visualised originating from the laryngeal ventricle. Literature proposes that laryngocoeles develop secondary to a one-way valve caused by an obstructing lesion distorting the saccule neck. We propose that the laryngocoele developed secondary to large obstructing polyps. Urgent excision of the polyps allowed decompression of the laryngopyocoele and reestablishment of a patent airway.

  4. Thromboembolic stroke associated with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meumann, Ella M; Chuen, Jason; Fitt, Greg; Perchyonok, Yuliya; Pond, Franklin; Dewey, Helen M

    2014-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome occurs due to compression of the neurovascular structures as they exit the thorax. Subclavian arterial compression is usually due to a cervical rib, and is rarely associated with thromboembolic stroke. The mechanism of cerebral embolisation associated with the thoracic outlet syndrome is poorly understood, but may be due to retrograde propagation of thrombus or transient retrograde flow within the subclavian artery exacerbated by arm abduction. We report an illustrative patient and review the clinical features, imaging findings and management of stroke associated with thoracic outlet syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bladder Diseases - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Bladder Diseases: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Enfermedades de la vejiga: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National ...

  6. A Rare Case of Inguinal Hernia with Complete Bladder Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaaz Habib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of the bladder in inguinal hernias is rare and occurs in less than 5% of the cases. The diagnosis and management of this condition may present a challenge to the surgeon. We present a case of an elderly gentleman who presented with a large left-sided inguinoscrotal hernia causing an obstructive uropathy which was surgically repaired. The patient made a quick postoperative recovery with complete resolution of renal function.

  7. A Rare Case of Inguinal Hernia with Complete Bladder Herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Habib, Ayaaz

    2017-01-01

    Involvement of the bladder in inguinal hernias is rare and occurs in less than 5% of the cases. The diagnosis and management of this condition may present a challenge to the surgeon. We present a case of an elderly gentleman who presented with a large left-sided inguinoscrotal hernia causing an obstructive uropathy which was surgically repaired. The patient made a quick postoperative recovery with complete resolution of renal function.

  8. Detention basin alternative outlet design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the outlets structures CDOT has historically employed to drain water quality treatment detention basins and flood control basins, presents two new methods of metering the water quality capture volume (WQCV), namely 1) the Elliptic...

  9. Isolated Inguinal Bladder Hernia

    OpenAIRE

    BAYSAL, Tamer; SOYLU, Ahmet; ERDOĞAN, Özgül

    2010-01-01

    Isolated urinary bladder herniation into the inguinal canal is rare. It is often diagnosed intraoperatively during surgery or is identified after intraoperative injury. Early diagnosis with radiologic imaging is important to avoid complications during repair surgery. Computed tomography seems the best imaging choice to outline the details of herniation. We report an incidentally discovered case of inguinal bladder herniation with intravenous pyelography and computed tomography findings. ...

  10. Long neglected neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Binnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  11. Engineering functional bladder tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Maya; Madduri, Srinivas; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Milleret, Vinzent; Hall, Heike; Atala, Anthony; Eberli, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    End stage bladder disease can seriously affect patient quality of life and often requires surgical reconstruction with bowel tissue, which is associated with numerous complications. Bioengineering of functional bladder tissue using tissue-engineering techniques could provide new functional tissues for reconstruction. In this review, we discuss the current state of this field and address different approaches to enable physiologic voiding in engineered bladder tissues in the near future. In a collaborative effort, we gathered researchers from four institutions to discuss the current state of functional bladder engineering. A MEDLINE® and PubMed® search was conducted for articles related to tissue engineering of the bladder, with special focus on the cells and biomaterials employed as well as the microenvironment, vascularisation and innervation strategies used. Over the last decade, advances in tissue engineering technology have laid the groundwork for the development of a biological substitute for bladder tissue that can support storage of urine and restore physiologic voiding. Although many researchers have been able to demonstrate the formation of engineered tissue with a structure similar to that of native bladder tissue, restoration of physiologic voiding using these constructs has never been demonstrated. The main issues hindering the development of larger contractile tissues that allow physiologic voiding include the development of correct muscle alignment, proper innervation and vascularization. Tissue engineering of a construct that will support the contractile properties that allow physiologic voiding is a complex process. The combination of smart scaffolds with controlled topography, the ability to deliver multiple trophic factors and an optimal cell source will allow for the engineering of functional bladder tissues in the near future. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Alcohol outlets, social disorganization, and robberies: accounting for neighborhood characteristics and alcohol outlet types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Aleksandra J; Freiburger, Tina L

    2015-05-01

    We estimated spatially lagged regression and spatial regime models to determine if the variation in total, on-premise, and off-premise alcohol outlet(1) density is related to robbery density, while controlling for direct and moderating effects of social disorganization.(2) Results suggest that the relationship between alcohol outlet density and robbery density is sensitive to the measurement of social disorganization levels. Total alcohol outlet density and off-premise alcohol outlet density were significantly associated with robbery density when social disorganization variables were included separately in the models. However, when social disorganization levels were captured as a four item index, only the association between off-premise alcohol outlets and robbery density remained significant. More work is warranted in identifying the role of off-premise alcohol outlets and their characteristics in robbery incidents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration), obstructive sleep apnoea and mixed or complex sleep apnoea.1. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common of these three disorders and is defined as airway obstruction during sleep, accompanied by at least ...

  14. Socioeconomic Determinants of Exposure to Alcohol Outlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christopher; Gruenewald, Paul J.; Ponicki, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol outlets tend to be located in lower income areas, exposing lower income populations to excess risks associated with alcohol sales through these establishments. The objective of this study was to test two hypotheses about the etiology of these differential exposures based on theories of the economic geography of retail markets: (a) outlets will locate within or near areas of high alcohol demand, and (b) outlets will be excluded from areas with high land and structure rents. Method: Data from the 2010 National Drug Strategy Household Survey were used to develop a surrogate for alcohol demand (i.e., market potential) at two census geographies for the city of Melbourne, Australia. Bayesian conditional autoregressive Poisson models estimated multilevel spatial relationships between counts of bars, restaurants, and off-premise outlets and market potential, income, and zoning ordinances (Level 1: n = 8,914). Results: Market potentials were greatest in areas with larger older age, male, English-speaking, high-income populations. Independent of zoning characteristics, greater numbers of outlets appeared in areas with greater market potentials and the immediately surrounding areas. Greater income excluded outlets in local and surrounding areas. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that alcohol outlets are located in areas with high demand and are excluded from high-income areas. These processes appear to take place at relatively small geographic scales, encourage the concentration of outlets in specific low-income areas, and represent a very general economic process likely to take place in communities throughout the world. PMID:25978830

  15. Plug into a Great Outlet for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Is there beauty in the wall socket that people plug their appliances into daily? Can one find beauty in the grate covering the heat vent in his classroom? The author posed these very questions to her third-grade students. She had the students take a good look at the outlet cover (or plate) on the wall. After thinking and discussing the outlets,…

  16. Bladder cancer and schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer was believed, for several decades, to be a completely unique entity of disease, different from urothelial cancer. This was probably due to its distinct clinico pathologic and demographic features that varied from those of urothelial entity. The carcinogenesis is an extremely complex process resulting from the accumulation of many genetic and epigenetic changes leading to alterations in the cell proliferation regulation process. In bladder cancer, many of these carcinogenic cascades were not fully documented or somewhat conflicting. In spite of the efforts performed, much is still needed to explore the presence or absence of the carcinogenic difference with a different etiology. The control of schistosomiasis in certain countries and the subsequent decrease in the intensity of infestation showed changing of features approaching that of urothelial tumors. However the schistosoma-associated bladder cancer presented in more advanced stages than schistosoma-non associated urothelial cancer. More recently, data are gathered that, upon applying the same treatment protocol and management care, stage by stage comparison of the treatment end-results were found to be similar in bladder cancer patients with a different etiology. All treatment options; including radical cystectomy with or without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy or tri modality bladder preserving treatment seem to lead to similar end-results regardless of etiologic factor(s) implicated in bladder cancer development.

  17. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavhan, Govind B.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Muthusami, Prakash [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Image Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Borschel, Gregory H. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation. (orig.)

  18. Validity of Secondary Retail Food Outlet Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischhacker, Sheila E.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Sharkey, Joseph; Pitts, Stephanie B.J.; Rodriguez, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Context Improving access to healthy foods is a promising strategy to prevent nutrition-related chronic diseases. To characterize retail food environments and identify areas with limited retail access, researchers, government programs, and community advocates have primarily used secondary retail food outlet data sources (e.g., InfoUSA or government food registries). To advance the state of the science on measuring retail food environments, this systematic review examined the evidence for validity reported for secondary retail food outlet data sources for characterizing retail food environments. Evidence acquisition A literature search was conducted through December 31, 2012 to identify peer-reviewed published literature that compared secondary retail food outlet data sources to primary data sources (i.e., field observations) for accuracy of identifying the type and location of retail food outlets. Data were analyzed in 2013. Evidence synthesis Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The evidence for validity reported varied by secondary data sources examined, primary data–gathering approaches, retail food outlets examined, and geographic and sociodemographic characteristics. More than half of the studies (53%) did not report evidence for validity by type of food outlet examined and by a particular secondary data source. Conclusions Researchers should strive to gather primary data but if relying on secondary data sources, InfoUSA and government food registries had higher levels of agreement than reported by other secondary data sources and may provide sufficient accuracy for exploring these associations in large study areas. PMID:24050423

  19. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavhan, Govind B.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi; Muthusami, Prakash; Towbin, Alexander J.; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation. (orig.)

  20. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavhan, Govind B; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi; Muthusami, Prakash; Towbin, Alexander J; Borschel, Gregory H

    2017-09-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation.

  1. Bladder catheter protocol: technical modification for the change of Long-Term bladder catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rueda Pérez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of urinary catheters is a common practice in chronic patients for both outpatients and inpatients. This action involves a large number of nursing interventions either planned or caused by emergency (obstruction, incorrect implantation, etc.... This modification of the catheter technique tries to improve the patient’s quality of life by minimizing the stress produced by urethral catheter replacements and reducing malpractice risks. This change in the urinary catheter technique also intends to alleviate some of the side effects of permanent urethral catheterization. By filling the bladder with saline prior to the change of catheter, it is possible to get a quick and safe implantation, dragging possible sediment and microorganisms and thereby reducing the number of nursing actions related to the process of the urinary catheter replacement (obstruction or incorrect catheter implantations etc.

  2. 11. Damus–Kaye–Stansel operation versus bulboventricular foramen enlargement for the management of univentricular heart with systemic outflow obstruction: 17 years experience, a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Albahlooli

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Although both procedures effectively relieve the obstruction in the systemic outlet chamber, direct BVF enlargement carries higher risk of heart block and new AVVR than the Damus–Kaye–Stansel procedure.

  3. A technique for resection of invasive tumors involving the trigone area of the bladder in dogs: preliminary results in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier-Troff, Francois-Guillaume; Busoni, Valeria; Hamaide, Annick

    2008-07-01

    To describe a surgical technique for resection of the entire bladder neck, including the trigone and proximal urethra in dogs with invasive tumors causing life-threatening urinary tract obstruction. Clinical case reports. Dogs (n=2) with bladder tumors. Circumferential excision of the bladder neck and proximal urethra with preservation of the neurovascular pedicles was performed to remove a rhabdomyosarcoma (dog 1) and a transitional cell carcinoma (dog 2) involving the trigone and bladder neck that were causing urinary tract obstruction. Reconstruction of the bladder and proximal urethra included bilateral ureteroneocystostomy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered postoperatively to both dogs. Postoperatively, dogs 1 and 2 were continent after 7 and 17 days, respectively, and regained normal urinary function after resolution of a transient pollakiuria. Dog 1 had no evidence of local or regional recurrence; however, a large solitary pulmonary metastatic lesion was diagnosed 8 months later. The dog was euthanatized despite a lack of clinical signs. Dog 2 had at least 1 metastatic lesion in the abdominal wall 6 months later and was euthanatized at 580 days because of renal failure. En-bloc removal of the bladder neck and proximal urethra with preservation of the dorsal vascular and nervous pedicles, although a technically challenging procedure, can be performed without associated urinary incontinence or bladder wall necrosis. In dogs with invasive bladder tumors causing life-threatening urinary tract obstruction, resection of the bladder neck and proximal urethra should be considered as a promising surgical alternative to urinary diversion.

  4. Spontaneous Bladder Perforation in an Infant Neurogenic Bladder: Laparoscopic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cabezalí Barbancho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bladder perforation is an uncommon event in childhood. It is usually associated with bladder augmentation. We are presenting a case of bladder rupture in an infant with neurogenic bladder without prior bladder surgery. Three days after lipomyelomeningocele excision the patient showed signs and symptoms of acute abdomen. The ultrasound exploration revealed significant amount of intraperitoneal free fluid and therefore a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A posterior bladder rupture was diagnosed and repaired laparoscopically. Currently, being 3 years old, she keeps successfully dry with clean intermittent catheterization. Neurogenic bladder voiding function can change at any time of its evolution and lead to complications. Early diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture is of paramount importance, so it is essential to think about it in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen.

  5. Bladder activation: afferent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2002-05-01

    The major function of the lower urinary tract is to store and periodically evacuate urine from the bladder. This requires coordination of the smooth muscles of the bladder and urethra, and of the striated muscles of the outflow region and pelvic floor by a complex neural control system. Lumbosacral afferent fibers (pelvic afferents), but also afferents in the hypogastric and pudendal nerves, are of major importance for the regulation of the mechanisms for continence and micturition. In the bladder, afferent nerves have been identified suburothelially as well as in the detrusor muscle. Suburothelially, they form a plexus that lies immediately beneath the epithelial lining. This plexus is particularly dense in the bladder neck and the trigone. The most important afferents for the micturition process are myelinated Adelta-fibers and unmyelinated C-fibers. Immunocytochemical and tracing studies have revealed that numerous peptides, including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, enkephalins, and cholecystokinin are localized either alone, or in combination, in afferent pathways of the bladder and urethra. The receptors on these nerves include: vanilloid receptors, purinoceptors, tachykinin, and prostanoid receptors. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been found to mediate excitation of small-diameter sensory neurons via P2X3 receptors, and it has been proposed that in the bladder, distention causes release of ATP from the urothelium. ATP, in turn, can activate P2X3 receptors on suburothelial afferent nerve terminals to evoke a neural discharge. However, it is most likely that a cascade of inhibitory and stimulatory transmitters/mediators, as well as ATP, are involved in the transduction mechanisms underlying the activation of afferent fibers during bladder filling.

  6. 14 CFR 23.977 - Fuel tank outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank outlet. 23.977 Section 23.977... tank outlet. (a) There must be a fuel strainer for the fuel tank outlet or for the booster pump. This... damage any fuel system component. (b) The clear area of each fuel tank outlet strainer must be at least...

  7. 7 CFR 989.24a - Non-normal outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Non-normal outlets. 989.24a Section 989.24a... GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 989.24a Non-normal outlets. Non-normal outlets means outlets other than those customarily used for commercial disposition of raisins meeting the...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Malignant tumor of urinary bladder Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Bladder Cancer General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Avelumab Bavencio (Avelumab) Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Durvalumab ...

  10. [Double outlet right ventricle. Embryological approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Castellanos, Luis; Kuri, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    It is proposed a pathogenetic explanation that explains the morphogenesis of the anatomic variants of double outlet right ventricle. An anatomic embryological correlation was made in which the plane separating the outlets and great arteries in the types of this cardiopathy was compared with the normal truncoconal septum in the embryonic heart. Thirty five hearts with double outlet right ventricle were described, fifteen with great arteries slightly crossed, ten with side by side great arteries and ten with anterior aorta and posterior pulmonary artery. The cephalic border of the truncoconal septum was compared with its inferior border in each group. With this procedure we calculated the type of torsion of the truncoconal septum. In the slightly crossed great arteries the truncoconal twist was of 135° in side by side great arteries the twist was of 90° and in anterior right aorta the truncoconal septum was straight with 0° of rotation, and with left anterior aorta the rotation was of -90°. Embryologically double outlet right ventricle is originated by the persisting continuity between the right ventricle with the truncus and conus which form the great arteries and their outlets. The anatomic variations are the consequence of progressive detortion of the truncoconal septum followed by a torsion of -90°. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Management of the devastated posterior urethra and bladder neck: refractory incontinence and stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirk M; Higuchi, Ty T; Flynn, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    Stricture of the proximal urethra following treatment for prostate cancer occurs in an estimated 1-8% of patients. Following prostatectomy, urethral reconstruction is feasible in many patients. However, in those patients with prior radiation therapy (RT), failed reconstruction, refractory incontinence or multiple comorbidities, reconstruction may not be feasible. The purpose of this article is to review the evaluation and management options for patients who are not candidates for reconstruction of the posterior urethra and require urinary diversion. Patient evaluation should result in the decision whether reconstruction is feasible. In our experience, risk factors for failed reconstruction include prior radiation and multiple failed endoscopic treatments. Pre-operative cystoscopy is an essential part of the evaluations to identify tissue necrosis, dystrophic calcification, or tumor in the urethra, prostate and/or bladder. If urethral reconstruction is not feasible it is imperative to discuss options for urine diversion with the patient. Treatment options include simple catheter diversion, urethral ligation, and both bladder preserving and non-preserving diversion. Surgical management should address both the bladder and the bladder outlet. This can be accomplished from a perineal, abdominal or abdomino-perineal approach. The devastated bladder outlet is a challenging problem to treat. Typically, patients undergo multiple procedures in an attempt to restore urethral continuity and continence. For the small subset who fails reconstruction, urinary diversion provides a definitive, "end-stage" treatment resulting in improved quality of life.

  12. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study to investigate the effects of finasteride combined with a biodegradable self-reinforced poly L-lactic acid spiral stent in patients with urinary retention caused by bladder outlet obstruction from benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotalo, T; Talja, M; Hellström, P; Perttilä, I; Välimaa, T; Törmälä, P; Tammela, T L

    2001-07-01

    To assess whether patients in acute urinary retention from benign prostatic enlargement can be treated with a combined therapy comprising finasteride and a bioabsorbable self-reinforced poly L-lactic acid (SR-PLLA) urethral stent. Fifty-five patients in acute urinary retention were treated as outpatients; they had a suprapubic catheter inserted and the SR-PLLA stent placed cystoscopically. After 2 weeks the patients were randomized to receive either finasteride 5 mg daily or placebo. They were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12 and 18 months for maximum urinary flow rate, prostate volume and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Nineteen patients completed the study while 36 discontinued. There was a statistically significant increase in the mean maximum flow rate, and a statistically significant decrease in the prostatic volume and serum PSA in the finasteride group. The same number of patients discontinued in both groups; the major reason for discontinuation was insufficient therapeutic response. The major problems were discontinuation of treatment because the response to therapy was insufficient, and uncontrolled breakdown of the spiral stent. To solve these problems, new configurations of bioabsorbable stents are needed.

  14. The artificial bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgrandchamps, F; Griffith, D P

    1999-04-01

    An artificial bladder should provide adequate urine storage, allow volitional complete evacuation of urine and preserve renal function. Moreover, its structure has to be biocompatible, resistant to urinary encrustation and tolerant to bacterial infection. Various solutions have been proposed over the years to achieve these multiple requirements. However, most of these solutions and their corresponding prototypes did not advance beyond the stage of a preliminary report of experimental data. This review will bring out the 'proof of principal' in alloplastic prosthetic bladder, including type of alloplast and design concept and the recent development in tissue engineering approaches.

  15. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...... experienced the symptoms for at least 6 weeks in the absence of any confusable diseases that may give rise to the symptoms. Symptoms compatible with the diagnosis are now thought to affect up to 3% of the female population in the United States with a 5:1 female-to-male preponderance. Diagnosis and treatment...

  16. Large sliding inguino-scrotal hernia of the urinary bladder: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Huang, Yonggang; Ye, Jing; Gao, Guodong; Zhang, Fangjie; Wu, Hao

    2018-03-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias of the urinary bladder are protrusions of the bladder through the internal inguinal ring, most of which are insignificant and diagnosed intra-operatively. Large inguino-scrotal bladder hernias commonly present with lower urinary tract symptoms and may cause severe complications, including bladder incarceration or necrosis, bladder hemorrhage, obstructive or neurogenic bladder dysfunction, and even renal failure. We describe and discuss the clinical findings and management of a 59-year-old man who complained of a decrease in scrotal size after voiding and 2-stage voiding requiring pressure to the scrotum. The patient was diagnosed preoperatively as massive, bilateral, inguinoscrotal hernias, and a large, left-sided, sliding bladder hernia. The patient underwent a timely open re-peritoneal inguinal herniorrhaphy using a mesh. The surgical outcomes were good, and no surgical site infection, chronic postoperative inguinal pain or recurrence were recorded during the follow-up. Better knowledge of this rare condition of large inguino-scrotal sliding bladder hernia could help in making a correct diagnosis preoperatively and provide proper surgical management timely, so as to reduce delay in treatment and avoid potential complications.

  17. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction presenting as urinary retention in neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Erin R; Sullivan, Jennifer; Nagaraj, Shashi K; Wiener, John S; Kishnani, Priya S

    2015-01-01

    Neuronopathic Gaucher disease can present as a continuum of clinical findings, including somatic symptoms of anemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and bone disease as well as neurologic sequelae. There is a spectrum of neurologic symptoms ranging from oculomotor apraxia to severe convulsions. The heterozygosity of phenotypes makes it difficult to predict the disease course. We describe an 8-year-old male with neuronopathic type III Gaucher disease who developed bladder dysfunction and was unable to completely void. He also presented with hypertension and acute renal insufficiency, most likely secondary to urinary retention. A complete evaluation was done for causes of urinary retention and bladder dysfunction. A renal bladder ultrasound demonstrated marked hydroureteronephrosis. There was no clinical evidence of infection and cystoscopy revealed no anatomic obstruction. In addition, MRI showed no spinal abnormalities. His bladder dysfunction was managed operatively by creating a catheterizable stoma, using his appendix, to empty his bladder, and surgical findings were consistent with neurogenic bladder. He continues to be managed for his Gaucher disease and neurogenic bladder by genetics, nephrology and urology. This is the first clinical report of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

  18. Urinary bladder incarceration and infarction by an intra-abdominal fat pad in a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Voe, Ryan S; Spaulding, Kathy A; Rotstein, Jack; Rotstein, David S

    2004-01-01

    A 2.5-year-old, female opossum had acute stranguria. Based on radiography and ultrasonographic examination a cystic structure was identified in the caudal abdomen associated with bilateral hydroureter and hydronephrosis. This structure contained a neutrophilic fluid, determined to be urine. There was a neutrophilic leukocytosis. Serum chemistry values were within normal limits. The opossum was euthanized. An intra-abdominal fat pad incarceration of the urinary bladder above the trigone was present, resulting in complete obstruction of the urinary bladder and partial obstruction of the ureters. Vessels to the bladder were involved in the incarceration which resulted in vascular compromise and infarction of the bladder. Mild to moderate hydroureter and hydronephrosis were present.

  19. Urinary Tract Infection in Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.B. Bielan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Among all the diseases of the urinary system, microbial-inflammatory lesions dominate, their prevalence is 29 per 1,000 of child population. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction leads to the chronicity and recurrence of urinary tract infections. Objective. To study the etiologic spectrum in children with urinary tract infection associated with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study involved 434 children aged 4 to 15 years, who were hospitalized and out-patient treatment in Omsk from 2008 to 2014. Bacteriological urine culture on the microflora with determining the sensitivity to antibiotics was performed using Urin System Plus (Liofilchem, Italy. At the same time, the urine was examined for the presence of Cytomegalovirus, Herpes simplex virus I–II, Mycoplasma genitalium, Chlamydiae trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum by polymerase chain reaction and enzyme immunoassay. Data processing was performed using Statistica 10.0 software package. Results. It was found that in the urine microbial landscape of children with urinary tract infection and neurogenic bladder dysfunction, Staphylococcus family dominated, unlike the spectrum of uropathogens in patirnts with urinary tract infection without functional obstruction, which is characterized by the predominance of Escherichia coli. The detection rate of cytomegalovirus in the urine indicates a significant decrease in the immunity of children with urinary tract infection and neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Conclusion. The shown differences in microbial landscape of the urine in urinary tract infection associated with neurogenic bladder dysfunction and without functional obstruction must be considered in the selection of an adequate therapy for patients of different groups, including immunocorrective approaches.

  20. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral sphincter function before and after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoiu, O S; Vozmediano-Chicharro, R; García-Galisteo, E; Soler-Martinez, J; del Rosa-Samaniego, J M; Machuca-Santacruz, J; Baena-Gonzalez, V

    2014-03-01

    Affectation of the bladder after open prostatectomy is demonstrated. Decrease in bladder capacity and bladder compliance, detrusor hyper-or hypo-activity and voiding dysfunction are observed. We propose to investigate the effects of robotic surgery on bladder and sphincter function through the comparative study of preoperative and postoperative urodynamic values 3 months after prostatectomy. Prospective study of 32 consecutive patients undergoing robotic prostatectomy. They all underwent urodynamic study one month before the intervention and 3 months after the radical prostatectomy. Twenty five percent of patients undergoing robotic prostatectomy showed detrusor hyperactivity accompanied by a decrease in bladder compliance of 30.2 to 21.8 ml/cmH2O. Urethral profile showed diminished functional length of 67 to 44 mm and decreased maximum urethral pressure of 48.5 to 29.3 cmH2O. After robotic prostatectomy 21.8% of patients had detrusor hypoactivity, obstruction decreased between 28.1% to 12.5%. Decreased bladder compliance, detrusor hypo- or hyperactivity and obstruction improvement observed in the study of the flow pressure have been associated with sphincter involvement. It is part of the complex of lower urinary tract dysfunction that occurs after robotic prostatectomy. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Membrano-bulbo-urethral junction stenosis. Posterior urethra obstruction due to extreme caliber disproportion in the male urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebeke, P B; Van Laecke, E; Raes, A; Vande Walle, J; Oosterlinck, W

    1997-01-01

    Based on 4 cases of infravesical obstruction due to extreme caliber disproportion between the posterior urethra and the penile urethra, a pathophysiological mechanism for this dynamic obstruction is given and endoscopic treatment is described. Four cases of membrano-bulbo-urethral junction (MBUJ) stenosis, seen between September 1995 and April 1996, are described. Two boys had previous successful valve resection but still showed extreme ballooning of the posterior urethra. The other 2 boys showed bladder instability on urodynamics and the male variant of the spinning top urethra on voiding cystourethrography (VCUG). All cases were successfully treated by endoscopic incision at the 12 o'clock position of the kink between the posterior and the penile urethra which is seen when the full bladder is expressed. Disproportion in the posterior urethra, seen on VCUG, together with bad urinary flow measured on uroflowmetry raise the suspicion of MBUJ stenosis. Although rarely seen, extreme caliber disproportion in the male urethra can cause obstruction. Ballooning of the posterior urethra, caused by urethral valves, bladder instability resisted by voluntary sphincter contraction or congenital posterior urethral dilatation, creates an obstructive kink in the urethra comparable to some obstructions in ureteropelvic junction stenosis. If suspicion of such a form of obstruction arises, cystoscopy during pressure on the full bladder is mandatory in order to see the obstruction, descending as a membrane from the vault of the urethra.

  2. Leiomyoma of Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of leiomyoma of urinary bladder, a rare benign tumor, is presented. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with long duration history of dysuria. Intravenous urography (IVU, ultrasound (US, computed tomography (CT and biopsy diagnosed this case accurately. The clinical presentation, imaging findings and management of this benign tumor are discussed.

  3. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Tomaszewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, 3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and 3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future.

  4. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  5. 24 CFR 3280.806 - Receptacle outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... compartments accessible from the outdoors, in bathrooms, and within 6 feet of a kitchen sink to serve counter... each side of the sink if counter tops are on each side and 12 inches or over in width). (2) Adjacent to... installed in or within reach (30 inches) of a shower or bathtub space. (f) Receptacle outlets shall not be...

  6. Computerized tomography and staging of bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wozniak, A.; Luongo, A.; Nogueira, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has been employed in 13 patients with bladder tumors; 8 of them subsequently underwent surgery. Concordance between CT and pathological staging ranged in 90% of accurate results. Our data are discussed and compared to those of other authors in the literature. Staging was carried out according to the International Union Against Cancer. CT proved to be very accurate in the assessment of local and regional spread of tumor, limphatic progression and early detection of ureteral obstruction, as well as diagnosis of distant metastasis in selected patients. In poor candidates for surgery CT provided invaluable data to be used for localizing fields of radiation therapy. CT is a very well tolerated procedure, it is therefore suitable in subsequent treatment control. (Author) [pt

  7. Screw as a Bladder Foreign Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Hosseini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the bladder are among the strangest differential diagnoses in the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and may be missed in initial medical evaluations. We present a 63-year-old man who was visited in the emergency department because of obstructive and irritative lower urinary tract symptoms. Two months earlier, he had a pelvic fracture due to motor vehicle accident and underwent an open reduction and internal fixation of the pubic rami and right acetabulum by an anterior ilioinguinal approach. After initial evaluation, an abdominopelvic X-ray revealed a 3 cm screw in the suprapubic area. He underwent urethrocystoscopy and a 3 cm screw was extracted by forceps.

  8. Pediatric posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome presenting with isolated cerebellar edema and obstructive hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Nicholas; Pearson, Matthew; Lamb, Fred S; Wellons, John C

    2014-10-01

    In this report, the authors describe the case of a teenage boy who presented with hypertensive emergency, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, and hydrocephalus due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a well-characterized but uncommon syndrome in children that is generally triggered by severe hypertension. The unusual clinical picture of this patient, who had isolated cerebellar edema leading to obstructive hydrocephalus, has been rarely described in children.

  9. Prognostic factors in invasive bladder carcinoma treated by combined modality protocol (organ-sparing approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Tadeja; Cufer, Tanja; Cervek, Jozica; Borstnar, Simona; Kragelj, Borut; Zumer-Pregelj, Mirjana

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The results of bladder sparing approach for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer, using a combination of transurethral resection (TUR), chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, are encouraging. The survival of patients treated by this method is similar to the survival of patients treated by radical cystectomy. The aim of our study was to find out which pretreatment characteristics influence the survival of patients treated by organ sparing approach that would enable us to identify the patients most suitable for this type of treatment. Methods and Materials: The prognostic value of different factors, such as age, gender, performance status, hemoglobin level, clinical stage, histologic grade, presence of obstructive uropathy, and completeness of TUR, has been studied in 105 patients with invasive bladder cancer, who received a bladder sparing treatment in the period from 1988 to 1995. They were treated with a combination of TUR, followed by 2-4 cycles of methotrexate, cisplatinum, and vinblastine polychemotherapy. In complete responders the treatment was completed by radiotherapy (50 Gy to the bladder and 40 Gy to the regional lymph nodes), whereas nonresponders underwent cystectomy whenever feasible. Results: Our study has confirmed an independent prognostic value of performance status, histologic grade, and obstructive uropathy, for the disease-specific survival (DSS) of bladder cancer patients treated by a conservative approach. We believe that performance status best reflects the extent of disease and exerts significant influence on the extent and course of treatment, while obstructive uropathy is a good indicator of local spread of the disease, better than clinical T-stage. Our finding that histologic grade is one of the strongest prognostic factors shows that tumor biology also is a very important prognostic factor in patients treated by conservative approach. Conclusion: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who are most likely to benefit

  10. Double-outlet right ventricle revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Ameneh; Spicer, Diane E; Backer, Carl L; Fricker, F Jay; Anderson, Robert H

    2017-08-01

    Double-outlet right ventricle is a form of ventriculoarterial connection. The definition formulated by the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease is based on hearts with both arterial trunks supported in their greater part by a morphologically right ventricle. Bilateral infundibula and ventricular septal defects are highly debated criteria. This study examines the anatomic controversies surrounding double-outlet right ventricle. We show that hearts with double-outlet right ventricle can have atrioventricular-to-arterial valvular continuity. We emphasize the difference between the interventricular communication and the zone of deficient ventricular septation. The hearts examined were from the University of Florida in Gainesville; Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, St Petersburg, Fla; and Lurie Children's Hospital, Chicago, Ill. Each specimen had at least 75% of both arterial roots supported by the morphologically right ventricle, with a total of 100 hearts examined. The morphologic method was used to assess anatomic features, including arterial-atrioventricular valvular continuity, subarterial infundibular musculature, and the location of the hole between the ventricles. Most hearts had fibrous continuity between one of the arterial valves and an atrioventricular valve, with bilateral infundibula in 23%, and intact ventricular septum in 5%. Bilateral infundibula are not a defining feature of double-outlet right ventricle, representing only 23% of the specimens in our sample. The interventricular communication can have a posteroinferior muscular rim or extend to become perimembranous (58%). Double-outlet right ventricle can exist with an intact ventricular septum. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute colonic obstruction due to benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mac Giobuin, S

    2012-02-01

    A seventy two year old man presented to the Emergency Department with clinical features of colonic obstruction. Subsequent radiological investigations confirmed this impression and revealed the aetiology to be compression of the sigmoid colon against the sacrum by a massively distended urinary bladder. Chronic urinary retention due to benign prostatic hypertrophy is an extremely unusual cause of large bowel obstruction. Little in this patient\\'s clinical findings suggested this aetiology. We reviewed the literature in this area and highlight the benefits of CT scanning over contrast studies.

  12. Hydrologic Outlets of the Greenland Ice Sheet, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hydrologic Outlets of the Greenland Ice Sheet data set contains GIS point shapefiles that include 891 observed and potential hydrologic outlets of the Greenland...

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    COPD; Chronic obstructive airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... The best test for COPD is a lung function test called spirometry . ... into a small machine that tests lung capacity. The results can ...

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  15. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  16. Audit of tobacco retail outlets in Hangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ting; Lv, Jun; Liu, Qingmin; Ren, Yanjun; Li, Liming; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2013-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of tobacco advertisements and warning messages at points of sale as well as to examine the density of tobacco retail outlets in neighbourhoods and around schools in Hangzhou, China. Tobacco retail outlets (n=1639) in all food and tobacco specialty stores were observed objectively by trained students. Tobacco advertisements and warning messages were assessed with an audit, and stores' addresses were recorded with Global Positioning System coordinates. The distances (1) between all pairs of tobacco retail outlets (2) between each tobacco retail outlet and 15 middle schools were calculated to assess the density of tobacco retail outlets in neighbourhoods and around schools. Among the 1639 tobacco retail outlets, outlets, the nearest distances to other tobacco retail outlets were outlets within a 100 m radius. Tobacco advertisement in retail outlets is prevalent and the density of tobacco retail outlets is high in Hangzhou, China. Signs indicating 'no sales to minors' and tobacco warning signs are almost non-existent. These findings point to an urgent need for the enforcement of regulations on display of 'no sales to minors' and a new density standard for tobacco retail outlets based on protecting the public's health.

  17. 7 CFR 993.108 - Non-human consumption outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Non-human consumption outlet. 993.108 Section 993.108... CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations Definitions § 993.108 Non-human consumption outlet. Non-human consumption outlet means any livestock feeder or manufacturer of inedible syrup, industrial alcohol, animal...

  18. 14 CFR 29.977 - Fuel tank outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank outlet. 29.977 Section 29.977... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.977 Fuel tank outlet. (a) There must be a fuel strainer for the fuel tank outlet or for the booster pump. This strainer must— (1) For...

  19. 14 CFR 25.977 - Fuel tank outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank outlet. 25.977 Section 25.977... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.977 Fuel tank outlet. (a) There must be a fuel strainer for the fuel tank outlet or for the booster pump. This strainer must— (1) For...

  20. 14 CFR 27.977 - Fuel tank outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank outlet. 27.977 Section 27.977... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.977 Fuel tank outlet. (a) There must be a fuel stainer for the fuel tank outlet or for the booster pump. This strainer must— (1) For...